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Sample records for brain tumour model

  1. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  2. RM-06IN VITRO CLONAL EVOLUTION OF GLIOBLASTOMA (GBM) BRAIN TUMOUR INITIATING CELLS (BTIC) TO MODEL TUMOUR RECURRENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Qazi, Maleeha; Vora, Parvez; Venugopal, Chitra; McFarlane, Nicole; Hallett, Robin; Singh, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly aggressive primary adult brain tumour. Despite multimodal therapy, patients on average experience relapse at 9 months and median survival rarely extends beyond 15 months. Targeting the cells that drive GBM formation as well as its inevitable and rapid recurrence has remained a major challenge, likely due to intra-tumoral heterogeneity. At the genetic level, this heterogeneity has prompted a molecular classification of GBM based on differential ...

  3. Brain tumour migration and invasion. The role of in vitro model systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human primary (intrinsic) brain tumours rarely metastasis to distant organs, however they do show a marked propensity for diffuse infiltrative invasion of the contiguous, normal brain tissue. This is arguably the most important biological feature of this group of - predominantly glial - neoplasms. Single neoplastic glia may migrate several millimetres, or even centimetres from the major tumour mass and there is increasing evidence that during the migratory phase these cells transiently arrest from the cell cycle therefore rendering them refractory to therapeutic radiation. Moreover, they are protected from the action of the majority of cytotoxic drugs by virtue of their investment within areas of intact blood-brain barrier. These migratory, socalled ''guerrilla'' cells later return to the division phase, under hither to unknown microenvironmental cues, to form local recurrences of the primary tumour. (author)

  4. The negative brain scintiscan in brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of 53 histologically verified and two histologically unidentified brain tumours, the author examined the reasons for these wrongly negative scintiscans. EEGs and angiographies carried out at about the same time were taken into account and compared with the scintigraphic findings. (orig.)

  5. Treatment of brain tumours with electroporation and bleomycin in an in vivo rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Ljungvall, Magnus; Salford, Leif; Persson, Bertil R

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the possibilities of prolonging the life of rats with brain tumours using electroporation only while conducting impedance scans to evaluate the rate of electroporation. During the experiments, the treated rats in the first batch had tumors grow for 14 days and were then given electroporation with 8 + 8 exponential pulses at 800 v/cm, and 15 micro-F. Three of the animals given electroporation and bleomycin and one of the animals given e...

  6. 5-Amino-4-oxopentanoic acid photodynamic diagnosis guided microsurgery and photodynamic therapy on VX2 brain tumour implanted in a rabbit model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Hong; LIAO Qiong; CHENG Ming; LI Fei; XIE Bing; LI Mei; FENG Hua

    2009-01-01

    Background Complete tumour resection is important for improving the prognosis of brain tumour patients. However,extensive resection remains controversial because the tumour margin is difficult to be distinguished from surrounding brain tissue. It has been established that 5-amino-4-oxopentanoic acid (5-aminolevulinic acid, ALA) can be used as a photodynamic diagnostic marker and a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy in surgical treatment of brain tumours. We investigated the efficacy of ALA photodynamically guided microsurgery and photodynamic therapy on VX2 brain tumour implanted in a rabbit model.Methods Eighty New Zealand rabbits implanted with VX2 brain tumours were randomly assigned to five groups: control, conventional white light microsurgery, a photodynamic therapy group, a photodynamically guided microsurgery group and a group in which guided microsurgery was followed by photodynamic therapy. The VX2 tumour was resected under a surgical microscope. The tumour resection was confirmed with histological analysis. All animals were examined with MRI for presence of any residual tumour tissue. The survival time of each rabbit was recorded.Results All treatment groups showed a significantly extended survival time compared with the control group.Photodynamically guided microsurgery combined with photodynamic therapy significantly prolonged survival time, compared with guided microsurgery alone. MRI and the autopsy results confirmed removal of most of the tumours.Conclusions Our results suggest that photodynamically guided surgery and photodynamic therapy significantly reduce or delay local recurrence, increase the effectiveness of radical resection and prolong the survival time of tumour bearing rabbits, Their combination has the potential to be used as a rapid and highly effective treatment of metastatic brain tumours.

  7. Movement disorders caused by brain tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatoe H

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are uncommon presenting features of brain tumours. Early recognition of such lesions is important to arrest further deficit. We treated seven patients with movement disorders secondary to brain tumours over a period of seven years. Only two of these were intrinsic thalamic tumours (astrocytomas while the rest were extrinsic tumours. The intrinsic tumours were accompanied by hemichorea. Among the extrinsic tumours, there was one pituitary macroadenoma with hemiballismus and four meningiomas with parkinsonism. Symptoms were unilateral in all patients except one with anterior third falcine meningioma who had bilateral rest tremors. There was relief in movement disorders observed after surgery. Imaging by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is mandatory in the evaluation of movement disorders, especially if the presentation is atypical, unilateral and/or accompanied by long tract signs.

  8. Residential Radon and Brain Tumour Incidence in a Danish Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Zorana J.; Andersen, Claus Erik;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased brain tumour incidence over recent decades may reflect improved diagnostic methods and clinical practice, but remain unexplained. Although estimated doses are low a relationship between radon and brain tumours may exist. Objective: To investigate the long-term effect of...... exposure to residential radon on the risk of primary brain tumour in a prospective Danish cohort. Methods: During 1993–1997 we recruited 57,053 persons. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence from enrolment until 31 December 2009, identifying 121 primary brain tumour cases. We traced...... residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 31 December 2009 and calculated radon concentrations at each address using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate-ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals...

  9. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  10. A numerical model for the study of photoacoustic imaging of brain tumours

    CERN Document Server

    Firouzi, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has shown great promise for medical imaging, where optical energy absorption by blood haemoglobin is used as the contrast mechanism. A numerical method was developed for the in-silico assessment of the photoacoustic image reconstruction of the brain. Image segmentation techniques were used to prepare a digital phantom from MR images. Light transport through brain tissue was modelled using a Finite Element approach. The resulting acoustic pressure was then estimated by pulsed photoacoustics considerations. The forward acoustic wave propagation was modelled by the linearized coupled first order wave equations and solved by an acoustic k-space method. Since skull bone is an elastic solid and strongly attenuates ultrasound (due to both scattering and absorption), a k-space method was developed for elastic media. To model scattering effects, a new approach was applied based on propagation in random media. In addition, absorption effects were incorporated using a power law. Finally, the acoust...

  11. Primary brain tumours, meningiomas and brain metastases in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verheecke, Magali; Halaska, Michael J; Lok, Christianne A;

    2014-01-01

    to obtain better insight into outcome and possibilities of treatment in pregnancy. METHODS: We collected all intracranial tumours (primary brain tumour, cerebral metastasis, or meningioma) diagnosed during pregnancy, registered prospectively and retrospectively by international collaboration since 1973......, respectively. Eight patients (30%) underwent brain surgery, seven patients (26%) had radiotherapy and in three patients (11%) chemotherapy was administered during gestation. Two patients died during pregnancy and four pregnancies were terminated. In 16 (59%) patients elective caesarean section was performed...... were reassuring. CONCLUSION: Adherence to standard protocol for the treatment of brain tumours during pregnancy appears to allow a term delivery and a higher probability of a vaginal delivery....

  12. Phase congruency map driven brain tumour segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilágyi, Tünde; Brady, Michael; Berényi, Ervin

    2015-03-01

    Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) systems are already of proven value in healthcare, especially for surgical planning, nevertheless much remains to be done. Gliomas are the most common brain tumours (70%) in adults, with a survival time of just 2-3 months if detected at WHO grades III or higher. Such tumours are extremely variable, necessitating multi-modal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). The use of Gadolinium-based contrast agents is only relevant at later stages of the disease where it highlights the enhancing rim of the tumour. Currently, there is no single accepted method that can be used as a reference. There are three main challenges with such images: to decide whether there is tumour present and is so localize it; to construct a mask that separates healthy and diseased tissue; and to differentiate between the tumour core and the surrounding oedema. This paper presents two contributions. First, we develop tumour seed selection based on multiscale multi-modal texture feature vectors. Second, we develop a method based on a local phase congruency based feature map to drive level-set segmentation. The segmentations achieved with our method are more accurate than previously presented methods, particularly for challenging low grade tumours.

  13. Neuropsychological Differences between Survivors of Supratentorial and Infratentorial Brain Tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S. K.; Mullins, W. A.; O'Neil, S. H.; Wilson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between brain tumour location and core areas of cognitive and behavioural functioning for paediatric brain tumour survivors. The extant literature both supports and refutes an association between paediatric brain tumour location and neurocognitive outcomes. We examined…

  14. TSPO expression in brain tumours:is TSPO a target for brain tumour imaging?

    OpenAIRE

    Roncaroli, Federico; Su, Zhangjie; Herholz, Karl; Gerhard, Alexander; Turkheimer, Federico E.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) alone or in combination with MRI is increasingly assuming a central role in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for brain tumours with the aim of addressing tumour heterogeneity, assisting in patient stratification, and contributing to predicting treatment response. The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is expressed in high-grade gliomas, while its expression is comparatively low in normal brain. In addition, the evidence of elevated TS...

  15. Imaging biomarkers in primary brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Franzese, Ciro; Navarria, Pierina; Scorsetti, Marta [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Grimaldi, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Zucali, Paolo Andrea; Simonelli, Matteo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Medical Oncology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Bello, Lorenzo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Neurosurgery, Rozzano, MI (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    We are getting used to referring to instrumentally detectable biological features in medical language as ''imaging biomarkers''. These two terms combined reflect the evolution of medical imaging during recent decades, and conceptually comprise the principle of noninvasive detection of internal processes that can become targets for supplementary therapeutic strategies. These targets in oncology include those biological pathways that are associated with several tumour features including independence from growth and growth-inhibitory signals, avoidance of apoptosis and immune system control, unlimited potential for replication, self-sufficiency in vascular supply and neoangiogenesis, acquired tissue invasiveness and metastatic diffusion. Concerning brain tumours, there have been major improvements in neurosurgical techniques and radiotherapy planning, and developments of novel target drugs, thus increasing the need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. However, in this context, conventional radiological criteria may be inappropriate to determine the best therapeutic option and subsequently to assess response to therapy. Integration of molecular imaging for the evaluation of brain tumours has for this reason become necessary, and an important role in this setting is played by imaging biomarkers in PET and MRI. In the current review, we describe most relevant techniques and biomarkers used for imaging primary brain tumours in clinical practice, and discuss potential future developments from the experimental context. (orig.)

  16. Imaging biomarkers in primary brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are getting used to referring to instrumentally detectable biological features in medical language as ''imaging biomarkers''. These two terms combined reflect the evolution of medical imaging during recent decades, and conceptually comprise the principle of noninvasive detection of internal processes that can become targets for supplementary therapeutic strategies. These targets in oncology include those biological pathways that are associated with several tumour features including independence from growth and growth-inhibitory signals, avoidance of apoptosis and immune system control, unlimited potential for replication, self-sufficiency in vascular supply and neoangiogenesis, acquired tissue invasiveness and metastatic diffusion. Concerning brain tumours, there have been major improvements in neurosurgical techniques and radiotherapy planning, and developments of novel target drugs, thus increasing the need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. However, in this context, conventional radiological criteria may be inappropriate to determine the best therapeutic option and subsequently to assess response to therapy. Integration of molecular imaging for the evaluation of brain tumours has for this reason become necessary, and an important role in this setting is played by imaging biomarkers in PET and MRI. In the current review, we describe most relevant techniques and biomarkers used for imaging primary brain tumours in clinical practice, and discuss potential future developments from the experimental context. (orig.)

  17. Telomerase activity in 144 brain tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Sano, T; Asai, A.; Mishima, K.; Fujimaki, T.; Kirino, T.

    1998-01-01

    Unlimited proliferation in immortalized cells is believed to be highly dependent on the activity of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein that synthesizes telomeric repeats onto chromosome ends. Using a polymerase chain reaction-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay, we analysed telomerase activity in 99 benign and 45 malignant brain tumours. The TRAP assay results were quantitated by normalizing the telomerase activity of each specimen to that of human glioma cell line T98G to...

  18. ABCB1 in children's brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Beth; Kessler, Maya; Sabnis, Durgagauri H; Kerr, Ian D

    2015-10-01

    Tumours of the central nervous system are the most common solid tumour, accounting for a quarter of the 1500 cases of childhood cancer diagnosed each year in the U.K. They are the most common cause of cancer-related death in children. Treatment consists of surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Survival rates have generally increased, but many survivors suffer from radiotherapy-related neurocognitive and endocrine side effects as well as an increased risk of secondary cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy is normally given in combination to circumvent chemoresistance, but several studies have demonstrated it to be ineffective in the absence of radiotherapy. The identification of children with drug-resistant disease at the outset could allow stratification of those that are potentially curable by chemotherapy alone. Ultimately, however, what is required is a means to overcome this drug resistance and restore the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Medulloblastomas and ependymomas account for over 30% of paediatric brain tumours. Advances in neurosurgery, adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy have led to improvements in 5-year overall survival rates. There remain, however, significant numbers of medulloblastoma patients that have intrinsically drug-resistant tumours and/or present with disseminated disease. Local relapse in ependymoma is also common and has an extremely poor prognosis with only 25% of children surviving first relapse. Each of these is consistent with the acquisition of drug and radiotherapy resistance. Since the majority of chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat these patients are transport substrates for ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1) we will address the hypothesis that ABCB1 expression underlies this drug resistance. PMID:26517917

  19. Scanning Techniques for Brain-Tumour, Localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The colour scanner has been used to scan two small clinical series of brain tumour cases, one by means of As74 using positron detection, the other with I131-labelled albumin using gamma detection and a focusing collimator. The results of these series are given and the value of the procedure to the clinician is presented. Matthews has shown, in studies on tumour- bearing rats, that Bi206 citrate should be a particularly favourable material for brain tumour localization and a preliminary attempt has been made to scan with this material using gamma detection and a focusing collimator. Preliminary results of this study are presented. The focusing collimators used with the gamma-emitting isotopes have a deep geometrical focus and isocount responses are obtained on point sources which are almost depth independent for 20 cm. Experimental results on a series of collimators lead to design data for building such collimators to a given specification. Stationary detector scanning has been carried out on brain-tumour cases using a gamma camera with storage-tube display. The advantages of such machines lie in greater sensitivity and more rapid visualization of the pattern of distribution of radioactivity, which in turn enables dynamic studies to be carried out. Problems which occur with such machines include the difficulty in marking anatomical features and the geometric distortions which occur. These are compared for pin-hole and matrix viewing apertures. The improvement in performance resulting from circuit modifications to remove the dependence of picture size on gamma-ray energy is discussed. The analysis of cerebral scans presents difficulties when the suspected region is only slightly greater in count-rate than its surroundings. A ''normal'' count-rate pattern for a head has been determined by dividing scans into regions which are approximately anatomically equivalent from patient to patient, and counting scintiscan marks in each region. Any abnormal scan may then be

  20. Osteopenia in children surviving brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitton, A.C.; Eves, M. [Children' s Hospital at Chedoke-McMaster, Room 3N27B, Health Sciences Centre, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Hay, J. [Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario (Canada); Gill, G.J.; Webber, C.E. [Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University (Canada); Simpson, T. [Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Barr, R.D. [Children' s Hospital at Chedoke-McMaster, Room 3N27B, Health Sciences Centre, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    Osteopenia has been reported in children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, apparently as a consequence of therapy. It has been suggested that cranial irradiation may play a crucial role in this disorder. To explore that possibility, survivors of brain tumours in childhood, all of whom had received radiotherapy, were examined for evidence of bone mineral loss. 19 children were assessed, on average at 7 years after treatment. Measurements of growth velocities, plain radiography of the skeleton, bone densitometry, health-related quality of life and physical activity were undertaken. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency had been detected in 6 children and 5 had received GH replacement, for a minimum of more than 3 years. 9 children were radiographically osteopenic (including the 5 who had received GH). Z scores for bone mineral density (BMD) were negative in the majority of children. Health-related quality of life was less and pain more frequent in those with low BMD scores. Pain was correlated negatively with both free-time activity and seasonal activity (P<0.01). Osteopenia is a common sequel of therapy in children with brain tumours. Those with osteopenia have more pain and more compromised, health-related quality of life than those who are not osteopenic, and pain significantly limits physical activity. The pathogenesis of osteopenia in these children is still uncertain, but is likely to be multifactorial. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. Osteopenia in children surviving brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteopenia has been reported in children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, apparently as a consequence of therapy. It has been suggested that cranial irradiation may play a crucial role in this disorder. To explore that possibility, survivors of brain tumours in childhood, all of whom had received radiotherapy, were examined for evidence of bone mineral loss. 19 children were assessed, on average at 7 years after treatment. Measurements of growth velocities, plain radiography of the skeleton, bone densitometry, health-related quality of life and physical activity were undertaken. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency had been detected in 6 children and 5 had received GH replacement, for a minimum of more than 3 years. 9 children were radiographically osteopenic (including the 5 who had received GH). Z scores for bone mineral density (BMD) were negative in the majority of children. Health-related quality of life was less and pain more frequent in those with low BMD scores. Pain was correlated negatively with both free-time activity and seasonal activity (P<0.01). Osteopenia is a common sequel of therapy in children with brain tumours. Those with osteopenia have more pain and more compromised, health-related quality of life than those who are not osteopenic, and pain significantly limits physical activity. The pathogenesis of osteopenia in these children is still uncertain, but is likely to be multifactorial. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. Residential Radon and Brain Tumour Incidence in a Danish Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Zorana J.; Andersen, Claus Erik; Pedersen, Camilla; Gravesen, Peter; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Loft, Steffen; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    exposure to residential radon on the risk of primary brain tumour in a prospective Danish cohort. Methods: During 1993–1997 we recruited 57,053 persons. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence from enrolment until 31 December 2009, identifying 121 primary brain tumour cases. We traced......Background: Increased brain tumour incidence over recent decades may reflect improved diagnostic methods and clinical practice, but remain unexplained. Although estimated doses are low a relationship between radon and brain tumours may exist. Objective: To investigate the long-term effect of...... (CI) for the risk of primary brain tumours associated with residential radon exposure with adjustment for age, sex, occupation, fruit and vegetable consumption and traffic-related air pollution. Effect modification by air pollution was assessed. Results: Median estimated radon was 40.5 Bq/m3. The...

  3. Brain tumour stem cells: the undercurrents of human brain cancer and their relationship to neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dirks, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    Conceptual and technical advances in neural stem cell biology are being applied to the study of human brain tumours. These studies suggest that human brain tumours are organized as a hierarchy and are maintained by a small number of tumour cells that have stem cell properties. Most of the bulk population of human brain tumours comprise cells that have lost the ability to initiate and maintain tumour growth. Although the cell of origin for human brain tumours is uncertain, recent evidence poin...

  4. Discrimination of paediatric brain tumours using apparent diffusion coefficient histograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bull, Jonathan G.; Clark, Christopher A. [UCL Institute of Child Health, Imaging and Biophysics Unit, London (United Kingdom); Saunders, Dawn E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    To determine if histograms of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) can be used to differentiate paediatric brain tumours. Imaging of histologically confirmed tumours with pre-operative ADC maps were reviewed (54 cases, 32 male, mean age 6.1 years; range 0.1-15.8 years) comprising 6 groups. Whole tumour ADC histograms were calculated; normalised for volume. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to differentiate tumour types using histogram metrics, initially for all groups and then for specific subsets. All 6 groups (5 dysembryoplastic neuroectodermal tumours, 22 primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNET), 5 ependymomas, 7 choroid plexus papillomas, 4 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumours (ATRT) and 9 juvenile pilocytic astrocytomas (JPA)) were compared. 74% (40/54) were correctly classified using logistic regression of ADC histogram parameters. In the analysis of posterior fossa tumours, 80% of ependymomas, 100% of astrocytomas and 94% of PNET-medulloblastoma were classified correctly. All PNETs were discriminated from ATRTs (22 PNET and 4 supratentorial ATRTs) (100%). ADC histograms are useful in differentiating paediatric brain tumours, in particular, the common posterior fossa tumours of childhood. PNETs were differentiated from supratentorial ATRTs, in all cases, which has important implications in terms of clinical management. (orig.)

  5. MicroRNA Regulation of Brain Tumour Initiating Cells in Central Nervous System Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Garg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CNS tumours occur in both pediatric and adult patients and many of these tumours are associated with poor clinical outcome. Due to a paradigm shift in thinking for the last several years, these tumours are now considered to originate from a small population of stem-like cells within the bulk tumour tissue. These cells, termed as brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs, are perceived to be regulated by microRNAs at the posttranscriptional/translational levels. Proliferation, stemness, differentiation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and cell cycle constitute some of the significant processes modulated by microRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. Characterization and functional studies on oncogenic or tumour suppressive microRNAs are made possible because of developments in sequencing and microarray techniques. In the current review, we bring recent knowledge of the role of microRNAs in BTIC formation and therapy. Special attention is paid to two highly aggressive and well-characterized brain tumours: gliomas and medulloblastoma. As microRNA seems to be altered in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, “microRNA therapy” may now have potential to improve outcomes for brain tumour patients. In this rapidly evolving field, further understanding of miRNA biology and its contribution towards cancer can be mined for new therapeutic tools.

  6. Quantitation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in human brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Bock, E; Warecka, K;

    1980-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) content of 58 human brain tumours was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using monospecific antibody against GFA. Astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, spongioblastomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas contained relatively high...... amounts of GFA, up to 85 times the concentration in parietal grey substance of normal human brain. GFA was not found in neurinomas, meningiomas, adenomas of the hypophysis, or in a single case of metastasis of adenocarcinoma. Non-glial tumours of craniopharyngioma and haemangioblastoma were infiltrated by...

  7. Early recognition and management of brain tumours in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Eleanor Katie; Cannon, Anna; Zaborowski, Krzysztof; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-08-31

    Brain tumours comprise over one quarter of all childhood cancers in the UK and are the most common cause of cancer-related deaths in children. The presentation of brain tumours can vary substantially in children. The presenting symptoms are often similar to less serious conditions, and are often managed as such initially. Therefore, it can be difficult to diagnose brain tumours in children. An early diagnosis is usually associated with more effective treatment and improved health outcomes. The diagnostic interval between first presentation to a health professional and diagnosis for brain tumours in children has been shown to be three times longer in the UK than in other developed countries. As a result, the HeadSmart campaign launched a symptom card in 2011 to increase awareness of brain tumours in children among the general population and healthcare professionals, with the aim of reducing the diagnostic interval to 5 weeks. Nurses have an essential role in early recognition of brain tumours in children, and in providing care and support to the child and their family following a diagnosis. PMID:27577312

  8. Intracerebral haemorrhage in primary and metastatic brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaggi, Andrea; Erbetta, Alessandra; Silvani, Antonio; Maderna, Emanuela; Pollo, Bianca

    2008-09-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage may both be a presenting manifestation in unrecognised brain tumour or--more frequently--take place in the disease course of known/suspected brain tumour due to diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, including biopsy, locoregional treatments and anti-angiogenic therapies. Apart from the difficulties inherent to accurate neuroradiological diagnosis in selected cases with small tumour volume, the main clinical problem that neurologists face is represented by decision making in prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism in these patients. These points are briefly discussed and available evidence on the last point is commented on. PMID:18690513

  9. Ex-vivo HRMAS of adult brain tumours: metabolite quantification and assignment of tumour biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS NMR spectroscopy allows detailed metabolic analysis of whole biopsy samples for investigating tumour biology and tumour classification. Accurate biochemical assignment of small molecule metabolites that are "NMR visible" will improve our interpretation of HRMAS data and the translation of NMR tumour biomarkers to in-vivo studies. Results 1D and 2D 1H HRMAS NMR was used to determine that 29 small molecule metabolites, along with 8 macromolecule signals, account for the majority of the HRMAS spectrum of the main types of brain tumour (astrocytoma grade II, grade III gliomas, glioblastomas, metastases, meningiomas and also lymphomas. Differences in concentration of 20 of these metabolites were statistically significant between these brain tumour types. During the course of an extended 2D data acquisition the HRMAS technique itself affects sample analysis: glycine, glutathione and glycerophosphocholine all showed small concentration changes; analysis of the sample after HRMAS indicated structural damage that may affect subsequent histopathological analysis. Conclusions A number of small molecule metabolites have been identified as potential biomarkers of tumour type that may enable development of more selective in-vivo 1H NMR acquisition methods for diagnosis and prognosis of brain tumours.

  10. Emotional and personality changes following brain tumour resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Lisanne M; Drummond, Katharine J; Andrewes, David G

    2016-07-01

    Psychological distress has a high prevalence in brain tumour patients, and understanding the emotional and personality changes that may follow neurosurgery is important for clinical management of these patients. We aimed to characterise these emotional and personality changes using subjective, observer-rated and clinical measures. We examined subjective changes in emotional experience and observer-rated changes to personality disturbances following neurosurgery for brain tumours (n=44), compared to a control group that had undergone spinal surgery (n=26). Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a Subjective Emotional Change Questionnaire. Observers who knew the patients well also completed the Iowa Rating Scale of Personality Change. Compared to controls, patients with tumours reported significantly more changes to their subjective experience of emotions following neurosurgery, particularly anger, disgust and sadness. For the observer-ratings, tumour patients were described as having significant changes in the personality disturbances of irritability, impulsivity, moodiness, inflexibility, and being easily overwhelmed. Anxiety and depression were not significantly different between groups. Neurosurgical resection of a brain tumour is a major life event that changes patients' subjective experiences of different emotions, and leads to observer-rated changes in personality. In this study, these changes were not accompanied by increases in anxiety or depression. We conclude with a discussion of biological and psychosocial mechanisms that can impact emotional functioning and personality in patients with brain tumours. PMID:26898575

  11. A rare metastasis from a rare brain tumour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Kristine; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2014-01-01

    This case report presents the story of a patient with an oligodendroglioma metastasizing to the bone marrow and to lymph nodes of the neck. The patient had undergone primary brain surgery 13 years prior to the discovery of metastases and radiotherapy directed at the brain tumour two months prior........ Oligodendroglioma are rare primary brain tumours of which extraneural metastasis is even more rare. The incidence of cases like this may be increasing because of better treatment and thus longer survival of patients with oligodendroglioma....

  12. Anatomical and biochemical investigation of primary brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancerous transformation entails major biochemical changes including modifications of the energy metabolism of the cell, e.g. utilisation of glucose and other substrates, protein synthesis, and expression of receptors and antigens. Tumour growth also leads to heterogeneity in blood flow owing to focal necrosis, angiogenesis and metabolic demands, as well as disruption of transport mechanisms of substrates across cell membranes and other physiological boundaries such as the blood-brain barrier. All these biochemical, histological and anatomical changes can be assessed with emission tomography, X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Whereas anatomical imaging is aimed at the diagnosis of brain tumours, biochemical imaging is better suited for tissue characterisation. The identification of a tumoural mass and the assessment of its size and vascularisation are best achieved with X-ray CT and MRI, while biochemical imaging can provide additional information that is crucial for tumour classification, differential diagnosis and follow-up. As the assessment of variables such as water content, appearance of cystic lesions and location of the tumour are largely irrelevant for tissue characterisation, a number of probes have been employed for the assessment of the biochemical features of tumours. Since biochemical changes may be related to the growth rate of cancer cells, they can be thought of as markers of tumour cell proliferation. Biochemical imaging with radionuclides of processes that occur at a cellular level provides information that complements findings obtained by anatomical imaging aimed at depicting structural, vascular and histological changes. This review focusses on the clinical application of anatomical brain imaging and biochemical assessment with positron emission tomography, single-photon emission tomography and MRS in the diagnosis of primary brain tumours, as well as in follow-up. (orig.)

  13. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  14. Dynamic characterisation of brain tumours growth from time series of nuclear magnetic resonance scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of a high grade glioblastoma of a patient undergoing radio-therapy has been analysed by considering a mathematical model which simulates the brain tumour growth within a two-dimensional domain defined by the brain and ventricles geometry. This simulated behaviour was compared with morphological data obtained from successive nuclear magnetic resonance scans of the patient. The model parameters include the proliferation rate and the diffusion coefficient of the tumour cells as well as their sensitivity to the irradiation. They were estimated using optimisation techniques to minimise the distance between simulated tumour area and scan data from different brain sections. The relevance of this quantitative estimation for the prognosis and for the consideration of additional parameters in the pre and post therapeutic evaluation of glioma is discussed. (authors). 12 refs., 2 figs

  15. Ten years summary: FDG-PET on irradiated brain tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate FDG-PET in differentiation of post-radiotherapy status: recurrence, radiation necrosis, malignant regression of low grade primary brain tumour, and to evaluate PET in terms of survival prediction. Material and methods: 117 irradiated patients (156 PET) were consecutively included. PET results were judged by a set of rigid follow-up standards. Brain metastases from lung carcinoma were further studied. Survival time was analysed with Kaplan-Meier method. Results: There were 61 true-positive, 2 false-positive, 15 false-negative, 51 true-negative PET; leaving 5 positive and 22 negative PET results indeterminate. PET positive predictive value was 96% in all and 100% in brain metastasis from lung carcinoma. PET negative predictive value was 55.6% among surgically selected cases. Survival time was significantly longer in patient's with negative PET, both brain metastasis and primary brain tumour. Conclusions: FDG-PET was a good method to pick up tumour recurrence from radiation necrosis, especially metastasis from lung carcinoma. FDG uptake could be used as a non-invasive parameter to predict patient's prognosis. (authors)

  16. Mobile phone use and risk of brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahkola, A.

    2010-05-15

    Mobile phone use has increased rapidly worldwide since the 1990's. As mobile telephones are used close to the head, the exposure to the radiofrequency radiation emitted by mobile phones has been suggested as a possible risk factor for brain tumours. The effect of mobile phone use on risk of brain tumours, particularly gliomas and meningiomas as well as acoustic neuromas, was evaluated using both a case-control approach and a meta-analysis. In addition, one of the most important sources of error in a case-control study, selection bias due to differential participation, was assessed in a subset of the case-control data. The risk of glioma and meningioma in relation to mobile phone use was investigated in population-based case-control studies conducted in five North European countries. All these countries used a common protocol and were included in a multinational study on mobile phone use and brain tumours, the INTERPHONE study, coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Cases (1,521 gliomas and 1,209 meningiomas) were identified mostly from hospitals and controls (3,299) from national population registers or general practitioners' patient lists. Detailed history of mobile phone use was obtained in personal interviews. Mobile phone use was assessed using several exposure indicators, such as regular use (phone use at least once a week for at least six months), duration of use as well as cumulative number of hours and calls. To comprehensively evaluate the effect of mobile phone use on risk of brain tumours, the existing evidence from the epidemiological studies published on the issue was combined using meta-analysis. In the analysis, a pooled estimate was calculated for all brain tumours combined, and also separately for the three most common tumour types, glioma, meningioma and acoustic neuroma using inverse variance-weighted method. Pooled estimate was also obtained for different telephone types (NMT and GSM) and by the location

  17. Mobile phone use and risk of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobile phone use has increased rapidly worldwide since the 1990's. As mobile telephones are used close to the head, the exposure to the radiofrequency radiation emitted by mobile phones has been suggested as a possible risk factor for brain tumours. The effect of mobile phone use on risk of brain tumours, particularly gliomas and meningiomas as well as acoustic neuromas, was evaluated using both a case-control approach and a meta-analysis. In addition, one of the most important sources of error in a case-control study, selection bias due to differential participation, was assessed in a subset of the case-control data. The risk of glioma and meningioma in relation to mobile phone use was investigated in population-based case-control studies conducted in five North European countries. All these countries used a common protocol and were included in a multinational study on mobile phone use and brain tumours, the INTERPHONE study, coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Cases (1,521 gliomas and 1,209 meningiomas) were identified mostly from hospitals and controls (3,299) from national population registers or general practitioners' patient lists. Detailed history of mobile phone use was obtained in personal interviews. Mobile phone use was assessed using several exposure indicators, such as regular use (phone use at least once a week for at least six months), duration of use as well as cumulative number of hours and calls. To comprehensively evaluate the effect of mobile phone use on risk of brain tumours, the existing evidence from the epidemiological studies published on the issue was combined using meta-analysis. In the analysis, a pooled estimate was calculated for all brain tumours combined, and also separately for the three most common tumour types, glioma, meningioma and acoustic neuroma using inverse variance-weighted method. Pooled estimate was also obtained for different telephone types (NMT and GSM) and by the location of the

  18. Iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain tumours - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine-125 brachytherapy has been applied to brain tumours since 1979. Even though the physical and biological characteristics make these implants particularly attractive for minimal invasive treatment, the place for stereotactic brachytherapy is still poorly defined. An extensive review of the literature has been performed, especially concerning indications, results and complications. Iodine-125 seeds have been implanted in astrocytomas I-III, glioblastomas, metastases and several other tumour entities. Outcome data given in the literature are summarized. Complications are rare in carefully selected patients. All in all, for highly selected patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent primary or metastatic tumours, this method provides encouraging survival rates with relatively low complication rates and a good quality of life

  19. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) of human brain tumours: assessment of differences between tumour types and its applicability in brain tumour categorization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in categorizing brain tumours. In vivo single-voxel 1H MRS at an echo time of 136 ms was performed in 108 patients with brain neoplasms that included 29 meningiomas (MEN), 15 low-grade astrocytomas (LGA), 12 anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), 25 glioblastomas (GBM) and 27 metastases (MET). Time-domain fitted areas of nine resonances were evaluated in all spectra. Twenty-five additional tumours were prospectively included as independent test set. Differences in at least two resonances were found in all pairwise comparisons of tumour groups except in GBM vs MET. Large lipid resonance at 1.30 ppm was found to be characteristic of GBM and MET, and alanine was characteristic of MEN. Significant differences were found between LGA and AA in choline-containing compounds and total creatine resonances. When implemented in a stepwise algorithm, these findings correctly classified 84% (21 of 25) tumours in the independent test set. Some additional utility was found in glycine/myo-inositol at 3.55 ppm for bilateral differentiation between GBM and MET (9 of 11, 82% correct classification in the test set). 1H MRS provides useful information to categorize the most common brain tumours that can be implemented in clinical practice with satisfactory results. (orig.)

  20. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for high-grade brain tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzuol, Lara

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour in adults and among the most aggressive of all tumours. For several decades, the standard care of GBM was surgical resection followed by radiotherapy alone. In 2005, a landmark phase III clinical trial coordinated by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) demonstrated the benefit of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. With TMZ, the median life expectancy in optimally managed patients is still only 12-14 months, with only 25% surviving 24 months. There is an urgent need for new therapies in particular in those patients whose tumour has an unmethylated methylguanine methyltransferase gene (MGMT) promoter, which is a predictive factor of benefit from TMZ. In this dissertation, the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation is investigated using both a mathematical model, based on in vivo population statistics of survival, and in vitro experimentation on a panel of human GBM cell lines. The results show that TMZ has an additive effect in vitro and that the population-based model may be insufficient in predicting TMZ response. The combination of TMZ with particle therapy is also investigated. Very little preclinical data exists on the effects of charged particles on GBM cell lines as well as on the concomitant application of chemotherapy. In this study, human GBM cells are exposed to 3 MeV protons and 6 MeV alpha particles in concomitance with TMZ. The results suggest that the radiation quality does not affect the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation, showing reproducible additive cytotoxicity. Since TMZ and radiation cause DNA damage in cancer cells, there has been increased attention to the use of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. PARP is a family of enzymes that play a key role in the repair of DNA breaks. In this study, a novel PARP inhibitor, ABT-888

  1. STUDY OF BRAIN TUMOURS BY NOVE L MAGNETIC RESONANCE TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shamim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study , thirty patients in the age range of 22 to 63 years of age were included after being diagnosed to be having brain tumour on CT scan or conventional MRI. In addition DWI , MRS , and PWI were carried out i n these patients. All the patients with suspicious malignant lesions were then subjected to FDG - PET examination . Histopathological correlation was obtained in all the patients to serve as gold standard against which other modalities will be assessed for th eir sensitivity , specificity , positive predictive value , negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy. Out of thirty patients selected for this study , twenty cases were found to be malignant and ten cases were benign on Histopathological evaluation. Majority of malignant lesions were glioblastoma multiforme. Amongst benign cases , majorities were meningioma , one was a Granulomatous lesion and one was a benign cystic lesion. MRI including the novel techniques showed high sensitivity and spe cificity in identifying malignant brain lesions and has a future role in better characterization of brain tumours. Wherever available , it should be integrated in routine workup of patients presenting with brain tumours or for follow up of patients undergon e surgery / adjuvant chemotherapy.

  2. Thyroid dysfunction after radiotherapy and chemotherapy of brain tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Livesey, E A; Brook, C G

    1989-01-01

    We investigated thyroid function in 119 survivors of treatment for brain tumours not involving the hypothalamo-pituitary region. Cranial irradiation did not effect thyroid function but 11 of 47 children (23%) who had spinal irradiation had raised concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone. Chemotherapy further increased the incidence of thyroid dysfunction: two of four patients who had cranial irradiation and chemotherapy and 20 of 29 patients (69%) who had spinal irradiation and chemother...

  3. Behavioural and psychological outcomes in children treated for brain tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, C.

    2007-01-01

    There is a sparcity of literature examining the outcomes of those treated for childhood brain tumours using surgery-only. Although several areas of significant long-term problems have been identified, such as deficits in executive functions and raised levels of behavioural and psychological problems, research so far has failed to consistently identify factors that predict outcomes. This makes it very difficult to make recommendations about how to lessen the impact of these cognitive, behaviou...

  4. In situ and in vitro profiling of brain tumour initiating cells of high-grade gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Leidgens, Verena Jeannine

    2016-01-01

    High-grade gliomas, especially glioblastomas, are highly complex and heterogeneous primary brain tumours. Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive cancers with poor overall survival prognosis. Fast and widespread invasion of the brain parenchyma by a subpopulation of progenitor tumour cells is a main pathophysiological feature of these tumours. Invasion renders localised therapies ineffective and is a primary cause of tumour recurrence as well as associated morbidity. Identification o...

  5. Alterations of monocarboxylate transporter densities during hypoxia in brain and breast tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chang; Edin, Nina F Jeppesen; Lauritzen, Knut H;

    2012-01-01

    Tumour cells are characterized by aerobic glycolysis, which provides biomass for tumour proliferation and leads to extracellular acidification through efflux of lactate via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Deficient and spasm-prone tumour vasculature causes variable hypoxia, which favours tum...... tumour cell survival and metastases. Brain metastases frequently occur in patients with advanced breast cancer.Effective treatment strategies are therefore needed against brain metastasis from breast carcinoma....

  6. Childhood brain tumours : Health and function in adult survivors and parental fears

    OpenAIRE

    Anclair, Malin

    2009-01-01

    The general aim of the present research was to investigate health and functional ability of patients treated for childhood brain tumour and systematically examine parental fears after a child s brain tumour. The aims were realised through two part-studies. Childhood cancer once regarded as an acute fatal illness has become a life threatening disease. Previous studies of the long-term sequelae in survivors of children treated for a brain tumour reflect the fact that most ...

  7. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in brain tumours: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parallel to the rapid development of clinical MRI, MR spectroscopy (MRS) has, after starting as an analytical tool used in chemistry and physics, evolved to a noninvasive clinical examination. Most common neuroradiological diagnostic indications for MRS are functional inborn errors, neonatal hypoxia, ischaemia, metabolic diseases, white matter and degenerative diseases, epilepsy, inflammation, infections and intracranial neoplasm. Compared to CT and MRI, well-established morphological diagnostic tools, MRS provides information on the metabolic state of brain tissue. We review the clinical impact of MRS in diagnosis of tumours and their differentiation from non-neoplastic lesions. (orig.)

  8. Tumour resistance to cisplatin: a modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, L.; Bezak, E.; Olver, I.; van Doorn, T.

    2005-01-01

    Although chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of haematological tumours, in many common solid tumours the success has been limited. Some of the reasons for the limitations are: the timing of drug delivery, resistance to the drug, repopulation between cycles of chemotherapy and the lack of complete understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a specific agent. Cisplatin is among the most effective cytotoxic agents used in head and neck cancer treatments. When modelling cisplatin as a single agent, the properties of cisplatin only have to be taken into account, reducing the number of assumptions that are considered in the generalized chemotherapy models. The aim of the present paper is to model the biological effect of cisplatin and to simulate the consequence of cisplatin resistance on tumour control. The 'treated' tumour is a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, previously grown by computer-based Monte Carlo techniques. The model maintained the biological constitution of a tumour through the generation of stem cells, proliferating cells and non-proliferating cells. Cell kinetic parameters (mean cell cycle time, cell loss factor, thymidine labelling index) were also consistent with the literature. A sensitivity study on the contribution of various mechanisms leading to drug resistance is undertaken. To quantify the extent of drug resistance, the cisplatin resistance factor (CRF) is defined as the ratio between the number of surviving cells of the resistant population and the number of surviving cells of the sensitive population, determined after the same treatment time. It is shown that there is a supra-linear dependence of CRF on the percentage of cisplatin-DNA adducts formed, and a sigmoid-like dependence between CRF and the percentage of cells killed in resistant tumours. Drug resistance is shown to be a cumulative process which eventually can overcome tumour regression leading to treatment failure.

  9. Tumour resistance to cisplatin: a modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of haematological tumours, in many common solid tumours the success has been limited. Some of the reasons for the limitations are: the timing of drug delivery, resistance to the drug, repopulation between cycles of chemotherapy and the lack of complete understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a specific agent. Cisplatin is among the most effective cytotoxic agents used in head and neck cancer treatments. When modelling cisplatin as a single agent, the properties of cisplatin only have to be taken into account, reducing the number of assumptions that are considered in the generalized chemotherapy models. The aim of the present paper is to model the biological effect of cisplatin and to simulate the consequence of cisplatin resistance on tumour control. The 'treated' tumour is a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, previously grown by computer-based Monte Carlo techniques. The model maintained the biological constitution of a tumour through the generation of stem cells, proliferating cells and non-proliferating cells. Cell kinetic parameters (mean cell cycle time, cell loss factor, thymidine labelling index) were also consistent with the literature. A sensitivity study on the contribution of various mechanisms leading to drug resistance is undertaken. To quantify the extent of drug resistance, the cisplatin resistance factor (CRF) is defined as the ratio between the number of surviving cells of the resistant population and the number of surviving cells of the sensitive population, determined after the same treatment time. It is shown that there is a supra-linear dependence of CRF on the percentage of cisplatin-DNA adducts formed, and a sigmoid-like dependence between CRF and the percentage of cells killed in resistant tumours. Drug resistance is shown to be a cumulative process which eventually can overcome tumour regression leading to treatment failure

  10. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Brain Tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for brain tumours is based on data from 9 randomized trials and 1 meta-analysis. Moreover, data from 2 prospective studies, 3 retrospective studies and 4 other articles were used. In total, 19 scientific articles are included, involving 4,266 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 11,252 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized as follows: The conclusion from SBU 129/2 that curative treatment is not available for patients with high-grade malignant glioma (grade III and IV) is still valid. The survival benefit from postoperative radiotherapy compared to supportive care only or chemotherapy is about 3-4 months, as demonstrated in earlier randomized studies. Quality of life is now currently estimated and considered to be of major importance when reporting the outcome of treatment for patients with brain tumours. There is no scientific evidence that radiotherapy using hyper- and hypofractionation leads to longer survival for patients with high-grade malignant glioma than conventional radiotherapy. There is large documentation, but only one randomized study. There is some documentation to support the view that patients with grade IV glioma and poor prognosis can be treated with hypofractionation and with an outcome similar to that after conventional fractionation. A shorter treatment time should be convenient for the patient. Documentation of the benefit of a radiotherapy boost with brachytherapy is limited and no conclusion can be drawn. There is no scientific evidence that radiotherapy prolongs life for patients with low-grade glioma. There are some data supporting that radiotherapy can be used to treat symptoms in

  11. CS-16THE eEF2 KINASE IS CRITICAL FOR BRAIN TUMOURS ADAPTATION TO METABOLIC STRESS

    OpenAIRE

    Leprivier, Gabriel; Remke, Marc; Rotblat, Barak; Agnihotri, Sameer; Kool, Marcel; Derry, Brent; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D.; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2014-01-01

    During tumour progression, brain tumour cells are exposed to metabolic stress, such as nutrient deprivation, due to abnormal tumour vasculature. The ability of tumour cells to respond and manage reduced nutrient availability has a strong impact on tumour outcome. The molecular pathways supporting metabolic adaptation of brain tumour cells to nutrient stress represent potential therapeutic targets which are still not well defined. We report that the translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2) kinas...

  12. Development of a positron probe for localization and excision of brain tumours during surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogalhas, F.; Charon, Y.; Duval, M.-A.; Lefebvre, F.; Palfi, S.; Pinot, L.; Siebert, R.; Ménard, L.

    2009-07-01

    The survival outcome of patients suffering from gliomas is directly linked to the complete surgical resection of the tumour. To help the surgeons to delineate precisely the boundaries of the tumour, we developed an intraoperative positron probe with background noise rejection capability. The probe was designed to be directly coupled to the excision tool such that detection and removal of the radiolabelled tumours could be simultaneous. The device consists of two exchangeable detection heads composed of clear and plastic scintillating fibres. Each head is coupled to an optic fibre bundle that exports the scintillating light to a photodetection and processing electronic module placed outside the operative wound. The background rejection method is based on a real-time subtraction technique. The measured probe sensitivity for 18F was 1.1 cps kBq-1 ml-1 for the small head and 3.4 cps kBq-1 ml-1 for the large head. The mean spatial resolution was 1.6 mm FWHM on the detector surface. The γ-ray rejection efficiency measured by realistic brain phantom modelling of the surgical cavity was 99.4%. This phantom also demonstrated the ability of the probe to detect tumour discs as small as 5 mm in diameter (20 mg) for tumour-to-background ratios higher than 3:1 and with an acquisition time around 4 s at each scanning step. These results indicate that our detector could be a useful complement to existing techniques for the accurate excision of brain tumour tissue and more generally to improve the efficiency of radio-guided cancer surgery.

  13. Development of a positron probe for localization and excision of brain tumours during surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival outcome of patients suffering from gliomas is directly linked to the complete surgical resection of the tumour. To help the surgeons to delineate precisely the boundaries of the tumour, we developed an intraoperative positron probe with background noise rejection capability. The probe was designed to be directly coupled to the excision tool such that detection and removal of the radiolabelled tumours could be simultaneous. The device consists of two exchangeable detection heads composed of clear and plastic scintillating fibres. Each head is coupled to an optic fibre bundle that exports the scintillating light to a photodetection and processing electronic module placed outside the operative wound. The background rejection method is based on a real-time subtraction technique. The measured probe sensitivity for 18F was 1.1 cps kBq-1 ml-1 for the small head and 3.4 cps kBq-1 ml-1 for the large head. The mean spatial resolution was 1.6 mm FWHM on the detector surface. The γ-ray rejection efficiency measured by realistic brain phantom modelling of the surgical cavity was 99.4%. This phantom also demonstrated the ability of the probe to detect tumour discs as small as 5 mm in diameter (20 mg) for tumour-to-background ratios higher than 3:1 and with an acquisition time around 4 s at each scanning step. These results indicate that our detector could be a useful complement to existing techniques for the accurate excision of brain tumour tissue and more generally to improve the efficiency of radio-guided cancer surgery.

  14. The use of PET in evaluating patients with primary brain tumours: is it useful?

    OpenAIRE

    Olivero, W C; Dulebohn, S C; Lister, J R

    1995-01-01

    During an 18 month period 39 patients were evaluated with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-PET (FDG-PET) for primary brain tumours. These included patients with suspected newly diagnosed tumours and patients with known tumours who were being evaluated for possible recurrence or increasing tumour grade. Scans were performed on a 951-31 Siemen's PET scanner with 4 mm resolution. Scanning time was about 20 minutes per patient. All patients had undergone recent cerebral MRI. These patients were divided i...

  15. Clinical applications of proton MR spectroscopy in the diagnosis of brain tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Bulakbasi, Nail

    2004-01-01

    There are few but important problems in magnetic resonance (MR) diagnosis of the brain tumours such as predicting the grade, exact definition of the tumour borders, differentiation of the cystic tumours from abscess, the tumoral core from peritumoral oedema, and the tumour recurrence from radiation necrosis. MR spectroscopy (MRS) can add more information to MR imaging (MRI) in solving many of these problems. Widespread usage of faster MRS applications with higher signal‒to‒noise ratio (SNR) a...

  16. Thallium uptake and biological behaviour in childhood brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, E.J.; Howman-Giles, R.; Kellie, S.; Uren, R.F. [Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: The histopathological grade and radiological appearance of the diverse cerebral neoplasms in childhood frequently poorly reflect their biological behaviour. We examined thallium accumulation prior to treatment (and in several cases, at intervals there after) in 13 children to determine its usefulness as a tumour marker. 23 SPECT studies were acquired 20 minutes after the injection of 1-3 mCi of {sup 201}TI. Thallium index (TI), the ratio of counts in tumour/normal brain, was calculated. No uptake was seen in two patients (pts) with a Grade 1 cerebellar astrocytomas (disease free at 4/12 f/u). Three pts with medulloblastomas were studied. One pt showed intense uptake (Tl =12). His tumour (proliferative antigen stain Ki67 = 50%) recurred early after debulking surgery (Tl +ve prior to CT or MRI changes). The second pt was imaged at relapse (Ki67 = 60%) and showed intense uptake, Tl = 17. The third pt showed lower level uptake (Tl = 2), Ki67 = 5%, and is disease-free at 5/12 (as per {sup 201}TI and MRI). One pt with a Grade 1 brainstem glioma showed Tl = 5 and has progressed rapidly despite low grade histology. Four pts with chiasmatic-hypothalamic gliomas have been studied. Although these neoplasms are usually low grade histologically, their growth properties vary greatly. Two pts with Tl<2.5 have been conservatively managed because of slow tumour growth. The other two pts have Tl>3.5 and have required aggressive treatment for rapid disease progression. One pt with a large pilocytic astrocytoma of the optic chiasm showed Tl = 9.5. Active treatment was not undertaken. One pt with a pineal germ cell tumour showed avid {sup 201}TI uptake (Tl not performed) and has had two normal studies, and is clinically well, since BMT. Avid {sup 201}TI uptake also seen in one pt with cerebral neuroblastoma. (Died at 8/12 after Dx.) Thus, {sup 201}TI accumulates in histologically diverse paediatric neoplasms. The Tl appears to reflect biological behaviour in the limited

  17. Radiation-induced brain disorders in patients with pituitary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced brain disorders (RIBD) are uncommon and they are grave sequelae of conventional radiotherapy. In the present report, we describe the clinical spectrum of RIBD in 11 patients who received post-surgery conventional megavoltage irradiation for residual pituitary tumours. Of these 11 patients (nine men, two women), seven had been treated for non-functioning pituitary tumours and four for somatotropinomas. At the time of irradiation the age of these patients ranged from 30 to 59 years (mean, 39.4 ± 8.3; median, 36) with a follow-up period of 696 months (mean, 18.3 ± 26.4; median, 11). The dose of radiation ranged from 45 to 90 Gy (mean, 51.3 ± 13.4; median, 45), which was given in 1530 fractions (mean, 18.6 ± 5.0; median, 15) with 2.8 ± 0.3 Gy (median, 3) per fraction. The biological effective dose calculated for late complications in these patients ranged from 78.7 to 180 Gy (mean, 99.1 ± 27.5; median, 90). The lag time between tumour irradiation and the onset of symptoms ranged from 6 to 168 months (mean, 46.3 ± 57.0; median, 57). The clinical spectrum of RIBD included new-onset visual abnormalities in five, cerebral radionecrosis in the form of altered sensorium in four, generalized seizures in four, cognitive dysfunction in five, dementia in three and motor deficits in two patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/CT of the brain was suggestive of radionecrosis in eight, cerebral oedema in three, cerebral atrophy in two and second neoplasia in one patient. Associated hormone deficiencies at presentation were hypogonadism in eight, hypoadrenalism in six, hypothyroidism in four and diabetes insipidus in one patient. Autopsy in two patients showed primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and brainstem radionecrosis in one, and a cystic lesion in the left frontal lobe following radionecrosis in the other. We conclude that RIBD have distinctive but varying clinical and radiological presentations. Diabetes insipidus and PNET as a second neoplastic

  18. A PROSPECTIVE HISTOPATHOLOGICAL-BASED STUDY OF BRAIN TUMOURS IN A REFERRAL CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathima Gujjaru

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Brain neoplasms occur at all ages and account for around 2-3 percent of all deaths in adults. In children, the frequency increases to more than twenty percent. In children, it forms the second most common type of malignancy. Most of the tumours encountered are not related to any identifiable risk factors except for irradiation and some hereditary syndromes like subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, cerebellar haemangioblastoma, meningioma, Schwannoma of 7 th cranial nerve. Gliomas constitute fifty percent of the brain tumours and sixty percent of all gliomas are glioblastoma multiforme. Meningiomas constitute twenty percent and cerebral metastasis is seen in fifteen percent of the cases. Seventy percent of supratentorial tumours are found in adults and seventy percent of brain tumours in children are infratentorial. The three common tumours of cerebellum are medulloblastoma, haemangioblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma. Brain tumours are space occupying lesions and cause compression and destruction of adjacent structures, brain oedema (Peritumoural tissue, infarction and ischaemia of brain by compressing/infiltrating cerebral blood vessels, obstruction of CSF flow causing hydrocephalus, and rise in intracranial pressure with herniations. Tumours can undergo ischaemic necrosis and necrotic tumours tend to bleed. Brain tumours generally do not metastasise. Schwannoma and meningioma are benign tumours. Medulloblastoma of childhood may have drop metastasis via CSF. A sincere effort has been put in this study to identify the incidence of each variety of brain tumour among the fifty confirmed and identified cases of brain tumours. METHODS The age range of the cases in present study was 5-72 years with a mean age of occurrence of 44.11 years and the peak age group affected were in the 3 rd and 4 th decades. Cerebral hemisphere was the commonest site for intracranial tumours. RESULT In the present study, fifty

  19. Optimization of tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours by radiation dose redistribution: a modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour hypoxia is a known cause of clinical resistance to radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to model the effects on tumour control probability (TCP) of selectively boosting the dose to hypoxic regions in a tumour, while keeping the mean tumour dose constant. A tumour model with a continuous oxygen distribution, incorporating pO2 histograms published for head and neck patients, was developed. Temporal and spatial variations in the oxygen distribution, non-uniform cell density and cell proliferation during treatment were included in the tumour modelling. Non-uniform dose prescriptions were made based on a segmentation of the tumours into four compartments. The main findings were: (1) Dose redistribution considerably improved TCP for all tumours. (2) The effect on TCP depended on the degree of reoxygenation during treatment, with a maximum relative increase in TCP for tumours with poor or no reoxygenation. (3) Acute hypoxia reduced TCP moderately, while underdosing chronic hypoxic cells gave large reductions in TCP. (4) Restricted dose redistribution still gave a substantial increase in TCP as compared to uniform dose boosts. In conclusion, redistributing dose according to tumour oxygenation status might increase TCP when the tumour response to radiotherapy is limited by chronic hypoxia. This could potentially improve treatment outcome in a subpopulation of patients who respond poorly to conventional radiotherapy

  20. Ex-vivo HRMAS of adult brain tumours: metabolite quantification and assignment of tumour biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, A.J.; Fellows, G.A.; Griffiths, J.R.; Wilson, M.; Bell, B.A.; Howe, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy allows detailed metabolic analysis of whole biopsy samples for investigating tumour biology and tumour classification. Accurate biochemical assignment of small molecule metabolites that are "NMR visible" will improve our inter

  1. Thallium uptake and biological behaviour in childhood brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The histopathological grade and radiological appearance of the diverse cerebral neoplasms in childhood frequently poorly reflect their biological behaviour. We examined thallium accumulation prior to treatment (and in several cases, at intervals there after) in 13 children to determine its usefulness as a tumour marker. 23 SPECT studies were acquired 20 minutes after the injection of 1-3 mCi of 201TI. Thallium index (TI), the ratio of counts in tumour/normal brain, was calculated. No uptake was seen in two patients (pts) with a Grade 1 cerebellar astrocytomas (disease free at 4/12 f/u). Three pts with medulloblastomas were studied. One pt showed intense uptake (Tl =12). His tumour (proliferative antigen stain Ki67 = 50%) recurred early after debulking surgery (Tl +ve prior to CT or MRI changes). The second pt was imaged at relapse Ki67 = 60%) and showed intense uptake, Tl = 17. The third pt showed lower level uptake (Tl = 2), Ki67 = 5%, and is disease-free at 5/12 (as per 201TI and MRI). One pt with a Grade 1 brainstem glioma showed Tl = 5 and has progressed rapidly despite low grade histology. Four pts with chiasmatic-hypothalamic gliomas have been studied. Although these neoplasms are usually low grade histologically, their growth properties vary greatly. Two pts with Tl3.5 and have required aggressive treatment for rapid disease progression. One pt with a large pilocytic astrocytoma of the optic chiasm showed Tl = 9.5. Active treatment was not undertaken. One pt with a pineal germ cell tumour showed avid 201TI uptake (Tl not performed) and has had two normal studies, and is clinically well, since BMT. Avid 201TI uptake also seen in one pt with cerebral neuroblastoma. (Died at 8/12 after Dx.) Thus, 201TI accumulates in histologically diverse paediatric neoplasms. The Tl appears to reflect biological behaviour in the limited number of medulloblastoma and optic gliomas pts studied. Whilst promising, further patient studies and longer follow-up is

  2. Three-dimensional textural features of conventional MRI improve diagnostic classification of childhood brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetit, Ahmed E; Novak, Jan; Peet, Andrew C; Arvanitits, Theodoros N

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of three-dimensional texture analysis (3D TA) of conventional MR images for the classification of childhood brain tumours in a quantitative manner. The dataset comprised pre-contrast T1 - and T2-weighted MRI series obtained from 48 children diagnosed with brain tumours (medulloblastoma, pilocytic astrocytoma and ependymoma). 3D and 2D TA were carried out on the images using first-, second- and higher order statistical methods. Six supervised classification algorithms were trained with the most influential 3D and 2D textural features, and their performances in the classification of tumour types, using the two feature sets, were compared. Model validation was carried out using the leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) approach, as well as stratified 10-fold cross-validation, in order to provide additional reassurance. McNemar's test was used to test the statistical significance of any improvements demonstrated by 3D-trained classifiers. Supervised learning models trained with 3D textural features showed improved classification performances to those trained with conventional 2D features. For instance, a neural network classifier showed 12% improvement in area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC) and 19% in overall classification accuracy. These improvements were statistically significant for four of the tested classifiers, as per McNemar's tests. This study shows that 3D textural features extracted from conventional T1 - and T2-weighted images can improve the diagnostic classification of childhood brain tumours. Long-term benefits of accurate, yet non-invasive, diagnostic aids include a reduction in surgical procedures, improvement in surgical and therapy planning, and support of discussions with patients' families. It remains necessary, however, to extend the analysis to a multicentre cohort in order to assess the scalability of the techniques used. PMID:26256809

  3. USP11 regulates PML stability to control Notch-induced malignancy in brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Ching; Liu, Cheng-Hsin; Chung, Hsiang-Ching; Wang, Ya-Ting; Lin, Ya-Wen; Ma, Hsin-I; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Lawler, Sean E; Chen, Ruey-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein controls multiple tumour suppressive functions and is downregulated in diverse types of human cancers through incompletely characterized post-translational mechanisms. Here we identify USP11 as a PML regulator by RNAi screening. USP11 deubiquitinates and stabilizes PML, thereby counteracting the functions of PML ubiquitin ligases RNF4 and the KLHL20-Cul3 (Cullin 3)-Roc1 complex. We find that USP11 is transcriptionally repressed through a Notch/Hey1-dependent mechanism, leading to PML destabilization. In human glioma, Hey1 upregulation correlates with USP11 and PML downregulation and with high-grade malignancy. The Notch/Hey1-induced downregulation of USP11 and PML not only confers multiple malignant characteristics of aggressive glioma, including proliferation, invasiveness and tumour growth in an orthotopic mouse model, but also potentiates self-renewal, tumour-forming capacity and therapeutic resistance of patient-derived glioma-initiating cells. Our study uncovers a PML degradation mechanism through Notch/Hey1-induced repression of the PML deubiquitinase USP11 and suggests an important role for this pathway in brain tumour pathogenesis. PMID:24487962

  4. Models of tumourigenesis and their relevance for tumour pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Mader

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the complex interplay between tumour biology and tumour pharmacology is the most promising approach to implement novel and rationally designed pharmacologic concepts. The current models of tumourigenesis are an indispensable impetus to this learning process.

  5. Image-guided microbeam irradiation to brain tumour bearing mice using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Hong; Burk, Laurel M.; Inscoe, Christy R.; Hadsell, Michael J.; Chtcheprov, Pavel; Lee, Yueh Z.; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a promising experimental and preclinical radiotherapy method for cancer treatment. Synchrotron based MRT experiments have shown that spatially fractionated microbeam radiation has the unique capability of preferentially eradicating tumour cells while sparing normal tissue in brain tumour bearing animal models. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of generating orthovoltage microbeam radiation with an adjustable microbeam width using a carbon nanotube based x-ray source array. Here we report the preliminary results from our efforts in developing an image guidance procedure for the targeted delivery of the narrow microbeams to the small tumour region in the mouse brain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumour identification, and on-board x-ray radiography was used for imaging of landmarks without contrast agents. The two images were aligned using 2D rigid body image registration to determine the relative position of the tumour with respect to a landmark. The targeting accuracy and consistency were evaluated by first irradiating a group of mice inoculated with U87 human glioma brain tumours using the present protocol and then determining the locations of the microbeam radiation tracks using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence staining. The histology results showed that among 14 mice irradiated, 11 received the prescribed number of microbeams on the targeted tumour, with an average localization accuracy of 454 µm measured directly from the histology (537 µm if measured from the registered histological images). Two mice received one of the three prescribed microbeams on the tumour site. One mouse was excluded from the analysis due to tissue staining errors.

  6. Image-guided microbeam irradiation to brain tumour bearing mice using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a promising experimental and preclinical radiotherapy method for cancer treatment. Synchrotron based MRT experiments have shown that spatially fractionated microbeam radiation has the unique capability of preferentially eradicating tumour cells while sparing normal tissue in brain tumour bearing animal models. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of generating orthovoltage microbeam radiation with an adjustable microbeam width using a carbon nanotube based x-ray source array. Here we report the preliminary results from our efforts in developing an image guidance procedure for the targeted delivery of the narrow microbeams to the small tumour region in the mouse brain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumour identification, and on-board x-ray radiography was used for imaging of landmarks without contrast agents. The two images were aligned using 2D rigid body image registration to determine the relative position of the tumour with respect to a landmark. The targeting accuracy and consistency were evaluated by first irradiating a group of mice inoculated with U87 human glioma brain tumours using the present protocol and then determining the locations of the microbeam radiation tracks using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence staining. The histology results showed that among 14 mice irradiated, 11 received the prescribed number of microbeams on the targeted tumour, with an average localization accuracy of 454 µm measured directly from the histology (537 µm if measured from the registered histological images). Two mice received one of the three prescribed microbeams on the tumour site. One mouse was excluded from the analysis due to tissue staining errors. (paper)

  7. Guiding intracortical brain tumour cells to an extracortical cytotoxic hydrogel using aligned polymeric nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anjana; Betancur, Martha; Patel, Gaurangkumar D.; Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Mukhatyar, Vivek J.; Vakharia, Ajit; Pai, S. Balakrishna; Brahma, Barunashish; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2014-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive, invasive brain tumour with a poor survival rate. Available treatments are ineffective and some tumours remain inoperable because of their size or location. The tumours are known to invade and migrate along white matter tracts and blood vessels. Here, we exploit this characteristic of glioblastoma multiforme by engineering aligned polycaprolactone (PCL)-based nanofibres for tumour cells to invade and, hence, guide cells away from the primary tumour site to an extracortical location. This extracortial sink is a cyclopamine drug-conjugated, collagen-based hydrogel. When aligned PCL-nanofibre films in a PCL/polyurethane carrier conduit were inserted in the vicinity of an intracortical human U87MG glioblastoma xenograft, a significant number of human glioblastoma cells migrated along the aligned nanofibre films and underwent apoptosis in the extracortical hydrogel. Tumour volume in the brain was significantly lower following insertion of aligned nanofibre implants compared with the application of smooth fibres or no implants.

  8. Mobile phone use, exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field, and brain tumour: a case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Takebayashi, T; Varsier, N.; Kikuchi, Y; Wake, K; Taki, M; Watanabe, S; Akiba, S; Yamaguchi, N

    2008-01-01

    In a case–control study in Japan of brain tumours in relation to mobile phone use, we used a novel approach for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR) inside the tumour, taking account of spatial relationships between tumour localisation and intracranial radiofrequency distribution. Personal interviews were carried out with 88 patients with glioma, 132 with meningioma, and 102 with pituitary adenoma (322 cases in total), and with 683 individually matched controls. All maximal SAR value...

  9. Imaging and pathological features of primary malignant rhabdoid tumours of the brain and spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article two cases of primary malignant extrarenal rhabdoid tumour are described. In the affected children the brain and the spinal cord were the primary sites of origin of the tumour. The imaging findings are presented and the pathology discussed. Although the imaging features are non-specific, rhabdoid tumour should be included in the differential diagnosis of childhood intracranial and spinal neoplasms. (orig.). With 5 figs

  10. Imaging of tuberculosis. Pt. 3. Tuberculosis as a mimicker of brain tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To show that intracranial tuberculosis (TB) often masquerades as brain tumour. Material and Methods: Forty-six patients with intracranial TB, who after CT at the local hospital were referred for surgery or radiotherapy of brain tumour, are presented. Sometimes the correct diagnosis was first established during surgery for tumour. Results: The differentiation between TB and gliomas, meningiomas, metastases, or lymphomas may be impossible from the clinical history and CT findings. Angiography, done in 25 of our cases, often helped by not showing the expected tumour vasculature. MR, performed in 9 patients, helped by demonstrating a layered capsule on T2-weighted images in 4 of the lesions (hypointense rim outside hyperintense rim); the centres of the lesions were of decreased, usually very mixed T2 signal intensity. Conclusion: Even in patients with findings typical of brain tumour, TB remains an important differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  11. Radiotherapy of primary brain tumours in the region of the third ventricle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, M A; Struikmans, H

    1990-01-01

    Patients (n = 18) with a primary brain tumour near the third ventricle and treated by radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. Four different subgroups of patients, according to the histology (germ cell tumours, astrocytomas, other histologies, no histology) were separately discussed. Third ventr

  12. Accuracy of computerised tomography in diagnosis of brain tumours in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT scan has replaced most of the invasive techniques in diagnosis of brain tumours because it can accurately demonstrate, localize and characterize the brain tumours. The objective of this study was to observe the accuracy of CT scan in the diagnosis of brain tumours in children by comparing it with histopathology. This descriptive case series was conducted at Department of Radiology, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from March 10, 2005 to March 9, 2007 both pre and post contrast CT scan was carried out on 120 patients referred to Radiology Department for CT scan suspected of having brain tumours. Data of CT findings/diagnosis of patients having brain tumours were collected on a proforma. Histopathology of specimen from operation or biopsy was carried out and compared with the CT scan diagnosis. Glial tumours comprised the largest category 68 (56.67%). Medulloblastoma was 23 (19.16%) Craniopharyngioma 8 (6.63%) and Ependymoma were 6 (5.0%) each. Hemangioblastoma 2 (1.67%), Choroid plexus one (0.83%) adenoma and pineal tumours were 9 (3.33%) each. As regards comparison between CT and histopathology, an agreement between the two was found in 104 (86.67%) cases whereas in 16 (13.33%) of the cases, the histopathology reports were different. In case of Astrocytomas 63 (92.64%) were confirmed on histopathology and 5 (7.36%) was reported differently. In Medulloblastomas 19 (82.60%) were accurately diagnosed on CT scan. Sensitivity of CT scan in diagnosis of brain tumours in children was 93.33%. CT Scan is more accurate predictor of brain tumour yet it is not always 100% accurate. (author)

  13. Comparison of contrast in brightness mode and strain ultrasonography of glial brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image contrast between normal tissue and brain tumours may sometimes appear to be low in intraoperative ultrasound. Ultrasound imaging of strain is an image modality that has been recently explored for intraoperative imaging of the brain. This study aims to investigate differences in image contrast between ultrasound brightness mode (B-mode) images and ultrasound strain magnitude images of brain tumours. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data was acquired during surgery in 15 patients with glial tumours. The data were subsequently processed to provide strain magnitude images. The contrast in the B-mode images and the strain images was determined in assumed normal brain tissue and tumour tissue at selected regions of interest (ROI). Three measurements of contrast were done in the ultrasound data for each patient. The B-mode and strain contrasts measurements were compared using the paired samples t- test. The statistical analysis of a total of 45 measurements shows that the contrasts in the strain magnitude images are significantly higher than in the conventional ultrasound B-mode images (P < 0.0001). The results indicate that ultrasound strain imaging provides better discrimination between normal brain tissue and glial tumour tissue than conventional ultrasound B-mode imaging. Ultrasound imaging of tissue strain therefore holds the potential of becoming a valuable adjunct to conventional intraoperative ultrasound imaging in brain tumour surgery

  14. Brain perfusion CT compared with 15O-H2O PET in patients with primary brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfusion CT (PCT) measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) have been proposed as a fast and easy method for identifying angiogenically active tumours. In this study, quantitative PCT rCBF measurements in patients with brain tumours were compared to the gold standard PET rCBF with 15O-labelled water (15O-H2O). On the same day within a few hours, rCBF was measured in ten adult patients with treatment-naive primary brain tumours, twice using 15O-H2O PET and once with PCT performed over the central part of the tumour. Matching rCBF values in tumour and contralateral healthy regions of interest were compared. PCT overestimated intratumoural blood flow in all patients with volume-weighted mean rCBF values of 28.2 ± 18.8 ml min-1 100 ml-1 for PET and 78.9 ± 41.8 ml min-1 100 ml-1 for PCT. There was a significant method by tumour grade interaction with a significant tumour grade rCBF difference for PCT of 32.9 ± 15.8 ml min-1 100 ml-1 for low-grade (WHO I + II) and 81.5 ± 15.4 ml min-1 100 ml-1 for high-grade (WHO III + IV) tumours, but not for PET. The rCBF PCT and PET correlation was only significant within tumours in two patients. Although intratumoural blood flow measured by PCT may add valuable information on tumour grade, the method cannot substitute quantitative measurements of blood flow by PET and 15O-H2O PET in brain tumours. (orig.)

  15. Primary malignant rhabdoid tumour of the brain in an adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a mass in the left cerebral hemisphere of a 20-year-old man. Histological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical features of the tumour were consistent with primary malignant rhabdoid tumour. The age of presentation, imaging features prior to histological examination, and prognosis in this case were unusual. (orig.)

  16. The biological behaviour of technetium complexes with particular reference to brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionic radionuclide complexes and in particular technetium compounds have long been the reagents of choice for the detection of brain tumours. Despite their lack of tumour specificity detection rates in the region of 80% can be routinely achieved. The most widely-used reagent to date has been sodium pertechnetate but recently a number of other technetium complexes such as DTPA, citrate and glucoheptonate with a more rapid blood clearance and better tumour to blood ratios than pertechnetate have been proposed as alternatives. All of these reagents are anionic complexes of reduced technetium which do not bind to any extent to plasma proteins or to enzymes. They do, however, satisfy the requirements of the ionic model proposed by Van der Pompe which has been outlined in the previous chapter. In the study reported here a number of technetium complexes, citrate, glucoheptonate and n-acetyl cysteine have been compared with pertechnetate with regard to their uptake in a transplantable rhabdomyosarcoma in the rat. The results obtained have then been used to provide a possible explanation for observed differences in clinical performance between these reagents. (Auth.)

  17. Quantitative MR imaging and spectroscopy of brain tumours: a step forward?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective quantitative MR study of brain tumours was performed to show the potential of combining different MR techniques to distinguish various disease processes in routine clinical practice. Twenty-three patients with various intracranial tumours before treatment (diagnosis confirmed by a biopsy) and 59 healthy subjects were examined on a 3-T system by conventional MR imaging, 1H spectroscopic imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and T2 relaxometry. Metabolic concentrations and their ratios, T2 relaxation times and mean diffusivities were calculated and correlated on a pixel-by-pixel basis and compared to control data. Different tumour types and different localisations revealed specific patterns of correlations between metabolic concentrations and mean diffusivity or T2 relaxation times. The patterns distinguish given tissue states in the examined area: healthy tissue, tissue infiltrated by tumour, active tumour, oedema infiltrated by tumour, oedema, etc. This method is able to describe the complexity of a highly heterogeneous tissue in the tumour and its vicinity, and determines crucial parameters for tissue differentiation. A combination of different MR parameters on a pixel-by-pixel basis in individual patients enables better identification of the tumour type, direction of proliferation and assessment of the tumour extension. (orig.)

  18. To SPECT diagnose of the brain tumour with Tc-MIBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of the new diagnosing methods developed, the diagnosis of brain tumours - primary and metastasis - still represents a challenge and diagnosing problem. Therefore, we tried in our study to determine the value of Tc-MIBI as a new specific radiopharmaceutical in the tumour diagnosing. The examination was carried out by injecting in bolus 370 MBq of Tc-99m-MIBI under the gamma camera to be followed by a dynamic study on a computer - 60 images in 60 seconds - and the calculation of relative perfusion in the artery phase 3T out of the generated curve. After one hour we performed the SPECT study (60 images within 360 degrees) and made a reconstruction study of all standard sections and generated a 3D picture. The examination has been performed in 9 pts with brain tumour and 10 pts with no signs of brain tumour which were directed to the scintigraphy of myocardium with MIBI. In patients with a tumour 3T was 1.15 and 2.35., i.e. raised. SPECT 3D scintigram evidenced in all patients exactly localized sharp limits of the increased accumulation. In patients without signs of brain tumour 3T was between 0.92 and 1.05 i.e. normal, SPECT 3D scintigram detected no increased accumulation in the brain region. Conclusion: The preliminary study speaks in favour of the fact that a high possibility may be expected to diagnose brain tumours with the SPECT 3D study with Tc-MIBI. (author)

  19. 3D Multiscale Modelling of Angiogenesis and Vascular Tumour Growth

    KAUST Repository

    Perfahl, H.

    2012-11-01

    We present a three-dimensional, multiscale model of vascular tumour growth, which couples nutrient/growth factor transport, blood flow, angiogenesis, vascular remodelling, movement of and interactions between normal and tumour cells, and nutrient-dependent cell cycle dynamics within each cell. We present computational simulations which show how a vascular network may evolve and interact with tumour and healthy cells. We also demonstrate how our model may be combined with experimental data, to predict the spatio-temporal evolution of a vascular tumour.

  20. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the diagnosis of paediatric low grade brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Low grade gliomas are the commonest brain tumours in children but present in a myriad of ways, each with its own treatment challenges. Conventional MRI scans play an important role in their management but have limited ability to identify likely clinical behaviour. The aim of this study is to investigate 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) as a method for detecting differences between the various low grade gliomas and related tumours in children. Patients and methods: Short echo time single voxel 1H MRS at 1.5 or 3.0 T was performed prior to treatment on children with low grade brain tumours at two centres and five MR scanners, 69 cases had data which passed quality control. MRS data was processed using LCModel to give mean spectra and metabolite concentrations which were compared using T-tests, ANOVA, Receiver Operator Characteristic curves and logistic regression in SPSS. Results: Significant differences were found in concentrations of key metabolites between glioneuronal and glial tumours (T-test p < 0.05) and between most of the individual histological subtypes of low grade gliomas. The discriminatory metabolites identified, such as choline and myoinositol, are known tumour biomarkers. In the set of pilocytic astrocytomas and unbiopsied optic pathway gliomas, significant differences (p < 0.05, ANOVA) were found in metabolite profiles of tumours depending on location and patient neurofibromatosis type 1 status. Logistic regression analyses yielded equations which could be used to assess the probability of a tumour being of a specific type. Conclusions: MRS can detect subtle differences between low grade brain tumours in children and should form part of the clinical assessment of these tumours

  1. {sup 1}H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the diagnosis of paediatric low grade brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orphanidou-Vlachou, E., E-mail: eleni.orphanidou@googlemail.com [School of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Whittall Street, Birmingham, B4 6NH (United Kingdom); Auer, D., E-mail: dorothee.auer@nottingham.ac.uk [Division of Academic Radiology, School of Medical and Surgical Sciences, The University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Children' s Brain Tumour Research Centre, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Brundler, M.A., E-mail: marie-anne.brundler@bch.nhs.uk [Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Whittall Street, Birmingham, B4 6NH (United Kingdom); Davies, N.P., E-mail: nigel.davies@nhs.net [School of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Whittall Street, Birmingham, B4 6NH (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2WB (United Kingdom); Jaspan, T., E-mail: tim.jaspan@nuh.nhs.uk [Children' s Brain Tumour Research Centre, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); MacPherson, L., E-mail: Lesley.MacPherson@bch.nhs.uk [Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Whittall Street, Birmingham, B4 6NH (United Kingdom); Natarajan, K., E-mail: Kal.Natarajan@uhb.nhs.uk [Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Whittall Street, Birmingham, B4 6NH (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2WB (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-06-15

    Introduction: Low grade gliomas are the commonest brain tumours in children but present in a myriad of ways, each with its own treatment challenges. Conventional MRI scans play an important role in their management but have limited ability to identify likely clinical behaviour. The aim of this study is to investigate {sup 1}H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) as a method for detecting differences between the various low grade gliomas and related tumours in children. Patients and methods: Short echo time single voxel {sup 1}H MRS at 1.5 or 3.0 T was performed prior to treatment on children with low grade brain tumours at two centres and five MR scanners, 69 cases had data which passed quality control. MRS data was processed using LCModel to give mean spectra and metabolite concentrations which were compared using T-tests, ANOVA, Receiver Operator Characteristic curves and logistic regression in SPSS. Results: Significant differences were found in concentrations of key metabolites between glioneuronal and glial tumours (T-test p < 0.05) and between most of the individual histological subtypes of low grade gliomas. The discriminatory metabolites identified, such as choline and myoinositol, are known tumour biomarkers. In the set of pilocytic astrocytomas and unbiopsied optic pathway gliomas, significant differences (p < 0.05, ANOVA) were found in metabolite profiles of tumours depending on location and patient neurofibromatosis type 1 status. Logistic regression analyses yielded equations which could be used to assess the probability of a tumour being of a specific type. Conclusions: MRS can detect subtle differences between low grade brain tumours in children and should form part of the clinical assessment of these tumours.

  2. Early medical rehabilitation after neurosurgical treatment of malignant brain tumours in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Kos Natasa; Kos Boris; Benedicic Mitja

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients with malignant brain tumours is on the rise, but due to the novel treatment methods the survival rates are higher. Despite increased survival the consequences of tumour properties and treatment can have a significant negative effect on the patients’ quality of life. Providing timely and appropriate rehabilitation interventions is an important aspect of patient treatment and should be started immediately after surgery. The most important goal of rehabilitation is to prev...

  3. Motor deficits correlate with resting state motor network connectivity in patients with brain tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Otten, Marc L.; Mikell, Charles B; Youngerman, Brett E.; Liston, Conor; Sisti, Michael B.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Small, Scott A.; McKhann, Guy M.

    2012-01-01

    While a tumour in or abutting primary motor cortex leads to motor weakness, how tumours elsewhere in the frontal or parietal lobes affect functional connectivity in a weak patient is less clear. We hypothesized that diminished functional connectivity in a distributed network of motor centres would correlate with motor weakness in subjects with brain masses. Furthermore, we hypothesized that interhemispheric connections would be most vulnerable to subtle disruptions in functional connectivity....

  4. Uptake of amino acids in brain tumours using positron emission tomography as an indicator for assessing metabolic activity and malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis and post-therapeutic follow-up of tumour patients necessitates morphological and particularly functional imaging methods. For the latter approach positron emission tomography has proven a valid tool for the measurement of perfusion, of energy consumption parameters such as oxygen extraction, glucose metabolism and amino acid uptake. However, neither perfusion nor energy consumption parameters have yielded unambiguous information on the clinical status of various tumours in respect of their malignancy and their growth status. It is shown in this paper that amino acid uptake seems to be a valid measure for the functional activity of tumour tissue for a broad range of neoplasms. The uptake of 11C-L-Methionine was measured in 33 patients having various brain tumours, and was compared with 6 patients who had an infarction, and with 8 patients suffering from arachnoidal cysts. The amino acid uptake correlated well with the histological grading of the tumours and the clinical status of the patient. The uptake was well differentiated against metabolically inactive lesions. Parallel investigations on the uptake mechanisms of amino acids in an animal model have shown that transport phenomena regulate the uptake rather than protein synthesis rates. However, protein synthesis may nevertheless exercise a control function on the transport process. (orig.)

  5. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E;

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  6. 1-123-lodo-{alpha}-methyl tyrosine SPECT in non-parenchymal brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheja, P.; Weckesser, M.; Franzius, Ch.; Riemann, B.; Schober, O. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany); Rickert, Ch. [Inst. of Neuropathology, Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany); Palkovic, St. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Purpose: Scintigraphy using 1-123-iodo-{alpha}-methyl tyrosine (IMT) is useful in the preoperative characterization of gliomas, in detecting recurrent glioma and in the biological re-evaluation of residual or recurrent tumours. A systematic evaluation of non-parenchymal brain tumours has not yet been performed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate IMT SPECT in the management of intracerebral metastases and lymphomas. Patients and methods: IMT uptake was analyzed in 31 patients with 28 metastases of extracerebral solid tumours and 7 cerebral lymphomas. Histology revealed high grade lymphomas, melanomas, and carcinomas of the following origin: lung, unknown primary, breast, colon, renal cell, ovary, vagina, frontal sinus. IMT uptake was quantified as ratio between maximal tumour accumulation and average uptake in the contralateral hemisphere. Results: All tumours except two renal cell and one small cell lung carcinoma metastases accumulated IMT (91%). The highest IMT uptake was found in metastasis of lung carcinoma. IMT uptake was highly variable and was similar in primary and in recurrent tumours. Conclusion: Significant accumulation of IMT is seen in the majority of tumours, so that this technique might be helpful for the management of cerebral metastases and lymphomas. (orig.)

  7. 1-123-lodo-α-methyl tyrosine SPECT in non-parenchymal brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Scintigraphy using 1-123-iodo-α-methyl tyrosine (IMT) is useful in the preoperative characterization of gliomas, in detecting recurrent glioma and in the biological re-evaluation of residual or recurrent tumours. A systematic evaluation of non-parenchymal brain tumours has not yet been performed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate IMT SPECT in the management of intracerebral metastases and lymphomas. Patients and methods: IMT uptake was analyzed in 31 patients with 28 metastases of extracerebral solid tumours and 7 cerebral lymphomas. Histology revealed high grade lymphomas, melanomas, and carcinomas of the following origin: lung, unknown primary, breast, colon, renal cell, ovary, vagina, frontal sinus. IMT uptake was quantified as ratio between maximal tumour accumulation and average uptake in the contralateral hemisphere. Results: All tumours except two renal cell and one small cell lung carcinoma metastases accumulated IMT (91%). The highest IMT uptake was found in metastasis of lung carcinoma. IMT uptake was highly variable and was similar in primary and in recurrent tumours. Conclusion: Significant accumulation of IMT is seen in the majority of tumours, so that this technique might be helpful for the management of cerebral metastases and lymphomas. (orig.)

  8. Fractionated afterloading therapy in inoperable malignant tumours of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of the method of afterloading the range of uses for fractionated interstitial brady-therapy could be broadened to include malignant cerebral tumours. The mean survival time of 33 female patients was calculated to be 8.3 months for the entire group and 11.3 months for cases not otherwise pretreated. Even though the age, tumour volume, target dose and Karnofsky index obviously tended to influence the survival time, such relationships could not be confirmed statistically. Using the method by Kaplan-Meier it was determined that 65% of the total study group were likely to survive beyond six months and 32% to survive for one year. A separate analysis of patients receiving no previous treatment showed these chances to be 75% and 44%, respectively. The advantages of this therapy are discussed on a comparative basis. (VHE)

  9. Preclinical studies for increasing radiation response of malignant brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant gliomas are the most common among the CNS cancers. Standard treatment for these tumours - comprises of surgery, followed by Radiotherapy (RT). Combination of Temozolomide (TMZ) increases survival, but hematological toxicities are also increased as compared to RT alone. The median survival depends on grade and location of tumour, as well as the age of the patient. Grade IV gliomas (GSMs) are third leading cause of cancer induced death in the age group of 15 to 34 years. Therefore, it is important to carry out further preclinical studies to develop more effective treatment of malignant gliomas. The present studies were carried out on different established malignant glioma cell lines. (U373MG) as well as primary monolayer cultures derived from biopsies obtained from patients with malignant gliomas. Exponentially growing cells were exposed to TMZ, Lonidamine (LND) (in 0.1% DMSO), or 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (2-DG, aqueous solution) - with or without 60Co-Gamma-rays (1- 2 Gy). The drugs were removed 4 hours after irradiation and the cultures were processed further for different assays of damage. Short term (4 h) treatments with TMZ 20 μM, LND 100 μM or their combination; did not induce micronuclei formation in the unirradiated cultures of U373MG cells. However, radiation (2 Gy) induced micronuclei was significantly increased by drug treatments. In primary cultures from different tumours, TMZ (≤ 10 μM) or 2-DG (1 mM), or gamma-irradiation (1-2 Gy) induced micronuclei and/ or apoptosis. The effects, however, varied in different tumours. These data show that clinically achievable, very low concentrations of these drugs could induce cellular damage and death; and increase radiosensitivity of malignant gliomas. Therefore, adjuvants like Lonidamine and 2-DG, with non-overlapping toxicities, could optimize treatment of malignant gliomas, by reducing the side effects of radio-chemotherapy. (author)

  10. Imaging features of primary malignant rhabdoid tumour of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary malignant rhabdoid tumour of the central nervous system is a rare neoplasm affecting children. We present a pathologically proven case, which was initially referred to the paediatric surgeons as a sebaceous cyst, and highlights the importance of imaging prior to surgery of potentially innocuous scalp lesions. Imaging features on CT and MRI are presented, which show bony involvement not previously reported in the literature. (orig.)

  11. A multinational case-control study on childhood brain tumours, anthropogenic factors, birth characteristics and prenatal exposures: A validation of interview data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienneau, Danielle; Infanger, Denis; Feychting, Maria; Schüz, Joachim; Schmidt, Lisbeth Samsø; Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Tettamanti, Giorgio; Klæboe, Lars; Kuehni, Claudia E; Tynes, Tore; Von der Weid, Nicolas; Lannering, Birgitta; Röösli, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about the aetiology of childhood brain tumours. We investigated anthropometric factors (birth weight, length, maternal age), birth characteristics (e.g. vacuum extraction, preterm delivery, birth order) and exposures during pregnancy (e.g. maternal: smoking, working, dietary supplement intake) in relation to risk of brain tumour diagnosis among 7-19 year olds. The multinational case-control study in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Switzerland (CEFALO) included interviews with 352 (participation rate=83.2%) eligible cases and 646 (71.1%) population-based controls. Interview data were complemented with data from birth registries and validated by assessing agreement (Cohen's Kappa). We used conditional logistic regression models matched on age, sex and geographical region (adjusted for maternal age and parental education) to explore associations between birth factors and childhood brain tumour risk. Agreement between interview and birth registry data ranged from moderate (Kappa=0.54; worked during pregnancy) to almost perfect (Kappa=0.98; birth weight). Neither anthropogenic factors nor birth characteristics were associated with childhood brain tumour risk. Maternal vitamin intake during pregnancy was indicative of a protective effect (OR 0.75, 95%-CI: 0.56-1.01). No association was seen for maternal smoking during pregnancy or working during pregnancy. We found little evidence that the considered birth factors were related to brain tumour risk among children and adolescents. PMID:26625087

  12. Human cytomegalovirus tegument protein pp65 is detected in all intra- and extra-axial brain tumours independent of the tumour type or grade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Libard

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV has been indicated being a significant oncomodulator. Recent reports have suggested that an antiviral treatment alters the outcome of a glioblastoma. We analysed the performance of commercial HCMV-antibodies applying the immunohistochemical (IHC methods on brain sample obtained from a subject with a verified HCMV infection, on samples obtained from 14 control subjects, and on a tissue microarray block containing cores of various brain tumours. Based on these trials, we selected the best performing antibody and analysed a cohort of 417 extra- and intra-axial brain tumours such as gliomas, medulloblastomas, primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and meningiomas. HCMV protein pp65 immunoreactivity was observed in all types of tumours analysed, and the IHC expression did not depend on the patient's age, gender, tumour type, or grade. The labelling pattern observed in the tumours differed from the labelling pattern observed in the tissue with an active HCMV infection. The HCMV protein was expressed in up to 90% of all the tumours investigated. Our results are in accordance with previous reports regarding the HCMV protein expression in glioblastomas and medulloblastomas. In addition, the HCMV protein expression was seen in primary brain lymphomas, low-grade gliomas, and in meningiomas. Our results indicate that the HCMV protein pp65 expression is common in intra- and extra-axial brain tumours. Thus, the assessment of the HCMV expression in tumours of various origins and pathologically altered tissue in conditions such as inflammation, infection, and even degeneration should certainly be facilitated.

  13. Multiphase modelling of vascular tumour growth in two spatial dimensions

    KAUST Repository

    Hubbard, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a continuum mathematical model of vascular tumour growth which is based on a multiphase framework in which the tissue is decomposed into four distinct phases and the principles of conservation of mass and momentum are applied to the normal/healthy cells, tumour cells, blood vessels and extracellular material. The inclusion of a diffusible nutrient, supplied by the blood vessels, allows the vasculature to have a nonlocal influence on the other phases. Two-dimensional computational simulations are carried out on unstructured, triangular meshes to allow a natural treatment of irregular geometries, and the tumour boundary is captured as a diffuse interface on this mesh, thereby obviating the need to explicitly track the (potentially highly irregular and ill-defined) tumour boundary. A hybrid finite volume/finite element algorithm is used to discretise the continuum model: the application of a conservative, upwind, finite volume scheme to the hyperbolic mass balance equations and a finite element scheme with a stable element pair to the generalised Stokes equations derived from momentum balance, leads to a robust algorithm which does not use any form of artificial stabilisation. The use of a matrix-free Newton iteration with a finite element scheme for the nutrient reaction-diffusion equations allows full nonlinearity in the source terms of the mathematical model.Numerical simulations reveal that this four-phase model reproduces the characteristic pattern of tumour growth in which a necrotic core forms behind an expanding rim of well-vascularised proliferating tumour cells. The simulations consistently predict linear tumour growth rates. The dependence of both the speed with which the tumour grows and the irregularity of the invading tumour front on the model parameters is investigated. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. MR-based cerebral blood volume maps as a diagnostic tool for brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today contrast enhanced MR imaging is a reliable method for detecting mostly distinguishing between different histological types of tumours. In this study we use a MR-based method to measure the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV). Using this technique we try to judge the grading and vitality of the tumours. 26 patients with various types of brain tumours were examined. To calculate rCBV-maps of one slice, low-dosed Gd-DTPA was injected as a bolus. Using the relaxation effect the obtained signal intensity-time curves were converted pixel-wise into rCBV images. For the tumours rCBV-ratios were calculated relative to the corresponding area in the contralateral hemisphere. In the investigated group all tumours were detected on the basis of a raised rCBV-ratio. Since only vital parts of the tumour are perfused, the rCBV maps may be used to determine the place of biopsy. (orig./MG)

  15. MR imaging-guided cryoablation of metastatic brain tumours: initial experience in six patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chengli; Wu, Lebin; Song, Jiqing; Liu, Ming; Lv, Yubo [Shandong University, Shandong Provincial Medical Imaging Research Institute, Jinan, Shandong (China); Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco [Shandong University, Shandong Provincial Medical Imaging Research Institute, Jinan, Shandong (China); Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oulu (Finland)

    2010-02-15

    The objective was to evaluate the initial experience and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided transcranial cryoablation in cystic metastatic brain tumours. Seven cystic metastatic brain tumours in six patients were treated with cryoablation. The approval from the local ethics committee and individual patient consent were acquired before the study. Before the procedure the tumours were detected with conventional CT or MRI. The procedure was performed under local anaesthesia and conscious sedation. A 0.23-T open MRI system with optical tracking was used for procedural planning, instrument guidance and procedural monitoring of the ice ball formation. An MR-compatible, argon-based cryoablation system was used. The schedule of follow-up imaging ranged from 12 days to 12 months. Seven treatment sessions were performed. All the cryoprobes were successfully inserted into the target with one pass. All the patients tolerated the procedure well without experiencing any neurological deficits during the treatment phase or during the immediate post-treatment period. One patient died 12 days after cryoablation. MR-guided and monitored metastasis brain tumour cryoablation is technically feasible and may represent an alternative treatment in selected patients. (orig.)

  16. Intra-operative 3-T MRI for paediatric brain tumours: challenges and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernethy, L.J.; Avula, S.; Hughes, G.M. [Alder Hey Children' s NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Wright, E.J. [Alder Hey Children' s Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mallucci, C.L. [Alder Hey Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    MRI is the ideal modality for imaging intracranial tumours. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) makes it possible to obtain scans during a neurosurgical operation that can aid complete macroscopic tumour resection - a major prognostic factor in the majority of brain tumours in children. Intra-operative MRI can also help limit damage to normal brain tissue. It therefore has the potential to improve the survival of children with brain tumours and to minimise morbidity, including neurological deficits. The use of ioMRI is also likely to reduce the need for second look surgery, and may reduce the need for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. High-field MRI systems provide better anatomical information and also enable effective utilisation of advanced MRI techniques such as perfusion imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. However, high-field ioMRI facilities require substantial capital investment, and careful planning is required for optimal benefit. Safe ioMRI requires meticulous attention to detail and rigorous application of magnetic field safety precautions. Interpretation of ioMRI can be challenging and requires experience and understanding of artefacts that are common in the intra-operative setting. (orig.)

  17. Spurious leptomeningeal enhancement on immediate post-operative MRI for paediatric brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widjaja, Elysa; Connolly, Daniel J.A. [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Gatscher, Sylvia; McMullen, John [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Griffiths, Paul D. [University of Sheffield, Academic section of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    Immediate post-operative MRI has been recommended as an accurate and robust method to assess residual brain tumour. Early enhancement at the resection margin and in the dura is well recognized, but we describe two cases of enhancement in the basal cisterns on immediate post-operative MRI that resolved on follow-up. The underlying cause of the enhancement remains to be elucidated, but it should be recognized that leptomeningeal enhancement may occur after surgery and that this does not necessarily imply tumour spread. (orig.)

  18. Spurious leptomeningeal enhancement on immediate post-operative MRI for paediatric brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immediate post-operative MRI has been recommended as an accurate and robust method to assess residual brain tumour. Early enhancement at the resection margin and in the dura is well recognized, but we describe two cases of enhancement in the basal cisterns on immediate post-operative MRI that resolved on follow-up. The underlying cause of the enhancement remains to be elucidated, but it should be recognized that leptomeningeal enhancement may occur after surgery and that this does not necessarily imply tumour spread. (orig.)

  19. Neuro-ophthalmic and clinical characteristics of brain tumours in a tertiary hospital in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anecdotally, increasing number of patients are seen at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH) with brain tumour. Neuro-ophthalmic symptoms and signs may help in timely diagnosis and intervention. The objective of this study is to evaluate the neuro-ophthalmic and clinical characteristics of brain tumour in patients presenting at a tertiary hospital in Ghana. The study design involved a prospective case series involving 36 consecutive patients newly diagnosed with brain tumour from November 2010 to October 2011, at the Ophthalmology, Neurosurgery and Endocrine units of KBTH, Ghana. All patients had clinical diagnosis of brain tumour with confirmation by computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirteen patients had histological confirmation of diagnosis. The outcome measures of the study include presenting visual acuity, colour vision, visual fields and cranial nerve deficits. Data of 36 patients were analysed. The results of the study showed that ages ranged from 3 to 69 years, mean (SD) 42.56(±16.6 years). Twenty-six (72%) were females. Tumours included pituitary adenoma (20, 55.5%), meningioma (10, 27.8%), choroid plexus tumour (1, 2.8%), medulloblastom (1, 2.8%), craniopharyngioma (1, 2.8%), haemangioblastoma (1, 2.8%), thalamic tumour (1, 2.8%) and haemangioma (1, 2.8%). Histologically confirmed tumours included pituitary adenoma (9, 69.2%), meningioma (3, 23.1%), craniopharyngioma (1, 7.7%). One patient had both a pituitary adenoma and meningioma. Blurred vision (30, 83.3%), headache (28, 77.8%) and photophobia (13, 36.1%) were predominant symptoms. Commonest neuro-ophthalmic signs were impaired colour vision (62 eyes, 88.6%), optic atrophy (26, 74.3%), unilateral or bitemporal hemianopia (15, 41.5%) and relative afferent pupillary defect (12, 34.3%). Seven (19.4%) patients were visually impaired and nine (25%) blind. Thirty-three of 72(45.8%) eyes had monocular blindness. Common neuro-ophthalmic characteristics were blurred vision

  20. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours: a practical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callot, Virginie [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: virginie.callot@univmed.fr; Galanaud, Damien [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France); Departement de Neuroradiologie, Hopital La Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Le Fur, Yann; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Cozzone, Patrick J. [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France)

    2008-08-15

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is proposed in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to help in the characterization of brain tumours by detecting metabolic alterations that may be indicative of the tumour class. MRS can be routinely performed on clinical magnets, within a reasonable acquisition time and if performed under adequate conditions, MRS is reproducible and thus can be used for longitudinal follow-up of treatment. MRS can also be performed in clinical practice to guide the neurosurgeon into the most aggressive part of the lesions or to avoid unnecessary surgery, which may furthermore decrease the risk of surgical morbidity.

  1. First experience of brain tumour scintigraphy with 99mTc-MIBI before and after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Morphological imaging techniques like computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are routinely used to localize tumours. However, their use for prediction of histopathological diagnosis and tumour changes after treatment is difficult. Functional imaging using positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were introduced as non-invasive methods for the differentiation and evaluation of brain tumours, especially for their follow-up. The purpose of present study was to investigate the uptake of 99mTc-MIBI in case of malignant brain tumours before and after surgery. 25 patients (13 males and 12 females; age range 21-75 years; average age 48.76±17.25 years) with brain tumours were investigated. The histological diagnoses of the tumours were confirmed from surgical specimens. None of the patients had received any treatment before enrolment for the study. 99mTc-MIBI brain SPECT was performed 3.88±2.85 days before surgery and 9.88±2.24 days after surgery in all cases. SPECT scans were acquired in 64 projections over 360 deg. using a dual-head gamma camera (Siemens E.Cam) coupled with low energy collimator, 15 minutes after intravenous injection of 550 MBq 99mTc-MIBI. Data were recorded in a 64x64 matrix at a zoom factor of 1.78. SPECT images were reconstructed and analysed in the transversal, axial and coronal planes. The study results are presented in the table. Of the 25 tumors, only 19, majority glioblastoma (11) showed avid uptake in the pre- surgery scan. Tumors, II0 astrocytoma (1), oligoasrtrocytoma (1), III0 astrocytoma (3) were missed in the pre surgery scan. Comparison of pre- and postoperative images showed the reduction of 99mTc-MIBI uptake post-operatively except in one case of gliosarcoma where the uptake increased after surgery. In one case of III deg. astrocytoma the 99mTc-MIBI uptakes was observed only after the surgery. All post-operative images showed more intensive uptake in the scalp (zone of

  2. Multiphase modelling of vascular tumour growth in two spatial dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard, M. E.; Byrne, H. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a continuum mathematical model of vascular tumour growth which is based on a multiphase framework in which the tissue is decomposed into four distinct phases and the principles of conservation of mass and momentum are applied to the normal/healthy cells, tumour cells, blood vessels and extracellular material. The inclusion of a diffusible nutrient, supplied by the blood vessels, allows the vasculature to have a nonlocal influence on the other phases. Two-dimensional c...

  3. Using R2* values to evaluate brain tumours on magnetic resonance imaging: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhenghua; Liao, Haibo; Yin, Jianhua [the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, The Department of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Medical Image Center, Nanchang (China); Li, Yanfang [Heze Medical College, The Department of Preventive Medicine, Shandong (China)

    2014-03-15

    To determine the usefulness of the R2* value in assessing the histopathological grade of glioma at magnetic resonance imaging and differentiating various brain tumours. Sixty-four patients with brain tumours underwent R2* mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging examinations. ANOVA was performed to analyse R2* values among four groups of glioma and among high-grade gliomas (grades III and IV), low-grade gliomas (grades I and II), meningiomas, and brain metastasis. Spearman's correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationships between the R2* values or apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and the histopathological grade of gliomas. R2* values of low- and high-grade gliomas were analysed with the receiver-operator characteristic curve. R2* values were significantly different among high-grade gliomas, low-grade gliomas, meningiomas, and brain metastasis, but not between grade I and grade II or between grade III and grade IV. The R2* value (18.73) of high-grade gliomas provided a very high sensitivity and specificity for differentiating low-grade gliomas. A strong correlation existed between the R2* value and the pathological grade of gliomas. R2* mapping is a useful sequence for determining grade of gliomas and in distinguishing benign from malignant tumours. R2* values are better than ADC for characterising gliomas. (orig.)

  4. Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields and brain tumour risks in the INTEROCC study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Michelle C; Benke, Geza; Bowman, Joseph D; Figuerola, Jordi; Fleming, Sarah; Hours, Martine; Kincl, Laurel; Krewski, Daniel; McLean, Dave; Parent, Marie-Elise; Richardson, Lesley; Sadetzki, Siegal; Schlaefer, Klaus; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Schüz, Joachim; Siemiatycki, Jack; van Tongeren, Martie; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF) is a suspected risk factor for brain tumours, however the literature is inconsistent. Few studies have assessed whether ELF in different time windows of exposure may be associated with specific histologic types of brain tumours. This study examines the association between ELF and brain tumours in the large-scale INTEROCC study. Methods Cases of adult primary glioma and meningioma were recruited in seven countries (Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, New Zealand, United Kingdom) between 2000 and 2004. Estimates of mean workday ELF exposure based on a job exposure matrix assigned. Estimates of cumulative exposure, average exposure, maximum exposure, and exposure duration were calculated for the lifetime, and 1–4, 5–9, and 10+ years prior to the diagnosis/reference date. Results There were 3,761 included brain tumour cases (1,939 glioma, 1,822 meningioma) and 5,404 population controls. There was no association between lifetime cumulative ELF exposure and glioma or meningioma risk. However, there were positive associations between cumulative ELF 1–4 years prior to the diagnosis/reference date and glioma (odds ratio (OR) ≥ 90th percentile vs < 25th percentile = 1.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36–2.07, p < 0.0001 linear trend), and, somewhat weaker associations with meningioma (OR ≥ 90th percentile vs < 25th percentile = 1.23, 95% CI 0.97–1.57, p = 0.02 linear trend). Conclusions Results showed positive associations between ELF in the recent past and glioma. Impact Occupational ELF exposure may play a role in the later stages (promotion and progression) of brain tumourigenesis. PMID:24935666

  5. Image processing and quantitative assessment in computer tomography for non-surgical treatment of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the EMI computer tomographic (CT) system, EMI-1010, a series of new programmes were developed for the digital analysis of the CT images in order to make a more objective and quantitative assessment possible of two non-surgical methods of treatment of brain tumours such as irradiation and chemotherapy. Amongst the various therapeutic effects demonstrable from the CT data, a reduction of the mass effect was found to lower the average CT number, with a dilatation of the cisterns and ventricles. In contrast, an improvement in the amount of perifocal oedema increased the average CT number of the region, however the changes in CT number of the tumour itself may be variable. The separate evaluation of these factors, therefore, gives more information about the results of the treatment than a simple analysis of the histogram of the region. Circumscribed tumours are fairly well evaluated with our programme for the statistical analysis of the volume and the CT weight of tumours and the degree of contrast enhancement using histograms and subtraction scans. For the digital analysis of the ventricular system, the subarachnoid space, perifocal oedema, and irregularly shaped infiltrating tumours, our programmes for the character-image print-out and edge correction for the partial-volume effect of skull and air are much more useful than the CRT display for data extraction and geographic-pattern recognition. (Author)

  6. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of intraventricular tumours of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majos, Carles; Aguilera, Carles [Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge (IDI). Centre Bellvitge, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Cos, Monica; Camins, Angels; Samitier, Alex; Castaner, Sara; Sanchez, Juan J. [Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge (IDI). Centre Bellvitge, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Candiota, Ana P.; Delgado-Goni, Teresa [Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Unitat de Bioquimica de Biociencies, Department de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Mato, David [Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Department of Neurosurgery, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Acebes, Juan J. [Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Department of Neurosurgery, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Arus, Carles [Unitat de Bioquimica de Biociencies, Department de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of proton MR spectroscopy in the diagnosis of intraventricular tumours. Fifty-two intraventricular tumours pertaining to 16 different tumour types were derived from our database. All cases had single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy performed at TE at both 30 and 136 ms at 1.5 T. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to search for the most discriminative datapoints each tumour type. Characteristic trends were found for some groups: high Glx and Ala in meningiomas (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively), high mobile lipids in metastasis (p<0.001), high Cho in PNET (p<0.001), high mI+Gly in ependymoma (p<0.001), high NAC (p<0.01) in the absence of the normal brain parenchyma pattern in colloid cysts, and high mI/Gly and Ala in central neurocytoma. Proton MR spectroscopy provides additional metabolic information that could be useful in the diagnosis of intraventricular brain tumors. (orig.)

  7. Blood vessel hyperpermeability and pathophysiology in human tumour xenograft models of breast cancer: a comparison of ectopic and orthotopic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human tumour xenografts in immune compromised mice are widely used as cancer models because they are easy to reproduce and simple to use in a variety of pre-clinical assessments. Developments in nanomedicine have led to the use of tumour xenografts in testing nanoscale delivery devices, such as nanoparticles and polymer-drug conjugates, for targeting and efficacy via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. For these results to be meaningful, the hyperpermeable vasculature and reduced lymphatic drainage associated with tumour pathophysiology must be replicated in the model. In pre-clinical breast cancer xenograft models, cells are commonly introduced via injection either orthotopically (mammary fat pad, MFP) or ectopically (subcutaneous, SC), and the organ environment experienced by the tumour cells has been shown to influence their behaviour. To evaluate xenograft models of breast cancer in the context of EPR, both orthotopic MFP and ectopic SC injections of MDA-MB-231-H2N cells were given to NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice. Animals with matched tumours in two size categories were tested by injection of a high molecular weight dextran as a model nanocarrier. Tumours were collected and sectioned to assess dextran accumulation compared to liver tissue as a positive control. To understand the cellular basis of these observations, tumour sections were also immunostained for endothelial cells, basement membranes, pericytes, and lymphatic vessels. SC tumours required longer development times to become size matched to MFP tumours, and also presented wide size variability and ulcerated skin lesions 6 weeks after cell injection. The 3 week MFP tumour model demonstrated greater dextran accumulation than the size matched 5 week SC tumour model (for P < 0.10). Immunostaining revealed greater vascular density and thinner basement membranes in the MFP tumour model 3 weeks after cell injection. Both the MFP and SC tumours showed evidence of insufficient lymphatic drainage

  8. Bevacizumab plus irinotecan in the treatment patients with progressive recurrent malignant brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, H.S.; Grunnet, K.; Sorensen, M.; Olsen, P.; Hasselbalch, B.; Nelausen, K.; Kosteljanetz, M.; Lassen, U.

    2009-01-01

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively determined the efficacy and safety of a combination of bevacizumab and irinotecan in a consecutive series of 52 heavily pre-treated patients with recurrent high-grade brain tumours. Patients received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) and irinotecan [340 mg/m(2) for...... grade IV glioma and 32 weeks for grade III glioma. Four patients discontinued treatment because of unmanageable toxicity: cerebral haemorrhage, cardiac arrhythmia, intestinal perforation and diarrhoea, the latter resulting in death. DISCUSSION: We conclude that the combination of bevacizumab and...... irinotecan shows acceptable safety and is a clinically relevant choice of therapy in heavily pre-treated patients with recurrent high-grade brain tumours Udgivelsesdato: 2009...

  9. Target volumes in radiation therapy of childhood brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric tumors have enjoyed considerable improvements for the past 30 years. This is mainly due to the extensive use of combined therapeutical modalities in which chemotherapy plays a prominent role. In many children, local treatment including radiotherapy, can nowadays be adapted in terms of target volume and dose to the 'response' to an initial course of chemotherapy almost on a case by case basis. This makes precise recommendation on local therapy highly difficult in this age group. We will concentrate in this paper on brain tumors in which chemotherapy is of limited value and radiotherapy still plays a key-role. (authors)

  10. The HealthAgents ontology: knowledge representation in a distributed decision support system for brain tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Miranda, Juan Crisóforo; Sáez Silvestre, Carlos; Hu, B.; Croitoru, M; Roset, R; Dupplaw, D.; Lurgi, M.; Dasmahapatra, S.; Lewis, P

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present our experience of representing the knowledge behind HealthAgents (HA), a distributed decision support system for brain tumour diagnosis. Our initial motivation came from the distributed nature of the information involved in the system and has been enriched by clinicians' requirements and data access restrictions. We present in detail the steps we have taken towards building our ontology starting from knowledge acquisition to data access and reasoning. We motivate our ...

  11. The contribution of drug resistant cancer stem cells to paediatric brain tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Punjaruk, Wiyada

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies have revealed that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in malignant disease. Additionally, it is proposed that these cells may survive following chemotherapy, and hence contribute to tumour relapse. A significant mechanism of drug resistance in CSCs is believed to be the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that efflux cytotoxic agents out of cells. The objective of this study was to study the existence of CSCs in a panel of primary paediatric brain tu...

  12. Excretion of metabolites of biogenic amines in patients with irradiated brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolites of biogenic amines were determined in the 24-hour urine samples of patients submitted to surgical removal of a malignant brain tumour and subsequently to telecobalt therapy of the corresponding head region. A significant increase in the excretion of 5-hydroxyindoleasetic acid (5-HIAA), vanillinmandelic acid (VMA) as well as of free 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol (MHPG) during the period of irradiation was found. This increase is presumably the result of radiation induced release of their parent amines from the brain; in the case of VMA the secondary response of the peripheral sympathetic system might occur. (author)

  13. 3-O-Methyl-6-[18F]fluoro-l-DOPA and its evaluation in brain tumour imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3-O-Methyl-6-[18F]fluoro-l-DOPA (OMFD) is a major metabolite of 6-[18F]fluoro-L-DOPA. Although synthesis of OFMD was primarily established to study the dopaminergic system, as it is an amino acid analogue, uptake in experimental tumours has been found. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of OMFD for brain tumour imaging and to obtain initial estimates of whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in humans. Nineteen patients with suspected or confirmed brain tumours were investigated with OMFD and dynamic brain PET, complemented by whole-body PET in seven patients. Tracer kinetics were compared for normal brain and intracerebral lesions. Tissue accumulation was quantified with standardised uptake values (SUVs). Whole-body distribution in combination with tracer kinetics from animal experiments was used for the calculation of radiation dosimetry data. On the basis of OMFD PET, viable brain tumour was suspected in 16 patients with SUVs of 3.0±0.8 and a tumour to non-tumour ratio of 1.9±0.5. Highest tumour and normal brain uptake occurred between 15 and 30 min, with a subsequent slow decrease. Late whole-body tracer distribution was uniform without specific organ accumulation. Elimination occurred via urine. The mean radiation dose to the whole body was estimated at 0.016 mSv/MBq, with the kidneys as dose-critical organ (0.033 mGy/MBq). In conclusion, OMFD enables the visualisation of brain tumours with SUVs similar to other fluorinated amino acids. The whole-body radiation exposure from OMFD is comparable to that from FDG imaging. (orig.)

  14. 3-O-Methyl-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-l-DOPA and its evaluation in brain tumour imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuthien-Baumann, B.; Bredow, J.; Hliscs, R.; Franke, W.G.; Kotzerke, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Technische Universitaet Dresden und PET Zentrum Rossendorf, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307, Dresden (Germany); Burchert, W. [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, PET Zentrum Rossendorf, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Institut fuer Molekulare Biophysik, Radiopharmazie und Nuklearmedizin, Herz- und Diabeteszentrum Nordrhein-Westfalen, Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Fuechtner, F.; Bergmann, R.; Johannsen, B. [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, PET Zentrum Rossendorf, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Alheit, H.D. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Reiss, G.; Steinmeier, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    3-O-Methyl-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-l-DOPA (OMFD) is a major metabolite of 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA. Although synthesis of OFMD was primarily established to study the dopaminergic system, as it is an amino acid analogue, uptake in experimental tumours has been found. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of OMFD for brain tumour imaging and to obtain initial estimates of whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in humans. Nineteen patients with suspected or confirmed brain tumours were investigated with OMFD and dynamic brain PET, complemented by whole-body PET in seven patients. Tracer kinetics were compared for normal brain and intracerebral lesions. Tissue accumulation was quantified with standardised uptake values (SUVs). Whole-body distribution in combination with tracer kinetics from animal experiments was used for the calculation of radiation dosimetry data. On the basis of OMFD PET, viable brain tumour was suspected in 16 patients with SUVs of 3.0{+-}0.8 and a tumour to non-tumour ratio of 1.9{+-}0.5. Highest tumour and normal brain uptake occurred between 15 and 30 min, with a subsequent slow decrease. Late whole-body tracer distribution was uniform without specific organ accumulation. Elimination occurred via urine. The mean radiation dose to the whole body was estimated at 0.016 mSv/MBq, with the kidneys as dose-critical organ (0.033 mGy/MBq). In conclusion, OMFD enables the visualisation of brain tumours with SUVs similar to other fluorinated amino acids. The whole-body radiation exposure from OMFD is comparable to that from FDG imaging. (orig.)

  15. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging increases the overall diagnostic accuracy in brain tumours: Correlation with histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasim Abul-Kasim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the contribution of multimodal MRI techniques, specifically perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI, and/or MR spectroscopy (MRS, in increasing the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in brain tumours.Methods: Forty-four patients with suspected brain tumours (27 (61% patients male, mean age 58±17 (mean±SD years were included in this retrospective analysis. Patients were examined with conventional MR sequences, DWI, and with PWI and/or MRS. The concordance between the diagnoses obtained with multimodal MRI and with the conventional MR sequences, and the final diagnosis obtained by biopsy, was estimated. Fisher’s exact test and/or chi-square test was performed to estimate the added utility of multimodal MRI. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05.Results: With multimodal MRI, the diagnosis in 41 (93% patients was the same as that obtained by biopsy, compared with 39% (17/44 patients when the readers were allowed to give one diagnostic possibility during the evaluation of the conventional MR sequences alone (p<0.001. The concordance between the diagnoses provided by evaluating the multimodal MRIs and the final diagnoses was almost perfect (κ value 0.92, 95% CI 0.82 - 1. PWI primarily helped to differentiate lymphomas from other solid tumours, whereas MRS helped to differentiate malignant glioma from metastasis. Both PWI and MRS helped in grading astrocytomas.Conclusion: Multimodal MRI increases diagnostic accuracy and should, wherever available, be performed in the work-up of brain tumours, although this entails increased examination cost and time.

  16. Role of diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI in distinguishing between brain abscess and tumour: a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, K.; Watanabe, N.; Nagayoshi, T.; Kanazawa, T.; Toyoshima, S.; Shimizu, M.; Seto, H. [Department of Radiology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate diffusion-weighted (DW) echo-planar MRI in differentiating between brain abscess and tumour. We examined two patients with surgically confirmed pyogenic brain abscess and 18 with metastatic brain tumours or high-grade glioma, using a 1.5 T system. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of each necrotic or solid contrast-enhancing lesion was measured with two different b values (20 and 1200 s/mm{sup 2}). All capsule-stage brain abscesses (4 lesions) and zones of cerebritis (2 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as markedly high-signal areas of decreased ADC (range, 0.58-0.70 [(10-3 mm{sup 2}/s; mean, 0.63)]). All cystic or necrotic portions of brain tumours (14 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as low-signal areas of increased ADC (range, 2.20-3.20 [(10-3 mm{sup 2}/s; mean, 2.70)]). Solid, contrast-enhancing portions of brain tumours (19 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as high-signal areas of sightly decreased or increased ADC (range, 0.77-1.29 [(10-3 mm{sup 2}/s; mean, 0.94)]). Our preliminary results indicate that DW echo-planar MRI be used for distinguishing between brain abscess and tumour. (orig.) (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 11 refs.

  17. Role of diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI in distinguishing between brain abscess and tumour: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was to evaluate diffusion-weighted (DW) echo-planar MRI in differentiating between brain abscess and tumour. We examined two patients with surgically confirmed pyogenic brain abscess and 18 with metastatic brain tumours or high-grade glioma, using a 1.5 T system. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of each necrotic or solid contrast-enhancing lesion was measured with two different b values (20 and 1200 s/mm2). All capsule-stage brain abscesses (4 lesions) and zones of cerebritis (2 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as markedly high-signal areas of decreased ADC (range, 0.58-0.70 [(10-3 mm2/s; mean, 0.63)]). All cystic or necrotic portions of brain tumours (14 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as low-signal areas of increased ADC (range, 2.20-3.20 [(10-3 mm2/s; mean, 2.70)]). Solid, contrast-enhancing portions of brain tumours (19 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as high-signal areas of sightly decreased or increased ADC (range, 0.77-1.29 [(10-3 mm2/s; mean, 0.94)]). Our preliminary results indicate that DW echo-planar MRI be used for distinguishing between brain abscess and tumour. (orig.) (orig.)

  18. Blood vessel hyperpermeability and pathophysiology in human tumour xenograft models of breast cancer: a comparison of ectopic and orthotopic tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Karyn S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human tumour xenografts in immune compromised mice are widely used as cancer models because they are easy to reproduce and simple to use in a variety of pre-clinical assessments. Developments in nanomedicine have led to the use of tumour xenografts in testing nanoscale delivery devices, such as nanoparticles and polymer-drug conjugates, for targeting and efficacy via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect. For these results to be meaningful, the hyperpermeable vasculature and reduced lymphatic drainage associated with tumour pathophysiology must be replicated in the model. In pre-clinical breast cancer xenograft models, cells are commonly introduced via injection either orthotopically (mammary fat pad, MFP or ectopically (subcutaneous, SC, and the organ environment experienced by the tumour cells has been shown to influence their behaviour. Methods To evaluate xenograft models of breast cancer in the context of EPR, both orthotopic MFP and ectopic SC injections of MDA-MB-231-H2N cells were given to NOD scid gamma (NSG mice. Animals with matched tumours in two size categories were tested by injection of a high molecular weight dextran as a model nanocarrier. Tumours were collected and sectioned to assess dextran accumulation compared to liver tissue as a positive control. To understand the cellular basis of these observations, tumour sections were also immunostained for endothelial cells, basement membranes, pericytes, and lymphatic vessels. Results SC tumours required longer development times to become size matched to MFP tumours, and also presented wide size variability and ulcerated skin lesions 6 weeks after cell injection. The 3 week MFP tumour model demonstrated greater dextran accumulation than the size matched 5 week SC tumour model (for P  Conclusions Dextran accumulation and immunostaining results suggest that small MFP tumours best replicate the vascular permeability required to observe the EPR effect

  19. Biodegradable interstitial release polymer loading a novel small molecule targeting Axl receptor tyrosine kinase and reducing brain tumour migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, S-Y; Chen, S-R; Hsieh, J; Li, Y-S; Chuang, S-E; Chuang, H-M; Huang, M-H; Lin, S-Z; Harn, H-J; Chiou, T-W

    2016-04-28

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumour. The neoplasms are difficult to resect entirely because of their highly infiltration property and leading to the tumour edge is unclear. Gliadel wafer has been used as an intracerebral drug delivery system to eliminate the residual tumour. However, because of its local low concentration and short diffusion distance, patient survival improves non-significantly. Axl is an essential regulator in cancer metastasis and patient survival. In this study, we developed a controlled-release polyanhydride polymer loading a novel small molecule, n-butylidenephthalide (BP), which is not only increasing local drug concentration and extending its diffusion distance but also reducing tumour invasion, mediated by reducing Axl expression. First, we determined that BP inhibited the expression of Axl in a dose- and time-dependent manner and reduced the migratory and invasive capabilities of GBM cells. In addition, BP downregulated matrix metalloproteinase activity, which is involved in cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BP regulated Axl via the extracellular signal-regulated kinases pathway. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is related to epithelial cells in the invasive migratory mesenchymal cells that underlie cancer progression; we demonstrated that BP reduced the expression of EMT-related genes. Furthermore, we used the overexpression of Axl in GBM cells to prove that Axl is a crucial target in the inhibition of GBM EMT, migration and invasion. In an in vivo study, we demonstrated that BP inhibited tumour growth and suppressed Axl expression in a dose-dependent manner according to a subcutaneous tumour model. Most importantly, in an intracranial tumour model with BP wafer in situ treatment, we demonstrated that the BP wafer not only significantly increased the survival rate but also decreased Axl expression, and inhibited tumour invasion. These results contribute to the

  20. Interstitial iridium-192 implantation for malignant brain tumours: Pt. 2. Clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, M.; McKeough, P.; Wu, A.; Kasdon, D.; Heros, D.; Chang, H.

    1989-02-01

    The treatment results of 37 patients with malignant brain neoplasms treated with a computed-tomography-guided stereotactic iridium-192 implant are reviewed. Of these, 29 patients with high-grade gliomas (20 with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), nine with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA)) received an implant as part of their initial management. The median survival was 14.5 and 15.5 months in the patients with previously untreated GBM and AA, respectively. In those patients with recurrent tumour after external-beam irradiation, durable local control over a year was achieved with implantation. Increasing the total tumour dose from 120 to 160 Gy did not improve survival or local control. Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) was used as an indicator of quality of life and was seen to decrease with a median interval of 8.5 months following treatment. No severe complications were noted in the entire group of patients treated with this implant procedure.

  1. Fast and accurate water content and T2⁎ mapping in brain tumours localised with FET-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of combined MR-PET scanners opens new opportunities for the characterisation of tumour environment. In this study, water content and relaxation properties of glioblastoma were investigated in five patients using advanced MRI. The region containing metabolically active tumour tissue was defined by simultaneously measured FET-PET uptake. The mean value of water content in tumour tissue – obtained noninvasively with high precision and accuracy for the first time – amounted to 84.5%, similar to the value for normal grey matter. Constancy of water content contrasted with a large variability of T2⁎ values in tumour tissue, qualitatively related to the magnetic inhomogeneity of tissue created by blood vessels and/or microbleeds. The quantitative MRI protocol takes 71/2 min of measurement time and is proposed for extended clinical use. -- Highlights: • Quantitative MRI and simultaneous FET-PET used for the study of brain tumours. • Quantitative water content and T2⁎ of the brain are reported in five glioblastoma patients. • The qMRI method achieves whole brain coverage in 71/2 min. • Water content in normal appearing tissue as well as tumour is constant within 1% for each class. • T2⁎ is highly variable within tumour volume and from patient to patient

  2. X-ray fluorescence study of the concentration of selected trace and minor elements in human brain tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandzilak, Aleksandra; Czyzycki, Mateusz; Radwanska, Edyta; Adamek, Dariusz; Geraki, Kalotina; Lankosz, Marek

    2015-12-01

    Neoplastic and healthy brain tissues were analysed to discern the changes in the spatial distribution and overall concentration of elements using micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. High-resolution distribution maps of minor and trace elements such as P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn made it possible to distinguish between homogeneous cancerous tissue and areas where some structures could be identified, such as blood vessels and calcifications. Concentrations of the elements in the selected homogeneous areas of brain tissue were compared between tumours with various malignancy grades and with the controls. The study showed a decrease in the average concentration of Fe, P, S and Ca in tissues with high grades of malignancy as compared to the control group, whereas the concentration of Zn in these tissues was increased. The changes in the concentration were found to be correlated with the tumour malignancy grade. The efficacy of micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between various types of cancer based on the concentrations of studied elements was confirmed by multivariate discriminant analysis. Our analysis showed that the most important elements for tissue classification are Cu, K, Fe, Ca, and Zn. This method made it possible to correctly classify histopathological types in 99.93% of the cases used to build the model and in as much as 99.16% of new cases.

  3. Pre- and post-operative values of serum CRP in patients undergoing surgery for brain tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the concentration of C-reactive protein in pre- and post-operative serum samples of brain tumour patients in order to detect the potential risks of post-operative infections. Methods: Serum C-reactive protein was measured on pre- and post-operative Day 1, Day 2 and Day 7 in 18 patients who underwent surgery for brain tumours. The study was performed at the Neurosurgical Ward, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from May 2007 to April 2008. Mean pre-operative patients and control values were compared using Mann-Whitney or Wilcoxon tests for comparing between pre- and post-operative values. P-value was considered significant at 5.0mg/L but no statistically significant difference was found when compared with healthy controls, with mean 4.4+-6.6 and 0.9+-0.7, respectively. Significantly raised serum concentrations were observed in all post-operative samples when compared with pre-operative samples. Serum CRP concentrations significantly increased post-operatively on Day 1, with mean value of 102.9+-82.0mg/L (p<0.0005), and further increased on Day 2 with mean value of 166.9+-128.1mg/L (p<0.0005), but declined on Day 7, with mean value of 42.7+-63.6mg/L (p<0.005). Conclusion: Pre-operative serum C-reactive protein concentrations of 28% of the patients were elevated, suggesting an association with brain tumours. Post-operative serum concentrations were significantly higher than those noted before the surgery. Absence of a fall of concentration from peak value on post-operative Day 2 or a secondary rise from post-operative Day 7 could be alarming for inter-current infection. (author)

  4. Childhood brain tumours and use of mobile phones: comparison of a case–control study with incidence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin Denis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The first case–control study on mobile phone use and brain tumour risk among children and adolescents (CEFALO study has recently been published. In a commentary published in Environmental Health, Söderqvist and colleagues argued that CEFALO suggests an increased brain tumour risk in relation to wireless phone use. In this article, we respond and show why consistency checks of case–control study results with observed time trends of incidence rates are essential, given the well described limitations of case–control studies and the steep increase of mobile phone use among children and adolescents during the last decade. There is no plausible explanation of how a notably increased risk from use of wireless phones would correspond to the relatively stable incidence time trends for brain tumours among children and adolescents observed in the Nordic countries. Nevertheless, an increased risk restricted to heavy mobile phone use, to very early life exposure, or to rare subtypes of brain tumours may be compatible with stable incidence trends at this time and thus further monitoring of childhood brain tumour incidence rate time trends is warranted.

  5. Prognostic implications of p53 protein, epidermal growth factor receptor, and Ki-67 labelling in brain tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Jaros, E.; Perry, R H; Adam, L.; Kelly, P J; Crawford, P. J.; Kalbag, R M; Mendelow, A D; Sengupta, R P; Pearson, A D

    1992-01-01

    The expression of p53 protein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Ki-67 nuclear antigen was examined by immunohistochemistry in biopsies of 16 types of human brain tumours, including 43 astrocytomas. P53 protein, almost certainly its mutant form, was expressed in seven of the 16, and EGFR in 11 of the 16 types of tumours. In astrocytomas both the proportion of tumours which expressed p53 or EGFR increased with grade of malignancy as did the mean Ki-67 labelling index (LI): p53-0% in...

  6. Modification of cellular radiosensitivity by the extracellular concentration of hydrogen ions - a possible explanation of the radiation resistance of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain tumours show a much higher local relapse frequency than other tumours after radiologic treatment. Influences of the extracellular environment on the radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells were examined in vitro. The results indicate that the low pH-value in the tumour might contribute to the radiation resistence. (orig.)

  7. Use of the Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) score in patients with brain metastases from primary tumours not represented in the diagnosis-specific GPA studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Assessment of prognostic factors might influence treatment decisions in patients with brain metastases. Based on large studies, the diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (GPA) score is a useful tool. However, patients with unknown or rare primary tumours are not represented in this model. A pragmatic approach might be use of the first GPA version which is not limited to specific primary tumours. Patients and methods: This retrospective analysis examines for the first time whether the GPA is a valid score in patients not eligible for the diagnosis-specific GPA. It includes 71 patients with unknown primary tumour, bladder cancer, ovarian cancer, thyroid cancer or other uncommon primaries. Survival was evaluated in uni- and multivariate tests. Results: The GPA significantly predicted survival. Moreover, improved survival was seen in patients treated with surgical resection or radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. The older recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) score was significant in univariate analysis. However, the multivariate model with RPA, GPA and surgery or SRS versus none showed that only GPA and type of treatment were independent predictors of survival. Conclusion: Ideally, cooperative research efforts would lead to development of diagnosis-specific scores also for patients with rare or unknown primary tumours. In the meantime, a pragmatic approach of using the general GPA score appears reasonable. (orig.)

  8. An imaging-based computational model for simulating angiogenesis and tumour oxygenation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikarla, Vikram; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-05-21

    Tumour growth, angiogenesis and oxygenation vary substantially among tumours and significantly impact their treatment outcome. Imaging provides a unique means of investigating these tumour-specific characteristics. Here we propose a computational model to simulate tumour-specific oxygenation changes based on the molecular imaging data. Tumour oxygenation in the model is reflected by the perfused vessel density. Tumour growth depends on its doubling time (T d) and the imaged proliferation. Perfused vessel density recruitment rate depends on the perfused vessel density around the tumour (sMVDtissue) and the maximum VEGF concentration for complete vessel dysfunctionality (VEGFmax). The model parameters were benchmarked to reproduce the dynamics of tumour oxygenation over its entire lifecycle, which is the most challenging test. Tumour oxygenation dynamics were quantified using the peak pO2 (pO2peak) and the time to peak pO2 (t peak). Sensitivity of tumour oxygenation to model parameters was assessed by changing each parameter by 20%. t peak was found to be more sensitive to tumour cell line related doubling time (~30%) as compared to tissue vasculature density (~10%). On the other hand, pO2peak was found to be similarly influenced by the above tumour- and vasculature-associated parameters (~30-40%). Interestingly, both pO2peak and t peak were only marginally affected by VEGFmax (~5%). The development of a poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) core with tumour growth increased VEGF accumulation, thus disrupting the vessel perfusion as well as further increasing hypoxia with time. The model with its benchmarked parameters, is applied to hypoxia imaging data obtained using a [(64)Cu]Cu-ATSM PET scan of a mouse tumour and the temporal development of the vasculature and hypoxia maps are shown. The work underscores the importance of using tumour-specific input for analysing tumour evolution. An extended model incorporating therapeutic effects can serve as a powerful tool for

  9. An imaging-based computational model for simulating angiogenesis and tumour oxygenation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikarla, Vikram; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Tumour growth, angiogenesis and oxygenation vary substantially among tumours and significantly impact their treatment outcome. Imaging provides a unique means of investigating these tumour-specific characteristics. Here we propose a computational model to simulate tumour-specific oxygenation changes based on the molecular imaging data. Tumour oxygenation in the model is reflected by the perfused vessel density. Tumour growth depends on its doubling time (T d) and the imaged proliferation. Perfused vessel density recruitment rate depends on the perfused vessel density around the tumour (sMVDtissue) and the maximum VEGF concentration for complete vessel dysfunctionality (VEGFmax). The model parameters were benchmarked to reproduce the dynamics of tumour oxygenation over its entire lifecycle, which is the most challenging test. Tumour oxygenation dynamics were quantified using the peak pO2 (pO2peak) and the time to peak pO2 (t peak). Sensitivity of tumour oxygenation to model parameters was assessed by changing each parameter by 20%. t peak was found to be more sensitive to tumour cell line related doubling time (~30%) as compared to tissue vasculature density (~10%). On the other hand, pO2peak was found to be similarly influenced by the above tumour- and vasculature-associated parameters (~30–40%). Interestingly, both pO2peak and t peak were only marginally affected by VEGFmax (~5%). The development of a poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) core with tumour growth increased VEGF accumulation, thus disrupting the vessel perfusion as well as further increasing hypoxia with time. The model with its benchmarked parameters, is applied to hypoxia imaging data obtained using a [64Cu]Cu-ATSM PET scan of a mouse tumour and the temporal development of the vasculature and hypoxia maps are shown. The work underscores the importance of using tumour-specific input for analysing tumour evolution. An extended model incorporating therapeutic effects can serve as a powerful tool for

  10. Combined therapy of irradiation and drug treatment in primary brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combinations of radiation - drug regimes in malignant brain tumours are not generally established. The reasons for their limited clinical use are due to the selective permeability of the blood/brain barrier to cytostatic drugs and the increased risk of acute and late effects by altered pathophysiology. Therefore, the effects of combined modality of radio- and chemotherapy in malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system such as malignant gliomas and medulloblastomas should be studied only in randomized trials. In spite of promising experimental results effective radiosensitizing agents are not available for clinical use. The biological response modifiers (Interferons, TNF, IL-2) are now introduced for clinical evaluations, but preliminary results postpone the hope for improvement the therapeutical results to following drug generations. (orig.)

  11. Low temperature magnetic analysis in the identification of iron compounds from human brain tumour tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brem, F [Institute of Geophysics, ETH-Hoenggerberg, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Hirt, A M [Institute of Geophysics, ETH-Hoenggerberg, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Simon, C [Neurology/EEG, University Hospital Zurich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Wieser, H-G [Neurology/EEG, University Hospital Zurich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dobson, J [Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 7QB, (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    In the brain, iron plays an important role, but also is potentially toxic if iron metabolism is disrupted. Excess iron accumulation in the brain has been shown to be associated with neurodegenerative diseases. However, identification of iron compounds in human tissue is difficult because concentrations are very low. Three types of magnetic methods were used to characterize iron compounds in tumour tissue from epileptic patients. Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM) was measured at 77 K and 300 K and reveals a low-coercivity phase with the properties of magnetite or maghemite. Induced magnetization was measured between 2 K and 300 K after cooling in zero-field and in a 50 mT field. These curves reveal an average blocking temperature of 11 K, which is compatible with ferritin. The results of this study show that the combination of different magnetic methods provides a useful and sensitive tool for the characterisation of magnetic iron compounds in human tissue.

  12. Spectrum of Side Effects of Anticonvulsants in Patients with Brain Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benit CP

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures are a common manifestation in patients with brain tumours, and most patients need anticonvulsants. Apart from seizure control, the risk of side effects makes the proper choice of anticonvulsants a major concern. Toxicities not only exist as common side effects, but also appear as drug-drug interactions, neurotoxicities, and other organ dysfunctions. One reason for interactions is the use of the classical anti-epileptic drugs (AED, phenobarbital (PB, phenytoin (PHT, and carbamazepine (CBZ. Large differences in dose regimens with concomitant chemotherapy reflect the potency of these effects. Although valproic acid (VPA can be beneficial to prevent tumour growth, it may lead to bone marrow suppression and other toxicities because of its enzyme-inhibiting properties. Another noteworthy side effect are skin reactions, like erythema multiforme, which occasionally develops during radiation. Although this side effect is rare, it can be life-threatening. Many anti-epileptic drugs can have extra toxic effects with existing organ dysfunction, like bone-marrow suppression or liver abnormalities, this applies particularly for PB, PHT, CBZ, and VPA. Existing clinical or subclinical signs of brain damage secondary to space-occupying tumoural effects or the sequelae of previous neurosurgery, radio-, and chemotherapy enhance the chances of neurotoxicity. Besides, the intake of anticonvulsants itself and their total number strongly contribute to cognitive dysfunction. As neurocognitive decline interferes with quality of life, such changes may substantially affect daily activities of patients and their family members. The multitude of co-therapies applied with brain tumours contributes to a myriad of side effects that are almost impossible to unravel, as drugs and other therapies used can have aggravating or counteracting effects on each other. Knowledge of individual anticonvulsants and anticipation of toxicity including the recognition of already

  13. Metastatic disease of the brain: extra-axial metastases (skull, dura, leptomeningeal) and tumour spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroldi, Roberto; Ambrosi, Claudia; Farina, Davide [University of Brescia, Department of Radiology, Brescia, BS (Italy)

    2005-03-01

    Extra-axial intracranial metastases may arise through several situations. Hematogenous spread to the meninges is the most frequent cause. Direct extension from contiguous extra-cranial neoplasms, secondary invasion of the meninges by calvarium and skull base metastases, and migration along perineural or perivascular structures are less common. Leptomeningeal invasion gives rise to tumour cell dissemination by the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), eventually leading to neoplastic coating of brain surfaces. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is complementary to CSF examinations and can be invaluable, detecting up to 50% of false-negative lumbar punctures. MR findings range from diffuse linear leptomeningeal enhancement to multiple enhancing extra-axial nodules, obstructive communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus. Both calvarial and epidural metastases infrequently transgress the dura, which acts as a barrier against tumour spread. Radionuclide bone studies are still a valuable screening test to detect bone metastases. With computed tomography (CT) and MR, bone metastases extending intracranially and primary dural metastases show the characteristic biconvex shape, usually associated with brain displacement away from the inner table. Although CT is better in detecting skull base erosion, MR is more sensitive and provides more detailed information about dural involvement. Perineural and perivascular spread from head and neck neoplasms require thin-section contrast-enhanced MR. (orig.)

  14. Metastatic disease of the brain: extra-axial metastases (skull, dura, leptomeningeal) and tumour spread

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extra-axial intracranial metastases may arise through several situations. Hematogenous spread to the meninges is the most frequent cause. Direct extension from contiguous extra-cranial neoplasms, secondary invasion of the meninges by calvarium and skull base metastases, and migration along perineural or perivascular structures are less common. Leptomeningeal invasion gives rise to tumour cell dissemination by the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), eventually leading to neoplastic coating of brain surfaces. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is complementary to CSF examinations and can be invaluable, detecting up to 50% of false-negative lumbar punctures. MR findings range from diffuse linear leptomeningeal enhancement to multiple enhancing extra-axial nodules, obstructive communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus. Both calvarial and epidural metastases infrequently transgress the dura, which acts as a barrier against tumour spread. Radionuclide bone studies are still a valuable screening test to detect bone metastases. With computed tomography (CT) and MR, bone metastases extending intracranially and primary dural metastases show the characteristic biconvex shape, usually associated with brain displacement away from the inner table. Although CT is better in detecting skull base erosion, MR is more sensitive and provides more detailed information about dural involvement. Perineural and perivascular spread from head and neck neoplasms require thin-section contrast-enhanced MR. (orig.)

  15. Brain Network Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther

    Three main topics are presented in this thesis. The first and largest topic concerns network modelling of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI). In particular nonparametric Bayesian methods are used to model brain networks derived from resting state f...... for their ability to reproduce node clustering and predict unseen data. Comparing the models on whole brain networks, BCD and IRM showed better reproducibility and predictability than IDM, suggesting that resting state networks exhibit community structure. This also points to the importance of using models, which...... allow for complex interactions between all pairs of clusters. In addition, it is demonstrated how the IRM can be used for segmenting brain structures into functionally coherent clusters. A new nonparametric Bayesian network model is presented. The model builds upon the IRM and can be used to infer...

  16. Unusual clustering of brain tumours in a family with NF1 and variable expression of cutaneous features

    OpenAIRE

    Faravelli, F.; Upadhyaya, M; Osborn, M.; Huson, S; Hayward, R.; Winter, R.

    1999-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the commonest autosomal dominant disorders in man. It is characterised by café au lait spots, peripheral neurofibromas, Lisch nodules, axillary freckling, skeletal dysplasia, and optic glioma. Symptomatic brain tumours occur in 1.5-2.2% of patients with NF1. We report here a family where seven members developed brain tumours. Of these, three have a clinical history strongly suggestive of NF1, while two do not fulfil diagnostic criteria for the disorder...

  17. Detection of comorbidities and synchronous primary tumours via thoracic radiography and abdominal ultrasonography and their influence on treatment outcome in dogs with soft tissue sarcomas, primary brain tumours and intranasal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigio Marcello, A; Gieger, T L; Jiménez, D A; Granger, L Abbigail

    2015-12-01

    Canine soft tissue sarcomas (STS), primary brain tumours and intranasal tumours are commonly treated with radiotherapy (RT). Given the low metastatic potential of these tumours, recommendations regarding imaging tests as staging are variable among institutions. The purpose of our study was to describe thoracic radiographic and abdominal ultrasonographic findings in dogs with these neoplasms and to investigate association of abnormal findings with alterations in recommended treatment. Medical records from 101 dogs, each having thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound performed as part of their staging, were reviewed. In 98 of 101 (97%), imaging abnormalities were detected, 27% of which were further investigated with fine needle aspiration cytology or biopsy. Nine percent of the detected abnormalities were considered serious comorbidities that altered treatment recommendations, including 3 (3%) which were confirmed as synchronous primary neoplasms. These findings may influence recommendations regarding the decision to perform thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound prior to initiation of RT. PMID:23968175

  18. Coupled modeling of tumour angiogenesis, tumour growth,and blood perfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a more realistic mathematical simulation method to investigate the dynamic process of tumour angio-genesis by fully coupling the vessel growth,tumour growth and associated blood perfusion.The tumour growth and angiogenesis are coupled by the chemical microenvironment and the cell-matrix interaction.The haemodynamic calculation is carried out on the new vasculature,and an estimation of vessel collapse is made according to the wall shear stress criterion.The results are consistent with phy...

  19. Differential Equations Related to the Williams-Bjerknes Tumour Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Martinez; A R Villena

    2000-08-01

    We investigate an initial value problem which is closely related to the Williams-Bjerknes tumour model for a cancer which spreads through an epithelial basal layer modeled on ⊂ 2. The solution of this problem is a family =(()), where each () could be considered as an approximation to the probability that the cell situated at is cancerous at time . We prove that this problem has a unique solution, it is defined on [0, + ∞], and, for some relevant situations, lim → ∞ ()=1 for all ∈ . Moreover, we study the expected number of cancerous cells at time .

  20. Apoptosis induced in vivo by photodynamic therapy in normal brain and intracranial tumour tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilge, L; Portnoy, M; Wilson, B C

    2000-10-01

    The apoptotic response of normal brain and intracranial VX2 tumour following photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated by 5 different photosensitizers (Photofrin, 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), chloroaluminium phthalocyanine (AlCIPc), Tin Ethyl Etiopurpurin (SnET(2)), and meta -tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (m THPC)) was evaluated following a previous analysis which investigated the necrotic tissue response to PDT at 24 h post treatment. Free DNA ends, produced by internucleosomal DNA cleavage in apoptotic cells, were stained using a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling) assay. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to quantify the local incidence of apoptosis and determine its spatial distribution throughout the brain. The incidence of apoptosis was confirmed by histopathology, which demonstrated cell shrinkage, pyknosis and karyorrhexis. At 24 h post PDT, AlClPc did not cause any detectable apoptosis, while the other photosensitizers produced varying numbers of apoptotic cells near the region of coagulative necrosis. The apoptotic response did not appear to be related to photosensitizer dose. These results suggest that at this time point, a minimal and fairly localized apoptotic effect is produced in brain tissues, the extent of which depends largely on the particular photosensitizer. PMID:10993661

  1. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of an open low-field magnetic resonance simulator for radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.H.; Laursen, F.J.; Logager, V.;

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is superior to computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy of brain tumours. In this study an open low-field MR-simulator is evaluated in order to eliminate the cost of and time spent on additional CT scanning. Materials and methods: Eleven...

  2. Intra-arterial and intra-venous chemotherapy combined with radiation in the treatment of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigations were undertaken to study the effect of combining different modalities of chemotherapy with radiation in post-operative treatment of brain tumours. The conclusions and clinical implication of the investigations are as follows: The combination of combined intra-arterial chemotherapy followed by radiation leads to an increased median survival with more long term survivors in patients with anaplastic astrocytomas and in patients older than 40 years with astrocytomas. In patients with glioblastoma multiforme, this modality of treatment do not improve median survival, but an increased number of long-term survivors may be seen. Patients younger than 40 years with astrocytomas do not benefit from this modality of treatment. A parallelism exists between sensitivity to chemotherapy and response to radiotherapy. Patients who will benefit from the treatment may be selected early, normally two months after treatment start. Combining intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation does not lead to an increased incidence of adverse CNS reactions. Specific transient abnormalities in the brain may occur during the first year after treatment and may be misinterpreted as tumour recurrence. EEG may be valuable in predicting adverse CNS reactions following treatment. Nuclear brain scan may be of valuable in selecting the patients who are in danger of developing adverse CNS reactions. Intra-arterial chemotherapy does have an effect in patients with brain tumours who have recurrent tumour after radiation. The most important prognostic factors are age, corticosteroid dependency at treatment start, performance status, histology and frontal lobe location. 103 refs., 2 tabs

  3. Evolution of growth hormone neurosecretory disturbance after cranial irradiation for childhood brain tumours: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the aetiopathology of post-irradiation growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we performed a mixed longitudinal analysis of 56 24 h serum GH concentration profiles and 45 paired insulin-induced hypoglycaemia tests (ITT) in 35 prepubertal children, aged 1.5-11.8 years, with brain tumours in the posterior foss (n = 25) or cerebral hemispheres (n 10). Assessments were made before (n = 16), 1 year (n = 25) and 2 to 5 years (n = 15) after a cranial irradiation (DXR) dose of at least 30 Gy. Fourier transforms, occupancy percentage, first-order derivatives (FOD) and mean concentrations were determined from the GH profiles taken after neurosurgery but before radiotherapy (n = 16) and in three treatment groups: Group 1: neurosurgery only without DXR 9n 9); Group 2: ≥ 30 Gy DXR only (n = 22); Group 3: ≥ 30 Gy DXR with additional chemotherapy (n = 9). Results were compared with those from 26 short normally growing (SN) children. (author)

  4. Assessing hypoxia in androgen dependent prostate tumour models using EF5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormone withdrawal therapy is an important treatment modality in prostate cancer in addition to surgery or radiotherapy. Most tumours respond to androgen ablation and regress; but eventually the tumours become androgen independent and can re-grow more aggressively. Rationale: The timing of radiation would be important if tumour hypoxia varies during hormone therapy. We are investigating the effect of androgen status on tumour hypoxia in murine prostate models. Tools: Initially, the Shionogi murine system, a hormone dependent tumour model for prostate cancer, was used with the nitroimidazole, EF5, to study changes in hypoxia during tumour progression. Methods: EF5 was injected into mice 3 hours before tumour harvest; half the tumour was disaggregated and analysed with flow cytometry while the other half was frozen for sectioning. The Cy3/5-tagged monoclonal antibody ELK3-51 was then used to assess EF5 binding in cells or in tissue sections (EF5 binding occurs in the absence of oxygen). Results: Tissue sections from androgen dependent (AD) tumours had variable regions of EF5 binding before castration; little EF5 binding was seen in tumours from castrated (CX) mice. However, androgen independent (AI) tumours (21 days post-castration) showed high levels of well-distributed EF5 binding. Flow cytometry indicated that the percentage of cells from AD, CX and AI tumours with levels of EF5 binding greater than control tumours (not exposed to EF5) were ∼30%, ∼2% and ∼50%, respectively. The extent of hypoxia did not appear to be related to tumour size. Our results at other time points, and in the human LNCaP model will be presented. Implications: If hypoxia is also variable in human prostate tumours, then it would be important to choose appropriate timing for radiotherapy or determine hypoxia on an individual basis in prostate patients

  5. Oxygen-Driven Tumour Growth Model: A Pathology-Relevant Mathematical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado-SanMartin, Juan A.; Hare, Jennifer I.; de Moura, Alessandro P. S.; Yates, James W. T.

    2015-01-01

    Xenografts -as simplified animal models of cancer- differ substantially in vasculature and stromal architecture when compared to clinical tumours. This makes mathematical model-based predictions of clinical outcome challenging. Our objective is to further understand differences in tumour progression and physiology between animal models and the clinic. To achieve that, we propose a mathematical model based upon tumour pathophysiology, where oxygen -as a surrogate for endocrine delivery- is our...

  6. Mathematical modeling of liver metastases tumour growth and control with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generating an optimized radiation treatment plan requires understanding the factors affecting tumour control. Mathematical models of tumour dynamics may help in future studies of factors predicting tumour sensitivity to radiotherapy. In this study, a time-dependent differential model, incorporating biological cancer markers, is presented to describe pre-treatment tumour growth, response to radiation, and recurrence. The model uses Gompertzian-Exponential growth to model pre-treatment tumour growth. The effect of radiotherapy is handled by a realistic cell-kill term that includes a volume-dependent change in tumour sensitivity. Post-treatment, a Gompertzian, accelerated, delayed repopulation is employed. As proof of concept, we examined the fit of the model's prediction using various liver enzyme levels as markers of metastatic liver tumour growth in a liver cancer patient. A tumour clonogen population model was formulated. Each enzyme was coupled to the same tumour population, and served as surrogates of the tumour. This dynamical model was solved numerically and compared to the measured enzyme levels. By minimizing the mean-squared error of the model enzyme predictions, we determined the following tumour model parameters: growth rate prior to treatment was 0.52% per day; the fractional radiation cell kill for the prescribed dose (60 Gy in 15 fractions) was 42% per day, and the tumour repopulation rate was 2.9% per day. These preliminary results provided the basis to test the model in a larger series of patients, to apply biological markers for improving the efficacy of radiotherapy by determining the underlying tumour dynamics.

  7. Efficient Monte Carlo modelling of individual tumour cell propagation for hypoxic head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckwell, W.; Bezak, E.; Yeoh, E.; Marcu, L.

    2008-09-01

    A Monte Carlo tumour model has been developed to simulate tumour cell propagation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The model aims to eventually provide a radiobiological tool for radiation oncology clinicians to plan patient treatment schedules based on properties of the individual tumour. The inclusion of an oxygen distribution amongst the tumour cells enables the model to incorporate hypoxia and other associated parameters, which affect tumour growth. The object oriented program FORTRAN 95 has been used to create the model algorithm, with Monte Carlo methods being employed to randomly assign many of the cell parameters from probability distributions. Hypoxia has been implemented through random assignment of partial oxygen pressure values to individual cells during tumour growth, based on in vivo Eppendorf probe experimental data. The accumulation of up to 10 million virtual tumour cells in 15 min of computer running time has been achieved. The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia are the parameters which most influence the final tumour growth rate. For a tumour with a doubling time of 40 days, the final stem cell percentage is approximately 1% of the total cell population. The effect of hypoxia on the tumour growth rate is significant. Using a hypoxia induced cell quiescence limit which affects 50% of cells with and oxygen levels less than 1 mm Hg, the tumour doubling time increases to over 200 days and the time of tumour growth for a clinically detectable tumour (109 cells) increases from 3 to 8 years. A biologically plausible Monte Carlo model of hypoxic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumour growth has been developed for real time assessment of the effects of multiple biological parameters which impact upon the response of the individual patient to fractionated radiotherapy.

  8. Efficient Monte Carlo modelling of individual tumour cell propagation for hypoxic head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo tumour model has been developed to simulate tumour cell propagation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The model aims to eventually provide a radiobiological tool for radiation oncology clinicians to plan patient treatment schedules based on properties of the individual tumour. The inclusion of an oxygen distribution amongst the tumour cells enables the model to incorporate hypoxia and other associated parameters, which affect tumour growth. The object oriented program FORTRAN 95 has been used to create the model algorithm, with Monte Carlo methods being employed to randomly assign many of the cell parameters from probability distributions. Hypoxia has been implemented through random assignment of partial oxygen pressure values to individual cells during tumour growth, based on in vivo Eppendorf probe experimental data. The accumulation of up to 10 million virtual tumour cells in 15 min of computer running time has been achieved. The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia are the parameters which most influence the final tumour growth rate. For a tumour with a doubling time of 40 days, the final stem cell percentage is approximately 1% of the total cell population. The effect of hypoxia on the tumour growth rate is significant. Using a hypoxia induced cell quiescence limit which affects 50% of cells with and oxygen levels less than 1 mm Hg, the tumour doubling time increases to over 200 days and the time of tumour growth for a clinically detectable tumour (109 cells) increases from 3 to 8 years. A biologically plausible Monte Carlo model of hypoxic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumour growth has been developed for real time assessment of the effects of multiple biological parameters which impact upon the response of the individual patient to fractionated radiotherapy

  9. Modelling intercellular communication and its effects on tumour invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a model aiming at the description of intercellular communication on the invasive character of gliomas. We start from a previous model of ours based on a cellular automaton and develop a new version of it in a three-dimensional geometry. Introducing the hydrodynamic limit of the automaton we obtain a macroscopic model involving a nonlinear diffusion equation. We show that this macroscopic model is quite adequate for the description of realistic situations. Comparison of the simulations with experimental results shows agreement with the finding that the inhibition of intercellular communication (through gap junctions) tends to decrease migration. As an application of our model we estimated the possible increase in life expectancy, due to reduced cell migration mediated by the inhibition of intercellular communication, on patients suffering from gliomas. We find that the obtained increase may amount to a 20% gain in the case of unresectable tumours

  10. Challenges in providing culturally-competent care to patients with metastatic brain tumours and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Lianne; Slater, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Being diagnosed with a metastatic brain tumour can be devastating as it is characterized by very low cure rates, as well as significant morbidity and mortality. Given the poor life expectancy and progressive disability that ensues, patients and family members experience much turmoil, which includes losses that bring about changes to family roles, routines and relationships. Crisis and conflict are common during such major disruptions to a family system, as individual members attempt to make sense of the illness experience based on cultural and spiritual beliefs, past experiences and personal philosophies. It is imperative health care providers strive towards increased awareness and knowledge of how culture affects the overall experience of illness and death in order to help create a mutually satisfactory care plan. Providing culturally-competent care entails the use of proper communication skills to facilitate the exploration of patient and family perspectives and allows for mutual decision making. A case study will illustrate the challenges encountered in providing culturally-competent care to a woman with brain cancer and her family. As the patient's health declined, the family entered into a state of crisis where communication between family members and health care professionals was strained; leading to conflict and sub-optimal outcomes. This paper will address the ethical dilemma of providing culturally-competent care when a patient's safety is at risk, and the nursing implications of upholding best practices in the context of differing beliefs and priorities. PMID:25265763

  11. Increasing Rates of Brain Tumours in the Swedish National Inpatient Register and the Causes of Death Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Hardell

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz–300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., “possibly”, carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR and Causes of Death Register (CDR to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998–2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007–2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008–2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk.

  12. Metastatic behaviour of primary human tumours in a zebrafish xenotransplantation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberrant regulation of cell migration drives progression of many diseases, including cancer cell invasion and metastasis formation. Analysis of tumour invasion and metastasis in living organisms to date is cumbersome and involves difficult and time consuming investigative techniques. For primary human tumours we establish here a simple, fast, sensitive and cost-effective in vivo model to analyse tumour invasion and metastatic behaviour. We fluorescently labelled small explants from gastrointestinal human tumours and investigated their metastatic behaviour after transplantation into zebrafish embryos and larvae. The transparency of the zebrafish embryos allows to follow invasion, migration and micrometastasis formation in real-time. High resolution imaging was achieved through laser scanning confocal microscopy of live zebrafish. In the transparent zebrafish embryos invasion, circulation of tumour cells in blood vessels, migration and micrometastasis formation can be followed in real-time. Xenografts of primary human tumours showed invasiveness and micrometastasis formation within 24 hours after transplantation, which was absent when non-tumour tissue was implanted. Furthermore, primary human tumour cells, when organotopically implanted in the zebrafish liver, demonstrated invasiveness and metastatic behaviour, whereas primary control cells remained in the liver. Pancreatic tumour cells showed no metastatic behaviour when injected into cloche mutant embryos, which lack a functional vasculature. Our results show that the zebrafish is a useful in vivo animal model for rapid analysis of invasion and metastatic behaviour of primary human tumour specimen

  13. International Case-Control Study of Adult Brain, Head and Neck Tumours: Results of the Feasibility Study (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the feasibility study were to collect and analyse the information necessary to assess the feasibility of a multi-centric study of adult head and neck tumours (including brain tumours) and mobile telephones. Information was obtained on the availability and accessibility of records from companies, the prevalence of mobile telephone use over time and the expected number of tumour cases in the proposed study regions. The conclusion is that it is feasible to develop a study of the relation between mobile telephone use and brain cancer risk. The feasibility of a study of the relation between radiofrequency exposure and cancer risk is, however, unclear at present. It is unknown whether a sufficiently accurate and precise RF exposure gradient can be derived to classify adequately each subject in the proposed study. A study of the relation between mobile telephone use and risk of salivary gland tumours and acoustic neurinomas is probably feasible, but more information is required about the logistic difficulties of ascertaining these cases in the study regions. Two subcommittees have been formed to develop the exposure measurement and epidemiological aspect of the study. (author)

  14. Tumours and tumourous diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book on tumours and tumourous diseases comprises two parts: 1. Bone tumours and tumourous lesions. 2. Soft tissue tumours and tumourous lesions. Details are presented on pathology, diagnosis, conservative and perioperative therapy, surgical therapy, complications after resection, indicators for amputation, recommendations for follow-up treatment, radiotherapy, radionuclide therapy, alternative therapies, therapy concepts in case of metastases, tissue engineering and plastic surgery. (uke)

  15. The HealthAgents Ontology: How to Represent the Knowledge behind a Brain Tumour Distributed Decision System

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Bo; Croitoru, Madalina; Roset, Roman; David, Dupplaw; Miguel, Lurgi; Srinandan, Dasmahapatra; Lewis, Paul; Martinez-Miranda, Juan; Saez, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present our experience of representing the knowledge behind HealthAgents, a distributed decision support system for brain tumour diagnosis. Our initial motivation came from the distributed nature of the information involved in the system and has been enriched by clinicians' requirements and data access restrictions. We present in detail the steps we have taken towards building our ontology starting from knowledge acquisition to data access and reasoning. We motivate our repre...

  16. Preoperative mapping of cortical language areas in adult brain tumour patients using PET and individual non-normalised SPM analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In patients scheduled for the resection of perisylvian brain tumours, knowledge of the cortical topography of language functions is crucial in order to avoid neurological deficits. We investigated the applicability of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) without stereotactic normalisation for individual preoperative language function brain mapping using positron emission tomography (PET). Seven right-handed adult patients with left-sided brain tumours (six frontal and one temporal) underwent 12 oxygen-15 labelled water PET scans during overt verb generation and rest. Individual activation maps were calculated for P<0.005 and P<0.001 without anatomical normalisation and overlaid onto the individuals' magnetic resonance images for preoperative planning. Activations corresponding to Broca's and Wernicke's areas were found in five and six cases, respectively, for P<0.005 and in three and six cases, respectively, for P<0.001. One patient with a glioma located in the classical Broca's area without aphasic symptoms presented an activation of the adjacent inferior frontal cortex and of a right-sided area homologous to Broca's area. Four additional patients with left frontal tumours also presented activations of the right-sided Broca's homologue; two of these showed aphasic symptoms and two only a weak or no activation of Broca's area. Other frequently observed activations included bilaterally the superior temporal gyri, prefrontal cortices, anterior insulae, motor areas and the cerebellum. The middle and inferior temporal gyri were activated predominantly on the left. An SPM group analysis (P<0.05, corrected) in patients with left frontal tumours confirmed the activation pattern shown by the individual analyses. We conclude that SPM analyses without stereotactic normalisation offer a promising alternative for analysing individual preoperative language function brain mapping studies. The observed right frontal activations agree with proposed reorganisation processes, but

  17. Transient Global Amnesia and Brain Tumour: Chance Concurrence or Aetiological Association? Case Report and Systematic Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Milburn-McNulty, Phil; Larner, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient presenting with episodes of transient amnesia, some with features suggestive of transient global amnesia (TGA), and some more reminiscent of transient epileptic amnesia. Investigation with neuroimaging revealed an intrinsic lesion in the right amygdala, with features suggestive of low-grade neoplasia. We undertook a systematic review of the literature on TGA and brain tumour. Fewer than 20 cases were identified, some of which did not conform to the clinical diagnostic crit...

  18. A study of patients with a primary malignant brain tumour and their carers: symptoms and access to services.

    OpenAIRE

    Arber, A; Faithfull, S; Plaskota, M; Lucas, C.; De Vries, K.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the symptom experience, access to supportive care services and rehabilitation of patients with a primary malignant brain tumour (PMBT) and their carers. Methods A case review of 70 patients with a diagnosis of PMBT who received palliative care in five specialist palliative care units between July 2005 and June 2006. The review examined patient’s symptom experience, care issues, access to rehabilitation and access to supportive care services....

  19. Long-term therapy related side effect on endocrine system among survivor with paediatric brain tumour and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Shu-wing, Sophia; 陳舒穎

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and brain tumours are frequently seen in childhood malignancies. With the improved effectiveness of treatments, approximately 70–80% patients can be cured of their primary illness. However, therapy-related long-term sequelae among survivors are becoming a major concern. Traditional treatments include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, and these have been shown to have prolonged side effects on the endocrine system, and symptoms may develop mon...

  20. Growth and growth hormone secretion in children following treatment of brain tumours with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the growth of 144 children after treatment of brain tumours distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary axis. All had cranial irradiation and 87 spinal irradiation. In 56 patients observed without intervention for 3 years, height SDS in the cranial (CR) group (n=20) declined from 0.02 to -0.44 and in the craniospinal (CS) group (n=36) from -0.28 to -1.11. Failure of spinal growth had a marked effect in the CS group. The onset of puberty was slightly but not significantly advanced; median ages at onset of puberty were 10.3 years in girls and 12.1 years in boys. Of the total group 86.4% had clinical and biochemical evidence of growth hormone insufficiency. Fifty-two children, 33 (28 CS; 5 CR) of whome were prepubertal, received biosynthetic human growth hormone, in a dose of 15 mU/m2/week by daily injection for a period of one year. Height velocity SDS increased significantly in both groups from -2.74 to +1.90 (CS) and from -1.0 to +4.26 (CR). Spinal response to GH treatment was restricted in the craniospinal group. (authors)

  1. Influence of X-rays on early response gene expression in rat astrocytes and brain tumour cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrdoljak, E.; Borchardt, P.E.; Bill, C.A.; Stephens, L.C.; Tofilon, P.J. [Anderson (M.D.) Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on c-fos, c-jun and jun-B mRNA levels were determined in cultures of rat perinatal type 1 astrocytes and two rat brain tumour cell lines, 175A and 9L. In astrocyte cultures X-ray doses as low as 1 Gy induced the expression of c-fos and jun-B but had essentially no effect on c-jun. The maximum increase in expression was found 1 h after irradiation, which then rapidly returned to control levels. These findings suggest that astrocytes may play a role in mediating the radiation response of the central nervous system via X-ray-induced changes in gene expression. In contrast, doses of up to 20 Gy had no effect on c-fos, c-jun and jun-B mRNA levels in the two brain tumour cell lines. In addition, whereas 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate induced the expression of these genes in astrocytes, it had little or no effect on fos or jun expression in 9L or 175A cells. These results suggest that the signal transduction pathways mediating radiation-induced genes expression may be different in normal astrocytes and brain tumour cells. (author).

  2. Influence of X-rays on early response gene expression in rat astrocytes and brain tumour cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ionizing radiation on c-fos, c-jun and jun-B mRNA levels were determined in cultures of rat perinatal type 1 astrocytes and two rat brain tumour cell lines, 175A and 9L. In astrocyte cultures X-ray doses as low as 1 Gy induced the expression of c-fos and jun-B but had essentially no effect on c-jun. The maximum increase in expression was found 1 h after irradiation, which then rapidly returned to control levels. These findings suggest that astrocytes may play a role in mediating the radiation response of the central nervous system via X-ray-induced changes in gene expression. In contrast, doses of up to 20 Gy had no effect on c-fos, c-jun and jun-B mRNA levels in the two brain tumour cell lines. In addition, whereas 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate induced the expression of these genes in astrocytes, it had little or no effect on fos or jun expression in 9L or 175A cells. These results suggest that the signal transduction pathways mediating radiation-induced genes expression may be different in normal astrocytes and brain tumour cells. (author)

  3. Dexamethasone and radiation response in the Lewis lung tumour model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of dexamethasone on the radiation response of Lewis lung tumour growth in the gastronemius muscle of mice was studied. The log average tumour volume/time curve did not show any significant difference in radiation response between the mice given dexamethasone and the mice not given the drug. (UK)

  4. Nonlinear modelling of cancer: bridging the gap between cells and tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite major scientific, medical and technological advances over the last few decades, a cure for cancer remains elusive. The disease initiation is complex, and including initiation and avascular growth, onset of hypoxia and acidosis due to accumulation of cells beyond normal physiological conditions, inducement of angiogenesis from the surrounding vasculature, tumour vascularization and further growth, and invasion of surrounding tissue and metastasis. Although the focus historically has been to study these events through experimental and clinical observations, mathematical modelling and simulation that enable analysis at multiple time and spatial scales have also complemented these efforts. Here, we provide an overview of this multiscale modelling focusing on the growth phase of tumours and bypassing the initial stage of tumourigenesis. While we briefly review discrete modelling, our focus is on the continuum approach. We limit the scope further by considering models of tumour progression that do not distinguish tumour cells by their age. We also do not consider immune system interactions nor do we describe models of therapy. We do discuss hybrid-modelling frameworks, where the tumour tissue is modelled using both discrete (cell-scale) and continuum (tumour-scale) elements, thus connecting the micrometre to the centimetre tumour scale. We review recent examples that incorporate experimental data into model parameters. We show that recent mathematical modelling predicts that transport limitations of cell nutrients, oxygen and growth factors may result in cell death that leads to morphological instability, providing a mechanism for invasion via tumour fingering and fragmentation. These conditions induce selection pressure for cell survivability, and may lead to additional genetic mutations. Mathematical modelling further shows that parameters that control the tumour mass shape also control its ability to invade. Thus, tumour morphology may serve as a predictor of

  5. Ncut在颅脑 MRI肿瘤提取中的应用研究%ON APPLYING NORMALISED CUT TO BRAIN MRI TUMOUR EXTRACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋广军; 赵春兰

    2013-01-01

    颅脑肿瘤自身边缘包含重要的病变信息,提取脑肿瘤区域,对脑部疾病的诊断和治疗具有重要意义。 Ncut ( Normalized Cut)是基于图理的典型分割方法。将Ncut算法应用到颅脑MRI肿瘤图像的分割中,针对不同颅脑MRI肿瘤图像,进行相关参数测试,选择合适的权重及参数,进行颅脑MR肿瘤的提取。通过利用Matlab进行仿真测试可知Ncut方法能够提取出肿瘤所在的基本轮廓,取得较好效果。%The brain tumour edge contains important pathology information itself ;it has the important meaning to extract brain tumour area for brain disease diagnosis and treatment .Ncut algorithm is the typical segmentation method based on graph theory .We apply the Ncut algorithm to MRI brain tumour image segmentation , test the related parameters according to different brain MRI tumour images , and select appropriate weights and parameters to extract MR image brain tumour .Through the use of Matlab in simulation test , we know that the Ncut method can extract the basic outline of tumour and achieve good effect .

  6. In vitro growth environment produces lipidomic and electron transport chain abnormalities in mitochondria from non-tumorigenic astrocytes and brain tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas N Seyfried

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial lipidome influences ETC (electron transport chain and cellular bioenergetic efficiency. Brain tumours are largely dependent on glycolysis for energy due to defects in mitochondria and oxidative phosphorylation. In the present study, we used shotgun lipidomics to compare the lipidome in highly purified mitochondria isolated from normal brain, from brain tumour tissue, from cultured tumour cells and from non-tumorigenic astrocytes. The tumours included the CT-2A astrocytoma and an EPEN (ependymoblastoma, both syngeneic with the C57BL/6J (B6 mouse strain. The mitochondrial lipidome in cultured CT-2A and EPEN tumour cells were compared with those in cultured astrocytes and in solid tumours grown in vivo. Major differences were found between normal tissue and tumour tissue and between in vivo and in vitro growth environments for the content or composition of ethanolamine glycerophospholipids, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. The mitochondrial lipid abnormalities in solid tumours and in cultured cells were associated with reductions in multiple ETC activities, especially Complex I. The in vitro growth environment produced lipid and ETC abnormalities in cultured non-tumorigenic astrocytes that were similar to those associated with tumorigenicity. It appears that the culture environment obscures the boundaries of the Crabtree and the Warburg effects. These results indicate that in vitro growth environments can produce abnormalities in mitochondrial lipids and ETC activities, thus contributing to a dependency on glycolysis for ATP production.

  7. Pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema in living rat brain via 1H2O MRI: implications for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Daniel C.; Li, Xin; Springer, Charles S., Jr.

    2005-05-01

    In addition to its common usage as a tracer in metabolic and physiological studies, deuterium possesses anti-tumoural activity and confers protection against γ-irradiation. A more recent interest in deuterium emanates from the search for alternatives capable of improving neutron penetrance whilst reducing healthy tissue radiation dose deposition in boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours. Despite this potential clinical application, deuterium induces brain oedema, which is detrimental to neutron capture therapy. In this study, five adult male rats were titrated with deuterated drinking water while brain oedema was monitored via water proton magnetic resonance imaging. This report concludes that deuterium, as well as deuterium-induced brain oedema, possesses a uniform brain bio-distribution. At a steady-state blood fluid deuteration value of 16%, when the deuterium isotope fraction in drinking water was 25%, a mean oedematous volume change of 9 ± 2% (p-value effective dose reduction factors using simple linear transport calculations. While body fluid deuteration enhances thermal neutron flux penetrance and reduces dose deposition, oedema has the opposite effect because it increases the volume of interest, e.g., the brain volume. Thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors could be reduced by as much as ~10% in the presence of a 9% water volume increase (oedema). All three authors have contributed equally to this work.

  8. Double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and a “cocktail” of non-tumourous elements is a reliable, quick and easy technique for inferring methylation status in glioblastomas and other primary brain tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Our aim was to develop a new protocol for MGMT immunohistochemistry with good agreement between observers and good correlation with molecular genetic tests of tumour methylation. We examined 40 primary brain tumours (30 glioblastomas and 10 oligodendroglial tumours) with our new technique, namely double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and a "cocktail" of non-tumour antigens (CD34, CD45 and CD68). We compared the results with single-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA, a recognised molecular genetic technique which we applied as the gold-standard for the methylation status). Results Double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT produced a visual separation of tumourous and non-tumourous elements on the same histological slide, making it quick and easy to determine whether tumour cell nuclei were MGMT-positive or MGMT-negative (and thereby infer the methylation status of the tumour). We found good agreement between observers (kappa 0.76) and within observer (kappa 0.84). Furthermore, double-labelling showed good specificity (80%), sensitivity (73.33%), positive predictive value (PPV, 83.33%) and negative predictive value (NPV, 68.75%) compared to MS-MLPA. Double-labelling was quicker and easier to assess than single-labelling and it outperformed quantitative computerised image analysis of MGMT single-labelling in terms of sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV. Conclusions Double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and a cocktail of non-tumourous elements provides a "one look" method for determining whether tumour cell nuclei are MGMT-positive or MGMT-negative. This can be used to infer the methylation status of the tumour. There is good observer agreement and good specificity, sensitivity, PPV and NPV compared to a molecular gold-standard. PMID:24252243

  9. A Stochastic and State Space Model for Tumour Growth and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Yuan Tan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a state space model documenting Gompertz behaviour of tumour growth. The state space model consists of two sub-models: a stochastic system model that is an extension of the deterministic model proposed by Gyllenberg and Webb (1991, and an observation model that is a statistical model based on data for the total number of tumour cells over time. In the stochastic system model we derive through stochastic equations the probability distributions of the numbers of different types of tumour cells. Combining with the statistic model, we use these distribution results to develop a generalized Bayesian method and a Gibbs sampling procedure to estimate the unknown parameters and to predict the state variables (number of tumour cells. We apply these models and methods to real data and to computer simulated data to illustrate the usefulness of the models, the methods, and the procedures.

  10. Tumour bed irradiation of human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model using a common X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies that investigate the radiation of human tumour xenografts require an appropriate radiation source and highly standardized conditions during radiation. This work reports on the design of standardized irradiation device using a commercially available X-ray tube with a custom constructed lead collimator with two circular apertures and an animal bed plate, permitting synchronous irradiation of two animals. Dosimetry and the corresponding methodology for radiotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft tumours transplanted to and growing subcutaneously on the right lower limb in a nude rat model were investigated. Procedures and results described herein prove the feasibility of use of the device, which is applicable for any investigation involving irradiation of non-tumorous and tumorous lesions in small animals. (author)

  11. Tumour bed irradiation of human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model using a common X-ray tube

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V Tokalov; W Enghardt; N Abolmaali

    2010-06-01

    Studies that investigate the radiation of human tumour xenografts require an appropriate radiation source and highly standardized conditions during radiation. This work reports on the design of a standardized irradiation device using a commercially available X-ray tube with a custom constructed lead collimator with two circular apertures and an animal bed plate, permitting synchronous irradiation of two animals. Dosimetry and the corresponding methodology for radiotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft tumours transplanted to and growing subcutaneously on the right lower limb in a nude rat model were investigated. Procedures and results described herein prove the feasibility of use of the device, which is applicable for any investigation involving irradiation of non-tumorous and tumorous lesions in small animals.

  12. Brain tumour imaging with carbon-11 choline: comparison with FDG PET and gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtani, Toshiyuki; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Ishiuchi, Shogo; Saito, Nobuhito; Sasaki, Tomio [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Gunma University School of Medicine (Japan); Oriuchi, Noboru; Inoue, Tomio [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Gunma University School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical potential of methyl-{sup 11}C-choline ({sup 11}C-choline) in the diagnosis of brain tumours. To this end, the results of {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) in 22 patients suspected of having brain tumours were compared with the findings of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET. A histopathological diagnosis was made for each patient during open surgery. The standardised uptake values of brain tumours and the tumour-to-white matter count (T/W) ratios were determined. The degree of {sup 11}C-choline accumulation noted in PET images was compared with the gadolinium-enhanced areas of MR images. The mean T/W ratio of {sup 11}C-choline in high-grade gliomas was found to be higher than that in low-grade gliomas. This difference was statistically significant (mean{+-}SD: 8.7{+-}6.2, n=9 versus 1.5{+-}0.7, n=5, P<0.03) when data pertaining to the prominent uptake of {sup 11}C-choline in a patient with a pilocytic astrocytoma were excluded. {sup 11}C-choline PET failed to detect non-neoplastic lesions in two patients. Areas of {sup 11}C-choline accumulation in PET scans were larger than areas enhanced on MR images in five cases involving high-grade gliomas. {sup 11}C-choline PET differentiated between low-grade gliomas and high-grade gliomas, but did not differentiate between low-grade gliomas and non-neoplastic lesions. The combination of {sup 11}C-choline PET and MR imaging may provide investigators with an accurate means by which to identify high-grade gliomas. (orig.)

  13. Brain tumour imaging with carbon-11 choline: comparison with FDG PET and gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical potential of methyl-11C-choline (11C-choline) in the diagnosis of brain tumours. To this end, the results of 11C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) in 22 patients suspected of having brain tumours were compared with the findings of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET. A histopathological diagnosis was made for each patient during open surgery. The standardised uptake values of brain tumours and the tumour-to-white matter count (T/W) ratios were determined. The degree of 11C-choline accumulation noted in PET images was compared with the gadolinium-enhanced areas of MR images. The mean T/W ratio of 11C-choline in high-grade gliomas was found to be higher than that in low-grade gliomas. This difference was statistically significant (mean±SD: 8.7±6.2, n=9 versus 1.5±0.7, n=5, P11C-choline in a patient with a pilocytic astrocytoma were excluded. 11C-choline PET failed to detect non-neoplastic lesions in two patients. Areas of 11C-choline accumulation in PET scans were larger than areas enhanced on MR images in five cases involving high-grade gliomas. 11C-choline PET differentiated between low-grade gliomas and high-grade gliomas, but did not differentiate between low-grade gliomas and non-neoplastic lesions. The combination of 11C-choline PET and MR imaging may provide investigators with an accurate means by which to identify high-grade gliomas. (orig.)

  14. Tumour control by whole brain irradiation of anti-VEGF-treated mice bearing intracerebral glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.C. Verhoeff; L.J.A. Stalpers; A. Claes; K.E. Hovinga; G.D. Musters; W. Vandertop; D.J. Richel; W.P.J. Leenders; W.R. van Furth

    2009-01-01

    Aim of the study: Tumour angiogenesis and invasion are key features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Angiogenesis inhibitors increase progression-free survival (PFS) of recurrent GBM patients. VEGF inhibition controls the bulk tumour growth by inhibition of angiogenesis, but does not inhibit the in

  15. Tumour control by whole brain irradiation of anti-VEGF-treated mice bearing intracerebral glioma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, J.J.; Stalpers, L.J.; Claes, A.; Hovinga, K.E.; Musters, G.D.; Top, W.P. van der; Richel, D.J.; Leenders, W.P.J.; Furth, W.R. van

    2009-01-01

    AIM OF THE STUDY: Tumour angiogenesis and invasion are key features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Angiogenesis inhibitors increase progression-free survival (PFS) of recurrent GBM patients. VEGF inhibition controls the bulk tumour growth by inhibition of angiogenesis, but does not inhibit the in

  16. Contribution of sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate brain scintigraphy in the diagnosis of tumours of posterior fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work concerns 38 posterior cranial fossa tumour cases subjected to sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate brain scintigraphy between May 1974 and June 1976. 33 of these patients have undergone an anatomical check while for the remaining 5, the existence of a posterior fossa tumour is established from the conjunction of clinical signs and other paraclinical examinations. The procedure was the same for all these 38 patients: after a 300 μC/kg injection of tracer, an immediate angioscintigraphic period, an early set of pictures (half an hour after the tracer injection) then delayed set (4 to 5 hours later) taken from 4 angles: front, back and two profiles. The examination was performed with an OHIO NUCLEAR SIEMENS gamma camera and sometimes a conventional scanner as well (the latter giving no better a diagnosis than the former). In 75% of the cases a hyperfixation of the injected tracer was observed and its site located quite accurately in the posterior fossa tumour. The etiology of the lesion could be diagnosed in 'most probable' or 'least probable' terms. Examination of work by other authors, who obtained similar results, leads to the conclusion that this method is very helpful in the diagnosis of posterior fossa tumours when used as a means of early detection, before the undertaking of more complex neuroradiological explorations

  17. In Silico Modelling of Treatment-Induced Tumour Cell Kill: Developments and Advances

    OpenAIRE

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Harriss-Phillips, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical and stochastic computer (in silico) models of tumour growth and treatment response of the past and current eras are presented, outlining the aims of the models, model methodology, the key parameters used to describe the tumour system, and treatment modality applied, as well as reported outcomes from simulations. Fractionated radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and combined therapies are reviewed, providing a comprehensive overview of the modelling literature for current modellers and rad...

  18. Advance care planning in patients with brain tumours: A prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal Song

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess and understand the awareness and experience of brain tumour (BT patients in discussing Advance Care Planning (ACP, to identify main symptoms experienced, physical and functional status perceived quality of life, and level of coping. Methods: A prospective cohort study with an initial open-ended questionnaire followed by semi-structured interview questions regarding ACP with 18 patients diagnosed with BT (WHO Grade I-IV, metastatic BT in hospital and community. Standardized assessments measured coping strategies, and quality of life (QoL. Interview transcripts regarding ACP discussions were analyzed, coded and interpreted using qualitative analytic techniques for thematic analyses. Results: Participants' mean age was 51 years (range 22-65 years, female (61%; median time since BT diagnosis was 1.5 years and just over half (56% had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Fatigue was the most common symptom reported by 83% of participants. Overall, participants indicated good QoL and used more problem-focused coping strategies including ‘acceptance’ and ‘positive reframing’. Thematic analyses indicated that participants had limited awareness and understanding of ACP, variable views on appropriate timing of ACP discussions and change of decisions over illness trajectory. Most felt able to discuss ACP and preferred dedicated sessions by a trained health professional. Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of providing timely information regarding ACP to BT patients during the course of their disease. Established ACP discussions have an important role in enhancing patient autonomy and to guide delivery of end-of-life care. The demonstrated low uptake of ACP in this pilot study shows need for improved awareness in clinical practice for timely ACP discussions and multifaceted interventions system-wide in implementing ACP

  19. Misdiagnosis of Child Abuse Related to Delay in Diagnosing a Paediatric Brain Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Wrennall

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Conflicting opinion regarding the relative weight that should be allocated to the investigation of organic causes of child illness, compared to the pursuit of suspicions of child abuse, has generated considerable public debate. The discourse of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy/Fabricated and Induced Illness is at the centre of contention. In particular, concern has arisen that children’s medical needs are being neglected when their conditions are misdiagnosed as child abuse. This paper documents a case study in which the use of Child Protection procedures was linked to the belief that the child’s illness had “no organic cause.” The case study is contextualised in a review of literature relevant to the diagnostic process. The deployment of the Child Protection perspective resulted in significant delay in the diagnosis of the child’s brain tumour. The child was ultimately found to be suffering from an optic chasm mass lesion involving the hypothalamus and the medial temporal regions, resulting in Diencephalic Syndrome. The evidence in this case is that erring on the side of suspecting Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy/Fabricated and Induced Illness, was not “erring on the side of the child.” Several lessons need to be learned from the case. The importance of ensuring that the Child Protection perspective does not displace adequate assessment of alternative explanations for the child’s condition is emphasised, as is the need for good communication in medical relationships. Strategies involving empathy, mediation, negotiation and conflict resolution may provide a more appropriate and therapeutic alternative to the use of Child Protection procedures in cases where the diagnosis is contentious. The need to re-write relevant policy, protocols and guidance is imperative.

  20. Potential of anti-cancer therapy based on anti-miR-155 oligonucleotides in glioma and brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltronieri, Palmiro; D'Urso, Pietro I; Mezzolla, Valeria; D'Urso, Oscar F

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are aberrantly expressed in many cancers and can exert tumour-suppressive or oncogenic functions. As oncomirs promote growth of cancer cells and support survival during chemotherapy, thus microRNA-silencing therapies could be a valuable approach to be associated with anticancer drugs and chemotherapy treatments. miR-155 microRNA was found overexpressed in different types of cancer, such as leukaemias (PML, B-cell lymphomas), lung cancer and glioblastoma. GABA-A receptor downregulation was found correlated with glioma grading, with decreasing levels associated with higher grade of malignancies. A relationship between knock-down of miR-155 and re-expression of GABRA 1 protein in vivo was recently individuated. This finding has implication on the effectiveness of RNA-silencing approaches against miR-155 with the scope to control proliferation and signalling pathways regulated by GABA-A receptor. Applying microRNAs for treatment of brain tumours poses several problems, and fields to be solved are mainly the passage of the brain-blood barrier and the targeted delivery to specific cell types. Glioblastoma multiforme cells bud off microvesicles that deliver cytoplasmic contents to nearby cells. Thus, the exploitation of these mechanisms to deliver antagomir therapeutics targeting microvescicles in the brain could take the lead in the near future in the treatment for brain cancers in substitution of invasive surgical intervention. PMID:22834637

  1. Tuberous sclerosis-A model for tumour growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Kayleigh M; Dunlop, Elaine A

    2016-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare genetic disorder where patients develop benign tumours in several organ systems. Central to TSC pathology is hyper-activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling pathway, which is a key controller of cell growth. As a result, TSC model systems are a valuable tool for examining mTORC1-driven cellular processes. The immunosuppressant, rapamycin, is a specific inhibitor of mTORC1 and has shown promise as a therapeutic agent in TSC as well as in malignancy. This review will focus on the cellular processes controlled by mTORC1 and how TSC-deficient cell lines and mouse models have broadened our understanding of the mTORC1 signalling network. It will also discuss how our knowledge of TSC signalling can help us understand sporadic conditions where mTORC1 activity is implicated in disease onset or progression, and the possibility of using rapamycin to treat sporadic disease. PMID:26816112

  2. Numerical modelling of biopotential field for detection of breast tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, E Y K; Ng, W K; Sim, L S J; Rajendra Acharya, U

    2007-08-01

    Breast cancer is a disease characterised by the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. These cancer cells can travel through the body by way of blood or lymph nodes. Previous studies have indicated that, changes in the electrical properties of abnormal breast are more significant compared to the breast normal tissues. In the present study, a simple 2D models of breast (close to realistic), with and without artificially inserted malignant cancer were simulated, based upon electrical activity within the breast. We developed an inhomogeneous female breast model, closer to the actual, by considering a breast as a hemisphere with various layers of unequal thickness in supine condition. In order to determine the potential distribution developed due to a dipole source, isotropic homogeneous conductivity was assigned to each of these compartments and the volume conductor problem was solved using finite element method. Significant changes in the potential distribution were recoded in the malignant and normal breast regions. The surface potential decreases about 0.5%, for the small malignant region of surface area 13 mm(2) (spherical diameter=2mm). And it (surface potential) decreases about 16.4% for large malignant surface area of 615 mm(2) (spherical diameter=14 mm). Hence, the results show that, the sizes of tumours result in the reduction of surface potential and follows a fourth order polynomial equation. Thus, biofield analysis yields promising results in the detection of the breast cancer of various sizes. PMID:17145053

  3. Using mathematical models to estimate drug resistance and treatment efficacy via CT scan measurements of tumour volume.

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, W. M.; Reznek, R. H.; Hallett, M; Slevin, M L

    1990-01-01

    A previously described mathematical model designed to evaluate resistance and tumour-kill for individual patients, and to predict changing tumour sizes, has been applied to patients with small cell lung cancer. The model requires tumour volume measurements, and these were obtained via computed tomography scans of the chest. The model fitted the data well, and was able to predict later tumour volumes using earlier ones, as well as suggesting times at which to change or abandon treatment for in...

  4. On the importance of the submicrovascular network in a computational model of tumour growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Lesart, Anne-Cécile; Van Der Sanden, Boudewijn; Hamard, Lauriane; Estève, François; Stéphanou, Angélique

    2012-01-01

    A computational model is potentially a powerful tool to apprehend complex phenomena like solid tumour growth and to predict the outcome of therapies. To that end, the confrontation of the model with experiments is essential to validate this tool. In this study, we develop a computational model specifically dedicated to the interpretation of tumour growth as observed in a mouse model with a dorsal skinfold chamber. Observation of the skin vasculature at the dorsal window scale shows a sparse n...

  5. Object-Oriented Paradigms for Modelling Vascular Tumour Growth: a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Connor, A J; Cooper, J; Byrne, H.M.; Maini, P.K.; Mckeever, S.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by a family of related hybrid multiscale models, we have built an object-oriented framework for developing and implementing multiscale models of vascular tumour growth. The models are implemented in our framework as a case study to highlight how object-oriented programming techniques and good object-oriented design may be used effectively to develop hybrid multiscale models of vascular tumour growth. The intention is that this paper will serve as a useful reference for researchers m...

  6. Cellular Telephones, Magnetic Field Exposure, Risk of Brain Tumours and Cancer at Other Sites: A Cohort Study (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study is to investigate whether exposure to electromagnetic fields from cellular telephones is associated with brain tumours and cancer at other sites. Key information has been obtained on all cellular telephone subscribers in Denmark from 1 January 1982 to 31 December 1995. The overall subscriber cohort will include approximately 500,000 individuals. Collected information includes name of subscriber, address, telephone number, system used (analogue or digital), and annual use of the telephone. The name and address of the subscribers will be linked to the Central Population Register, and the personal identification number will be supplied in addition to information on vital status and migration. Finally, all members of the cohort will be linked to the Danish Cancer Registry, and the observed number of tumours will be compared with those expected on the basis of national cancer incidence rates stratified by sex, age, and calendar time. (author)

  7. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging in brain tumours : The Western Australia positron emission tomography/cyclotron service experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans in the first 49 patients referred with either possible brain tumour or brain tumour recurrence were reviewed. FDG-PET imaging was reported with reference to anatomical imaging. Based on the report the FDG study was classified as either positive or negative for the presence of tumour. Thirty-eight cases were included in the analysis, 21 having pathological data and 17 with diagnostic clinical follow up. Eleven were excluded, as they had inadequate follow-up data. Of the 21 cases with pathology, 18 were shown to have tumour. In this group there were five false-negative scans and two false-positive PET scans. Seventeen cases were assessed by clinical follow up, nine were considered to have been tumour. There were two false negatives with one false positive. The overall sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 74, 73, 87 and 53% respectively. This is similar to figures previously quoted in published work. Despite relatively limited numbers, the utility of FDG PET imaging in our hands is similar to published reports. With a positive predictive value of 87%, a positive FDG study indicates a high likelihood that there is brain tumour present. A negative study does not exclude the presence of tumour

  8. Whole brain irradiation with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Local tumour control and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehlke, Oliver; Wucherpfennig, David; Prokic, Vesna [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Fels, Franziska [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); St. Josefs Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenburg (Germany); Frings, Lars [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Freiburg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Egger, Karl [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Weyerbrock, Astrid [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Freiburg (Germany); Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-01-16

    Hippocampal-avoidance whole brain radiotherapy (HA-WBRT) for multiple brain metastases may prevent treatment-related cognitive decline, compared to standard WBRT. Additionally, simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) on individual metastases may further improve the outcome. Here, we present initial data concerning local tumour control (LTC), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), toxicity and safety for this new irradiation technique. Twenty patients, enrolled between 2011 and 2013, were treated with HA-WBRT (30 Gy in 12 fractions, D{sub 98} {sub %} to hippocampus ≤ 9 Gy) and a SIB (51 Gy) on multiple (2-13) metastases using a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) approach based on 2-4 arcs. Metastases were evaluated bidimensionally along the two largest diameters in contrast-enhanced three-dimensional T1-weighed MRI. Median follow-up was 40 weeks. The median time to progression of boosted metastases has not been reached yet, corresponding to a LTC rate of 73 %. Median intracranial PFS was 40 weeks, corresponding to a 1-year PFS of 45.3 %. Median OS was 71.5 weeks, corresponding to a 1-year OS of 60 %. No obvious acute or late toxicities grade > 2 (NCI CTCAE v4.03) were observed. D{sub mean} to the bilateral hippocampi was 6.585 Gy ± 0.847 (α/β = 2 Gy). Two patients developed a new metastasis in the area of hippocampal avoidance. HA-WBRT (simultaneous integrated protection, SIP) with SIB to metastases is a safe and tolerable regime that shows favorable LTC for patients with multiple brain metastases, while it has the potential to minimize the side-effect of cognitive deterioration. (orig.) [German] Die Hippocampus-schonende Ganzhirnbestrahlung (HS-GHB) kann im Vergleich zur Standard-GHB die Verschlechterung der neurokognitiven Funktion verhindern. Zusaetzlich vermag ein simultan integrierter Boost (SIB) auf die Metastasen die Prognose der betroffenen Patienten weiter zu verbessern. In dieser Studie praesentieren wir erste Ergebnisse

  9. Genetic Modification of Cancer Cells Using Non-Viral, Episomal S/MAR Vectors for In Vivo Tumour Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Orestis Argyros; Suet Ping Wong; Kate Gowers; Richard Paul Harbottle

    2012-01-01

    The development of genetically marked animal tumour xenografts is an area of ongoing research to enable easier and more reliable testing of cancer therapies. Genetically marked tumour models have a number of advantages over conventional tumour models, including the easy longitudinal monitoring of therapies and the reduced number of animals needed for trials. Several different methods have been used in previous studies to mark tumours genetically, however all have limitations, such as genotoxi...

  10. INCIDENCE AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF BRAIN TUMOURS IN SOUTH INDIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Shetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION The incidence of intracranial [IC] tumours depends on the sources and methods used to collect the data and whether conditions such as tuberculomas, parasitic cysts and vascular malformations are included. The general consensus is that the annual incidence rate of primary intracranial neoplasm is between 10 and 12 per 100,000 and these constitute approximately 9% of all primary cancers. The presenting features of the case in the Department of Medicine which ultimately leads to the definitive diagnosis depend on the situation of the tumour. So in the present study a valiant effort has been put to help the fellow clinicians to diagnose by knowing the incidence and the common sites that the tumour presents. The aim of the study is to: 1. To establish the incidence of different types of tumours encountered in the Department of Medicine. 2. To establish the site of the tumour. Fifty patients were studied in the Department of Medicine, A. J. Shetty Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore. The surgical reference was taken and the type was confirmed by histopathology. So in the present study a valiant effort has been put to help the fellow clinicians to diagnose by knowing the incidence and the common sites that the tumour presents.

  11. Hyperthermia improves the antitumour effect of metronomic cyclophosphamide in a rat transplantable brain tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: As low-dose metronomic cyclophosphamide (CTX) and hyperthermia (HT) both exert antitumour effects in part through antiangiogenic mechanisms, interactive effects of the two modalities were explored. Materials and methods: Subcutaneously implanted rat tumours (BT4An) were treated with CTX 35 mg/kg i.p. three doses a week for two weeks, local water-bath HT yielding mean tumour temperature of 43 oC for one hour at day 0, both modalities combined (CTX-HT0), or saline. TUNEL assays, immunohistochemical staining of thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) and real time RT-PCR of TSP-1 mRNA were analysed the first three hours after completed treatment day 0. Results: Metronomic dosed CTX (p = 0.006) and HT (p 0 (41%) treated rats. TSP-1 protein was specifically upregulated in the vascular matrix of tumours receiving CTX (weak), HT (moderate) and CTX-HT0 (strong). In contrast, reduced expression of TSP-1 protein was observed in tumour cells after HT alone and CTX-HT0. TUNEL assays indicated induction of apoptosis by HT and CTX-HT0 90 minutes after end of the first treatment. Conclusion: A single session of local HT enhances the effects of low-dose metronomic CTX, possibly in part mediated through a differential effect on TSP-1 protein levels in tumour cells and tumour vasculature

  12. Pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema in living rat brain via 1H2O MRI: implications for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to its common usage as a tracer in metabolic and physiological studies, deuterium possesses anti-tumoural activity and confers protection against γ-irradiation. A more recent interest in deuterium emanates from the search for alternatives capable of improving neutron penetrance whilst reducing healthy tissue radiation dose deposition in boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours. Despite this potential clinical application, deuterium induces brain oedema, which is detrimental to neutron capture therapy. In this study, five adult male rats were titrated with deuterated drinking water while brain oedema was monitored via water proton magnetic resonance imaging. This report concludes that deuterium, as well as deuterium-induced brain oedema, possesses a uniform brain bio-distribution. At a steady-state blood fluid deuteration value of 16%, when the deuterium isotope fraction in drinking water was 25%, a mean oedematous volume change of 9 ± 2% (p-value <0.001) was observed in the rat brain-this may account for neurological and behavioural abnormalities found in mammals drinking highly deuterated water. In addition to characterizing the pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema, this report also estimates the impact of oedema on thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors using simple linear transport calculations. While body fluid deuteration enhances thermal neutron flux penetrance and reduces dose deposition, oedema has the opposite effect because it increases the volume of interest, e.g., the brain volume. Thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors could be reduced by as much as ∼10% in the presence of a 9% water volume increase (oedema)

  13. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging of intra-axial brain tumours: differentiation of high-grade gliomas from primary CNS lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) allows to quantitatively assess haemodynamic characteristics of brain tissue. We investigated if different brain tumor types can be distinguished from each other using Patlak analysis of PCT data. PCT data from 43 patients with brain tumours were analysed with a commercial implementation of the Patlak method. Four patients had low-grade glioma (WHO II), 31 patients had glioblastoma (WHO IV) and eight patients had intracerebral lymphoma. Tumour regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn in a morphological image and automatically transferred to maps of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and permeability (K Trans). Mean values were calculated, group differences were tested using Wilcoxon and Mann Whitney U-tests. In comparison with normal parenchyma, low-grade gliomas showed no significant difference of perfusion parameters (p > 0.05), whereas high-grade gliomas demonstrated significantly higher values (p Trans, p Trans values compared with unaffected cerebral parenchyma (p = 0.0078) but no elevation of CBV. High-grade gliomas show significant higher CBV values than lymphomas (p = 0.0078). PCT allows to reliably classify gliomas and lymphomas based on quantitative measurements of CBV and K Trans. (orig.)

  14. Oscillatory dynamics in a model of vascular tumour growth - implications for chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maini PK

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations of solid tumours suggest that vessel occlusion may occur when increased pressure from the tumour mass is exerted on the vessel walls. Since immature vessels are frequently found in tumours and may be particularly sensitive, such occlusion may impair tumour blood flow and have a negative impact on therapeutic outcome. In order to study the effects that occlusion may have on tumour growth patterns and therapeutic response, in this paper we develop and investigate a continuum model of vascular tumour growth. Results By analysing a spatially uniform submodel, we identify regions of parameter space in which the combination of tumour cell proliferation and vessel occlusion give rise to sustained temporal oscillations in the tumour cell population and in the vessel density. Alternatively, if the vessels are assumed to be less prone to collapse, stable steady state solutions are observed. When spatial effects are considered, the pattern of tumour invasion depends on the dynamics of the spatially uniform submodel. If the submodel predicts a stable steady state, then steady travelling waves are observed in the full model, and the system evolves to the same stable steady state behind the invading front. When the submodel yields oscillatory behaviour, the full model produces periodic travelling waves. The stability of the waves (which can be predicted by approximating the system as one of λ-ω type dictates whether the waves develop into regular or irregular spatio-temporal oscillations. Simulations of chemotherapy reveal that treatment outcome depends crucially on the underlying tumour growth dynamics. In particular, if the dynamics are oscillatory, then therapeutic efficacy is difficult to assess since the fluctuations in the size of the tumour cell population are enhanced, compared to untreated controls. Conclusions We have developed a mathematical model of vascular tumour growth formulated as a system of partial

  15. Tumour size measurement in a mouse model using high resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Animal models are frequently used to assess new treatment methods in cancer research. MRI offers a non-invasive in vivo monitoring of tumour tissue and thus allows longitudinal measurements of treatment effects, without the need for large cohorts of animals. Tumour size is an important biomarker of the disease development, but to our knowledge, MRI based size measurements have not yet been verified for small tumours (10−2–10−1 g). The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of MRI based tumour size measurements of small tumours on mice. 2D and 3D T2-weighted RARE images of tumour bearing mice were acquired in vivo using a 7 T dedicated animal MR system. For the 3D images the acquired image resolution was varied. The images were exported to a PC workstation where the tumour mass was determined assuming a density of 1 g/cm3, using an in-house developed tool for segmentation and delineation. The resulting data were compared to the weight of the resected tumours after sacrifice of the animal using regression analysis. Strong correlations were demonstrated between MRI- and necropsy determined masses. In general, 3D acquisition was not a prerequisite for high accuracy. However, it was slightly more accurate than 2D when small (<0.2 g) tumours were assessed for inter- and intraobserver variation. In 3D images, the voxel sizes could be increased from 1603 μm3 to 2403 μm3 without affecting the results significantly, thus reducing acquisition time substantially. 2D MRI was sufficient for accurate tumour size measurement, except for small tumours (<0.2 g) where 3D acquisition was necessary to reduce interobserver variation. Acquisition times between 15 and 50 minutes, depending on tumour size, were sufficient for accurate tumour volume measurement. Hence, it is possible to include further MR investigations of the tumour, such as tissue perfusion, diffusion or metabolic composition in the same MR session

  16. DMBT1, a new member of the SRCR superfamily, on chromosome 10q25.3-26.1 is deleted in malignant brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollenhauer, J; Wiemann, S; Scheurlen, W;

    1997-01-01

    Loss of sequences from human chromosome 10q has been associated with the progression of human cancer. Medulloblastoma and glioblastoma multiforme are the most common malignant brain tumours in children and adults, respectively. In glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive form, 80% of the...... tumours show loss of 10q. We have used representational difference analysis to identify a homozygous deletion at 10q25.3-26.1 in a medulloblastoma cell line and have cloned a novel gene, DMBT1, spanning this deletion. DMBT1 shows homology to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily....... Intragenic homozygous deletions has been detected in 2/20 medulloblastomas and in 9/39 glioblastomas multiformes. Lack of DMBT1 expression has been demonstrated in 4/5 brain-tumour cell lines. We suggest that DMBT1 is a putative tumour-suppressor gene implicated in the carcinogenesis of medulloblastoma and...

  17. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuner, Irene [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Kaffanke, Joachim B. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); MR-Transfer e.K., Wuppertal (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Stoffels, Gabriele; Weirich, Christoph; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Herzog, Hans [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as {sup 18}F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or {sup 11}C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  18. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as 18F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or 11C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  19. Increased levels of deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1) in active bacteria-related appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaemmerer, Elke; Schneider, Ursula; Klaus, Christina; Plum, Patrick; Reinartz, Andrea; Adolf, Maximilian; Renner, Marcus; Wolfs, Tim G A M; Kramer, Boris W; Wagner, Norbert; Mollenhauer, Jan; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Kaemmerer E, Schneider U, Klaus C, Plum P, Reinartz A, Adolf M, Renner M, Wolfs T G A M, Kramer B W, Wagner N, Mollenhauer J & Gassler N (2012) Histopathology Increased levels of deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1) in active bacteria-related appendicitis Aims:  Deleted in malignant brain...... bacteria-related active intestinal inflammation such as appendicitis. Methods and results:  mRNA and protein levels of DMBT1 were analysed in surgical resections of 50 appendices (active inflammation: n = 25). In non-actively inflamed appendices, inter-individual differences in basal DMBT1 levels of...... enterocytes and some non-epithelial cells were found. In active appendicitis, enterocytic DMBT1 mRNA expression was increased approximately fivefold, which was paralleled by a corresponding increase of cytoplasmic and secreted DMBT1 protein levels. Increased DMBT1 expression was predominant in enterocytes...

  20. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zagozdzon, Agnieszka M

    2012-05-30

    AbstractBackgroundNumerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study.ResultsA new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal.ConclusionsWe have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and\\/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  1. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques

  2. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagozdzon Agnieszka M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. Results A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. Conclusions We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  3. Mir-34a mimics are potential therapeutic agents for p53-mutated and chemo-resistant brain tumour cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Ngan Fan

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic drug resistance and relapse remains a major challenge for paediatric (medulloblastoma and adult (glioblastoma brain tumour treatment. Medulloblastoma tumours and cell lines with mutations in the p53 signalling pathway have been shown to be specifically insensitive to DNA damaging agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of triggering cell death in p53 mutated medulloblastoma cells by a direct activation of pro-death signalling downstream of p53 activation. Since non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs have the ability to fine tune the expression of a variety of target genes, orchestrating multiple downstream effects, we hypothesised that triggering the expression of a p53 target miRNA could induce cell death in chemo-resistant cells. Treatment with etoposide, increased miR-34a levels in a p53-dependent fashion and the level of miR-34a transcription was correlated with the cell sensitivity to etoposide. miR-34a activity was validated by measuring the expression levels of one of its well described target: the NADH dependent sirtuin1 (SIRT1. Whilst drugs directly targeting SIRT1, were potent to trigger cell death at high concentrations only, introduction of synthetic miR-34a mimics was able to induce cell death in p53 mutated medulloblastoma and glioblastoma cell lines. Our results show that the need of a functional p53 signaling pathway can be bypassed by direct activation of miR-34a in brain tumour cells.

  4. Diagnostic benefits of presurgical fMRI in patients with brain tumours in the primary sensorimotor cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable imaging of eloquent tumour-adjacent brain areas is necessary for planning function-preserving neurosurgery. This study evaluates the potential diagnostic benefits of presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in comparison to a detailed analysis of morphological MRI data. Standardised preoperative functional and structural neuroimaging was performed on 77 patients with rolandic mass lesions at 1.5 Tesla. The central region of both hemispheres was allocated using six morphological and three functional landmarks. fMRI enabled localisation of the motor hand area in 76/77 patients, which was significantly superior to analysis of structural MRI (confident localisation of motor hand area in 66/77 patients; p < 0.002). FMRI provided additional diagnostic information in 96% (tongue representation) and 97% (foot representation) of patients. FMRI-based presurgical risk assessment correlated in 88% with a positive postoperative clinical outcome. Routine presurgical FMRI allows for superior assessment of the spatial relationship between brain tumour and motor cortex compared with a very detailed analysis of structural 3D MRI, thus significantly facilitating the preoperative risk-benefit assessment and function-preserving surgery. The additional imaging time seems justified. FMRI has the potential to reduce postoperative morbidity and therefore hospitalisation time. (orig.)

  5. An immune system-tumour interactions model with discrete time delay: Model analysis and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Monika Joanna

    2016-05-01

    In this article a generalised mathematical model describing the interactions between malignant tumour and immune system with discrete time delay incorporated into the system is considered. Time delay represents the time required to generate an immune response due to the immune system activation by cancer cells. The basic mathematical properties of the considered model, including the global existence, uniqueness, non-negativity of the solutions, the stability of steady sates and the possibility of the existence of the stability switches, are investigated when time delay is treated as a bifurcation parameter. The model is validated with the sets of the experimental data and additional numerical simulations are performed to illustrate, extend, interpret and discuss the analytical results in the context of the tumour progression.

  6. Imaging of adult astrocytic brain tumours with 7 T MRI: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study tumour vascularity and necrosis of intracranial astrocytomas were compared using 7 T and 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifteen patients with histologically proven astrocytomas (WHO grades II-IV) were prospectively examined at 1.5 T (Magnetom Espree or Sonata) and 7 T (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) with T2*-w (weighted), T1-w with (only a subset of five patients at 7 T) and without contrast medium, T2-w and proton-density (PD)-w MRI. Clinically used 1.5 T sequences were adapted to 7 T. Histological findings and T2*-w MR images at both field strengths were compared for the presence of assumed tumour microvascularity and necrosis. Two diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas, four anaplastic astrocytomas and nine glioblastomas were included. T2*-w images depicted susceptibility patterns representing presumed tumour microvascularity in 8 out of 15 (53%) gliomas at 7 T compared with 5 out of 15 (33%) gliomas at 1.5 T. Compared with 1.5 T MRI three additional necrotic tumour areas were depicted only on 7 T T2- and T2*-w images of one glioblastoma. On T1-w MR images, contrast enhancement of five out of five glioblastomas was similar at both field strengths. 7 T gradient-echo sequences provide excellent image contrast of presumed microvasculature and necrosis in astrocytomas. (orig.)

  7. O-(2-[{sup 18}F]Fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine and L-[methyl-{sup 11}C]methionine uptake in brain tumours: initial results of a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.A.; Wester, H.J.; Herz, M.; Dzewas, B.; Stoecklin, G.; Schwaiger, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Grosu, A.L.; Feldmann, H.J.; Molls, M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    O-(2-[{sup 18}F]Fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (FET) is a recently described amino acid analogue that has shown high accumulation in animal tumours. The aim of this study was to compare the uptake of FET with that of l-[methyl-{sup 11}C]methionine (MET) in patients with suspected primary or recurrent intracerebral tumours. Sixteen consecutive patients with intracerebral lesions were studied on the same day by positron emission tomography (PET) using MET and FET. Uptake of FET and MET was quantified by standardized uptake values. Tracer kinetics for normal brain and intracerebral lesions were compared. On the basis of the MET-PET studies, viable tumour tissue was found in 13 patients. All tumours showed rapid uptake of FET and were visualized with high contrast. Mean uptake of FET for normal grey matter, white matter and tumour tissue was 1.1{+-}0.2, 0.8{+-}0.2 and 2.7{+-}0.8 SUV, respectively. In all three tissues, uptake of MET was slightly higher (1.4{+-}0.2, 0.9{+-}0.1 and 3.3{+-}1.0 SUV; P<0.01). However, contrast between tumour and normal tissues was not significantly different between MET and FET. Uptake of FET in non-neoplastic lesions (1.0{+-}0.1 SUV) was significantly lower than in tumour tissue (P=0.007). For all lesions there was a close correlation (r=0.98) between MET and FET uptake. In conclusion, in PET studies of human brain tumours, the uptake and image contrast of FET appear to be very similar to those of MET. The specificity of FET for tumour tissue is promising but has to be addressed in a larger series of patients with non-neoplastic lesions. (orig.)

  8. The Klein–Gordon equation in mixture models of tumour growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caviglia, G. [DIMA, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 35, 16146 Genoa (Italy); Morro, A. [DIBRIS, University of Genoa, Via Opera Pia 13, 16145 Genoa (Italy); Pinamonti, N., E-mail: pinamont@dima.unige.it [DIMA, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 35, 16146 Genoa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa (Italy)

    2014-11-14

    A mixture model of tumour microenvironment is considered, which consists of a solid phase for the tumour cells, a liquid phase for the interstitial fluid, and a nutrient phase. The balance equations for the three phases take into account exchange of mass between tumour and nutrients, and exchange of drag forces between the constituents. Under rather natural assumptions, the determination of the nutrient density is reduced to the solution of a Klein–Gordon equation, with source term depending on mass injection from outside. A chain of decoupled equations for the remaining unknowns is then determined in terms of the nutrient density. Finally, the growth of tumour volume is investigated under the assumption of spherical symmetry.

  9. The effect of trocar composition on tumour cell adherence: and in vivo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Port site recurrence of tumour is a recognised complication of laparoscopic surgery for cancer. It has previously been shown that an increased number of tumour cells adhere to metal rather than plastic trocars and sites through which metal trocars had passed. In an extension of this study, adherence of such cells to trocars and trocar sites was investigated in an in vivo porcine model. 99mTc-HMPAO labelled LIM 1215 tumour cells were injected under direct laparoscopic vision into the pelvises of pigs, and then metal and plastic trocars were inserted through the anterior abdominal wall. Trocar type, removal and replacement, as well as site, were all examined for the presence of 99mTc-tumour cells by counting samples in a large volume counter. Greater contamination occurred with metal rather than plastic trocars, and after increased manipulation of the trocars. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  10. On the importance of the submicrovascular network in a computational model of tumour growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesart, Anne-Cécile; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Hamard, Lauriane; Estève, François; Stéphanou, Angélique

    2012-09-01

    A computational model is potentially a powerful tool to apprehend complex phenomena like solid tumour growth and to predict the outcome of therapies. To that end, the confrontation of the model with experiments is essential to validate this tool. In this study, we develop a computational model specifically dedicated to the interpretation of tumour growth as observed in a mouse model with a dorsal skinfold chamber. Observation of the skin vasculature at the dorsal window scale shows a sparse network of a few main vessels of several hundreds micrometers in diameter. However observation at a smaller scale reveals the presence of a dense and regular interconnected network of capillaries about ten times smaller. We conveniently designate this structure as the submicrovascular network (SMVN).(1) The question that we wish to answer concerns the necessity of explicitly taking into account the SMVN in the computational model to describe the tumour evolution observed in the dorsal chamber. For that, simulations of tumour growth realised with and without the SMVN are compared and lead to two distinct scenarios. Parameters that are known to strongly influence the tumour evolution are then tested in the two cases to determine to which extent those parameters can be used to compensate the observed differences between these scenarios. Explicit modelling of the smallest vessels appears mandatory although not necessarily under the form of a regular grid. A compromise between the two investigated cases can thus be reached. PMID:22705361

  11. The effects of exogenous growth factors on matrix metalloproteinase secretion by human brain tumour cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rooprai, H K; Rucklidge, G J; Panou, C; Pilkington, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a growing family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases that are capable of degrading various components of the extracellular matrix. These enzymes have been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions including embryogenesis and tumour invasion. The synthesis of many MMPs is thought to be regulated by growth factors, cytokines and hormones. In this study, we investigated the effects of five exogenous growth factors known to be expressed...

  12. Oxygen-Driven Tumour Growth Model: A Pathology-Relevant Mathematical Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Delgado-SanMartin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Xenografts--as simplified animal models of cancer-differ substantially in vasculature and stromal architecture when compared to clinical tumours. This makes mathematical model-based predictions of clinical outcome challenging. Our objective is to further understand differences in tumour progression and physiology between animal models and the clinic. To achieve that, we propose a mathematical model based upon tumour pathophysiology, where oxygen--as a surrogate for endocrine delivery--is our main focus. The Oxygen-Driven Model (ODM, using oxygen diffusion equations, describes tumour growth, hypoxia and necrosis. The ODM describes two key physiological parameters. Apparent oxygen uptake rate (k'R represents the amount of oxygen cells seem to need to proliferate. The more oxygen they appear to need, the more the oxygen transport. k'R gathers variability from the vasculature, stroma and tumour morphology. Proliferating rate (kp deals with cell line specific factors to promote growth. The KH,KN describe the switch of hypoxia and necrosis. Retrospectively, using archived data, we looked at longitudinal tumour volume datasets for 38 xenografted cell lines and 5 patient-derived xenograft-like models. Exploration of the parameter space allows us to distinguish 2 groups of parameters. Group 1 of cell lines shows a spread in values of k'R and lower kp, indicating that tumours are poorly perfused and slow growing. Group 2 share the value of the oxygen uptake rate (k'R and vary greatly in kp, which we interpret as having similar oxygen transport, but more tumour intrinsic variability in growth. However, the ODM has some limitations when tested in explant-like animal models, whose complex tumour-stromal morphology may not be captured in the current version of the model. Incorporation of stroma in the ODM will help explain these discrepancies. We have provided an example. The ODM is a very simple -and versatile- model suitable for the design of preclinical

  13. A viscoelastic model of the correlation between respiratory lung tumour motion and an external abdominal signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Accuracy of radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer is limited by respiratory induced tumour motion. Compensation for this motion is required to increase treatment efficacy. The lung tumour motion is related to motion of an external abdominal marker, but a reliable model of this correlation is essential. Three viscoelastic systems were developed, in order to determine the best model and analyse its effectiveness on clinical data. Three 1D viscoelastic systems (a spring and dash pot in parallel, series and a combination) were developed and compared using a simulated breathing pattern. The most effective model was applied to 60 clinical data sets (consisting of co-ordinates of tumour and abdominal motion) from multiple treatment fractions of ten patients. The model was optimised for each data set, and efficacy determined by calculating the root mean square (RMS) error between the mo elled position and the actual tumour motion. Upon application to clinical data the parallel configuration achieved an average RMS error of 0.95 mm (superior-inferior direction). The model had patient specific parameters, and displayed good consistency over extended treatment periods. The model ha dled amplitude, frequency and baseline variations of the input signal, and phase shifts between tumour and abdominal motions. This study has shown that a viscoelastic model can be used to cor relate internal lung tumour motion with an external abdominal signal. The ability to handle breathing pattern in'egularities is comparable or better than previous models. Extending the model to a full 3D, pr dictive system could allow clinical implementation for radiotherapy.

  14. Current technological progress in neurosurgery and its impact on surgical treatment of glioma brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain gliomas are characterized by infiltrative growth, with possible finding of functional brain tissue within the tumor. Intraoperatively are glioma borders often indistinguishable from surrounding brain. Eloquent areas can be damaged during surgical removal of tumors near or within these areas. Therefore, in addition to preoperative identification of cortical and subcortical eloquent areas, meticulous microsurgical technique, neuro navigation, intraoperative imaging, neuro monitoring and awake surgery are necessary. Using these methods, satisfactory and safe resection of tumors previously considered as unresectable is possible. (author)

  15. Brain tumours at 7T MRI compared to 3T - contrast effect after half and full standard contrast agent dose: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie; Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Szomolanyi, P.; Juras, V. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kronnerwetter, C. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Nemec, S.; Prayer, D. [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ladd, M.E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Trattnig, S. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-15

    To compare the contrast agent effect of a full dose and half the dose of gadobenate dimeglumine in brain tumours at 7 Tesla (7T) MR versus 3 Tesla (3T). Ten patients with primary brain tumours or metastases were examined. Signal intensities were assessed in the lesion and normal brain. Tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were calculated. Additionally, two independent readers subjectively graded the image quality and artefacts. The enhanced mean tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were significantly higher at 7T than at 3T for both half the dose (91.8 ± 45.8 vs. 43.9 ± 25.3 [p = 0.010], 128.1 ± 53.7 vs. 75.5 ± 32.4 [p = 0.004]) and the full dose (129.2 ± 50.9 vs. 66.6 ± 33.1 [p = 0.002], 165.4 ± 54.2 vs. 102.6 ± 45.4 [p = 0.004]). Differences between dosages at each field strength were also significant. Lesion enhancement was higher with half the dose at 7T than with the full dose at 3T (p =.037), while the tumour-to-brain contrast was not significantly different. Subjectively, contrast enhancement, visibility, and lesion delineation were better at 7T and with the full dose. All parameters were rated as good, at the least. Half the routine contrast agent dose at 7T provided higher lesion enhancement than the full dose at 3T which indicates the possibility of dose reduction at 7T. (orig.)

  16. Brain tumours at 7T MRI compared to 3T - contrast effect after half and full standard contrast agent dose: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the contrast agent effect of a full dose and half the dose of gadobenate dimeglumine in brain tumours at 7 Tesla (7T) MR versus 3 Tesla (3T). Ten patients with primary brain tumours or metastases were examined. Signal intensities were assessed in the lesion and normal brain. Tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were calculated. Additionally, two independent readers subjectively graded the image quality and artefacts. The enhanced mean tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were significantly higher at 7T than at 3T for both half the dose (91.8 ± 45.8 vs. 43.9 ± 25.3 [p = 0.010], 128.1 ± 53.7 vs. 75.5 ± 32.4 [p = 0.004]) and the full dose (129.2 ± 50.9 vs. 66.6 ± 33.1 [p = 0.002], 165.4 ± 54.2 vs. 102.6 ± 45.4 [p = 0.004]). Differences between dosages at each field strength were also significant. Lesion enhancement was higher with half the dose at 7T than with the full dose at 3T (p =.037), while the tumour-to-brain contrast was not significantly different. Subjectively, contrast enhancement, visibility, and lesion delineation were better at 7T and with the full dose. All parameters were rated as good, at the least. Half the routine contrast agent dose at 7T provided higher lesion enhancement than the full dose at 3T which indicates the possibility of dose reduction at 7T. (orig.)

  17. In-phantom two-dimensional thermal neutron distribution for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the in-phantom thermal neutron distribution derived from neutron beams for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT). Gold activation wires arranged in a cylindrical water phantom with (void-in-phantom) or without (standard phantom) a cylinder styrene form placed inside were irradiated by using the epithermal beam (ENB) and the mixed thermal-epithermal beam (TNB-1) at the Japan Research Reactor No 4. With ENB, we observed a flattened distribution of thermal neutron flux and a significantly enhanced thermal flux delivery at a depth compared with the results of using TNB-1. The thermal neutron distribution derived from both the ENB and TNB-1 was significantly improved in the void-in-phantom, and a double high dose area was formed lateral to the void. The flattened distribution in the circumference of the void was observed with the combination of ENB and the void-in-phantom. The measurement data suggest that the ENB may provide a clinical advantage in the form of an enhanced and flattened dose delivery to the marginal tissue of a post-operative cavity in which a residual and/or microscopically infiltrating tumour often occurs. The combination of the epithermal neutron beam and IOBNCT will improve the clinical results of BNCT for brain tumours. (author)

  18. Patterns of exposure to infectious diseases and social contacts in early life and risk of brain tumours in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T V; Schmidt, L S; Poulsen, A H;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious diseases and social contacts in early life have been proposed to modulate brain tumour risk during late childhood and adolescence. METHODS: CEFALO is an interview-based case-control study in Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland, including children and adolescents aged 7...

  19. A combined MRI and MRSI based multiclass system for brain tumour recognition using LS-SVMs with class probabilities and feature selection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luts, J.; Heerschap, A.; Suykens, J.A.; Huffel, S. van

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the use of automated pattern recognition methods on magnetic resonance data with the ultimate goal to assist clinicians in the diagnosis of brain tumours. Recently, the combined use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (M

  20. Improvement of Radiation-Mediated Immunosuppression of Human NSCLC Tumour Xenografts in a Nude Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Tokalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model have consistently been used as an essential part of preclinical studies for anticancer drugs activity in human. Commonly, these animals receive whole body irradiation to assure immunosuppression. But whole body dose delivery might be inhomogeneous and the resulting incomplete bone marrow depletion may modify tumour behaviour. To improve irradiation-mediated immunosuppression of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model irradiation (2 + 2 Gy from opposite sides of animals has been performed using a conventional X-ray tube. The described modification of whole body irradiation improves growth properties of human NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model. The design of the whole body irradiation mediated immunosuppression described here for NSCLC xenografts may be useful for research applications involving other types of human tumours.

  1. Determination of tumour hypoxia with the PET tracer [{sup 18}F]EF3: improvement of the tumour-to-background ratio in a mouse tumour model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Nicolas; Bol, Anne; Bast, Marc de; Labar, Daniel; Lee, John; Mahy, Pierre; Gregoire, Vincent [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Center for Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy, Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    The 2-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)-N-(3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)acetamide (EF3) is a 2-nitroimidazole derivative which undergoes bioreductive activation under hypoxic conditions. Using the PET tracer [{sup 18}F]EF3 in mice, tumour-to-muscle ratios ranging from 1.3 to 3.5 were observed. This study investigated the impact of various interventions aimed at increasing [{sup 18}F]EF3 elimination, thus potentially increasing the tumour-to-noise ratio in mice, by increasing the renal filtration rate (spironolactone, furosemide), decreasing tubular re-absorption (metronidazole, ornidazole, amino acid solution) or stimulating gastro-intestinal elimination (phenobarbital). C3H mice were injected i.v. with an average of 12.95 MBq of [{sup 18}F]EF3. Drugs were injected i.v. 15 min before the tracer or daily 4 days prior to the experiment (phenobarbital). Anaesthetised mice were imaged from 30 to 300 min with a dedicated animal PET (Mosaic, Philips). Regions of interest were delineated around the tumour, bladder, heart, liver and leg muscle. Radioactivity was expressed as a percentage of injected activity per gram of tissue. Ornidazole decreased the urinary excretion and increased the liver uptake of [{sup 18}F]EF3, but without causing any changes in the other organs. Phenobarbital significantly increased the liver concentration and decreased radioactivity in blood and muscle without affecting the tracer uptake in tumour. Consequently, a small but non-significant increase in tumour-to-noise ratio was observed. Although some effects were observed with other drugs, they did not modify the tumour-to-noise ratio. Only phenobarbital induced a trend toward an increased tumour-to-noise ratio that could possibly be tested in the clinical situation. (orig.)

  2. Prognostic and predictive biomarkers in adult and paediatric gliomas: towards personalised brain tumour treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KathreenaMaryKurian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly clear that both adult and paediatric glial tumour entities represent collections of neoplastic lesions, each with individual pathological molecular events and treatment responses. In this review we discuss the current prognostic biomarkers validated for clinical use or with future clinical validity for gliomas. Accurate prognostication is crucial for managing patients as treatments may be associated with high morbidity and the benefits of high risk interventions must be judged by the treating clinicians. We also review biomarkers with predictive validity which may become clinically relevant with the development of targeted therapies for adult and paediatric gliomas.

  3. Framework and Bio-Mechanical Model for a Per-Operative Image-Guided Neuronavigator Including 'Brain-Shift' Compensation

    CERN Document Server

    Bucki, M; Bucki, Marek; Payan, Yohan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology to adress the problem of brain tissue deformation referred to as "brainshift". This deformation occurs throughout a neurosurgery intervention and strongly alters the accuracy of the neuronavigation systems used to date in clinical routine which rely solely on preoperative patient imaging to locate the surgical target, such as a tumour or a functional area. After a general description of the framework of our intraoperative image-guided system, we propose a biomechanical model of the brain which can take into account interactively such deformations as well as surgical procedures that modify the brain structure, like tumour or tissue resection.

  4. An Improved Image Mining Technique For Brain Tumour Classification Using Efficient Classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Rajendran, P

    2010-01-01

    An improved image mining technique for brain tumor classification using pruned association rule with MARI algorithm is presented in this paper. The method proposed makes use of association rule mining technique to classify the CT scan brain images into three categories namely normal, benign and malign. It combines the low level features extracted from images and high level knowledge from specialists. The developed algorithm can assist the physicians for efficient classification with multiple keywords per image to improve the accuracy. The experimental result on prediagnosed database of brain images showed 96 percent and 93 percent sensitivity and accuracy respectively.

  5. Relationship between tumour oxygenation, bioenergetic status and radiobiological hypoxia in an experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour oxygenation and bioenergetic status were measured in the same tumour and these results related to radiobiological hypoxia. A C3H mouse mammary carcinoma grown in the feet of CDF1 mice was used. Bioenergetic status was assessed by 31P MRS using a SISCO 7 Tesla magnet, oxygen measurements were done by a polarographic electrode and the hypoxic fraction was determined from direct analysis of the radiation dose-response data. During all examinations restrained, non-anaesthetized mice were allowed to breathe either 100% oxygen, carbogen, normal air, carbon monoxide (CO) at 75, 220, or 660 ppm or had blood flow occluded by clamping. Results showed a significant correlation between the radiobiological hypoxic fraction and % pO2 ≤ 5 mmHg under the different treatment conditions, whereas no correlation was found between beta nucleosidetriphosphate/inorganic phosphate (β-NTP/Pi) ratio and either the hypoxic fraction or the % of pO2 values ≤ 5 mmHg under the different treatment conditions. In conclusion, oxygen electrode measurements were sensitive to changes in tumour hypoxia whereas the bioenergetic status alone seemed to be a less precise measure of hypoxia in this tumour model. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that tumour cells in vivo can actually maintain the bioenergetic status during a period of severe hypoxia. (orig.)

  6. Spatio-temporal tumour model for analysis and mechanism of action of intracellular drug accumulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Somna Mishra; V K Katiyar

    2008-09-01

    We have developed a one-dimensional tumour simulator to describe the biodistribution of chemotherapeutic drugs to a tumoral lesion and the tumour cell’s response to therapy. A three-compartment model is used for drug dynamics within the tumour. The first compartment represents the extracellular space in which cells move, the second corresponds to the intracellular fluid space (including cell membrane) which is in direct equilibrium with the extracellular space, and the third is a non-exchangeable compartment that represents sequestered drug which is trapped in the nucleus to damage the cellular DNA, directly triggering cell death. Analytical and numerical techniques (Finite Element Method) are used to describe the tumour’s response to therapy and the effect of parameter variation on the drug concentration profiles in the three compartments.

  7. Localisation of motor areas in brain tumour patients: a comparison of preoperative [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET and intraoperative cortical electrostimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreckenberger, M.; Sabri, O.; Meyer, P.T.; Zeggel, T.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U. [Technische Univ. Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Spetzger, U.; Gilsbach, J. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Aachen Univ. of Technology (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    Assessment of the exact spatial relation between tumour and adjacent functionally relevant brain areas is a primary tool in the presurgical planning in brain tumour patients. The purpose of this study was to compare a preoperative fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) activation protocol in patients with tumours near the central area with the results of intraoperative direct cortical electrostimulation, and to determine whether non-invasive preoperative PET imaging can provide results equivalent to those achieved with the invasive neurosurgical ''gold standard''. In this prospective study, we examined 20 patients with various tumours of the central area, performing two PET scans (each 30 min after i.v. injection of 134-341 MBq [{sup 18}F]FDG) in each patient: (1) a resting baseline scan and (2) an activation scan using a standardised motor task (finger tapping, foot stretching). Following PET/MRI realignment and normalisation to the whole brain counts, parametric images of the activation versus the rest study were calculated and pixels above categorical threshold values were projected to the individual MRI for bimodal assessment of morphology and function (PET/MRI overlay). Intraoperative direct cortical electrostimulation was performed using a Viking IV probe (5 pulses, each of 100 {mu}s) and documented using a dedicated neuro navigation system. Results were compared with the preoperative PET findings. PET revealed significant activation of the contralateral primary motor cortex in 95% (19/20) of the brain tumour patients (hand activation 13/13, foot activation 6/7), showing a mean increase in normalised [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake of 20.5%{+-}5.2% (hand activation task) and 17.2%{+-}2.5% (foot activation task). Additionally detected activation of the ipsilateral primary motor cortex was interpreted as a metabolic indication for interhemispheric compensational processes. Evaluation of the PET findings by

  8. Localisation of motor areas in brain tumour patients: a comparison of preoperative [18F]FDG-PET and intraoperative cortical electrostimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of the exact spatial relation between tumour and adjacent functionally relevant brain areas is a primary tool in the presurgical planning in brain tumour patients. The purpose of this study was to compare a preoperative fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG PET) activation protocol in patients with tumours near the central area with the results of intraoperative direct cortical electrostimulation, and to determine whether non-invasive preoperative PET imaging can provide results equivalent to those achieved with the invasive neurosurgical ''gold standard''. In this prospective study, we examined 20 patients with various tumours of the central area, performing two PET scans (each 30 min after i.v. injection of 134-341 MBq [18F]FDG) in each patient: (1) a resting baseline scan and (2) an activation scan using a standardised motor task (finger tapping, foot stretching). Following PET/MRI realignment and normalisation to the whole brain counts, parametric images of the activation versus the rest study were calculated and pixels above categorical threshold values were projected to the individual MRI for bimodal assessment of morphology and function (PET/MRI overlay). Intraoperative direct cortical electrostimulation was performed using a Viking IV probe (5 pulses, each of 100 μs) and documented using a dedicated neuro navigation system. Results were compared with the preoperative PET findings. PET revealed significant activation of the contralateral primary motor cortex in 95% (19/20) of the brain tumour patients (hand activation 13/13, foot activation 6/7), showing a mean increase in normalised [18F]FDG uptake of 20.5%±5.2% (hand activation task) and 17.2%±2.5% (foot activation task). Additionally detected activation of the ipsilateral primary motor cortex was interpreted as a metabolic indication for interhemispheric compensational processes. Evaluation of the PET findings by cortical stimulation yielded a 94% sensitivity

  9. Treatment fractionation for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumours: a modelling study of the influence of chronic and acute hypoxia on tumour control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has led to promising local control and overall survival for fractionation schemes with increasingly high fractional doses. A point has however been reached where the number of fractions used might be too low to allow efficient local inter-fraction reoxygenation of the hypoxic cells residing in the tumour. It was therefore the purpose of this study to investigate the impact of hypoxia and extreme hypofractionation on the tumour control probability (TCP) from SBRT. A three-dimensional model of tumour oxygenation able to simulate oxygenation changes on the microscale was used. The TCP was determined for clinically relevant SBRT fractionation schedules of 1, 3 and 5 fractions assuming either static tumour oxygenation or that the oxygenation changes locally between fractions due to fast reoxygenation of acute hypoxia without an overall reduction in chronic hypoxia. For the schedules applying three or five fractions the doses required to achieve satisfying levels of TCP were considerably lower when local oxygenation changes were assumed compared to the case of static oxygenation; a decrease in D50 of 17.7 Gy was observed for a five-fractions schedule applied to a 20% hypoxic tumour when fast reoxygenation was modelled. Assuming local oxygenation changes, the total doses required for a tumor control probability of 50% were of similar size for one, three and five fractions. Although attractive from a practical point of view, extreme hypofractionation using just one single fraction may result in impaired local control of hypoxic tumours, as it eliminates the possibility for any kind of reoxygenation

  10. Computer simulation of tumour control probabilities after irradiation for varying intrinsic radio-sensitivity using a single cell based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Currently, optimisation of the dose distribution and clinical acceptance are almost entirely based on the physical dose distribution and tumour control probability modelling is far from being routinely used as objective in treatment planning. For future individualised radiotherapeutic strategies, a reliable patient specific simulation model, taking into account customised tumour features, is needed to predict and improve treatment outcome. Materials and methods. To approach these demands, a single cell and Monte-Carlo based model was developed, which enables three-dimensional tumour growth and radiation response simulation. Tumour cells were characterised by cell-associated features such as age, intrinsic radio-sensitivity, proliferation ability, and oxygenation status, while capillary cells were considered as sources of a radial-dependent oxygen profile. Response to radiation was simulated by the linear-quadratic model, taking into account the lower radio-sensitivity of poorly oxygenated tumour cells. Results. The present study shows the influence of the model components and demonstrates the impact of the intra- and inter-tumoural radio-sensitivity heterogeneity on the treatment response. Conclusion. The simulation model adequately delineates the importance of the above described selected parameters on tumour control probability, providing an insight into the interplay of different physical and biological parameters, and its relevance for an individual tumour response

  11. WAVELET STATISTICAL TEXTURE FEATURES WITH ORTHOGONAL OPERATORS TUMOUR CLASSIFICATION IN MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Meenakshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors medically also called neoplasms are an abnormal mass of tissue resulting from uncontrolled proliferation or division of cells occurring in the human body. If such growth is located in the brain then it is called as brain tumor. Identification of such tumors is a major challenge in the field of medical science. Early identification of tumors prove to be critical as serious consequences can be averted. Its threat level depends on a combination of various factors like the type of tumor, its location, its size and its developmental stage. Tumor can occur in any part of the body. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI technique is mainly used for analyzing the brain, as the images produced are of high precision and applicability. The main objective of this study is to classify the brain MRI dataset for the existence or non existence of tumors. The proposed method uses Two Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Transform (2D-DWT for pre-processing and further classification with orthogonal operators and SVM. The usage of 2D-DWT for pre-processing improves the classification accuracy by 2% when compared to the existing classification techniques.

  12. Modelling tumour cell proliferation from vascular structure using tissue decomposition into avascular elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besenhard, Maximilian O; Jarzabek, Monika; O'Farrell, Alice C; Callanan, John J; Prehn, Jochen Hm; Byrne, Annette T; Huber, Heinrich J

    2016-08-01

    Computer models allow the mechanistically detailed study of tumour proliferation and its dependency on nutrients. However, the computational study of large vascular tumours requires detailed information on the 3-dimensional vessel network and rather high computation times due to complex geometries. This study puts forward the idea of partitioning vascularised tissue into connected avascular elements that can exchange cells and nutrients between each other. Our method is able to rapidly calculate the evolution of proliferating as well as dead and quiescent cells, and hence a proliferative index, from a given amount and distribution of vascularisation of arbitrary complexity. Applying our model, we found that a heterogeneous vessel distribution provoked a higher proliferative index, suggesting increased malignancy, and increased the amount of dead cells compared to a more static tumour environment when a homogenous vessel distribution was assumed. We subsequently demonstrated that under certain amounts of vascularisation, cell proliferation may even increase when vessel density decreases, followed by a subsequent decrease of proliferation. This effect was due to a trade-off between an increase in compensatory proliferation for replacing dead cells and a decrease of cell population due to lack of oxygen supply in lowly vascularised tumours. Findings were illustrated by an ectopic colorectal cancer mouse xenograft model. Our presented approach can be in the future applied to study the effect of cytostatic, cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic chemotherapy and is ideally suited for translational systems biology, where rapid interaction between theory and experiment is essential. PMID:27155046

  13. Bifurcation analysis of a free boundary problem modelling tumour growth under the action of inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we investigate non-radial stationary solutions of a free boundary problem modelling tumour growth under the action of inhibitors. The model consists of two elliptic equations describing the concentration of nutrients and inhibitors, respectively, and a Stokes equation for the velocity of tumour cells and internal pressure. The ratio μ/γ of the proliferation rate μ and the cell-to-cell adhesiveness γ plays the role of the bifurcation parameter. We prove that in certain situations there exists a positive sequence {(μ/γ)n}n≥n* such that for each (μ/γ)n(n even ⩾n*) there exist non-radial stationary solutions bifurcating from the radial stationary solution, while in the other situations there exists at most a finite number of bifurcation points. This is a remarkable difference from the corresponding inhibitor-free model where there always exist infinitely many branches of non-radial stationary bifurcation solutions. Our analysis also indicates that inhibitor supply may lower the ability of tumour invasion, and even make the tumour unaggressive and stable. (paper)

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of cognitive deficits caused by radiation in patients with brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses about the diagnosis and evaluation of brain higher functions, feature of their impairment induced by radiotherapy for brain tumor, and association of the impairment and neurogenesis in hippocampus (H). Radiation is one of important causes of cognitive impairment in patients with brain tumor: exempli gratia (e.g.) single irradiation of 2 Gy increases its risk. The impairment is usually diagnosed and evaluated with neuropsychological tests like mini-mental state examination (MMSE), authors' Ryudai version of the brief neuropsychological test battery, etc. The neurotoxicity of radiation is classified in acute effect caused by destruction of the blood brain barrier (BBB) appearing within 2 weeks after irradiation, early-late one of demyelination as a result of BBB rupture within 1-6 months after radiotherapy and late-late effect accompanying serious symptoms like necrosis of irradiated region at later than a few months to several years. Lowered neurogenic function in H and invasion of microglia cells are observed in autopsy specimen of the irradiated brain, and single X-irradiation at 5 or 10 Gy is known to result in the arrest of neurogenesis in the mouse H dentate gyrus. Lowered cognition by irradiation of H in clinical cases is particularly reported in children. Inflammatory biomarkers like cytokines are detected in the serum of irradiated patients as well as of animals. Although fMRI alone is not satisfactory to diagnose and evaluate the radiation-induced impairment, the imaging reveals the association of anatomically different regions in cognition through neural network. It has been recently shown that the impairment can be partially protected by planning the irradiation field so as to avoid H, by medication with donepezil, memantine, erythropoietin and indomethacin, and by hyperbaric oxygen therapy. (T.T.)

  15. Growth hormone receptor antagonism suppresses tumour regrowth after radiotherapy in an endometrial cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Angharad; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Liu, Dong-Xu; Wilson, William R; Perry, Jo K

    2016-08-28

    Human GH expression is associated with poor survival outcomes for endometrial cancer patients, enhanced oncogenicity of endometrial cancer cells and reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in vitro, suggesting that GH is a potential target for anticancer therapy. However, whether GH receptor inhibition sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo has not been tested. In the current study, we evaluated whether the GH receptor antagonist, pegvisomant (Pfizer), sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo in an endometrial tumour xenograft model. Subcutaneous administration of pegvisomant (20 or 100 mg/kg/day, s.c.) reduced serum IGF1 levels by 23% and 68%, respectively, compared to vehicle treated controls. RL95-2 xenografts grown in immunodeficient NIH-III mice were treated with vehicle or pegvisomant (100 mg/kg/day), with or without fractionated gamma radiation (10 × 2.5 Gy over 5 days). When combined with radiation, pegvisomant significantly increased the median time tumours took to reach 3× the pre-radiation treatment volume (49 days versus 72 days; p = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that 100 mg/kg pegvisomant every second day was sufficient to abrogate MAP Kinase signalling throughout the tumour. In addition, treatment with pegvisomant increased hypoxic regions in irradiated tumours, as determined by immunohistochemical detection of pimonidazole adducts, and decreased the area of CD31 labelling in unirradiated tumours, suggesting an anti-vascular effect. Pegvisomant did not affect intratumoral staining for HIF1α, VEGF-A, CD11b, or phospho-EGFR. Our results suggest that blockade of the human GH receptor may improve the response of GH and/or IGF1-responsive endometrial tumours to radiation. PMID:27241667

  16. Multiscale modelling of tumour growth induced by circadian rhythm disruption in epithelial tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Bratsun, D. A.; Merkuriev, D. V.; Zakharov, A. P.; Pismen, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a multiscale chemo-mechanical model of cancer tumour development in an epithelial tissue. The model is based on transformation of normal cells into the cancerous state triggered by a local failure of spatial synchronisation of the circadian rhythm. The model includes mechanical interactions and chemical signal exchange between neighbouring cells, as well as division of cells and intercalation, and allows for modification of the respective parameters following transformation into th...

  17. Detection of human herpesviruses 6 and 7 genomic sequences in brain tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, P K; Ng, H.K.; Cheng, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human herpesviruses 6 and 7 (HHV-6, HHV-7) are ubiquitous, with primary infection occurring early in life followed by persistence, which may involve neural tissue. While HHV-6 and HHV-7 are predominantly T lymphotropic, the extent of tissue tropism in persistent infection is not known. AIM: To investigate neuropersistence and the role of HHV-6 and HHV-7 in brain tumorigenesis. METHODS: Nested polymerase chain reaction was used to detect HHV-6 and HHV-7 genomic sequences in prepara...

  18. Challenges relating to solid tumour brain metastases in clinical trials, part 1: patient population, response, and progression. A report from the RANO group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nancy U; Lee, Eudocia Q; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Barani, Igor J; Baumert, Brigitta G; Brown, Paul D; Camidge, D Ross; Chang, Susan M; Dancey, Janet; Gaspar, Laurie E; Harris, Gordon J; Hodi, F Stephen; Kalkanis, Steven N; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Linskey, Mark E; Macdonald, David R; Margolin, Kim; Mehta, Minesh P; Schiff, David; Soffietti, Riccardo; Suh, John H; van den Bent, Martin J; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Wen, Patrick Y

    2013-09-01

    Therapeutic outcomes for patients with brain metastases need to improve. A critical review of trials specifically addressing brain metastases shows key issues that could prevent acceptance of results by regulatory agencies, including enrolment of heterogeneous groups of patients and varying definitions of clinical endpoints. Considerations specific to disease, modality, and treatment are not consistently addressed. Additionally, the schedule of CNS imaging and consequences of detection of new or progressive brain metastases in trials mainly exploring the extra-CNS activity of systemic drugs are highly variable. The Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) working group is an independent, international, collaborative effort to improve the design of trials in patients with brain tumours. In this two-part series, we review the state of clinical trials of brain metastases and suggest a consensus recommendation for the development of criteria for future clinical trials. PMID:23993384

  19. Bio-Mechanical Model of the Brain for a Per-Operative Image-Guided Neuronavigator Compensating for "Brain-Shift" Deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Bucki, Marek; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology to address the problem of brain tissue deformation referred to as 'brain-shift'. This deformation occurs throughout a neurosurgery intervention and strongly alters the accuracy of the neuronavigation systems used to date in clinical routine which rely solely on pre-operative patient imaging to locate the surgical target, such as a tumour or a functional area. After a general description of the framework of our intra-operative image-guided system, we describe a procedure to generate patient specific finite element meshes of the brain and propose a biomechanical model which can take into account tissue deformations and surgical procedures that modify the brain structure, like tumour or tissue resection.

  20. The food processing contaminant glyoxal promotes tumour growth in the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Camilla; Høie, Anja Hortemo; Alexander, Jan; Murkovic, Michael; Husøy, Trine

    2016-08-01

    Glyoxal is formed endogenously and at a higher rate in the case of hyperglycemia. Glyoxal is also a food processing contaminant and has been shown to be mutagenic and genotoxic in vitro. The tumourigenic potential of glyoxal was investigated using the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model, which spontaneously develops intestinal tumours and is susceptible to intestinal carcinogens. C57BL/6J females were mated with Min males. Four days after mating and throughout gestation and lactation, the pregnant dams were exposed to glyoxal through drinking water (0.0125%, 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%) or regular tap water. Female and male offspring were housed separately from PND21 and continued with the same treatment. One group were only exposed to 0.1% glyoxal from postnatal day (PND) 21. There was no difference in the number of intestinal tumours between control and treatment groups. However, exposure to 0.1% glyoxal starting in utero and at PND21 caused a significant increase in tumour size in the small intestine for male and female mice in comparison with respective control groups. This study suggests that glyoxal has tumour growth promoting properties in the small intestine in Min mice. PMID:27288931

  1. Hierarchical models in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Friston

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a general model that subsumes many parametric models for continuous data. The model comprises hidden layers of state-space or dynamic causal models, arranged so that the output of one provides input to another. The ensuing hierarchy furnishes a model for many types of data, of arbitrary complexity. Special cases range from the general linear model for static data to generalised convolution models, with system noise, for nonlinear time-series analysis. Crucially, all of these models can be inverted using exactly the same scheme, namely, dynamic expectation maximization. This means that a single model and optimisation scheme can be used to invert a wide range of models. We present the model and a brief review of its inversion to disclose the relationships among, apparently, diverse generative models of empirical data. We then show that this inversion can be formulated as a simple neural network and may provide a useful metaphor for inference and learning in the brain.

  2. Integrative genomic analyses identify LIN28 and OLIG2 as markers of survival and metastatic potential in childhood central nervous system primitive neuro-ectodermal brain tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Daniel; Miller, Suzanne; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Bouffet, Eric; Rogers, Hazel A; Chan, Tiffany SY; Kim, Seung-Ki; Ra, Young-Shin; Fangusaro, Jason; Korshunov, Andrey; Toledano, Helen; Nakamura, Hideo; Hayden, James T; Chan, Jennifer; Lafay-Cousin, Lucie; Hu, Ping X; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M; Pomeroy, Scott L; Lau, Ching C; Ng, Ho-Keung; Jones, Chris; Meter, Timothy Van; Clifford, Steven C; Eberhart, Charles; Gajjar, Amar; Pfister, Stefan M; Grundy, Richard G; Huang, Annie

    2013-01-01

    Background Childhood Central Nervous System Primitive Neuro-Ectodermal brain Tumours (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive brain tumours for which molecular features and best therapeutic strategy remains unknown. We interrogated a large cohort of these rare tumours in order to identify molecular markers that will enhance clinical management of CNS-PNET. Methods Transcriptional and copy number profiles from primary hemispheric CNS-PNETs were examined using clustering, gene and pathways enrichment analyses to discover tumour sub-groups and group-specific molecular markers. Immuno-histochemical and/or gene expression analyses were used to validate and examine the clinical significance of novel sub-group markers in 123 primary CNS-PNETs. Findings Three molecular sub-groups of CNS-PNETs distinguished by primitive neural (Group 1), oligo-neural (Group 2) and mesenchymal lineage (Group 3) gene expression signature were identified. Tumour sub-groups exhibited differential expression of cell lineage markers, LIN28 and OLIG2, and correlated with distinct demographics, survival and metastatic incidence. Group 1 tumours affected primarily younger females; male: female ratios were respectively 0.61 (median age 2.9 years; 95% CI: 2.4–5.2; p≤ 0.005), 1.25 (median age 7.9 years; 95% CI: 6–9.7) and 1.63 (median age 5.9 years; 95% CI: 4.9–7.8) for group 1, 2 and 3 patients. Overall outcome was poorest in group 1 patients which had a median survival of 0.8 years (95% CI: 0.47–1.2; p=0.019) as compared to 1.8 years (95% CI: 1.4–2.3) and 4.3 years; (95% CI: 0.82–7.8) respectively for group 2 and 3 patients. Group 3 tumours had the highest incidence of metastases at diagnosis; M0: M+ ratio were respectively 0.9 and 3.9 for group 3, versus group 1 and 2 tumours combined (p=0.037). Interpretation LIN28 and OLIG2 represent highly promising, novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers for CNS PNET that warrants further evaluation in prospective clinical trials. PMID:22691720

  3. Demyelinating disease simulating brain tumours: A histopathologic assessment of seven cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Deepali

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Demyelinating diseases can present as space occupying lesions with in the brain. It is clinically and radiologically difficult to differentiate them from primary neoplasms. Histopathologically they mimic astrocytic neoplasms closely and identifying these lesions correctly has a profound impact in treatment and prognosis of these patients. Aims and Objectives: The objective was to determine the histopathologic features of such acute focal demyelinating disease that clinically presented as brain tumors. Material and Methods: Seven cases were included for the study. Detailed histopathological examination including stains for myelin and axon were performed. The histopathological keys in arriving at the right diagnoses included a well demarcated lesion that contains uniform distribution of foamy macrophages in the absence of any associated coagulative necrosis, sheets of gemistocytic astrocytes in the white matter that show well-formed processes, perivascular chronic inflammatory cell infiltration and total absence of myelin with relative preservation of axons within these areas. Conclusion: The degree of suspicion (clinical, radiological and histopathological should be high to diagnose these group of lesions. The above-mentioned diagnostic keys should help in arriving at the correct histopathological diagnoses of such cases.

  4. An evolutionary-game model of tumour-cell interactions: possible relevance to gene therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Lars Arve; Bentzen, Søren; Alsner, Jan;

    2001-01-01

    interpretations of gene therapy. Two prototypical strategies for gene therapy are suggested, both of them leading to extinction of the malignant phenotype: one approach would be to reduce the relative proportion of the cooperating malignant cell type below a certain critical value. Another approach would be to......Evolutionary games have been applied as simple mathematical models of populations where interactions between individuals control the dynamics. Recently, it has been proposed to use this type of model to describe the evolution of tumour cell populations with interactions between cells. We extent the...... analysis to allow for synergistic effects between cells. A mathematical model of a tumour cell population is presented in which population-level synergy is assumed to originate through the interaction of triplets of cells. A threshold of two cooperating cells is assumed to be required to produce a...

  5. The significance of electron spin resonance of the ascorbic acid radical in freeze dried human brain tumours and oedematous or normal periphery.

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, H. W.; Tannert, S.

    1986-01-01

    The ESR spectrum, attributed to the ascorbic acid (ascorbyl) radical and obtained by exposing freeze dried material to air, can not be used as proof for the occurrence of in vivo free radical reactions. Depending on the method of freeze drying, the content of blood or hemolyzed blood is the dominant factor in creating higher than normal ESR signals in brain or related tissue. These findings explain why the signal, though larger in many human brain tumours than in their surroundings, is not in...

  6. Spontaneous transformation of human granulosa cell tumours into an aggressive phenotype: a metastasis model cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granulosa cell tumours (GCTs) are frequently seen in menopausal women and are relatively indolent. Although the physiological properties of normal granulosa cells have been studied extensively, little is known about the molecular mechanism of GCT progression. Here, we characterise the unique behavioural properties of a granulosa tumour cell line, KGN cells, for the molecular analysis of GCT progression. Population doubling was carried out to examine the proliferation capacity of KGN cells. Moreover, the invasive capacity of these cells was determined using the in vitro invasion assay. The expression level of tumour markers in KGN cells at different passages was then determined by Western blot analysis. Finally, the growth and metastasis of KGN cells injected subcutaneously (s.c.) into nude mice was observed 3 months after injection. During in vitro culture, the advanced passage KGN cells grew 2-fold faster than the early passage cells, as determined by the population doubling assay. Moreover, we found that the advanced passage cells were 2-fold more invasive than the early passage cells. The expression pattern of tumour markers, such as p53, osteopontin, BAX and BAG-1, supported the notion that with passage, KGN cells became more aggressive. Strikingly, KGN cells at both early and advanced passages metastasized to the bowel when injected s.c. into nude mice. In addition, more tumour nodules were formed when the advanced passage cells were implanted. KGN cells cultured in vitro acquire an aggressive phenotype, which was confirmed by the analysis of cellular activities and the expression of biomarkers. Interestingly, KGN cells injected s.c. are metastatic with nodule formation occurring mostly in the bowel. Thus, this cell line is a good model for analysing GCT progression and the mechanism of metastasis in vivo

  7. Incompressible limit of a mechanical model of tumour growth with viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perthame, Benoît; Vauchelet, Nicolas

    2015-09-13

    Various models of tumour growth are available in the literature. The first type describe the evolution of the cell number density when considered as a continuous visco-elastic material with growth. The second type describe the tumour as a set, and rules for the free boundary are given related to the classical Hele-Shaw model of fluid dynamics. Following previous papers where the material is described by a purely elastic material, or when active cell motion is included, we make the link between the two types of description considering the 'stiff pressure law' limit. Even though viscosity is a regularizing effect, new mathematical difficulties arise in the visco-elastic case because estimates on the pressure field are weaker and do not immediately imply compactness. For instance, travelling wave solutions and numerical simulations show that the pressure is discontinuous in space, which is not the case for an elastic material. PMID:26261366

  8. New Ideas for Brain Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran Greer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes some biologically-inspired processes that could be used to build the sort of networks that we associate with the human brain. New to this paper, a ‘refined’ neuron will be proposed. This is a group of neurons that by joining together can produce a more analogue system, but with the same level of control and reliability that a binary neuron would have. With this new structure, it will be possible to think of an essentially binary system in terms of a more variable set of values. The paper also shows how recent research can be combined with established theories, to produce a more complete picture.The propositions are largely in line with conventional thinking, but possibly with one or two more radical suggestions. An earlier cognitive model can be filled in with more specific details, based on the new research results, where the components appear to fit together almost seamlessly. The intention of the research has been to describe plausible ‘mechanical’ processes that can produce the appropriate brain structures and mechanisms, but that could be used without the magical ‘intelligence’ part that is still not fully understood.There are also some important updates from an earlier version of this paper.Keywords: neuron, neural network, cognitive model, self-organise, analogue, resonance.

  9. The INTERPRET Decision-Support System version 3.0 for evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy data from human brain tumours and other abnormal brain masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercadal Guillem

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proton Magnetic Resonance (MR Spectroscopy (MRS is a widely available technique for those clinical centres equipped with MR scanners. Unlike the rest of MR-based techniques, MRS yields not images but spectra of metabolites in the tissues. In pathological situations, the MRS profile changes and this has been particularly described for brain tumours. However, radiologists are frequently not familiar to the interpretation of MRS data and for this reason, the usefulness of decision-support systems (DSS in MRS data analysis has been explored. Results This work presents the INTERPRET DSS version 3.0, analysing the improvements made from its first release in 2002. Version 3.0 is aimed to be a program that 1st, can be easily used with any new case from any MR scanner manufacturer and 2nd, improves the initial analysis capabilities of the first version. The main improvements are an embedded database, user accounts, more diagnostic discrimination capabilities and the possibility to analyse data acquired under additional data acquisition conditions. Other improvements include a customisable graphical user interface (GUI. Most diagnostic problems included have been addressed through a pattern-recognition based approach, in which classifiers based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA were trained and tested. Conclusions The INTERPRET DSS 3.0 allows radiologists, medical physicists, biochemists or, generally speaking, any person with a minimum knowledge of what an MR spectrum is, to enter their own SV raw data, acquired at 1.5 T, and to analyse them. The system is expected to help in the categorisation of MR Spectra from abnormal brain masses.

  10. Genetic modification of cancer cells using non-viral, episomal S/MAR vectors for in vivo tumour modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orestis Argyros

    Full Text Available The development of genetically marked animal tumour xenografts is an area of ongoing research to enable easier and more reliable testing of cancer therapies. Genetically marked tumour models have a number of advantages over conventional tumour models, including the easy longitudinal monitoring of therapies and the reduced number of animals needed for trials. Several different methods have been used in previous studies to mark tumours genetically, however all have limitations, such as genotoxicity and other artifacts related to the usage of integrating viral vectors. Recently, we have generated an episomally maintained plasmid DNA (pDNA expression system based on Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Region (S/MAR, which permits long-term luciferase transgene expression in the mouse liver. Here we describe a further usage of this pDNA vector with the human Ubiquitin C promoter to create stably transfected human hepatoma (Huh7 and human Pancreatic Carcinoma (MIA-PaCa2 cell lines, which were delivered into "immune deficient" mice and monitored longitudinally over time using a bioluminometer. Both cell lines revealed sustained episomal long-term luciferase expression and formation of a tumour showing the pathological characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and pancreatic carcinoma (PaCa, respectively. This is the first demonstration that a pDNA vector can confer sustained episomal luciferase transgene expression in various mouse tumour models and can thus be readily utilised to follow tumour formation without interfering with the cellular genome.

  11. Simultaneous evaluation of brain tumour metabolism, structure and blood volume using [18F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET/MRI: feasibility, agreement and initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both [18F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET and blood volume (BV) MRI supplement routine T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI in gliomas, but whether the two modalities provide identical or complementary information is unresolved. The aims of the study were to investigate the feasibility of simultaneous structural MRI, BV MRI and FET PET of gliomas using an integrated PET/MRI scanner and to assess the spatial and quantitative agreement in tumour imaging between BV MRI and FET PET. A total of 32 glioma patients underwent a 20-min static simultaneous PET/MRI acquisition on a Siemens mMR system 20 min after injection of 200 MBq FET. The MRI protocol included standard structural MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging for BV measurements. Maximal relative tumour FET uptake (TBRmax) and BV (rBVmax), and Dice coefficients were calculated to assess the quantitative and spatial congruence in the tumour volumes determined by FET PET, BV MRI and contrast-enhanced MRI. FET volume and TBRmax were higher in BV-positive than in BV-negative scans, and both VOLBV and rBVmax were higher in FET-positive than in FET-negative scans. TBRmax and rBVmax were positively correlated (R2 = 0.59, p < 0.001). FET and BV positivity were in agreement in only 26 of the 32 patients and in 42 of 63 lesions, and spatial congruence in the tumour volumes as assessed by the Dice coefficients was generally poor with median Dice coefficients exceeding 0.1 in less than half the patients positive on at least one modality for any pair of modalities. In 56 % of the patients susceptibility artefacts in DSC BV maps overlapped the tumour on MRI. The study demonstrated that although tumour volumes determined by BV MRI and FET PET were quantitatively correlated, their spatial congruence in a mixed population of treated glioma patients was generally poor, and the modalities did not provide the same information in this population of patients. Combined imaging of brain tumour metabolism and perfusion using

  12. Simultaneous evaluation of brain tumour metabolism, structure and blood volume using [{sup 18}F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET/MRI: feasibility, agreement and initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, Otto M.; Hansen, Adam E.; Law, Ian [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Clinical Physiology Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsen, Vibeke A. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Muhic, Aida; Poulsen, Hans S. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsson, Henrik B.W. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Functional Imaging Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology Nuclear Medicine and PET, Glostrup (Denmark)

    2016-01-15

    imaging of brain tumour metabolism and perfusion using hybrid PET/MR systems may provide complementary information on tumour biology, but the potential clinical value remains to be determined in future trials. (orig.)

  13. Kinetic analysis of experimental rabbit tumour and inflammation model with 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-specific accumulation of 18F-FDG by both tumour and inflammatory lesions can make diagnostic analysis difficult. Our aim was to explore the difference in 18F-FDG uptake kinetics between tumour and inflammatory cells. To this end, we investigated VX2 tumour lesions and inflammatory lesions in rabbits. Methods: Six rabbits with VX2 tumour cells transplanted into one forelimb muscle and inflammatory lesions induced by turpentine oil in the contralateral forelimb were scanned for 60 minutes post 18F-FDG injection. Imaging data was analyzed with the standard 2-tissue-compartment model. Parameters, VB, Ki, K1, k2, k3, k4, were compared between tumour and inflammatory lesions. SUV and dual time scan methods were also compared in the experiment. Results: Time activity curves of VX2 tumour lesions showed a characteristic pattern of gradually increasing 18F-FDG uptake up to 60 min, whereas, 18F-FDG uptake in inflammatory lesions increased more slowly than in tumours. Parameters estimated from the uptake process showed that forward transport constant, K1, and influx constant, Ki, values in VX2 tumour lesions (0.186 ± 0.053 and 0.048 ± 0.014, respectively) was significantly higher than that in inflammatory lesions (0.129 ± 0.024 and 0.022 ± 0.007, respectively) (p 18F-FDG injection were also significantly higher in the VX2 tumor lesions than in the inflammatory lesions. Retention index (RI) was not significantly different between VX2 tumours and inflammatory lesions (1.134 ± 0.076 vs. 1.060 ± 0.058, p > 0.05). Conclusion: Different kinetic parameters (Ki, K1, k3) exist between inflammatory and tumour lesions. (orig.)

  14. Neurocomputational models of brain disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutsuridis, Vassilis; Heida, Tjitske; Duch, Wlodek; Doya, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Recent decades have witnessed dramatic accumulation of knowledge about the genetic, molecular, pharmacological, neurophysiological, anatomical, imaging and psychological characteristics of brain disorders. Despite these advances, however, experimental brain science has offered very little insight in

  15. Mid-ventilation position planning: Optimal model for dose distribution in lung tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - The dose distribution for lung tumour is estimated using a 3D-CT scan, and since a person breathes while the images are captured, the dose distribution doesn't reflect the reality. A 4D-CT scan integrates the motion of the tumour during breathing and, therefore, provides us with important information regarding tumour's motion in all directions, the motion volume (ITV) and the time-weighted average position (MVP). Patient and methods. - Based on these two concepts, we have estimated, for a lung carcinoma case a 3D dose distribution from a 3D-CT scan, and a 4D dose distribution from a 4-D CT scan. To this, we have applied a non-rigid registration to estimate the cumulative dose. Results. - Our study shows that the 4D dose estimation of the GTV is almost the same when made using MVP and ITV concepts, but sparring of the healthy lung is better done using the MPV model (MVP), as compared to the ITV model. This improvement of the therapeutic index allows, from a projection on the theoretical maximal dose to PTV (strictly restricted to doses for the lungs and the spinal cord), for an increase of about 11% on the total dose (maximal dose of 86 Gy for the ITV and 96 Gy for the MVP). Conclusion. - Further studies with more patients are needed to confirm our data. (authors)

  16. Intra-individual, randomised comparison of the MRI contrast agents gadobutrol versus gadoteridol in patients with primary and secondary brain tumours, evaluated in a blinded read

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prove that 1.0 M gadobutrol provides superior contrast enhancement and MRI image characteristics of primary and secondary brain tumours compared with 0.5 M gadoteridol, thereby providing superior diagnostic information. Brain MRI was performed in two separate examinations in patients scheduled for neurosurgery. Independent injections of 1.0 M gadobutrol and 0.5 M gadoteridol at doses of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight were administered per patient in randomised order. Evaluation was performed in an off-site blinded read. Fifty-one patients in the full analysis set (FAS) were eligible for efficacy analysis and 44 for the per-protocol analysis. For the primary efficacy variable ''preference in contrast enhancement for one contrast agent or the other'', the rate of ''gadobutrol preferred'' was estimated at 0.73 (95 % confidence interval 0.61; 0.83), showing significant superiority of gadobutrol over gadoteridol. Calculated lesion-to-brain contrast and the results of all qualitative secondary efficacy variables were also in favour of gadobutrol. Keeping a sufficient time delay after contrast application proved to be essential to get optimal image quality. Compared with 0.5 M gadoteridol, 1.0 M gadobutrol was proven to have significantly superior contrast enhancement characteristics in a routine MRI protocol of primary and secondary brain tumours. (orig.)

  17. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V.; Swanson, Benjamin J.; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Denko, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  18. Continuous, pulsed or single acute irradiation of a transplanted rodent tumour model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Recent advances in remote afterloading pulsed mode brachytherapy have provided a much needed tool for the radiation oncologist. It has the versatility of optimised physical dose distribution along with improved staff radiation protection and patient nursing. Purpose: This preliminary study was designed to explore the radiobiological equivalence between conventional continuous low dose rate tumour irradiation (CLDR) and the new technique of pulsed dose irradiation (PDR). Materials and methods: Subcutaneous isogenic sarcomas transplanted in female John's Strain Wistar rats were irradiated locally with acute, pulsed or continuous interstitial low dose-rate exposures at 9-11 mm mean diameter. Results: As expected, single acute doses (5-40 Gy) were more effective (P < 0.01) in achieving tumour growth delay (1.4 days/Gy) than CLDR exposure (4-51 Gy) over 24-48 h (0.93 days/Gy). However, PDR treatment (8 hourly fractions/day) at high dose-rate (8-48Gy) over 8-72 h was significantly (P = 0.01) more effective (1.66 days/Gy) than CLDR but not acute exposures. Conclusions: These data suggest that, clinically a significantly improved therapeutic ratio may also be achievable with pulsed high dose rate brachytherapy, and that further radiobiological studies with in-vivo tumour models are needed

  19. Computed 88% TCP dose for SBRT of NSCLC from tumour hypoxia modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In small NSCLC, 88% local control at three years from SBRT was reported both for schedule (20–22 Gy ×3) (Fakiris et al 2009 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 75 677–82), actually close to (18–20 Gy ×3) if density correction is properly applied, and for schedules (18 Gy ×3) and (11 Gy ×5) (Palma et al 2012 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 82 1149–56). Here, we compare our computed iso-TCP = 88% dose per fraction (d88) for three and five fractions (n) with such clinically adopted ones. Our TCP model accounts for tumour repopulation, at rate λ (d−1), reoxygenation of chronic hypoxia (ch-), at rate a (d−1) and fluctuating oxygenation of acute hypoxia (ah-), with hypoxic fraction (C) of the acutely hypoxic fractional volume (AHF). Out of the eight free parameters whose values we had fitted to in vivo animal data (Ruggieri et al 2012 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 83 1603–8), we here maintained (a(d−1), C, OERch, OERah/OERch, AHF, CHF) = (0.026, 0.17, 1.9, 2.2, 0.033, 0.145) while rescaling the initial total number of clonogens (No) according to the ratio of NSCLC on animal median tumour volumes. From the clinical literature, the usually assumed (αo/βo(Gy), λ(d−1)) = (10, 0.217) for the well-oxygenated (o-)cells were taken. By normal (lognormal) random sampling of all parameter values over their 95% C.I., the uncertainty on present d88(n) computations was estimated. Finally, SBRT intra-tumour dose heterogeneity was simulated by a 1.3 dose boost ratio on 50% of tumour volume. Computed d88(±1σ) were 19.0 (16.3; 21.7) Gy, for n = 3; 10.4 (8.7; 12.1) Gy, for n = 5; 5.8 (5.2; 6.4) Gy, for n = 8; 4.0 (3.6; 4.3) Gy, for n = 12. Furthermore, the iso-TCP = 88% total dose, D88(n) = d88(n)*n, exhibited a relative minimum around n = 8. Computed d88(n = 3, 5) are strictly consistent with the clinically adopted ones, which confirms the validity of LQ-model-based TCP predictions at the doses used in SBRT if a highly radioresistant cell subpopulation

  20. Improvement in tumour control probability with active breathing control and dose escalation: A modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The prognosis from non-small cell lung cancer remains poor, even in those patients suitable for radical radiotherapy. The ability of radiotherapy to achieve local control is hampered by the sensitivity of normal structures to irradiation at the high tumour doses needed. This study aimed to look at the potential gain in tumour control probability from dose escalation facilitated by moderate deep inspiration breath-hold. Method: The data from 28 patients, recruited into two separate studies were used. These patients underwent planning with and without the use of moderate deep inspiration breath-hold with an active breathing control (ABC) device. Whilst maintaining the mean lung dose (MLD) at the level of the conventional plan, the ABC plan dose was theoretically escalated to a maximum of 84 Gy, constrained by usual normal tissue tolerances. Calculations were performed using data for both lungs and for the ipsilateral lung only. Resulting local progression-free survival at 30 months was calculated using a standard logistic model. Results: The prescription dose could be escalated from 64 Gy to a mean of 73.7 ± 6.5 Gy without margin reduction, which represents a statistically significant increase in tumour control probability from 0.15 ± 0.01 to 0.29 ± 0.11 (p < 0.0001). The results were not statistically different whether both lungs or just the ipsilateral lung was used for calculations. Conclusion: A near-doubling of tumour control probability is possible with modest dose escalation, which can be achieved with no extra increase in lung dose if deep inspiration breath-hold techniques are used.

  1. MRI EVALUATION OF SUPRATENTORIAL TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumours represents 1.7% of all cancers and contributes 1.8% of all cancer deaths. Of all the brain tumours 80% are supratentorial.1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging is an important modality, having higher sensitivity for detecting intracranial pathology. Multiplanar imaging is possible with MRI which helps in detection, localization and characterization of the lesion. The MRI examination has helped in early diagnosis, accurate localization of the tumour with prompt initiation of appropriate medical or surgical therapy. Recent advances like Magnetic Resonance (MR spectroscopy, MR fluoroscopy with stereotactic guided biopsy have revolutionized the role of MRI in study of intracranial tumours.

  2. Establishment of a small animal tumour model for in vivo studies with low energy laser accelerated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term aim of developing a laser based acceleration of protons and ions towards clinical application requires not only substantial technological progress, but also the radiobiological characterization of the resulting ultra-short pulsed particle beams. Recent in vitro data showed similar effects of laser-accelerated versus 'conventional' protons on clonogenic cell survival. As the proton energies currently achieved by laser driven acceleration are too low to penetrate standard tumour models on mouse legs, the aim of the present work was to establish a tumour model allowing for the penetration of low energy protons (~ 20 MeV) to further verify their effects in vivo. KHT mouse sarcoma cells were injected subcutaneously in the right ear of NMRI (nu/nu) mice and the growing tumours were characterized with respect to growth parameters, histology and radiation response. In parallel, the laser system JETI was prepared for animal experimentation, i.e. a new irradiation setup was implemented and the laser parameters were carefully adjusted. Finally, a proof-of-principle experiment with laser accelerated electrons was performed to validate the tumour model under realistic conditions, i.e. altered environment and horizontal beam delivery. KHT sarcoma on mice ears showed a high take rate and continuous tumour growth after reaching a volume of ~ 5 mm3. The first irradiation experiment using laser accelerated electrons versus 200 kV X-rays was successfully performed and tumour growth delay was evaluated. Comparable tumour growth delay was found between X-ray and laser accelerated electron irradiation. Moreover, experimental influences, like anaesthesia and positioning at JETI, were found to be negligible. A small animal tumour model suitable for the irradiation with low energy particles was established and validated at a laser based particle accelerator. Thus, the translation from in vitro to in vivo experimentation was for the first time realized allowing a

  3. Addition of vasopressin synthetic analogue [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard chemotherapy enhances tumour growth inhibition and impairs metastatic spread in aggressive breast tumour models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garona, Juan; Pifano, Marina; Pastrian, Maria B; Gomez, Daniel E; Ripoll, Giselle V; Alonso, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP is a novel 2nd generation vasopressin analogue with robust antitumour activity against metastatic breast cancer. We recently reported that, by acting on vasopressin V2r membrane receptor present in tumour cells and microvascular endothelium, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis and metastatic progression of the disease without overt toxicity. Despite chemotherapy remaining as a primary therapeutic option for aggressive breast cancer, its use is limited by low selectivity and associated adverse effects. In this regard, we evaluated potential combinational benefits by adding [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard-of-care chemotherapy. In vitro, combination of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with sub-IC50 concentrations of paclitaxel or carmustine resulted in a cooperative inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in comparison to single-agent therapy. In vivo antitumour efficacy of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition to chemotherapy was first evaluated using the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. Tumour-bearing mice were treated with i.v. injections of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice weekly) in combination with weekly cycles of paclitaxel (10 mg/kg i.p.). After 6 weeks of treatment, combination regimen resulted in greater tumour growth inhibition compared to monotherapy. [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition was also associated with reduction of local aggressiveness, and impairment of tumour invasion and infiltration of the skin. Benefits of combined therapy were confirmed in the hormone-independent and metastatic F3II breast cancer model by combining [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with carmustine (25 mg/kg i.p.). Interestingly, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP plus cytotoxic agents severely impaired colony forming ability of tumour cells and inhibited breast cancer metastasis to lung. The present study shows that [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP may complement conventional chemotherapy by modulating metastatic progression and early stages of microtumour establishment, and thus supports further preclinical testing of

  4. Investigation of various growth mechanisms of solid tumour growth within the linear-quadratic model for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAneney, H.; O'Rourke, S. F. C.

    2007-02-01

    The standard linear-quadratic survival model for radiotherapy is used to investigate different schedules of radiation treatment planning to study how these may be affected by different tumour repopulation kinetics between treatments. The laws for tumour cell repopulation include the logistic and Gompertz models and this extends the work of Wheldon et al (1977 Br. J. Radiol. 50 681), which was concerned with the case of exponential re-growth between treatments. Here we also consider the restricted exponential model. This has been successfully used by Panetta and Adam (1995 Math. Comput. Modelling 22 67) in the case of chemotherapy treatment planning.Treatment schedules investigated include standard fractionation of daily treatments, weekday treatments, accelerated fractionation, optimized uniform schedules and variation of the dosage and α/β ratio, where α and β are radiobiological parameters for the tumour tissue concerned. Parameters for these treatment strategies are extracted from the literature on advanced head and neck cancer, prostate cancer, as well as radiosensitive parameters. Standardized treatment protocols are also considered. Calculations based on the present analysis indicate that even with growth laws scaled to mimic initial growth, such that growth mechanisms are comparable, variation in survival fraction to orders of magnitude emerged. Calculations show that the logistic and exponential models yield similar results in tumour eradication. By comparison the Gompertz model calculations indicate that tumours described by this law result in a significantly poorer prognosis for tumour eradication than either the exponential or logistic models. The present study also shows that the faster the tumour growth rate and the higher the repair capacity of the cell line, the greater the variation in outcome of the survival fraction. Gaps in treatment, planned or unplanned, also accentuate the differences of the survival fraction given alternative growth

  5. Brain metastases after stereotactic radiosurgery using the Leksell gamma knife: can FDG PET help to differentiate radionecrosis from tumour progression?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell gamma knife promotes acute and chronic local changes in glucose metabolism. We have been able to find very few papers on Medline on the subject of assessment of metastases by 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) after SRS. The aim of this work was to specify the additional value of FDG PET, in comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in differentiating SRS-induced radionecrosis from viable brain metastasis in a clinical setting. Fifty-seven metastases in 25 patients were treated by SRS. An average of 33 weeks later, all the patients underwent FDG PET. At the same time (SD=2 weeks) all the patients underwent MRI. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of both FDG PET and MRI examinations were calculated with reference to clinical and radiological follow-up or biopsies. The additional value derived from use of FDG PET after MRI was assessed and progression-free survival rates were compared. The difference in progression-free survival rates between the negative and positive subgroups was significant (P=0.0005) for MRI and even more so (P<0.00001) for FDG PET. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 75% (6/8), 93.9% (46/49) and 91.2% (52/57) for FDG PET, and 100% (8/8), 65.3% (32/49) and 70.2% (40/57) for MRI. In the subgroup of patients with positive or non-diagnostic MRI, the probability of presence of a viable tumour was only 32% (8/25). This probability increased to 100% (5/5) when subsequent FDG PET was positive and decreased to 11.1% (2/18) when FDG PET was negative. The frequency of a viable neoplasm was significantly different (P=0.001) in the FDG PET negative and positive subgroups. MRI and FDG PET both have an important predictive value for persistent viable metastases after treatment by SRS. Neither sensitive but non-specific MRI nor specific but insensitive FDG PET is reliable on its own. While FDG PET significantly improved the diagnostic accuracy in the

  6. Bayesian Models of Brain and Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Penny, William

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a review of Bayesian models of brain and behaviour. We first review the basic principles of Bayesian inference. This is followed by descriptions of sampling and variational methods for approximate inference, and forward and backward recursions in time for inference in dynamical models. The review of behavioural models covers work in visual processing, sensory integration, sensorimotor integration, and collective decision making. The review of brain models covers a range of...

  7. A systems-based mathematical modelling framework for investigating the effect of drugs on solid tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Cong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidating the effects of drugs on solid tumours is a highly challenging multi-level problem, since this involves many complexities associated with transport and cellular response, which in turn is characterized by highly non-linear chemical signal transduction. Appropriate systems frameworks are needed to seriously address the sources of these complexities, especially from the cellular side. Results We develop a skeletal modelling framework incorporating interstitial drug transport, intracellular signal processing and cell population descriptions. The descriptions aim to appropriately capture the nature of information flow. The model is deliberately formulated to start with simple intracellular descriptions so that additional features can be incorporated in a modular fashion. Two kinds of intracellular signalling modules which describe the drug effect were considered, one a monostable switch and the other a bistable switch. Analysis of our model revealed how different drug stimuli can lead to cell killing in the tumour. Interestingly both modules considered exhibited similar trends. The effects of important parameters were also studied. Conclusions We have created a predictive systems platform integrating drug transport and cellular response which can be systematically augmented to include additional layers of cellular complexity. Our results indicate that intracellular signalling models which are qualitatively different can give rise to similar behaviour to simple (and typical stimuli, and that validating intracellular descriptions must be performed with care by considering a variety of drug stimuli.

  8. Tracer kinetic modelling of tumour angiogenesis based on dynamic contrast-enhanced CT and MRI measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical developments in both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) have helped to reduce scan times and expedited the development of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging techniques. Since the temporal change of the image signal following the administration of a diffusible, extracellular contrast agent (CA) is related to the local blood supply and the extravasation of the CA into the interstitial space, DCE imaging can be used to assess tissue microvasculature and microcirculation. It is the aim of this review to summarize the biophysical and tracer kinetic principles underlying this emerging imaging technique offering great potential for non-invasive characterization of tumour angiogenesis. In the first part, the relevant contrast mechanisms are presented that form the basis to relate signal variations measured by serial CT and MRI to local tissue concentrations of the administered CA. In the second part, the concepts most widely used for tracer kinetic modelling of concentration-time courses derived from measured DCE image data sets are described in a consistent and unified manner to highlight their particular structure and assumptions as well as the relationships among them. Finally, the concepts presented are exemplified by the analysis of representative DCE data as well as discussed with respect to present and future applications in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Depending on the specific protocol used for the acquisition of DCE image data and the particular model applied for tracer kinetic analysis of the derived concentration-time courses, different aspects of tumour angiogenesis can be quantified in terms of well-defined physiological tissue parameters. DCE imaging offers promising prospects for improved tumour diagnosis, individualization of cancer treatment as well as the evaluation of novel therapeutic concepts in preclinical and early-stage clinical trials. (orig.)

  9. Simultaneous evaluation of brain tumour metabolism, structure and blood volume using [(18)F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto M; Larsen, Vibeke A; Muhic, Aida; Hansen, Adam E; Larsson, Henrik B W; Poulsen, Hans S; Law, Ian

    2016-01-01

    at least one modality for any pair of modalities. In 56 % of the patients susceptibility artefacts in DSC BV maps overlapped the tumour on MRI. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated that although tumour volumes determined by BV MRI and FET PET were quantitatively correlated, their spatial congruence in......PURPOSE: Both [(18)F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET and blood volume (BV) MRI supplement routine T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI in gliomas, but whether the two modalities provide identical or complementary information is unresolved. The aims of the study were to investigate the feasibility of...... simultaneous structural MRI, BV MRI and FET PET of gliomas using an integrated PET/MRI scanner and to assess the spatial and quantitative agreement in tumour imaging between BV MRI and FET PET. METHODS: A total of 32 glioma patients underwent a 20-min static simultaneous PET/MRI acquisition on a Siemens m...

  10. Kinetic analysis of experimental rabbit tumour and inflammation model with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, P. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Ninth People' s Hospital, Medical School of Jiaotong Univ., SH (China); Huang, G.; Dong, S.; Wan, L. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Medical School of Jiaotong Univ., SH (China)

    2009-07-01

    Non-specific accumulation of {sup 18}F-FDG by both tumour and inflammatory lesions can make diagnostic analysis difficult. Our aim was to explore the difference in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake kinetics between tumour and inflammatory cells. To this end, we investigated VX2 tumour lesions and inflammatory lesions in rabbits. Methods: Six rabbits with VX2 tumour cells transplanted into one forelimb muscle and inflammatory lesions induced by turpentine oil in the contralateral forelimb were scanned for 60 minutes post {sup 18}F-FDG injection. Imaging data was analyzed with the standard 2-tissue-compartment model. Parameters, VB, Ki, K1, k2, k3, k4, were compared between tumour and inflammatory lesions. SUV and dual time scan methods were also compared in the experiment. Results: Time activity curves of VX2 tumour lesions showed a characteristic pattern of gradually increasing {sup 18}F-FDG uptake up to 60 min, whereas, {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in inflammatory lesions increased more slowly than in tumours. Parameters estimated from the uptake process showed that forward transport constant, K1, and influx constant, Ki, values in VX2 tumour lesions (0.186 {+-} 0.053 and 0.048 {+-} 0.014, respectively) was significantly higher than that in inflammatory lesions (0.129 {+-} 0.024 and 0.022 {+-} 0.007, respectively) (p < 0.05). In contrast, mean values of VB, k2, k3 and k4 derived from VX2 tumours were not significantly different from that of inflammatory lesions. SUVs at 60 minutes post {sup 18}F-FDG injection were also significantly higher in the VX2 tumor lesions than in the inflammatory lesions. Retention index (RI) was not significantly different between VX2 tumours and inflammatory lesions (1.134 {+-} 0.076 vs. 1.060 {+-} 0.058, p > 0.05). Conclusion: Different kinetic parameters (Ki, K1, k3) exist between inflammatory and tumour lesions. (orig.)

  11. An experimental environment for the production, exchange and discussion of fused radiology images, for the management of patients with residual brain tumour disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellaropoulos, G C; Kagadis, G C; Karystianos, C; Karnabatidis, D; Constantoyannis, C; Nikiforidis, G C

    2003-06-01

    The present work aims to display the use of groupware as a tool for better management of the available resources (human, computing and imaging) within the University Hospital of Patras, Greece for the task of managing patients with postoperative residual brain tumour. Emphasis is given to the additional information that can be revealed and taken into account from novel image processing techniques, developed by our group, and the central role of the Medical Physicist in the groupware. Fused images, produced by the combination of CT, MR and SPECT representations of the brain, contain both anatomical and functional information and comprise a new representation of reality. Medical experts, unfamiliar with this new representation, form a groupware for the task of interpreting them and providing better services to the patient. Groupware procedures, facilitated by modern network technology, bring experts' tacit knowledge to the surface and facilitate its exchange. PMID:14692590

  12. Use of GPUs to boost the performance of a lattice-free tumour growth model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently developed a computational model of tumour growth. It is a cell- based model that can simulate the growth of multicellular tumour spheroids up to more than one million cells. The simulation program is very demanding and simulation time severely limits the integration of additional biological details, and indeed, at the moment, a typical simulation run requires tens of days to be completed. A new version of the code that exploits Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) to boost performance is being developed. In this paper we describe the design and implementation of a nearest-neighbour search (NNS) algorithm suitable to run on GPU. The algorithm will be integrated in the original code to manage the geometrical calculation in the simulation of the spheroid. Initially the stand alone NNS algorithm was tested for spheroids of different size: better efficency was obtained for bigger spheroids. Eventually the code was integrated in the whole simulation code and preliminary runs gave a speed up of about 5 for spheroids of relatively small size (15000 cells)

  13. Targeting FGFR2 with alofanib (RPT835) shows potent activity in tumour models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimafeyeu, Ilya; Ludes-Meyers, John; Stepanova, Evgenia; Daeyaert, Frits; Kochenkov, Dmitry; Joose, Jean-Baptiste; Solomko, Eliso; Van Akene, Koen; Peretolchina, Nina; Yin, Wei; Ryabaya, Oxana; Byakhov, Mikhail; Tjulandin, Sergei

    2016-07-01

    Alofanib (RPT835) is a novel selective allosteric inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). We showed previously that alofanib could bind to the extracellular domain of FGFR2 and has an inhibitory effect on FGF2-induced phoshphorylation of FRS2α. In the present study, we further showed that alofanib inhibited phosphorylation of FRS2α with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 7 and 9 nmol/l in cancer cells expressing different FGFR2 isoforms. In a panel of four cell lines representing several tumour types (triple-negative breast cancer, melanoma, and ovarian cancer), alofanib inhibited FGF-mediated proliferation with 50% growth inhibition (GI50) values of 16-370 nmol/l. Alofanib dose dependently inhibited the proliferation and migration of human and mouse endothelial cells (GI50 11-58 nmol/l) compared with brivanib and bevacizumab. Treatment with alofanib ablated experimental FGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo. In a FGFR-driven human tumour xenograft model, oral administration of alofanib was well tolerated and resulted in potent antitumour activity. Importantly, alofanib was effective in FGFR2-expressing models. These results show that alofanib is a potent FGFR2 inhibitor and provide strong rationale for its evaluation in patients with FGFR2-driven cancers. PMID:27136102

  14. Successful high-resolution animal positron emission tomography of human Ewing tumours and their metastases in a murine xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzius, Christiane; Hermann, Sven; Schaefers, Klaus; Schober, Otmar; Schaefers, Michael [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Hotfilder, Marc; Juergens, Heribert [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Poremba, Christopher; Gabbert, Helmut E. [Heinrich-Heine-University, Institute of Pathology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Vormoor, Josef [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Muenster (Germany); University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Newcastle (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    As primary osseous metastasis is the main adverse prognostic factor in patients with Ewing tumours, a NOD/scid mouse model for human Ewing tumour metastases has been established to examine the mechanisms of metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of diagnostic molecular imaging by small animal PET in this mouse model. Human Ewing tumour cells were transplanted into immune-deficient NOD/scid mice via s.c injection (n=17) or i.v. injection (n=17). The animals (mean weight 23.2 g) were studied 2-7 weeks after transplantation using a submillimetre resolution animal PET scanner. To assess glucose utilisation and bone metabolism, mice were scanned after intravenous injection of 9.6 MBq (mean) 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) or 9.4 MBq (mean) [{sup 18}F]fluoride. Whole-body PET images were analysed visually and semi-quantitatively [%ID/g, tumour to non-tumour ratio (T/NT)]. Foci of pathological uptake were identified with respect to the physiological organ uptake in corresponding regions. Subcutaneously transplanted Ewing tumours demonstrated a moderately increased glucose uptake (median %ID/g 2.5; median T/NT 2.2). After i.v. transplantation, the pattern of metastasis was similar to that in patients with metastases in lung, bone and soft tissue. These metastases showed an increased FDG uptake (median %ID/g 3.6; median T/NT 2.7). Osseous metastases were additionally visible on [{sup 18}F]fluoride PET by virtue of decreased [{sup 18}F]fluoride uptake (osteolysis; median %ID/g 8.4; median T/NT 0.59). Metastases were confirmed immunohistologically. Diagnostic molecular imaging of Ewing tumours and their small metastases in an in vivo NOD/scid mouse model is feasible using a submillimetre resolution PET scanner. (orig.)

  15. Use of 5-[76Br]bromo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine as a ligand for tumour proliferation: validation in an animal tumour model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the prominent features in cancer development. Precise tools are needed for determination of the proliferation rate before, during and after treatment, thereby permitting assessment of treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study was to validate the use of 5-[76Br]bromo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (76Br-BFU) as a proliferation marker in an animal tumour model. Comparison was made with 2-[14C]thymidine (14C-TdR) incorporation and the labelling index assessed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd-LI). Fibrosarcoma (NFSA)-bearing mice were used for all experiments. Gemcitabine (dFdC), a potent inhibitor of DNA synthesis, was used to modulate cell proliferation. dFdC was injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg or 40 mg/kg to induce partial (∼50%) or complete inhibition of DNA synthesis, respectively. 76Br-BFU (0.5-3 MBq per animal), 14C-TdR (37-74 kBq per animal) and cold BrdUrd (60 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally in combination or alone. Animals were sacrificed at various times after tracer administration, and tumour and small intestine were removed for determination of radioactivity in whole tissue and the DNA fraction, as well as for LI assessment by flow cytometry. Cimetidine (6 mg/kg) was used to decrease 76Br-BFU elimination and increase its bioavailability. The fraction of radioactivity associated with DNA increased with the time interval between tracer injection and tissue removal. At 6 h after injection, for both tracers, more than 95% of the radioactivity in the tumours was associated with the DNA fraction and an excellent correlation was observed with the LI. Similar findings were observed in the small intestine. Under all experimental conditions, 76Br-BFU uptake was 4-10 times lower than 14C-TdR uptake. Co-injection of cimetidine resulted in a three- to fourfold increase in 76Br-BFU incorporation without affecting the effect of dFdC on DNA synthesis. 76Br-BFU is a potentially good tracer for the assessment

  16. Modeling premature brain injury and recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Scafidi, Joey; Fagel, Devon M.; Ment, Laura R.; Vaccarino, Flora M.

    2009-01-01

    Premature birth is a growing and significant public health problem because of the large number of infants that survive with neurodevelopmental sequelae from brain injury. Recent advances in neuroimaging have shown that although some neuroanatomical structures are altered, others improve over time. This review outlines recent insights into brain structure and function in these preterm infants at school age and relevant animal models. These animal models have provided scientists with an opportu...

  17. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-04-26

    Abstract Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression.

  18. Orthotopic human melanoma xenograft model systems for studies of tumour angiogenesis, pathophysiology, treatment sensitivity and metastatic pattern.

    OpenAIRE

    Rofstad, E. K.

    1994-01-01

    Adequate tumour models are a prerequisite in experimental cancer research. The purpose of the present work was to establish and assess the validity of four new orthotopic human melanoma xenograft model systems (A-07, D-12, R-18, U-25). Permanent cell lines were established in monolayer culture from subcutaneous metastases of four different melanoma patients by using an in vivo-in vitro procedure, and cells from these lines were inoculated intradermally in Balb/c nu/nu mice to form tumours. In...

  19. In vivo suppression of solid Ehrlich cancer via chlorophyllin derivative mediated PDT: an albino mouse tumour model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Iman; Saraya, Hend; Zekri, Maha; Abdel-Kader, Mahmoud

    2015-03-01

    In this study, copper chlorophyllin was used as a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy (PDT) in Ehrlich tumour mouse model. Six groups of animals comprising 5 animals per group were subcutaneously transplanted with 1x106 Ehrlich tumour cells. A single dose of 200 μg/gm body weight chlorophylin derivative was administered by intravenous (IV) or intratumoral (IT) routes. Mice were exposed to monochromatic red laser of 630 nm for 1 h, and tumour regression was followed up for three consecutive months post treatment. Several Biochemical, histological and molecular tests were performed in order to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the applied treatment. An interest has been also directed towards investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying chlorophyllin derivative mediated PDT. PDT-treated animals via either the IV or IT routes showed significant decrease in tumour size 72 h post-treatment. Tumours at the IV-PDT group disappeared totally within a week with no recurrence over three months follow up. In the IT-PDT, the decrease in tumour size at the first week was interrupted by a slight increase; however never reached the original size. Histological examination of tumour tissues of the IV-PDT group at 24 h post treatment demonstrated restoring the normal muscle tissue architecture, and the biochemical assays indicated normal liver functions. The immunohistochemical analysis of caspase-3, and the quantitative PCR results of caspases-8 and 9 proved the presence of extrinsic apoptotic pathway after cholorphyllin derivative-mediated PDT. In conclusion IV-PDT strategy proved better cure rate than the IT-PDT, with no recurrence over three months of follow up.

  20. Melanoma Brain Metastasis: Mechanisms, Models, and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, David A; Silvis, Mark R; Cho, Joseph H; Holmen, Sheri L

    2016-01-01

    The development of brain metastases in patients with advanced stage melanoma is common, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for their development are poorly understood. Melanoma brain metastases cause significant morbidity and mortality and confer a poor prognosis; traditional therapies including whole brain radiation, stereotactic radiotherapy, or chemotherapy yield only modest increases in overall survival (OS) for these patients. While recently approved therapies have significantly improved OS in melanoma patients, only a small number of studies have investigated their efficacy in patients with brain metastases. Preliminary data suggest that some responses have been observed in intracranial lesions, which has sparked new clinical trials designed to evaluate the efficacy in melanoma patients with brain metastases. Simultaneously, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of melanoma cell dissemination to the brain have revealed novel and potentially therapeutic targets. In this review, we provide an overview of newly discovered mechanisms of melanoma spread to the brain, discuss preclinical models that are being used to further our understanding of this deadly disease and provide an update of the current clinical trials for melanoma patients with brain metastases. PMID:27598148

  1. Beyond anaemia management: evolving role of erythropoietin therapy in neurological disorders, multiple myeloma and tumour hypoxia models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogaerts, Marc; Mittelman, Moshe; Vaupel, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin) has become the standard of care in the treatment of anaemia resulting from cancer and its treatment, and chronic kidney disease. The discovery that erythropoietin and its receptor are located in regions outside the erythropoietic system has led to interest in the potential role of epoetin in other tissues, such as the central nervous system. Animal studies have shown that systemically applied epoetin can cross the blood-brain barrier, where it reduces tissue injury associated with stroke, blunt trauma and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Pilot studies in humans have shown that epoetin treatment given within 8 h of stroke reduces infarct size and results in a significantly better outcome when compared with placebo treatment. Studies also suggest that epoetin has the potential to improve cognitive impairment associated with adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with cancer. Anaemia is a major factor causing tumour hypoxia, a condition that can promote changes within neoplastic cells that further tumour survival and malignant progression and also reduces the effectiveness of several anticancer therapies including radiotherapy and oxygen-dependent cytotoxic agents. Use of epoetin to prevent or correct anaemia has the potential to reduce tumour hypoxia and improve treatment outcome. Several therapeutic studies in anaemic animals with experimental tumours have shown a beneficial effect of epoetin on delaying tumour growth. Furthermore, clinical observations in patients with multiple myeloma and animal studies have suggested that epoetin has an antimyeloma effect, mediated via the immune system through activation of CD8+ T cells. Therefore, the role of epoetin may go well beyond that of increasing haemoglobin levels in anaemic patients, although additional studies are required to confirm these promising results. PMID:16244507

  2. Identification of genes involved in the biology of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours using Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Eikmeier, Kristin; Linge, Anna; Kool, Marcel; Koos, Björn; Schulz, Jacqueline; Albrecht, Stefanie; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Frühwald, Michael C.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RT) are malignant brain tumours. Unlike most other human brain tumours, AT/RT are characterized by inactivation of one single gene, SMARCB1. SMARCB1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex, which has an important role in the control of cell differentiation and proliferation. Little is known, however, about the pathways involved in the oncogenic effects of SMARCB1 inactivation, which might also represent targets for treatment. Here we report a comprehensive genetic screen in the fruit fly that revealed several genes not yet associated with loss of snr1, the Drosophila homologue of SMARCB1. We confirm the functional role of identified genes (including merlin, kibra and expanded, known to regulate hippo signalling pathway activity) in human rhabdoid tumour cell lines and AT/RT tumour samples. These results demonstrate that fly models can be employed for the identification of clinically relevant pathways in human cancer.

  3. Inverse relationship between tumour proliferation markers and connexin expression in a malignant cardiac tumour originating from mesenchymal stem cell engineered tissue in a rat in-vivo model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StefanDhein

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions and hypothesis: These observations strongly suggest the hypothesis, that invasive tumour growth is accompanied by reduction in connexins. This implicates that gap junction communication between tumour and normal tissue is reduced or absent, which could mean that growth and differentiation signals can not be exchanged.

  4. C1q-tumour necrosis factor-related protein 8 (CTRP8) is a novel interaction partner of relaxin receptor RXFP1 in human brain cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogowska, Aleksandra; Kunanuvat, Usakorn; Stetefeld, Jörg; Patel, Trushar R; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Krcek, Jerry; Weber, Ekkehard; Wong, G William; Del Bigio, Marc R; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Klonisch, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    We report a novel ligand-receptor system composed of the leucine-rich G-protein-coupled relaxin receptor, RXFP1, and the C1q-tumour necrosis factor-related protein 8 (CTRP8) in human primary brain cancer, a tumour entity devoid of the classical RXFP1 ligands, RLN1-3. In structural homology studies and computational docking experiments we delineated the N-terminal region of the globular C1q region of CTRP8 and the leucine-rich repeat units 7 and 8 of RXFP1 to mediate this new ligand-receptor interaction. CTRP8 secreted from HEK293T cells, recombinant human (rh) CTRP8, and short synthetic peptides derived from the C1q globular domain of human CTRP8 caused the activation of RXFP1 as determined by elevated intracellular cAMP levels and the induction of a marked pro-migratory phenotype in established glioblastoma (GB) cell lines and primary cells from GB patients. Employing a small competitor peptide, we were able to disrupt the CTRP8-RXFP1-induced increased GB motility. The CTRP8-RXFP1-mediated migration in GB cells involves the activation of PI3K and specific protein kinase C pathways and the increased production/secretion of the potent lysosomal protease cathepsin B (cathB), a known prognostic marker of GB. Specific inhibition of CTRP8-induced cathB activity effectively blocked the ability of primary GB to invade laminin matrices. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed the direct interaction of human CTRP8 with RXFP1. Our results support a therapeutic approach in GB aimed at targeting multiple steps of the CTRP8-RXFP1 signalling pathway by a combined inhibitor and peptide-based strategy to block GB dissemination within the brain. PMID:24014093

  5. 111In-labelled somatostatin analogues in a rat tumour model: somatostatin receptor status and effects of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptide receptor scintigraphy with the radioactive somatostatin analogue 111In-DTPA-octreotide is a sensitive and specific technique to show in vivo the presence of somatostatin receptors on various tumours. Since 111In emits not only gamma rays but also therapeutic Auger and internal conversion electrons with a medium to short tissue penetration (0.02-10 μm and 200-550 μm, respectively), 111In-DTPA-octreotide is also being used for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). In this study we investigated the therapeutic effects of 111In-DTPA-octreotide in tumours of various sizes. Regrowth of a tumour despite PRRT with 111In-DTPA-octreotide may be due to the lack of crossfire from 111In, whereby any possible receptor-negative tumour cell can multiply. We therefore also investigated the somatostatin receptor status of the tumour before and after PRRT. The radiotherapeutic effects of different doses of 111In-DTPA-octreotide in vivo were investigated in Lewis rats bearing small (≤1 cm2) or large (≥8 cm2) somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic CA20948 tumours expressing the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2). In addition, the somatostatin receptor density on the tumour after injection of a therapeutic labelled somatostatin analogue was investigated when the tumour was either declining in size or regrowing after an initial reduction in size. To initiate a partial response of the tumour (so that regrowth would follow) and not a complete response, a relatively low dose was administered. Impressive radiotherapeutic effects of 111In-labelled octreotide were observed in this rat tumour model. Complete responses (up to 50%) were found in the animals bearing small (≤1 cm2) tumours after at least three injections of 111 MBq or a single injection of 370 MBq 111In-DTPA-octreotide, leading to a dose of 6.3-7.8 mGy/MBq (1-10 g tumour). In the rats bearing the larger (≥8 cm2) tumours, the effects were much less pronounced and only partial responses were

  6. Analysis of the effects of exposure to acute hypoxia on oxidative lesions and tumour progression in a transgenic mouse breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour hypoxia is known to be a poor prognostic indicator, predictive of increased risk of metastatic disease and reduced survival. Genomic instability has been proposed as one of the potential mechanisms for hypoxic tumour progression. Both of these features are commonly found in many cancer types, but their relationship and association with tumour progression has not been examined in the same model. To address this issue, we determined the effects of 6 week in vivo acute hypoxic exposure on the levels of mutagenic lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine DNA (8-oxo-dG) lesions in the transgenic polyomavirus middle T (PyMT) breast cancer mouse model. We observed significantly increased plasma lipid peroxidation and 8-oxo-dG lesion levels in the hypoxia-exposed mice. Consumption of malondialdehyde also induced a significant increase in the PyMT tumour DNA lesion levels, however, these increases did not translate into enhanced tumour progression. We further showed that the in vivo exposure to acute hypoxia induced accumulation of F4/80 positive tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs), demonstrating a relationship between hypoxia and macrophages in an experimental model. These data suggest that although exposure to acute hypoxia causes an increase in 8-oxo-dG lesions and TAMs in the PyMT tumours, these increases do not translate into significant changes in tumour progression at the primary or metastatic levels in this strong viral oncogene-driven breast cancer model

  7. Electrochemotherapy of tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemotherapy consists of chemotherapy followed by local application of electric pulses to the tumour to increase drug delivery into cells. Drug uptake can be increased by electroporation for only those drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, only bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical trials. In vitro studies demonstrated several fold increase of their cytotoxicity after electroporation of cells. In vivo, electroporation of tumours after local or systemic administration of either of the drugs, i.e. electrochemotherapy, proved to be an effective antitumour treatment. In preclinical studies on several tumour models, electrochemotherapy either with bleomycin or cisplatin was elaborated and parameters for effective local tumour control were determined. In veterinary medicine, electrochemotherapy also proved to be effective in the treatment of primary tumours in cats, dogs and horses. In human clinical studies, electrochemotherapy was performed on the patients with progressive disease and accessible tumour nodules of different malignancies. All clinical studies demonstrated that electrochemotherapy is an effective treatment for local tumour control in cancer patients. (author)

  8. A spatio-temporal simulation model of the response of solid tumours to radiotherapy in vivo: parametric validation concerning oxygen enhancement ratio and cell cycle duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced bio-simulation methods are expected to substantially improve radiotherapy treatment planning. To this end a novel spatio-temporal patient-specific simulation model of the in vivo response of malignant tumours to radiotherapy schemes has been recently developed by our group. This paper discusses recent improvements to the model: an optimized algorithm leading to conformal shrinkage of the tumour as a response to radiotherapy, the introduction of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), a realistic initial cell phase distribution and finally an advanced imaging-based algorithm simulating the neovascularization field. A parametric study of the influence of the cell cycle duration Tc, OER, OERβ for the beta LQ parameter on tumour growth, shrinkage and response to irradiation under two different fractionation schemes has been made. The model has been applied to two glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cases, one with wild type (wt) and another one with mutated (mt) p53 gene. Furthermore, the model has been applied to a hypothetical GBM tumour with α and β values corresponding to those of generic radiosensitive tumours. According to the model predictions, a whole tumour with shorter Tc tends to repopulate faster, as is to be expected. Furthermore, a higher OER value for the dormant cells leads to a more radioresistant whole tumour. A small variation of the OERβ value does not seem to play a major role in the tumour response. Accelerated fractionation proved to be superior to the standard scheme for the whole range of the OER values considered. Finally, the tumour with mt p53 was shown to be more radioresistant compared to the tumour with wt p53. Although all simulation predictions agree at least qualitatively with the clinical experience and literature, a long-term clinical adaptation and quantitative validation procedure is in progress

  9. Tumour devitalization as a tool for cancer immunotherapy - Experiences from animal models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Vratislav; Vanucci, L.; Morávková, Alena; Strnádel, Ján; Holubová, Monika; Hradecký, Jan; Klaudy, Jiří; Usvald, Dušan; Plánská, Daniela; Burócziová, Monika; Vure, Michal

    2009. s. 1-1. [World Congress on Cellular and Molecular Biology (WCCMB, 2009). 02.10.2009-06.10.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : tumour devitalization Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  10. An initiation-promotion model of tumour prevalence from high-charge and energy radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    A repair/misrepair kinetic model for multiple radiation-induced lesions (mutation inactivation) is coupled to a two-mutation model of initiation-promotion in tissue to provide a parametric description of tumour prevalence in the mouse Harderian gland from high-energy and charge radiations. Track-structure effects are considered using an action-cross section model. Dose-response curves are described for gamma rays and relativistic ions, and good agreement with experiment is found. The effects of nuclear fragmentation are also considered for high-energy proton and alpha-particle exposures. The model described provides a parametric description of age-dependent cancer induction for a wide range of radiation fields. Radiosensitivity parameters found in the model for an initiation mutation (sigma 0 = 7.6 x 10(-10) cm2 and D0 = 148.0 Gy) are somewhat different than previously observed for neoplastic transformation of C3H10T1/2 cell cultures (sigma 0 = 0.7 x 10(-10) cm2 and D0 = 117.0 Gy). We consider the two hypotheses that radiation acts solely as an initiator or as both initiator and promoter and make model calculations for fractionation exposures from gamma rays and relativistic Fe ions. For fractionated Fe exposures, an inverse-dose-rate effect is provided by a promotion hypothesis with an increase of 30% or more, dependent on the dose level and fractionation schedule, using a mutation rate for promotion similar to that of single-gene mutations.

  11. Decrease of deleted in malignant brain tumour-1 (DMBT-1) expression is a crucial late event in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, M; Huang, S-F; Chen, M-F;

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the participation of DMBT-1, a candidate tumour suppressor gene, in the development of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma via intraductal papillary neoplasm of the liver (IPN-L) arising in hepatolithiasis. DMBT-1 plays a role in mucosal immune defence. METHODS AND RESULTS: The...... expression of DMBT-1 was examined immunohistochemically in biliary epithelial cells in hepatolithiasis (n = 25), invasive and non-invasive cholangiocarcinoma associated with hepatolithiasis (n = 52), IPN-L with hepatolithiasis (n = 49), cholangiocarcinoma without hepatolithiasis (n = 32), and 10 normal...... control livers. DMBT-1 was expressed more frequently in the biliary epithelia of hepatolithiasis when compared with normal livers (P < 0.05). DMBT-1 expression was also frequent in IPN-L (57%) and non-invasive cholangiocarcinoma (79%). By contrast, DMBT-1 was decreased in invasive cholangiocarcinoma with...

  12. The use of thermographic imaging to evaluate therapeutic response in human tumour xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Nosheen; Connah, David; Ugail, Hassan; Cooper, Patricia A; Falconer, Robert A; Patterson, Laurence H; Shnyder, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive methods to monitor tumour growth are an important goal in cancer drug development. Thermographic imaging systems offer potential in this area, since a change in temperature is known to be induced due to changes within the tumour microenvironment. This study demonstrates that this imaging modality can be applied to a broad range of tumour xenografts and also, for the first time, the methodology's suitability to assess anti-cancer agent efficacy. Mice bearing subcutaneously implanted H460 lung cancer xenografts were treated with a novel vascular disrupting agent, ICT-2552, and the cytotoxin doxorubicin. The effects on tumour temperature were assessed using thermographic imaging over the first 6 hours post-administration and subsequently a further 7 days. For ICT-2552 a significant initial temperature drop was observed, whilst for both agents a significant temperature drop was seen compared to controls over the longer time period. Thus thermographic imaging can detect functional differences (manifesting as temperature reductions) in the tumour response to these anti-cancer agents compared to controls. Importantly, these effects can be detected in the first few hours following treatment and therefore the tumour is observable non-invasively. As discussed, this technique will have considerable 3Rs benefits in terms of reduction and refinement of animal use. PMID:27491535

  13. Brain-inspired Stochastic Models and Implementations

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2015-05-12

    One of the approaches to building artificial intelligence (AI) is to decipher the princi- ples of the brain function and to employ similar mechanisms for solving cognitive tasks, such as visual perception or natural language understanding, using machines. The recent breakthrough, named deep learning, demonstrated that large multi-layer networks of arti- ficial neural-like computing units attain remarkable performance on some of these tasks. Nevertheless, such artificial networks remain to be very loosely inspired by the brain, which rich structures and mechanisms may further suggest new algorithms or even new paradigms of computation. In this thesis, we explore brain-inspired probabilistic mechanisms, such as neural and synaptic stochasticity, in the context of generative models. The two questions we ask here are: (i) what kind of models can describe a neural learning system built of stochastic components? and (ii) how can we implement such systems e ̆ciently? To give specific answers, we consider two well known models and the corresponding neural architectures: the Naive Bayes model implemented with a winner-take-all spiking neural network and the Boltzmann machine implemented in a spiking or non-spiking fashion. We propose and analyze an e ̆cient neuromorphic implementation of the stochastic neu- ral firing mechanism and study the e ̄ects of synaptic unreliability on learning generative energy-based models implemented with neural networks.

  14. Radiosensitivity in vitro of clonogenic and non-clonogenic glioblastoma cells obtained from a human brain tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buronfosse, A.; Thomas, C.P.; Ginestet, C.; Dore, J.F. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1994-11-01

    Cells obtained from a human glioblastoma (G5) were characterized and used to develop an assay measuring their radiosensitivity in vitro. Surviving fractions were estimated 12 days after irradiation by image analysis of the total surface occupied by the cells. This report evaluates 4 experimental factors which may influence the radiosensitivity in vitro of G5 cells: passage number, delay between plating and irradiation, cell density and clonal heterogeneity. The radiosensitivity of the G5 cell line was found to be passage-independent at least between passages 12 and 75. Experimental conditions influence the radiosensitivity as surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) range from 90% (5 000 cells/well, irradiation 72 h after seeding) to 49% (2 500 cells per well, irradiation 24 h after seeding). The heterogeneity of the radiosensitivity is large at the clonal level as SF2 of six clones isolated from the G5 line were 45%, 50%, 72%, 74%, 79% and 84%. Finally, when G5 cells were irradiated at low cell density and at the beginning of the growth phase, the radiosensitivity measured with this assay is comparable to that obtained with a standard colony assay. We propose that this assay may be useful to determine the intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells obtained from human tumours. (authors). 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Aerosolised 5-azacytidine suppresses tumour growth and reprogrammes the epigenome in an orthotopic lung cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M D; Tellez, C S; Grimes, M J; Picchi, M A; Tessema, M; Cheng, Y S; March, T H; Kuehl, P J; Belinsky, S A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epigenetic silencing by promoter methylation and chromatin remodelling affects hundreds of genes and is a causal event for lung cancer. Treatment of patients with low doses of the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine in combination with the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat has yielded clinical responses. The subcutaneous dosing route for consecutive days and reduced bioavailability of 5-azacytidine because of inactivation by cytidine deaminase may limit the expansion of epigenetic therapy into Phase III trials. To mitigate these barriers, an aerosol of 5-azacytidine was generated and characterised. Methods: The effect of aerosol vs systemic delivery of 5-azacytidine on tumour burden and molecular response of engrafted lung tumours in the nude rat was compared. Results: Pharmacokinetics revealed major improvement in the half-life of 5-azacytidine in lung tissue with aerosol delivery. Aerosolised 5-azacytidine significantly reduced lung tumour burden and induced global demethylation of the epigenome at one-third of the comparable effective systemic dose. High commonality for demethylation of genes was seen in tumours sampled throughout lung lobes and across treated animals receiving the aerosolised drug. Conclusion: Collectively, these findings show that aerosolised 5-azacytidine targets the lung, effectively reprogrammes the epigenome of tumours, and is a promising approach to combine with other drugs for treating lung cancer. PMID:24045660

  16. Multiscale modeling of brain blow flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karniadakis, George

    2014-11-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as brain aneurysms, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum, 3D or 1D) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We will present a physical model of the brain vasculature consisting at the macro level of all major arteries (about 200 down to 0.5 mm), at the mesoscale the fractal arteriolar tree (more than 10 millions down to 20 nm) and at the microscale the capillary bed. Correspondingly, we employ three different methods to model the total brain vasculature by developing proper interface conditions at each level. We will present examples from aneurysms and other hematological diseases, where red blood cell rheology is modeled explicitly.

  17. New Zealand adolescents’ cellphone and cordless phone user-habits: are they at increased risk of brain tumours already? A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redmayne Mary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellphone and cordless phone use is very prevalent among early adolescents, but the extent and types of use is not well documented. This paper explores how, and to what extent, New Zealand adolescents are typically using and exposed to active cellphones and cordless phones, and considers implications of this in relation to brain tumour risk, with reference to current research findings. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 373 Year 7 and 8 school students with a mean age of 12.3 years (range 10.3-13.7 years from the Wellington region of New Zealand. Participants completed a questionnaire and measured their normal body-to-phone texting distances. Main exposure-metrics included self-reported time spent with an active cellphone close to the body, estimated time and number of calls on both phone types, estimated and actual extent of SMS text-messaging, cellphone functions used and people texted. Statistical analyses used Pearson Chi2 tests and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r. Analyses were undertaken using SPSS version 19.0. Results Both cellphones and cordless phones were used by approximately 90% of students. A third of participants had already used a cordless phone for ≥ 7 years. In 4 years from the survey to mid-2013, the cordless phone use of 6% of participants would equal that of the highest Interphone decile (≥ 1640 hours, at the surveyed rate of use. High cellphone use was related to cellphone location at night, being woken regularly, and being tired at school. More than a third of parents thought cellphones carried a moderate-to-high health risk for their child. Conclusions While cellphones were very popular for entertainment and social interaction via texting, cordless phones were most popular for calls. If their use continued at the reported rate, many would be at increased risk of specific brain tumours by their mid-teens, based on findings of the Interphone and Hardell-group studies.

  18. In vivo imaging of pancreatic tumours and liver metastases using 7 Tesla MRI in a murine orthotopic pancreatic cancer model and a liver metastases model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of tumour death in the western world. However, appropriate tumour models are scarce. Here we present a syngeneic murine pancreatic cancer model using 7 Tesla MRI and evaluate its clinical relevance and applicability. 6606PDA murine pancreatic cancer cells were orthotopically injected into the pancreatic head. Liver metastases were induced through splenic injection. Animals were analyzed by MRI three and five weeks following injection. Tumours were detected using T2-weighted high resolution sequences. Tumour volumes were determined by callipers and MRI. Liver metastases were analyzed using gadolinium-EOB-DTPA and T1-weighted 3D-Flash sequences. Tumour blood flow was measured using low molecular gadobutrol and high molecular gadolinium-DTPA. MRI handling and applicability was similar to human systems, resolution as low as 0.1 mm. After 5 weeks tumour volumes differed significantly (p < 0.01) when comparing calliper measurments (n = 5, mean 1065 mm3+/-243 mm3) with MRI (mean 918 mm3+/-193 mm3) with MRI being more precise. Histology (n = 5) confirmed MRI tumour measurements (mean size MRI 38.5 mm2+/-22.8 mm2 versus 32.6 mm2+/-22.6 mm2 (histology), p < 0,0004) with differences due to fixation and processing of specimens. After splenic injection all mice developed liver metastases with a mean of 8 metastases and a mean volume of 173.8 mm3+/-56.7 mm3 after 5 weeks. Lymphnodes were also easily identified. Tumour accumulation of gadobutrol was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than gadolinium-DTPA. All imaging experiments could be done repeatedly to comply with the 3R-principle thus reducing the number of experimental animals. This model permits monitoring of tumour growth and metastasis formation in longitudinal non-invasive high-resolution MR studies including using contrast agents comparable to human pancreatic cancer. This multidisciplinary environment enables radiologists, surgeons and physicians to further improve

  19. Modelling Brain Tissue using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Dyrby, Tim Bjørn; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion MRI, or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), is a technique that measures the restricted diffusion of water molecules within brain tissue. Different reconstruction methods quantify water-diffusion anisotropy in the intra- and extra-cellular spaces of the neural environment. Fibre tracking models then use the directions of greatest diffusion as estimates of white matter fibre orientation. Several fibre tracking algorithms have emerged in the last few years that provide reproducible visu...

  20. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Celeste eLeung; Zhengping eJia

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectua...

  1. Model human heart or brain signals

    OpenAIRE

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2008-01-01

    A new model is suggested and used to mimic various spatial or temporal designs in biological or non biological formations where the focus is on the normal or irregular electrical signals coming from human heart (ECG) or brain (EEG). The electrical activities in several muscles (EMG) or neurons or other organs of human or various animals, such as lobster pyloric neuron, guinea pig inferior olivary neuron, sepia giant axon and mouse neocortical pyramidal neuron and some spatial formations are a...

  2. In silico modelling of a cancer stem cell-targeting agent and its effects on tumour control during radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Marcu, David

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNC), like most solid tumours, contain a subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSC) that are commonly responsible for treatment failure. Conventional therapies are unsuccessful in controlling CSCs, thus novel, targeting therapies are needed. A promising agent is ATRA (All-trans-retinoic acid) that was shown to induce CSC differentiation, cell cycle redistribution and CSCs radiosensitisation. To add to the limited data, this work simulated the effects of ATRA on a virtual HNC and evaluated tumour response to radiotherapy. A Monte Carlo technique was employed to grow a HNC consisting of all lineages of cancer cells. The biologically realistic input parameters led to a pre-treatment CSC population of 5.9%. The Linear Quadratic model was employed to simulate radiotherapy. ATRA-induced differentiation, cell arrest and apoptosis were modelled, based on literature data. While the effect of differentiation was marginal, the strongest influence on CSC subpopulation was displayed by ATRA’s cell arrest effect via an exponential behaviour of the dose-response curve. The apoptotic effect induced by ATRA shows linear correlation between the percentage of apoptotic cells and dose required to eradicate CSCs. In conclusion, ATRA is a potent CSC-targeting agent with viable impact on tumour control when combined with radiotherapy. PMID:27573059

  3. Introduction of Hypermatrix and Operator Notation into a Discrete Mathematics Simulation Model of Malignant Tumour Response to Therapeutic Schemes In Vivo. Some Operator Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Stamatakos, Georgios S.; Dimitra D. Dionysiou

    2009-01-01

    The tremendous rate of accumulation of experimental and clinical knowledge pertaining to cancer dictates the development of a theoretical framework for the meaningful integration of such knowledge at all levels of biocomplexity. In this context our research group has developed and partly validated a number of spatiotemporal simulation models of in vivo tumour growth and in particular tumour response to several therapeutic schemes. Most of the modeling modules have been based on discrete mathe...

  4. P17.35GEINO-10: A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL MULTICENTER STUDY OF THE CHARACTERISTICS OF PATIENTS WITH INTRA-AXIAL BRAIN TUMOURS AND THEIR THERAPEUTIC MANAGEMENT IN SPANISH HOSPITALS

    OpenAIRE

    Gil-Gil, M.J.; Sepúlveda, J.M.; Vieitez, J.M. (J. M.); Peñas, R. de las; Fernández-Pérez, I.; Pérez-Segura, P.; Fuster, P.; Martinez-García, M.; Quintanar, T.; del Barco, S.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Primitive brain tumours (BT) represent 2% of adult malignancies. BT patients are treated by different clinical specialists in Spanish hospitals. This means that we did not know with certainty how these patients are treated in Spain. To improve this knowledge the Neuro-Oncology Investigation Spanish Group (GEINO) designed this prospective observational multicenter study. OBJECTIVE: Describe the clinical and pathological characteristics and therapeutic management of intra-axial BT...

  5. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression.

  6. In vivo fluorescence kinetics and localisation of aluminium phthalocyanine disulphonate in an autologous tumour model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, MJH; Speelman, OC; Nikkels, PGJ; Nooren, CAAM; Nauta, JM; vanderHolt, B; vanLeengoed, HLLM; Roodenburg, JLN

    1996-01-01

    Sulphonated phthalocyanines are studied as photosensitisers for photodynamic therapy of cancer. Their strong fluorescence and tumour-localising properties make them also potentially useful for detection of cancer by fluorescence. For this purpose, we have studied the fluorescence kinetics and locali

  7. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornblower, V. D. M.; Yu, E.; Fenster, A.; Battista, J. J.; Malthaner, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo.

  8. Cyclopentenyl cytosine has biological and anti-tumour activity, but does not enhance the efficacy of gemcitabine and radiation in two animal tumour models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van Bree; A.D. Barten-van Rijbroek; R. Leen; H.M. Rodermond; A.B.P. van Kuilenburg; H.B. Kal

    2009-01-01

    Cyclopentenyl cytosine (CPEC), targetting the de novo biosynthesis of cytidine triphosphate (CTP), increases the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine, dFdC) alone and in combination with irradiation in several human tumour cells in vitro. We investigated whether OPEC enhances

  9. Translation and pilot validation of Hindi translation of assessing quality of life in patients with primary brain tumours using EORTC brain module (BN-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budrukkar Ashwini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To translate and validate the European Organisation for Research and Treatment for Cancer (EORTC brain cancer module (BN-20 into Hindi to make it available for patients and scientific community. Methods and Results: The EORTC BN-20 was translated into Hindi using standard guidelines by EORTC. The process included forward translation by two translators, discussion with the translators in case of discrepancies and formation of first intermediate questionnaire. This questionnaire was then given to two more translators who translated this questionnaire back into English. These 2 questionnaires were then compared with the original EORTC questionnaire and the second intermediate questionnaire was formed. The second intermediate questionnaire was subsequently administered in 10 patients with brain tumors who had never seen the questionnaire before, for pilot-testing. Each of these 10 patients after filling up the questionnaire themselves was then interviewed for any difficulty encountered during the filling up of the questionnaire. These were in the form of specific modules including difficulty in answering, confusion while answering and difficulty to understand, whether the questions were upsetting and if patients would have asked the question in any different way. There were major suggestions in three questions, which were incorporated into the second intermediate questionnaire to form the final Hindi BN-20 questionnaire. Conclusion: The final Hindi BN-20 has been approved by EORTC and can be used in clinical practice and studies for patients with brain tumors.

  10. Experimental tumour treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report of 1984 is the seventh in a series and presents that year's results of continuous studies in the domain of experimental tumour radiotherapy. In the year under review, more personnel has been available for the studies, and the scientific programmes for the assessment of acute and chronic side effects of radiotherapies have been extended. New models have been developed, among them a first system based on animal experiments, for quantifying the mucositis of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa, a limiting condition in the radiotherapy of head and throat tumours. Another significant advancement is a model for quantification of chronical damage to the ureter, which still is a serious problem in the radiotherapy of gynaecological tumours. The 1984 experimental tumour studies have been mainly devoted to the repopulation and split-dose recovery in various tumours, concentrating on dose fractionation as one of the major problems studies. Particular interest has been attached to the processes involved in treatments over several weeks with a daily effective dose of 2 Gy. (orig./MG)

  11. Analysis of the effects of exposure to acute hypoxia on oxidative lesions and tumour progression in a transgenic mouse breast cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunt Sarah

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumour hypoxia is known to be a poor prognostic indicator, predictive of increased risk of metastatic disease and reduced survival. Genomic instability has been proposed as one of the potential mechanisms for hypoxic tumour progression. Both of these features are commonly found in many cancer types, but their relationship and association with tumour progression has not been examined in the same model. Methods To address this issue, we determined the effects of 6 week in vivo acute hypoxic exposure on the levels of mutagenic lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine DNA (8-oxo-dG lesions in the transgenic polyomavirus middle T (PyMT breast cancer mouse model. Results We observed significantly increased plasma lipid peroxidation and 8-oxo-dG lesion levels in the hypoxia-exposed mice. Consumption of malondialdehyde also induced a significant increase in the PyMT tumour DNA lesion levels, however, these increases did not translate into enhanced tumour progression. We further showed that the in vivo exposure to acute hypoxia induced accumulation of F4/80 positive tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs, demonstrating a relationship between hypoxia and macrophages in an experimental model. Conclusion These data suggest that although exposure to acute hypoxia causes an increase in 8-oxo-dG lesions and TAMs in the PyMT tumours, these increases do not translate into significant changes in tumour progression at the primary or metastatic levels in this strong viral oncogene-driven breast cancer model.

  12. Molecular imaging of tumour hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By allowing an earlier diagnosis and a more exhaustive assessment of extension of the disease, the tomography by emission of positrons (PET) transforms the care of numerous cancers. At present, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]-F.D.G.) imaging appears as the only one available but new molecular markers are being developed. In the next future they would modify the approach of cancers. In this context, the molecular imaging of the hypoxia and especially the 18Fluoromisonidazole PET ([18F]-MISO PET) can give supplementary information allowing the mapping of hypoxic regions within the tumour. Because of the links, which exist between tumour hypoxia and treatment resistance of very numerous cancers, this information can have an interest, for determination of prognosis as well as for the delineation, volumes to be irradiated. Head and neck tumours are doubtless those for which the literature gives the most elements on the therapeutic impact of tumour hypoxia. Targeted therapies, based on hypoxia, already exist and the contribution of the molecular imaging could be decisive in the evaluation of the impact of such treatment. Molecular imaging of brain tumours remains to be developed. The potential contributions of the [18F]-MISO PET for the care of these patients need to be confirmed. In this context, we propose a review of hypoxia molecular imaging taking as examples head and neck tumours and glioblastomas (GB), two tumours for which hypoxia is one of the key factors to overcome in order to increase therapeutics results

  13. Interplay between pro-inflammatory cytokines and brain oxidative stress biomarkers: evidence of parallels between butyl paraben intoxication and the valproic acid brain physiopathology in autism rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Hoda G; Ali, Elham H A; Elgoly, Amany H Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    Butyl paraben is a preservative used in food, drugs and cosmetics. Neurotoxic effect was reported recently beside the potential estrogenic activity of parabens. There is controversy as to the potential harmful effects of butyl parabens, which are suspected to contribute to autism and learning disabilities. The purpose of this study was to examine the similarities between paraben intoxication signs in the rat brain and brain markers in an autistic like rat model. This study provides evidence of many parallels between the two, including (1) oxidative stress, (2) decreased reduced glutathione levels and elevated oxidised glutathione, (3) mitochondrial dysfunction, and (4) neuroinflammation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the brain (tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1-beta, and interleukin-6). (5) Increased protein oxidation reported by a significant increase in 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT)/tyrosine ratio. (6) A marked disturbance was found in the production of energy carriers (AMP, ATP and AMP/ATP ratio) in comparison with the control. The evidence suggests that paraben may, to some extent, either cause or contribute to the brain physiopathology in ASDs or pathogens that produce the brain pathology observed in the diagnosed rat model of ASD. PMID:25461396

  14. Diffusion Based Modeling of Human Brain Response to External Stimuli

    CERN Document Server

    Namazi, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Human brain response is the overall ability of the brain in analyzing internal and external stimuli in the form of transferred energy to the mind/brain phase-space and thus, making the proper decisions. During the last decade scientists discovered about this phenomenon and proposed some models based on computational, biological, or neuropsychological methods. Despite some advances in studies related to this area of the brain research there was less effort which have been done on the mathematical modeling of the human brain response to external stimuli. This research is devoted to the modeling of human EEG signal, as an alert state of overall human brain activity monitoring, due to receiving external stimuli, based on fractional diffusion equation. The results of this modeling show very good agreement with the real human EEG signal and thus, this model can be used as a strong representative of the human brain activity.

  15. O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein expression by immunohistochemistry in brain and non-brain systemic tumours: systematic review and meta-analysis of correlation with methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DNA repair protein O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) confers resistance to alkylating agents. Several methods have been applied to its analysis, with methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) the most commonly used for promoter methylation study, while immunohistochemistry (IHC) has become the most frequently used for the detection of MGMT protein expression. Agreement on the best and most reliable technique for evaluating MGMT status remains unsettled. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the correlation between IHC and MSP. A computer-aided search of MEDLINE (1950-October 2009), EBSCO (1966-October 2009) and EMBASE (1974-October 2009) was performed for relevant publications. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were those comparing MGMT protein expression by IHC with MGMT promoter methylation by MSP in the same cohort of patients. Methodological quality was assessed by using the QUADAS and STARD instruments. Previously published guidelines were followed for meta-analysis performance. Of 254 studies identified as eligible for full-text review, 52 (20.5%) met the inclusion criteria. The review showed that results of MGMT protein expression by IHC are not in close agreement with those obtained with MSP. Moreover, type of tumour (primary brain tumour vs others) was an independent covariate of accuracy estimates in the meta-regression analysis beyond the cut-off value. Protein expression assessed by IHC alone fails to reflect the promoter methylation status of MGMT. Thus, in attempts at clinical diagnosis the two methods seem to select different groups of patients and should not be used interchangeably

  16. Anti-tumour activity of oncolytic Western Reserve vaccinia viruses in canine tumour cell lines, xenografts, and fresh tumour biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, K; Knuuttila, A; Kipar, A; Ahonen, M; Parviainen, S; Diaconu, I; Kanerva, A; Hakonen, T; Vähä-Koskela, M; Hemminki, A

    2014-10-10

    Cancer is one of the most common reasons for death in dogs. One promising approach is oncolytic virotherapy. We assessed the oncolytic effect of genetically modified vaccinia viruses in canine cancer cells, in freshly excised tumour biopsies, and in mice harbouring canine tumour xenografts. Tumour transduction efficacy was assessed using virus expressing luciferase or fluorescent marker genes and oncolysis was quantified by a colorimetric cell viability assay. Oncolytic efficacy in vivo was evaluated in a nude mouse xenograft model. Vaccinia virus was shown to infect most tested canine cancer cell lines and primary surgical tumour tissues. Virus infection significantly reduced tumour growth in the xenograft model. Oncolytic vaccinia virus has antitumour effects against canine cancer cells and experimental tumours and is able to replicate in freshly excised patient tumour tissue. Our results suggest that oncolytic vaccinia virus may offer an effective treatment option for otherwise incurable canine tumours. PMID:25302859

  17. On a Quantum Model of Brain Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, K.-H.; Fichtner, L.; Freudenberg, W.; Ohya, M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main activities of the brain is the recognition of signals. A first attempt to explain the process of recognition in terms of quantum statistics was given in [6]. Subsequently, details of the mathematical model were presented in a (still incomplete) series of papers (cf. [7, 2, 5, 10]). In the present note we want to give a general view of the principal ideas of this approach. We will introduce the basic spaces and justify the choice of spaces and operations. Further, we bring the model face to face with basic postulates any statistical model of the recognition process should fulfill. These postulates are in accordance with the opinion widely accepted in psychology and neurology.

  18. Preoperative shunts in thalamic tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel A

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty one patients with thalamic glioma underwent a pre-tumour resection shunt surgery. The procedure was uneventful in 23 patients with relief from symptoms of increased intracranial pressure. Eight patients worsened after the procedure. The level of sensorium worsened from excessively drowsy state to unconsciousness in seven patients. Three patients developed hemiparesis, 4 developed paresis of extra-ocular muscles and altered pupillary reflexes, and 1 developed incontinence of urine and persistent vomiting. Alteration in the delicately balanced intracranial pressure and movements in the tumour and vital adjacent brain areas could be the probable cause of the worsening in the neurological state in these 8 patients. On the basis of these observations and on review of literature, it is postulated that the ventricular dilatation following an obstruction in the path of the cerebrospinal fluid flow by a tumour could be a natural defense phenomenon of the brain.

  19. Histone modifications patterns in tissues and tumours from acute promyelocytic leukemia xenograft model in response to combined epigenetic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiulienė, Giedrė; Treigytė, Gražina; Savickienė, Jūratė; Matuzevičius, Dalius; Alksnė, Milda; Jarašienė-Burinskaja, Rasa; Bukelskienė, Virginija; Navakauskas, Dalius; Navakauskienė, Rūta

    2016-04-01

    Xenograft models are suitable for in vivo study of leukemia's pathogenesis and the preclinical development of anti-leukemia agents but understanding of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms linking to adult cell functions in pathological conditions during different in vivo treatments is yet unknown. In this study, for the first time epigenetic chromatin modifications were characterized in tissues and tumours from murine xenograft model generated using the human acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) NB4 cells engrafted in immunodeficient NOG mice. Xenografts were subjected to combined epigenetic treatment by histone deacetylase inhibitor Belinostat, histone methyltransferase inhibitor 3-DZNeaplanocin A and all-trans-retinoic acid based on in vitro model, where such combination inhibited NB4 cell growth and enhanced retinoic acid-induced differentiation to granulocytes. Xenotransplantation was assessed by peripheral blood cells counts, the analysis of cell surface markers (CD15, CD33, CD45) and the expression of certain genes (PML-RAR alpha, CSF3, G-CSFR, WT1). The combined treatment prolonged APL xenograft mice survival and prevented tumour formation. The analysis of the expression of histone marks such as acetylation of H4, trimethylation of H3K4, H3K9 and H3K27 in APL xenograft mice tumours and tissues demonstrated tissue-specific changes in the level of histone modifications and the APL prognostic mark, WT1 protein. In summary, the effects of epigenetic agents used in this study were positive for leukemia prevention and linked to a modulation of the chromatin epigenetic environment in adult tissues of malignant organism. PMID:27044813

  20. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjavaara, S.

    2011-07-01

    approximately two-thirds (64%; 95% CI, 50 - 78). The underreporting was more pronounced among the elderly and in those with no histological confirmation of the meningioma diagnosis. An increasing trend of VS incidence was observed, but with considerable differences between countries. The overall annual increase of VS incidence was 2.8% per year (95% CI, 2.3 - 3.2) in 1987 - 2007, when all the four countries and both sexes were combined. However, no statistically significant increase was seen in the rates of VS incidence in Finnish men or Swedish women, and the incidence even showed some decrease in Finnish women (-0.4%, 95% CI, -1.8 to +1.1) during the study period. The overall increase in rates stabilized in the late 1990s, with relatively constant incidence rates and even some decline after 2000. Gliomas were distributed unevenly in the brain, with substantial variation between the cerebral lobes showing an excess of gliomas in the frontal and temporal lobes (over four-fold relative to occipital lobe, even after accounting for tissue volume). In the detailed spatial 3D-analysis, statistically significant heterogeneity was found with most gliomas in the anterior subcortical part of the brain. There was no excess of gliomas in the parts of the brain nearest to the typical location where mobile phones are held. Gliomas among never-regular mobile phone users and contralateral users (phone held on the opposite side of the head than the side of tumour) were closer to the source of electromagnetic field (EMF) than among regular and ipsilateral (exposure at the same side as the tumour location) users. In the case-specular analysis, the distance from the glioma cases to the mobile phone was shorter than for the speculars (hypothetical controls assigned for each glioma case). However, no such association was found in analyses by amount of phone use. In both models, glioma cases were closer to the source of exposure in long-term users (over ten years of use), but the differences

  1. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    approximately two-thirds (64%; 95% CI, 50 - 78). The underreporting was more pronounced among the elderly and in those with no histological confirmation of the meningioma diagnosis. An increasing trend of VS incidence was observed, but with considerable differences between countries. The overall annual increase of VS incidence was 2.8% per year (95% CI, 2.3 - 3.2) in 1987 - 2007, when all the four countries and both sexes were combined. However, no statistically significant increase was seen in the rates of VS incidence in Finnish men or Swedish women, and the incidence even showed some decrease in Finnish women (-0.4%, 95% CI, -1.8 to +1.1) during the study period. The overall increase in rates stabilized in the late 1990s, with relatively constant incidence rates and even some decline after 2000. Gliomas were distributed unevenly in the brain, with substantial variation between the cerebral lobes showing an excess of gliomas in the frontal and temporal lobes (over four-fold relative to occipital lobe, even after accounting for tissue volume). In the detailed spatial 3D-analysis, statistically significant heterogeneity was found with most gliomas in the anterior subcortical part of the brain. There was no excess of gliomas in the parts of the brain nearest to the typical location where mobile phones are held. Gliomas among never-regular mobile phone users and contralateral users (phone held on the opposite side of the head than the side of tumour) were closer to the source of electromagnetic field (EMF) than among regular and ipsilateral (exposure at the same side as the tumour location) users. In the case-specular analysis, the distance from the glioma cases to the mobile phone was shorter than for the speculars (hypothetical controls assigned for each glioma case). However, no such association was found in analyses by amount of phone use. In both models, glioma cases were closer to the source of exposure in long-term users (over ten years of use), but the differences

  2. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer, which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each...

  3. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Guanqun; Li, Qingquan; Peng, Gang; Ma, Jun; Fan, Hongwei; Li, Yingbin

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are still unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain t...

  4. Cisplatinum dose dependent response in germ cell cancer evaluated by tumour marker modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, J; Christensen, T B; von der Maase, H

    1992-01-01

    This study presents an analysis on longitudinal tumour marker series in twenty-two patients with non-seminomatous germ cell cancers treated with cisplatinum (DDP) based combination chemotherapy. Series of alphafoetoprotein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH...... faster than AFP producing cells, and were 3-5-fold more sensitive to the chemotherapy given than AFP producing cells. Treatment response versus DDP dose appeared to be bi-phasic, but with no significant change in treatment efficiency within the given range of DDP doses....

  5. Model human heart or brain signals

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2008-01-01

    A new model is suggested and used to mimic various spatial or temporal designs in biological or non biological formations where the focus is on the normal or irregular electrical signals coming from human heart (ECG) or brain (EEG). The electrical activities in several muscles (EMG) or neurons or other organs of human or various animals, such as lobster pyloric neuron, guinea pig inferior olivary neuron, sepia giant axon and mouse neocortical pyramidal neuron and some spatial formations are also considered (in Appendix). In the biological applications, several elements (cells or tissues) in an organ are taken as various entries in a representative lattice (mesh) where the entries are connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences. The biological elements evolve in time (with the given tissue or organ) in terms of the mentioned connections (interactions) besides some individual feedings. The anatomical diversity of the species (or organs) is handled in terms o...

  6. Modeling brain resonance phenomena using a neural mass model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Spiegler

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation with rhythmic light flicker (photic driving plays an important role in the diagnosis of schizophrenia, mood disorder, migraine, and epilepsy. In particular, the adjustment of spontaneous brain rhythms to the stimulus frequency (entrainment is used to assess the functional flexibility of the brain. We aim to gain deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying this technique and to predict the effects of stimulus frequency and intensity. For this purpose, a modified Jansen and Rit neural mass model (NMM of a cortical circuit is used. This mean field model has been designed to strike a balance between mathematical simplicity and biological plausibility. We reproduced the entrainment phenomenon observed in EEG during a photic driving experiment. More generally, we demonstrate that such a single area model can already yield very complex dynamics, including chaos, for biologically plausible parameter ranges. We chart the entire parameter space by means of characteristic Lyapunov spectra and Kaplan-Yorke dimension as well as time series and power spectra. Rhythmic and chaotic brain states were found virtually next to each other, such that small parameter changes can give rise to switching from one to another. Strikingly, this characteristic pattern of unpredictability generated by the model was matched to the experimental data with reasonable accuracy. These findings confirm that the NMM is a useful model of brain dynamics during photic driving. In this context, it can be used to study the mechanisms of, for example, perception and epileptic seizure generation. In particular, it enabled us to make predictions regarding the stimulus amplitude in further experiments for improving the entrainment effect.

  7. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron N. Johnstone

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53 tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3, parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8 and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36 might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer.

  8. Targeted radionuclide therapy with RAFT-RGD radiolabelled with {sup 90}Y or {sup 177}Lu in a mouse model of αvβ3-expressing tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozon-Petitprin, A.; Bacot, S.; Ahmadi, M.; Marti-Batlle, D.; Perret, P.; Broisat, A.; Riou, L.M. [INSERM, U1039, Grenoble (France); Universite de Grenoble, UMR-S1039, Grenoble (France); Gauchez, A.S.; Bourre, J.C.; Fagret, D.; Vuillez, J.P. [INSERM, U1039, Grenoble (France); Universite de Grenoble, UMR-S1039, Grenoble (France); CHRU Grenoble, Hopital Michallon, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Grenoble (France); Claron, M.; Boturyn, D. [CNRS, UMR 5250, Departement de Chimie Moleculaire, Grenoble (France); Ghezzi, Catherine [INSERM, U1039, Grenoble (France); Universite de Grenoble, UMR-S1039, Grenoble (France); INSERM U1039, Radiopharmaceutiques biocliniques, Batiment Jean Roget, Domaine de la Merci, Faculte de Medecine, La Tronche (France)

    2014-08-28

    The αvβ3 integrin plays an important role in tumour-induced angiogenesis, tumour proliferation, survival and metastasis. The tetrameric RGD-based peptide, regioselectively addressable functionalized template-(cyclo-[RGDfK]){sub 4} (RAFT-RGD), specifically targets the αvβ3 integrin in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of RAFT-RGD radiolabelled with β{sup -} emitters in a nude mouse model of αvβ3 integrin-expressing tumours. Biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed after injection of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD or {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD in nude mice subcutaneously xenografted with αvβ3 integrin-expressing U-87 MG cells. Experimental targeted radionuclide therapy with {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD or {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD and {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RAD or {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RAD (nonspecific controls) was evaluated by intravenous injection of the radionuclides into mice bearing αvβ3 integrin-expressing U-87 MG tumours of different sizes (small or large) or bearing TS/A-pc tumours that do not express αvβ3. Tumour volume doubling time was used to evaluate the efficacy of each treatment. Injection of 37 MBq of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD into mice with large αvβ3-positive tumours or 37 MBq of {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD into mice with small αvβ3-positive tumours caused significant growth delays compared to mice treated with 37 MBq of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RAD or 37 MBq of {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RAD or untreated mice. In contrast, injection of 30 MBq of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD had no effect on the growth of αvβ3-negative tumours. {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD and {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD are potent agents targeting αvβ3-expressing tumours for internal targeted radiotherapy. (orig.)

  9. Mathematical modelling of blood-brain barrier failure and edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Sarah; Lang, Georgina; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Injuries such as traumatic brain injury and stroke can result in increased blood-brain barrier permeability. This increase may lead to water accumulation in the brain tissue resulting in vasogenic edema. Although the initial injury may be localised, the resulting edema causes mechanical damage and compression of the vasculature beyond the original injury site. We employ a biphasic mixture model to investigate the consequences of blood-brain barrier permeability changes within a region of brain tissue and the onset of vasogenic edema. We find that such localised changes can indeed result in brain tissue swelling and that the type of damage that results (stress damage or strain damage) depends on the ability of the brain to clear edema fluid.

  10. Identification of imaging biomarkers for the assessment of tumour response to different treatments in a preclinical glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) activity is one of the major players in hypoxia-mediated glioma progression and resistance to therapies, and therefore the focus of this study was the evaluation of HIF-1α modulation in relation to tumour response with the purpose of identifying imaging biomarkers able to document tumour response to treatment in a murine glioma model. U251-HRE-mCherry cells expressing Luciferase under the control of a hypoxia responsive element (HRE) and mCherry under the control of a constitutive promoter were used to assess HIF-1α activity and cell survival after treatment, both in vitro and in vivo, by optical, MRI and positron emission tomography imaging. This cell model can be used to monitor HIF-1α activity after treatment with different drugs modulating transduction pathways involved in its regulation. After temozolomide (TMZ) treatment, HIF-1α activity is early reduced, preceding cell cytotoxicity. Optical imaging allowed monitoring of this process in vivo, and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression was identified as a translatable non-invasive biomarker with potential clinical significance. A preliminary in vitro evaluation showed that reduction of HIF-1α activity after TMZ treatment was comparable to the effect of an Hsp90 inhibitor, opening the way for further elucidation of its mechanism of action. The results of this study suggest that the U251-HRE-mCherry cell model can be used for the monitoring of HIF-1α activity through luciferase and CAIX expression. These cells can become a useful tool for the assessment and improvement of new targeted tracers for potential theranostic procedures. (orig.)

  11. Identification of imaging biomarkers for the assessment of tumour response to different treatments in a preclinical glioma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Dico, A.; Martelli, C. [University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Centre of Molecular and Cellular Imaging-IMAGO, Milan (Italy); Valtorta, S.; Belloli, S. [National Researches Council (CNR), Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology (IBFM), Segrate, MI (Italy); IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Experimental Imaging Center, Milan (Italy); Raccagni, I.; Moresco, R.M. [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Experimental Imaging Center, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Health Sciences, Monza (Italy); Diceglie, C. [University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Doctorate School of Molecular Medicine, Milan (Italy); Gianelli, U.; Bosari, S. [University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan (Italy); Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda-Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Division of Pathology, Milan (Italy); Vaira, V. [Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda-Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Division of Pathology, Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Genetica Molecolare ' ' Romeo ed Enrica Invernizzi' ' (INGM), Milan (Italy); Politi, L.S. [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Department and Neuroradiology Research Group, Milan (Italy); Lucignani, G. [University of Milan, Centre of Molecular and Cellular Imaging-IMAGO, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Health Sciences, Milan (Italy); San Paolo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Services, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Ottobrini, L. [University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Centre of Molecular and Cellular Imaging-IMAGO, Milan (Italy); National Researches Council (CNR), Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology (IBFM), Segrate, MI (Italy)

    2015-03-27

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) activity is one of the major players in hypoxia-mediated glioma progression and resistance to therapies, and therefore the focus of this study was the evaluation of HIF-1α modulation in relation to tumour response with the purpose of identifying imaging biomarkers able to document tumour response to treatment in a murine glioma model. U251-HRE-mCherry cells expressing Luciferase under the control of a hypoxia responsive element (HRE) and mCherry under the control of a constitutive promoter were used to assess HIF-1α activity and cell survival after treatment, both in vitro and in vivo, by optical, MRI and positron emission tomography imaging. This cell model can be used to monitor HIF-1α activity after treatment with different drugs modulating transduction pathways involved in its regulation. After temozolomide (TMZ) treatment, HIF-1α activity is early reduced, preceding cell cytotoxicity. Optical imaging allowed monitoring of this process in vivo, and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression was identified as a translatable non-invasive biomarker with potential clinical significance. A preliminary in vitro evaluation showed that reduction of HIF-1α activity after TMZ treatment was comparable to the effect of an Hsp90 inhibitor, opening the way for further elucidation of its mechanism of action. The results of this study suggest that the U251-HRE-mCherry cell model can be used for the monitoring of HIF-1α activity through luciferase and CAIX expression. These cells can become a useful tool for the assessment and improvement of new targeted tracers for potential theranostic procedures. (orig.)

  12. A Neurocomputational Model of an Imitation Deficit following Brain Lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Petreska, B.; Billard, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the neural mechanisms of visuo-motor imitation in humans through convergent evidence from neuroscience. In particular, we consider a deficit in imitation following callosal brain lesion, based on the rational that looking at how imitation is impaired can unveil its underlying neural principles. We ground the functional architecture and information flow of our model in brain imaging studies and use findings from monkey brain neurophysiological studies to drive the choic...

  13. The connected brain: Causality, models and intrinsic dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    A razi; Friston, K.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there have been several concerted international efforts - the BRAIN initiative, European Human Brain Project and the Human Connectome Project, to name a few - that hope to revolutionize our understanding of the connected brain. Over the past two decades, functional neuroimaging has emerged as the predominant technique in systems neuroscience. This is foreshadowed by an ever increasing number of publications on functional connectivity, causal modeling, connectomics, and multivariate ...

  14. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanqun Qiao; Qingquan Li; Gang Peng; Jun Ma; Hongwei Fan; Yingbin Li

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are stil unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cel s and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain tumor stem cells. The numbers of cytolysosomes and autophagosomes in brain tumor stem cells and induced neural stem cel s were lower and the proliferative activity was obviously stronger than that in normal neural stem cells. Normal neural stem cells could differentiate into glial fibril ary acidic protein-positive and microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells, which were also negative for nestin. However, glial fibril ary acidic protein/nestin, microtubule associated protein-2/nestin, and glial fibril ary acidic protein/microtubule associated protein-2 double-positive cells were found in induced neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cel s. Results indicate that induced neural stem cells are similar to brain tumor stem cells, and are possibly the source of brain tumor stem cells.

  15. Application of SPET using technetium-99m sestamibi in brain tumours and comparison with expression of the MDR-1 gene: is it possible to predict the response to chemotherapy in patients with gliomas by means of 99mTc-sestamibi SPET?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, MIBI SPET was compared with thallium-201 (Tl) SPET using magnetic resonance imaging as a guide in 16 patients with untreated brain tumours (ten glioblastomas (GBs)), two anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs), two low-grade gliomas (LGASs) and two metastatic brain tumours and in four patients who had received treatment for with brain tumours (two GBs, two AAs). In addition, we investigated the expression of the MDR-1 gene and its product Pgp inn the same patients, and compared the results with MIBI SPET findings. MIBI, as well as Tl, was highly accumulated and retained in the enhanced region of malignant gliomas. In addition, MIBI SPET yielded sharp and well-contrasted images, and the margin of the tumour was more clearly defined than with Tl SPET due to a good signal-to-noise ratio. Follow-up MIBI SPET in patients who had received therapy showed marked uptake in a patient with malignant transformation, who deteriorated clinically. Patients with no uptake on MIBI SPET showed no sign of recurrence. Semiquantitative analysis of untreated patients showed a relationship between the early uptake index and the degree of malignancy. The retention index (RI, ratio of delayed to early UI) of MIBI was significantly lower than that of Tl in metastatic brain tumours (P<0.05), but not in malignant gliomas. Histological and biological investigation of gliomas showed that the MDR-1 gene and its product Pgp were expressed only in normal endothelial cells and not in tumour cells or proliferating enen550601l cells; Pgp tended to decrease as the degree of malignancy rose. Hence, the presence of Pgp and the grade of malignancy were inversely related in gliomas. By contrast, immunohistochemical study showed strong accumulation of Pgp in metastatic brain tumour cells. (orig./MG) (orig.)

  16. Molecular Descriptors in Modelling the Tumour Necrosis Factor-α Converting Enzyme Inhibition Activity of Novel Tartrate-Based Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumour necrosis factor-α converting enzyme inhibition activity of a series comprising of novel tartrate-based analogues has been quantitatively analysed in terms of molecular descriptors. The statistically validated quantitative structure-activity relationship models provided rationales to explain the inhibition activity of these congeners. The descriptors identified through combinatorial protocol in multiple linear regression analysis have highlighted the role of Moran autocorrelation of lag 7, weighted by atomic van der Waals volume, presence of both prime and nonprime amide carbonyl oxygen in the tartrate moiety and occurrence of five membered ring bearing substituents at varying sites. A few potential novel tartrate-based analogues have been suggested for further investigation.

  17. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  18. Animal models of brain dysfunction in phenylketonuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martynyuk, A. E.; van Spronsen, F. J.; Van der Zee, E. A.

    2010-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a metabolic disorder that results in significant brain dysfunction if untreated. Although phenylalanine restricted diets instituted at birth have clearly improved PKU outcomes, neuropsychological deficits and neurological changes still represent substantial problems. The spe

  19. The History and Evolution of Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povlishock, John

    2016-01-01

    This narrative provides a brief history of experimental animal model development for the study of traumatic brain injury. It draws upon a relatively rich history of early animal modeling that employed higher order animals to assess concussive brain injury while exploring the importance of head movement versus stabilization in evaluating the animal's response to injury. These themes are extended to the development of angular/rotational acceleration/deceleration models that also exploited brain movement to generate both the morbidity and pathology typically associated with human traumatic brain injury. Despite the significance of these early model systems, their limitations and overall practicality are discussed. Consideration is given to more contemporary rodent animal models that replicate individual/specific features of human injury, while via various transgenic technologies permitting the evaluation of injury-mediated pathways. The narrative closes on a reconsideration of higher order, porcine animal models of injury and their implication for preclinical/translational research. PMID:27604709

  20. Modeling human brain development with cerebral organoids

    OpenAIRE

    Muzio, Luca; Consalez, G. Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of a new three-dimensional culture system for the derivation of cerebral organoids from human induced pluripotent stem cells provides developmental neurobiologists with the first example of a three-dimensional framework for the study of human brain development. This innovative approach permits the in vitro assembly of a human embryonic brain rudiment that recapitulates the developing human cerebrum. Organoids contain progenitor populations that develop to yield mature cor...

  1. Animal models of traumatic brain injury : a critical evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, William; Smyth, Aoife; Gilchrist, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Animal models are necessary to elucidate changes occurring after brain injury and to establish new therapeutic strategies towards a stage where drug efficacy in brain injured patients (against all classes of symptoms) can be predicted. In this review, six established animal models of head trauma, namely fluid percussion, rigid indentation, inertial acceleration, impact acceleration, weight-drop and dynamic cortical deformation are evaluated. While no single animal model is entirely successful...

  2. Edema-induced increase in tumour cell survival for 125I and 103Pd prostate permanent seed implants - a bio-mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ning; Chen, Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2002-04-01

    Edema caused by the surgical procedure of prostate seed implantation expands the source-to-point distances within the prostate and hence decreases the dose coverage. The decrease of dose coverage results in an increase in tumour cell survival. To investigate the effects of edema on tumour cell survival, a bio-mathematical model of edema and the corresponding cell killing by continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) was developed so that tumour cell surviving fractions can be estimated in an edematous prostate for both 125I and 103Pd seed implants. The dynamic nature of edema and its resolution were modelled with an exponential function V(T) = Vp (1 + M exp(-0.693T/Te)) where Vp is the prostate volume before implantation, M is the edema magnitude and Te is edema half-life (EHL). The dose rate of a radioactive seed was calculated according to AAPM TG43, i.e. Λg(r) αBED), where α is the linear coefficient of the survival curve. The tumour cell survival was calculated for both 125I and 103Pd seed implants and for different tumour potential doubling time (TPDT) (from 5 days to 30 days) and for edemas of different magnitudes (from 0% to 95%) and edema half-lives (from 4 days to 30 days). Tumour cell survival increased with the increase of edema magnitude and EHL. For a typical edema of a half-life of 10 days and a magnitude of 50%, the edema increased tumour cell survival by about 1 and 2 orders of magnitude for 125I and 103Pd seed implants respectively. At the extreme (95% edema magnitude and an edema half-life of 30 days), the increase was more than 3 and 5 orders of magnitude for 125I and 103Pd seed implants respectively. The absolute increases were almost independent of TPDT and the prostate edema did not significantly change the effective treatment time. Tumour cell survival for prostate undergoing CLDRI using 125I or 103Pd seeds may be increased substantially due to the presence of edema caused by surgical trauma. This effect appears to be more pronounced for

  3. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  4. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood–brain barrier model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, an in vitro blood–brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood–brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITC-Dextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood–brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood–brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood–brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood–brain barrier (e.g. CPB). (paper)

  5. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood–brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Di; Sun, Linlin; Mi, Gujie; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-02-21

    In the present study, an in vitro blood–brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood–brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITCDextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood–brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood–brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood–brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood–brain barrier (e.g. CPB). PMID:24457539

  6. Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morrissey, David

    2012-01-31

    Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.

  7. Modelling the current distribution across the depth electrode-brain interface in deep brain stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yousif, Nada; Liu, Xuguang

    2007-01-01

    The mismatch between the extensive clinical use of deep brain stimulation (DBS), which is being used to treat an increasing number of neurological disorders, and the lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms, is confounded by the difficulty of measuring the spread of electric current in the brain in vivo. Here we present a brief review of the recent computational models which simulate the electric current and field distribution in the three-dimensional space, and consequently make es...

  8. Recombinant HPV16 E7 assembled into particles induces an immune response and specific tumour protection administered without adjuvant in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgi Colomba

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HPV16 E7 protein is both a tumour-specific and a tumour-rejection antigen, the ideal target for developing therapeutic vaccines for the treatment of HPV16-associated cancer and its precursor lesions. E7, which plays a key role in virus-associated carcinogenesis, contains 98 amino acids and has two finger-type structures which bind a Zn++ ion. The ability of an Escherichia coli-produced E7-preparation, assembled into particles, to induce protective immunity against a HPV16-related tumour in the TC-1-C57BL/6 mouse tumour model, was evaluated. Methods E7 was expressed in E. coli, purified via a one-step denaturing protocol and prepared as a soluble suspension state after dialysis in native buffer. The presence in the E7 preparation of particulate forms was analysed by non-reducing SDS-PAGE and negative staining electron microscopy (EM. The Zn++ ion content was analysed by mass-spectrometry. Ten μg of protein per mouse was administered to groups of animals, once, twice or three times without adjuvant. The E7-specific humoral response was monitored in mice sera using an E7-based ELISA while the cell-mediated immune response was analysed in mice splenocytes with lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays. The E7 immunized mice were challenged with TC-1 tumour cells and the tumour growth monitored for two months. Results In western blot analysis E7 appears in multimers and high molecular mass oligomers. The EM micrographs show the protein dispersed as aggregates of different shape and size. The protein appears clustered in micro-, nano-aggregates, and structured particles. Mice immunised with this protein preparation show a significant E7-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune response of mixed Th1/Th2 type. The mice are fully protected from the tumour growth after vaccination with three E7-doses of 10 μg without any added adjuvant. Conclusions This report shows that a particulate form of HPV16 E7 is able to induce

  9. An Embodied Brain Model of the Human Foetus

    OpenAIRE

    Yasunori Yamada; Hoshinori Kanazawa; Sho Iwasaki; Yuki Tsukahara; Osuke Iwata; Shigehito Yamada; Yasuo Kuniyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cortical learning via sensorimotor experiences evoked by bodily movements begins as early as the foetal period. However, the learning mechanisms by which sensorimotor experiences guide cortical learning remain unknown owing to technical and ethical difficulties. To bridge this gap, we present an embodied brain model of a human foetus as a coupled brain-body-environment system by integrating anatomical/physiological data. Using this model, we show how intrauterine sensorimotor experiences rela...

  10. Tumours and tumourous diseases; Tumoren, tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, W. (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    This book on tumours and tumourous diseases comprises two parts: 1. Bone tumours and tumourous lesions. 2. Soft tissue tumours and tumourous lesions. Details are presented on pathology, diagnosis, conservative and perioperative therapy, surgical therapy, complications after resection, indicators for amputation, recommendations for follow-up treatment, radiotherapy, radionuclide therapy, alternative therapies, therapy concepts in case of metastases, tissue engineering and plastic surgery. (uke) [German] Der vorliegende Band der Reihe Orthopaedie und orthopaedische Chirurgie behandelt das Thema Tumoren und tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen. Der Band teilt sich in zwei Kapitel: 1. Knochentumoren und tumorartige Laesionen und 2. Weichteiltumoren und tumorartige Laesionen. Dargestellt werden Pathologie, Diagnostik, konservative und perioperative Therapie, chirurgische Therapie, Komplikationen nach Resektion, Indikatoren zur Amputation, Nachsorgeempfehlung, Strahlentherapie, Radionuklidtherapie, alternative Therapieverfahren, Therapiekonzepte bei Metastasen, Tissue Engineering und plastisch-chirurgische Massnahmen. (uke)

  11. Establishment of rat model of opening blood-brain barrier with conventional whole-brain irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish a rat model of opening blood-brain barrier with conventional whole-brain irradiation. Methods: According to different dosage of irradiation, a hundred Sprague-Dowley rats were randomly assigned into five groups, the control group (no irradiation), and four irradiated groups at 10 grays, 20 grays, 30 grays and 40 grays. The rats were administered to conventional fraction irradiation (2 Gy/day and 5 days a week) with routine 60Co gamma-rays. The intake of feed and autonomic activities were observed every day. Changes in skin and hair in the irradiated field, body weight, and center nervous system symptoms and signs were examined and recorded every week during irradiation. The neurological status was ranked on a scale based on the Mickley's Scale. Ultrastructure changes of blood-brain barrier at 16 hours after the last irradiation were examined with electron microscope using lanthanum trace labeling. Results: Neither abnormal nervous sign, nor change of feed intake, skin and hair was observed in all the rats. No statistically significant difference of body weight was observed among the five groups (P>0.05). The effect that radiation can directly damage the function and structure of blood-brain barrier was proportional to irradiation doses. Conclusion: This rat model is a suitable for study on blood-brain barrier pathophysiology and molecular biology after conventional whole-brain irradiation. (authors)

  12. A Bayesian model of category-specific emotional brain responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Tor D; Kang, Jian; Johnson, Timothy D; Nichols, Thomas E; Satpute, Ajay B; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2015-04-01

    Understanding emotion is critical for a science of healthy and disordered brain function, but the neurophysiological basis of emotional experience is still poorly understood. We analyzed human brain activity patterns from 148 studies of emotion categories (2159 total participants) using a novel hierarchical Bayesian model. The model allowed us to classify which of five categories--fear, anger, disgust, sadness, or happiness--is engaged by a study with 66% accuracy (43-86% across categories). Analyses of the activity patterns encoded in the model revealed that each emotion category is associated with unique, prototypical patterns of activity across multiple brain systems including the cortex, thalamus, amygdala, and other structures. The results indicate that emotion categories are not contained within any one region or system, but are represented as configurations across multiple brain networks. The model provides a precise summary of the prototypical patterns for each emotion category, and demonstrates that a sufficient characterization of emotion categories relies on (a) differential patterns of involvement in neocortical systems that differ between humans and other species, and (b) distinctive patterns of cortical-subcortical interactions. Thus, these findings are incompatible with several contemporary theories of emotion, including those that emphasize emotion-dedicated brain systems and those that propose emotion is localized primarily in subcortical activity. They are consistent with componential and constructionist views, which propose that emotions are differentiated by a combination of perceptual, mnemonic, prospective, and motivational elements. Such brain-based models of emotion provide a foundation for new translational and clinical approaches. PMID:25853490

  13. Recurrence and Progression in Meningiomas: The Clonal Cytogenetic Evolution of a Benign Human Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketter R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas are mostly benign tumours that originate from the coverings of brain and spinal cord. Only a minority of cases show progression to an anaplastic tumour (WHO grades II and III. Multiple and familial cases are rare and mostly associated with (hereditary neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2. Meningiomas show an unexpectedly high recurrence rate. Also, completely removed low-grade tumours can recur. On a cytogenetic level, meningiomas are the best-studied tumours in humans. The majority of high-grade but only a minority of low-grade meningiomas show loss of merlin, a cytoskeleton-cytoplasm-linker protein. Merlin is the product of the NF2 gene located on chromosome 22. A second tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 22 on 22q12.3 is the gene for the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3, which appears to be involved in meningioma progression and a high-grade meningioma phenotype. In contrast to other solid tumours, progression of meningiomas is correlated with increasing hypodiploidy, showing characteristic clonal evolutions that mostly include chromosomes 14, 18, and 19 and, more rarely, 6 and 10. Structural aberrations are rare, except for the loss of the short arm of one chromosome 1, which appears to be the decisive step for anaplastic growth. A biostatistical approach has been proposed, using an oncogenetic tree model that estimates the most likely cytogenetic pathways of meningioma patients in terms of accumulation of chromosome changes in tumour cells. The genetic progression score (GPS estimates the genetic status of a tumour as progression in the corresponding tumour cells along this model. High GPS values are highly correlated with early recurrence of meningiomas (p 10–4. This correlation holds true even when patients are stratified by WHO grade. Tumour location also has an impact on genetic progression. Clinical relevance of the GPS is demonstrated with respect to origin, WHO grade, and recurrence of the tumour. As a quantitative

  14. Radiation damage, repopulation and cell recovery analysis of in vitro tumour cell megacolony culture data using a non-Poissonian cell repopulation TCP model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of radiation damage, tumour repopulation and cell sublethal damage repair and the possibility of extracting information about the model parameters describing them are investigated in this work. Previously published data on two different cultured cell lines were analysed with the help of a tumour control probability (TCP) model that describes tumour cell dynamics properly. Different versions of a TCP model representing the cases of full or partial cell recovery between fractions of radiation, accompanied by repopulation or no repopulation were used to fit the data and were ranked according to statistical criteria. The data analysis shows the importance of the linear-quadratic mechanism of cell damage for the description of the in vitro cell dynamics. In a previous work where in vivo data were analysed, the employment of the single hit model of cell kill and cell repopulation produced the best fit, while ignoring the quadratic term of cell damage in the current analysis leads to poor fits. It is also concluded that more experiments using different fractionation regimes producing diverse data are needed to help model analysis and better ranking of the models

  15. Development of a Model for Whole Brain Learning of Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleton, Saramarie; Muller, Anton

    2011-01-01

    In this report, a model was developed for whole brain learning based on Curry's onion model. Curry described the effect of personality traits as the inner layer of learning, information-processing styles as the middle layer of learning, and environmental and instructional preferences as the outer layer of learning. The model that was developed…

  16. Using computational models to relate structural and functional brain connectivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Coombes, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 2 (2012), s. 2137-2145. ISSN 0953-816X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E08027 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 200728 - BRAIN SYNC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : brain disease * computational modelling * functional connectivity * graph theory * structural connectivity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.753, year: 2012

  17. Bayesian network models in brain functional connectivity analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ide, Jaime S.; Zhang, Sheng; Chiang-shan R. Li

    2013-01-01

    Much effort has been made to better understand the complex integration of distinct parts of the human brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Altered functional connectivity between brain regions is associated with many neurological and mental illnesses, such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, addiction, and depression. In computational science, Bayesian networks (BN) have been used in a broad range of studies to model complex data set in the presence of uncertainty and wh...

  18. New Experimental Model of Brain Tumors in Brains of Adult Immunocompetent Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Baklaushev, Vladimir P.; Kavsan, Vadym M.; Balynska, Olena V; Yusubalieva, Gaukhar M.; Abakumov, Maxim A.; Chekhonin, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Xenograft models, namely heterotransplantation of human cancer cells or tumor biopsies into immunodeficient rodents are the major preclinical approach for the development of novel cancer therapeutics. However, in these models the animals must be used only after the severe systemic immune suppression in order to ensure graft survival. Thus, additional new human brain tumor models without immune suppression of the recipient rodent may be required. Place and Duration of Study: Laboratory o...

  19. Modelling DW-MRI data from primary and metastatic ovarian tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfield, Jessica M. [Institute of Cancer Research, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Surrey (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, MRI Unit, Surrey (United Kingdom); DeSouza, Nandita M.; Collins, David J. [Institute of Cancer Research, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Surrey (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Priest, Andrew N.; Hodgkin, Charlotte; Freeman, Susan [University of Cambridge, Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wakefield, Jennifer C.; Orton, Matthew R. [Institute of Cancer Research, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    To assess goodness-of-fit and repeatability of mono-exponential, stretched exponential and bi-exponential models of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) data in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer. Thirty-nine primary and metastatic lesions from thirty-one patients with stage III or IV ovarian cancer were examined before and after chemotherapy using DW-MRI with ten diffusion-weightings. The data were fitted with (a) a mono-exponential model to give the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), (b) a stretched exponential model to give the distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC) and stretching parameter (α), and (c) a bi-exponential model to give the diffusion coefficient (D), perfusion fraction (f) and pseudodiffusion coefficient (D*). Coefficients of variation, established from repeated baseline measurements, were: ADC 3.1 %, DDC 4.3 %, α 7.0 %, D 13.2 %, f 44.0 %, D* 165.1 %. The bi-exponential model was unsuitable in these data owing to poor repeatability. After excluding the bi-exponential model, analysis using Akaike Information Criteria showed that the stretched exponential model provided the better fit to the majority of pixels in 64 % of lesions. The stretched exponential model provides the optimal fit to DW-MRI data from ovarian, omental and peritoneal lesions and lymph nodes in pre-treatment and post-treatment measurements with good repeatability. (orig.)

  20. Perinatal tumours: the contribution of radiology to management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, Veronica; Ryan, Stephanie; Twomey, Eilish [Children' s University Hospital, Radiology Department, Dublin (Ireland)

    2008-06-15

    A formal classification does not exist and they are probably best classified by their location. Overall the most common neoplasms are - Extracranial teratoma - Neuroblastoma - Soft-tissue tumours - Brain tumours - Leukaemia - Renal tumours - Liver tumours - Retinoblastoma. The prognosis is generally poor, although there are some exceptions such as congenital neuroblastoma and hepatoblastoma. These tumours have a tendency to regress and have a benign clinical course despite a clear malignant histological picture. Other tumours, though histologically benign, may be fatal because of their size and location. Large benign masses may cause airway or cardiovascular compromise and death. Others may cause significant mass effect preventing normal organ development. As normal embryonic cells have a high mitotic rate it is not surprising that perinatal tumours may have a rapid growth rate and become enormous in size. (orig.)

  1. Drosophila melanogaster as a Model Organism of Brain Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Werner Paulus; Astrid Jeibmann

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been utilized to model human brain diseases. In most of these invertebrate transgenic models, some aspects of human disease are reproduced. Although investigation of rodent models has been of significant impact, invertebrate models offer a wide variety of experimental tools that can potentially address some of the outstanding questions underlying neurological disease. This review considers what has been gleaned from invertebrate models of neurodegenerative diseases...

  2. Ablation of lung tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Gillams, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Radiofrequency, laser, microwave and cryotherapy have all been used for the ablation of lung tumours. However, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation are the most widely used technologies. RFA has been successfully applied to tumour measuring from

  3. Magnetic resonance-imaging of the effect of targeted antiangiogenic gene delivery in a melanoma tumour model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the effect of targeted gene therapy to melanoma tumours (M21) by MR-imaging. M21 and M21-L tumours were grown to a size of 850 mm3. M21 and M21-L tumours were intravenously treated with an αvβ3-integrin-ligand-coupled nanoparticle (RGDNP)/RAF(-) complex five times every 72 hours. MRI was performed at set time intervals 24h and 72h after the i.v. injection of the complex. The MRI protocol was T1-wt-SE±CM, T2-wt-FSE, DCE-MRI, Diffusion-wt-STEAM-sequence, T2-time obtained on a 1.5-T-GE-MRI device. The size of the treated M21 tumours kept nearly constant during the treatment phase (847.8±31.4 mm3 versus 904.8±44.4 mm3). The SNR value (T2-weighted images) of the tumours was 36.7±0.6 and dropped down to 30.6±1.9 (p=0.004). At the beginning the SNR value (T1-weighted images) of the tumours after contrast medium application was 42.3±1.9 and dropped down to 28.5±3.0 (p<0.001). In the treatment group the diffusion coefficient increased significantly under therapy (0.54±0.01x10-3 mm2/s versus 0.67±0.04x10-3 mm2/s). The DCE-MRI showed a reduction of the slope and of the Akep of 67.8±4.3 % respectively 64.8±3.3 % compared to baseline. Targeted gene delivery therapy induces significant changes in MR-imaging. MRI showed a significant reduction of contrast medium uptake parameters and increase of the diffusion coefficient of the tumours. (orig.)

  4. Computational modeling of brain tumors: discrete, continuum or hybrid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    In spite of all efforts, patients diagnosed with highly malignant brain tumors (gliomas), continue to face a grim prognosis. Achieving significant therapeutic advances will also require a more detailed quantitative understanding of the dynamic interactions among tumor cells, and between these cells and their biological microenvironment. Data-driven computational brain tumor models have the potential to provide experimental tumor biologists with such quantitative and cost-efficient tools to generate and test hypotheses on tumor progression, and to infer fundamental operating principles governing bidirectional signal propagation in multicellular cancer systems. This review highlights the modeling objectives of and challenges with developing such in silico brain tumor models by outlining two distinct computational approaches: discrete and continuum, each with representative examples. Future directions of this integrative computational neuro-oncology field, such as hybrid multiscale multiresolution modeling are discussed.

  5. Cardiac tumours in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tumours are benign or malignant neoplasms arising primarily in the inner lining, muscle layer, or the surrounding pericardium of the heart. They can be primary or metastatic. Primary cardiac tumours are rare in paediatric practice with a prevalence of 0.0017 to 0.28 in autopsy series. In contrast, the incidence of cardiac tumours during foetal life has been reported to be approximately 0.14%. The vast majority of primary cardiac tumours in children are benign, whilst approximately 10% are malignant. Secondary malignant tumours are 10–20 times more prevalent than primary malignant tumours. Rhabdomyoma is the most common cardiac tumour during foetal life and childhood. It accounts for more than 60% of all primary cardiac tumours. The frequency and type of cardiac tumours in adults differ from those in children with 75% being benign and 25% being malignant. Myxomas are the most common primary tumours in adults constituting 40% of benign tumours. Sarcomas make up 75% of malignant cardiac masses. Echocardiography, Computing Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the heart are the main non-invasive diagnostic tools. Cardiac catheterisation is seldom necessary. Tumour biopsy with histological assessment remains the gold standard for confirmation of the diagnosis. Surgical resection of primary cardiac tumours should be considered to relieve symptoms and mechanical obstruction to blood flow. The outcome of surgical resection in symptomatic, non-myxomatous benign cardiac tumours is favourable. Patients with primary cardiac malignancies may benefit from palliative surgery but this approach should not be recommended for patients with metastatic cardiac tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may prolong survival. The prognosis for malignant primary cardiac tumours is generally extremely poor.

  6. Calcium-activated potassium channels mediated blood-brain tumor barrier opening in a rat metastatic brain tumor model

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Background The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) impedes the delivery of therapeutic agents to brain tumors. While adequate delivery of drugs occurs in systemic tumors, the BTB limits delivery of anti-tumor agents into brain metastases. Results In this study, we examined the function and regulation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels in a rat metastatic brain tumor model. We showed that intravenous infusion of NS1619, a KCa channel agonist, and bradykinin selectively enhanced BTB perm...

  7. Creating physical 3D stereolithograph models of brain and skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    Full Text Available The human brain and skull are three dimensional (3D anatomical structures with complex surfaces. However, medical images are often two dimensional (2D and provide incomplete visualization of structural morphology. To overcome this loss in dimension, we developed and validated a freely available, semi-automated pathway to build 3D virtual reality (VR and hand-held, stereolithograph models. To evaluate whether surface visualization in 3D was more informative than in 2D, undergraduate students (n = 50 used the Gillespie scale to rate 3D VR and physical models of both a living patient-volunteer's brain and the skull of Phineas Gage, a historically famous railroad worker whose misfortune with a projectile tamping iron provided the first evidence of a structure-function relationship in brain. Using our processing pathway, we successfully fabricated human brain and skull replicas and validated that the stereolithograph model preserved the scale of the VR model. Based on the Gillespie ratings, students indicated that the biological utility and quality of visual information at the surface of VR and stereolithograph models were greater than the 2D images from which they were derived. The method we developed is useful to create VR and stereolithograph 3D models from medical images and can be used to model hard or soft tissue in living or preserved specimens. Compared to 2D images, VR and stereolithograph models provide an extra dimension that enhances both the quality of visual information and utility of surface visualization in neuroscience and medicine.

  8. Classical Wave Model of Quantum-Like Processing in Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, A.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the conjecture on quantum-like (QL) processing of information in the brain. It is not based on the physical quantum brain (e.g., Penrose) - quantum physical carriers of information. In our approach the brain created the QL representation (QLR) of information in Hilbert space. It uses quantum information rules in decision making. The existence of such QLR was (at least preliminary) confirmed by experimental data from cognitive psychology. The violation of the law of total probability in these experiments is an important sign of nonclassicality of data. In so called "constructive wave function approach" such data can be represented by complex amplitudes. We presented 1,2 the QL model of decision making. In this paper we speculate on a possible physical realization of QLR in the brain: a classical wave model producing QLR . It is based on variety of time scales in the brain. Each pair of scales (fine - the background fluctuations of electromagnetic field and rough - the cognitive image scale) induces the QL representation. The background field plays the crucial role in creation of "superstrong QL correlations" in the brain.

  9. Cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity induced by devitalization in porcine malignant melanoma model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Vratislav; Soukupová, Pavla; Šinkora, J.; Řeháková, Z.; Málek, Ondřej; Hradecký, Jan; Klaudy, Jiří

    Praha: European School of Hematology, 2003. s. 1. [Euroconference on Animal Models of Human Diseases/3./. 16.05.2003-18.05.2003, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/01/0162; GA AV ČR IBS5045113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : devitalization Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  10. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Jin; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yun Hui; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, Jin Su; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institite of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-01

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advent of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not good enough as human image. Due to larger brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mouse or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCI. A burr hole was made at 1 cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 {mu}l was injected using 30 G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. {sup 18}F-FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville, TN) scans were performed 1, 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition, {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans were performed using human PET scanner (Gemini, Philips medical systems, CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infarction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the human PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using {sup 18}F-FDG microPET scanner.

  11. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. J.; Lee, D. S.; Kim, J. H.; Hwang, D. W.; Jung, J. G.; Lee, M. C [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, S. M [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advance of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not so much satisfactory as human image. As cats have relatively large sized brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mice or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCl. A burr hole was made at 1cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 ul was injected using 30G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. F-18 FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville. TN) scans were performed 1. 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition. 18F-FDG PET scans were performed using Gemini PET scanner (Philips medical systems. CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infraction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the Gemini PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using F-18 FDG microPET scanner.

  12. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advent of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not good enough as human image. Due to larger brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mouse or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCI. A burr hole was made at 1 cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 μl was injected using 30 G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. 18F-FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville, TN) scans were performed 1, 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition, 18F-FDG PET scans were performed using human PET scanner (Gemini, Philips medical systems, CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infarction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the human PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using 18F-FDG microPET scanner

  13. Modelling Brain Tissue using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    an ongoing chemical reaction due to the fixative used. Short-term instabilities within the first 15 hours of DWI scanning were observed and found likely to be caused by the preparation of the postmortem tissue prior to MR scanning. This artefact can be avoided e.g. by simply excluding DW......Diffusion MRI, or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), is a technique that measures the restricted diffusion of water molecules within brain tissue. Different reconstruction methods quantify water-diffusion anisotropy in the intra- and extra-cellular spaces of the neural environment. Fibre tracking...... environment differs from that of in vivo both due to a lowered environmental temperature and due to the fixation process itself. We argue that the perfusion fixation procedure employed in this thesis ensures that the postmortem tissue is as close to that of in vivo as possible. Different fibre reconstruction...

  14. Data-driven forward model inference for EEG brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hauberg, Søren; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a flexible and accessible tool with excellent temporal resolution but with a spatial resolution hampered by volume conduction. Reconstruction of the cortical sources of measured EEG activity partly alleviates this problem and effectively turns EEG into a brain......-of-concept study, we show that, even when anatomical knowledge is unavailable, a suitable forward model can be estimated directly from the EEG. We propose a data-driven approach that provides a low-dimensional parametrization of head geometry and compartment conductivities, built using a corpus of forward models....... Combined with only a recorded EEG signal, we are able to estimate both the brain sources and a person-specific forward model by optimizing this parametrization. We thus not only solve an inverse problem, but also optimize over its specification. Our work demonstrates that personalized EEG brain imaging...

  15. Catastrophic shifts and lethal thresholds in a propagating front model of unstable tumour progression

    CERN Document Server

    Amor, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Unstable dynamics characterizes the evolution of most solid tumors. Because of an increased failure of maintaining genome integrity, a cumulative increase in the levels of gene mutation and loss is observed. Previous work suggests that instability thresholds to cancer progression exist, defining phase transition phenomena separating tumor-winning scenarios from tumor extinction or coexistence phases. Here we present an integral equation approach to the quasispecies dynamics of unstable cancer. The model exhibits two main phases, characterized by either the success or failure of cancer tissue. Moreover, the model predicts that tumor failure can be due to either a reduced selective advantage over healthy cells or excessive instability. We also derive an approximate, analytical solution that predicts the front speed of aggressive tumor populations on the instability space.

  16. Resolving structural variability in network models and the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Klimm

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale white matter pathways crisscrossing the cortex create a complex pattern of connectivity that underlies human cognitive function. Generative mechanisms for this architecture have been difficult to identify in part because little is known in general about mechanistic drivers of structured networks. Here we contrast network properties derived from diffusion spectrum imaging data of the human brain with 13 synthetic network models chosen to probe the roles of physical network embedding and temporal network growth. We characterize both the empirical and synthetic networks using familiar graph metrics, but presented here in a more complete statistical form, as scatter plots and distributions, to reveal the full range of variability of each measure across scales in the network. We focus specifically on the degree distribution, degree assortativity, hierarchy, topological Rentian scaling, and topological fractal scaling--in addition to several summary statistics, including the mean clustering coefficient, the shortest path-length, and the network diameter. The models are investigated in a progressive, branching sequence, aimed at capturing different elements thought to be important in the brain, and range from simple random and regular networks, to models that incorporate specific growth rules and constraints. We find that synthetic models that constrain the network nodes to be physically embedded in anatomical brain regions tend to produce distributions that are most similar to the corresponding measurements for the brain. We also find that network models hardcoded to display one network property (e.g., assortativity do not in general simultaneously display a second (e.g., hierarchy. This relative independence of network properties suggests that multiple neurobiological mechanisms might be at play in the development of human brain network architecture. Together, the network models that we develop and employ provide a potentially useful

  17. Tailored nanoparticles for tumour therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Drake, Philip; Cho, Hui-Ju; Kao, Chao-Hung; Lee, Kun-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Lin, Yuh-Jiuan

    2012-06-01

    Gd doped iron-oxide nanoparticles were developed for use in tumour therapy via magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The effect of the Gd3+ dopant on the particle size and magnetic properties was investigated. The final particle composition varied from Gd0.01Fe2.99O4 to Gd0.04Fe2.96O4 as determined by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). TEM image analysis showed the average magnetic core diameters to be 12 nm and 33 nm for the lowest and highest Gd levels respectively. The specific power adsorption rate (SAR) determined with a field strength of 246 Oe and 52 kHz had a maximum of 38Wg(-1) [Fe] for the Gd0.03Fe2.97O4 sample. This value is about 4 times higher than the reported SAR values for Fe3O4. The potential for in vivo tumour therapy was investigated using a mouse model. The mouse models treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 displayed much slower tumour growth after the first treatment cycle, the tumour had increased its mass by 25% after 7 days post treatment compared to a 79% mass increase over the same period for those models treated with standard iron-oxide or saline solution. After a second treatment cycle the mouse treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 showed complete tumour regression with no tumour found for at least 5 days post treatment. PMID:22905580

  18. Causation model of autism: Audiovisual brain specialization in infancy competes with social brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffler, Karen Frankel; Oestreicher, Leonard M

    2016-06-01

    Earliest identifiable findings in autism indicate that the autistic brain develops differently from the typical brain in the first year of life, after a period of typical development. Twin studies suggest that autism has an environmental component contributing to causation. Increased availability of audiovisual (AV) materials and viewing practices of infants parallel the time frame of the rise in prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Studies have shown an association between ASD and increased TV/cable screen exposure in infancy, suggesting AV exposure in infancy as a possible contributing cause of ASD. Infants are attracted to the saliency of AV materials, yet do not have the experience to recognize these stimuli as socially relevant. The authors present a developmental model of autism in which exposure to screen-based AV input in genetically susceptible infants stimulates specialization of non-social sensory processing in the brain. Through a process of neuroplasticity, the autistic infant develops the skills that are driven by the AV viewing. The AV developed neuronal pathways compete with preference for social processing, negatively affecting development of social brain pathways and causing global developmental delay. This model explains atypical face and speech processing, as well as preference for AV synchrony over biological motion in ASD. Neural hyper-connectivity, enlarged brain size and special abilities in visual, auditory and motion processing in ASD are also explained by the model. Positive effects of early intervention are predicted by the model. Researchers studying causation of autism have largely overlooked AV exposure in infancy as a potential contributing factor. The authors call for increased public awareness of the association between early screen viewing and ASD, and a concerted research effort to determine the extent of causal relationship. PMID:26146132

  19. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each BCM by a measurement model (MM), which simulates the way the brain-activity measurements reflect neuronal activity (e.g. local averaging in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) voxels or sparse sampling in array recordings). The resulting generative model (BCM-MM) produces simulated measurements. To avoid having to fit the MM to predict each individual measurement channel of the brain-activity data, we compare the measured and predicted data at the level of summary statistics. We describe a novel particular implementation of this approach, called probabilistic representational similarity analysis (pRSA) with MMs, which uses representational dissimilarity matrices (RDMs) as the summary statistics. We validate this method by simulations of fMRI measurements (locally averaging voxels) based on a deep convolutional neural network for visual object recognition. Results indicate that the way the measurements sample the activity patterns strongly affects the apparent representational dissimilarities. However, modelling of the measurement process can account for these effects, and different BCMs remain distinguishable even under substantial noise. The pRSA method enables us to perform Bayesian inference on the set of BCMs and to recognize the data-generating model in each case.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574316

  20. Animal models of brain maldevelopment induced by cycad plant genotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisby, Glen E; Moore, Holly; Spencer, Peter S

    2013-12-01

    Cycads are long-lived tropical and subtropical plants that contain azoxyglycosides (e.g., cycasin, macrozamin) and neurotoxic amino acids (notably β-N-methylamino-l-alanine l-BMAA), toxins that have been implicated in the etiology of a disappearing neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex that has been present in high incidence among three genetically distinct populations in the western Pacific. The neuropathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex includes features suggestive of brain maldevelopment, an experimentally proven property of cycasin attributable to the genotoxic action of its aglycone methylazoxymethanol (MAM). This property of MAM has been exploited by neurobiologists as a tool to study perturbations of brain development. Depending on the neurodevelopmental stage, MAM can induce features in laboratory animals that model certain characteristics of epilepsy, schizophrenia, or ataxia. Studies in DNA repair-deficient mice show that MAM perturbs brain development through a DNA damage-mediated mechanism. The brain DNA lesions produced by systemic MAM appear to modulate the expression of genes that regulate neurodevelopment and contribute to neurodegeneration. Epigenetic changes (histone lysine methylation) have also been detected in the underdeveloped brain after MAM administration. The DNA damage and epigenetic changes produced by MAM and, perhaps by chemically related substances (e.g., nitrosamines, nitrosoureas, hydrazines), might be an important mechanism by which early-life exposure to genotoxicants can induce long-term brain dysfunction. PMID:24339036

  1. A porcine model of haematogenous brain infectionwith staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg;

    2012-01-01

    A PORCINE MODEL OF HAEMATOGENOUS BRAIN INFECTION WITH STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS Astrup Lærke1, Agerholm Jørgen1, Nielsen Ole1, Jensen Henrik1, Leifsson Páll1, Iburg Tine2. 1: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark boye@life.ku.dk 2: National Veterinary Institute......, Uppsala, Sweden Introduction Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) is a common cause of sepsis and brain abscesses in man and a frequent cause of porcine pyaemia. Here we present a porcine model of haematogenous S. aureus-induced brain infection. Materials and Methods Four pigs had two intravenous catheters...... inserted surgically, one in a. carotis communis and one in v. jugularis externa. All pigs received 106 CFU/kg body weight S. aureus through the arterial catheter. Bacteria were either suspended in isotonic saline infused at constant flow for 60 minutes (two pigs) or given as a bolus injection of autologoue...

  2. Scaffold and stem cell based modeling of brain disease

    OpenAIRE

    Karpiak, Jerome V.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular models of brain disease involve genetic modulation, geometric patterning, neurophysiologic monitoring and analyses of both primary and immortalized cell lines. Additionally, recent neurological disease models often necessitate in vitro directed differentiation and maturation of human stem cell lines. To advance human stem cell based neural disease models within this evolving field, adaptive approaches of progressive complexity are essential. First, I invented an adaptable 3D laminar ...

  3. Animal models of focal brain ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sicard Kenneth M; Fisher Marc

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is a leading cause of disability and death in many countries. Understanding the pathophysiology of ischemic injury and developing therapies is an important endeavor that requires much additional research. Animal stroke models provide an important mechanism for these activities. A large number of stroke models have been developed and are currently used in laboratories around the world. These models are overviewed as are approaches for measuring infarct size and functional outcome.

  4. MR diffusion imaging of human intracranial tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Gideon, P; Wagn, P; Hansen, Ulla; Thomsen, C; Madsen, F

    1997-01-01

    We used MRI for in vivo measurement of brain water self-diffusion in patients with intracranial tumours. The study included 28 patients (12 with high-grade and 3 with low-grade gliomas, 7 with metastases, 5 with meningiomas and 1 with a cerebral abscess). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) wer...

  5. Research on Perfusion CT in Rabbit Brain Tumor Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the vascular characteristics of tumors and normal tissue using perfusion CT in the rabbit brain tumor model. The VX2 carcinoma concentration of 1 x 107 cells/ml(0.1 ml) was implanted in the brain of nine New Zealand white rabbits (weight: 2.4 kg-3.0 kg, mean: 2.6 kg). The perfusion CT was scanned when the tumors were grown up to 5 mm. The tumor volume and perfusion value were quantitatively analyzed by using commercial workstation (advantage windows workstation, AW, version 4.2, GE, USA). The mean volume of implanted tumors was 316±181 mm3, and the biggest and smallest volumes of tumor were 497 mm3 and 195 mm3, respectively. All the implanted tumors in rabbits are single-nodular tumors, and intracranial metastasis was not observed. In the perfusion CT, cerebral blood volume (CBV) were 74.40±9.63, 16.8±0.64, 15.24±3.23 ml/100g in the tumor core, ipsilateral normal brain, and contralateral normal brain, respectively (p≤0.05). In the cerebral blood flow (CBF), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p≤0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (962.91±75.96 vs. 357.82±12.82 vs. 323.19±83.24 ml/100g/min). In the mean transit time (MTT), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p≤0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (4.37±0.19 vs. 3.02±0.41 vs. 2.86±0.22 sec). In the permeability surface (PS), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (47.23±25.44 vs. 14.54±1.60 vs. 6.81±4.20 ml/100g/min)(p≤0.05). In the time to peak (TTP) were no significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains. In the positive enhancement integral (PEI), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral brains (61.56±16.07 vs. 12.58±2.61 vs. 8.26±5

  6. Research on Perfusion CT in Rabbit Brain Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Bon Chul; Kwak, Byung Kook; Jung, Ji Sung [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Chung Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan; Jung, Hong Ryang [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    We investigated the vascular characteristics of tumors and normal tissue using perfusion CT in the rabbit brain tumor model. The VX2 carcinoma concentration of 1 x 10{sup 7} cells/ml(0.1 ml) was implanted in the brain of nine New Zealand white rabbits (weight: 2.4 kg-3.0 kg, mean: 2.6 kg). The perfusion CT was scanned when the tumors were grown up to 5 mm. The tumor volume and perfusion value were quantitatively analyzed by using commercial workstation (advantage windows workstation, AW, version 4.2, GE, USA). The mean volume of implanted tumors was 316{+-}181 mm{sup 3}, and the biggest and smallest volumes of tumor were 497 mm{sup 3} and 195 mm{sup 3}, respectively. All the implanted tumors in rabbits are single-nodular tumors, and intracranial metastasis was not observed. In the perfusion CT, cerebral blood volume (CBV) were 74.40{+-}9.63, 16.8{+-}0.64, 15.24{+-}3.23 ml/100g in the tumor core, ipsilateral normal brain, and contralateral normal brain, respectively (p{<=}0.05). In the cerebral blood flow (CBF), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p{<=}0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (962.91{+-}75.96 vs. 357.82{+-}12.82 vs. 323.19{+-}83.24 ml/100g/min). In the mean transit time (MTT), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p{<=}0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (4.37{+-}0.19 vs. 3.02{+-}0.41 vs. 2.86{+-}0.22 sec). In the permeability surface (PS), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (47.23{+-}25.44 vs. 14.54{+-}1.60 vs. 6.81{+-}4.20 ml/100g/min)(p{<=}0.05). In the time to peak (TTP) were no significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains. In the positive enhancement integral (PEI), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and

  7. Nano-Modeling and Computation in Bio and Brain Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Di Sia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of brain dynamics currently utilizes the new features of nanobiotechnology and bioengineering. New geometric and analytical approaches appear very promising in all scientific areas, particularly in the study of brain processes. Efforts to engage in deep comprehension lead to a change in the inner brain parameters, in order to mimic the external transformation by the proper use of sensors and effectors. This paper highlights some crossing research areas of natural computing, nanotechnology, and brain modeling and considers two interesting theoretical approaches related to brain dynamics: (a the memory in neural network, not as a passive element for storing information, but integrated in the neural parameters as synaptic conductances; and (b a new transport model based on analytical expressions of the most important transport parameters, which works from sub-pico-level to macro-level, able both to understand existing data and to give new predictions. Complex biological systems are highly dependent on the context, which suggests a “more nature-oriented” computational philosophy.

  8. Edema-induced increase in tumour cell survival for 125I and 103Pd prostate permanent seed implants - a bio-mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edema caused by the surgical procedure of prostate seed implantation expands the source-to-point distances within the prostate and hence decreases the dose coverage. The decrease of dose coverage results in an increase in tumour cell survival. To investigate the effects of edema on tumour cell survival, a bio-mathematical model of edema and the corresponding cell killing by continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) was developed so that tumour cell surviving fractions can be estimated in an edematous prostate for both 125I and 103Pd seed implants. The dynamic nature of edema and its resolution were modelled with an exponential function V(T)=Vp (1+M exp(-0.693T/Te)) where Vp is the prostate volume before implantation, M is the edema magnitude and Te is edema half-life (EHL). The dose rate of a radioactive seed was calculated according to AAPM TG43, i.e. D radical SkΔg(r) φ-baran/r2, where r is the distance between a seed and a given point. The distance r is now a function of time because of edema. The g(r) was approximated as 1/r0.4 and 1/r0.8 for 125I and 103Pd, respectively. By expanding the mathematical expression of the resultant dose rate in a Taylor series of exponential functions of time, the dose rate was made equivalent to that produced from multiple fictitious radionuclides of different decay constants and strengths. The biologically effective dose (BED) for an edematous prostate implant was then calculated using a generalized Dale equation. The cell surviving fraction was computed as exp(-αBED), where α is the linear coefficient of the survival curve. The tumour cell survival was calculated for both 125I and 103Pd seed implants and for different tumour potential doubling time (TPDT) (from 5 days to 30 days) and for edemas of different magnitudes (from 0% to 95%) and edema half-lives (from 4 days to 30 days). Tumour cell survival increased with the increase of edema magnitude and EHL. For a typical edema of a half-life of 10 days and a magnitude of

  9. Edema-induced increase in tumour cell survival for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd prostate permanent seed implants - a bio-mathematical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue Ning; Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2002-04-01

    Edema caused by the surgical procedure of prostate seed implantation expands the source-to-point distances within the prostate and hence decreases the dose coverage. The decrease of dose coverage results in an increase in tumour cell survival. To investigate the effects of edema on tumour cell survival, a bio-mathematical model of edema and the corresponding cell killing by continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) was developed so that tumour cell surviving fractions can be estimated in an edematous prostate for both {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seed implants. The dynamic nature of edema and its resolution were modelled with an exponential function V(T)=V{sub p} (1+M exp(-0.693T/T{sub e})) where V{sub p} is the prostate volume before implantation, M is the edema magnitude and T{sub e} is edema half-life (EHL). The dose rate of a radioactive seed was calculated according to AAPM TG43, i.e. D radical S{sub k}{delta}g(r) {phi}-bar{sub an}/r{sup 2}, where r is the distance between a seed and a given point. The distance r is now a function of time because of edema. The g(r) was approximated as 1/r{sup 0.4} and 1/r{sup 0.8} for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, respectively. By expanding the mathematical expression of the resultant dose rate in a Taylor series of exponential functions of time, the dose rate was made equivalent to that produced from multiple fictitious radionuclides of different decay constants and strengths. The biologically effective dose (BED) for an edematous prostate implant was then calculated using a generalized Dale equation. The cell surviving fraction was computed as exp(-{alpha}BED), where {alpha} is the linear coefficient of the survival curve. The tumour cell survival was calculated for both {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seed implants and for different tumour potential doubling time (TPDT) (from 5 days to 30 days) and for edemas of different magnitudes (from 0% to 95%) and edema half-lives (from 4 days to 30 days). Tumour cell survival increased

  10. Preparation of 125IUdR and its evaluation in animal tumour model as a potential therapeutic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    5-Iodo-2'-deoxyuridine or iodoxyuridine (IUdR), an analogue of thymidine, is taken up by the proliferating cells during DNA synthesis. Radioiodinated IUdR is a potential therapeutic agent since radiohalogenated thymidine analogues are used for in-vivo tumour targeting and Auger electrons from radionuclides such as 123I and 125I are very effective in cell destruction when internalised. 125IUdR was prepared and studied for its suitability as an in-vivo tumour therapy agent. 125IUdR was prepared both by direct iodination of 2'-deoxyuridine and iododemercuration of 5-chloromercury-2'-deoxyuridine. Radioiodination yields were between 60-80% at pH 7. Iododemercuration was preferred since with direct iodination poor yields were observed when high specific activity product was desired and also the purification procedure was lengthier. The identity of 125IUdR was established by comparison of TLC and HPLC patterns with those of authentic IUdR. The purified 125IUdR had radiochemical purity >95% and was stable for 20 days at 4 deg. C and for a week at 23 deg. C and 37 deg. C. Bio-uptake of 125IUdR was studied by injecting the tracer in tumour bearing mice (Sarcoma S-180). The uptake in tumour cells was 4.28 +- 2.7% per gram at 3 h and 1.48 +- 0.19% at 24 h post injection. In-vivo deiodination of the product was observed as seen by the uptake of the activity in the thyroid. About 40% the activity from all other organs was excreted in 70 h. The optimum time for injection of the tracer for therapy was studied by observing the delay in tumour growth and survival rate in mice injected at 0,3,9 and 12 days after tumour induction. Injection of the tracer on the third day was found to be the most beneficial for retardation of tumour growth, while injection of the activity on the zeroth and ninth day had no effect. (author)

  11. Magnetic resonance-imaging of the effect of targeted antiangiogenic gene delivery in a melanoma tumour model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundt, Walter [Stanford School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Research Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Philipps University Marburg, Department of Radiology, Marburg (Germany); Steinbach, Silke [Philipps University Marburg, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Marburg (Germany); Mayer, Dirk; Guccione, Samira [Stanford School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Research Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Burbelko, Mykhaylo; Kiessling, Andreas; Figiel, Jens [Philipps University Marburg, Department of Radiology, Marburg (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the effect of targeted gene therapy to melanoma tumours (M21) by MR-imaging. M21 and M21-L tumours were grown to a size of 850 mm{sup 3}. M21 and M21-L tumours were intravenously treated with an αvβ3-integrin-ligand-coupled nanoparticle (RGDNP)/RAF(-) complex five times every 72 hours. MRI was performed at set time intervals 24h and 72h after the i.v. injection of the complex. The MRI protocol was T1-wt-SE±CM, T2-wt-FSE, DCE-MRI, Diffusion-wt-STEAM-sequence, T2-time obtained on a 1.5-T-GE-MRI device. The size of the treated M21 tumours kept nearly constant during the treatment phase (847.8±31.4 mm{sup 3} versus 904.8±44.4 mm{sup 3}). The SNR value (T2-weighted images) of the tumours was 36.7±0.6 and dropped down to 30.6±1.9 (p=0.004). At the beginning the SNR value (T1-weighted images) of the tumours after contrast medium application was 42.3±1.9 and dropped down to 28.5±3.0 (p<0.001). In the treatment group the diffusion coefficient increased significantly under therapy (0.54±0.01x10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s versus 0.67±0.04x10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). The DCE-MRI showed a reduction of the slope and of the Akep of 67.8±4.3 % respectively 64.8±3.3 % compared to baseline. Targeted gene delivery therapy induces significant changes in MR-imaging. MRI showed a significant reduction of contrast medium uptake parameters and increase of the diffusion coefficient of the tumours. (orig.)

  12. Tumours and tumour mimics in the olecranon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesions in the olecranon are rare and may be identified during the investigation of a clinically suspected abnormality or as an incidental finding. This review describes the spectrum of tumours and tumour-like lesions that can involve the olecranon and illustrates the radiographic, CT, and MRI appearances that may facilitate diagnosis. A variety of pathological processes affecting the olecranon are presented and discussed including the epidemiology and imaging features

  13. Efficient multilevel brain tumor segmentation with integrated bayesian model classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, J J; Sharon, E; Dube, S; El-Saden, S; Sinha, U; Yuille, A

    2008-05-01

    We present a new method for automatic segmentation of heterogeneous image data that takes a step toward bridging the gap between bottom-up affinity-based segmentation methods and top-down generative model based approaches. The main contribution of the paper is a Bayesian formulation for incorporating soft model assignments into the calculation of affinities, which are conventionally model free. We integrate the resulting model-aware affinities into the multilevel segmentation by weighted aggregation algorithm, and apply the technique to the task of detecting and segmenting brain tumor and edema in multichannel magnetic resonance (MR) volumes. The computationally efficient method runs orders of magnitude faster than current state-of-the-art techniques giving comparable or improved results. Our quantitative results indicate the benefit of incorporating model-aware affinities into the segmentation process for the difficult case of glioblastoma multiforme brain tumor. PMID:18450536

  14. Why are epididymal tumours so rare?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Hei Yeung; Kai Wang; Trevor G Cooper

    2012-01-01

    Epididymal tumour incidence is at most 0.03% of all male cancers.It is an enigma why the human epididymis does not often succumb to cancer,when it expresses markers of stem and cancer cells,and constitutively expresses oncogenes,pro-proliferative and pro-angiogenic factors that allow tumour cells to escape immunosurveillance in cancer-prone tissues.The privileged position of the human epididymis in evading tumourigenicity is reflected in transgenic mouse models in which induction of tumours in other organs is not accompanied by epididymal neoplasia.The epididymis appears to:(i) prevent tumour initiation (it probably lacks stem cells and has strong anti-oxidative mechanisms,active tumour suppressors and inactive oncogene products); (ii) foster tumour monitoring and destruction (by strong immuno-surveillance and -eradication,and cellular senescence); (iii) avert proliferation and angiogenesis (with persistent tight junctions,the presence of anti-angiogenic factors and misplaced pro-angiogenic factors),which together (iv) promote dormancy and restrict dividing cells to hyperplasia.Epididymal cells may be rendered non-responsive to oncogenic stimuli by the constitutive expression of factors generally inducible in tumours,and resistant to the normal epididymal environment,which mimics that of a tumour niche promoting tumour growth.The threshold for tumour initiation may thus be higher in the epididymis than in other organs.Several anti-tumour mechanisms are those that maintain spermatozoa quiescent and immunologically silent,so the low incidence of cancer in the epididymis may be a consequence of its role in sperm maturation and storage.Understanding these mechanisms may throw light on cancer prevention and therapy in general.

  15. Modeling altered functional connectivity in brain disease states

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlinka, Jaroslav

    Lorentz Center, 2011. [Computational Neuroscience and the Dynamics of Disease States. 08.08.2012-12.08.2012, Leiden] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : synchronization * brain disease * computational modelling * functional connectivity * graph theory * structural connectivity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology http://www.lorentzcenter.nl/lc/web/2011/457/abstracts.php3?wsid=457&type=presentations

  16. Virtual model of the human brain for neurosurgical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paolis, Lucio T; De Mauro, Alessandro; Raczkowsky, Joerg; Aloisio, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a realistic virtual model of the human brain that could be used in a neurosurgical simulation for both educational and preoperative planning purposes. The goal of such a system would be to enhance the practice of surgery students, avoiding the use of animals, cadavers and plastic phantoms. A surgeon, before carrying out the real procedure, will, with this system, be able to rehearse by using a surgical simulator based on detailed virtual reality models of the human brain, reconstructed with real patient's medical images. In order to obtain a realistic and useful simulation we focused our research on the physical modelling of the brain as a deformable body and on the interactions with surgical instruments. The developed prototype is based on the mass-spring-damper model and, in order to obtain deformations similar to the real ones, a three tiered structure has been built. In this way, we have obtained local and realistic deformations using an ad-hoc point distribution in the volume where the contact between the brain surface and a surgical instrument takes place. PMID:19745425

  17. Stochastic model of Tsc1 lesions in mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Prabhakar

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant disorder due to mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 that affects many organs with hamartomas and tumors. TSC-associated brain lesions include subependymal nodules, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and tubers. Neurologic manifestations in TSC comprise a high frequency of mental retardation and developmental disorders including autism, as well as epilepsy. Here, we describe a new mouse model of TSC brain lesions in which complete loss of Tsc1 is achieved in multiple brain cell types in a stochastic pattern. Injection of an adeno-associated virus vector encoding Cre recombinase into the cerebral ventricles of mice homozygous for a Tsc1 conditional allele on the day of birth led to reduced survival, and pathologic findings of enlarged neurons, cortical heterotopias, subependymal nodules, and hydrocephalus. The severity of clinical and pathologic findings as well as survival was shown to be dependent upon the dose and serotype of Cre virus injected. Although several other models of TSC brain disease exist, this model is unique in that the pathology reflects a variety of TSC-associated lesions involving different numbers and types of cells. This model provides a valuable and unique addition for therapeutic assessment.

  18. Directions for Mind, Brain, and Education: Methods, Models, and Morality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Zachary; Fischer, Kurt W.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we frame a set of important issues in the emerging field of Mind, Brain, and Education in terms of three broad headings: methods, models, and morality. Under the heading of methods we suggest that the need for synthesis across scientific and practical disciplines entails the pursuit of usable knowledge via a catalytic symbiosis…

  19. Lateral (Parasagittal) Fluid Percussion Model of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Ken C; Lyeth, Bruce G

    2016-01-01

    Fluid percussion was first conceptualized in the 1940s and has evolved into one of the leading laboratory methods for studying experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). Over the decades, fluid percussion has been used in numerous species and today is predominantly applied to the rat. The fluid percussion technique rapidly injects a small volume of fluid, such as isotonic saline, through a circular craniotomy onto the intact dura overlying the brain cortex. In brief, the methods involve surgical production of a circular craniotomy, attachment of a fluid-filled conduit between the dura overlying the cortex and the outlet port of the fluid percussion device. A fluid pulse is then generated by the free-fall of a pendulum striking a piston on the fluid-filled cylinder of the device. The fluid enters the cranium, producing a compression and displacement of the brain parenchyma resulting in a sharp, high magnitude elevation of intracranial pressure that is propagated diffusely through the brain. This results in an immediate and transient period of traumatic unconsciousness as well as a combination of focal and diffuse damage to the brain, which is evident upon histological and behavioral analysis. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the rat fluid percussion model reproduces a wide range of pathological features associated with human TBI. PMID:27604722

  20. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  1. Self-Organized Criticality model for Brain Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    De Arcangelis, Lucilla; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2006-01-01

    Networks of living neurons exhibit an avalanche mode of activity, experimentally found in organotypic cultures. Here we present a model based on self-organized criticality and taking into account brain plasticity, which is able to reproduce the spectrum of electroencephalograms (EEG). The model consists in an electrical network with threshold firing and activity-dependent synapse strenghts. The system exhibits an avalanche activity power law distributed. The analysis of the power spectra of t...

  2. Dosha brain-types: A neural model of individual differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick T Travis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores brain patterns associated with the three categories of regulatory principles of the body, mind, and behavior in Ayurveda, called Vata, Pitta, and Kapha dosha. A growing body of research has reported patterns of blood chemistry, genetic expression, physiological states, and chronic diseases associated with each dosha type. Since metabolic and growth factors are controlled by the nervous system, each dosha type should be associated with patterns of functioning of six major areas of the nervous system: The prefrontal cortex, the reticular activating system, the autonomic nervous system, the enteric nervous system, the limbic system, and the hypothalamus. For instance, the prefrontal cortex, which includes the anterior cingulate, ventral medial, and the dorsal lateral cortices, would exhibit a high range of functioning in the Vata brain-type leading to the possibility of being easily overstimulated. The Vata brain-type performs activity quickly. Learns quickly and forgets quickly. Their fast mind gives them an edge in creative problem solving. The Pitta brain-type reacts strongly to all challenges leading to purposeful and resolute actions. They never give up and are very dynamic and goal oriented. The Kapha brain-type is slow and steady leading to methodical thinking and action. They prefer routine and needs stimulation to get going. A model of dosha brain-types could provide a physiological foundation to understand individual differences. This model could help individualize treatment modalities to address different mental and physical dysfunctions. It also could explain differences in behavior seen in clinical as well as in normal populations.

  3. General solutions to poroviscoelastic model of hydrocephalic human brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Amin; Abousleiman, Younane

    2011-12-21

    Hydrocephalus is a well-known disorder of brain fluidic system. It is commonly associated with complexities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation in brain. In this paper, hydrocephalus and shunting surgery which is used in its treatment are modeled. Brain tissues are considered to follow a poroviscoelastic constitutive model in order to address the effects of time dependence of mechanical properties of soft tissues and fluid flow hydraulics. Our solution draws from Biot's theory of poroelasticity, generalized to account for viscoelastic effects through the correspondence principle. Geometrically, the brain is conceived to be spherically symmetric, where the ventricles are assumed to be a hollow concentric space filled with cerebrospinal fluid. A generalized Kelvin model is considered for the rheological properties of brain tissues. The solution presented is useful in the analysis of the disorder of hydrocephalus as well as the treatment associated with it, namely, ventriclostomy surgery. The sensitivity of the solution to various factors such as aqueduct blockage level and trabeculae stiffness is thoroughly analyzed using numerical examples. Results indicate that partial aqueduct stenosis may be a cause of hydrocephalus. However, only severe occlusion of the aqueduct can cause a significant increase in the ventricle and brain's extracellular fluid pressure. Ventriculostomy shunts are commonly used as a remedy to hydrocephalus. They serve to reduce the ventricular pressure to the normal level. However, sensitivity analysis on the shunt's fluid deliverability parameter has shown that inappropriate design or selection of design shunt may cause under-drainage or over-drainage of the ventricles. Excessive drainage of CSF may increase the normal tensile stress on trabeculae. It can cause rupture of superior cerebral veins or damage to trabeculae or even brain tissues which in turn may lead to subdural hematoma, a common side-effect of the surgery. These Post

  4. Corticonic models of brain mechanisms underlying cognition and intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Nabil H.

    The concern of this review is brain theory or more specifically, in its first part, a model of the cerebral cortex and the way it: (a) interacts with subcortical regions like the thalamus and the hippocampus to provide higher-level-brain functions that underlie cognition and intelligence, (b) handles and represents dynamical sensory patterns imposed by a constantly changing environment, (c) copes with the enormous number of such patterns encountered in a lifetime by means of dynamic memory that offers an immense number of stimulus-specific attractors for input patterns (stimuli) to select from, (d) selects an attractor through a process of “conjugation” of the input pattern with the dynamics of the thalamo-cortical loop, (e) distinguishes between redundant (structured) and non-redundant (random) inputs that are void of information, (f) can do categorical perception when there is access to vast associative memory laid out in the association cortex with the help of the hippocampus, and (g) makes use of “computation” at the edge of chaos and information driven annealing to achieve all this. Other features and implications of the concepts presented for the design of computational algorithms and machines with brain-like intelligence are also discussed. The material and results presented suggest, that a Parametrically Coupled Logistic Map network (PCLMN) is a minimal model of the thalamo-cortical complex and that marrying such a network to a suitable associative memory with re-entry or feedback forms a useful, albeit, abstract model of a cortical module of the brain that could facilitate building a simple artificial brain. In the second part of the review, the results of numerical simulations and drawn conclusions in the first part are linked to the most directly relevant works and views of other workers. What emerges is a picture of brain dynamics on the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales that gives a glimpse of the nature of the long sought after brain code

  5. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of metastatic abdominal and pelvic tumours is sensitive to early changes induced by a VEGF inhibitor using alternative diffusion attenuation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, Matthew R. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Messiou, Christina; DeSouza, Nandita [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Collins, David; Leach, Martin O. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, Veronica A. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Tessier, Jean; Young, Helen [Early Clinical Development, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    To assess the utility of diffusion weighted imaging for monitoring early treatment effects associated with a VEGF inhibitor. Twenty-nine patients with metastatic abdominal and pelvic tumours were recruited and imaged with DW-MRI: twice at baseline, and after 7 and 28 days of treatment with cediranib. Tumour measures were derived using mono-exponential, bi-exponential and stretched-exponential models, and parameter repeatability and treatment effects seen after 7 and 28 days were assessed. Correlations with volume changes and DCE-MRI metrics were also assessed. Diffusion coefficient repeatabilities from all models were < 6 %; f and D* (bi-exponential) were 22 % and 44 %; α (stretched-exponential) was 4.2 %. Significant increases in the diffusion coefficients from all models were observed at day 28 but not day 7. Significant decreases in D* and f.D* were observed at day 7 and in f at day 28; significant increases in α were observed at both time-points. Weak correlations between DW-MRI changes and volume changes and DCE-MRI changes were observed. DW-MRI is sensitive to early and late treatment changes caused by a VEGF inhibitor using non-mono-exponential models. Evidence of over-fitting using the bi-exponential model suggests that the stretched-exponential model is best suited to monitor such changes. (orig.)

  6. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of metastatic abdominal and pelvic tumours is sensitive to early changes induced by a VEGF inhibitor using alternative diffusion attenuation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the utility of diffusion weighted imaging for monitoring early treatment effects associated with a VEGF inhibitor. Twenty-nine patients with metastatic abdominal and pelvic tumours were recruited and imaged with DW-MRI: twice at baseline, and after 7 and 28 days of treatment with cediranib. Tumour measures were derived using mono-exponential, bi-exponential and stretched-exponential models, and parameter repeatability and treatment effects seen after 7 and 28 days were assessed. Correlations with volume changes and DCE-MRI metrics were also assessed. Diffusion coefficient repeatabilities from all models were < 6 %; f and D* (bi-exponential) were 22 % and 44 %; α (stretched-exponential) was 4.2 %. Significant increases in the diffusion coefficients from all models were observed at day 28 but not day 7. Significant decreases in D* and f.D* were observed at day 7 and in f at day 28; significant increases in α were observed at both time-points. Weak correlations between DW-MRI changes and volume changes and DCE-MRI changes were observed. DW-MRI is sensitive to early and late treatment changes caused by a VEGF inhibitor using non-mono-exponential models. Evidence of over-fitting using the bi-exponential model suggests that the stretched-exponential model is best suited to monitor such changes. (orig.)

  7. A Mixed Approach for Modeling Blood Flow in Brain Microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Davit, Yohan; Quintard, Michel; Groupe d'Etude sur les Milieux Poreux Team

    2015-11-01

    Consistent with its distribution and exchange functions, the vascular system of the human brain cortex is a superposition of two components. At small-scale, a homogeneous and space-filling mesh-like capillary network. At large scale, quasi-fractal branched veins and arteries. From a modeling perspective, this is the superposition of: (a) a continuum model resulting from the homogenization of slow transport in the small-scale capillary network; and (b) a discrete network approach describing fast transport in the arteries and veins, which cannot be homogenized because of their fractal nature. This problematic is analogous to fast conducting wells embedded in a reservoir rock in petroleum engineering. An efficient method to reduce the computational cost is to use relatively large grid blocks for the continuum model. This makes it difficult to accurately couple both components. We solve this issue by adapting the ``well model'' concept used in petroleum engineering to brain specific 3D situations. We obtain a unique linear system describing the discrete network, the continuum and the well model. Results are presented for realistic arterial and venous geometries. The mixed approach is compared with full network models including various idealized capillary networks of known permeability. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102.

  8. Neuroteratology and Animal Modeling of Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Trevor; Kostrzewa, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a large number of selective neurotoxins were discovered and developed, making it possible to animal-model a broad range of human neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. In this paper, we highlight those neurotoxins that are most commonly used as neuroteratologic agents, to either produce lifelong destruction of neurons of a particular phenotype, or a group of neurons linked by a specific class of transporter proteins (i.e., dopamine transporter) or body of receptors for a specific neurotransmitter (i.e., NMDA class of glutamate receptors). Actions of a range of neurotoxins are described: 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), 6-hydroxydopa, DSP-4, MPTP, methamphetamine, IgG-saporin, domoate, NMDA receptor antagonists, and valproate. Their neuroteratologic features are outlined, as well as those of nerve growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and that of stress. The value of each of these neurotoxins in animal modeling of human neurologic, neurodegenerative, and neuropsychiatric disorders is discussed in terms of the respective value as well as limitations of the derived animal model. Neuroteratologic agents have proven to be of immense importance for understanding how associated neural systems in human neural disorders may be better targeted by new therapeutic agents. PMID:26857462

  9. Monitoring the Growth of an Orthotopic Tumour Xenograft Model: Multi-Modal Imaging Assessment with Benchtop MRI (1T), High-Field MRI (9.4T), Ultrasound and Bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Daniel J.; David, Anna L.; Pedley, R. Barbara; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Siow, Bernard; Walker-Samuel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background Research using orthotopic and transgenic models of cancer requires imaging methods to non-invasively quantify tumour burden. As the choice of appropriate imaging modality is wide-ranging, this study aimed to compare low-field (1T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a novel and relatively low-cost system, against established preclinical techniques: bioluminescence imaging (BLI), ultrasound imaging (US), and high-field (9.4T) MRI. Methods A model of colorectal metastasis to the liver was established in eight mice, which were imaged with each modality over four weeks post-implantation. Tumour burden was assessed from manually segmented regions. Results All four imaging systems provided sufficient contrast to detect tumours in all of the mice after two weeks. No significant difference was detected between tumour doubling times estimated by low-field MRI, ultrasound imaging or high-field MRI. A strong correlation was measured between high-field MRI estimates of tumour burden and all the other modalities (p < 0.001, Pearson). Conclusion These results suggest that both low-field MRI and ultrasound imaging are accurate modalities for characterising the growth of preclinical tumour models. PMID:27223614

  10. Self-Organized Criticality Model for Brain Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2006-01-01

    Networks of living neurons exhibit an avalanche mode of activity, experimentally found in organotypic cultures. Here we present a model that is based on self-organized criticality and takes into account brain plasticity, which is able to reproduce the spectrum of electroencephalograms (EEG). The model consists of an electrical network with threshold firing and activity-dependent synapse strengths. The system exhibits an avalanche activity in a power-law distribution. The analysis of the power spectra of the electrical signal reproduces very robustly the power-law behavior with the exponent 0.8, experimentally measured in EEG spectra. The same value of the exponent is found on small-world lattices and for leaky neurons, indicating that universality holds for a wide class of brain models.

  11. Sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes significantly enhance the pharmacokinetic and therapeutic properties of vincristine in murine and human tumour models.

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, M S; Harasym, T. O.; Masin, D.; Bally, M. B.; Mayer, L. D.

    1995-01-01

    This study reports on the development of a liposomal formulation of vincristine with significantly enhanced stability and biological properties. The in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic, tumour delivery and efficacy properties of liposomal vincristine formulations based on sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol were compared with liposomes composed of distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) and cholesterol. SM/cholesterol liposomes had significantly greater in vitro stability than did similar DSPC/c...

  12. The histogenesis of giant cell tumour of bone: a model of interaction between neoplastic cells and osteoclasts

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, M H; ROBBINS, P; Xu, J.; Huang, Liping; Wood, D. J.; Papadimitriou, J M

    2001-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of bone (GCT) is a benign primary neoplasm of a bone characterised by distinctive clinical, radiological and pathological features. Females are slightly more often affected than males, and the majority of patients present between the ages of 20 and 50. GCT is locally aggressive and produces expansive and lytic lesions, most commonly in the epiphyses of long tubular bones. Histologically, it is composed of oval and spindle mononuclear cells, un...

  13. Mouse Model of Devil Facial Tumour Disease Establishes That an Effective Immune Response Can be Generated Against the Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pinfold, Terry L.; Brown, Gabriella K.; Bettiol, Silvana S.; Woods, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    The largest carnivorous marsupial in Australia, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is facing extinction in the wild due to a transmissible cancer known as Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). DFTD is a clonal cell line transmitted from host to host with 100% mortality and no known immunity. While it was first considered that low genetic diversity of the population of devils enabled the allograft transmission of DFTD recent evidence reveals that genetically diverse animals succumb to th...

  14. Brain metastases of solid tumour. Treatment distribution and analysis of survival in the period 1/01/2004 to 31/12/2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the characteristics, treatments and survival analysis in patients with solid tumors with brain metastases (E IV) assisted in Unit Neuro-Oncology over a period of five years. Patients and methods: The records of patients (pts) with diagnosis of brain metastases from solid tumors assisted in Neuro-Oncology Unit, from 1/01/2004 and 31/12/2008. Results: 51 new patients carriers of brain metastases were treated with solid tumors. The median age at diagnosis was 57 years, ranging from 30 to 75. They corresponded to the male 37 and female 14 ratio 2.5 / 1. The majority was presented as metastases 31/51. The location was in the supratentorial region in 27 cases, posterior fossa in 11 and 13 were supra and infratentorial. In only 5 patients cranial MRI was performed in only one case and it changed the therapeutical strategy. In 35 patients he corresponded to the lung primary tumor (CBP), following cancer renal (5/51). Within the CBP, the most common histologic subtypes were to large cells and adenocarcinomas, 11 and 10, respectively. In 32 patients were not found dissemination elsewhere. Surgery + RT was performed in 30 cases, in 11 exclusive RT, exclusive surgery in 4 and 3 patients symptomatic treatment. In 39 cases did not Systemic treatment diagnosis. When a progression was only diagnosed It could make systemic treatment 5 pts. The median survival was 15.4 weeks (1-301 weeks). Conclusions: Lung cancer is the most common source of metastases brain, with a poor survival. The results of other characteristics patients, systemic treatments performed and survival according to the treatments performed will be presented during the congresss

  15. Longitudinal MRI contrast enhanced monitoring of early tumour development with manganese chloride (MnCl2) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) in a CT1258 based in vivo model of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell lines represent a key tool in cancer research allowing the generation of neoplasias which resemble initial tumours in in-vivo animal models. The characterisation of early tumour development is of major interest in order to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based in-vivo characterisation allows visualisation and characterisation of tumour development in early stages prior to manual palpation. Contrast agents for MRI such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) and manganese chloride (MnCl2) represent powerful tools for the in-vivo characterisation of early stage tumours. In this experimental study, we labelled prostate cancer cells with MnCl2 or SPIOs in vitro and used 1 T MRI for tracing labelled cells in-vitro and 7 T MRI for tracking in an in-vivo animal model. Labelling of prostate cancer cells CT1258 was established in-vitro with MnCl2 and SPIOs. In-vitro detection of labelled cells in an agar phantom was carried out through 1 T MRI while in-vivo detection was performed using 7 T MRI after subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of labelled cells into NOD-Scid mice (n = 20). The animals were scanned in regular intervals until euthanization. The respective tumour volumes were analysed and corresponding tumour masses were subjected to histologic examination. MnCl2in-vitro labelling resulted in no significant metabolic effects on proliferation and cell vitality. In-vitro detection-limit accounted 105 cells for MnCl2 as well as for SPIOs labelling. In-vivo 7 T MRI scans allowed detection of 103 and 104 cells. In-vivo MnCl2 labelled cells were detectable from days 4–16 while SPIO labelling allowed detection until 4 days after s.c. injection. MnCl2 labelled cells were highly tumourigenic in NOD-Scid mice and the tumour volume development was characterised in a time dependent manner. The amount of injected cells correlated with tumour size development and disease progression. Histological analysis of the induced

  16. Lateral fluid percussion: model of traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, Janet; Fujioka, Wendy; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Crockett, David P; Thakker-Varia, Smita

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) research has attained renewed momentum due to the increasing awareness of head injuries, which result in morbidity and mortality. Based on the nature of primary injury following TBI, complex and heterogeneous secondary consequences result, which are followed by regenerative processes (1,2). Primary injury can be induced by a direct contusion to the brain from skull fracture or from shearing and stretching of tissue causing displacement of brain due to movement (3,4). The resulting hematomas and lacerations cause a vascular response (3,5), and the morphological and functional damage of the white matter leads to diffuse axonal injury (6-8). Additional secondary changes commonly seen in the brain are edema and increased intracranial pressure (9). Following TBI there are microscopic alterations in biochemical and physiological pathways involving the release of excitotoxic neurotransmitters, immune mediators and oxygen radicals (10-12), which ultimately result in long-term neurological disabilities (13,14). Thus choosing appropriate animal models of TBI that present similar cellular and molecular events in human and rodent TBI is critical for studying the mechanisms underlying injury and repair. Various experimental models of TBI have been developed to reproduce aspects of TBI observed in humans, among them three specific models are widely adapted for rodents: fluid percussion, cortical impact and weight drop/impact acceleration (1). The fluid percussion device produces an injury through a craniectomy by applying a brief fluid pressure pulse on to the intact dura. The pulse is created by a pendulum striking the piston of a reservoir of fluid. The percussion produces brief displacement and deformation of neural tissue (1,15). Conversely, cortical impact injury delivers mechanical energy to the intact dura via a rigid impactor under pneumatic pressure (16,17). The weight drop/impact model is characterized by the fall of a rod with a specific

  17. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-02-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination.

  18. Modeling the impact of COPD on the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Borson

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Soo Borson1, James Scanlan1, Seth Friedman2, Elizabeth Zuhr1, Julie Fields3, Elizabeth Aylward1,2, Rodney Mahurin2, Todd Richards2, Yoshimi Anzai2, Michi Yukawa4, Shingshing Yeh51Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Radiology Department, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; 3Department of Psychology (Neuropsychology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Texas, USA; 4Department of Medicine (Geriatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 5Department of Medicine (Geriatrics, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Northport, New York, USAAbstract: Previous studies have shown that COPD adversely affects distant organs and body systems, including the brain. This pilot study aims to model the relationships between respiratory insufficiency and domains related to brain function, including low mood, subtly impaired cognition, systemic inflammation, and brain structural and neurochemical abnormalities. Nine healthy controls were compared with 18 age- and education-matched medically stable COPD patients, half of whom were oxygen-dependent. Measures included depression, anxiety, cognition, health status, spirometry, oximetry at rest and during 6-minute walk, and resting plasma cytokines and soluble receptors, brain MRI, and MR spectroscopy in regions relevant to mood and cognition. ANOVA was used to compare controls with patients and with COPD subgroups (oxygen users [n = 9] and nonusers [n = 9], and only variables showing group differences at p ≤ 0.05 were included in multiple regressions controlling for age, gender, and education to develop the final model. Controls and COPD patients differed significantly in global cognition and memory, mood, and soluble TNFR1 levels but not brain structural or neurochemical measures. Multiple regressions identified pathways linking disease severity with impaired performance on sensitive cognitive processing measures, mediated

  19. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Horvat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB. It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a dimensionless model parameter c, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural c=1 line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the latter case, the bound on c is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on c obtained from various observational tests.

  20. Neuronal regeneration in a zebrafish model of adult brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihito Kishimoto

    2012-03-01

    Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult mammalian forebrain are a potential source of neurons for neural tissue repair after brain insults such as ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI. Recent studies show that neurogenesis in the ventricular zone (VZ of the adult zebrafish telencephalon has features in common with neurogenesis in the adult mammalian SVZ. Here, we established a zebrafish model to study injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult brain. We show that the adult zebrafish brain possesses a remarkable capacity for neuronal regeneration. Telencephalon injury prompted the proliferation of neuronal precursor cells (NPCs in the VZ of the injured hemisphere, compared with in the contralateral hemisphere. The distribution of NPCs, viewed by BrdU labeling and ngn1-promoter-driven GFP, suggested that they migrated laterally and reached the injury site via the subpallium and pallium. The number of NPCs reaching the injury site significantly decreased when the fish were treated with an inhibitor of γ-secretase, a component of the Notch signaling pathway, suggesting that injury-induced neurogenesis mechanisms are at least partly conserved between fish and mammals. The injury-induced NPCs differentiated into mature neurons in the regions surrounding the injury site within a week after the injury. Most of these cells expressed T-box brain protein (Tbr1, suggesting they had adopted the normal neuronal fate in this region. These results suggest that the telencephalic VZ contributes to neural tissue recovery following telencephalic injury in the adult zebrafish, and that the adult zebrafish is a useful model for regenerative medicine.

  1. Neurocomputational models of the remote effects of focal brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggia, James A

    2004-11-01

    Sudden localized brain damage, such as occurs in stroke, produces neurological deficits directly attributable to the damaged site. In addition, other clinical deficits occur due to secondary "remote" effects that functionally impair the remaining intact brain regions (e.g., due to their sudden disconnection from the damaged area), a phenomenon known as diaschisis. The underlying mechanisms of these remote effects, particularly those involving interactions between the left and right cerebral hemispheres, have proven somewhat difficult to understand in the context of current theories of hemispheric specialization. This article describes some recent neurocomputational models done in the author's research group that try to explain diaschisis qualitatively. These studies show that both specialization and diaschisis can be accounted for with a single model of hemispheric interactions. Further, the results suggest that left-right subcortical influences may be much more important in influencing hemispheric specialization than is generally recognized. PMID:15564108

  2. Self-organization in a simple brain model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stassinopoulos, D.; Bak, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Alstroem, P. [Niels Bohr Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Physics

    1994-03-10

    Simulations on a simple model of the brain are presented. The model consists of a set of randomly connected neurons. Inputs and outputs are also connected randomly to a subset of neurons. For each input there is a set of output neurons which must fire in order to achieve success. A signal giving information as to whether or not the action was successful is fed back to the brain from the environment. The connections between firing neurons are strengthened or weakened according to whether or not the action was successful. The system learns, through a self-organization process, to react intelligently to input signals, i.e. it learns to quickly select the correct output for each input. If part of the network is damaged, the system relearns the correct response after a training period.

  3. Developing better and more valid animal models of brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2015-01-01

    Valid sensitive animal models are crucial for understanding the pathobiology of complex human disorders, such as anxiety, autism, depression and schizophrenia, which all have the 'spectrum' nature. Discussing new important strategic directions of research in this field, here we focus i) on cross-species validation of animal models, ii) ensuring their population (external) validity, and iii) the need to target the interplay between multiple disordered domains. We note that optimal animal models of brain disorders should target evolutionary conserved 'core' traits/domains and specifically mimic the clinically relevant inter-relationships between these domains. PMID:24384129

  4. Joint Modelling of Structural and Functional Brain Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten;

    -parametric Bayesian network model which allows for joint modelling and integration of multiple networks. We demonstrate the model’s ability to detect vertices that share structure across networks jointly in functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion MRI (dMRI) data. Using two fMRI and dMRI scans per subject, we establish...... significant structures that are consistently shared across subjects and data splits. This provides an unsupervised approach for modeling of structure-function relations in the brain and provides a general framework for multimodal integration....

  5. Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Modeling, Pathogenesis and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wanqiu; Choi, Eun-Jung; McDougall, Cameron M.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients harboring brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) are at life-threatening risk of rupture and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The pathogenesis of bAVM has not been completely understood. Current treatment options are invasive and ≈ 20% of patients are not offered interventional therapy because of excessive treatment risk. There are no specific medical therapies to treat bAVMs. The lack of validated animal models has been an obstacle for testing hypotheses of bAVM pathogenesis and test...

  6. Globalization and Migration: A “Unified Brain Drain” Model

    OpenAIRE

    Elise S. Brezis; Soueri, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Globalization has led to a vast flow of migration of workers but also of students. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the migration of individuals encompassing decisions already at the level of education. We develop a unified brain drain model that incorporates the decisions of an individual vis - à - vis both education and migration. In the empirical part, this paper addresses international flows of migration within the EU and presents strong evidence of concentration of students in cou...

  7. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    CERN Document Server

    Horvat, R

    2015-01-01

    In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter) regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB). It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a parameter $c$, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural $c = 1$ line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the later case, the bound on $c$ is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on $c$ obtained from various observational tests.

  8. Predictive models for pressure-driven fluid infusions into brain parenchyma

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavan, Raghu; Brady, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Direct infusions into brain parenchyma of biological therapeutics for serious brain diseases have been, and are being, considered. However, individual brains, as well as distinct cytoarchitectural regions within brains, vary in their response to fluid flow and pressure. Further, the tissue responds dynamically to these stimuli, requiring a nonlinear treatment of equations that would describe fluid flow and drug transport in brain. We here report in detail on an individual–specific model and a...

  9. A Delphi Study on Brain-based Instructional Model in Science

    OpenAIRE

    Duangkamon Charnsirirattana; Prasart Nuangchalerm

    2010-01-01

    Development of science instructional model for brain-based learning by using knowledge of the brain to be the tool designed of learning process is now interesting. This study aimed to develop science instructional model for brain-based learning. Delphi method was employed with 18 panel members. The findings can be showed that science instructional model for brain-based learning consisted of five steps of learning organization (PRADA- Preparation, Relaxation, Action, Discussion, and Applicatio...

  10. Statistical shape model-based segmentation of brain MRI images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Jonathan; Ruan, Su; Constans, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    We propose a segmentation method that automatically delineates structures contours from 3D brain MRI images using a statistical shape model. We automatically build this 3D Point Distribution Model (PDM) in applying a Minimum Description Length (MDL) annotation to a training set of shapes, obtained by registration of a 3D anatomical atlas over a set of patients brain MRIs. Delineation of any structure from a new MRI image is first initialized by such registration. Then, delineation is achieved in iterating two consecutive steps until the 3D contour reaches idempotence. The first step consists in applying an intensity model to the latest shape position so as to formulate a closer guess: our model requires far less priors than standard model in aiming at direct interpretation rather than compliance to learned contexts. The second step consists in enforcing shape constraints onto previous guess so as to remove all bias induced by artifacts or low contrast on current MRI. For this, we infer the closest shape instance from the PDM shape space using a new estimation method which accuracy is significantly improved by a huge increase in the model resolution and by a depth-search in the parameter space. The delineation results we obtained are very encouraging and show the interest of the proposed framework. PMID:18003193

  11. Neonatal exposure to estradiol-17β modulates tumour necrosis factor alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in brain and also in ovaries of adult female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridharan, Radhika Nagamangalam; Krishnagiri, Harshini; Govindaraj, Vijayakumar; Sarangi, SitiKantha; Rao, Addicam Jagannadha

    2016-02-01

    The sexually dimorphic organization in perinatal rat brain is influenced by steroid hormones. Exposure to high levels of estrogen or endocrine-disrupting compounds during perinatal period may perturb this process, resulting in compromised reproductive physiology and behavior as observed in adult In our recent observation neonatal exposure of the female rats to estradiol-17β resulted in down-regulation of TNF-α, up-regulation of COX-2 and increase in SDN-POA size in pre-optic area in the adulthood. It is known that the control of reproductive performance in female involves a complex interplay of the hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary. The present study was undertaken to understand the possible molecular mechanism involved in changes observed in the ovarian morphology and expression of selected genes in the ovary. Administration of estradiol-17β (100 μg) on day 2 and 3 after birth revealed up-regulation of ER-α, ER-β, COX-2 and down-regulation of TNF-α expression. Also the decrease in the ovarian weight, altered ovarian morphology and changes in the 2D protein profiles were also seen. This is apparently the first report documenting that neonatal estradiol exposure modulates TNF-α and COX-2 expression in the ovary as seen during adult stage. Our results permit us to suggest that cues originating from the modified brain structure due to neonatal exposure of estradiol-17β remodel the ovary at the molecular level in such a way that there is a disharmony in the reproductive function during adulthood and these changes are perennial and can lead to infertility and changes of reproductive behavior. PMID:26872318

  12. Radiation biology of human tumour xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation response of human tumour xenografts can be measured with sufficient accuracy using cell survival in vitro and tumour growth delay in vivo as endpoints. There is evidence that radiation response of xenografts mirrors clinical radioresponsiveness of corresponding tumours in patients. Thus xenografts may have a significant potential in experimental radiotherapeutic research, e.g. in development of in vitro and in vivo predictive assays of clinical radioresponsiveness. There are at least three main disadvantages with xenografts as models for human cancer. Firstly, volume doubling time is usually shorter for xenografts than for tumours in patients. Secondly, the haematological system and vascular network of xenografts originate from the host. Thirdly, host defence mechanisms may be active against xenografts. These disadvantages may limit the usefulness of xenografts as models for human cancer in some types of radiobiological studies. (author)

  13. Modeling the dynamical effects of anesthesia on brain circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Shinung; Brown, Emery N

    2014-04-01

    General anesthesia is a neurophysiological state that consists of unconsciousness, amnesia, analgesia, and immobility along with maintenance of physiological stability. General anesthesia has been used in the United States for more than 167 years. Now, using systems neuroscience paradigms how anesthetics act in the brain and central nervous system to create the states of general anesthesia is being understood. Propofol is one of the most widely used and the most widely studied anesthetics. When administered for general anesthesia or sedation, the electroencephalogram (EEG) under propofol shows highly structured, rhythmic activity that is strongly associated with changes in the patient's level of arousal. These highly structured oscillations lend themselves readily to mathematical descriptions using dynamical systems models. We review recent model descriptions of the commonly observed EEG patterns associated with propofol: paradoxical excitation, strong frontal alpha oscillations, anteriorization and burst suppression. Our analysis suggests that propofol's actions at GABAergic networks in the cortex, thalamus and brainstem induce profound brain dynamics that are one of the likely mechanisms through which this anesthetic induces altered arousal states from sedation to unconsciousness. Because these dynamical effects are readily observed in the EEG, the mathematical descriptions of how propofol's EEG signatures relate to its mechanisms of action in neural circuits provide anesthesiologists with a neurophysiologically based approach to monitoring the brain states of patients receiving anesthesia care. PMID:24457211

  14. Model sparsity and brain pattern interpretation of classification models in neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Churchill, Nathan W; Hansen, Lars Kai; Strother, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    Interest is increasing in applying discriminative multivariate analysis techniques to the analysis of functional neuroimaging data. Model interpretation is of great importance in the neuroimaging context, and is conventionally based on a ‘brain map’ derived from the classification model. In this...... study we focus on the relative influence of model regularization parameter choices on both the model generalization, the reliability of the spatial patterns extracted from the classification model, and the ability of the resulting model to identify relevant brain networks defining the underlying neural...... for both ℓ2 and ℓ1 regularization. Importantly, we illustrate a trade-off between model spatial reproducibility and prediction accuracy. We show that known parts of brain networks can be overlooked in pursuing maximization of classification accuracy alone with either ℓ2 and/or ℓ1 regularization. This...

  15. Drosophila melanogaster as a Model Organism of Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Paulus

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster has been utilized to model human brain diseases. In most of these invertebrate transgenic models, some aspects of human disease are reproduced. Although investigation of rodent models has been of significant impact, invertebrate models offer a wide variety of experimental tools that can potentially address some of the outstanding questions underlying neurological disease. This review considers what has been gleaned from invertebrate models of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, metabolic diseases such as Leigh disease, Niemann-Pick disease and ceroid lipofuscinoses, tumor syndromes such as neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy as well as CNS injury. It is to be expected that genetic tools in Drosophila will reveal new pathways and interactions, which hopefully will result in molecular based therapy approaches.

  16. Relaxins enhance growth of spontaneous murine breast cancers as well as metastatic colonization of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Claudia; Chuang, Eugenia; Habla, Christina; Bleckmann, Annalen; Schulz, Matthias; Bathgate, Ross; Einspanier, Almuth

    2014-01-01

    Relaxins are known for their tissue remodeling capacity which is also a hallmark of cancer progression. However, their role in the latter context is still unclear, particularly in breast cancer. In a mouse model with spontaneously arising breast cancer due to erbB2-overexpression we show that exposure to porcine relaxin results in significantly enhanced tumour growth as compared to control animals. This is accompanied by increased serum concentrations of progesterone and estradiol as well as elevated expression of the respective receptors and the relaxin receptor RXFP1 in the tumour tissue. It is also associated with enhanced infiltration by tumour-associated macrophages which are known to promote tumour progression. Additionally, we show in an ex vivo model of metastatic brain colonization that porcine relaxin as well as human brain-specific relaxin-3 promotes invasion into the brain tissue and enhance interaction of breast cancer cells with the resident brain macrophages, the microglia. Relaxin signaling is mediated via RXFP1, since R 3/I5, a specific agonist of the relaxin-3 receptor RXFP3 in the brain, does not significantly enhance invasion. Taken together, these findings strongly support a role of relaxins in the progression of breast cancer where they foster primary tumour growth as well as metastatic colonization by direct and indirect means. PMID:23963762

  17. Systematic Review of Traumatic Brain Injury Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Helen W

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this chapter are to provide an introduction into the variety of animal models available for studying traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to provide a concise systematic review of the general materials and methods involved in each model. Materials and methods were obtained from a literature search of relevant peer-reviewed articles. Strengths and weaknesses of each animal choice were presented to include relative cost, anatomical and physiological features, and mechanism of injury desired. Further, a variety of homologous, isomorphic/induced, and predictive animal models were defined, described, and compared with respect to their relative ease of use, characteristics, range, adjustability (e.g., amplitude, duration, mass/size, velocity, and pressure), and rough order of magnitude cost. Just as the primary mechanism of action of TBI is limitless, so are the animal models available to study TBI. With such a wide variety of available animals, types of injury models, along with the research needs, there exists no single "gold standard" model of TBI rendering cross-comparison of data extremely difficult. Therefore, this chapter reflects a representative sampling of the TBI animal models available and is not an exhaustive comparison of every possible model and associated parameters. Throughout this chapter, special considerations for animal choice and TBI animal model classification are discussed. Criteria central to choosing appropriate animal models of TBI include ethics, funding, complexity (ease of use, safety, and controlled access requirements), type of model, model characteristics, and range of control (scope). PMID:27604713

  18. Construction of digital model of sellar area tumours and its application in surgical plan%数字化鞍区肿瘤模型的构建及在手术规划中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张尚明; 王守森; 荆俊杰; 张辉建; 马明; 钟群

    2012-01-01

    目的 采用虚拟现实技术构建数字化鞍区肿瘤模型,并探讨其在手术规划中的应用价值.方法 60例经MRI诊断为鞍区肿瘤的病例,术前行薄层CT、MRI扫描,以DICOM格式导入Dextroscope图像工作站,进行模型构建,观测入路相关解剖标志及肿瘤的毗邻关系,模拟手术进程,并与术中图像对照分析.结果 所有数字化模型均清晰显示了肿瘤、瘤周血管、骨质、视神经、脑组织等结构的形态及其毗邻关系,可随意观测手术径路各解剖结构;根据肿瘤的特点成功模拟了手术入路,制定了手术规划方案,术前模拟与术中实际情况一致.结论 所建模型图像逼真、立体感强烈,可为术者提供额外的三维立体解剖信息,是常规临床手术规划的有效补充;使用虚拟器械可在模型上重复模拟手术操作,是青年医师学习鞍区解剖和手术的便利工具.%Objective To construct the digital model of the sellar area tumours using virtual reality technology,and to investigate its values in surgical plan.Methods 60 patients with tumor near the sellar area were examined by magnetic resonance imaging scan.The examinations of preoperative including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging,were imported into Dextroscope workstation in DICOM format images to construct model.The anatomic landmarks of surgical approach and structures around the tumor were observed.Furthermore the virtual process of surgery was performed,and compared with the real operation.Results Digital models of all patients can clearly show the anatomical shape and the relation of the sellar tumour,peripheral vessel,bone,optic nerve,and brain tissue.We can freely observe and measure the anatomic structures of surgical approach.The approaches were simulated according to the anatomic characteristics of tumour,and the surgical plans were designed successfully.The images of surgical plans were consistent with the real situation in operation

  19. A STUDY OF TUMOURS OF THE CRANIAL NERVE AND PARASPINAL NERVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Shetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION One of the frequent sites of tumour formation is the cranial nerves and paraspinal nerves. The cranial nerves perform a plethora of functions and so the signs and symptoms caused may be different. They are mainly classified into four different types. The aim of the study is: 1. To study the tumours arising from the cranial nerves in an epidemiological point of view. 2. To study the tumours histopathologically. 3. To classify the tumours according to WHO classification. Thirty-eight brain tumor cases were studied in the Department of Medicine, A. J. Shetty Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore. Cranial nerve tumours accounts for 4(10% among the intracranial tumours. Schwannomas makes up 3(7.39% among the Intracranial tumours. and constituted 3(75% among cranial nerve tumours. All the 3 schwannomas were located in CP angle. The geographic distribution of cases was found to be 28 cases from Mangalore and 10 cases from Kerala.

  20. Multiscale modeling and simulation of brain blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdikaris, Paris; Grinberg, Leopold; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work is to present an overview of recent advances in multi-scale modeling of brain blood flow. In particular, we present some approaches that enable the in silico study of multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena in the cerebral vasculature. We discuss the formulation of continuum and atomistic modeling approaches, present a consistent framework for their concurrent coupling, and list some of the challenges that one needs to overcome in achieving a seamless and scalable integration of heterogeneous numerical solvers. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is demonstrated in a realistic case involving modeling the thrombus formation process taking place on the wall of a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm. This highlights the ability of multi-scale algorithms to resolve important biophysical processes that span several spatial and temporal scales, potentially yielding new insight into the key aspects of brain blood flow in health and disease. Finally, we discuss open questions in multi-scale modeling and emerging topics of future research.

  1. Multiscale modeling and simulation of brain blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to present an overview of recent advances in multi-scale modeling of brain blood flow. In particular, we present some approaches that enable the in silico study of multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena in the cerebral vasculature. We discuss the formulation of continuum and atomistic modeling approaches, present a consistent framework for their concurrent coupling, and list some of the challenges that one needs to overcome in achieving a seamless and scalable integration of heterogeneous numerical solvers. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is demonstrated in a realistic case involving modeling the thrombus formation process taking place on the wall of a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm. This highlights the ability of multi-scale algorithms to resolve important biophysical processes that span several spatial and temporal scales, potentially yielding new insight into the key aspects of brain blood flow in health and disease. Finally, we discuss open questions in multi-scale modeling and emerging topics of future research

  2. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  3. Multiscale modeling and simulation of brain blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdikaris, Paris, E-mail: parisp@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Grinberg, Leopold, E-mail: leopoldgrinberg@us.ibm.com [IBM T.J Watson Research Center, 1 Rogers St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 (United States); Karniadakis, George Em, E-mail: george-karniadakis@brown.edu [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this work is to present an overview of recent advances in multi-scale modeling of brain blood flow. In particular, we present some approaches that enable the in silico study of multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena in the cerebral vasculature. We discuss the formulation of continuum and atomistic modeling approaches, present a consistent framework for their concurrent coupling, and list some of the challenges that one needs to overcome in achieving a seamless and scalable integration of heterogeneous numerical solvers. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is demonstrated in a realistic case involving modeling the thrombus formation process taking place on the wall of a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm. This highlights the ability of multi-scale algorithms to resolve important biophysical processes that span several spatial and temporal scales, potentially yielding new insight into the key aspects of brain blood flow in health and disease. Finally, we discuss open questions in multi-scale modeling and emerging topics of future research.

  4. Targeting ALCAM in the cryo-treated tumour microenvironment successfully induces systemic anti-tumour immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Fuwa, Takafumi; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Cryoablative treatment has been widely used for treating cancer. However, the therapeutic efficacies are still controversial. The molecular mechanisms of the cryo-induced immune responses, particularly underlying the ineffectiveness, remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we identified a new molecular mechanism involved in the cryo failure. We used cryo-ineffective metastatic tumour models that murine melanoma B16-F10 cells were subcutaneously and intravenously implanted into C57BL/6 mice. When the subcutaneous tumours were treated cryoablation on day 7 after tumour implantation, cells expressing activated leucocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) were significantly expanded not only locally in the treated tumours but also systemically in spleen and bone marrow of the mice. The cryo-induced ALCAM(+) cells including CD45(-) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells significantly suppressed interferon γ production and cytotoxicity of tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells via ALCAM expressed in these cells. This suggests that systemic expansion of the ALCAM(+) cells negatively switches host-immune directivity to the tumour-supportive mode. Intratumoural injection with anti-ALCAM blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) following the cryo treatment systemically induced tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells with higher cytotoxic activities, resulting in suppression of tumour growth and metastasis in the cryo-resistant tumour models. These suggest that expansion of ALCAM(+) cells is a determinant of limiting the cryo efficacy. Further combination with an immune checkpoint inhibitor anti-CTLA4 mAb optimized the anti-tumour efficacy of the dual-combination therapy. Targeting ALCAM may be a promising strategy for overcoming the cryo ineffectiveness leading to the better practical use of cryoablation in clinical treatment of cancer. PMID:27208904

  5. Tumour-host dynamics under radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placeres Jimenez, Rolando, E-mail: rpjcu@yahoo.com [Departamento de Fi' sica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos - SP (Brazil); Ortiz Hernandez, Eloy [Centre of Medicine and Complexity, Medical University Carlos J. Finlay, Carretera Central s/n, Camagueey (Cuba)

    2011-09-15

    Highlight: > Tumour-host interaction is modelled by Lotka-Volterra equations. > A brief review of the motion integral and analysis of linear stability is presented. > Radiotherapy is introduced into the model, using a periodic Dirac delta function. > A two-dimensional logistic map is derived from the modified Lotka-Volterra model. > It is shown that tumour can be controlled by a correct selection of therapy strategy. - Abstract: Tumour-host interaction is modelled by the Lotka-Volterra equations. Qualitative analysis and simulations show that this model reproduces all known states of development for tumours. Radiotherapy effect is introduced into the model by means of the linear-quadratic model and the periodic Dirac delta function. The evolution of the system under the action of radiotherapy is simulated and parameter space is obtained, from which certain threshold of effectiveness values for the frequency and applied doses are derived. A two-dimensional logistic map is derived from the modified Lotka-Volterra model and used to simulate the effectiveness of radiotherapy in different regimens of tumour development. The results show the possibility of achieving a successful treatment in each individual case by employing the correct therapeutic strategy.

  6. Cardiac tumours in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yadava, O.P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac tumours in infancy are rare and are mostly benign with rhabdomyomas, fibromas and teratomas accounting for the majority. The presentation depends on size and location of the mass as they tend to cause cavity obstruction or arrhythmias. Most rhabdomyomas tend to regress spontaneously but fibromas and teratomas generally require surgical intervention for severe haemodynamic or arrhythmic complications. Other relatively rare cardiac tumours too are discussed along with an Indian perspect...

  7. Spatiotemporal Modeling of Brain Dynamics Using Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Gaussian Hidden Markov Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiyang; Langley, Jason; Chen, Xiangchuan; Hu, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    Analyzing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time courses with dynamic approaches has generated a great deal of interest because of the additional temporal features that can be extracted. In this work, to systemically model spatiotemporal patterns of the brain, a Gaussian hidden Markov model (GHMM) was adopted to model the brain state switching process. We assumed that the brain switches among a number of different brain states as a Markov process and used multivariate Gaussian distributions to represent the spontaneous activity patterns of brain states. This model was applied to resting-state fMRI data from 100 subjects in the Human Connectome Project and detected nine highly reproducible brain states and their temporal and transition characteristics. Our results indicate that the GHMM can unveil brain dynamics that may provide additional insights regarding the brain at resting state. PMID:27008543

  8. 3D segmented model of head for modelling electrical activity of brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egill A. Friðgeirsson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Computer simulation and modelling of the human body and its behaviour are very useful tools in situations where it is either too risky to perform an invasive procedure or too costly for in vivo experiments or simply impossible for ethical reasons. In this paper we describe a method to model the electrical behaviour of human brain from segmented MR images. The aim of the work is to use these models to predict the electrical activity of human brain under normal and pathological conditions. The image processing software package MIMICS is used for 3D volume segmentation of MR images. These models have detailed 3D representation of major tissue surfaces within the head, with over 12 different tissues segmented. In addition, computational tools in Matlab were developed for calculating normal vectors on the brain surface and for associating this information to the equivalent electrical dipole sources as an input into the model.

  9. Pituitary tumour clonality revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R N; Farrell, W E

    2004-01-01

    Allelotype analysis and X chromosome inactivation analysis in women enables the assessment of tissue clonality, and has demonstrated that the majority of sporadic human pituitary adenomas are monoclonal. This implies that these tumours arise from de novo somatic genetic change(s) in a single pituitary cell. However, clonality within any given tumour may be multiple or single, multiple tumours arising on the background of hyperplasia may be of identical or different clonality, multiple 'sporadic' tumours in a tissue may be of differing clonal origin, and finally morphology cannot predict genetic makeup. These general principles may also apply to the pituitary so it is simplistic to assume that monoclonality is inevitable and that pituitary tumours cannot be multiclonal in origin. Indeed, these observations would be entirely compatible with the initiating stimulus resulting in hyperplasia of specific cell subtypes in the pituitary giving rise to a number of different clones each with variable potential to develop into a discrete tumour depending on their rate of cell division/rate of apotosis. Stimuli might include pituitary-specific oncogenes, intrapituitary growth factors, or extrapituitary trophic factors (e.g. hypothalamic releasing hormones). PMID:15281347

  10. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonise a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, Canine Transmissible Venereal Tumour (CTVT) that spreads among dogs and Devil Facial Tumour Disease (D...

  11. Model of the Brain Tumor–Pumilio translation repressor complex

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Thomas A.; Wilkinson, Brian D.; Wharton, Robin P.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2003-01-01

    The Brain Tumor (Brat) protein is recruited to the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of hunchback mRNA to regulate its translation. Recruitment is mediated by interactions between the Pumilio RNA-binding Puf repeats and the NHL domain of Brat, a conserved structural motif present in a large family of growth regulators. In this report, we describe the crystal structure of the Brat NHL domain and present a model of the Pumilio–Brat complex derived from in silico docking experiments and supported by ...

  12. Modelling Human Cortical Network in Real Brain Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-Bai; FENG Hong-Bo; TANG Yi-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Highly specific structural organization is of great significance in the topology of cortical networks.We introduce a human cortical network model.taking the specific cortical structure into account,in which nodes are brain sites placed in the actual positions of cerebral cortex and the establishment of edges depends on the spatial path length rather than the linear distance.The resulting network exhibits the essential features of cortical connectivity,properties of small-world networks and multiple clusters structure.Additionally.assortative mixing is also found in this roodel.All of these findings may be attributed to the spedtic cortical architecture.

  13. Assessment of traumatic brain injury degree in animal model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Qiang Chen; Cheng-Cheng Zhang; Hong Lu; Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To establish stable and controllable brain injury with accurate degree and good repeatability in rat model.Methods:Controlled cortical impact(CCI) device was used to prepare for the rat brain injury model by the impact head of different model(GroupANo.4,GroupBNo.5, GroupCNo.6) and the impact depth(GroupA:1.5-2.0 mm,GroupB:2.5-3.0 mm,GroupC:3.5-4.0 mm) with impact time of0.1 s and impact velocity of2.5 m/s.Twelve rats with three months of age were used in each group(the impact depth of every two rats was added1 mm respectively).After modeling for1 h, magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) was received and brain histopathology was observed to assess degree of injury by model parameters of three groups.Results:After modeling ofGroupA,MRI showed that the cortex structure was damaged with a small amount of bleeding in center and mild edema around, and the total volume of injury was(28.69±4.94) mm3.Pathology revealed the injury was confined to the superficial cortical with mild edema of nerve cell, which was assessed as mild cerebral contusion.While after modeling,MRI ofGroupB showed that the structure of cortex and medulla were damaged simultaneously and extended to cerebral nuclei zone, with4 cases of hematoma in the center and larger edema range around, and the total volume of injury was(78.38±9.28) mm3.Pathology revealed the injury range was reached nuclei zone, with swell of nerve cell and mitochondria, which was assessed to moderate cerebral contusion. After modeling ofGroupC,MRI showed that extensive tissue injury was appeared in cortex and medulla and deep nuclei, with9 cases of hematoma and large edema signal of surrounding tissue T2WI, while in5 cases, lateral nucleus of injury signal was increased, and the total volume of injury was(135.89±24.80) mm3.Pathology revealed the deep cerebral nuclei was damaged, with the disappearance of neuronal structure and vacuolization of mitochondria, which was assessed as severe cerebral contusion.MRI changes were

  14. The Simulation and Correction to the Brain Deformation Based on the Linear Elastic Model in IGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Xiao-lan; SONG Zhi-jian

    2004-01-01

    @@ The brain deformation is a vital factor affecting the precision of the IGS and it becomes a hotspot to simulate and correct the brain deformation recently.The research organizations, which firstly resolved the brain deformation with the physical models, have the Image Processing and Analysis department of Yale University, Biomedical Modeling Lab of Vanderbilt University and so on. The former uses the linear elastic model; the latter uses the consolidation model.The linear elastic model only needs to drive the model using the surface displacement of exposed brain cortex,which is more convenient to be measured in the clinic.

  15. The Simulation and Correction to the Brain Deformation Based on the Linear Elastic Model in IGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MUXiao-lan; SONGZhi-jian

    2004-01-01

    The brain deformation is a vital factor affecting the precision of the IGS and it becomes a hotspot to simulate and correct the brain deformation recently.The research organizations, which firstly resolved the brain deformation with the physical models, have the Image Processing and Analysis department of Yale University, Biomedical Modeling Lab of Vanderbilt University and so on. The former uses the linear elastic model; the latter uses the consolidation model.

  16. Cluster imaging of multi-brain networks (CIMBN: a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian eDuan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Studying the neural basis of human social interactions is a key topic in the field of social neuroscience. Brain imaging studies in this field usually focus on the neural correlates of the social interactions between two participants. However, as the participant number further increases, even by a small amount, great difficulties raise. One challenge is how to concurrently scan all the interacting brains with high ecological validity, especially for a large number of participants. The other challenge is how to effectively model the complex group interaction behaviors emerging from the intricate neural information exchange among a group of socially organized people. Confronting these challenges, we propose a new approach called Cluster Imaging of Multi-brain Networks (CIMBN. CIMBN consists of two parts. The first part is a cluster imaging technique with high ecological validity based on multiple functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS systems. Using this technique, we can easily extend the simultaneous imaging capacity of social neuroscience studies up to dozens of participants. The second part of CIMBN is a multi-brain network (MBN modeling method based on graph theory. By taking each brain as a network node and the relationship between any two brains as a network edge, one can construct a network model for a group of interacting brains. The emergent group social behaviors can then be studied using the network’s properties, such as its topological structure and information exchange efficiency. Although there is still much work to do, as a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains, CIMBN can provide new insights into the neural correlates of group social interactions, and advance social neuroscience and social psychology.

  17. Cluster imaging of multi-brain networks (CIMBN): a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Dai, Rui-Na; Xiao, Xiang; Sun, Pei-Pei; Li, Zheng; Zhu, Chao-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Studying the neural basis of human social interactions is a key topic in the field of social neuroscience. Brain imaging studies in this field usually focus on the neural correlates of the social interactions between two participants. However, as the participant number further increases, even by a small amount, great difficulties raise. One challenge is how to concurrently scan all the interacting brains with high ecological validity, especially for a large number of participants. The other challenge is how to effectively model the complex group interaction behaviors emerging from the intricate neural information exchange among a group of socially organized people. Confronting these challenges, we propose a new approach called "Cluster Imaging of Multi-brain Networks" (CIMBN). CIMBN consists of two parts. The first part is a cluster imaging technique with high ecological validity based on multiple functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) systems. Using this technique, we can easily extend the simultaneous imaging capacity of social neuroscience studies up to dozens of participants. The second part of CIMBN is a multi-brain network (MBN) modeling method based on graph theory. By taking each brain as a network node and the relationship between any two brains as a network edge, one can construct a network model for a group of interacting brains. The emergent group social behaviors can then be studied using the network's properties, such as its topological structure and information exchange efficiency. Although there is still much work to do, as a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains, CIMBN can provide new insights into the neural correlates of group social interactions, and advance social neuroscience and social psychology. PMID:26283906

  18. Performance modeling of a wearable brain PET (BET) camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtlein, C. R.; Turner, J. N.; Thompson, M. O.; Mandal, K. C.; Häggström, I.; Zhang, J.; Humm, J. L.; Feiglin, D. H.; Krol, A.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To explore, by means of analytical and Monte Carlo modeling, performance of a novel lightweight and low-cost wearable helmet-shaped Brain PET (BET) camera based on thin-film digital Geiger Avalanche Photo Diode (dGAPD) with LSO and LaBr3 scintillators for imaging in vivo human brain processes for freely moving and acting subjects responding to various stimuli in any environment. Methods: We performed analytical and Monte Carlo modeling PET performance of a spherical cap BET device and cylindrical brain PET (CYL) device, both with 25 cm diameter and the same total mass of LSO scintillator. Total mass of LSO in both the BET and CYL systems is about 32 kg for a 25 mm thick scintillator, and 13 kg for 10 mm thick scintillator (assuming an LSO density of 7.3 g/ml). We also investigated a similar system using an LaBr3 scintillator corresponding to 22 kg and 9 kg for the 25 mm and 10 mm thick systems (assuming an LaBr3 density of 5.08 g/ml). In addition, we considered a clinical whole body (WB) LSO PET/CT scanner with 82 cm ring diameter and 15.8 cm axial length to represent a reference system. BET consisted of distributed Autonomous Detector Arrays (ADAs) integrated into Intelligent Autonomous Detector Blocks (IADBs). The ADA comprised of an array of small LYSO scintillator volumes (voxels with base a×a: 1.0 energy resolution was 10.8% and 3.3% for LSO and LaBr3 respectively and the coincidence window was set at 2 ns. The brain was simulated as a sphere of uniform F-18 activity with diameter of 10 cm embedded in a center of water sphere with diameter of 10 cm. Results: Analytical and Monte Carlo models showed similar results for lower energy window values (458 keV versus 445 keV for LSO, and 492 keV versus 485 keV for LaBr3), and for the relative performance of system sensitivity. Monte Carlo results further showed that the BET geometry had >50% better noise equivalent count (NEC) performance relative to the CYL geometry, and >1100% better performance than a WB

  19. Monte Carlo dose calculations and radiobiological modelling: analysis of the effect of the statistical noise of the dose distribution on the probability of tumour control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to investigate the influence of the statistical fluctuations of Monte Carlo (MC) dose distributions on the dose volume histograms (DVHs) and radiobiological models, in particular the Poisson model for tumour control probability (tcp). The MC matrix is characterized by a mean dose in each scoring voxel, d, and a statistical error on the mean dose, σd; whilst the quantities d and σd depend on many statistical and physical parameters, here we consider only their dependence on the phantom voxel size and the number of histories from the radiation source. Dose distributions from high-energy photon beams have been analysed. It has been found that the DVH broadens when increasing the statistical noise of the dose distribution, and the tcp calculation systematically underestimates the real tumour control value, defined here as the value of tumour control when the statistical error of the dose distribution tends to zero. When increasing the number of energy deposition events, either by increasing the voxel dimensions or increasing the number of histories from the source, the DVH broadening decreases and tcp converges to the 'correct' value. It is shown that the underestimation of the tcp due to the noise in the dose distribution depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the radiobiological parameters over the population; in particular this error decreases with increasing the biological heterogeneity, whereas it becomes significant in the hypothesis of a radiosensitivity assay for single patients, or for subgroups of patients. It has been found, for example, that when the voxel dimension is changed from a cube with sides of 0.5 cm to a cube with sides of 0.25 cm (with a fixed number of histories of 108 from the source), the systematic error in the tcp calculation is about 75% in the homogeneous hypothesis, and it decreases to a minimum value of about 15% in a case of high radiobiological heterogeneity. The possibility of using the error on the tcp to

  20. Modeling the brain-pituitary-gonad axis in salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jonghan; Hayton, William L.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2006-08-24

    To better understand the complexity of the brain-pituitary-gonad axis (BPG) in fish, we developed a biologically based pharmacodynamic model capable of accurately predicting the normal functioning of the BPG axis in salmon. This first-generation model consisted of a set of 13 equations whose formulation was guided by published values for plasma concentrations of pituitary- (FSH, LH) and ovary- (estradiol, 17a,20b-dihydroxy-4-pregnene-3-one) derived hormones measured in Coho salmon over an annual spawning period. In addition, the model incorporated pertinent features of previously published mammalian models and indirect response pharmacodynamic models. Model-based equations include a description of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) synthesis and release from the hypothalamus, which is controlled by environmental variables such as photoperiod and water temperature. GnRH stimulated the biosynthesis of mRNA for FSH and LH, which were also influenced by estradiol concentration in plasma. The level of estradiol in the plasma was regulated by the oocytes, which moved along a maturation progression. Estradiol was synthesized at a basal rate and as oocytes matured, stimulation of its biosynthesis occurred. The BPG model can be integrated with toxico-genomic, -proteomic data, allowing linkage between molecular based biomarkers and reproduction in fish.

  1. Resuscitation speed affects brain injury in a large animal model of traumatic brain injury and shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Jin, Guang; Johansson, Pär I;

    2014-01-01

    infusion speed increment NS (n¿=¿7). Hemodynamic variables over a 6-hour observation phase were recorded. Following euthanasia, brains were harvested and lesion size as well as brain swelling was measured.ResultsBolus FFP resuscitation resulted in greater brain swelling (22.36¿±¿1.03% vs. 15.58¿±¿2.52%, p...

  2. Multistability in Large Scale Models of Brain Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Golos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Noise driven exploration of a brain network's dynamic repertoire has been hypothesized to be causally involved in cognitive function, aging and neurodegeneration. The dynamic repertoire crucially depends on the network's capacity to store patterns, as well as their stability. Here we systematically explore the capacity of networks derived from human connectomes to store attractor states, as well as various network mechanisms to control the brain's dynamic repertoire. Using a deterministic graded response Hopfield model with connectome-based interactions, we reconstruct the system's attractor space through a uniform sampling of the initial conditions. Large fixed-point attractor sets are obtained in the low temperature condition, with a bigger number of attractors than ever reported so far. Different variants of the initial model, including (i a uniform activation threshold or (ii a global negative feedback, produce a similarly robust multistability in a limited parameter range. A numerical analysis of the distribution of the attractors identifies spatially-segregated components, with a centro-medial core and several well-delineated regional patches. Those different modes share similarity with the fMRI independent components observed in the "resting state" condition. We demonstrate non-stationary behavior in noise-driven generalizations of the models, with different meta-stable attractors visited along the same time course. Only the model with a global dynamic density control is found to display robust and long-lasting non-stationarity with no tendency toward either overactivity or extinction. The best fit with empirical signals is observed at the edge of multistability, a parameter region that also corresponds to the highest entropy of the attractors.

  3. Language Model Applications to Spelling with Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Mora-Cortes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL community, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs have raised great hopes as they provide alternative communication means for persons with disabilities bypassing the need for speech and other motor activities. Although significant advancements have been realized in the last decade, applications of language models (e.g., word prediction, completion have only recently started to appear in BCI systems. The main goal of this article is to review the language model applications that supplement non-invasive BCI-based communication systems by discussing their potential and limitations, and to discern future trends. First, a brief overview of the most prominent BCI spelling systems is given, followed by an in-depth discussion of the language models applied to them. These language models are classified according to their functionality in the context of BCI-based spelling: the static/dynamic nature of the user interface, the use of error correction and predictive spelling, and the potential to improve their classification performance by using language models. To conclude, the review offers an overview of the advantages and challenges when implementing language models in BCI-based communication systems when implemented in conjunction with other AAL technologies.

  4. Mouse Model of Devil Facial Tumour Disease Establishes That an Effective Immune Response Can be Generated Against the Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinfold, Terry L; Brown, Gabriella K; Bettiol, Silvana S; Woods, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    The largest carnivorous marsupial in Australia, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is facing extinction in the wild due to a transmissible cancer known as Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). DFTD is a clonal cell line transmitted from host to host with 100% mortality and no known immunity. While it was first considered that low genetic diversity of the population of devils enabled the allograft transmission of DFTD recent evidence reveals that genetically diverse animals succumb to the disease. The lack of an immune response against the DFTD tumor cells may be due to a lack of immunogenicity of the tumor cells. This could facilitate transmission between devils. To test immunogenicity, mice were injected with viable DFTD cells and anti-DFTD immune responses analyzed. A range of antibody isotypes against DFTD cells was detected, indicating that as DFTD cells can induce an immune response they are immunogenic. This was supported by cytokine production, when splenocytes from mice injected with DFTD cells were cultured in vitro with DFTD cells and the supernatant analyzed. There was a significant production of IFN-γ and TNF-α following the first injection with DFTD cells and a significant production of IL-6 and IL-10 following the second injection. Splenocytes from naïve or immunized mice killed DFTD cells in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Thus, they are also targets for immunological destruction. We conclude that as an immune response can be generated against DFTD cells they would be suitable targets for a vaccine. PMID:24904594

  5. Lethal giant larvae 1 tumour suppressor activity is not conserved in models of mammalian T and B cell leukaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin D Hawkins

    Full Text Available In epithelial and stem cells, lethal giant larvae (Lgl is a potent tumour suppressor, a regulator of Notch signalling, and a mediator of cell fate via asymmetric cell division. Recent evidence suggests that the function of Lgl is conserved in mammalian haematopoietic stem cells and implies a contribution to haematological malignancies. To date, direct measurement of the effect of Lgl expression on malignancies of the haematopoietic lineage has not been tested. In Lgl1⁻/⁻ mice, we analysed the development of haematopoietic malignancies either alone, or in the presence of common oncogenic lesions. We show that in the absence of Lgl1, production of mature white blood cell lineages and long-term survival of mice are not affected. Additionally, loss of Lgl1 does not alter leukaemia driven by constitutive Notch, c-Myc or Jak2 signalling. These results suggest that the role of Lgl1 in the haematopoietic lineage might be restricted to specific co-operating mutations and a limited number of cellular contexts.

  6. Modeling of a segmented electrode for desynchronizing deep brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eBuhlmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an effective therapy for medically refrac- tory movement disorders like Parkinson’s disease. The electrodes, implanted in the target area within the human brain, generate an electric field which activates nerve fibers and cell bodies in the proximate vicinity. Even though the different target nuclei display considerable differences in their anatomical structure, only few types of electrodes are currently commercially available. It is desirable to adjust the electric field and in particular the volume of tissue activated around the electrode with respect to the corresponding target nucleus in a such way that side effects can be reduced. Furthermore, a more selective and partial activation of the target structure is desirable for an optimal application of novel stimulation strate- gies, e.g. coordinated reset neuromodulation. Hence we designed a DBS electrode with a segmented design allowing a more selective activation of the target struc- ture. We created a finite element model (FEM of the electrode and analyzed the volume of tissue activated for this electrode design. The segmented electrode ac- tivated an area in a targeted manner, of which the dimension and position relative to the electrode could be controlled by adjusting the stimulation parameters for each contact. According to our computational analysis, this directed stimulation might be superior with respect to the occurrence of side effects and it enables the application of coordinated reset neuromodulation under optimal conditions.

  7. Modeling Brain Circuitry over a Wide Range of Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eFua

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available If we are ever to unravel the mysteries of brain function at its most fundamental level, we will need a precise understanding of how its component neurons connect to each other. Electron Microscopes (EM can now provide the nanometer resolution that is needed to image synapses, and therefore connections, while Light Microscopes (LM see at the micrometer resolution required to model the 3D structure of the dendritic network. Since both the topology and the connection strength are integral parts of the brain's wiring diagram, being able to combine these two modalities is critically important.In fact, these microscopes now routinely produce high-resolution imagery in such large quantities that the bottleneck becomes automated processing and interpretation, which is needed for such data to be exploited to its full potential. In this paper, we briefly review the Computer Vision techniques we have developed at EPFL to address this need. They include delineating dendritic arbors from LM imagery, segmenting organelles from EM, and combining the two into a consistent representation.

  8. On the appropriateness of modelling brain parenchyma as a biphasic continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavner, A C R; Roy, T Dutta; Hor, K W W; Majimbi, M; Joldes, G R; Wittek, A; Bunt, S; Miller, K

    2016-08-01

    Computational methods originally developed for analysis in engineering have been applied to the analysis of biological materials for many years. One particular application of these engineering tools is the brain, allowing researchers to predict the behaviour of brain tissue in various traumatic, surgical and medical scenarios. Typically two different approaches have been used to model deformation of brain tissue: single-phase models which treat the brain as a viscoelastic material, and biphasic models which treat the brain as a porous deformable medium through which liquid can move. In order to model the brain as a biphasic continuum, the hydraulic conductivity of the solid phase is required; there are many theoretical values for this conductivity in the literature, with variations of up to three orders of magnitude. We carried out a series of simple experiments using lamb and sheep brain tissue to establish the rate at which cerebrospinal fluid moves through the brain parenchyma. Mindful of possible variations in hydraulic conductivity with tissue deformation, our intention was to carry out our experiments on brain tissue subjected to minimal deformation. This has enabled us to compare the rate of flow with values predicted by some of the theoretical values of hydraulic conductivity from the literature. Our results indicate that the hydraulic conductivity of the brain parenchyma is consistent with the lowest theoretical published values. These extremely low hydraulic conductivities lead to such low rates of CSF flow through the brain tissue that in effect the material behaves as a single-phase deformable solid. PMID:27136087

  9. A model for traumatic brain injury using laser induced shockwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selfridge, A.; Preece, D.; Gomez, V.; Shi, L. Z.; Berns, M. W.

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a major treatment challenge in both civilian and military medicine; on the cellular level, its mechanisms are poorly understood. As a method to study the dysfunctional repair mechanisms following injury, laser induced shock waves (LIS) are a useful way to create highly precise, well characterized mechanical forces. We present a simple model for TBI using laser induced shock waves as a model for damage. Our objective is to develop an understanding of the processes responsible for neuronal death, the ways in which we can manipulate these processes to improve cell survival and repair, and the importance of these processes at different levels of biological organization. The physics of shock wave creation has been modeled and can be used to calculate forces acting on individual neurons. By ensuring that the impulse is in the same regime as that occurring in practical TBI, the LIS model can ensure that in vitro conditions and damage are similar to those experienced in TBI. This model will allow for the study of the biochemical response of neurons to mechanical stresses, and can be combined with microfluidic systems for cell growth in order to better isolate areas of damage.

  10. Chapter 3 animal models of traumatic brain injury: is there an optimal model that parallels human brain injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, Teresita L

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the younger population worldwide. Survivors of TBI often experience long-term disability in the form of cognitive, sensorimotor, and affective impairments. Despite the high prevalence in, and cost of TBI to, both individuals and society, some of its underlying pathophysiology is not completely understood. Animal models have been developed over the past few decades to closely replicate the different facets of TBI in humans to better understand the underlying pathophysiology and behavioral impairments and assess potential therapies that can promote neuroprotection. However, no effective treatment for TBI has been established to date in the clinical setting, despite promising results generated in preclinical studies in the use of neuroprotective strategies. The failure to translate results from preclinical studies to the clinical setting underscores a compelling need to revisit the current state of knowledge in the use of animal models in TBI. PMID:25946383

  11. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. PMID:25187312

  12. Phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli - modeling of single action potential

    CERN Document Server

    Seetharaman, Karthik; Kulish, Vladimir V

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we detail a phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli. The model is derived using the basic laws of physics like conservation of energy law. This model eliminates the paradox of instantaneous propagation of the action potential in the brain. The solution of this model is then presented. The model is further applied in the case of a single neuron and is verified by simulating a single action potential. The results of this modeling are useful not only for the fundamental understanding of single action potential generation, but also they can be applied in case of neuronal interactions where the results can be verified against the real EEG signal.

  13. Cathepsin S expression: An independent prognostic factor in glioblastoma tumours--A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Thomas; McQuaid, Stephen; McGoohan, Caroline; McConnell, Robert S; McGregor, Gordon; Mirakhur, Meenakshi; Hamilton, Peter; Diamond, James; Cran, Gordon; Walker, Brian; Scott, Christopher; Martin, Lorraine; Ellison, David; Patel, Chirag; Nicholson, Clare; Mendelow, David; McCormick, Derek; Johnston, Patrick G

    2006-08-15

    Cysteine proteinases have been implicated in astrocytoma invasion. We recently demonstrated that cathepsin S (CatS) expression is up-regulated in astrocytomas and provided evidence for a potential role in astrocytoma invasion (Flannery et al., Am J Path 2003;163(1):175-82). We aimed to evaluate the significance of CatS in human astrocytoma progression and as a prognostic marker. Frozen tissue homogenates from 71 patients with astrocytomas and 3 normal brain specimens were subjected to ELISA analyses. Immunohistochemical analysis of CatS expression was performed on 126 paraffin-embedded tumour samples. Fifty-one astrocytoma cases were suitable for both frozen tissue and paraffin tissue analysis. ELISA revealed minimal expression of CatS in normal brain homogenates. CatS expression was increased in grade IV tumours whereas astrocytoma grades I-III exhibited lower values. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a similar pattern of expression. Moreover, high-CatS immunohistochemical scores in glioblastomas were associated with significantly shorter survival (10 vs. 5 months, p = 0.014). With forced inclusion of patient age, radiation dose and Karnofsky score in the Cox multivariate model, CatS score was found to be an independent predictor of survival. CatS expression in astrocytomas is associated with tumour progression and poor outcome in glioblastomas. CatS may serve as a useful prognostic indicator and potential target for anti-invasive therapy. PMID:16550604

  14. Pathobiology of brain metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Nathoo, N; Chahlavi, A; Barnett, G. H.; Toms, S A

    2005-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a major cause of systemic cancer morbidity and mortality. Many factors participate in the development and maintenance of brain metastases. The survival of the metastasis depends upon crucial interactions between tumour cells and the brain microenvironment during its development at the new site. This review focuses on the pathobiological mechanisms involved in the establishment and regulation of brain metastases. Developments in molecular biology have vastly expanded our kn...

  15. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome. PMID:23716380

  16. Mapping Metabolic Brain Activity in Three Models of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Arias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrhosis is a common disease in Western countries. Liver failure, hyperammonemia, and portal hypertension are the main factors that contribute to human cirrhosis that frequently leads to a neuropsychiatric disorder known as hepatic encephalopathy (HE. In this study, we examined the differential contribution of these leading factors to the oxidative metabolism of diverse brain limbic system regions frequently involved in memory process by histochemical labelling of cytochrome oxidase (COx. We have analyzed cortical structures such as the infralimbic and prelimbic cotices, subcortical structures such as hippocampus and ventral striatum, at thalamic level like the anterodorsal, anteroventral, and mediodorsal thalamus, and, finally, the hypothalamus, where the mammillary nuclei (medial and lateral were measured. The severest alteration is found in the model that mimics intoxication by ammonia, followed by the thioacetamide-treated group and the portal hypertension group. No changes were found at the mammillary bodies for any of the experimental groups.

  17. 3D tumour spheroids as a model to assess the suitability of [18F]FDG-PET as an early indicator of response to PI3K inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography ([18F]FDG-PET) is widely used to monitor response to therapy in the clinic and has, more recently, been proposed as an early marker of long term response. This relies on the assumption that a change in glucose consumption parallels a reduction in viability and long term growth potential. However, cells may utilise substrates other than glucose and as many therapeutics interfere with glucose metabolism directly, it is entirely plausible that a positive [18F]FDG-PET response may be unrelated to long term growth. Furthermore, changes in metabolism and proliferation may take place on different temporal scales, thus restricting the time window in which [18F]FDG-PET is predictive. The PI3K oncogenic signalling pathway is a master regulator of multiple cellular processes including glucose metabolism, proliferation and cell survival. Inhibition of PI3K has been shown to reduce [18F]FDG uptake in several tumour types but the relative influence of this pathway on glucose metabolism and proliferation is not fully established. Aim: We proposed to (i) assess the suitability of [18F]FDG as a tracer for measuring response to PI3K inhibition and (ii) determine the optimum imaging schedule, in vitro. We used multicellular tumour spheroids, an excellent 3D in vitro model of avascular tumours, to investigate the effects of the PI3K inhibitors, NVP-BKM120 and NVP-BEZ235, on [18F]FDG uptake and its relation to 3D growth. Methods: Spheroids were prepared from two cell lines with a constitutively active PI3K/Akt pathway, EMT6 (highly proliferative mouse mammary) and FaDu (moderately proliferate human nasopharyngeal). Treatment consisted of a 24 h exposure to either inhibitor, and growth was monitored over the following 7 days. To mimic potential imaging regimens with [18F]FDG-PET, average [18F]FDG uptake per viable cell was measured (a) directly following the 24 h exposure, (b) following an additional 24 h recovery period

  18. Facial reflex examination for assessment of trigeminal nerve involvement in pituitary fossa tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Bynke, O

    1985-01-01

    Sixteen patients with pituitary fossa tumours with different intrasellar extension have been studied by facial reflex examination, a neurophysiological test for the trigemino-facial pathway. Impaired transmission along the reflex path was shown in patients with proved encroachments on the flexible walls of the cavernous sinuses, but with no tumour spread to the brain stem and facial nerve. The findings were consistent with a subclinical involvement of the first trigeminal division. Tumour rem...

  19. A rare cause of infant facial paralysis: atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumour located in the cerebellopontine angle

    OpenAIRE

    Öztürk, Mehmet; Siğirci, Ahmet; Karadağ, Neşe

    2015-01-01

    Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumour (ATRT) is a rare malignant tumour of the central nervous system with embryonal roots. The majority are seen in early childhood and location is often in the posterior fossa. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are used in treatment. Knowledge of the localisation of the mass preoperatively is necessary for direction of the chemoradiotherapy and sufficient resection in surgery. Differentiation from other brain tumours is important because of poor prognosis an...

  20. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides are effective in therapy of minimal residual tumour disease after chemotherapy or surgery in a murine model of MHC class I-deficient, HPV16-associated tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiniš, Milan; Šímová, Jana; Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 5 (2007), s. 1247-1251. ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/04/0492; GA ČR GA301/06/0774 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18933 - CLINIGENE Grant ostatní: Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HPV16 * minimal residual tumour disease * CpG oligonucleotides Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.295, year: 2007

  1. Modeling the dynamics of human brain activity with recurrent neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Güçlü, Umut; Marcel A J van Gerven

    2016-01-01

    Encoding models are used for predicting brain activity in response to sensory stimuli with the objective of elucidating how sensory information is represented in the brain. Encoding models typically comprise a nonlinear transformation of stimuli to features (feature model) and a linear transformation of features to responses (response model). While there has been extensive work on developing better feature models, the work on developing better response models has been rather limited. Here, we...

  2. Stroke and Drug Delivery—In Vitro Models of the Ischemic Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Brodin, Birger

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Both cerebral hypoperfusion and focal cerebral infarcts are caused by a reduction of blood flow to the brain, leading to stroke and subsequent brain damage. At present, only few medical treatments of stroke are available, with the Food and...... permeation pathways across the barrier in ischemic and postischemic brain endothelium is important for development of new medical treatments. The blood-brain barrier, that is, the endothelial monolayer lining the brain capillaries, changes properties during an ischemic event. In vitro models of the blood...

  3. Characterization of a novel brain barrier ex vivo insect-based P-glycoprotein screening model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, O.; Badisco, L.; Hansen, A. H.;

    2014-01-01

    In earlier studies insects were proposed as suitable models for vertebrate blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability prediction and useful in early drug discovery. Here we provide transcriptome and functional data demonstrating the presence of a P-glycoprotein (Pgp) efflux transporter in the brain...... vertebrates, the locust brain–barrier function is morphologically confined to one specific cell layer and by using a whole-brain ex vivo drug exposure technique our locust model may retain the major cues that maintain and modulate the physiological function of the brain barrier. We show that the locust model...

  4. The feasibility of a brain tumour website

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, K; Jakobsen, J; Juhler, M;

    2015-01-01

    hypothesized that the BTW would be feasible, safe, helpful and convenient for individuals to obtain support and information. METHODS: This is an exploratory, prospective six-month feasibility study. Two separate samples were collected: 1) a nationwide sample consisting of BTW visitors over a six-month period...... and 2) a sample of patients with HGG (n = 9) and their caregivers (n = 8) interviewed three months after being introduced to the BTW. RESULTS: The BTW was accessed from 131 different Danish towns and cities, and from ten different countries. The website had 637 unique users. The interviews identified...

  5. Atypical Teratoid/Rrhabdoid Tumour of Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Sidhu,P.Sakhuja,V.Malhotra,R.Gondal S.Kumar

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET / medulloblastoma (MB are the most commonmalignantcentral nervous tumors of the first decade of life. Atypical teratoid / rhabdoid tumor (ATT / RT isa tumor of infancy and childhood although occasional cases have also been described in adults.ATT/RT has a characteristic histopathological, immunocytochemical and ultrastructural features.ATT /RT is a rare tumor, incidence of which remains to be defined with only hundred publishedcases. The present report docurilents the clinical features, histological and immunohistochemicalfindings of a case ofATT / RT.

  6. Genetically modified tumour vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, Suppl. 1 (2005), S7. ISSN 1214-021X. [Cells VI - Biological Days /18./. 24.10.2005-26.10.2005, České Budějovice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : tumour vaccines * HPV16 Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  7. Comparison of Acuros (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) for dose calculation in treatment of oesophageal cancer: effects on modelling tumour control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate systematic changes in dose arising when treatment plans optimised using the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) are recalculated using Acuros XB (AXB) in patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) for locally advanced oesophageal cancers. We have compared treatment plans created using AAA with those recalculated using AXB. Although the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) is currently more widely used in clinical routine, Acuros XB (AXB) has been shown to more accurately calculate the dose distribution, particularly in heterogeneous regions. Studies to predict clinical outcome should be based on modelling the dose delivered to the patient as accurately as possible. CT datasets from ten patients were selected for this retrospective study. VMAT (Volumetric modulated arc therapy) plans with 2 arcs, collimator rotation ± 5-10° and dose prescription 50 Gy / 25 fractions were created using Varian Eclipse (v10.0). The initial dose calculation was performed with AAA, and AXB plans were created by re-calculating the dose distribution using the same number of monitor units (MU) and multileaf collimator (MLC) files as the original plan. The difference in calculated dose to organs at risk (OAR) was compared using dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics and p values were calculated using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The potential clinical effect of dosimetric differences in the gross tumour volume (GTV) was evaluated using three different TCP models from the literature. PTV Median dose was apparently 0.9 Gy lower (range: 0.5 Gy - 1.3 Gy; p < 0.05) for VMAT AAA plans re-calculated with AXB and GTV mean dose was reduced by on average 1.0 Gy (0.3 Gy −1.5 Gy; p < 0.05). An apparent difference in TCP of between 1.2% and 3.1% was found depending on the choice of TCP model. OAR mean dose was lower in the AXB recalculated plan than the AAA plan (on average, dose reduction: lung 1.7%, heart 2.4%). Similar trends were seen for CRT plans

  8. Traumatic brain injury–Modeling neuropsychiatric symptoms in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oz eMalkesman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Each year in the United States, approximately 1.5 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI. Victims of TBI can suffer from chronic post-TBI symptoms, such as sensory and motor deficits, cognitive impairments including problems with memory, learning, and attention, and neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety, irritability, aggression, and suicidal rumination. Although partially associated with the site and severity of injury, the biological mechanisms associated with many of these symptoms—and why some patients experience differing assortments of persistent maladies—are largely unknown. The use of animal models is a promising strategy for elucidation of the mechanisms of impairment and treatment, and learning, memory, sensory and motor tests have widespread utility in rodent models of TBI and psychopharmacology. Comparatively, behavioral tests for the evaluation of neuropsychiatric symptomatology are rarely employed in animal models of TBI and, as determined in this review, the results have been inconsistent. Animal behavioral studies contribute to the understanding of the biological mechanisms by which TBI is associated with neurobehavioral symptoms and offer a powerful means for pre-clinical treatment validation. Therefore, further exploration of the utility of animal behavioral tests for the study of injury mechanisms and therapeutic strategies for the alleviation of emotional symptoms are relevant and essential.

  9. Modelling of the human brain with detailed anatomy for numerical simulation of surgical interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the design and simulation process of MEMS medical devices used in neurosurgery, there is a need to build a brain model with detailed anatomy and physical properties incorporated as a platform to conduct numerical analysis. This paper presents a study on constructing a brain model for simulation of medical device interventions during neurosurgery. A brain atlas was utilized to develop a detailed model consisting of multiple structures. Two types of atlas model were generated employing different mesh types and biomechanical properties suited for various applications. The developed model was able to capture the detailed anatomy of the brain and reflect the application-dependant biomechanical behaviour based on material modelling of brain tissue under surgical intervention

  10. Improving In Vivo High-Resolution CT Imaging of the Tumour Vasculature in Xenograft Mouse Models through Reduction of Motion and Bone-Streak Artefacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerle Kersemans

    Full Text Available Preclinical in vivo CT is commonly used to visualise vessels at a macroscopic scale. However, it is prone to many artefacts which can degrade the quality of CT images significantly. Although some artefacts can be partially corrected for during image processing, they are best avoided during acquisition. Here, a novel imaging cradle and tumour holder was designed to maximise CT resolution. This approach was used to improve preclinical in vivo imaging of the tumour vasculature.A custom built cradle containing a tumour holder was developed and fix-mounted to the CT system gantry to avoid artefacts arising from scanner vibrations and out-of-field sample positioning. The tumour holder separated the tumour from bones along the axis of rotation of the CT scanner to avoid bone-streaking. It also kept the tumour stationary and insensitive to respiratory motion. System performance was evaluated in terms of tumour immobilisation and reduction of motion and bone artefacts. Pre- and post-contrast CT followed by sequential DCE-MRI of the