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Sample records for brain tumor imaging

  1. Brain tumor (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign ... tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges ( ...

  2. Imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  3. Brain tumors imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the beginning of the illness, we should use an anatomical technique for brain exploration (CT scan or MRI) to see the boundaries of the lesion before the diagnostic biopsy. After treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and/or surgery), the evolution of the lesion can be observed with functional techniques (SPECT Thallium or MIBI or PET scan). (author)

  4. Recent advances in imaging of brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    D A Sanghvi

    2009-01-01

    The recent advances in brain tumor imaging offer unique anatomical as well as pathophysiological information that provides new insights on brain tumors, directed at facilitating therapeutic decisions and providing information regarding prognosis. This information is presently utilized in clinical practice for initial diagnosis and noninvasive, preoperative grading of tumors, biopsy planning, surgery, and radiation portal planning, as well as, prognostication. The newer advances described in t...

  5. Permeability imaging in pediatric brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Sandi; Lin, Yimo; Warnke, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    While traditional computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging illustrate the structural morphology of brain pathology, newer, dynamic imaging techniques are able to show the movement of contrast throughout the brain parenchyma and across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These data, in combination with pharmacokinetic models, can be used to investigate BBB permeability, which has wide-ranging applications in the diagnosis and management of central nervous system (CNS) tumors in ...

  6. Proton MRS imaging in pediatric brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarifi, Maria; Tzika, A Aria

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques offer a noninvasive, non-irradiating yet sensitive approach to diagnosing and monitoring pediatric brain tumors. Proton MR spectroscopy (MRS), as an adjunct to MRI, is being more widely applied to monitor the metabolic aspects of brain cancer. In vivo MRS biomarkers represent a promising advance and may influence treatment choice at both initial diagnosis and follow-up, given the inherent difficulties of sequential biopsies to monitor therapeutic response. When combined with anatomical or other types of imaging, MRS provides unique information regarding biochemistry in inoperable brain tumors and can complement neuropathological data, guide biopsies and enhance insight into therapeutic options. The combination of noninvasively acquired prognostic information and the high-resolution anatomical imaging provided by conventional MRI is expected to surpass molecular analysis and DNA microarray gene profiling, both of which, although promising, depend on invasive biopsy. This review focuses on recent data in the field of MRS in children with brain tumors. PMID:27233788

  7. Recent advances in imaging of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D A Sanghvi

    2009-01-01

    The next decade will witness further sophistication of these techniques, with data available from larger studies. It is expected that imaging will continue to provide new and unique insights in neuro-oncology, which should hopefully contribute to the better management of patients with brain tumors.

  8. Non-FDG PET imaging of brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zemin; GUAN Yihui; ZUO Chuantao; ZHANG Zhengwei; XUE Fangping; LIN Xiangtong

    2007-01-01

    Due to relatively high uptake of glucose in the brain cortex, the use of FDG PET imaging is greatly limited in brain tumor imaging, especially for low-grade gliomas and some metastatic tumours. More and more tracers with higher specificity were developed lately for brain tumor imaging. There are 3 main types of non-FDG PET tracers:amino acid tracers, choline tracers and nucleic acid tracers. These tracers are now widely applied in many aspects of brain tumor imaging. This article summarized the general use of non-FDG PET in different aspects of brain tumor imaging.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging method based on the detecting signal from hydrogen nuclei of water molecules and fat. Performances of MRI are continuously increasing, and its domains of investigation of the human body are growing in both morphological and functional study. MRI also allows It also performing advanced management of tumours especially in the brain, by combining anatomical information (morphological MRI), functional (diffusion, perfusion and BOLD contrast) and metabolic (tissue composition in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). The MRI techniques have an important role in cancerology. These techniques allow essential information for the diagnosis and answering therapist's questions before, during or after the treatment. The MR allows clarifying the localization of expanding processes, the differential diagnosis between brain tumour and a lesion confined by another structural aspect, the diagnosis of the tumoral aspect of a lesion, the histological ranking in case of glial tumour and the extension of its localization as well as the therapeutic follow-up (pre-therapeutic and post-therapeutics assessments). A better combination between the morphological, functional and metabolic studies, as well as integrating new technical developments, especially while using a multichannel bird cage coils the 3T magnet and suitable computing software, would allow significant improvements of the exploration strategies and management of brain tumors.

  10. Wavelet Based Image Fusion for Detection of Brain Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CYN Dwith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumor, is one of the major causes for the increase in mortality among children and adults. Detecting the regions of brain is the major challenge in tumor detection. In the field of medical image processing, multi sensor images are widely being used as potential sources to detect brain tumor. In this paper, a wavelet based image fusion algorithm is applied on the Magnetic Resonance (MR images and Computed Tomography (CT images which are used as primary sources to extract the redundant and complementary information in order to enhance the tumor detection in the resultant fused image. The main features taken into account for detection of brain tumor are location of tumor and size of the tumor, which is further optimized through fusion of images using various wavelet transforms parameters. We discuss and enforce the principle of evaluating and comparing the performance of the algorithm applied to the images with respect to various wavelets type used for the wavelet analysis. The performance efficiency of the algorithm is evaluated on the basis of PSNR values. The obtained results are compared on the basis of PSNR with gradient vector field and big bang optimization. The algorithms are analyzed in terms of performance with respect to accuracy in estimation of tumor region and computational efficiency of the algorithms.

  11. Imaging of brain tumors with histological correlations. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelegas, Antonios (ed.)

    2011-07-01

    This volume provides a deeper understanding of the diagnosis of brain tumors by correlating radiographic imaging features with the underlying pathological abnormalities. All modern imaging modalities are used to complete a diagnostic overview of brain tumors with emphasis on recent advances in diagnostic neuroradiology. High-quality illustrations depicting common and uncommon imaging characteristics of a wide range of brain tumors are presented and analysed, drawing attention to the ways in which these characteristics reflect different aspects of pathology. Important theoretical considerations are also discussed. Since the first edition, chapters have been revised and updated and new material has been added, including detailed information on the clinical application of functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. Radiologists and other clinicians interested in the current diagnostic approach to brain tumors will find this book to be an invaluable and enlightening clinical tool. (orig.)

  12. The Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menze, Bjoern H.; Jakab, Andras; Bauer, Stefan;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report the set-up and results of the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS) organized in conjunction with the MICCAI 2012 and 2013 conferences. Twenty state-of-the-art tumor segmentation algorithms were applied to a set of 65 multi-contrast MR scans of low- a...

  13. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  14. Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging of brain tumor specimens during neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello Enrico; Schiariti, Marco P.; Grana, Chiara M.; Ferrari, Mahila; Cremonesi, Marta; Boschi, Federico

    2016-05-01

    We presented the first example of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI) of human tumor specimens. A patient with a brain meningioma localized in the left parietal region was injected with 166 MBq of Y90-DOTATOC the day before neurosurgery. The specimens of the tumor removed during surgery were imaged using both CLI and RLI using an optical imager prototype developed in our laboratory. The system is based on a cooled electron multiplied charge coupled device coupled with an f/0.95 17-mm C-mount lens. We showed for the first time the possibility of obtaining CLI and RLI images of fresh human brain tumor specimens removed during neurosurgery.

  15. Skull-stripping for Tumor-bearing Brain Images

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Stefan; Reyes, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Skull-stripping separates the skull region of the head from the soft brain tissues. In many cases of brain image analysis, this is an essential preprocessing step in order to improve the final result. This is true for both registration and segmentation tasks. In fact, skull-stripping of magnetic resonance images (MRI) is a well-studied problem with numerous publications in recent years. Many different algorithms have been proposed, a summary and comparison of which can be found in [Fennema-Notestine, 2006]. Despite the abundance of approaches, we discovered that the algorithms which had been suggested so far, perform poorly when dealing with tumor-bearing brain images. This is mostly due to additional difficulties in separating the brain from the skull in this case, especially when the lesion is located very close to the skull border. Additionally, images acquired according to standard clinical protocols, often exhibit anisotropic resolution and only partial coverage, which further complicates the task. There...

  16. Assessment of brain retraction injury from tumor operation with 99Tcm-ECD brain SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the rCBF of brain retraction injury by 99Tcm-ECD SPECT imaging. Methods: The 99Tcm-ECD SPECT brain imaging was performed in 21 patients with brain tumor before and after operation. To compare the rCBF of peripheral tumor region with that of retraction injury region by semi-quantitative analysis. The rCBF levels of the central and peripheral areas of brain retraction injury were also studied. Results: Both the peripheral tumor region before operation and retraction region after operation were ischemic, but the difference between them was significant (P99Tcm-ECD SPECT brain imaging is a useful technique in detecting retraction injury come from brain tumor operation

  17. Pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  18. Pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  19. Simulation of brain tumor resection in image-guided neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images are typically used for neuronavigation in image-guided neurosurgery. However, intraoperative brain deformation (e.g., as a result of gravitation, loss of cerebrospinal fluid, retraction, resection, etc.) significantly degrades the accuracy in image guidance, and must be compensated for in order to maintain sufficient accuracy for navigation. Biomechanical finite element models are effective techniques that assimilate intraoperative data and compute whole-brain deformation from which to generate model-updated MR images (uMR) to improve accuracy in intraoperative guidance. To date, most studies have focused on early surgical stages (i.e., after craniotomy and durotomy), whereas simulation of more complex events at later surgical stages has remained to be a challenge using biomechanical models. We have developed a method to simulate partial or complete tumor resection that incorporates intraoperative volumetric ultrasound (US) and stereovision (SV), and the resulting whole-brain deformation was used to generate uMR. The 3D ultrasound and stereovision systems are complimentary to each other because they capture features deeper in the brain beneath the craniotomy and at the exposed cortical surface, respectively. In this paper, we illustrate the application of the proposed method to simulate brain tumor resection at three temporally distinct surgical stages throughout a clinical surgery case using sparse displacement data obtained from both the US and SV systems. We demonstrate that our technique is feasible to produce uMR that agrees well with intraoperative US and SV images after dural opening, after partial tumor resection, and after complete tumor resection. Currently, the computational cost to simulate tumor resection can be up to 30 min because of the need for re-meshing and the trial-and-error approach to refine the amount of tissue resection. However, this approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow

  20. Brain abscesses in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) - comparison to cystic brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical usefulness of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was evaluated in patients with brain abscesses in comparison to patients with cystic brain tumors. Five patients with surgically confirmed brain abscesses underwent beside a brain MRI examination with contrast media application diffusion weighted imaging. Apparent diffusion coefficients (rADC) in three orthogonal diffusion gradient were calculated. The same protocol was used to examine 5 patients with cystic brain tumors. Showing an rADC of 0.33 x 10-3/mm2/s abscesses have a highly restricted diffusion in comparison to cystic brain tumors with an rADC of 1,67 x 10-3/mm2/s. Diffusion weighted imaging is a usefull diagnostic tool in the work up of brain abscesses. (orig.)

  1. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are metastatic, ...

  2. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  3. Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging for metastatic brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present series consists of 24 patients with brain metastasis smaller than 10 mm in diameter demonstrated on Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging (Gd-MRI). All patients underwent contrast-enhanced (CE) CT to be compared with Gd-MRI in size, number and detectability. The primary lesions of the series included 18 patients with lung cancer (9 with adenocarcinoma, 4 with small cell cancer, 3 with squamous cell cancer and 2 with large cell cancer), 4 with breast cancer, and each 1 with parotid cancer and renal cell carcinoma. All 24 patients except one who underwent surgery were treated with radiation therapy. In 13 patients examined by Gd-MRI and CE-CT both before and after the brain irradiation, therapeutic effect was estimated on each diagnostic imaging comparatively. In regard to size of brain metastases of 24 patients, 91 lesions smaller than 5 mm in diameter were detected by Gd-MRI but only 15 by CE-CT. Three of all patients, no brain metastasis was found on CE-CT. In 6 patients estimated as CR (complete remission) by CE-CT after brain irradiation, Gd-MRI evidenced tumor residues in 5 patients to alter the score of therapeutic effect as PR (partial remission). The difference in therapeutic effects confirmed by Gd-MRI was noted according to histological results and size of metastasis. The most radiosensitive tumor was small cell lung cancer, of which brain metastases smaller than 5 mm in diameter completely disappeared after 20∼50 Gy irradiation. Prophylactic whole brain irradiation has been an alternative indication for small cell lung cancer when CT showed no evidence of brain metastasis. However, our data strongly suggest that the small or tiny brain metastases negative on CE-CT will become new subjects of 'radical' radiotherapy. The higher sensitivity of Gd-MRI for detecting brain metastasis may propose new clinical prospects in staging, planning of therapy and estimation of therapeutic effect. (author)

  4. Using Diffusion-weighted Images to Identify Brain Tumors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marcon, P.; Bartušek, Karel; Šprláková, A.

    Cambridge: The Electromagnetics Academy, 2014, s. 2340-2343. ISBN 978-1-934142-28-8. [PIERS 2014. Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium /35./. Guangzhou (CN), 25.08.2014-28.08.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/1104 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : brain tumor * MRI * diffusion-weighted image s Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  5. Differential MRI Diagnosis Between Brain Abscess and Necrotic or Cystic Brain Tumors Using Diffusion Weighted Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinat Miabi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nIntroduction: Differentiating brain abscesses from cystic or necrotic tumors by CT or MR imaging can be difficult. Difficulties in the diagnosis of intracranial abscess are mainly due to the combination of often unspecified clinical findings and similarities in the morphologic appearance of some intracranial mass lesions, such as cystic gliomas, metastases, and brain abscesses. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides a way to evaluate the diffusion properties of water molecules in tissue and has been used for diseases such as ischemia, tumors, epilepsy, and white matter disorders. The goal of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic utility of diffusion MRI to differentiate between brain abscesses and necrotic or cystic brain tumors. "nMaterials and Methods: MRI was performed in 17 patients (12 men and five women; age range, 19–74 years [mean, 55 years] with necrotic lesions and MR imaging evidence of ring-shaped enhancement after the injection of contrast material .In addition to standard MR sequences diffusion weighted MRI with apparent coefficient (ADC maps. "nResults: Eleven patients had tumors, and six had pyogenic abscesses. The tumors were glioblastomas (five patients, anaplastic astrocytoma (three patients, metastases (three patients, and primary malignancy, including lung (2 and breast (1 cancer. Surgical or stereotactic biopsies were obtained, and histologic studies were performed in all except one case (case 5. In the cases of abscess, bacteriologic analysis was also conducted. None of these lesions appeared hemorrhagic on T1-weighted images. "nConclusion: Diffusion-weighted imaging is useful for differentiating brain abscess from cystic or necrotic brain tumor, which is often difficult with conventional MR imaging. Diffusion-weighted imaging is useful as an additional imaging technique for establishing the differential diagnosis between brain abscesses and cystic or necrotic brain tumors. It requires less imaging time and is more

  6. Round Randomized Learning Vector Quantization for Brain Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Norul Huda Sheikh Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI classification into normal and abnormal is a critical and challenging task. Owing to that, several medical imaging classification techniques have been devised in which Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ is amongst the potential. The main goal of this paper is to enhance the performance of LVQ technique in order to gain higher accuracy detection for brain tumor in MRIs. The classical way of selecting the winner code vector in LVQ is to measure the distance between the input vector and the codebook vectors using Euclidean distance function. In order to improve the winner selection technique, round off function is employed along with the Euclidean distance function. Moreover, in competitive learning classifiers, the fitting model is highly dependent on the class distribution. Therefore this paper proposed a multiresampling technique for which better class distribution can be achieved. This multiresampling is executed by using random selection via preclassification. The test data sample used are the brain tumor magnetic resonance images collected from Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center and UCI benchmark data sets. Comparative studies showed that the proposed methods with promising results are LVQ1, Multipass LVQ, Hierarchical LVQ, Multilayer Perceptron, and Radial Basis Function.

  7. Round Randomized Learning Vector Quantization for Brain Tumor Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) classification into normal and abnormal is a critical and challenging task. Owing to that, several medical imaging classification techniques have been devised in which Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) is amongst the potential. The main goal of this paper is to enhance the performance of LVQ technique in order to gain higher accuracy detection for brain tumor in MRIs. The classical way of selecting the winner code vector in LVQ is to measure the distance between the input vector and the codebook vectors using Euclidean distance function. In order to improve the winner selection technique, round off function is employed along with the Euclidean distance function. Moreover, in competitive learning classifiers, the fitting model is highly dependent on the class distribution. Therefore this paper proposed a multiresampling technique for which better class distribution can be achieved. This multiresampling is executed by using random selection via preclassification. The test data sample used are the brain tumor magnetic resonance images collected from Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center and UCI benchmark data sets. Comparative studies showed that the proposed methods with promising results are LVQ1, Multipass LVQ, Hierarchical LVQ, Multilayer Perceptron, and Radial Basis Function.

  8. IMPLEMENTATION OF BRAIN TUMOR IDENTIFICATION USING SVM AND CLASSIFICATION USING BAYESIAN CLASSIFIER IN MRI IMAGES

    OpenAIRE

    Sree Sankar.J*, R.A. Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors are one of the deadly diseases. Identifying the type of the brain tumor is very essential for the planning of treatment and surgery. Early detection and classification of the tumors will increase the chances of survival. In this paper we propose a methodology for the detection and classification of brain tumors from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans. Here for the tumor detection Support Vector Machine (SVM) is used and for classification of tumor Bayesian classifier is used....

  9. Brain Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: Quantification and Biomedical Applications in Alzheimer's Disease and Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Wardak, Mirwais

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a unique and powerful imaging technique that is used to visualize and quantify various biological processes in living subjects in health and disease. PET imaging can also provide biological information for the assessment of therapies. In this dissertation, we will cover three projects that utilize the quantitative capability of PET for studying two neurological disorders: Alzheimer's disease and brain tumors.One of the goals in PET imaging is to produce...

  10. Tumor angiogenesis in rabbit VX2 brain tumor: model establishment, pathologic study and preliminary imaging observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish a stable implanted model of VX2 rabbit brain tumor, and to evaluate the pathological and imaging features and tumor angiogenesis. Methods: Thirty New Zealand white rabbits were implanted with 100 μl viable VX2 tumor cells (107/ml) through a hole 5 mm to the right of the sagittal suture and 5 mm posterior to the coronal suture bored by a dental drill. MRI was performed every 2 days after 7 days of implantation to evaluate the growth of the tumor, and perfusion CT studies were performed in different days of tumor growth. After that the animals were sacrificed on days 14, 18, 22, 26, and 30 of tumor implantation. 2% Evans blue (2 ml/kg) was given intravenously in 16 of these animals 1 hour prior to sacrifice to detect the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The specimens of the rabbit brains were examined pathologically and histologically. VEGF and MVD were evaluated in immunohistochemical examination. Results: Of the 22 animals included into the study, the tumor grew in 20 animals, which could be seen clearly on MR imaging. Pathologic examination showed characteristics of squamous carcinoma. VEGF was expressed in all tumors with the mean rate of positive cells of (52.51 ± 19.15)% (19.5%-92.9%). Mean MVD was (51.30 ± 14.42) pice piece/microscope (25-81 pice piece/microscope). Using Pearson's linear correlation analysis, positive correlation was found between tumor growth time and volume (r=0.791, P=0.000), between MVD and tumor growth time (r=0.875, P=0.000), and between MVD and tumor volume (r=0.901, P=0.000), respectively. Spearman's rank correlation analysis showed positive correlation between VEGF grade and blue stain of the tumor (rs=0.594, P=0.015). Conclusion: A stable model of VX2 rabbit brain tumor has been established with the method of skull drilling. The method was simple and easy to use, with a high tumor growth rate and remarkable angiogenesis. The model is helpful for the pathological and radiological study of tumor

  11. Automatic detection of brain tumors in MR images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, P.; Kropatsch, W.G.; Bartušek, Karel

    Brno: University of technolgy, 2013, s. 577-580. ISBN 978-1-4799-0404-4. [International conference on telecommunications and signal processing /36./. Rome (IT), 02.07.2013-04.07.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/1104; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : brain symmetry * brain tumor * magnetic resonance * tumor detection Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  12. Brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNCT in the past was not widely accepted because of poor usability of a nuclear reactor as a neutron source. Recently, technical advancements in the accelerator field have made accelerator-based BNCT feasible. Consequently, clinical trials of intractable brain tumors have started using it since 2012. In this review, our clinical results obtained from conventional reactor-based BNCT for treatment of brain tumors are introduced. It is strong hope that accelerator-based BNCT becomes a standard therapy for current intractable brain tumors. (author)

  13. Fetal brain tumors: Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hérbene; José; Milani; Edward; Araujo; Júnior; Sérgio; Cavalheiro; Patrícia; Soares; Oliveira; Wagner; Jou; Hisaba; Enoch; Quinderé; Sá; Barreto; Maurício; Mendes; Barbosa; Luciano; Marcondes; Nardozza; Antonio; Fernandes; Moron

    2015-01-01

    Congenital central nervous system tumors diagnosed during pregnancy are rare, and often have a poor prognosis. The most frequent type is the teratoma. Use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance image allows the suspicion of brain tumors during pregnancy. However, the definitive diagnosis is only confirmed after birth by histology. The purpose of this mini-review article is to describe the general clinical aspects of intracranial tumors and describe the main fetal brain tumors.

  14. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  15. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of glial brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the author's experience with the use of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) on patients with glial tumors. Methods: A retrospective evaluation of a group of 24 patients with glial tumors was performed. There were eight patients with Grade II, eight patients with Grade III and eight patients with Grade IV tumors with a histologically proven diagnosis. All the patients underwent routine imaging including T2 weighted images, multidirectional diffusion weighted imaging (measured in 60 non-collinear directions) and T1 weighted non-enhanced and contrast enhanced images. The imaging sequence and evaluation software were produced by Massachusetts General Hospital Corporation (Boston, MA, USA). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were calculated in all patients. The white matter FA changes were assessed within the tumorous tissue, on the tumorous borderline and in the normally appearing white matter adjacent to the tumor. A three-dimensional model of the white matter tract was created to demonstrate the space relationship of the tumor and the capsula interna or corpus callosum in each case using the following fiber tracing parameters: FA step 0.25 and a tensor declination angle of 45 gr. An additional assessment of the tumorous tissue enhancement was performed. Results: A uniform homogenous structure with sharp demargination of the Grade II tumors and the wide rim of the intermedial FA in all Grade III tumors respectively, were found during the evaluation of the FA maps. In Grade IV tumors a variable demargination was noted on the FA maps. The sensitivity and specificity for the discrimination of low- and high-grade glial tumors using FA maps was revealed to be 81% and 87% respectively. If the evaluation of the contrast enhancement was combined with the evaluation of the FA maps, both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. Conclusion: Although the evaluation of the fractional anisotropy maps is not sufficient for glioma grading, the combination of

  16. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of glial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferda, Jiri, E-mail: ferda@fnplzen. [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Kastner, Jan [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Mukensnabl, Petr [Sikl' s Institute of Pathological Anatomy, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Choc, Milan [Department of Neurosurgery, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Horemuzova, Jana; Ferdova, Eva; Kreuzberg, Boris [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-15

    Aim: To evaluate the author's experience with the use of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) on patients with glial tumors. Methods: A retrospective evaluation of a group of 24 patients with glial tumors was performed. There were eight patients with Grade II, eight patients with Grade III and eight patients with Grade IV tumors with a histologically proven diagnosis. All the patients underwent routine imaging including T2 weighted images, multidirectional diffusion weighted imaging (measured in 60 non-collinear directions) and T1 weighted non-enhanced and contrast enhanced images. The imaging sequence and evaluation software were produced by Massachusetts General Hospital Corporation (Boston, MA, USA). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were calculated in all patients. The white matter FA changes were assessed within the tumorous tissue, on the tumorous borderline and in the normally appearing white matter adjacent to the tumor. A three-dimensional model of the white matter tract was created to demonstrate the space relationship of the tumor and the capsula interna or corpus callosum in each case using the following fiber tracing parameters: FA step 0.25 and a tensor declination angle of 45 gr. An additional assessment of the tumorous tissue enhancement was performed. Results: A uniform homogenous structure with sharp demargination of the Grade II tumors and the wide rim of the intermedial FA in all Grade III tumors respectively, were found during the evaluation of the FA maps. In Grade IV tumors a variable demargination was noted on the FA maps. The sensitivity and specificity for the discrimination of low- and high-grade glial tumors using FA maps was revealed to be 81% and 87% respectively. If the evaluation of the contrast enhancement was combined with the evaluation of the FA maps, both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. Conclusion: Although the evaluation of the fractional anisotropy maps is not sufficient for glioma grading, the

  17. Imaging of non tumorous and tumorous human brain tissue with full-field optical coherence tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Assayag, Osnath; Devaux, Bertrand; Harms, Fabrice; Pallud, Johan; Chretien, Fabrice; Boccara, Claude; Varlet, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on neurosurgical samples from 18 patients to evaluate the use of Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) in brain tumor diagnosis. FF-OCT captures en face slices of tissue samples at 1\\mum resolution in 3D with a typical 200\\mum imaging depth. A 1cm2 specimen is scanned at a single depth and processed in about 5 minutes. This rapid imaging process is non-invasive and 30 requires neither contrast agent injection nor tissue preparation, which makes it particularly well suited to medical imaging applications. Temporal chronic epileptic parenchyma and brain tumors such as meningiomas, low- grade and high-grade gliomas, and choroid plexus papilloma were imaged. A subpopulation of neurons, myelin fibers and CNS vasculature were clearly identified. Cortex could be discriminated from white matter, but individual glial cells as astrocytes (normal or reactive) or oligodendrocytes were not observable. This study reports for the first time on the feasibility of using FF-OCT in a...

  18. Cerebral infarction mimicking brain tumor on Tc-99m tetrofosmin brain SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soon [College of Medicine, Dongguk Univ., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Zeon, Seok Kil; Won, Kyoung Sook [School of Medicine, Keimyung Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-01

    A 43-year-old man was presented with persistent headache for two weeks. T2 weighted MR imaging showed high signal intensity with surrounding edema in the left frontal lobe. These findings were considered with intracranial tumor such as glioma or metastasis. Tc-99m tetrofosmin SPECT showed focal radiotracer accumulation in the left frontal lobe. The operative specimen contained cerebral infarction with organizing leptomeningeal hematoma by pathologist. Another 73-year-old man was hospitalized for chronic headache. Initial CT showed ill-defined hypodensity with mass effect in the right parietal lobe. Tc-99m tetrofosmin SPECT showed focal radiotracer uptake in the right parietal lobe. These findings were considered with low-grade glioma or infarction. Follow-up CT after 5 months showed slightly decreased in size of low density in the right parietal lobe, and cerebral infarction is more likely than others. Tc-99m tetrofosmin has been proposed as a cardiotracer of myocardial perfusion imaging and an oncotropic radiotracer. Tc-99 tetrofosmin SPECT image provides a better attractive alternative agent than TI-201 as a tumor-imaging agent, with characteristics such as high-energy flux, short half-life, favorable biodistribution, dosimetry and lower background radioactivity. We have keep in mind on the analysis of Tc-99m tetrofosmin imaging when cerebral infarction is being differentiated from brain tumor.

  19. Usefulness of three-dimensional MR images of brain tumors for surgical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) MR imaging of brain tumors for surgical planning. Sixty-nine patients with various tumors of the brain were included in the present study. Using a volume-rendering (VR) method on an independent workstation, 3D-MR images were obtained with the fast-spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR) sequence after Gd-DTPA administration. VR images could show an exact relationship between the surface of the brain and major vessels. However, in patients with deeply located tumors, VR images did not necessarily provide sufficient information as to the relationship between the tumor and vessels. In combination with a surface-rendering method, 3D-MR imaging could demonstrate the exact relationships among the tumors, major vessels, and surface of the brain. In tumors without contrast enhancement, this method was able to show 3D images of tumors with surrounding structures. For neurosurgeons, 3D-MR images were useful for understanding the surface anatomy and surrounding structures of the tumors prior to surgery. These images were also helpful in explaining the condition of the disease to patients and their families. (author)

  20. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  1. A survey of MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stefan; Wiest, Roland; Nolte, Lutz-P.; Reyes, Mauricio

    2013-07-01

    MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies is gaining attention in recent times due to an increased need for efficient and objective evaluation of large amounts of data. While the pioneering approaches applying automated methods for the analysis of brain tumor images date back almost two decades, the current methods are becoming more mature and coming closer to routine clinical application. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview by giving a brief introduction to brain tumors and imaging of brain tumors first. Then, we review the state of the art in segmentation, registration and modeling related to tumor-bearing brain images with a focus on gliomas. The objective in the segmentation is outlining the tumor including its sub-compartments and surrounding tissues, while the main challenge in registration and modeling is the handling of morphological changes caused by the tumor. The qualities of different approaches are discussed with a focus on methods that can be applied on standard clinical imaging protocols. Finally, a critical assessment of the current state is performed and future developments and trends are addressed, giving special attention to recent developments in radiological tumor assessment guidelines.

  2. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging After High-Dose Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Childhood Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Brain necrosis or other subacute iatrogenic reactions has been recognized as a potential complication of radiotherapy (RT), although the possible synergistic effects of high-dose chemotherapy and RT might have been underestimated. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the clinical and radiologic data of 49 consecutive children with malignant brain tumors treated with high-dose thiotepa and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue, preceded or followed by RT. The patients were assessed for neurocognitive tests to identify any correlation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anomalies. Results: Of the 49 children, 18 (6 of 25 with high-grade gliomas and 12 of 24 with primitive neuroectodermal tumors) had abnormal brain MRI findings occurring a median of 8 months (range, 2-39 months) after RT and beginning to regress a median of 13 months (range, 2-26 months) after onset. The most common lesion pattern involved multiple pseudonodular, millimeter-size, T1-weighted unevenly enhancing, and T2-weighted hyperintense foci. Four patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumors also had subdural fluid leaks, with meningeal enhancement over the effusion. One-half of the patients had symptoms relating to the new radiographic findings. The MRI lesion-free survival rate was 74% ± 6% at 1 year and 57% ± 8% at 2 years. The number of marrow ablative courses correlated significantly to the incidence of radiographic anomalies. No significant difference was found in intelligent quotient scores between children with and without radiographic changes. Conclusion: Multiple enhancing cerebral lesions were frequently seen on MRI scans soon after high-dose chemotherapy and RT. Such findings pose a major diagnostic challenge in terms of their differential diagnosis vis-a-vis recurrent tumor. Their correlation with neurocognitive results deserves further investigation

  3. Contrast-enhanced fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging in patients with brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Kyo; Na, Dong Gyu; Ryoo, Wook Jae; Byun Hong Sik; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Kim, Jong hyun [Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    To assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) MR imaging in patients with brain tumors. This study involved 31 patients with pathologically proven brain tumors and nine with clinically diagnosed metastases. In all patients, T2-weighted, fast FLAIR, images were visual contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images were obtained. Contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR images were visually compared with other MR sequences in terms of tumor conspicuity. In order to distinguish tumor and surrounding edema, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR images were compared with fast FLAIR and T2-weighted images. The tumor-to- white matter contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), as demonstrated by T2-weighted, fast FLAIR, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging, were quantitatively assessed and compared. For the visual assessment of tumor conspicuity, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR image imaging superior to fast FLAIR in 60% of cases (24/40), and superior to T2-weighted in 70% (28/40). Contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging was inferior to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted in 58% of cases (23/40). For distinguishing between tumor and surrounding edema, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging was superior to fast FLAIR or T2-weighted in 22 of 27 tumors with peritumoral edema (81%). Quantitatively, CNR was the highest on contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR image and the lowest on fast FLAIR. For the detection of leptomeningeal metastases, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR was partially superior to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging in two of three high-grade gliomas. Although contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging should not be seen as a replacement for conventional modalities, it provides additional informaton for assessment of the extent of glial cell tumors and leptomeningeal metastases in patients with brain tumors. (author)

  4. Contrast-enhanced fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging in patients with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) MR imaging in patients with brain tumors. This study involved 31 patients with pathologically proven brain tumors and nine with clinically diagnosed metastases. In all patients, T2-weighted, fast FLAIR, images were visual contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images were obtained. Contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR images were visually compared with other MR sequences in terms of tumor conspicuity. In order to distinguish tumor and surrounding edema, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR images were compared with fast FLAIR and T2-weighted images. The tumor-to- white matter contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), as demonstrated by T2-weighted, fast FLAIR, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging, were quantitatively assessed and compared. For the visual assessment of tumor conspicuity, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR image imaging superior to fast FLAIR in 60% of cases (24/40), and superior to T2-weighted in 70% (28/40). Contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging was inferior to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted in 58% of cases (23/40). For distinguishing between tumor and surrounding edema, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging was superior to fast FLAIR or T2-weighted in 22 of 27 tumors with peritumoral edema (81%). Quantitatively, CNR was the highest on contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR image and the lowest on fast FLAIR. For the detection of leptomeningeal metastases, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR was partially superior to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging in two of three high-grade gliomas. Although contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging should not be seen as a replacement for conventional modalities, it provides additional informaton for assessment of the extent of glial cell tumors and leptomeningeal metastases in patients with brain tumors. (author)

  5. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining. PMID:26830089

  6. Novel positron emission tomography radiotracers in brain tumor imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Mathew D′Souza; Rajnish Sharma; Madhavi Tripathi; Puja Panwar; Abhinav Jaimini; Anupam Mondal

    2011-01-01

    Although [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the most widely used radiopharmaceutical the world over, it is not the ideal tracer for brain imaging, owing to its high physiological cortical uptake and lack of specificity. This has paved the way for the introduction of several novel radiotracers, each with their own inherent strengths and limitations. We present the insights gained from the use of these radiotracers at our institution.

  7. Novel positron emission tomography radiotracers in brain tumor imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mathew D′Souza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG is the most widely used radiopharmaceutical the world over, it is not the ideal tracer for brain imaging, owing to its high physiological cortical uptake and lack of specificity. This has paved the way for the introduction of several novel radiotracers, each with their own inherent strengths and limitations. We present the insights gained from the use of these radiotracers at our institution.

  8. Brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) is the method of choice for the diagnostics of cerebral gliomas, but the differentiation of tumour tissue from unspecific tissue changes is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET) and Single-Photon-Emission-Computed Tomography (SPECT) may offer relevant additional information which allows for a more accurate diagnostics in unclear situations. Especially, radiolabeled amino acids offer a better delineation of cerebral gliomas which allows an improved guidance of biopsy, planning of surgery and radiation therapy. Furthermore, amino acid imaging appears to be useful to differentiate tumor recurrence from unspecific posttherapeutic tissue, to predict the prognosis especially in low grade gliomas and to monitor the metabolic response during tumor therapy. (orig.)

  9. American Brain Tumor Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Health Care Professionals About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Tumor Grade Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics ABTA Publications Brain Tumor ...

  10. Brain Tumor Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatric Caregiver Resource Center About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Tumor Grade Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics ABTA Publications Brain Tumor ...

  11. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  12. {sup 18}F-labeled RGD peptide: initial evaluation for imaging brain tumor angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xiaoyuan; Park, Ryan; Shahinian, Anthony H.; Tohme, Michel; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Bozorgzadeh, Mohammed H.; Bading, James R.; Moats, Rex; Laug, Walter E.; Conti, Peter S. E-mail: pconti@usc.edu

    2004-02-01

    Brain tumors are highly angiogenesis dependent. The cell adhesion receptor integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} is overexpressed in glioma and activated endothelial cells and plays an important role in brain tumor growth, spread and angiogenesis. Suitably labeled {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-integrin antagonists may therefore be useful for imaging brain tumor associated angiogenesis. Cyclic RGD peptide c(RGDyK) was labeled with {sup 18}F via N-succinimidyl-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoate through the side-chain {epsilon}-amino group of the lysine residue. The radiotracer was evaluated in vivo for its tumor targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics in subcutaneously implanted U87MG and orthotopically implanted U251T glioblastoma nude mouse models by means of microPET, quantitative autoradiography and direct tissue sampling. The N-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoyl-RGD ([{sup 18}F]FB-RGD) was produced in less than 2 h with 20-25% decay-corrected yields and specific activity of 230 GBq/{mu}mol at end of synthesis. The tracer showed very rapid blood clearance and both hepatobiliary and renal excretion. Tumor-to-muscle uptake ratio at 30 min was approximately 5 in the subcutaneous U87MG tumor model. MicroPET imaging with the orthotopic U251T brain tumor model revealed very high tumor-to-brain ratio, with virtually no uptake in the normal brain. Successful blocking of tumor uptake of [{sup 18}F]FB-RGD in the presence of excess amount of c(RGDyK) revealed receptor specific activity accumulation. Hence, N-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoyl labeled cyclic RGD peptide [{sup 18}F]FB-RGD is a potential tracer for imaging {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-integrin positive tumors in brain and other anatomic locations.

  13. Development of image-processing software for automatic segmentation of brain tumors in MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the commercially available software for brain tumor segmentation have limited functionality and frequently lack the careful validation that is required for clinical studies. We have developed an image-analysis software package called 'Prometheus,' which performs neural system-based segmentation operations on MR images using pre-trained information. The software also has the capability to improve its segmentation performance by using the training module of the neural system. The aim of this article is to present the design and modules of this software. The segmentation module of Prometheus can be used primarily for image analysis in MR images. Prometheus was validated against manual segmentation by a radiologist and its mean sensitivity and specificity was found to be 85. 7 4.89% and 93. 2±2.87%, respectively. Similarly, the mean segmentation accuracy and mean correspondence ratio was found to be 92. 35±3. 37% and 0. 78±0. 046, respectively. (author)

  14. Adolescent and Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abta.org Donate Now Menu Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ... or Complete our contact form Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ...

  15. Optimizing brain tumor resection. Midfield interventional MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, E

    2001-11-01

    The development of the intraoperative MR imager represents an important example of creative vision and interdisciplinary teamwork. The result is a remarkable tool for neurosurgical applications. MRT allows surgical manipulation under direct visualization of the intracranial contents through the eye of the surgeon and through the volumetric images of the MR imaging system. This technology can be applied to cranial and spinal cases, and forseeably can encompass application to the entire gamut of neurosurgical efforts. The author's experience has been that this device is easy and comfortable for the surgeon to use. Image acquisition, giving views in the plane of choice, lasts no more than 2 to 60 seconds (depending on the imaging method), and does not increase the duration of a given procedure substantially. The author believes that the information received through intraoperative MR imaging scanning ultimately will contribute to decreasing the duration of surgery. Future possibilities include combining the intraoperative MR imager with other technologies, such as the endoscope, focused ultrasound, robotics, and the evaluation of brain function intraoperatively. The development of the intraoperative MR imager marks a significant advance in neurosurgery, an advance that will revolutionize intraoperative visualization as fully as the operating microscope. The combination of intraoperative visualization and precise surgical navigation is unparalleled, and its enhancement of surgical applications will be widespread. Considering the remarkable potential of the intraoperative MR imager for neurosurgical applications, optimal magnet design, image quality, and navigational methods are necessary to capitalize on the advantages of this revolutionary tool. The intraoperative MR imaging system that the author's team has developed and used has combined these features, and allows the performance of open surgical procedures without the need of patient or magnet repositioning. By

  16. 1H chemical shift imaging characterization of human brain tumor and edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of metabolites in human brain tumor, peritumoral edema, and unaffected brain tissue were assessed from point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) 1H chemical shift imaging results at different repetition times (TR=1500 and 5000 ms; T1: n=19) and echo times (TE=135 and 270 ms; T2: n=7). Metabolite T1 and T2 relaxation times in unaffected brain tissue corresponded with those published for healthy volunteers. T2 relaxation times were reduced in tumor (choline, N-acetyl aspartate) and edema (choline, creatine) compared with unaffected brain tissue (p1H chemical shift imaging is most suited in the use of choline elevation as tumor marker. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of treatment response of gamma knife for brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xiao; ZHANG Xue-ning; ZHANG Yun-ting; YU Chun-shui; XU De-sheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in assessing treatment response to gamma knife radiosurgery for brain tumors.Data sources Published articles about assessing treatment response to gamma knife radiosurgery for brain tumors were selected using PubMed. The search terms were "MRI", "gamma knife" and "brain tumors".Study selection Articles regarding the MRI techniques using for early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife were selected.Results MRI techniques, especially diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, are useful for early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife by detecting the hemodynamic, metabolic, and cellular alterations. Moreover, they can also provide important information on prognosis.Conclusions Diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can provide early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife for brain tumors, and also information of tumor progression or recurrence earlier than conventional MRI. But there are still many questions to be answered which should be based on the development and advancement of MRI and related disciplines.

  18. Improved tumor identification using dual tracer molecular imaging in fluorescence guided brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Torres, Veronica; Straus, David; Brey, Eric M.; Byrne, Richard W.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    Brain tumors represent a leading cause of cancer death for people under the age of 40 and the probability complete surgical resection of brain tumors remains low owing to the invasive nature of these tumors and the consequences of damaging healthy brain tissue. Molecular imaging is an emerging approach that has the potential to improve the ability for surgeons to correctly discriminate between healthy and cancerous tissue; however, conventional molecular imaging approaches in brain suffer from significant background signal in healthy tissue or an inability target more invasive sections of the tumor. This work presents initial studies investigating the ability of novel dual-tracer molecular imaging strategies to be used to overcome the major limitations of conventional "single-tracer" molecular imaging. The approach is evaluated in simulations and in an in vivo mice study with animals inoculated orthotopically using fluorescent human glioma cells. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted Affibody-fluorescent marker was employed as a targeted imaging agent, and the suitability of various FDA approved untargeted fluorescent tracers (e.g. fluorescein & indocyanine green) were evaluated in terms of their ability to account for nonspecific uptake and retention of the targeted imaging agent. Signal-to-background ratio was used to measure and compare the amount of reporter in the tissue between targeted and untargeted tracer. The initial findings suggest that FDA-approved fluorescent imaging agents are ill-suited to act as untargeted imaging agents for dual-tracer fluorescent guided brain surgery as they suffer from poor delivery to the healthy brain tissue and therefore cannot be used to identify nonspecific vs. specific uptake of the targeted imaging agent where current surgery is most limited.

  19. False positive Tc-99m tetrofosmin brain tumor SPECT imaging in cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The Tc-99m tetrofosmin brain SPECT imaging is known to be useful for the therapeutic efficacy evaluation of brain tumor, follow-up study for the detection of tumor recurrence and differential diagnosis between radiation necrosis and recurred brain tumor. We would like to report two cases of brain infarction in the brain tumor SPECT with Tc-99m tetrofosmin. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one patients with suspected brain tumor underwent Tc-99m tetrofosmin SPECT from March, 1997 to July, 2001. Each patient received 800 MBq tetrofosmin intravenously followed by SPECT using a dual-head gamma camera after the rest of 30 minutes. Regions of interest were outlined in the tumor area using a computer-automated program to include all counts above background activity. Mean tumor activity were obtained from this region of interest. The tumor region of interest was mirrored to the contralateral uninvolved cerebral hemisphere to obtain background control count activity. Then tumor to background activity ratios were calculated. Results: Two of 31 patients were cerebral infarction. In these patients the clinical and radiological findings necessitated more information about the nature of the lesion before treatment planning. One of two patients was 43 year-old male and the other patient was 73 year-old male. Both patients complained continuous severe headache for two weeks. Their MRI and CT findings suggested inconclusive brain tumor. Thus Tc-99m tetrofosmin brain SPECT was performed that revealed an abnormal uptake in the left frontal lobe in one patient and in the right parietal lobe in the other patient. The tumor to background activity ratios were 10.0 and 3.35, respectively. Cerebral infarction was finally confirmed by excisional biopsy in the former patient and by follow-up CT after 5 months in the other patient. Conclusion: Two cases of intracranial Tc-99m tetrofosmin uptake, reported as positive tumor activity in patients with a final diagnosis of cerebral infarction

  20. A Review of Fully Automated Techniques for Brain Tumor Detection From MR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjum Hayat Gondal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiologists use medical images to diagnose diseases precisely. However, identification of brain tumor from medical images is still a critical and complicated job for a radiologist. Brain tumor identification form magnetic resonance imaging (MRI consists of several stages. Segmentation is known to be an essential step in medical imaging classification and analysis. Performing the brain MR images segmentation manually is a difficult task as there are several challenges associated with it. Radiologist and medical experts spend plenty of time for manually segmenting brain MR images, and this is a non-repeatable task. In view of this, an automatic segmentation of brain MR images is needed to correctly segment White Matter (WM, Gray Matter (GM and Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF tissues of brain in a shorter span of time. The accurate segmentation is crucial as otherwise the wrong identification of disease can lead to severe consequences. Taking into account the aforesaid challenges, this research is focused towards highlighting the strengths and limitations of the earlier proposed segmentation techniques discussed in the contemporary literature. Besides summarizing the literature, the paper also provides a critical evaluation of the surveyed literature which reveals new facets of research. However, articulating a new technique is beyond the scope of this paper.

  1. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Tumor Grading and Staging Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Webinars Anytime Learning About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain ...

  2. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  3. Evaluation of image quality of MRI data for brain tumor surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, Frank; Arlt, Felix; Geisler, Benjamin; Zidowitz, Stephan; Neumuth, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    3D medical images are important components of modern medicine. Their usefulness for the physician depends on their quality, though. Only high-quality images allow accurate and reproducible diagnosis and appropriate support during treatment. We have analyzed 202 MRI images for brain tumor surgery in a retrospective study. Both an experienced neurosurgeon and an experienced neuroradiologist rated each available image with respect to its role in the clinical workflow, its suitability for this specific role, various image quality characteristics, and imaging artifacts. Our results show that MRI data acquired for brain tumor surgery does not always fulfill the required quality standards and that there is a significant disagreement between the surgeon and the radiologist, with the surgeon being more critical. Noise, resolution, as well as the coverage of anatomical structures were the most important criteria for the surgeon, while the radiologist was mainly disturbed by motion artifacts.

  4. Necessity of medical imaging registration for brain tumor radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: For brain tumors, the GTV contouring on a CT scan is not precise enough since the soft tissue is hard to be determined. Considering this, the magnetic resonance is the superior method. The goal of this paper is to present the difference in dose distribution if GTV is contoured on a CT scan instead of on an MRI scan. Materials and methods: All 20 analysed patients had pretreatment CT scan of the head, immobilized with thermoplastic mask. Pre-operative MRI is attached to the patient. Both 3D scans are registered. Two plans are made for each patient. Pr is the real one made according to PTV, where GTV is contoured on MRI slices and all other volumes (CTV, PTV and OARs) on CT-slices. Pc is a plan for comparison, made according to PTVc. Like all other structures, GTVc is contoured on a CT-scan. Results: Three parameters are analysed, GTV, CTV dose distribution and conformity index. Analysis results show differences in the volumes of structures GTV and GTVc between 4 and 100 cm3 (Fig. 3), or between 2,3 and 21 mm in diameter if we transform volumes in spheres. The minimal dose coverage of CTV with all plans Pr is above 95 %, except in two cases (93,5 % and 94,5) But, only with three Pc plans the dose coverage of CTV is above 90 %. Index conformity values from the analysis show high level of conformation for all Pr plans and for one half of the Pc plans. For one third of the Pc plans, that values are not acceptable. The results presented in this paper show that the contouring of GTV without using MRI in modern radiotherapy results in sub-dosing of the volume of interest; and that multiple increase of uncertainty results in lower local tumour control. (Author)

  5. Clinical application of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (DWI) in the assessment of intracerebral malignant tumors. This study included 33 patients (10 with glioblastomas, 1 with anaplastic astrocytomas, 19 with brain metastases and 3 with malignant lymphomas) during the last 1.5 years. DWI was acquired using the diffusion-weighted, single-shot, multislice, echo planar SE sequence. In high-grade gliomas, malignant lymphomas and brain metastases, areas of tumors that showed significant enhancement on T1-weighted MR images after administration of contrast material were hyperintense on DWI. Furthermore, on DWI the edema surrounding glioblastomas produced higher signals than edema surrounding metastases. DWI is a clinically useful technique for studying malignant tumors. It enables us to differentiate various aspects of tumors (e.g., enhancing, nonenhancing, cystic, necrotic, or recurrence). Further investigations of pathological features of these areas are needed. (author)

  6. Enhancement of brain tumor MR images based on intuitionistic fuzzy sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wankai; Deng, He; Cheng, Lifang

    2015-12-01

    Brain tumor is one of the most fatal cancers, especially high-grade gliomas are among the most deadly. However, brain tumor MR images usually have the disadvantages of low resolution and contrast when compared with the optical images. Consequently, we present a novel adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy enhancement scheme by combining a nonlinear fuzzy filtering operation with fusion operators, for the enhancement of brain tumor MR images in this paper. The presented scheme consists of the following six steps: Firstly, the image is divided into several sub-images. Secondly, for each sub-image, object and background areas are separated by a simple threshold. Thirdly, respective intuitionistic fuzzy generators of object and background areas are constructed based on the modified restricted equivalence function. Fourthly, different suitable operations are performed on respective membership functions of object and background areas. Fifthly, the membership plane is inversely transformed into the image plane. Finally, an enhanced image is obtained through fusion operators. The comparison and evaluation of enhancement performance demonstrate that the presented scheme is helpful to determine the abnormal functional areas, guide the operation, judge the prognosis, and plan the radiotherapy by enhancing the fine detail of MR images.

  7. Gallium-68 ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) imaging of brain tumors by positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While noncontrast CT demonstrates the effects of brain tumors, such as regions surrounding the tumors with low CT numbers, contrast is often required to show the tumor itself. Unfortunately, contrast may cause seizures in 9-15% of patients with brain metastases. Contrast enters the tumor region because of absence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Chelates have been used in planar nuclear imaging to study BBB integrity, but have not been used widely in position tomography. The authors carried out positron tomography (PET) with Ga-68 EDTA in 22 patients with suspected or proven brain tumors. In l3/22, the lesions were detected equally well by contract CT and PET. In 3/22 the lesions were more clearly visualized with PET than contrast CT. In 1 case, there as a more extensive abnormality on PET than on contract CT. In 2 post-operating patients, the presence of tumor was detected by contrast CT and PET, but interference from surgical clips obscured the CT but not the PET images. Indications for positron tomography with Ga-68 EDTA include allergy to contrast media, history of seizures with contrast media, or interfering opacities such as surgical clips or calcifications. An important characteristic of Ga-68 EDTA is that it is easily eluted from a long lived Ge-68 generator. Furthermore, GA-68 EDTA can be used to quantify BBB integrity with the appropriate modelling, e.g. as in steroid therapy

  8. Functional MRI procedures in the diagnosis of brain tumors. Perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the increased diagnostic accuracy of contrast material enhanced MR imaging, specification and grading of brain tumors are still only approximate at best: neither morphology, nor relaxation times or contrast material enhancement reliably predict tumor histology or tumor grade. As histology and tumor grade strongly influence which therapy concept is chosen, a more precise diagnosis is mandatory. With diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI, PWI) it is now possible to obtain important information regarding the cellular matrix and the relative regional cerebral blood volume (rrCBV) of brain tumors, which cannot be obtained with standard MR techniques. These dynamic-functional imaging techniques are very useful in the preoperative diagnosis of gliomas, lymphomas, and metastases, as well as in the differentiation of these neoplastic lesions from abscesses, atypical ischemic infarctions, and tumor-like manifestations of demyelinating disease. Additionally, they appear suitable for determining glioma grade and regions of active tumor growth which should be the target of stereotactic biopsy and therapy. After therapy these techniques are helpful to better assess the tumor response to therapy, possible therapy failure and therapy complications such as radiation necrosis. (orig.)

  9. Perfusion MR imaging: clinical utility for the differential diagnosis of various brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the utility of perfusion MR imaging in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors. Fifty-seven patients with pathologically proven brain tumors (21 high-grade gliomas, 8 low-grade gliomas, 8 lymphomas, 6 hemangioblastomas, 7 metastases, and 7 various other tumors) were included in this study. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and time-to-peak (TTP) ratios were quantitatively analyzed and the rCBV grade of each tumor was also visually assessed on an rCBV map. The highest rCBV ratios were seen in hemangioblastomas, followed by high-grade gliomas, metastases, low-grade gliomas, and lymphomas. There was no significant difference in TTP ratios between each tumor group (p>0.05). At visual assessment, rCBV was high in 17 (81%) of 21 high-grade gliomas and in 4 (50%) of 8 low-grade gliomas. Hemangioblastomas showed the highest rCBV and lymphomas the lowest. Perfusion MR imaging may be helpful in the differentiation of the various solid tumors found in the brain, and in assessing the grade of the various glial tumors occurring there

  10. Development of image-processing software for automatic segmentation of brain tumors in MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, C.; Gharpure, Damayanti Chandrashekhar

    2011-01-01

    Most of the commercially available software for brain tumor segmentation have limited functionality and frequently lack the careful validation that is required for clinical studies. We have developed an image-analysis software package called ‘Prometheus,’ which performs neural system–based segmentation operations on MR images using pre-trained information. The software also has the capability to improve its segmentation performance by using the training module of the neural system. The aim of this article is to present the design and modules of this software. The segmentation module of Prometheus can be used primarily for image analysis in MR images. Prometheus was validated against manual segmentation by a radiologist and its mean sensitivity and specificity was found to be 85.71±4.89% and 93.2±2.87%, respectively. Similarly, the mean segmentation accuracy and mean correspondence ratio was found to be 92.35±3.37% and 0.78±0.046, respectively. PMID:21897560

  11. Kinetic characterization of hexokinase isoenzymes from glioma cells: Implications for FDG imaging of human brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzi, Mark E-mail: muzi@u.washington.edu; Freeman, Scott D.; Burrows, Robert C.; Wiseman, Robert W.; Link, Jeanne M.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Graham, Michael M.; Spence, Alexander M

    2001-02-01

    Quantitative imaging of glucose metabolism of human brain tumors with PET utilizes 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and a conversion factor called the lumped constant (LC), which relates the metabolic rate of FDG to glucose. Since tumors have greater uptake of FDG than would be predicted by the metabolism of native glucose, the characteristic of tumors that governs the uptake of FDG must be part of the LC. The LC is chiefly determined by the phosphorylation ratio (PR), which is comprised of the kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) of hexokinase (HK) for glucose as well as for FDG (LC {proportional_to} (Km{sub glc} {center_dot} Vmax{sub FDG})/(Km{sub FDG} {center_dot} Vmax{sub glc})). The value of the LC has been estimated from imaging studies, but not validated in vitro from HK kinetic parameters. In this study we measured the kinetic constants of bovine and 36B-10 rat glioma HK I (predominant in normal brain) and 36B-10 glioma HK II (increased in brain tumors) for the hexose substrates glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) and FDG. Our principal results show that the KmGlc < KmFDG << Km2DG and that PR2DG < PRFDG. The FDG LC calculated from our kinetic parameters for normal brain, possessing predominantly HK I, would be higher than the normal brain LC predicted from animal studies using 2DG or human PET studies using FDG or 2DG. These results also suggest that a shift from HK I to HK II, which has been observed to increase in brain tumors, would have little effect on the value of the tumor LC.

  12. Kinetic characterization of hexokinase isoenzymes from glioma cells: Implications for FDG imaging of human brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative imaging of glucose metabolism of human brain tumors with PET utilizes 2-[18F]-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and a conversion factor called the lumped constant (LC), which relates the metabolic rate of FDG to glucose. Since tumors have greater uptake of FDG than would be predicted by the metabolism of native glucose, the characteristic of tumors that governs the uptake of FDG must be part of the LC. The LC is chiefly determined by the phosphorylation ratio (PR), which is comprised of the kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) of hexokinase (HK) for glucose as well as for FDG (LC ∝ (Kmglc · VmaxFDG)/(KmFDG · Vmaxglc). The value of the LC has been estimated from imaging studies, but not validated in vitro from HK kinetic parameters. In this study we measured the kinetic constants of bovine and 36B-10 rat glioma HK I (predominant in normal brain) and 36B-10 glioma HK II (increased in brain tumors) for the hexose substrates glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) and FDG. Our principal results show that the KmGlc < KmFDG << Km2DG and that PR2DG < PRFDG. The FDG LC calculated from our kinetic parameters for normal brain, possessing predominantly HK I, would be higher than the normal brain LC predicted from animal studies using 2DG or human PET studies using FDG or 2DG. These results also suggest that a shift from HK I to HK II, which has been observed to increase in brain tumors, would have little effect on the value of the tumor LC

  13. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... wireless devices Head injuries Smoking Hormone therapy SPECIFIC TUMOR TYPES Brain tumors are classified depending on: Location of the ...

  14. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  15. Interobserver variations in gross tumor volume delineation of brain tumors on computed tomography and impact of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: (1) To assess the interobserver variability of brain tumor delineation on computed tomography (CT). (2) To assess the impact of the addition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) information. Methods: Nine physicians were asked to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV) of five patients with supratentorial inoperable brain tumors on CT scans and 2 weeks (or more) later on MRIs. The delineations were performed on a computer screen. During delineation on MRI, the registered CT images (without delineation) were displayed on the screen (MRI+CT). Results: A high interobserver variability in GTV delineation on CT is found: the ratio of the largest to the smallest defined volumes varies for the five patients by factors of resp. 2.8, 1.8, 1.8, 1.9 and 1.7. The interobserver variability is as large on MRI+CT as on CT alone (ratio largest/smallest volume: 2.4, 1.7, 1.9, 2.7 and 1.5). Volumes delineated on MRI+CT (mean: 69.6 cm3) are larger than on CT alone (mean: 59.5 cm3). Residual volumes (volume delineated on one image modality but not on the other) are >0 for CT alone and for MRI+CT. Conclusions: A large interobserver variability in GTV delineation of brain tumors is demonstrated. The addition of MRI to CT does not reduce interobserver variability. GTVs delineated on MRI+CT are larger than on CT alone, but some volumes are delineated on CT and not on MRI. Therefore, a combination of the two image modalities is recommended for brain tumor delineation for treatment planning

  16. In vivo pink-beam imaging and fast alignment procedure for rat brain tumor radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoz, Christian; Kibleur, Astrid; Hyacinthe, Jean Noël; Berruyer, Gilles; Brochard, Thierry; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Le Duc, Géraldine; Brun, Emmanuel; Elleaume, Hélène; Serduc, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    A fast positioning method for brain tumor microbeam irradiations for preclinical studies at third-generation X-ray sources is described. The three-dimensional alignment of the animals relative to the X-ray beam was based on the X-ray tomography multi-slices after iodine infusion. This method used pink-beam imaging produced by the ID17 wiggler. A graphical user interface has been developed in order to define the irradiation parameters: field width, height, number of angles and X-ray dose. This study is the first reporting an image guided method for soft tissue synchrotron radiotherapy. It allowed microbeam radiation therapy irradiation fields to be reduced by a factor of ∼20 compared with previous studies. It permitted more targeted, more efficient brain tumor microbeam treatments and reduces normal brain toxicity of the radiation treatment. PMID:26698083

  17. Hemodynamic response imaging: a potential tool for the assessment of angiogenesis in brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafna Ben Bashat

    Full Text Available Blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD imaging under either hypercapnia or hyperoxia has been used to study neuronal activation and for assessment of various brain pathologies. We evaluated the benefit of a combined protocol of BOLD imaging during both hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenges (termed hemodynamic response imaging (HRI. Nineteen healthy controls and seven patients with primary brain tumors were included: six with glioblastoma (two newly diagnosed and four with recurrent tumors and one with atypical-meningioma. Maps of percent signal intensity changes (ΔS during hyperoxia (carbogen; 95%O2+5%CO2 and hypercapnia (95%air+5%CO2 challenges and vascular reactivity mismatch maps (VRM; voxels that responded to carbogen with reduced/absent response to CO2 were calculated. VRM values were measured in white matter (WM and gray matter (GM areas of healthy subjects and used as threshold values in patients. Significantly higher response to carbogen was detected in healthy subjects, compared to hypercapnia, with a GM/WM ratio of 3.8 during both challenges. In patients with newly diagnosed/treatment-naive tumors (n = 3, increased response to carbogen was detected with substantially increased VRM response (compared to threshold values within and around the tumors. In patients with recurrent tumors, reduced/absent response during both challenges was demonstrated. An additional finding in 2 of 4 patients with recurrent glioblastoma was a negative response during carbogen, distant from tumor location, which may indicate steal effect. In conclusion, the HRI method enables the assessment of blood vessel functionality and reactivity. Reference values from healthy subjects are presented and preliminary results demonstrate the potential of this method to complement perfusion imaging for the detection and follow up of angiogenesis in patients with brain tumors.

  18. Integrated MR imaging/P-31 MR spectroscopy studies of large pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied 14 children with brain tumors; the patient's ages ranged from 1 week to 16 years. All patients underwent surgical excision or biopsy within 1 week of MR imaging, and histologic confirmation was obtained. The authors used either surface coil localization or depth-resolved surface-coil spectroscopic (DRESS) localization in the P-31 MR spectroscopic portion of the study. Tumor volumes were estimated from the MR images and ranged between 10 and 585 cm3 (median size, 147 cm3). The pooled analysis indicates that the phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi) ratio was lower in malignant tumors (mean, 0.86 ± 0.15) than in benign tumors (mean, 2.0 ± 0.37) in these patients

  19. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of primary brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister, Daniel; Kingston, Sara; Hoque, Kristina E; Law, Meng; Shiroishi, Mark S

    2014-08-01

    Gliomas comprise 80% of primary brain neoplasms, with glioblastoma multiforme being the most commonly diagnosed glioma. The annual incidence is 5.26 per 100,000, or 17,000 newly diagnosed cases per year in the United States. The incidence increases with age, peaking between the 6th and 8th decades. Gliomas are more common among Caucasians and occur more often in men. They can be associated with certain rare hereditary syndromes including Cowden, Turcot, Li-Fraumeni, neurofibromatosis type 1 and type 2, tuberous sclerosis, and familial schwannomatosis. Known risk factors include a history of ionizing radiation, family history of glioma, and certain genetic susceptibility variants that are weakly associated with glioma. Preventative measures have not been shown to decrease the risk of later development. In addition, screening tests are unwarranted since early diagnosis and treatment have not been shown to improve outcome. PMID:25173141

  20. Computer aided detection of tumor and edema in brain FLAIR magnetic resonance image using ANN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nandita; Sinha, A. K.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an efficient region based segmentation technique for detecting pathological tissues (Tumor & Edema) of brain using fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images. This work segments FLAIR brain images for normal and pathological tissues based on statistical features and wavelet transform coefficients using k-means algorithm. The image is divided into small blocks of 4×4 pixels. The k-means algorithm is used to cluster the image based on the feature vectors of blocks forming different classes representing different regions in the whole image. With the knowledge of the feature vectors of different segmented regions, supervised technique is used to train Artificial Neural Network using fuzzy back propagation algorithm (FBPA). Segmentation for detecting healthy tissues and tumors has been reported by several researchers by using conventional MRI sequences like T1, T2 and PD weighted sequences. This work successfully presents segmentation of healthy and pathological tissues (both Tumors and Edema) using FLAIR images. At the end pseudo coloring of segmented and classified regions are done for better human visualization.

  1. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of alpha-[F-18]fluoromethyl phenylalanine for brain tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: Radiolabeled amino acids have proven utility for imaging brain tumors in humans, particularly those that target system L amino acid transport. We have prepared the novel phenylalanine analogue, α-[18F]fluoromethyl phenylalanine (FMePhe, ), as part of an effort to develop new system L tracers that can be prepared in high radiochemical yield through nucleophilic [18F]fluorination. The tumor imaging properties of both enantiomers of this new tracer were evaluated through cell uptake, biodistribution and microPET studies in the mouse DBT model of high grade glioma. Methods: The non-radioactive form of and the cyclic sulfamidate labeling precursor were prepared from commercially available racemic α-benzylserine. Racemic [18F] was prepared from the labeling precursor in two steps using standard[18F]fluoride nucleophilic reaction conditions followed by acidic deprotection. The individual enantiomers [18F]9a and [18F]9b were isolated using preparative chiral HPLC. In vitro uptake inhibition assays were performed with each enantiomer using DBT cells. Biodistribution and microPET/CT studies were performed with each enantiomer in male BALB/c mice at approximately 2 weeks after implantation of DBT tumor cells. Results: Radiolabeling of the cyclic sulfamidate precursor 5 provides racemic [18F] in high radiochemical yield (60%–70%, n = 4) and high radiochemical purity (> 96%, n = 4). In vitro uptake assays demonstrate that both [18F]9a and [18F]9b undergo tumor cell uptake through system L transport. The biodistribution studies using the single enantiomers [18F]9a and [18F]9b demonstrated good tumor uptake with lower uptake in most normal tissues, and [18F]9a had higher tumor uptake than [18F]9b. MicroPET imaging demonstrated good tumor visualization within 10 min of injection, rapid uptake of radioactivity, and tumor to brain ratios of approximately 6:1 at 60 min postinjection. Conclusions: The novel PET tracer, [18F]FMePhe, is readily synthesized in good yield

  2. A brain tumor molecular imaging strategy using a new triple-modality MRI-photoacoustic-Raman nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Zerda, Adam; Kircher, Moritz F.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Zavaleta, Cristina L.; Kempen, Paul J.; Mittra, Erik; Pitter, Ken; Huang, Ruimin; Campos, Carl; Habte, Frezghi; Sinclair, Robert; Brennan, Cameron W.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Holland, Eric C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-03-01

    The difficulty in delineating brain tumor margins is a major obstacle in the path toward better outcomes for patients with brain tumors. Current imaging methods are often limited by inadequate sensitivity, specificity and spatial resolution. Here we show that a unique triplemodality magnetic resonance imaging - photoacoustic imaging - Raman imaging nanoparticle (termed here MPR nanoparticles), can accurately help delineate the margins of brain tumors in living mice both preoperatively and intraoperatively. The MPRs were detected by all three modalities with at least a picomolar sensitivity both in vitro and in living mice. Intravenous injection of MPRs into glioblastoma-bearing mice led to MPR accumulation and retention by the tumors, with no MPR accumulation in the surrounding healthy tissue, allowing for a noninvasive tumor delineation using all three modalities through the intact skull. Raman imaging allowed for guidance of intraoperative tumor resection, and a histological correlation validated that Raman imaging was accurately delineating the brain tumor margins. This new triple-modality- nanoparticle approach has promise for enabling more accurate brain tumor imaging and resection.

  3. Content-based image retrieval using spatial layout information in brain tumor T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyan Huang

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop content-based image retrieval (CBIR system for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR (CE-MR images of brain tumors. When a tumor region is fed to the CBIR system as a query, the system attempts to retrieve tumors of the same pathological category. The bag-of-visual-words (BoVW model with partition learning is incorporated into the system to extract informative features for representing the image contents. Furthermore, a distance metric learning algorithm called the Rank Error-based Metric Learning (REML is proposed to reduce the semantic gap between low-level visual features and high-level semantic concepts. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain T1-weighted CE-MR dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor. Using the BoVW model with partition learning, the mean average precision (mAP of retrieval increases beyond 4.6% with the learned distance metrics compared with the spatial pyramid BoVW method. The distance metric learned by REML significantly outperforms three other existing distance metric learning methods in terms of mAP. The mAP of the CBIR system is as high as 91.8% using the proposed method, and the precision can reach 93.1% when the top 10 images are returned by the system. These preliminary results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and feasible for the retrieval of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MR Images.

  4. Content-based image retrieval using spatial layout information in brain tumor T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Wu, Yao; Jiang, Jun; Gao, Yang; Chen, Yang; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Lu, Zhentai

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to develop content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR (CE-MR) images of brain tumors. When a tumor region is fed to the CBIR system as a query, the system attempts to retrieve tumors of the same pathological category. The bag-of-visual-words (BoVW) model with partition learning is incorporated into the system to extract informative features for representing the image contents. Furthermore, a distance metric learning algorithm called the Rank Error-based Metric Learning (REML) is proposed to reduce the semantic gap between low-level visual features and high-level semantic concepts. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain T1-weighted CE-MR dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor). Using the BoVW model with partition learning, the mean average precision (mAP) of retrieval increases beyond 4.6% with the learned distance metrics compared with the spatial pyramid BoVW method. The distance metric learned by REML significantly outperforms three other existing distance metric learning methods in terms of mAP. The mAP of the CBIR system is as high as 91.8% using the proposed method, and the precision can reach 93.1% when the top 10 images are returned by the system. These preliminary results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and feasible for the retrieval of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MR Images. PMID:25028970

  5. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Michigan event celebrates 25 years Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  6. The registration accuracy analysis of different CT-MRI imaging fusion method in brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To find an effective CT-MRI image fusion protocol in brain tumor by analyzing the registration accuracy of different methods. Methods: The simulation CT scan and MRI T1 WI imaging of 10 brain tumor patients obtained with same position were registered by Tris-Axes landmark ,Tris-Axes landmark + manual adjustment, mutual information and mutual information + manual adjustment method. The clinical tumor volume (CTV) were contoured on both CT and MRI images respectively. The accuracy of image fusion was assessed by the mean distance of five bone markers (d1-5), central position of CTV (dCTV) the percentage of CTV overlap (PCT-MRI) between CT and MRI images. The difference between different methods was analyzed by Freedman M non-parameter test. Results: The difference of the means d1-5 between the Tris-Axes landmark,Tris-Axes landmark plus manual adjustment,mutual information and mutual information plus manual adjustment methods were 0.28 cm ±0.12 cm, 0.15 cm ±0.02 cm, 0.25 cm± 0.19 cm, 0.10 cm ± 0.06 cm, (M = 14.41, P = 0.002). the means dCTV were 0.59 cm ± 0.28 cm, 0.60 cm± 0.32 cm, 0.58 cm ± 0.39 cm, 0.42 cm± 0.30 cm (M = 9.72, P = 0.021), the means PCT-MRI were 0.69% ±0.18%, 0.68% ±0.16%, 0.66% ±0.17%, 0.74% ±0.14% (M =14.82, P=0.002), respectively. Conclusions: Mutual information plus manual adjustment registration method was the preferable fusion method for brain tumor patients. (authors)

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Diffusion Weighted MR Images of Brain Tumor Using Signal Intensity Gradient Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Shanbhag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion weighted-magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI in the examination and classification of brain tumors, namely, glioma and meningioma. Our hypothesis was that as signal intensity variations on diffusion weighted (DW images depend on histology and cellularity of the tumor, analysing the signal intensity characteristics on DW images may allow differentiating between the tumor types. Towards this end the signal intensity variations on DW images of the entire tumor volume data of 20 subjects with glioma and 12 subjects with meningioma were investigated and quantified using signal intensity gradient (SIG parameter. The relative increase in the SIG values (RSIG for the subjects with glioma and meningioma was in the range of 10.08–28.36 times and 5.60–9.86 times, respectively, compared to their corresponding SIG values on the contralateral hemisphere. The RSIG values were significantly different between the subjects with glioma and meningioma (P<0.01, with no overlap between RSIG values across the two tumors. The results indicate that the quantitative changes in the RSIG values could be applied in the differential diagnosis of glioma and meningioma, and their adoption in clinical diagnosis and treatment could be helpful and informative.

  8. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Tumors of the brain and ...

  9. Characterization of normal brain and brain tumor pathology by chisquares parameter maps of diffusion-weighted image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To characterize normal and pathologic brain tissue by quantifying the deviation of diffusion-related signal from a simple monoexponential decay, when measured over a wider than usual range of b-factors. Methods and materials: Line scan diffusion imaging (LSDI), with diffusion weighting at multiple b-factors between 100 and 5000 s/mm2, was performed on 1.5 T clinical scanners. Diffusion data of single slice sections were acquired in five healthy subjects and 19 brain tumor patients. In-patients, conventional T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained for reference purposes. The chisquare (χ2) error parameter associated with the monoexponential fits of the measured tissue water signals was then used to quantify the departure from a simple monoexponential signal decay on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Results: Diffusion-weighted images over a wider b-factor range than typically used were successfully obtained in all healthy subjects and patients. Normal and pathologic tissues demonstrated signal decays, which clearly deviate from a simple monoexponential behavior. The χ2 of cortical and deep grey matter was considerably lower than in white matter. In peritumoral edema, however, χ2 was 68% higher than in normal white matter. In highly malignant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) or anaplastic astrocytoma, χ2 values were on average almost 400% higher than in normal white matter, while for one low grade astrocytoma and two cases of metastasis, χ2 was not profoundly different from the χ2 value of white matter. Maps of the χ2 values provide good visualization of spatial details. However, the tumor tissue contrast generated appeared in many cases to be different from the enhancement produced by paramagnetic contrast agents. For example, in cases where the contrast agent only highlighted the rim of the tumor, χ2 enhancement was present within the solid part of the tumor. Conclusion: The deviation from a purely

  10. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... They are among the most common types of childhood cancers. Some are benign tumors, which aren't ... can still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches ...

  11. Brain imaging and brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage

  12. Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches for the Diagnosis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ciulla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research presents signal-image post-processing techniques called Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches with application to the diagnosis of human brain tumors detected through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Post-processing of the MRI of the human brain encompasses the following model functions: (i bivariate cubic polynomial, (ii bivariate cubic Lagrange polynomial, (iii monovariate sinc, and (iv bivariate linear. The following Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches were used: (i classic-curvature, (ii signal resilient to interpolation, (iii intensity-curvature measure and (iv intensity-curvature functional. The results revealed that the classic-curvature, the signal resilient to interpolation and the intensity-curvature functional are able to add additional information useful to the diagnosis carried out with MRI. The contribution to the MRI diagnosis of our study are: (i the enhanced gray level scale of the tumor mass and the well-behaved representation of the tumor provided through the signal resilient to interpolation, and (ii the visually perceptible third dimension perpendicular to the image plane provided through the classic-curvature and the intensity-curvature functional.

  13. Brain tumor imaging using small-angle x-ray scattering tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Torben H.; Bech, Martin; Bunk, Oliver; Thomsen, Maria; Menzel, Andreas; Bouchet, Audrey; Le Duc, Géraldine; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate high-resolution small-angle x-ray scattering computed tomography (SAXS-CT) of soft matter and soft tissue samples. Complete SAXS patterns over extended ranges of momentum transfer are reconstructed spatially resolved from volumes inside an extended sample. Several SAXS standard samples are used to quantitatively validate the method and demonstrate its performance. Further results on biomedical tissue samples (rat brains) are presented that demonstrate the advantages of the method compared to existing biomedical x-ray imaging approaches. Functional areas of the brains as well as tumor morphology are imaged. By providing insights into the structural organization at the nano-level, SAXS-CT complements and extends results obtainable with standard methods such as x-ray absorption tomography and histology.

  14. Functional MR imaging using sensory and motor task in brain tumors and other focal cerebral lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ok, Chul Su; Lim, Myung Kwan; Yu, Ki Bong; Kim, Hyung Jin; Suh, Chang Hae [College of Medicine, Inha Univ., Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    To determine the usefulness of the functional MRI (fMRI) using motor and sensory stimuli in patients with brain tumors of focal cerebral lesions. This study involved five patients with brain tumors (n=2) or cerebral lesions (cysticercosis (n=1)), arteriovenous malformation (n=1), focal infarction (n=1) and seven normal controls. For MR examinations a 1.5T scanner was used, and during motor or sensory stimulation, the EPI BOLD technique was employed. For image postprocessing an SPM program was utilized. In volunteers, contralateral sensori-motor cortices were activated by both motor and sensory stimuli, while supplementary motor cortices were activated by motor stimuli and other sensory cortices by sensory stimuli. Preoperative evaluation of the relationship between lesions and important sensory and motor areas was possible, and subsequent surgery was thus successful, involving no severe complications. Activation of ipsilateral or other areas occurred in patients with destruction of a major sensory and/or motor area, suggesting compensatory reorganization. fMRI could be a useful supportive method for determining the best approach to surgery treatment in patients with brain tumors or focal cerebral lesions.

  15. Functional MR imaging using sensory and motor task in brain tumors and other focal cerebral lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the usefulness of the functional MRI (fMRI) using motor and sensory stimuli in patients with brain tumors of focal cerebral lesions. This study involved five patients with brain tumors (n=2) or cerebral lesions (cysticercosis (n=1), arteriovenous malformation (n=1), focal infarction (n=1) and seven normal controls. For MR examinations a 1.5T scanner was used, and during motor or sensory stimulation, the EPI BOLD technique was employed. For image postprocessing an SPM program was utilized. In volunteers, contralateral sensori-motor cortices were activated by both motor and sensory stimuli, while supplementary motor cortices were activated by motor stimuli and other sensory cortices by sensory stimuli. Preoperative evaluation of the relationship between lesions and important sensory and motor areas was possible, and subsequent surgery was thus successful, involving no severe complications. Activation of ipsilateral or other areas occurred in patients with destruction of a major sensory and/or motor area, suggesting compensatory reorganization. fMRI could be a useful supportive method for determining the best approach to surgery treatment in patients with brain tumors or focal cerebral lesions

  16. Intraaxial brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of primary intracranial tumors in the United States is approximately 15,0000 new cases per year. It has been estimated that 80--85% of all intracranial tumors occur in adults; the majority are situated in the supratentorial compartment. In the pediatric population, intracranial tumors are extraordinarily common---the CNS is the second most common site of pediatric neoplasia. Excluding the first year of life and adolescence, the location of intracranial tumors in the pediatric age group is infratentorial in 60--70% of cases, of which 75% involve the cerebellum and 25% reside in the brainstem. The limitations of neuroimaging are often revealed by understanding the microscopic pathology of these lesions, just as the neuropathologist would find if he or she relied solely on gross pathology. The general correlation between pathology and imaging will be stressed in this paper. Innumerable schemes for tumor classification have been devised; unfortunately, no classification is perfect. For the purposes of this discussion, the author has modified the proposed classifications of tumors in an attempt to combine typical neuroanatomic sites with the complex divisions traditionally formed on the basis of histopathology, since it is well recognized that the clinical behavior of brain tumors can depend largely on their sites of origin

  17. In vivo pink-beam imaging and fast alignment procedure for rat brain tumor radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nemoz, Christian; Kibleur, Astrid; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noël; Berruyer, Gilles; Brochard, Thierry; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Le Duc, Géraldine; Brun, Emmanuel; Elleaume, Hélène; Serduc, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    A fast positioning method for brain tumor microbeam irradiations for preclinical studies at third-generation X-ray sources is described. The three-dimensional alignment of the animals relative to the X-ray beam was based on the X-ray tomography multi-slices after iodine infusion. This method used pink-beam imaging produced by the ID17 wiggler. A graphical user interface has been developed in order to define the irradiation parameters: field width, height, number of angles and X-ray dose. This...

  18. Epilepsy and Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-yi Sha

    2009-01-01

    @@ Epidemiology It is estimated 61,414 new cases of primary brain tumors are expected to be diagnosed in 2009 in the U.S. The incidence statistic of 61,414 persons diagnosed per year includes both malignant (22,738) and non-malignant (38,677) brain tumors. (Data from American Brain Tumor Association). During the years 2004-2005, approximately 359,000 people in the United States were living with the diagnosis of a primary brain or central nervous system tumor. Specifically, more than 81,000 persons were living with a malignant tumor, more than 267,000 persons with a benign tumor. For every 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 131 are living following the diagnosis of a brain tumor. This represents a prevalence rate of 130.8 per 100,000 person years[1].

  19. Functional imaging for brain tumors (perfusion, DTI and MR spectroscopy); Funktionelle Bildgebung bei Hirntumoren (Perfusion, DTI, MR-Spektroskopie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, M.; Giesel, F.; Stieltjes, B.; Weber, M.A. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radiologie

    2007-06-15

    This contribution considers the possibilities involved with using functional methods in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnostics for brain tumors. Of the functional methods available, we discuss perfusion MRI (PWI), diffusion MRI (DWI and DTI) and MR spectroscopy (H-MRS). In cases of brain tumor, PWI aids in grading and better differentiation in diagnostics as well as for pre-therapeutic planning. In addition, the course of treatment, both after chemo- as well as radiotherapy in combination with surgical treatment, can be optimized. PWI allows better estimates of biological activity and aggressiveness in low grade brain tumors, and in the case of WHO grade II astrocytoma showing anaplastically transformed tumor areas, allows more rapid visualization and a better prediction of the course of the disease than conventional MRI diagnostics. Diffusion MRI, due to the directional dependence of the diffusion, can illustrate the course and direction of the nerve fibers, as well as reconstructing the nerve tracts in the cerebrum, pons and cerebellum 3-dimensionally. Diffusion imaging can be used for describing brain tumors, for evaluating contralateral involvement and the course of the nerve fibers near the tumor. Due to its operator dependence, DTI based fiber tracking for defining risk structures is controversial. DWI can also not differentiate accurately between cystic and necrotic brain tumors, or between metastases and brain abscesses. H-MRS provides information on cell membrane metabolism, neuronal integrity and the function of neuronal structures, energy metabolism and the formation of tumors and brain tissue necroses. Diagnostic problems such as the differentiation between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions, grading cerebral glioma and distinguishing between primary brain tumors and metastases can be resolved. An additional contribution will discuss the control of the course of glial tumors after radiotherapy. (orig.)

  20. Development of NMR imaging using CEST agents: application to brain tumor in a rodent model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study aimed at developing saturation transfer imaging of lipoCEST contrast agents for the detection of angiogenesis in a U87 mouse brain tumor model. A lipoCEST with a sensitivity threshold of 100 pM in vitro was optimized in order to make it compatible with CEST imaging in vivo. Thanks to the development of an experimental setup dedicated to CEST imaging, we evaluated lipoCEST to detect specifically tumor angiogenesis. We demonstrated for the first time that lipoCEST visualization was feasible in vivo in a mouse brain after intravenous injection. Moreover, the integrin αvβ3 over expressed during tumor angiogenesis can be specifically targeted using a functionalized lipoCEST with RGD peptide. The specific association between the RGD-lipoCEST and its target αvβ3 was confirmed by immunohistochemical data and fluorescence microscopy. Finally, in order to tend to a molecular imaging protocol by CEST-MRI, we developed a quantification tool of lipoCEST contrast agents. This tool is based on modeling of proton exchange processes in vivo. By taking into account both B0 and B1 fields inhomogeneities which can dramatically alter CEST contrast, we showed that the accuracy of our quantification tool was 300 pM in vitro. The tool was applied on in vivo data acquired on the U87 mouse model and the maximum concentration of RGD-lipoCEST linked to their molecular targets was evaluated to 1.8 nM. (author)

  1. Detecting brain tumor in computed tomography images using Markov random fields and fuzzy C-means clustering techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain tumors, are an abnormal growth of tissues in the brain. They may arise in people of any age. They must be detected early, diagnosed accurately, monitored carefully, and treated effectively in order to optimize patient outcomes regarding both survival and quality of life. Manual segmentation of brain tumors from CT scan images is a challenging and time consuming task. Size and location accurate detection of brain tumor plays a vital role in the successful diagnosis and treatment of tumors. Brain tumor detection is considered a challenging mission in medical image processing. The aim of this paper is to introduce a scheme for tumor detection in CT scan images using two different techniques Hidden Markov Random Fields (HMRF) and Fuzzy C-means (FCM). The proposed method has been developed in this research in order to construct hybrid method between (HMRF) and threshold. These methods have been applied on 4 different patient data sets. The result of comparison among these methods shows that the proposed method gives good results for brain tissue detection, and is more robust and effective compared with (FCM) techniques

  2. Detecting brain tumor in computed tomography images using Markov random fields and fuzzy C-means clustering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulbaqi, Hayder Saad [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11700, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Physics, College of Education, University of Al-Qadisiya, Al-Qadisiya (Iraq); Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; Mustafa, Iskandar Shahrim Bin [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11700, Penang (Malaysia); Abood, Loay Kadom [Department of Computer Science, College of Science, University of Baghdad, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2015-04-24

    Brain tumors, are an abnormal growth of tissues in the brain. They may arise in people of any age. They must be detected early, diagnosed accurately, monitored carefully, and treated effectively in order to optimize patient outcomes regarding both survival and quality of life. Manual segmentation of brain tumors from CT scan images is a challenging and time consuming task. Size and location accurate detection of brain tumor plays a vital role in the successful diagnosis and treatment of tumors. Brain tumor detection is considered a challenging mission in medical image processing. The aim of this paper is to introduce a scheme for tumor detection in CT scan images using two different techniques Hidden Markov Random Fields (HMRF) and Fuzzy C-means (FCM). The proposed method has been developed in this research in order to construct hybrid method between (HMRF) and threshold. These methods have been applied on 4 different patient data sets. The result of comparison among these methods shows that the proposed method gives good results for brain tissue detection, and is more robust and effective compared with (FCM) techniques.

  3. Brain Tumor Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Press Releases Headlines Newsletter ABTA ... About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information Brain ...

  4. Improvement of therapeutic index for brain tumors with daily image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guidance maximizes the therapeutic index of brain irradiation by decreasing setup uncertainty. As dose-volume data emerge defining the tolerance of critical normal structures responsible for neuroendocrine function and neurocognition, minimizing clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) expansion of targets near these structures potentially lessens long-term toxicity. We reviewed the treatment records of 29 patients with brain tumors, with a total of 517 fractions analyzed. The CTV was uniformly expanded by 3 mm to create the PTV for all cases. We determined the effect of patient specific factors (prescribed medications, weight gain, tumor location) and image-guidance technique on setup uncertainty and plotted the mean +/- standard deviation for each factor. ANOVA was used to determine significance between these factors on setup uncertainty. We determined the impact of applying the initial three fraction variation as custom PTV-expansion on dose to normal structures. The initial 3 mm margin encompassed 88% of all measured shifts from daily imaging for all fractions. There was no difference (p = n.s.) in average setup uncertainty between CBCT or kV imaging for all patients. Vertical, lateral, longitudinal, and 3D shifts were similar (p = n.s.) between days 1, 2, and 3 imaging and later fractions. Patients prescribed sedatives experienced increased setup uncertainty (p < 0.05), while weight gain, corticosteroid administration, and anti-seizure medication did not associate with increased setup uncertainty. Patients with targets near OAR with individualized margins led to decreased OAR dose. No reductions to targets occurred with individualized PTVs. Daily imaging allows application of individualized CTV expansion to reduce dose to OAR responsible for neurocognition, learning, and neuroendocrine function below doses shown to correlate with long-term morbidity. The demonstrated reduction in dose to OAR in this study has implications for quality

  5. Brain Tumor Detection and Classification Using Deep Learning Classifier on MRI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Gladis Pushpa Rathi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has become an effective tool for clinical research in recent years and has found itself in applications such as brain tumour detection. In this study, tumor classification using multiple kernel-based probabilistic clustering and deep learning classifier is proposed. The proposed technique consists of three modules, namely segmentation module, feature extraction module and classification module. Initially, the MRI image is pre-processed to make it fit for segmentation and de-noising process is carried out using median filter. Then, pre-processed image is segmented using Multiple Kernel based Probabilistic Clustering (MKPC. Subsequently, features are extracted for every segment based on the shape, texture and intensity. After features extraction, important features will be selected using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA for classification purpose. Finally, deep learning classifier is employed for classification into tumor or non-tumor. The proposed technique is evaluated using sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. The proposed technique results are also compared with existing technique which uses Feed-Forward Back Propagation Network (FFBN. The proposed technique achieved an average sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.88, 0.80 and 0.83, respectively with the highest values as about 1, 0.85 and 0.94. Improved results show the efficiency of the proposed technique.

  6. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glioblastoma multiforme - children; Ependymoma - children; Glioma - children; Astrocytoma - children; Medulloblastoma - children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children)

  7. Automatic Brain Tumor Detection in T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Pavel; Kropatsch, W.G.; Bartušek, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2013), s. 223-230. ISSN 1335-8871 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/1104; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Brain tumor * Brain tumor detection * Symmetry analysis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.162, year: 2013

  8. Increased Nanoparticle Delivery to Brain Tumors by Autocatalytic Priming for Improved Treatment and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Liang; Kong, Derek K; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Murikinati, Sasidhar; Ma, Chao; Yuan, Peng; Li, Liyuan; Tian, Daofeng; Cai, Qiang; Ye, Chunlin; Holden, Daniel; Park, June-Hee; Gao, Xiaobin; Thomas, Jean-Leon; Grutzendler, Jaime; Carson, Richard E; Huang, Yiyun; Piepmeier, Joseph M; Zhou, Jiangbing

    2016-04-26

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is partially disrupted in brain tumors. Despite the gaps in the BBB, there is an inadequate amount of pharmacological agents delivered into the brain. Thus, the low delivery efficiency renders many of these agents ineffective in treating brain cancer. In this report, we proposed an "autocatalytic" approach for increasing the transport of nanoparticles into the brain. In this strategy, a small number of nanoparticles enter into the brain via transcytosis or through the BBB gaps. After penetrating the BBB, the nanoparticles release BBB modulators, which enables more nanoparticles to be transported, creating a positive feedback loop for increased delivery. Specifically, we demonstrated that these autocatalytic brain tumor-targeting poly(amine-co-ester) terpolymer nanoparticles (ABTT NPs) can readily cross the BBB and preferentially accumulate in brain tumors at a concentration of 4.3- and 94.0-fold greater than that in the liver and in brain regions without tumors, respectively. We further demonstrated that ABTT NPs were capable of mediating brain cancer gene therapy and chemotherapy. Our results suggest ABTT NPs can prime the brain to increase the systemic delivery of therapeutics for treating brain malignancies. PMID:26967254

  9. Measurement of fractional anisotropy in normal cerebral white matter and brain tumors with diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of normal adult brain tissue and tumors, and to compare the differences. Eight normal adults and ten patients in whom intracranial tumors had been diagnosed were included. Imaging was performed using a 1.5 T MR unit and a single-shot spin-echo EPI pulse sequence (TR/TE=4024/94 msec, 128 acquisition/256 reconstruction, 23 cm FOV, 5mm thickness, 2mm interslice gap, 4 NSA), six different direction gradients (x, y, z, xy, yz, xz), and 2 b-values (0, 1000). Isotropic ADC (D) was obtained from seven images per slice, and fractional anisotropy (FA) was calculated from the isotropic ADC and eigenvalues of three directions. A region of interest was drawn at frontal gray and white matter, periventricular white matter, the corpus callosum, internal capsule, caudate nucleus and center of the tumor mass, and for each region, fractional anisotropy readings were obtained. In normal adults, the findings were as follows: frontal gray matter: D=0.81±0.06, FA=0.32±0.03; frontal white matter:D=0.79±0.04, FA=0.56±0.09, periventricular white matter: D=0.77±0.02, FA=0.51±0.04; corpus callosum: D=0.79±0.07, FA=0.82±0.07; internal capsule: D=0.73±0.04, FA=0.77±0.05; caudate nucleus: D=0.76±0.05, FA=0.35±0.05. High anisotropy was demonstrated in white matter, especially in the corpus callosum and internal capsule, and the degree of anisotropy was similar in gray and deep gray matter. For most brain tumors, isotropic ADC was similar to that of white matter, but fractional anisotropy was lower. A low-grade astrocytoma showed higher isotropic ADC and lower fractional anisotropy than normal white matter, and at the center of al meningioma, fractional anisotropy was high. For the classification of brain tumors and determination of the extent of disease, comparison between the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy is useful

  10. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques of brain imaging and results in perfusion studies and delayed images are outlined. An analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the brain scan in a variety of common problems is discussed, especially as compared with other available procedures. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions are considered. (Auth/C.F.)

  11. Mutual-information-corrected tumor displacement using intraoperative ultrasound for brain shift compensation in image-guided neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2008-03-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound (iUS) has emerged as a practical neuronavigational tool for brain shift compensation in image-guided tumor resection surgeries. The use of iUS is optimized when coregistered with preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR) of the patient's head. However, the fiducial-based registration alone does not necessarily optimize the alignment of internal anatomical structures deep in the brain (e.g., tumor) between iUS and pMR. In this paper, we investigated and evaluated an image-based re-registration scheme to maximize the normalized mutual information (nMI) between iUS and pMR to improve tumor boundary alignment using the fiducial registration as a starting point for optimization. We show that this scheme significantly (p<<0.001) reduces tumor boundary misalignment pre-durotomy. The same technique was employed to measure tumor displacement post-durotomy, and the locally measured tumor displacement was assimilated into a biomechanical model to estimate whole-brain deformation. Our results demonstrate that the nMI re-registration pre-durotomy is critical for obtaining accurate measurement of tumor displacement, which significantly improved model response at the craniotomy when compared with stereopsis data acquired independently from the tumor registration. This automatic and computationally efficient (<2min) re-registration technique is feasible for routine clinical use in the operating room (OR).

  12. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experience symptoms associated with their tumor(s) and/or treatment(s). People with brain tumors often suffer from: Headaches Seizures Sensory (touch) and motor (movement control) loss Deep venous thrombosis (DVT, or blood clot) Hearing loss Vision loss ...

  13. Automated brain tumor segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging based on sliding-window technique and symmetry analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian Yanyun; Song Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    Background Brain tumor segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important step toward surgical planning,treatment planning,monitoring of therapy.However,manual tumor segmentation commonly used in clinic is time-consuming and challenging,and none of the existed automated methods are highly robust,reliable and efficient in clinic application.An accurate and automated tumor segmentation method has been developed for brain tumor segmentation that will provide reproducible and objective results close to manual segmentation results.Methods Based on the symmetry of human brain,we employed sliding-window technique and correlation coefficient to locate the tumor position.At first,the image to be segmented was normalized,rotated,denoised,and bisected.Subsequently,through vertical and horizontal sliding-windows technique in turn,that is,two windows in the left and the right part of brain image moving simultaneously pixel by pixel in two parts of brain image,along with calculating of correlation coefficient of two windows,two windows with minimal correlation coefficient were obtained,and the window with bigger average gray value is the location of tumor and the pixel with biggest gray value is the locating point of tumor.At last,the segmentation threshold was decided by the average gray value of the pixels in the square with center at the locating point and 10 pixels of side length,and threshold segmentation and morphological operations were used to acquire the final tumor region.Results The method was evaluated on 3D FSPGR brain MR images of 10 patients.As a result,the average ratio of correct location was 93.4% for 575 slices containing tumor,the average Dice similarity coefficient was 0.77 for one scan,and the average time spent on one scan was 40 seconds.Conclusions An fully automated,simple and efficient segmentation method for brain tumor is proposed and promising for future clinic use.Correlation coefficient is a new and effective feature for tumor

  14. Parameter estimation of brain tumors using intraoperative thermal imaging based on artificial tactile sensing in conjunction with artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraoperative Thermal Imaging (ITI) is a new minimally invasive diagnosis technique that can potentially locate margins of brain tumor in order to achieve maximum tumor resection with least morbidity. This study introduces a new approach to ITI based on artificial tactile sensing (ATS) technology in conjunction with artificial neural networks (ANN) and feasibility and applicability of this method in diagnosis and localization of brain tumors is investigated. In order to analyze validity and reliability of the proposed method, two simulations were performed. (i) An in vitro experimental setup was designed and fabricated using a resistance heater embedded in agar tissue phantom in order to simulate heat generation by a tumor in the brain tissue; and (ii) A case report patient with parafalcine meningioma was presented to simulate ITI in the neurosurgical procedure. In the case report, both brain and tumor geometries were constructed from MRI data and tumor temperature and depth of location were estimated. For experimental tests, a novel assisted surgery robot was developed to palpate the tissue phantom surface to measure temperature variations and ANN was trained to estimate the simulated tumor’s power and depth. Results affirm that ITI based ATS is a non-invasive method which can be useful to detect, localize and characterize brain tumors. (paper)

  15. Parameter estimation of brain tumors using intraoperative thermal imaging based on artificial tactile sensing in conjunction with artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Goughari, M.; Mojra, A.; Sadeghi, S.

    2016-02-01

    Intraoperative Thermal Imaging (ITI) is a new minimally invasive diagnosis technique that can potentially locate margins of brain tumor in order to achieve maximum tumor resection with least morbidity. This study introduces a new approach to ITI based on artificial tactile sensing (ATS) technology in conjunction with artificial neural networks (ANN) and feasibility and applicability of this method in diagnosis and localization of brain tumors is investigated. In order to analyze validity and reliability of the proposed method, two simulations were performed. (i) An in vitro experimental setup was designed and fabricated using a resistance heater embedded in agar tissue phantom in order to simulate heat generation by a tumor in the brain tissue; and (ii) A case report patient with parafalcine meningioma was presented to simulate ITI in the neurosurgical procedure. In the case report, both brain and tumor geometries were constructed from MRI data and tumor temperature and depth of location were estimated. For experimental tests, a novel assisted surgery robot was developed to palpate the tissue phantom surface to measure temperature variations and ANN was trained to estimate the simulated tumor’s power and depth. Results affirm that ITI based ATS is a non-invasive method which can be useful to detect, localize and characterize brain tumors.

  16. Adult Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma Mimicking a Cortical Brain Tumor: MR Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jong Chang; Weon, Young Cheol; Suh, Jae Hee; Kim, Young; Hwang, Jae Cheol [Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    A pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a recently identified low-grade neoplasm that was previously classified as a pilocytic astrocytoma (PA), yet demonstrates unique histological features and more aggressive behavior. Although a PMA is generally a tumor of early childhood and typically occurs in the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region, it can mimic cortical tumors, especially in adults. We report the MR findings of a PMA presenting as a cortical brain tumor in an adult with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1)

  17. Adult Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma Mimicking a Cortical Brain Tumor: MR Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a recently identified low-grade neoplasm that was previously classified as a pilocytic astrocytoma (PA), yet demonstrates unique histological features and more aggressive behavior. Although a PMA is generally a tumor of early childhood and typically occurs in the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region, it can mimic cortical tumors, especially in adults. We report the MR findings of a PMA presenting as a cortical brain tumor in an adult with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1)

  18. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Mission Advance Research Clinical Trial Endpoints Defeat GBM Oligo Research Fund Pediatric Initiatives Funded Research & Accomplishments ... no symptoms when their brain tumor is discovered Recurrent headaches Issues with vision Seizures Changes in personality ...

  19. Brain Tumor Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for example), unusual symptoms such as headaches or short-term memory loss can be investigated with your family history in mind. Click here to view our webinars on Causes and Risk Factors of Brain Tumors. Additional information ...

  20. Monitoring Radiographic Brain Tumor Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Sampson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining radiographic progression in primary malignant brain tumors has posed a significant challenge to the neuroncology community. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO Grade IV through its inherent heterogeneous enhancement, growth patterns, and irregular nature has been difficult to assess for progression. Our ability to detect tumor progression radiographically remains inadequate. Despite the advanced imaging techniques, detecting tumor progression continues to be a clinical challenge. Here we review the different criteria used to detect tumor progression, and highlight the inherent challenges with detection of progression.

  1. USE OF PROTON MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING DATA IN PLANNING FOCAL RADIATION THERAPIES FOR BRAIN TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward E Graves

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in radiation therapy for malignant neoplasms have produced techniques such as Gamma Knife radiosurgery, capable of delivering an ablative dose to a specific, irregular volume of tissue. However, efficient use of these techniques requires the identification of a target volume that will produce the best therapeutic response while sparing surrounding normal brain tissue. Accomplishing this task using conventional computed tomography (CT and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques has proven difficult because of the difficulties in identifying the effective tumor margin. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI has been shown to offer a clinically-feasible metabolic assessment of the presence and extent of neoplasm that can complement conventional anatomic imaging. This paper reviews current Gamma Knife protocols and MRSI acquisition, reconstruction, and interpretation techniques, and discusses the motivation for including magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings while planning focal radiation therapies. A treatment selection and planning strategy incorporating MRSI is then proposed, which can be used in the future to assess the efficacy of spectroscopy-based therapy planning.

  2. Evaluating brain tumors with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of cerebral blood flow and metabolism using functional imaging in combination with morphological imaging by CT and MRI has recently been attracting attention in neuroradiological diagnosis of brain tumor. This report assesses the clinical usefulness of SPECT for brain tumor. Because 201TlCl SPECT is useful in determining the degree of brain tumor malignancy and clearly reflects tumor metabolism after radiochemotherapy, it is capable of determining therapeutic outcomes earlier than MRI. To increase the diagnostic performance of 201TlCl SPECT, time-course accumulation dynamics were investigated using early and delayed imaging. Three-dimensional SPECT imaging using N-isopropyl-p[123I]-iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP) is a new diagnostic method that not only visually evaluates the lesion but also quantifies the expansion volume of the hypoperfusion area associated with the lesion. Development of functional imaging may lead to a new therapeutic method by providing clinical images that more faithfully reproduce the pathological state. (author)

  3. GRAPPA-based Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging of Normal Volunteers and Patients with Brain Tumor at 7T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Janine M.; Banerjee, Suchandrima; Hammond, Kathryn E.; Kelley, Douglas A.C.; Xu, Duan; Chang, Susan M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a valuable technique for high-resolution imaging of brain vasculature that greatly benefits from the emergence higher field strength MR scanners. Autocalibrating partially parallel imaging techniques can be employed to reduce lengthy acquisition times as long as the decrease in signal-to-noise ratio does not significantly affect the contrast between vessels and brain parenchyma. This study assessed the feasibility of a GRAPPA-based SWI technique at 7 Tesla in both healthy volunteers and brain tumor patients. GRAPPA-based SWI allowed a 2-fold or more reduction in scan time without compromising vessel contrast and small vessel detection. Post-processing parameters for the SWI needed to be modified for patients where the tumor causes high-frequency phase wrap artifacts but did not adversely affect vessel contrast. GRAPPA-based SWI at 7T revealed regions of microvascularity, hemorrhage, and calcification within heterogeneous brain tumors that may aid in characterizing active or necrotic tumor and monitoring treatment effects. PMID:18823730

  4. Perfusion and spectroscopy magnetic resonance imaging in a case of lymphocytic vasculitis mimicking brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymphocytic vasculitis of the central nervous system is an uncommon subtype of primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) – a rare inflammatory disorder affecting parenchymal and leptomeningeal arteries and veins. Establishing diagnosis on the basis of neuroimaging only is difficult, as it can mimic a brain tumor. Thus, histological diagnosis is essential for appropriate management. We present a case of biopsy-proven lymphocytic vasculitis mimicking a brain tumor on neuroimaging that was subsequently successfully treated with steroid therapy. We also discuss the findings in perfusion MR (PWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Regional hypoperfusion on PWI and elevation of glutamate and glutamine levels on MRS (without associated typical tumor spectra) are common findings in inflammatory disorders, including PACNS, and can be useful in differential diagnosis with tumors

  5. Extra-axial brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapalino, Otto; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    Extra-axial brain tumors are the most common adult intracranial neoplasms and encompass a broad spectrum of pathologic subtypes. Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial brain tumor (approximately one-third of all intracranial neoplasms) and typically present as slowly growing dural-based masses. Benign meningiomas are very common, and may occasionally be difficult to differentiate from more aggressive subtypes (i.e., atypical or malignant varieties) or other dural-based masses with more aggressive biologic behavior (e.g., hemangiopericytoma or dural-based metastases). Many neoplasms that typically affect the brain parenchyma (intra-axial), such as gliomas, may also present with primary or secondary extra-axial involvement. This chapter provides a general and concise overview of the common types of extra-axial tumors and their typical imaging features. PMID:27432671

  6. Fiber tracking for brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to validate an innovative scanning method for patients diagnosed with brain tumors. Using a 1.5 Tesla whole body magnetic resonance (MR) imager, 23 patients with brain tumors were scanned. The recorded data points of the diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) sequences were 128 x 37 with the parallel imaging technique. The parallel imaging technique was equivalent to a true resolution of 128 x 74. The scan parameters were repetition time (TR)=6000, echo time (TE)=88, 6 averaging with a b-value of 800 s/mm2. The total scan time for DTI was 4 minutes and 24 seconds. DTI scans and subsequent fiber tracking were successfully applied in all cases. All fiber tracts on the contralesional side were visualized in the expected locations. Fiber tracts on the lesional side had varying degrees of displacement, disruption, or a combination of displacement and disruption due to the tumor. Tract disruption resulted from direct tumor involvement, compression upon the tract, and vasogenic edema surrounding the tumor. This DTI method using a parallel imaging technique allows for clinically feasible fiber tracking that can be incorporated into a routine MR examination. (author)

  7. Adult brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of adults with brain tumors. This refresher course will focus on a wide variety of benign and malignant brain neoplasms and how contemporary radiotherapy affects survival. In each case the intent of radiation therapy is to destroy the neoplasm without affecting normal tissues. However, for many neoplasms serial post-treatment scans may show little change, and success is often measured more by absence of tumor progression than by scan normalization. Successful outcome after radiation therapy of brain tumors usually requires that (1) there is no tumor extension beyond the target volume, (2) adequate dose is delivered to the target volume, and (3) normal tissue tolerance doses are not exceeded. For some tumors it may be impossible to satisfy all three criteria. Three-dimensional treatment planning based on MRI or CT makes it possible to guarantee delivery of the full dose of radiation to gross tumor while minimizing the volume of normal tissue receiving high dose. Acceptable dose conformity can often be achieved with 2-4 static beams or arcs and are usually preferable to opposed lateral fields. Examples of planning solutions for a variety of tumor types, sizes, and anatomic location will be given. For some tumors, protocols involving substantial dose escalation require a large number of non-coplanar x-ray beams or particle therapy. Several concepts and techniques which relate to the treatment of brain tumors will be discussed, including conformal radiotherapy, brachytherapy, radiosurgery, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, altered fractionation, inverse treatment planning, re-irradiation and biologically effective dose (BED)

  8. Brain tumor delineation based on CT and MR imaging. Implications for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, M A; Wijrdeman, H K; Struikmans, H; Witkamp, T; Moerland, M A

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the impact MRI may have on radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumors. The authors analyzed differences in size and position of treatment fields as indicated by three observers (two radiotherapists and one neuroradiologist) using CT or MR based radiotherapy planning proced

  9. Brain tumor stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies. PMID:20370314

  10. Adult brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of adults with brain tumors. This refresher course will focus on a variety of benign and malignant brain neoplasms and how contemporary radiotherapy affects outcome. Successful outcome after radiotherapy requires that (1) there is no tumor extension beyond the selected target volume, (2) adequate dose is delivered to the target volume, and (3) normal tissue tolerance dose is not exceeded. For many neoplasms serial post-treatment scans may show little change, and success is often measured more by absence of tumor progression than by scan normalization. Three-dimensional treatment planning based on MRI or CT makes it possible to guarantee delivery of the full prescription dose to gross tumor while minimizing the volume of normal tissue receiving high dose. Acceptable dose conformity can often be achieved with 2-4 static beams or arcs, which is usually preferable to opposed lateral fields. Protocols involving substantial dose escalation require a large number of non-coplanar x-ray beams or particle therapy. This course will cover important concepts and techniques which relate to the treatment of brain tumors, including conformal radiotherapy, brachytherapy, radiosurgery, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, altered fractionation, inverse treatment planning, re-irradiation, and biologically effective dose (BED). Examples of planning solutions for a variety of tumor types, size and anatomical locations will be given

  11. MicroPET imaging of brain tumor angiogenesis with {sup 18}F-labeled PEGylated RGD peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoyuan; Park, Ryan; Hou, Yingping; Tohme, Michel; Bading, James R.; Conti, Peter S. [PET Imaging Science Center, Department of Radiology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, 1510 San Pablo St., Suite 350, CA 90033, Los Angeles (United States); Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Gonzales-Gomez, Ignacio; Laug, Walter E. [Department of Pediatrics, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, CA 90027, Los Angeles (United States)

    2004-08-01

    We have previously labeled cyclic RGD peptide c(RGDyK) with fluorine-18 through conjugation labeling via a prosthetic 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoyl moiety and applied this [{sup 18}F]FB-RGD radiotracer for {alpha}{sub v}-integrin expression imaging in different preclinical tumor models with good tumor-to-background contrast. However, the unfavorable hepatobiliary excretion and rapid tumor washout rate of this tracer limit its potential clinical applications. The aims of this study were to modify the [{sup 18}F]FB-RGD tracer by inserting a heterobifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG, M.W. =3,400) between the {sup 18}F radiolabel and the RGD moiety and to test this [{sup 18}F]FB-PEG-RGD tracer for brain tumor targeting and in vivo kinetics. [{sup 18}F]FB-PEG-RGD was prepared by coupling the RGD-PEG conjugate with N-succinimidyl 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoate ([{sup 18}F]SFB) under slightly basic conditions (pH=8.5). The radiochemical yield was about 20-30% based on the active ester [{sup 18}F]SFB, and specific activity was over 100 GBq/{mu}mol. This tracer had fast blood clearance, rapid and high tumor uptake in the subcutaneous U87MG glioblastoma model (5.2{+-}0.5%ID/g at 30 min p.i.). Moderately rapid tumor washout was observed, with the activity accumulation decreased to 2.2{+-}0.4%ID/g at 4 h p.i. MicroPET and autoradiography imaging showed a very high tumor-to-background ratio and limited activity accumulation in the liver, kidneys and intestinal tracts. U87MG tumor implanted into the mouse forebrain was well visualized with [{sup 18}F]FB-PEG-RGD. Although uptake in the orthotopic tumor was significantly lower (P<0.01) than in the subcutaneous tumor, the maximum tumor-to-brain ratio still reached 5.0{+-}0.6 due to low normal brain background. The results of H and E staining post mortem agreed with the anatomical information obtained from non-invasive microPET imaging. In conclusion, PEGylation suitably modifies the physiological behavior of the RGD peptide. [{sup 18

  12. Echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) with high-resolution matrix in intra-axial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, R.; Scheidler, J.; Porn, U.; Reiser, M. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich (Germany); Seelos, K.; Yousry, T. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich (Germany); Exner, H. [Institute for Medical Epidemiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Rosen, B.R. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, NMR Center, Charlestown, MA (United States)

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of high-speed interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) to achieve diagnostic image quality comparable to T2-weighted imaging in patients with brain tumors. Seventeen patients with intra-axial, supratentorial tumors (10 untreated gliomas, 7 radiated gliomas) were investigated on a 1.5-T scanner. The conventional scan (SE, TR/TE = 2200/80 ms, 18 slices) was acquired in 8 min, 4 s, and EPI (TR/TE = 3000/80 ms, 18 slices) was completed in 25 s. The films were compared in a blinded trail by three radiologists. On the general impression and anatomic display, both sequences were rated to be of similar quality. Artifacts were slightly more pronounced at the skull base and around surgical clips using EPI. Tumor delineation was nearly equivalent using EPI, compared with the T2-weighted sequence. Echo-planar imaging reached diagnostic quality in all patients. Interleaved high-resolution EPI yielded sufficient quality to depict intra-axial, supratentorial brain tumors. Since EPI can be obtained in a small fraction of the time needed for conventional spin echo, in addition to other indications it could be considered to study patients unable to cooperate. (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 27 refs.

  13. Echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) with high-resolution matrix in intra-axial brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of high-speed interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) to achieve diagnostic image quality comparable to T2-weighted imaging in patients with brain tumors. Seventeen patients with intra-axial, supratentorial tumors (10 untreated gliomas, 7 radiated gliomas) were investigated on a 1.5-T scanner. The conventional scan (SE, TR/TE = 2200/80 ms, 18 slices) was acquired in 8 min, 4 s, and EPI (TR/TE = 3000/80 ms, 18 slices) was completed in 25 s. The films were compared in a blinded trail by three radiologists. On the general impression and anatomic display, both sequences were rated to be of similar quality. Artifacts were slightly more pronounced at the skull base and around surgical clips using EPI. Tumor delineation was nearly equivalent using EPI, compared with the T2-weighted sequence. Echo-planar imaging reached diagnostic quality in all patients. Interleaved high-resolution EPI yielded sufficient quality to depict intra-axial, supratentorial brain tumors. Since EPI can be obtained in a small fraction of the time needed for conventional spin echo, in addition to other indications it could be considered to study patients unable to cooperate. (orig.)

  14. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 families will mourn the loss of their child to a brain or spinal cord tumor. Friends, family and community will try to make sense of an untimely death and the unfulfilled promise of a life. 6 families will transition to survivorship. A mother may be too exhausted from providing constant care ...

  15. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors Afinitor (Everolimus) Afinitor Disperz (Everolimus) Avastin (Bevacizumab) Becenum ( ...

  16. Brain abscesses in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) - comparison to cystic brain tumors; Der Hirnabszess in der Diffusionswichtung und Unterschiede zum zystischen Hirntumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomczak, R. [Zentrum fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, SLK-Kliniken, Bad Friedrichshall (Germany); Zentrum fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, SLK-Kliniken, Klinikum am Plattenwald, Bad Friedrichshall (Germany); Wunderlich, A.; Brambs, H.J. [Abteilung fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaet Ulm (Germany); Goerich, J. [Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Kreiskrankenhaus Sinzheim (Germany); Rilinger, N. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Staedtische Kliniken Offenbach (Germany)

    2003-08-01

    The clinical usefulness of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was evaluated in patients with brain abscesses in comparison to patients with cystic brain tumors. Five patients with surgically confirmed brain abscesses underwent beside a brain MRI examination with contrast media application diffusion weighted imaging. Apparent diffusion coefficients (rADC) in three orthogonal diffusion gradient were calculated. The same protocol was used to examine 5 patients with cystic brain tumors. Showing an rADC of 0.33 x 10{sup -3}/mm{sup 2}/s abscesses have a highly restricted diffusion in comparison to cystic brain tumors with an rADC of 1,67 x 10{sup -3}/mm{sup 2}/s. Diffusion weighted imaging is a usefull diagnostic tool in the work up of brain abscesses. (orig.) [German] Ziel der vorliegenden Studie ist der Nachweis von Moeglichkeiten der Diagnostik von Hirnabszessen durch die Diffusionswichtung und das unterschiedliche Erscheinungsbild zystischer Hirntumoren in der Diffusionswichtung. Bei 5 Patienten mit neurochirurgisch nachgewiesenen Hirnabszessen wurde eine native und kontrastierte MRT des Kopfes durchgefuehrt. Zusaetzlich wurden eine Sequenz mit Diffusionswichtung und der apparente Diffusionskoeffizient (rADC) in 3 orthogonal zueinander stehenden Raumrichtungen berechnet. Dasselbe Verfahren wurde bei 5 Patienten mit zystischen Hirntumoren angewendet. Alle Abszesse des Neurokraniums zeigten mit 0,33 x 10{sup -3}/mm{sup 2}/s eine im Vergleich zu normalem Hirngewebe deutlich eingeschraenkte Diffusion. Die zystischen Hirntumoren zeigten mit 1,67 x 10{sup -3}/mm{sup 2}/s eine geringer eingeschraenkte Diffusion. Die Diffusionswichtung kann bei der Sicherung der Verdachtsdiagnose Hirnabszess hilfreich sein und die Abgrenzung gegen einen zystischen Hirntumor erlauben. (orig.)

  17. Shift of the pyramidal tract during resection of the intraaxial brain tumors estimated by intraoperative diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study evaluated the shift of the pyramidal tract during resection of 17 proximal intraaxial brain tumors. In each case intraoperative diffusion-weighted (iDW) magnetic resonance imaging with a motion-probing gradient applied in the anteroposterior direction was performed using a scanner with a 0.3 T vertical magnetic field. The position of the white matter bundles containing the pyramidal tract was estimated on the coronal images before and after resection of the neoplasm, and both quantitative and directional evaluation of its displacement was done. In all cases iDW imaging provided visualization of the structure of interest. The magnitude of the pyramidal tract displacement due to removal of the neoplasm varied from 0.5 to 8.7 mm (mean 4.4±2.5 mm) on the lesion side and from 0 to 3.6 mm (mean 1.3±1.1 mm) on the normal side (p<0.001). Tumor location in regards to the pyramidal tract was significantly associated with the direction of the pyramidal tract displacement (p<0.05). Outward shift occurred in 10 out of 13 cases of the lateral neoplasms, whereas in all 4 superomedial tumors inward shift was marked. In conclusion, the direction of the pyramidal tract displacement during resection of the proximal intraaxial brain tumors is mainly determined by position of the neoplasm, but can be unpredictable in some cases, which necessitates use of subcortical brain mapping and intraoperative imaging, particularly iDW imaging with updated neuronavigation. (author)

  18. Ultrasound/Magnetic Targeting with SPIO-DOX-Microbubble Complex for Image-Guided Drug Delivery in Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Cheng, Yu-Hang; Ting, Chien-Yu; Ho, Yi-Ju; Hsu, Po-Hung; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the deployment of chemotherapeutic drugs against brain tumors is ensuring that sufficient drug concentrations reach the tumor, while minimizing drug accumulation at undesired sites. Recently, injection of therapeutic agents following blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening by focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles (MBs) has been shown to enhance drug delivery in targeted brain regions. Nevertheless, the distribution and quantitative deposition of agents delivered to the brain are still hard to estimate. Based on our previous work on superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-loaded MBs, we present a novel theranostic complex of SPIO-Doxorubicin (DOX)-conjugated MB (SD-MB) for drug delivery to the brain. Magnetic labeling of the drug enables direct visualization via magnetic resonance imaging, and also facilitates magnetic targeting (MT) to actively enhance targeted deposition of the drug. In a rat glioma model, we demonstrated that FUS sonication can be used with SD-MBs to simultaneously facilitate BBB opening and allow dual ultrasound/magnetic targeting of chemotherapeutic agent (DOX) delivery. The accumulation of SD complex within brain tumors can be significantly enhanced by MT (25.7 fold of DOX, 7.6 fold of SPIO). The change in relaxation rate R2 (1/T2) within tumors was highly correlated with SD deposition as quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (R2 = 0.93) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (R2 = 0.94), demonstrating real-time monitoring of DOX distribution. Our results suggest that SD-MBs can serve as multifunction agents to achieve advanced molecular theranostics. PMID:27446489

  19. Recurrence after gross-total resection of low-grade pediatric brain tumors: the frequency and timing of postoperative imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Albert H.; Thompson, Elizabeth A.; Governale, Lance S.; Santa, Catalina; Cahill, Kevin; Kieran, Mark W.; Chi, Susan N.; Ullrich, Nicole J.; Scott, R. Michael; Goumnerova, Liliana C.

    2016-01-01

    Object Low-grade glial and glioneuronal brain tumors are frequently encountered in the pediatric population and can be effectively treated by resection. The authors aimed to use imaging to evaluate how often tumors recurred and to determine if recurrences were associated with any clinical symptoms, along with the financial costs of imaging, in patients with radiographically proven gross-total resection (GTR) at Boston Children’s Hospital. These data were assessed to propose guidelines regarding postoperative surveillance. Methods The authors performed a retrospective cohort analysis of the Pediatric Brain Tumor Program database from 1993 to 2003 to identify patients with glial or glioneuronal tumors initially evaluated at Boston Children’s Hospital. Among the 888 patients evaluated for any type of brain tumor during this period, 67 patients had WHO Grade I glial or glioneuronal lesions with radiographically proven GTR and available follow-up data. The frequency and timing of postoperative imaging was compared with the institutional protocol. Recurrence-free survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Financial costs of imaging were available from 2001 to 2009 and were averaged to extrapolate the postoperative surveillance costs. Results Among the 67 patients with GTR, 13 recurrences were detected radiographically with a mean time to recurrence of 32.4 months (range 2.9–128.5 months). The mean duration of follow-up after surgery was 6.6 years. The recurrence-free survival at 2 and 5 years after GTR for all low-grade glial and glioneuronal tumors was 0.90 (95% CI 0.82–0.97) and 0.82 (95% CI 0.73–0.92), respectively. No clinical symptoms were associated with any of the recurrences, and no deaths occurred. Under the institutional protocol of surveillance imaging, the estimated cost per recurrence at 5 years was $104,094 per patient. The proposed protocol would reduce the number of MR scans in the first 5 years from 10 to 5, providing a potential

  20. Adult brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of adults with brain tumors. This refresher course will focus on a variety of benign and malignant brain neoplasms and how contemporary radiotherapy affects outcome. Successful outcome after radiotherapy requires that (1) there is no tumor extension beyond the selected target volume, (2) adequate dose is delivered to the target volume, and (3) normal tissue tolerance dose is not exceeded. For many neoplasms serial post-treatment scans may show little change, and success is often measured more by absence of tumor progression than by scan normalization. Three-dimensional treatment planning based on MRI or CT makes it possible to guarantee delivery of the full prescription dose to gross tumor while minimizing the volume of normal tissue receiving high dose. Acceptable dose conformity can often be achieved with 2-4 static beams or arcs, which is usually preferable to opposed lateral fields. Protocols involving substantial dose escalation require a large number of non-coplanar x-ray beams or particle therapy. This course will cover important concepts and techniques which relate to the treatment of brain tumors, including conformal radiotherapy, brachytherapy, radiosurgery, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, altered fractionation, inverse treatment planning, re-irradiation, and biologically effective dose (BED). Examples of planning solutions for a variety of tumor types, size and anatomical locations will be given. Note: I will incorporate examples of interesting, difficult and unusual cases from other practices as time permits, provided slides and descriptive materials are sent to me in advance of the course

  1. Human brain tumor imaging with a protein-binding MR contrast agent: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, Marco; Giesel, Frederik; Weber, Marc-Andre; Gerigk, Lars [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Rohrer, Martin [University of Applied Science Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Tuettenberg, Jochen [University of Heidelberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Mannheim (Germany); Michaely, Hendrik; Voth, Matthias [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Klinikum Mannheim (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Gadofosveset is a Gd-based protein-binding blood pool agent with increased relaxivities and blood half-life compared with conventional Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). No experience exists about the use of gadofosveset as an extracellular agent. In this report we present the first clinical experience with gadofosveset in enhancing intracranial tumors. Ten patients with different intracranial tumors were examined with a standard dose (0.03 mmol/kg) of gadofosveset compared with a standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg) of conventional GBCA. As a result of its significantly higher relaxivity, gadofosveset could, despite its low dose, achieve a sufficient contrast enhancement. The visual rating of the intensity of enhancement and the contrast to noise ratios were comparable to conventional agents. The detection and delineation of more complex lesions was rated equal. In one nonenhancing low grade astrocytoma an enhancing nodule became visible only 5 h after gadofosvesest injection. As shown in this initial report, contrast-enhanced intracranial tumor imaging is possible with the protein-binding blood pool agent gadofosveset. The agent gives a significant tumor contrast in early postcontrast imaging comparable with conventional agents. As a result of its unique longer lasting contrast, the use of gadofosveset might enable a new approach to imaging mild or nonenhancing tumors. (orig.)

  2. Imaging in Pediatric Infratentorial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hajiahmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial tumors are the second cause of malignancies in childhood following leukemia. The overall incidence varies between 1:20000 and 1:100000 in different series. They are the most common solid tumors that occur in childhood .The most important diagnostic feature of an intracranial mass is its location. They can be supratentorial or infratentorial. With the exception of the first year of life, infratentorial brain tumors are more frequent than supratentorial tumors in the first decade of life. In particular, these are cerebellar low-grade astrocytomas, medulloblastomas, brain stem gliomas and ependymomas of the fourth ventricle. .Posterior fossa tumors also are readily identified with both CT and MRI. Spectroscopy in the analysis of brain tumors has recently come on the scene but may be of limited practical value when it comes to differentiating tumors. However, CT and especially MRI are the primary imaging modalities for the investigation of brain tumors. Sonography can be used in the neonates. With modern imaging, it is relatively easy to detect the presence of a tumor in most patients. The purpose of this essay is to illustrate the imaging features of various infratentorial brain tumors to make a clue for differentiation them by these features.

  3. "Comet tail sign": A pitfall of post-gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging findings for metastatic brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuya, Koichi; Nakasu, Yoko; Narita, Yoshitaka; Nakasu, Satoshi; Ohno, Makoto; Miyakita, Yasuji; Abe, Masato; Ito, Ichiro; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Endo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    A highly enhanced cap attached to the surface of metastatic tumors in the brain parenchyma is occasionally encountered on magnetic resonance (MR) images. This atypical enhanced cap tends to occur in severe peritumoral edema and may produce the characteristic bulge of a metastatic mass lesion termed the "comet tail sign" (CTS). The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the features of the CTS using MR imaging and pathological findings, and to clarify its clinical relevance. We selected 21 consecutive cases of newly diagnosed metastases from MR imaging studies that demonstrated the CTS; all had diffuse peritumoral edema. The MR T2-weighted images showed similarly homogenous and high intensity signals in both the tail and peritumoral edema. Fourteen of the 21 patients underwent surgical resection of their tumors, and 12 tails were separately removed for pathological examination, no tumor cells which revealed. We speculate that the CTS does not contain neoplastic tissues but is observed as a result of the leakage of contrast medium from the tumor body into the interstitial space of the white matter. Although CTS is a peculiar and uncommon enhancement pattern, it has clinical significance in determining the extent of the margin for invasive local treatments, such as surgical resection or stereotactic radiotherapy; this is particularly true in and near the eloquent areas. PMID:26839020

  4. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of brain tumors for benign and malignant tumors combined is 18.71 per 100,000 persons/year. The most common benign brain tumor in adults is meningioma, which is most present in women, and the most common malignant tumor is glioblastoma, which is most present in adult men. Due to high mortality, especially in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma and significant brain tumor morbidity, there is a constant interest in understanding its etiology in order to possibly prevent tumor occurrence in future and enable more efficient treatment strategies for this fatal brain disease. Despite the continuously growing number of epidemiological studies on possible factors of tumor incidence, the etiology remains unclear. The only established environmental risk factor of gliomas is ionizing radiation exposure. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields via cell phone use has gained a lot of attention as a potential risk factor of brain tumor development. However, studies have been inconsistent and inconclusive, so more definite results are still expected.

  5. Brain tumors in children; Hirntumoren beim Kind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harting, I.; Seitz, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Neuroradiologie

    2009-06-15

    Brain tumors are common in children; in Germany approximately 400 children are diagnosed every year. In the posterior fossa, cerebellar neoplasms outnumber brainstem gliomas. In contrast to their rarity in adults, brainstem gliomas are not uncommon in children. Supratentorial tumors can be subdivided by location into neoplasms of the cerebral hemispheres, suprasellar and pineal tumors. Astrocytoma is the most common pediatric brain tumor followed by medulloblastoma, ependymoma and craniopharyngeoma. The combination of imaging morphology, tumor localisation and patient age at manifestation form the basis of the neuroradiological differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. Contrast-enhanced magnetization transfer imaging: improvement of brain tumor conspicuity and delineation for radiosurgical target volume definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the contrast-noise-ratio (CNR), and thus tumor conspicuity and delineation, on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetization transfer (MT) images compared to conventional T1-weighted spin echo (SE) images as a strategy to improve definition of the macroscopic boost volume in radiosurgery treatment planning in patients with high grade gliomas or metastatic brain lesions. Materials and methods: Fifty patients (mean age, 51 years) with histologically proven or suspected high grade glioma or cerebral metastases were prospectively examined by MR imaging. Following gadolinium dimeglumine administration (0.1 mmol/kg body weight) the brain was imaged with both a T1-weighted MT-fast low angle shot (FLASH) pulse sequence and with a conventional T1-weighted SE sequence without MT saturation. Lesion conspicuity, size and CNR were compared for both techniques. Results: The mean tumor diameter of malignant gliomas was significantly (P < 0.01) larger when measured on T1-weighted MT-FLASH images compared to T1-weighted SE images and was comparable for metastatic lesions. The mean CNR of enhancing lesions on T1-weighted MT-FLASH was 14 ± 5 compared to 10 ± 4 on SE images, representing a significant (P < 0.05) improvement. Lesion conspicuity and delineation was improved in 10 of 20 patients (50%) with high grade gliomas and in 15 of 30 patients (50%) with metastases. Additional contrast enhancing lesions were detected in 8 of 30 patients (27%) with metastases on MT-FLASH images. Lesion conspicuity was markedly improved in the posterior fossa. Discussion: Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MT-FLASH images improve lesion detection and delineation in the planning process of radiosurgery in patients with intracranial high grade gliomas or metastases and may even alter the treatment approach

  7. Brain Tumors and Brain Tumor Research Progress in Image Classification%脑肿瘤及脑肿瘤图像分类的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞海平; 邬立保

    2011-01-01

    Many methods of brain tumor classification,there is no uniform classification^! A variety of tumors and pathological features of the different tissue, the study of benign and malignant, and things are not the same characteristics. Usually can be classified as histological.-(l) Originated in glial tumors: astrocytoma, less support glial cell tumors, medulloblastoma, etc.(2) Originated in meningeal tumors: meningioma, meningeal sarcoma, arachnoid cyst.(3) Originated in the pituitary tumors: tired color cell adenoma, acidophilic, basophilic cell adenoma.(4) Originated in cranial nerve tumors: acoustic neuroma, trigeminal nerve sheath tumors and other tumors.(S) Originated from residual embryonic tissue: craniopharyngioma, chordoma, dermoid cyst (6) Originated in vascular cells: vascular tumors and vascular reticular cell tumor, etc.(7) Transfer or by other parts of the tumor invasion: a variety of metastatic tumors, and nasopharyn-geal carcinoma, etc.%脑肿瘤分类的方法很多,目前尚无统一的分类方法,并且各种肿瘤的组织发生与病理特征不同,其良性与恶性以及物学特性也不一样.通常按组织学可分类如下:(1)发源于神经胶质的肿瘤:星形细胞瘤、少支胶质细胞瘤、髓母细胞瘤等.(2)发源于脑膜的肿瘤:脑膜瘤、脑膜内瘤、蛛网膜囊肿等.(3)发源于垂体的肿瘤:厌色细胞腺瘤,嗜酸、嗜碱性细胞腺瘤.(4)发源于颅神经的肿瘤:听神经瘤、三叉神经瘤等各种神经鞘瘤.(5)发源于胚胎残余组织:颅咽管瘤、脊索瘤、皮样囊肿等.(6)发源于血管细胞:血管瘤及血管网织细胞瘤等.(7)由其它部位转移或侵入的肿瘤:各种转移瘤及鼻咽癌等.

  8. Pediatric brain tumors of neuroepithelial tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumors of neuroepithelial tissue represent the largest group of pediatric brain tumors by far and has therefore been divided into several discrete tumor subtypes each corresponding to a specific component of the neuropil. The neuropil contains several subtypes of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and modified ependymal cells that form the choroid plexus. This review discusses the imaging aspects of the most common pediatric tumors of neuroepithelial tissue. (orig.)

  9. Three-dimensional visualization of functional brain tissue and functional magnetic resonance imaging-integrated neuronavigation in the resection of brain tumor adjacent to motor cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the value of three -dimensional visualization of functional brain tissue and the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-integrated neuronavigation in the resection of brain tumor adjacent to motor cortex. Method: Sixty patients with tumor located in the central sulcus were enrolled. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to function group and 30 to control group. Patients in function group underwent fMRI to localize the functional brain tissues. Then the function information was transferred to the neurosurgical navigator. The patients in control group underwent surgery with navigation without function information. The therapeutic effect, excision rate. improvement of motor function, and survival quality during follow-up were analyzed. Result: All patients in function group were accomplished visualization of functional brain tissues and fMRI-integrated neuronavigation. The locations of tumors, central sulcus and motor cortex were marked during the operation. The fMRI -integrated information played a great role in both pre- and post-operation. Pre-operation: designing the location of the skin flap and window bone, determining the relationship between the tumor and motor cortex, and designing the pathway for the resection. Post- operation: real-time navigation of relationship between the tumor and motor cortex, assisting to localize the motor cortex using interoperation ultra-sound for correcting the displacement by the CSF outflow and collapsing tumor. The patients in the function group had better results than the patients in the control group in therapeutic effect (u=2.646, P=0.008), excision rate (χ=7.200, P<0.01), improvement of motor function (u=2.231, P=0.026), and survival quality (KPS uc= 2.664, P=0.008; Zubrod -ECOG -WHO uc=2.135, P=0.033). Conclusions: Using preoperative three -dimensional visualization of cerebral function tissue and the fMRI-integrated neuronavigation technology, combining intraoperative accurate positioning

  10. Tumor Microenvironment in the Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to malignant cancer cells, tumors contain a variety of different stromal cells that constitute the tumor microenvironment. Some of these cell types provide crucial support for tumor growth, while others have been suggested to actually inhibit tumor progression. The composition of tumor microenvironment varies depending on the tumor site. The brain in particular consists of numerous specialized cell types such as microglia, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. In addition to these brain-resident cells, primary and metastatic brain tumors have also been shown to be infiltrated by different populations of bone marrow-derived cells. The role of different cell types that constitute tumor microenvironment in the progression of brain malignancies is only poorly understood. Tumor microenvironment has been shown to be a promising therapeutic target and diagnostic marker in extracranial malignancies. A better understanding of tumor microenvironment in the brain would therefore be expected to contribute to the development of improved therapies for brain tumors that are urgently required due to a poor availability of treatments for these malignancies. This review summarizes some of the known interactions between brain tumors and different stromal cells, and also discusses potential therapeutic approaches within this context

  11. Tumor Microenvironment in the Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorger, Mihaela [Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, St. James’s University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-22

    In addition to malignant cancer cells, tumors contain a variety of different stromal cells that constitute the tumor microenvironment. Some of these cell types provide crucial support for tumor growth, while others have been suggested to actually inhibit tumor progression. The composition of tumor microenvironment varies depending on the tumor site. The brain in particular consists of numerous specialized cell types such as microglia, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. In addition to these brain-resident cells, primary and metastatic brain tumors have also been shown to be infiltrated by different populations of bone marrow-derived cells. The role of different cell types that constitute tumor microenvironment in the progression of brain malignancies is only poorly understood. Tumor microenvironment has been shown to be a promising therapeutic target and diagnostic marker in extracranial malignancies. A better understanding of tumor microenvironment in the brain would therefore be expected to contribute to the development of improved therapies for brain tumors that are urgently required due to a poor availability of treatments for these malignancies. This review summarizes some of the known interactions between brain tumors and different stromal cells, and also discusses potential therapeutic approaches within this context.

  12. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...

  13. Brain tumors; Hirntumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langen, K.J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Biophysik; Stoffels, G. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). C. und O. Vogt Inst. fuer Hirnforschung

    2007-09-15

    Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) is the method of choice for the diagnostics of cerebral gliomas, but the differentiation of tumour tissue from unspecific tissue changes is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET) and Single-Photon-Emission-Computed Tomography (SPECT) may offer relevant additional information which allows for a more accurate diagnostics in unclear situations. Especially, radiolabeled amino acids offer a better delineation of cerebral gliomas which allows an improved guidance of biopsy, planning of surgery and radiation therapy. Furthermore, amino acid imaging appears to be useful to differentiate tumor recurrence from unspecific posttherapeutic tissue, to predict the prognosis especially in low grade gliomas and to monitor the metabolic response during tumor therapy. (orig.)

  14. 19F molecular MR imaging for detection of brain tumor angiogenesis: in vivo validation using targeted PFOB nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) targeted contrast agents has emerged as a promising diagnostic approach in cancer research to detect associated bio-markers. In this work, the potential of 19F MRI was investigated to detect angiogenesis with αvβ3-targeted perfluoro-octylbromide nanoparticles (PFOB NP) in a U87 glioblastoma mouse model at 7 Tesla. Mice were injected intravenously with targeted or non-targeted NP and 19F images were immediately acquired for 90 min using a PFOB-dedicated MRI sequence. Mice infused with targeted NP exhibited higher concentrations in tumors than mice of the control group, despite the presence of nonspecific signal originating from the blood. Imaging results were corroborated by histology and fluorescence imaging, suggesting specific binding of targeted NP to αvβ3 integrin. Two other groups of mice were injected 24 h before imaging to allow blood clearance but no significant differences were found between both groups, probably due to a loss of specificity of PFOB NP. This is the first demonstration of the ability of 19F MRI to detect αvβ3 -integrin endothelial expression in brain tumors in vivo. (authors)

  15. Diffusion tensor imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in brain tumorCorrelation between structure and metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Min; Chen Niu; Netra Rana; Huanmei Ji; Ming Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging are non-invasive techniques used to detect metabolites and water diffusion in vivo. Previous studies have confirmed a positive correlation of individual fractional anisotropy values with N-acetylaspartate/creatine and N-acetylaspartate/choline ratios in tumors, edema, and normal white matter. This study divided the brain parenchyma into tumor, peritumoral edema, and normal-appearing white matter according to MRI data, and analyzed the correlation of metabolites with water molecular diffusion. Results demonstrated that in normal-appearing white matter, N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratios were positively correlated with fractional anisotropy values, negatively correlated with radial diffusivities, and positively correlated with maximum eigenvalues. Maximum eigenvalues and radial diffusivities in peritumoral edema showed a negative correlation with choline, N-acetylaspartate, and creatine. Radial diffusivities in tumor demonstrated a negative correlation with choline. These data suggest that the relationship between metabolism and structure is markedly changed from normal white matter to peritumoral edema and tumor. Neural metabolism in the peritumoral edema area decreased with expanding extracellular space. The normal relationship of neural function and microstructure disappeared in the tumor region.

  16. NANOROBOTS IN BRAIN TUMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed Tarannum, Garje Dattatray H

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicine is the process of diagnosing, treating, and preventing disease and traumatic injury, of relieving pain, and of preserving and improving human health, using molecular tools and molecular knowledge of the human body. In the relatively near term, nanomedicine can address many important medical problems by using nanoscale-structured materials and simple nanodevices that can be manufactured today, including the interaction of nanostructured materials with biological systems. The authors predict that technology-assisted medicine and robotics in particular, will have a significant impact over the next few decades. Robots will augment the surgeon’s motor performance, diagnosis capability, and senses with haptics (feel, augmented reality (sight, and ultrasound (sound. Robotic devices have been used in cardiac surgery, urology, fetal surgery, pediatrics, neurosurgery, orthopedics, and many other medical disciplines. In this article, we present the Nanorobot drug delivery to brain tumor, paying special attention to the transformation trends of organizations, and the integration of robots in brain tumor and underscoring potential repercussions which may deserve more attention and further research.

  17. Net-based data transfer and automatic image fusion of metabolic (PET) and morphologic (CT/MRI) images for radiosurgical planning of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The main purpose of radiosurgery in comparison to conventional radiotherapy of brain tumors is to reach a higher radiation dose in the tumor and sparing normal brain tissue as much as possible. To reach this aim it is crucial to define the target volume extremely accurately. For this purpose, MRI and CT examinations are used for radiotherapy planning. In certain cases, however, metabolic information obtained by positron emission tomography (PET) may be useful to achieve a higher therapeutic accuracy by sparing important brain structures. This can be the case, i.e. in low grade astrocytomas for exact delineation of vital tumor as well as in differentiating scaring tissue from tumor recurrence and edema after operation. For this purpose, radiolabeled aminoacid analogues (e.g. C-11 methionine) and recently O-2-[18F] Fluorethyl-L-Tyrosin (F-18 FET) have been introduced as PET tracers to detect the area of highest tumor metabolism which allows to obtain additional information as compared to FDG-PET that reflects the local glucose metabolism. In these cases, anatomical and metabolic data have to be combined with the technique of digital image fusion to exactly determine the target volume, the isodoses and the area where the highest dose has to be applied. Materials: We have set up a data transfer from the PET Center of the Zentralklinik Bad Berka with the Department of Stereotactic Radiation at the Helios Klinik Erfurt (distance approx. 25 km) to enable this kind of image fusion. PET data (ECAT EXACT 47, Siemens/CTI) are transferred to a workstation (NOVALIS) in the Dept. of Stereotactic Radiation to be co-registered with the CT or MRI data of the patient. All PET images are in DICOM format (obtained by using a HERMES computer, Nuclear Diagnostics, Sweden) and can easily be introduced into the NOVALIS workstation. The software uses the optimation of mutual information to achieve a good fusion quality. Sometimes manual corrections have to be performed to get an

  18. Use of 99m-technetium-glucoheptonate as a tracer for brain tumor imaging: An overview of its strengths and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain tumors represent a vexing clinical problem in oncology due to their increasing incidence, difficulties in treatment and high rates of recurrence. It is especially challenging to evaluate the posttreatment disease status because differentiation of recurrence from treatment-induced changes (radiation necrosis) is not possible with the use of magnetic resonance imaging, the most commonly used imaging method in this setting. Various functional imaging methods, including positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have been employed in this context. SPECT with 99m-technetium (99mTc)-glucoheptonate (GHA) has shown promising results for differentiation of recurrent brain tumor from radiation necrosis. In this review, we have discussed in details the basics of 99mTc-GHA SPECT imaging in brain tumor along with the available literature in this regard

  19. Cortical mapping by functional magnetic resonance imaging in patients with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our study was to establish the effectiveness of the functional MRI (fMRI) technique in comparison with intraoperative cortical stimulation (ICS) in planning cortex-saving neurosurgical interventions. The combination of sensory and motor stimulation during fMRI experiments was used to improve the exactness of central sulcus localization. The study subjects were 30 volunteers and 33 patients with brain tumors in the rolandic area. Detailed topographical relations of activated areas in fMRI and intraoperative techniques were compared. The agreement in the location defined by the two methods for motor centers was found to be 84%; for sensory centers it was 83%. When both kinds of activation are taken into account this agreement increases to 98%. A significant relation was found between fMRI and ICS for the agreement of the distance both for motor and sensory centers (p=0.0021-0.0024). Also a strong dependence was found between the agreement of the location and the agreement of the distance for both kinds of stimulation. The spatial correlation between fMRI and ICS methods for the sensorimotor cortex is very high. fMRI combining functional and structural information is very helpful for preoperative neurosurgical planning. The sensitivity of the fMRI technique in brain mapping increases when using both motor and sensory paradigms in the same patient. (orig.)

  20. Asymptomatic brain tumor detected at brain check-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onizuka, Masanari; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Shibayama, Akira; Hiura, Tsuyoshi; Horie, Nobutaka; Miyazaki, Hisaya [Sankoukai Miyazaki Hospital, Isahaya, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Brain check-up was performed in 4000 healthy subjects who underwent medical and radiological examinations for possible brain diseases in our hospital from April 1996 to March 2000. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed 11 brain tumors which consisted of six meningiomas, three pituitary adenomas, one astrocytoma, and one epidermoid cyst. The detection rate of incidental brain tumor in our hospital was 0.3%. Nine patients underwent surgery, with one case of morbidity due to postoperative transient oculomotor nerve paresis. The widespread use of brain check-up may increasingly detect asymptomatic brain tumors. Surgical indications for such lesions remain unclear, and the strategy for treatment should be determined with consideration of the patient's wishes. (author)

  1. Multiparametric MR assessment of pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR assessment of pediatric brain tumors has expanded to include physiologic information related to cellular metabolites, hemodynamic and diffusion parameters. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between MR and proton MR spectroscopic imaging in children with primary brain tumors. Twenty-one patients (mean age 9 years) with histologically verified brain tumors underwent conventional MR imaging, hemodynamic MR imaging (HMRI) and proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Fourteen patients also had diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWMRI). Metabolic indices including choline-containing compounds (Cho), total creatine (tCr) and lipids/lactate (L) were derived by proton MRSI, relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) by HMRI, and apparent tissue water diffusion coefficients (ADC) by DWMRI. Variables were examined by linear regression and correlation as well as by ANOVA. Cho (suggestive of tumor cellularity and proliferative activity) correlated positively with rCBV, while the relationship between Cho and ADC (suggestive of cellular density) was inverse (P<0.001). The relationship between rCBV and ADC was also inverse (P=0.004). Cho and lipids (suggestive of necrosis and/or apoptosis) were not significantly correlated (P=0.51). A positive relationship was found between lipids and ADC (P=0.002). The relationships between Cho, rCBV, ADC and lipids signify that tumor physiology is influenced by the tumor's physical and chemical environment. Normalized Cho and lipids distinguished high-grade from low-grade tumors (P<0.05). Multiparametric MR imaging using MRSI, HMRI and DWMRI enhances assessment of brain tumors in children and improves our understanding of tumor physiology while promising to distinguish higher- from lower-malignancy tumors, a distinction that is particularly clinically important among inoperable tumors. (orig.)

  2. Imaging metastatic brain tumors before and after gamma-knife radiosurgery using principles of echo-shifting with a train of observations (PRESTO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aimed to clarify the characteristics of susceptibility imaging using the principles of echo-shifting with a train of observations (PRESTO) technique at 3 tesla before and after gamma-knife radiosurgery (GKR) for metastatic brain tumor. We investigated 41 metastatic brain tumors in 14 patients (9 men, 5 women; aged 44 to 80 years, mean age, 62 years) using 3T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before and after GKR. Primary tumors were located in the lung in 11 patients, kidney in one, colon in one, and uterus in one. The interval between GKR and follow-up MR imaging ranged from one to 12 months (mean, 3.8 months). PRESTO and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging were performed using an Achieva 3T system (Phillips, Best, The Netherlands). Two neuroradiologists evaluated tumor size and signal voids (''dark spots'') in the tumor on MR images before and after GKR. The mean tumor diameter decreased significantly from 7.2 mm before GKR to 5.3 mm after (P<0.0001). Before GKR, use of 3T PRESTO detected ''dark spots'' in 25 lesions (60.98%); after GKR, the mean area of ''dark spots'' on PRESTO increased significantly, from 22.4% to 71.78% (P<0.0001, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). On PRESTO, the dark spots in metastatic brain tumor increase after GKR. (author)

  3. Living with a Brain Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when you have been diagnosed with a brain tumor diagnosis. Dealing with changes to your appearance – such as losing your hair or losing weight is difficult for most of us. Keep in mind that your life is not so much ... with a brain tumor may mean rethinking your work and professional goals, ...

  4. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  5. Development in NMR spiral imaging and application to the assessment of the permeability of the blood-brain barrier on 2 models of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results presented in this work were obtained as part of methodological developments in magnetic resonance imaging. First of all, the setting of the rapid imaging technique using a k-space sampling scheme along a variable density spiral is described. Numerical simulations were used to optimize the acquisitions parameters and to compare different reconstruction techniques. An original approach to calibrate the k-space trajectory was proposed. Then, spiral imaging was used to implement a method to measure the blood brain barrier permeability to Gd-DOTA. This protocol was combined to blood volume and vessel size index measurements using Sinerem. The results obtained highlighted differences between the microvascular parameters measured on C6 and RG2 tumor models. The presence of Sinerem induces a mean decrease of the transfer constant across the vascular wall (Ktrans), in the tumor, of 24 per cent. This study also showed extravasation of the Sinerem, during the first two hours after the product injection, only in the RG2 tumors. (author)

  6. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  7. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted

  8. Treatment of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Karajannis, Matthias; Allen, Jeffrey C.; Newcomb, Elizabeth W.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decades considerable advances have been made in neurosurgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy resulting in improved survival and cure rates for children with brain tumors. Here we review four of the most common subtypes of pediatric brain tumors, low-grade and high-grade astrocytomas, medulloblastomas and ependymomas, highlighting their molecular features regarding their tumor biology and promising potential therapeutic targets that may hold promise for finding new “molecularly ta...

  9. Improvised Levelset method for segmentation and grading of brain tumors in dynamic contrast susceptibility and apparent diffusion coefficient magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Chinnadurai

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel Neuro – level set algorithm is proposed and evaluated for simultaneous segmentation and grading of brain tumors. The algorithm utilizes vascular and cellular information provided by the reconstructed images of dynamic contrast susceptibility magnetic resonance images and apparent diffusion coefficient images. The reconstructed images are relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV image, time to peak (TTP image and percentage of base at peak (PBP image along with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC maps. The proposed neural - levelset algorithm utilizes a neural block to provide the speed image for the levelset methods. In this study, two different architectures of levelset method have been implemented and their results are compared. The results show that the proposed Neuro- Levelset method performs better in differentiating the tumor, edema,necrosis in reconstructed images of dynamic contrast susceptibility magnetic resonance images and apparent diffusion coefficient MR images.

  10. In vitro influence of hypoxia on bioluminescence imaging in brain tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Jarvi, Mark; Niedre, Mark; Mocanu, Joseph D.; Moriyama, Yumi; Li, Buhong; Lilge, Lothar; Wilson, Brian C.

    2007-02-01

    Bioluminescence Imaging (BLI) has been employed as an imaging modality to identify and characterize fundamental processes related to cancer development and response at cellular and molecular levels. This technique is based on the reaction of luciferin with oxygen in the presence of luciferase and ATP. A major concern in this technique is that tumors are generally hypoxic, either constitutively and/or as a result of treatment, therefore the oxygen available for the bioluminescence reaction could possibly be reduced to limiting levels, and thus leading to underestimation of the actual number of luciferase-labeled cells during in vivo procedures. In this report, we present the initial in vitro results of the oxygen dependence of the bioluminescence signal in rat gliosarcoma 9L cells tagged with the luciferase gene (9L luc cells). Bioluminescence photon emission from cells exposed to different oxygen tensions was detected by a sensitive CCD camera upon exposure to luciferin. The results showed that bioluminescence signal decreased at administered pO II levels below about 5%, falling by approximately 50% at 0.2% pO II. Additional experiments showed that changes in BLI was due to the cell inability to maintain normal levels of ATP during the hypoxic period reducing the ATP concentration to limiting levels for BLI.

  11. Functional brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive method that has become one of the major tools for understanding human brain function and in recent years has also been developed for clinical applications. Changes in hemodynamic signals correspond to changes in neuronal activity with good spatial and temporal resolution in fMRI. Using high-field MR systems and increasingly dedicated statistics and postprocessing, activated brain areas can be detected and superimposed on anatomical images. Currently, fMRI data are often combined in multimodal imaging, e. g. with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequences. This method is helping to further understand the physiology of cognitive brain processes and is also being used in a number of clinical applications. In addition to the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals, this article deals with the construction of fMRI investigations, selection of paradigms and evaluation in the clinical routine. Clinically, this method is mainly used in the planning of brain surgery, analyzing the location of brain tumors in relation to eloquent brain areas and the lateralization of language processing. As the BOLD signal is dependent on the strength of the magnetic field as well as other limitations, an overview of recent developments is given. Increases of magnetic field strength (7 T), available head coils and advances in MRI analytical methods have led to constant improvement in fMRI signals and experimental design. Especially the depiction of eloquent brain regions can be done easily and quickly and has become an essential part of presurgical planning. (orig.)

  12. Imaging the Tumor Microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    LeBleu, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex, heterogeneous, and dominant component of solid tumors. Cancer imaging strategies of a subset of characteristics of the tumor microenvironment are under active development and currently used modalities and novel approaches are summarized here. Understanding the dynamic and evolving functions of the tumor microenvironment is critical to accurately inform imaging and clinical care of cancer. Novel insights into distinct roles of the tumor microenvironment...

  13. Monte Carlo simulation studies on scintillation detectors and image reconstruction of brain-phantom tumors in TOFPET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Nagendra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS results of detection efficiencies, spatial resolutions and resolving powers of a time-of-flight (TOF PET detector systems. Cerium activated Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (Lu 2 SiO 5 : Ce in short LSO, Barium Fluoride (BaF 2 and BriLanCe 380 (Cerium doped Lanthanum tri-Bromide, in short LaBr 3 scintillation crystals are studied in view of their good time and energy resolutions and shorter decay times. The results of MCS based on GEANT show that spatial resolution, detection efficiency and resolving power of LSO are better than those of BaF 2 and LaBr 3 , although it possesses inferior time and energy resolutions. Instead of the conventional position reconstruction method, newly established image reconstruction (talked about in the previous work method is applied to produce high-tech images. Validation is a momentous step to ensure that this imaging method fulfills all purposes of motivation discussed by reconstructing images of two tumors in a brain phantom.

  14. Brain hypoxia imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Chun [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The measurement of pathologically low levels of tissue pO{sub 2} is an important diagnostic goal for determining the prognosis of many clinically important diseases including cardiovascular insufficiency, stroke and cancer. The target tissues nowadays have mostly been tumors or the myocardium, with less attention centered on the brain. Radiolabelled nitroimidazole or derivatives may be useful in identifying the hypoxic cells in cerebrovascular disease or traumatic brain injury, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In acute stroke, the target of therapy is the severely hypoxic but salvageable tissue. {sup 18}F-MISO PET and {sup 99m}Tc-EC-metronidazole SPECT in patients with acute ischemic stroke identified hypoxic tissues and ischemic penumbra, and predicted its outcome. A study using {sup 123}I-IAZA in patient with closed head injury detected the hypoxic tissues after head injury. Up till now these radiopharmaceuticals have drawbacks due to its relatively low concentration with hypoxic tissues associated with/without low blood-brain barrier permeability and the necessity to wait a long time to achieve acceptable target to background ratios for imaging in acute ischemic stroke. It is needed to develop new hypoxic marker exhibiting more rapid localization in the hypoxic region in the brain. And then, the hypoxic brain imaging with imidazoles or non-imidazoles may be very useful in detecting the hypoxic tissues, determining therapeutic strategies and developing therapeutic drugs in several neurological disease, especially, in acute ischemic stroke.

  15. Pathological advances in pediatric brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Li-Feng; Wang, Rui-Fen; Guan, Wen-bin; Yan, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric brain tumors are the most common solid tumors in children. Compared with brain tumors in adults, pediatric brain tumors have characteristic clinicopathological features and molecular mechanisms. The accurate diagnosis and classification of brain tumors in children is important for patients to have an individualized therapy and to improve the survival rate. With the further study of pediatric brain tumors, there are some new viewpoints on pilocytic astrocytoma (PA), ependymoma,...

  16. Negative brain scintigrams in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With 53 histologically verified and 2 histologically not identified brain tumors, that showed a negative scintigram, it was tried to find reasons for the wrong and negative dropout of these scintigrams. The electroencephalograms and angiograms, that were made simultaneously were taken into consideration with respect to their propositional capability and were compared with the scintigram findings. For the formation of the negative brain scintigrams there could be found no unique cause or causal constellation. The scintigraphic tumor representation is likely based on a complex process. Therefore the reasons for the negativity of the brain scintigrams can be a manifold of causes. An important role plays the vascularisation of the tumor, but not in a sole way. As well the tumor localisation gains some importance; especially in the temporal lobe or in the deeper structures situated tumors can be negative in the scintigram. To hold down the rate of wrong-negative quote in the case of intracranial tumor search, one is advised to continue with an further exposure after 2 to 4 hours besides the usual exposures, unless a sequential scintigraphy was made from the beginning. (orig./MG)

  17. Brain Tumor Therapy-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing Brainstem Measured With Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Chiaho, E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Gajjar, Amar; Broniscer, Alberto [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Zhang, Yong [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Li Yimei [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Glenn, George R.; Kun, Larry E.; Ogg, Robert J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize therapy-induced changes in normal-appearing brainstems of childhood brain tumor patients by serial diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 109 DTI studies from 20 brain tumor patients, aged 4 to 23 years, with normal-appearing brainstems included in the treatment fields. Those with medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (n = 10) received postoperative craniospinal irradiation (23.4-39.6 Gy) and a cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy to the primary site, followed by four cycles of high-dose chemotherapy. Patients with high-grade gliomas (n = 10) received erlotinib during and after irradiation (54-59.4 Gy). Parametric maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were computed and spatially registered to three-dimensional radiation dose data. Volumes of interest included corticospinal tracts, medial lemnisci, and the pons. Serving as an age-related benchmark for comparison, 37 DTI studies from 20 healthy volunteers, aged 6 to 25 years, were included in the analysis. Results: The median DTI follow-up time was 3.5 years (range, 1.6-5.0 years). The median mean dose to the pons was 56 Gy (range, 7-59 Gy). Three patterns were seen in longitudinal FA and apparent diffusion coefficient changes: (1) a stable or normal developing time trend, (2) initial deviation from normal with subsequent recovery, and (3) progressive deviation without evidence of complete recovery. The maximal decline in FA often occurred 1.5 to 3.5 years after the start of radiation therapy. A full recovery time trend could be observed within 4 years. Patients with incomplete recovery often had a larger decline in FA within the first year. Radiation dose alone did not predict long-term recovery patterns. Conclusions: Variations existed among individual patients after therapy in longitudinal evolution of brainstem white matter injury and recovery. Early response in

  18. Brain Tumor Therapy-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing Brainstem Measured With Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To characterize therapy-induced changes in normal-appearing brainstems of childhood brain tumor patients by serial diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 109 DTI studies from 20 brain tumor patients, aged 4 to 23 years, with normal-appearing brainstems included in the treatment fields. Those with medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (n = 10) received postoperative craniospinal irradiation (23.4–39.6 Gy) and a cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy to the primary site, followed by four cycles of high-dose chemotherapy. Patients with high-grade gliomas (n = 10) received erlotinib during and after irradiation (54–59.4 Gy). Parametric maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were computed and spatially registered to three-dimensional radiation dose data. Volumes of interest included corticospinal tracts, medial lemnisci, and the pons. Serving as an age-related benchmark for comparison, 37 DTI studies from 20 healthy volunteers, aged 6 to 25 years, were included in the analysis. Results: The median DTI follow-up time was 3.5 years (range, 1.6–5.0 years). The median mean dose to the pons was 56 Gy (range, 7–59 Gy). Three patterns were seen in longitudinal FA and apparent diffusion coefficient changes: (1) a stable or normal developing time trend, (2) initial deviation from normal with subsequent recovery, and (3) progressive deviation without evidence of complete recovery. The maximal decline in FA often occurred 1.5 to 3.5 years after the start of radiation therapy. A full recovery time trend could be observed within 4 years. Patients with incomplete recovery often had a larger decline in FA within the first year. Radiation dose alone did not predict long-term recovery patterns. Conclusions: Variations existed among individual patients after therapy in longitudinal evolution of brainstem white matter injury and recovery. Early response

  19. Brain Tumor Detection Based On Mathematical Analysis and Symmetry Information

    OpenAIRE

    G., Narkhede Sachin; Khairnar, Vaishali; Kadu, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Image segmentation some of the challenging issues on brain magnetic resonance image tumor segmentation caused by the weak correlation between magnetic resonance imaging intensity and anatomical meaning.With the objective of utilizing more meaningful information to improve brain tumor segmentation,an approach which employs bilateral symmetry information as an additional feature for segmentation is proposed.This is motivated by potential performance improvement in the general automatic brain tu...

  20. Fluorescent Nanoparticle Uptake for Brain Tumor Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Tréhin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate delineation of tumor margins is vital to the successful surgical resection of brain tumors. We have previously developed a multimodal nanoparticle CLIO-Cy5.5, which is detectable by both magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence, to assist in intraoperatively visualizing tumor boundaries. Here we examined the accuracy of tumor margin determination of orthotopic tumors implanted in hosts with differing immune responses to the tumor. Using a nonuser-based signal intensity method applied to fluorescent micrographs of 9L gliosarcoma green fluorescent protein (GFP tumors, mean overestimations of 2 and 24 µm were obtained using Cy5.5 fluorescence, compared to the true tumor margin determined by GFP fluorescence, in nude mice and rats, respectively. To resolve which cells internalized the nanoparticle and to quantitate degree of uptake, tumors were disaggregated and cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Nanoparticle uptake was seen in both CD11b+ cells (representing activated microglia and macrophages and tumor cells in both animal models by both methods. CD11b+ cells were predominantly found at the tumor margin in both hosts, but were more pronounced at the margin in the rat model. Additional metastatic (CT26 colon and primary (Gli36 glioma brain tumor models likewise demonstrated that the nanoparticle was internalized both by tumor cells and by host cells. Together, these observations suggest that fluorescent nanoparticles provide an accurate method of tumor margin estimation based on a combination of tumor cell and host cell uptake for primary and metastatic tumors in animal model systems and offer potential for clinical translation.

  1. Quantitation of blood-brain barrier defect by magnetic resonance imaging and gadolinium-DTPA in patients with multiple sclerosis and brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Stubgaard, M; Frederiksen, J L;

    1990-01-01

    In this study quantitation of the degree of deficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with multiple sclerosis or brain tumors, by using MRI, is shown to be possible. As a measure of permeability of the BBB to Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) the flux per unit of distribution volume per uni...... treatments in intracranial diseases....

  2. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults Download Printable ... the topics below to get started. What Is Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults? What are adult brain ...

  3. Usefulness of double dose contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for clear delineation of gross tumor volume in stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning of metastatic brain tumors. A dose comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the size and clearness of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) of metastatic brain tumors on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images between a single dose contrast administration protocol and a double dose contrast administration protocol to determine the optimum dose of contrast-enhancement for clear delineation of GTV in stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). A total of 28 small metastatic brain tumors were evaluated in 13 patients by intra-individual comparison of GTV measurements using single dose and double dose contrast-enhanced thin-slice (1-mm) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All patients had confirmed histological types of primary tumors and had undergone hypo-fractionated SRT for metastatic brain tumors. The mean tumor diameter with single dose and double dose contrast-enhancement was 12.0 ± 1.1 mm and 13.2 ± 1.1 mm respectively (P 1ml volume was 41.8 ± 0.05% and 12.4 ± 0.03% respectively (P < 0.001). We conclude that double dose contrast-enhanced thin-slice MRI is a more useful technique than single dose contrast-enhanced thin-slice MRI, especially for clear delineation of GTVs of small metastatic brain tumors in treatment planning of highly precise SRT. (author)

  4. Usefulness of double dose contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for clear delineation of gross tumor volume in stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning of metastatic brain tumors: a dose comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Kalloo Sharma; Takahashi, Takeo; Yamano, Takafumi; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Nishimura, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the size and clearness of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) of metastatic brain tumors on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images between a single dose contrast administration protocol and a double dose contrast administration protocol to determine the optimum dose of contrast-enhancement for clear delineation of GTV in stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). A total of 28 small metastatic brain tumors were evaluated in 13 patients by intra-individual comparison of GTV measurements using single dose and double dose contrast-enhanced thin-slice (1-mm) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All patients had confirmed histological types of primary tumors and had undergone hypo-fractionated SRT for metastatic brain tumors. The mean tumor diameter with single dose and double dose contrast-enhancement was 12.0 ± 1.1 mm and 13.2 ± 1.1 mm respectively (P 1ml volume was 41.8 ± 0.05 % and 12.4 ± 0.03 % respectively (P < 0.001). We conclude that double dose contrast-enhanced thin-slice MRI is a more useful technique than single dose contrast-enhanced thin-slice MRI, especially for clear delineation of GTVs of small metastatic brain tumors in treatment planning of highly precise SRT. PMID:22843378

  5. Which is the best advanced MR imaging protocol for predicting recurrent metastatic brain tumor following gamma-knife radiosurgery: focused on perfusion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Myeong Ju; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Sang Joon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    High spatial resolution of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging allows characterization of heterogenous tumor microenvironment. Our purpose was to determine which is the best advanced MR imaging protocol, focused on additional MR perfusion method, for predicting recurrent metastatic brain tumor following gamma-knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Seventy-two consecutive patients with post-GKRS metastatic brain tumor were enrolled. Two readers independently calculated the percentile histogram cutoffs for normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) from dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging and initial area under the time signal-intensity curve (IAUC) from DCE imaging, respectively. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and interreader agreement were assessed. For differentiating tumor recurrence from therapy effect, adding DCE imaging to diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) significantly improved AUC from 0.79 to 0.95 for reader 1 and from 0.80 to 0.96 for reader 2, respectively. There was no significant difference of AUC between the combination of DWI with DSC imaging and the combination of DWI with DCE imaging for both readers. With the combination of DWI and DCE imaging, the sensitivity and specificity were 86.7 and 88.1 % for reader 1 and 90.0 and 85.7 % for reader 2, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between readers was highest for calculation of the 90th percentile histogram cutoffs for IAUC (ICC, 0.87). Adding perfusion MR imaging to DWI significantly improves the prediction of recurrent metastatic tumor; however, the diagnostic performance is not affected by selection of either DSC or DCE MR perfusion method. (orig.)

  6. Which is the best advanced MR imaging protocol for predicting recurrent metastatic brain tumor following gamma-knife radiosurgery: focused on perfusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High spatial resolution of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging allows characterization of heterogenous tumor microenvironment. Our purpose was to determine which is the best advanced MR imaging protocol, focused on additional MR perfusion method, for predicting recurrent metastatic brain tumor following gamma-knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Seventy-two consecutive patients with post-GKRS metastatic brain tumor were enrolled. Two readers independently calculated the percentile histogram cutoffs for normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) from dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging and initial area under the time signal-intensity curve (IAUC) from DCE imaging, respectively. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and interreader agreement were assessed. For differentiating tumor recurrence from therapy effect, adding DCE imaging to diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) significantly improved AUC from 0.79 to 0.95 for reader 1 and from 0.80 to 0.96 for reader 2, respectively. There was no significant difference of AUC between the combination of DWI with DSC imaging and the combination of DWI with DCE imaging for both readers. With the combination of DWI and DCE imaging, the sensitivity and specificity were 86.7 and 88.1 % for reader 1 and 90.0 and 85.7 % for reader 2, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between readers was highest for calculation of the 90th percentile histogram cutoffs for IAUC (ICC, 0.87). Adding perfusion MR imaging to DWI significantly improves the prediction of recurrent metastatic tumor; however, the diagnostic performance is not affected by selection of either DSC or DCE MR perfusion method. (orig.)

  7. Brain Tumor Detection Based On Symmetry Information

    OpenAIRE

    G., Narkhede Sachin; Khairnar, Vaishali

    2013-01-01

    Advances in computing technology have allowed researchers across many fields of endeavor to collect and maintain vast amounts of observational statistical data such as clinical data, biological patient data, data regarding access of web sites, financial data, and the like. This paper addresses some of the challenging issues on brain magnetic resonance (MR) image tumor segmentation caused by the weak correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) intensity and anatomical meaning. With th...

  8. Quantitation of blood-brain barrier defect by magnetic resonance imaging and gadolinium-DTPA in patients with multiple sclerosis and brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Stubgaard, M; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Jensen, M; Henriksen, O; Paulson, O B

    1990-01-01

    In this study quantitation of the degree of deficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with multiple sclerosis or brain tumors, by using MRI, is shown to be possible. As a measure of permeability of the BBB to Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) the flux per unit of distribution volume per unit...... of brain mass was used. This quantity was found by introducing the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) as a measure of concentration of Gd-DTPA in the brain tissue in the mathematical model for the transcapillary transport over the BBB. High accordance between the observed data points and the model was...

  9. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of an 18Fluorine-Labeled COX Inhibitor—[18F]Fluorooctyl Fenbufen Amide—For Imaging of Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Cheng Huang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging of brain tumors remains a great challenge, despite the advances made in imaging technology. An anti-inflammatory compound may be a useful tool for this purpose because there is evidence of inflammatory processes in brain tumor micro-environments. Fluorooctylfenbufen amide (FOFA was prepared from 8-chlorooctanol via treatment with potassium phthalimide, tosylation with Ts2O, fluorination with KF under phase transfer catalyzed conditions, deprotection using aqueous hydrazine, and coupling with fenbufen. The corresponding radiofluoro product [18F]FOFA, had a final radiochemical yield of 2.81 mCi and was prepared from activated [18F]F− (212 mCi via HPLC purification and concentration. The radiochemical purity was determined to be 99%, and the specific activity was shown to exceed 22 GBq/μmol (EOS based on decay-corrected calculations. Ex-vivo analysis of [18F]FOFA in plasma using HPLC showed that the agent had a half-life of 15 min. PET scanning showed significant accumulation of [18F]FOFA over tumor loci with reasonable contrast in C6-glioma bearing rats. These results suggest that this molecule is a promising agent for the visualization of brain tumors. Further investigations should focus on tumor micro-environments.

  10. Increased expression of aquaporin-4 in human traumatic brain injury and brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Hua; YAO Hong-tian; ZHANG Wei-ping; ZHANG LEI; DING Wei; ZHANG Shi-hong; CHEN Zhong; WEI Er-qing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), one of the aquaporins (AQPs), in human brain specimens from patients with traumatic brain injury or brain tumors. Methods: Nineteen human brain specimens were obtained from the patients with traumatic brain injury, brain tumors, benign meningioma or early stage hemorrhagic stroke. MRI or CT imaging was used to assess brain edema. Hematoxylin and eosin staining were used to evaluate cell damage. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the AQP4 expression. Results: AQP4 expression was increased from 15h to at least 8 d after injury. AQP4immunoreactivity was strong around astrocytomas, ganglioglioma and metastatic adenocarcinoma. However, AQP4 immunoreactivity was only found in the centers of astrocytomas and ganglioglioma, but not in metastatic adenocarcinoma derived from lung.Conclusion: AQP4 expression increases in human brains after traumatic brain injury, within brain-derived tumors, and around brain tumors.

  11. Evaluation of intraoperative brain shift using an ultrasound-linked navigation system for brain tumor surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guided neurosurgery using navigation systems is an essential tool to increase accuracy in brain tumor surgery. However, brain shift during surgery has remained problematic. The present study evaluated the utility of a new ultrasound (US)-linked navigation system for brain tumor surgery in 64 patients with intracranial tumors. The navigation system consisted of a StealthStationTM navigation system, a SonoNavTM system, and a standard US scanner. This system determines the orientation of the US images and reformats the images from preoperative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to match the US images. The system was used intraoperatively to measure brain shift several times, using the results to guide tumor resection. US-linked navigation provided information regarding brain shift, and extent of tumor resection during surgery. Evaluation of brain shift was easily achieved in all patients, without using intraoperative CT or MR imaging. Accurate information regarding the true anatomical configuration of the patient could be obtained in all phases of the operation. Magnitude of brain shift increased progressively from pre- to post-resection and depended on the type of cranial structure. Integration of the US scanner with the navigation system allowed comparisons between the intraoperative US and preoperative images, thus improving interpretation of US images. The system also improved the rate of tumor resection by facilitating the detection of remnant tumor tissue. This US-linked navigation system provides information on brain shift, and improves the accuracy and utility of image-guided surgery. (author)

  12. Evidence That MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging (Tractography) Predicts the Natural History of Regional Progression in Patients Irradiated Conformally for Primary Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is fast becoming the method of choice for treatment of nonsuperficial brain lesions. SRT treatment plans of malignant brain tumors typically incorporate a 20-mm isotropic margin to account for microscopic tumor spread; however, distant or progressive tumors occur outside this margin. Our hypothesis is that paths of elevated water diffusion may provide a preferred route for transport or migration of cancer cells. If our hypothesis is correct, then future SRT treatment volumes could be modified to provide elongated treatment margins along the paths of elevated water diffusion, thereby creating a biologically better treatment plan that may reduce the incidence of progression. Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) datasets were acquired on patient subjects before the appearance of >5 mm diameter progressive lesions or secondary tumors. DTI was performed using an echo-planar imaging sequence on a 1.5T clinical General Electric scanner with voxel dimensions of 0.98 x 0.98 x 6 mm. After SRT, patients were given repeated magnetic resonance imaging follow-ups at regular intervals to identify early tumor progression. When progressive disease was detected, DTIstudio and FMRIB Software Library software was used to compute paths of preferred water diffusion through the primary tumor site and the site of progression. Results: Our preliminary results on 14 patient datasets suggest a strong relationship between routes of elevated water diffusion from the primary tumor and the location of tumor progression. Conclusions: Further investigation is therefore warranted. Future work will employ more sophisticated fiber analysis in a prospective study

  13. Brain tumor stem cell dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Issues regarding cancer stem cell (CSC movement are important in neurosphere biology as cell-cell or cell-environment interactions may have significant impacts on CSC differentiation and contribute to the heterogeneity of the neurosphere. Aims. Despite the growing body of literature data on the biology of brain tumor stem cells, floating CSC-derived neurospheres have been scarcely characterized from a morphological and ultrastructural point of view. Results. Here we report a morphological and ultrastructural characterization performed by live imaging and scanning electron microscopy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM CSC-derived neurospheres are heterogeneous and are constituted by cells, morphologically different, capable of forming highly dynamic structures. These dynamic structures are regulated by not serendipitous cell-cell interactions, and they synchronously pulsate following a cyclic course made of "fast" and "slow" alternate phases. Autocrine/paracrine non canonical Wnt signalling appears to be correlated with the association status of neurospheres. Conclusions. The results obtained suggest that GBM CSCs can behave both as independents cells and as "social" cells, highly interactive with other members of its species, giving rise to a sort of "multicellular organism".

  14. Evolution of DNA aptamers for malignant brain tumor gliosarcoma cell recognition and clinical tissue imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiaoyi; Wu, Liang; Wang, Yuzhe; Zhu, Zhi; Song, Yanling; Tan, Yuyu; Wang, Xing-Fu; Li, Jiuxing; Kang, Dezhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-06-15

    Gliosarcoma, a variant of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is a highly invasive malignant tumor. Unfortunately, this disease still marked by poor prognosis regardless of modern treatments. It is of great significance to discover specific molecular probes targeting gliosarcoma for early cancer diagnosis and therapy. Herein, we have selected a group of DNA aptamers with high affinity and selectivity against gliosarcoma cells K308 using cell-SELEX. All the dissociation constants of these aptamers against gliosarcoma cells were in the nanomolar range and aptamer WQY-9 has the highest affinity and good selectivity among them. Furthermore, truncated aptamer sequence, WQY-9-B, shows similar recognition ability to aptamer WQY-9. In addition, WQY-9-B was found to be able to bind selectively and internalize into cytoplasm of target cancer cell at 37°C. More importantly, compared to a random sequence, aptamer WQY-9-B showed excellent recognition rate (73.3%) for tissue sections of clinical gliosarcoma samples. These data suggests that aptamer WQY-9-B has excellent potential as an effective molecular probe for gliosarcoma diagnosis. PMID:26802746

  15. Brain Tumor Detection Based On Mathematical Analysis and Symmetry Information

    OpenAIRE

    Narkhede Sachin G.,; Prof. Vaishali Khairnar

    2014-01-01

    Image segmentation some of the challenging issues on brain magnetic resonance (MR) image tumor segmentation caused by the weak correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) intensity and anatomical meaning. With the objective of utilizing more meaningful information to improve brain tumor segmentation, an approach which employs bilateral symmetry information as an additional feature for segmentation is proposed. This is motivated by potential performance improvement in ...

  16. High resolution susceptibility weighted MR-imaging of brain tumors during the application of a gaseous agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, A. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena (Germany); Exzellenzzentrum Hochfeld-Magnetresonanz, Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria); Sedlacik, J.; Fitzek, C.; Kaiser, W.A.; Reichenbach, J.R. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena (Germany); Walter, B.; Hochstetter, A.; Kalff, R. [Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: to employ a high resolution blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) method called susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) together with the breathing of carbogen to investigate the response of cerebral tumors to this breathing gas and to assess tumor anatomy at high resolution. Methods: five patients with cerebral tumors (four glioblastoma multiforme, one astrocytoma [WHO grade II]) were studied using a susceptibility weighted 3D gradient echo, first order velocity compensated sequence (TE = 45 ms, TR = 67 ms, {alpha} = 25 , FOV = 256 x 192 x 64 mm{sup 3}, typical matrix = 512 x 192 x 64), on a 1.5 T MR scanner while they were breathing air and carbogen. Signal changes between the two breathing conditions were investigated. Results: the glioblastomas showed strong but heterogeneous signal changes between carbogen and air breathing, with changes between + 22.4 {+-} 4.9% at the perimeter of the tumors and -5.0 {+-} 0.4% in peritumoral areas that appeared hyperintense on T{sub 2}-weighted images. The astrocytoma displayed a signal decrease during carbogen breathing (-4.1 {+-} 0.1% to -6.8 {+-} 0.3% in peritumoral areas that correspond to hyperintense regions on T{sub 2}-weighted images, and -3.1 {+-} 0.1% in the tumor-center). Conclusions: SWI provides high resolution images of cerebral anatomy and venous vascularization. Combined with hypercapnia it allows for regional assessment of tumor activity. (orig.)

  17. Brain imaging and schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain structures and brain function have been investigated by the new brain imaging techniques for more than ten years. In Psychiatry, these techniques could afford a new understanding of mental diseases. In schizophrenic patients, CAT scanner and RMI pointed out statistically significant ventricular enlargments which are presently considered as evidence for abnormalities in brain maturation. Functional imaging techniques reported metabolic dysfunctions in the cortical associative areas which are probably linked to the cognitive features of schizophrenics

  18. In Vivo CEST MR imaging of U87 mice brain tumor angiogenesis using targeted LipoCEST contrast agent at 7 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LipoCEST are liposome-encapsulating paramagnetic contrast agents (CA) based on chemical exchange saturation transfer with applications in bio-molecular MRI. Their attractive features include biocompatibility, sub-nanomolar sensitivity, and amenability to functionalization for targeting bio-markers. We demonstrate MR imaging using a targeted lipoCEST, injected intravenously. A lipoCEST carrying Tm(III)-complexes was conjugated to RGD tripeptide (RGD-lipoCEST), to target integrin αv,β3 receptors involved in tumor angiogenesis and was compared with an unconjugated lipoCEST. Brain tumors were induced in athymic nude mice by intracerebral injection of U87MG cells and were imaged at 7 T after intravenous injection of either of the two contrast agents (n = 12 for each group). Chemical exchange saturation transfer-MSME sequence was applied over 2 h with an average acquisition time interval of 13.5 min. The chemical exchange saturation transfer signal was ∼1% in the tumor and controlateral regions, and decreased to ∼0.3% after 2 h; while RGD-lipoCEST signal was ∼1.4% in the tumor region and persisted for up to 2 h. Immunohistochemical staining revealed a persistent co-localization of RGD-lipoCEST with αv,β3 receptors in the tumor region. These results constitute an encouraging step toward in vivo MRI imaging of tumor angiogenesis using intravenously injected lipoCEST. (authors)

  19. Mapping of language brain areas in patients with brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Rasha; Kamel, Nidal; Boon, Tang Tong; Reza, Faruque

    2015-08-01

    Language cortex in the human brain shows high variability among normal individuals and may exhibit a considerable shift from its original position due to tumor growth. Mapping the precise location of language areas is important before surgery to avoid postoperative language deficits. In this paper, the Magnetoencephalography (MEG) recording and the MRI scanning of six brain tumorous subjects are used to localize the language specific areas. MEG recordings were performed during two silent reading tasks; silent word reading and silent picture naming. MEG source imaging is performed using distributed source modeling technique called CLARA ("Classical LORETA Analysis Recursively Applied"). Estimated MEG sources are overlaid on individual MRI of each patient to improve interpretation of MEG source imaging results. The results show successful identification of the essential language areas and clear definition of the time course of neural activation connecting them. PMID:26736340

  20. More Complete Removal of Malignant Brain Tumors by Fluorescence-Guided Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    Benign Neoplasms, Brain; Brain Cancer; Brain Neoplasms, Benign; Brain Neoplasms, Malignant; Brain Tumor, Primary; Brain Tumor, Recurrent; Brain Tumors; Intracranial Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Brain; Neoplasms, Intracranial; Primary Brain Neoplasms; Primary Malignant Brain Neoplasms; Primary Malignant Brain Tumors; Gliomas; Glioblastoma

  1. Brain angiogenesis: Mechanism and Therapeutic Intervention in Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Woo-Young; Lee, Ho-Young

    2009-01-01

    Formation of new blood vessels is required for growth and metastasis of all solid tumors. New blood vessels are established in tumors mainly through angiogenesis. Brain tumors in particular are highly angiogenic. Therefore, interventions designed to prevent angiogenesis may be effective at controlling brain tumors. Indeed, many recent findings from preclinical and clinical studies of antiangiogenic therapy for brain tumors showed that it is a promising approach to managing this deadly disease...

  2. Brain and Spinal Tumors: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and worsen as the tumor grows. The most obvious sign of a brain tumor in infants is ... blood flow, antidepressants to treat anxiety or ease depression that might occur following a tumor diagnosis, and ...

  3. Dual time point imaging with 18F-FDG and its comparison with MRI in primary brain tumors - a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the diagnostic reliability of delayed imaging with 18F-FDG PET/CT in primary brain tumors and its comparison with 1 hour imaging and MRI. Twenty four patients, 4 pre-operative and 20 post-operative, undergoing evaluation for primary brain tumors were imaged at 2 time points, 1 h (54-72 min) and 3 h (174-192 min) after 18F-FDG injection. 5/20 were operated for high grade gliomas (1/5 histopathologically proven oligodendroglioma and 4/5 astrocytomas) and 15/20 for low grade gliomas (12/15 astrocytomas and 3/15 oligodendrogliomas). After PET study, 1 of 4 pre op cases was histopathologically proven to be low grade astrocytoma. 2 were radiologically diagnosed midbrain gliomas. Encephalitis was diagnosed in 1 pre op case on clinico radiological follow up. 7 low grade post op cases were disease free on 6 months follow up. Tracer uptake was quantified by standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the SUV max ratios of tumor relative to the gray matter and white matter at each imaging time point. Conventional MR studies were done in all patients

  4. Advantages of stereotaxic needle biopsy of brain tumor using interventional magnetic resonance imaging. Report of 12 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional MRI, an advanced neuroimaging system, was used to perform stereotaxic needle biopsy of brain tissue (AIRIS, 0.3 Tesla, Hitachi) in 12 patients (9 males, 3 females) with intraparenchymal abnormal lesions. This system permits accurate and safe biopsy of brain tissue in real time. Patient ages ranged from 31 to 79 years (mean 61.5 years). We evaluated the abnormal lesion and dominant hemisphere of these patients preoperatively by using CT, MRI and cerebral angiography. Lesions were located in the left frontal lobe in 3 cases, the right frontal lobe in 1 case, the left temporal lobe in 1 case, the right temporal lobe in 1 case, the left parietal lobe in 2 cases, the right parietal lobe in 1 case, the left occipital lobe in 1 case, the bilateral basal ganglia in 1 case and the corpus callosum in 1 case. The sampling points were in the dominant hemisphere in 7 cases and in the non-dominant hemisphere in 5 cases. The diagnosis based on stereotaxic needle biopsy using this system were 4 gliomas, 1 brain abscess, 1 metastatic brain tumor, 1 granuloma, 2 cerebral infarctions, 2 malignant lymphomas and 1 normal brain tissue. Success rate of biopsy for our 12 cases using this system was 91.7%. Brain hemorrhage was a complication in 1 case but there was no case of meningitis or convulsion. This method is useful in patients with inoperable lesions, including deep lesion or lesions in the brainstem diencephalon or dominant hemisphere, in patients with serious complications, and in geriatric patients. In the future, this MRI system may be applied to minimally invasive therapies such as tumor ablation, cryosurgery, chemoablation, and ventrolateral thalamotomy for parkinsonism. (author)

  5. 1H-MR spectroscopy of brain tumors in the course of radiation therapy: Use of fast spectroscopic imaging and single-voxel spectroscopy for diagnosing recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To improve differential diagnosis of residual or recurrent tumor vs. tissue necrosis in the course of radiation therapy of neurosurgically-treated brain tumors by application of fast 1H-MR spectroscopic imaging in combination with single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS). Methods: 54 patients after with malignant brain tumor (44 cases of glioblastoma, 10 other high-grade gliomas) were examined post-surgically in a total of 140 proton MRS examinations in the course of radiotherapy and in follow-up controls. Fast SI acquisition was performed as single-slice or double-slice TSI sequence with 32x32 phase encodings within 11 or 15 minutes, respectively. SVS with TR/TE 2000/272 ms yielded relative metabolite ratios, and in 15 patients the time courses of the absolute concentrations of brain metabolites were also determined. Results: In the group of 44 patients that could be tracked by MRS until therapy completion, TSI localized in 23 patients a persistent or newly arisen distinct choline accumulation indicating residual or reccurent tumor after radiation therapy. In all these cases MRS diagnosis was confirmed histologically or by short-term follow-up. However, in 6 of 15 patients showing a normal choline pattern in the TSI acquisition, tumor recurrence appeared within three months. SVS provided early recognition of recurrent tumor when detecting characteristic alterations of metabolite concentrations oin therapy follow-up. Conclusion: TSI and SVS represent complementary MRS techniques fand are able to diagnose tumor recurrence early and unambiguously in cases where focal choline accumulation is detected. (orig.)

  6. Preliminary study of MR elastography in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the potential values of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for evaluating the brain tumor consistency in vivo. Methods: Fourteen patients with known solid brain tumor (5 male, 9 female; age range: 16-63 years) underwent brain MRE studies. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. A dedicated external force actuator for brain MRE study was developed. The actuator was fixed to the head coil. During scan, one side of the actuator was attached to the patients' head. Low frequency oscillation was produced by the actuator and caused shear waves propagating into brain tissue. The pulse sequence used in the study was phase-contrast gradient-echo sequence. Phase images of the brain were obtained and the shear waves within the brain were directly imaged. Phase images were processed with local frequency estimation (LFE) technique to obtain the elasticity image. Consistency of brain tumors was evaluated at surgery and was classified as soft, intermediate, or hard with comparison to the white matter of the brain. Correspondence of MRE evaluation with operative results was studied. Results: The elastic modulus of the tumor was lower than that of white matter in 1 patient, higher in 11 patients, and similar in 2 patients. At surgery, the tumor manifested a soft consistency in 1 patient, hard consistency in 11 patients, intermediate consistency in 2 patients. The elasticity of tumors in 14 patients evaluated by MRE was correlated with the tumor consistency on the operation. Conclusion: MRE can noninvasively display the elasticity of brain tumors in vivo, and evaluate the brain tumor consistency before operation. (authors)

  7. Therapy of malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tumors of the brain claim for a separate position in scientific medicine regarding biology, morphology, features of clinical manifestation, diagnostics and therapy. During the past years due to rapid progress in medical biotechnics the situation of the neuroclinician in front of brain tumors has been dramatically changed. The prerequisites for early and accurate diagnosis as well as for successful treatment also of malignant neoplasms have increased and remarkably improved. At the same time the information necessary for an appropriate pragmatic use of the available cognitive methods and therapeutic means increased along the same scale. These facts necessitate the preparation of publications in which the state of the art is presented in possible completeness, systematic order and proper dis-posability for rational management and therapeutic strategies. The primary aim of the present book is to serve these purposes. With 8 chapters, two of them are indexed for INIS, the collective of competent authors deal on the biology, pathology and immunology of malignant brain tumors of adults and of children including relevant basic and recent data of experimental research; further on the available methods of therapy: neurosurgery, radiology and chemotherapy, the fundamental principals of their efficacy and the differing models of single respective combined application, in comprehensive critical form. 111 figs

  8. Pathological advances in pediatric brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-feng WANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric brain tumors are the most common solid tumors in children. Compared with brain tumors in adults, pediatric brain tumors have characteristic clinicopathological features and molecular mechanisms. The accurate diagnosis and classification of brain tumors in children is important for patients to have an individualized therapy and to improve the survival rate. With the further study of pediatric brain tumors, there are some new viewpoints on pilocytic astrocytoma (PA, ependymoma, medulloblastoma (MB, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT, etc. In this article, an overview about pathological advances in the common pediatric brain tumors will be shown. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.002

  9. Evaluation of Clinical Contributions Provided by Addition of the Brain, Calvarium, and Scalp to the Limited Whole Body Imaging Area in FDG-PET/CT Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Tasdemir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to detect additional findings in whole body FDG-PET/CT scan including the brain, calvarium, and scalp (compared to starting from the base of the skull in cancer patients and to determine contributions of these results to tumor staging and treatment protocols. Materials and Methods. We noted whether the findings related to the brain, calvarium, and scalp in 1359 patients had a potential to modify staging of the disease, chemotherapy protocol, radiotherapy protocol, and surgical management. We identified rates of metastatic findings on the brain, calvarium, and scalp according to the tumor types on FDG-PET/CT scanning. Results. We found FDG-PET/CT findings for malignancy above the base of the skull in 42 patients (3.1%, one of whom was a patient with an unknown primary tumor. Twenty-two of the metastatic findings were in the brain, 16 were in the calvarium, and two were in the scalp. Conclusion. This study has demonstrated that addition of the brain to the limited whole body FDG-PET/CT scanning may provide important contributions to the patient’s clinical management especially in patients with lung cancer, bladder cancer, malignant melanoma, breast cancer, stomach cancer, and unknown primary tumor.

  10. In vivo near-infrared imaging for the tracking of systemically delivered mesenchymal stem cells: tropism for brain tumors and biodistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Seong Muk Kim,1 Chang Hyun Jeong,2 Ji Sun Woo,2 Chung Heon Ryu,1 Jeong-Hwa Lee,3 Sin-Soo Jeun1,21Postech-Catholic Biomedical Engineering Institute, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; 3Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, KoreaAbstract: Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based gene therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of various neurological diseases, including brain tumors. However, the tracking of in vivo stem cell migration, distribution, and survival need to be defined for their clinical application. The systemic routes of stem cell delivery must be determined because direct intracerebral injection as a cure for brain tumors is an invasive method. In this study, we show for the first time that near-infrared (NIR imaging can reveal the distribution and tumor tropism of intravenously injected MSCs in an intracranial xenograft glioma model. MSCs were labeled with NIR fluorescent nanoparticles, and the effects of the NIR dye on cell proliferation and migratory capacity were evaluated in vitro. We investigated the tumor-targeting properties and tissue distribution of labeled MSCs introduced by intravenous injection and followed by in vivo imaging analysis, histological analysis, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed no cytotoxicity or change in the overall growth rate and characteristics of labeled MSCs compared with control MSCs. NIR fluorescent imaging showed the organ distribution and targeted tumor tropism of systemically injected human MSCs. A significant number of MSCs accumulated specifically at the tumor site in the mouse brain. These results suggest that NIR-based cell tracking is a potentially useful imaging technique to visualize cell survival, migration, and distribution for the application of MSC

  11. Central Nervous System Lymphoma in a 3-Year-Old Male Suffering from a Severe Juvenile Xanthogranuloma – the Usefulness of Perfusion Weighted Imaging and Diffusion Weighted Imaging in the Diagnostics of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neska-Matuszewska, Małgorzata; Zimny, Anna; Kałwak, Krzysztof; Sąsiadek, Marek J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas (PCNSLs) are rare, malignant brain tumors derived from lymphocytes B. Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a non-Langerhans histiocytic cell disorder in children which mostly affects the skin. Rare fatalities have been reported in extracutaneous manifestation. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a method of choice in the diagnostics of all neoplastic CNS lesions. Perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) allow for more detailed analysis of brain tumors including the rate of neoangiogenesis and cellularity. We presented a pediatric patient suffering from JXG with CNS involvement and the role of brain MRI including DWI and PWI in the evaluation of brain focal lesions. Case Report A 3-year-old male with severe JXG underwent two stem cell transplantations with a development of neurological complications. The patient underwent emergency CT and MRI which revealed a non-specific enhancing focal brain lesion. In DWI it showed restricted diffusion while PWI revealed low values of rCBV and the signal intensity curve returning above the baseline level. Advanced MRI techniques such as DWI and PWI suggested PCNSL. Stereotactic biopsy confirmed PCNSL due to Ebstein-Barr virus reactivation. Conclusions The use of advanced MRI sequences is important to differentiate brain lesions in pediatric patients. The use of PWI and DWI facilitated the diagnosis of PCNSL. It is important to remember that PCNSLs show a very typical pattern of changes visualized with MRI such as: usually strong homogenous enhancement, restricted diffusion and low perfusion. PMID:25624957

  12. Central Nervous System Lymphoma in a 3-Year-Old Male Suffering from a Severe Juvenile Xanthogranuloma – the Usefulness of Perfusion Weighted Imaging and Diffusion Weighted Imaging in the Diagnostics of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas (PCNSLs) are rare, malignant brain tumors derived from lymphocytes B. Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a non-Langerhans histiocytic cell disorder in children which mostly affects the skin. Rare fatalities have been reported in extracutaneous manifestation. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a method of choice in the diagnostics of all neoplastic CNS lesions. Perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) allow for more detailed analysis of brain tumors including the rate of neoangiogenesis and cellularity. We presented a pediatric patient suffering from JXG with CNS involvement and the role of brain MRI including DWI and PWI in the evaluation of brain focal lesions. A 3-year-old male with severe JXG underwent two stem cell transplantations with a development of neurological complications. The patient underwent emergency CT and MRI which revealed a non-specific enhancing focal brain lesion. In DWI it showed restricted diffusion while PWI revealed low values of rCBV and the signal intensity curve returning above the baseline level. Advanced MRI techniques such as DWI and PWI suggested PCNSL. Stereotactic biopsy confirmed PCNSL due to Ebstein-Barr virus reactivation. The use of advanced MRI sequences is important to differentiate brain lesions in pediatric patients. The use of PWI and DWI facilitated the diagnosis of PCNSL. It is important to remember that PCNSLs show a very typical pattern of changes visualized with MRI such as: usually strong homogenous enhancement, restricted diffusion and low perfusion

  13. Performance Analysis of Unsupervised Clustering Methods for Brain Tumor Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar H Jaware

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical image processing is the most challenging and emerging field of neuroscience. The ultimate goal of medical image analysis in brain MRI is to extract important clinical features that would improve methods of diagnosis & treatment of disease. This paper focuses on methods to detect & extract brain tumour from brain MR images. MATLAB is used to design, software tool for locating brain tumor, based on unsupervised clustering methods. K-Means clustering algorithm is implemented & tested on data base of 30 images. Performance evolution of unsupervised clusteringmethods is presented.

  14. An attempt toward objective assessment of brain tumor vascularization using susceptibility weighted imaging and dedicated computer program – a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a novel MRI sequence which demonstrates the susceptibility differences between adjacent tissues and it is promising to be a sequence useful in the assessment of brain tumors vascularity. The aim of our study was to demonstrate usefulness of SWI in evaluation of intratumoral vessels in comparison to CET1 sequence in a standardized, objective manner. 10 patients with supratentorial brain tumors were included in the study. All of them underwent conventional MRI examination with a 1,5 T scanner. SWI sequence was additionally performed using the following parameters: TR 49 ms,TE 40 ms. We used authors’ personal computer software – Vessels View, to assess the vessels number. Comparison of SWI and CET1 sequences was performed using our program. Analysis of all 26 ROIs demonstrated predominance of SWI in the amount of white pixels (vessel cross-sectional) and a similar number of elongated structures (blood vessels). To conclude, the results of this study are encouraging; they confirm the added value of SWI as an appropriate and useful sequence in the process of evaluation of intratumoral vascularity. Using our program significantly improved visualization of blood vessels in cerebral tumors. The Vessel View application assists radiologists in demonstrating the vessels and facilitates distinguishing them from adjacent tissues in the image

  15. IMAGE SEGMENTATION FOR TUMOR DETECTION USING FUZZY INFERENCE SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    V. Janani; P. Meena

    2013-01-01

    Image segmentation on surgical images plays a vital role in diagnosing and analyzing theanatomy of human body. The area of image segmentation has made an extensive ideology for classifyingbiomedical images. One such application for segmenting and classifying MRI brain images using fuzzy basedcontrol theory is proposed in this project. A special technique called FIS is used in brain image segmentation.The proposed FIS technique plays a promising part in identifying the tumor in brain image. In...

  16. Tumor hypoxia and microscopic diffusion capacity in brain tumors: A comparison of 62Cu-Diacetyl-Bis (N4-Methylthiosemicarbazone) PET/CT and diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between tumor hypoxia and microscopic diffusion capacity in primary brain tumors using 62Cu-Diacetyl-Bis (N4-Methylthiosemicarbazone) (62Cu-ATSM) PET/CT and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). This study was approved by the institutional human research committee and was HIPAA compliant, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. 62Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DWI were performed in a total of 40 primary brain tumors of 34 patients with low grade glioma (LGG, n = 13), glioblastoma (GBM, n = 20), and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, n = 7). 62Cu-ATSM PET/CT parameters and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) obtained by DWI were compared. High intensity signals by 62Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DWI in patients with GBM and PCNSL, and low intensity signals in LGG patients were observed. An inverse correlation was found between maximum SUV (SUVmax) and minimum ADC (ADCmin) (r = -0.583, p ratio) and ADCmin for all tumors (r = -0.532, p max and T/Bratio in GBM were higher than LGG (p min was lower in GBM (p = 0.011) and PCNSL (p = 0.01) than in LGG, while no significant difference was found between GBM and PCNSL (p = 0.90). Tumor hypoxia assessed by 62Cu-ATSM PET/CT correlated with microscopic diffusion capacity obtained by DWI in brain tumors. Both 62Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DWI were considered feasible imaging methods for grading glioma. However, 62Cu-ATSM PET/CT provided additional diagnostic information to differentiate between GBM and PCNSL. (orig.)

  17. Classification of Medical Brain Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Haiwei(潘海为); Li Jianzhong; Zhang Wei

    2003-01-01

    Since brain tumors endanger people's living quality and even their lives, the accuracy of classification becomes more important. Conventional classifying techniques are used to deal with those datasets with characters and numbers. It is difficult, however, to apply them to datasets that include brain images and medical history (alphanumeric data), especially to guarantee the accuracy. For these datasets, this paper combines the knowledge of medical field and improves the traditional decision tree. The new classification algorithm with the direction of the medical knowledge not only adds the interaction with the doctors, but also enhances the quality of classification. The algorithm has been used on real brain CT images and a precious rule has been gained from the experiments. This paper shows that the algorithm works well for real CT data.

  18. Treatment of Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment of Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Childhood Brain Tumors The brain is made of different kinds of cells . Childhood ... following: What You Need To Know About™ Brain Tumors Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC) For more childhood cancer information ...

  19. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhri, Asim F; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A

    2015-09-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. PMID:26346145

  20. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhri, Asim F. [Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Siddiqui, Adeel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); St. Jude Children' s Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  1. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  2. Histamine in brain development and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panula, P; Lintunen, M; Karlstedt, K

    2000-02-01

    Histamine is found in developing mammalian brain in both neurons and mast cells. Under normal conditions, histamine H1 and H2 receptors are found in neural, glial and endothelial cells, and H3 receptors at least on neurons. Experimental brain tumors display both H1 and H2 receptors, and histamine increases permeability in the tumors and in the neighboring areas. Many studies have addressed histaminergic signalling mechanisms in cell lines originating from brain tumors. However, the role of histamine in normal development of brain structures, proliferation and differentiation of neurons and glial cells, and growth of malignant tumors in situ is still poorly understood. PMID:10888266

  3. Automatic Diagnosis of Abnormal Tumor Region from Brain Computed Tomography Images Using Wavelet Based Statistical Texture Features

    CERN Document Server

    Padma, A

    2011-01-01

    The research work presented in this paper is to achieve the tissue classification and automatically diagnosis the abnormal tumor region present in Computed Tomography (CT) images using the wavelet based statistical texture analysis method. Comparative studies of texture analysis method are performed for the proposed wavelet based texture analysis method and Spatial Gray Level Dependence Method (SGLDM). Our proposed system consists of four phases i) Discrete Wavelet Decomposition (ii) Feature extraction (iii) Feature selection (iv) Analysis of extracted texture features by classifier. A wavelet based statistical texture feature set is derived from normal and tumor regions. Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used to select the optimal texture features from the set of extracted texture features. We construct the Support Vector Machine (SVM) based classifier and evaluate the performance of classifier by comparing the classification results of the SVM based classifier with the Back Propagation Neural network classifier(BPN...

  4. Human brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just as there have been dramatic advances in the molecular biology of the human brain in recent years, there also have been remarkable advances in brain imaging. This paper reports on the development and broad application of microscopic imaging techniques which include the autoradiographic localization of receptors and the measurement of glucose utilization by autoradiography. These approaches provide great sensitivity and excellent anatomical resolution in exploring brain organization and function. The first noninvasive external imaging of receptor distributions in the living human brain was achieved by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. Developments, techniques and applications continue to progress. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is also becoming important. Its initial clinical applications were in examining the structure and anatomy of the brain. However, more recent uses, such as MRI spectroscopy, indicate the feasibility of exploring biochemical pathways in the brain, the metabolism of drugs in the brain, and also of examining some of these procedures at an anatomical resolution which is substantially greater than that obtainable by PET scanning. The issues will be discussed in greater detail

  5. Brain Tumor Detection Based On Mathematical Analysis and Symmetry Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narkhede Sachin G.,

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation some of the challenging issues on brain magnetic resonance (MR image tumor segmentation caused by the weak correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI intensity and anatomical meaning. With the objective of utilizing more meaningful information to improve brain tumor segmentation, an approach which employs bilateral symmetry information as an additional feature for segmentation is proposed. This is motivated by potential performance improvement in the general automatic brain tumor segmentation systems which are important for many medical and scientific applications. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI segmentation is a complex problem in the field of medical imaging despite various presented methods. MR image of human brain can be divided into several sub-regions especially soft tissues such as gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. Although edge information is the main clue in image segmentation, it can’t get a better result in analysis the content of images without combining other information. Our goal is to detect the position and boundary of tumors automatically. Experiments were conducted on real pictures, and the results show that the algorithm is flexible and convenient.

  6. Tumor hypoxia and microscopic diffusion capacity in brain tumors: A comparison of {sup 62}Cu-Diacetyl-Bis (N4-Methylthiosemicarbazone) PET/CT and diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino-Shishikura, Ayako; Tateishi, Ukihide; Shibata, Hirofumi; Yoneyama, Tomohiro; Nishii, Toshiaki; Torii, Ikuo; Inoue, Tomio [Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Tateishi, Kensuke; Ohtake, Makoto; Kawahara, Nobutaka [Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Department of Neurosurgery, Yokohama (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between tumor hypoxia and microscopic diffusion capacity in primary brain tumors using {sup 62}Cu-Diacetyl-Bis (N4-Methylthiosemicarbazone) ({sup 62}Cu-ATSM) PET/CT and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). This study was approved by the institutional human research committee and was HIPAA compliant, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DWI were performed in a total of 40 primary brain tumors of 34 patients with low grade glioma (LGG, n = 13), glioblastoma (GBM, n = 20), and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, n = 7). {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT parameters and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) obtained by DWI were compared. High intensity signals by {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DWI in patients with GBM and PCNSL, and low intensity signals in LGG patients were observed. An inverse correlation was found between maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) and minimum ADC (ADC{sub min}) (r = -0.583, p < 0.0001), and between tumor/brain ratio (T/B{sub ratio}) and ADC{sub min} for all tumors (r = -0.532, p < 0.0001). Both SUV{sub max} and T/B{sub ratio} in GBM were higher than LGG (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001), and those in PCNSL were also higher than GBM (p = 0.033 and p = 0.044). The ADC{sub min} was lower in GBM (p = 0.011) and PCNSL (p = 0.01) than in LGG, while no significant difference was found between GBM and PCNSL (p = 0.90). Tumor hypoxia assessed by {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT correlated with microscopic diffusion capacity obtained by DWI in brain tumors. Both {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DWI were considered feasible imaging methods for grading glioma. However, {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT provided additional diagnostic information to differentiate between GBM and PCNSL. (orig.)

  7. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in brain tumors and pituitary tumors: First experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This preliminary study embraced 45 patients with meningiomas, brain tumors or pituitary tumors, which were imaged by planar and tomographic scintigraphy after intravenous injection of 111Indium-labeled octreotide. In all of the meningiomas studied (unifocal and multifocal tumors in various locations), a high density of somatostatin receptors was detected by scintigraphy. Pituitary tumors were slightly positive in 50% of cases only, independent of the endocrine activity. Gliomas with an intact blood-brain barrier showed no enhanced tracer uptake in vivo, while gliomas with distributed blood-brain barrier had a high activity uptake. We conclude that in vivo somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, although not tumor-specific, may aid in the preoperative diagnosis and staging of intracranial tumors, especially skull base tumors. (orig.)

  8. Automated classification of brain tumor type in whole-slide digital pathology images using local representative tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Jocelyn; Hoogi, Assaf; Depeursinge, Adrien; Rubin, Daniel L

    2016-05-01

    Computerized analysis of digital pathology images offers the potential of improving clinical care (e.g. automated diagnosis) and catalyzing research (e.g. discovering disease subtypes). There are two key challenges thwarting computerized analysis of digital pathology images: first, whole slide pathology images are massive, making computerized analysis inefficient, and second, diverse tissue regions in whole slide images that are not directly relevant to the disease may mislead computerized diagnosis algorithms. We propose a method to overcome both of these challenges that utilizes a coarse-to-fine analysis of the localized characteristics in pathology images. An initial surveying stage analyzes the diversity of coarse regions in the whole slide image. This includes extraction of spatially localized features of shape, color and texture from tiled regions covering the slide. Dimensionality reduction of the features assesses the image diversity in the tiled regions and clustering creates representative groups. A second stage provides a detailed analysis of a single representative tile from each group. An Elastic Net classifier produces a diagnostic decision value for each representative tile. A weighted voting scheme aggregates the decision values from these tiles to obtain a diagnosis at the whole slide level. We evaluated our method by automatically classifying 302 brain cancer cases into two possible diagnoses (glioblastoma multiforme (N = 182) versus lower grade glioma (N = 120)) with an accuracy of 93.1 % (p < 0.001). We also evaluated our method in the dataset provided for the 2014 MICCAI Pathology Classification Challenge, in which our method, trained and tested using 5-fold cross validation, produced a classification accuracy of 100% (p < 0.001). Our method showed high stability and robustness to parameter variation, with accuracy varying between 95.5% and 100% when evaluated for a wide range of parameters. Our approach may be useful to automatically

  9. Functional Brain Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vessal

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: The historical evolution of concepts of the mind has had a tremendous impact on human civilization. Aside from Smith’s surgical papyrus, there exists practically no documentation down to the era of Hippocrates. While in Corpus, the seat of all sensations is put in the brain, there is an amazing regression, for many centuries thereafter notably influenced by Aristotle, to displace it to the heart. This erroneous diversion promulgated in De Anima with minor corrections by Galen, has per-petuated to our time when we say, for example, that we love something with our very hearts or “knowing by heart” when we mean to memorize something. Avicenna challenged many of Aristotle’s ideas in El-monnafs (psychology section of Al Shafa, paving the road for the later European Renaissance. Cartesian choice of pineal body as the seat of soul in the first half of the 7th century was a fundamental departure from brain-soul dichotomy. It was followed by Gall’s pseudo-science, phrenology, as the first attempt of brain mapping in ascribing “mental faculties” to the speculative “organs” of the brain. Brain mapping through Functional Brain Imaging has flourished ex-tensively in the past decades -starting from PET with later substitution by fMRI- as robust tools for interro-gating mysteries of the brain. With a surprising pace of development, Functional Brain Imaging heralds a welcome adjunct to the science of radiology in ex-ploring mind and human behavior. Given the multi-tude of appropriate MRI machines operating across the country, attention to this aspect of imaging can invigorate research in radiology and boost generation of knowledge in this rapidly growing field. Recent advances in MRI fast imaging, fMRI, as well as clini-cal and spectroscopic imaging with present clinical application and future trends are discussed.

  10. Research of the multimodal brain-tumor segmentation algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yisu; Chen, Wufan

    2015-12-01

    It is well-known that the number of clusters is one of the most important parameters for automatic segmentation. However, it is difficult to define owing to the high diversity in appearance of tumor tissue among different patients and the ambiguous boundaries of lesions. In this study, a nonparametric mixture of Dirichlet process (MDP) model is applied to segment the tumor images, and the MDP segmentation can be performed without the initialization of the number of clusters. A new nonparametric segmentation algorithm combined with anisotropic diffusion and a Markov random field (MRF) smooth constraint is proposed in this study. Besides the segmentation of single modal brain tumor images, we developed the algorithm to segment multimodal brain tumor images by the magnetic resonance (MR) multimodal features and obtain the active tumor and edema in the same time. The proposed algorithm is evaluated and compared with other approaches. The accuracy and computation time of our algorithm demonstrates very impressive performance.

  11. Evaluation of brain tumor endothelial permeability by dynamic magnetic resonance Magnevist contrast imaging on a low-field MR-tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the endothelial permeability to hydrophilic macromolecules in brain tumors the technique for evaluating the Gd-DTPA absorption kinetics on results of dynamic MRI performed by means of the low-field MR-tomograph Magnetom Open and for calculating the index of blood-tumor GdDTPA transport is developed. 27 patients with various brain tumors are examined. The indices of Magnevist transport to tumor tissue vary substantially, depending on the degree of malignancy and deliver essential information on permeability of tumor capillary bed

  12. Cancer stem cells and brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Castillo, Ana; Aguilar Morante, Diana; Morales-García, José A.; Dorado, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Besides the role of normal stem cells in organogenesis, cancer stem cells are thought to be crucial for tumorigenesis. Most current research on human tumors is focused on molecular and cellular analysis of the bulk tumor mass. However, evidence in leukemia and, more recently, in solid tumors suggests that the tumor cell population is heterogeneous. In recent years, several groups have described the existence of a cancer stem cell population in different brain tumors. These neural cancer stem ...

  13. Radiosensitized treatment of malignant brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloznelyte-Plesniene, Laima

    2003-12-01

    Around 12,000 deaths from glioblastoma occurs within the European Community annually. At present, the best available treatment for malignant brain tumors results in a median survival of patients of 15 months despite surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to review our results of radiosensitized treatment of malignant brain tumors.

  14. Brain imaging in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Guendalina; Zamboni, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging has contributed significantly to the understanding of different dementia syndromes. Over the past 20 years these imaging techniques have been increasingly used for clinical characterisation and differential diagnosis, and to provide insight into the effects on functional capacity of the brain, patterns of spatial distribution of different dementia syndromes and their natural history and evolution over time. Brain imaging is also increasingly used in clinical trials, as part of inclusion criteria and/or as a surrogate outcome measure. Here we review all the relatively specific findings that can be identified with different MRI and PET techniques in each of the most frequent dementing disorders. PMID:26933232

  15. Early Experience of Pre- and Post-Contrast 7.0T MRI in Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Paek, Seung Leal; Chung, Young Seob; Paek, Sun Ha; Hwang, Jae Ha; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Choi, Seung Hong; Son, Young Don; Kim, Young Bo; Kim, Dong Gyu; Lee, Kendall H.; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the safety and clinical applicability of 7.0 Tesla (T) brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with brain tumors. Twenty-four patients with intraaxial or extraaxial brain tumors were enrolled in this study. 7.0T MRIs of T2*-weighted axial and T1-weighted coronal or sagittal images were obtained and compared with 1.5T brain MRIs. The T2*-weighted images from 7.0T brain MRI revealed detailed microvasculature and the internal contents of supratentorial brain tumors bet...

  16. BRAIN TUMOR CLASSIFICATION USING NEURAL NETWORK BASED METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyani A. Bhawar*, Prof. Nitin K. Bhil

    2016-01-01

    MRI (Magnetic resonance Imaging) brain neoplasm pictures Classification may be a troublesome tasks due to the variance and complexity of tumors. This paper presents two Neural Network techniques for the classification of the magnetic resonance human brain images. The proposed Neural Network technique consists of 3 stages, namely, feature extraction, dimensionality reduction, and classification. In the first stage, we have obtained the options connected with tomography pictures victimization d...

  17. Cortical Plasticity in the Setting of Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisicaro, Ryan A; Jost, Ethan; Shaw, Katharina; Brennan, Nicole Petrovich; Peck, Kyung K; Holodny, Andrei I

    2016-02-01

    Cortical reorganization of function due to the growth of an adjacent brain tumor has clearly been demonstrated in a number of surgically proven cases. Such cases demonstrate the unmistakable implications for the neurosurgical treatment of brain tumors, as the cortical function may not reside where one may initially suspect based solely on the anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Consequently, preoperative localization of eloquent areas adjacent to a brain tumor is necessary, as this may demonstrate unexpected organization, which may affect the neurosurgical approach to the lesion. However, in interpreting functional MRI studies, the interpreting physician must be cognizant of artifacts, which may limit the accuracy of functional MRI in the setting of brain tumors. PMID:26848558

  18. What underlies the diversity of brain tumors?

    OpenAIRE

    Swartling, Fredrik J.; Hede, Sanna-Maria; Weiss, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Glioma and medulloblastoma represent the most commonly occurring malignant brain tumors in adults and in children respectively. Recent genomic and transcriptional approaches present a complex group of diseases, and delineate a number of molecular subgroups within tumors that share a common histopathology. Differences in cells of origin, regional niches, developmental timing and genetic events all contribute to this heterogeneity. In an attempt to recapitulate the diversity of brain tumors, an...

  19. Brain Image Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Benjaminsen, Claus; Larsen, Rasmus;

    2015-01-01

    The application of motion tracking is wide, including: industrial production lines, motion interaction in gaming, computer-aided surgery and motion correction in medical brain imaging. Several devices for motion tracking exist using a variety of different methodologies. In order to use such devices...... offset and tracking noise in medical brain imaging. The data are generated from a phantom mounted on a rotary stage and have been collected using a Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph for positron emission tomography. During acquisition the phantom was tracked with our latest tracking prototype...

  20. BNCT for malignant brain tumors in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BSH-based intra-operative BNCT as an initial treatment underwent in 4 children with malignant brain tumors since 1998. There were 2 glioblastomas, one primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) and one anaplastic ependymoma patient. They included two children under 3-year-old. All GBM patients were died of CSF dissemination without tumor regrowth in the primary site. Another PNET and anaplastic ependymoma patients are still alive without tumor recurrence. We can consider BNCT is optimal treatment modality for malignant brain tumor in children. (author)

  1. Brain tumors in patients primarly treated psychiatrically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović-Ristić Dragana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Psychiatric symptoms are not rare manifestations of brain tumors. Brain tumors presented by symptoms of raised intracranial pressure, focal neurological signs, or convulsions are usually first seen by the neurologist or less frequently by the neurosurgeon in routine diagnostic procedures. On the other hand, when psychiatric symptoms are the first manifestation in “neurologically silent” brain tumors, the patients are sent to the psychiatrist for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms and brain tumors are left misdiagnosed for a long period of time. Case Report. We presented three patients with the diagnosed brain tumor where psychiatrist had been the first specialist to be consulted. In all three cases neurological examination was generally unremarkable with no focal signs or features of raised intracranial pressure. CT scan demonstrated right insular tumor in a female patient with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; right parietal temporal tumor in a patient with delusions and depression and left frontal tumor in a patient with history of alcohol dependency. Conclusion. Psychiatric symptoms/disorders in patients with brain tumors are not specific enough and can have the same clinical presentation as the genuine psychiatric disorder. Therefore, we emphasize the consideration of neuroimaging in patients with abrupt beginning of psychiatric symptoms, in those with a change in mental status, or when headaches suddenly appear or in cases of treatment resistant psychiatric disorders regardless the lack of neurological symptoms.

  2. Brain tumors: Special characters for research and banking

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Kheirollahi; Sepideh Dashti; Zahra Khalaj; Fatemeh Nazemroaia; Parvin Mahzouni

    2015-01-01

    A brain tumor is an intracranial neoplasm within the brain or in the central spinal canal. Primary malignant brain tumors affect about 200,000 people worldwide every year. Brain cells have special characters. Due to the specific properties of brain tumors, including epidemiology, growth, and division, investigation of brain tumors and the interpretation of results is not simple. Research to identify the genetic alterations of human tumors improves our knowledge of tumor biology, genetic inter...

  3. Evolution of Brain Tumor and Stability of Geometric Invariants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tawbe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to reconstruct and to calculate geometric invariants on brain tumors. The geometric invariants considered in the paper are the volume, the area, the discrete Gauss curvature, and the discrete mean curvature. The volume of a tumor is an important aspect that helps doctors to make a medical diagnosis. And as doctors seek a stable calculation, we propose to prove the stability of some invariants. Finally, we study the evolution of brain tumor as a function of time in two or three years depending on patients with MR images every three or six months.

  4. A Case Report of Brain Stem Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nazari

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain and spinal cord tumors are the most frequent neoplasms after leukemia in children. Brain stem glioma is responsible for 10-20% of brain tumors in this group and often found in pons presenting with cerebellar signs, cranial nerve palsies, pyramidal signs and eventually increased intracranial pressure Case Report: In this article we reported an 11 year old girl affected with brain stem tumor with signs of headache, dizziness, vomiting and ataxia. Strabismus due to palsy of sixth cranial nerve, and dysarthria was observed. Conclusion: Children complaining of vomiting, headache and dizziness for a long time must be assessed for brain tumor in posterior fossa that sometimes may lead to increased intracranial pressure. An exact neurological examination can be worth guide to diagnosis.

  5. Analysis of the Setup Uncertainty and Margin of the Daily ExacTrac 6D Image Guide System for Patients with Brain Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se An Oh

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the setup uncertainties for brain sites when using BrainLAB's ExacTrac X-ray 6D system for daily pretreatment to determine the optimal planning target volume (PTV margin. Between August 2012 and April 2015, 28 patients with brain tumors were treated by daily image-guided radiotherapy using the BrainLAB ExacTrac 6D image guidance system of the Novalis-Tx linear accelerator. DUONTM (Orfit Industries, Wijnegem, Belgium masks were used to fix the head. The radiotherapy was fractionated into 27-33 treatments. In total, 844 image verifications were performed for 28 patients and used for the analysis. The setup corrections along with the systematic and random errors were analyzed for six degrees of freedom in the translational (lateral, longitudinal, and vertical and rotational (pitch, roll, and yaw dimensions. Optimal PTV margins were calculated based on van Herk et al.'s [margin recipe = 2.5∑ + 0.7σ - 3 mm] and Stroom et al.'s [margin recipe = 2∑ + 0.7σ] formulas. The systematic errors (∑ were 0.72, 1.57, and 0.97 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical translational dimensions, respectively, and 0.72°, 0.87°, and 0.83° in the pitch, roll, and yaw rotational dimensions, respectively. The random errors (σ were 0.31, 0.46, and 0.54 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical rotational dimensions, respectively, and 0.28°, 0.24°, and 0.31° in the pitch, roll, and yaw rotational dimensions, respectively. According to van Herk et al.'s and Stroom et al.'s recipes, the recommended lateral PTV margins were 0.97 and 1.66 mm, respectively; the longitudinal margins were 1.26 and 3.47 mm, respectively; and the vertical margins were 0.21 and 2.31 mm, respectively. Therefore, daily setup verifications using the BrainLAB ExacTrac 6D image guide system are very useful for evaluating the setup uncertainties and determining the setup margin.

  6. Analysis of the Setup Uncertainty and Margin of the Daily ExacTrac 6D Image Guide System for Patients with Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se An; Yea, Ji Woon; Kang, Min Kyu; Park, Jae Won; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the setup uncertainties for brain sites when using BrainLAB's ExacTrac X-ray 6D system for daily pretreatment to determine the optimal planning target volume (PTV) margin. Between August 2012 and April 2015, 28 patients with brain tumors were treated by daily image-guided radiotherapy using the BrainLAB ExacTrac 6D image guidance system of the Novalis-Tx linear accelerator. DUONTM (Orfit Industries, Wijnegem, Belgium) masks were used to fix the head. The radiotherapy was fractionated into 27-33 treatments. In total, 844 image verifications were performed for 28 patients and used for the analysis. The setup corrections along with the systematic and random errors were analyzed for six degrees of freedom in the translational (lateral, longitudinal, and vertical) and rotational (pitch, roll, and yaw) dimensions. Optimal PTV margins were calculated based on van Herk et al.'s [margin recipe = 2.5∑ + 0.7σ - 3 mm] and Stroom et al.'s [margin recipe = 2∑ + 0.7σ] formulas. The systematic errors (∑) were 0.72, 1.57, and 0.97 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical translational dimensions, respectively, and 0.72°, 0.87°, and 0.83° in the pitch, roll, and yaw rotational dimensions, respectively. The random errors (σ) were 0.31, 0.46, and 0.54 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical rotational dimensions, respectively, and 0.28°, 0.24°, and 0.31° in the pitch, roll, and yaw rotational dimensions, respectively. According to van Herk et al.'s and Stroom et al.'s recipes, the recommended lateral PTV margins were 0.97 and 1.66 mm, respectively; the longitudinal margins were 1.26 and 3.47 mm, respectively; and the vertical margins were 0.21 and 2.31 mm, respectively. Therefore, daily setup verifications using the BrainLAB ExacTrac 6D image guide system are very useful for evaluating the setup uncertainties and determining the setup margin. PMID:27019082

  7. Congenital Brain Tumors, a Series of Seven Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Nejat

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Congenital brain tumors are very rare. We review these tumors in patients younger than 2 months diagnosed in our Department. Material & Methods: Seven congenital brain tumors were diagnosed during five years. Clinical and radiological findings and prognosis are analyzed. Findings: The study included 5 female and two male infants. Two cases were diagnosed antenatally by means of ultrasonography. All patients presented with intracranial hypertension. The tumor was non-homogenous with cystic and solid components in all neuroimaging, except for the case with choroid plexus papilloma. Hydrocephalus was evident in all of them. Most findings were infra-tentorial lesions. There were three teratomas, one primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor, one ependymoblastoma and one choroid plexus papilloma. Six patients were operated on, with one intra-operative death. Two passed away postoperatively with aspiration pneumonia. One patient died due to complications of chemotherapy and another one due to tumor recurrence one year after surgery. Only the patient with choroid plexus papilloma is alive after 2 years. Conclusion: Today, the availability of noninvasive imaging procedures such as computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging has improved the diagnosis of congenital brain tumors. Inspite of development in prenatal diagnosis, appropriate pre and post operative management, the mortality associated with these tumors still remains high. The final prognosis in these patients is still discouraging despite early surgery and operative and anesthetic improvements. Choroid plexus papilloma accompanies the best prognosis, whereas teratoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors have the worst prognosis.

  8. Brain tumors and synchrotron radiation: new methods for mini-beams radiation therapy and treatment follow-up by functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An innovative method of synchrotron radiation therapy, called mini-beams, was proposed by A. Dilmanian et al. in 2006. Mini-beams consists in tumor irradiation with monochromatic sub-millimetric x-ray beams spatially fractionated produced by a synchrotron source. To obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume, an interleaving is realized using two orthogonal incidences. Adjacent healthy tissue is only partially irradiated by mini-beams, the areas between the beams only receive scattered radiation and therefore the energy deposited is 10 to 15 times lower than on one mini-beam axis, leading to a sparing effect of healthy tissue even when a high dose is deposited in the target volume. The thesis project is the development of this experimental method of monochromatic mini-beams, which involves the control of the irradiation geometry, the control of dosimetry and its modeling by Monte Carlo simulations. To evaluate the method, preclinical experiments on models of brain tumors implanted in rats (F98) are performed. Follow-up by anatomical and functional imaging is carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. Functional imaging of cerebral perfusion (volume and cerebral blood flow, mean transit time of heavy elements) appears to be associated in the literature as a relevant method for monitoring prognostic. The key parameters of the cerebral vasculature are mainly studied in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because of the harmlessness of this imaging modality. The relation between MRI signal and contrast agent concentration is very complex and no quantitative relationship is well known. Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography (SRCT) is an imaging modality with performances to measure absolute contrast agent concentration very close to the theoretical limits and can be used as gold-standard. The used pharmacokinetic models need as input parameters a contrast agent concentration versus time. A comparison of perfusion measurements between MRI and SRCT

  9. 3-D in vivo brain tumor geometry study by scaling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Hoyos, F.; Martín-Landrove, M.

    2012-02-01

    A new method, based on scaling analysis, is used to calculate fractal dimension and local roughness exponents to characterize in vivo 3-D tumor growth in the brain. Image acquisition was made according to the standard protocol used for brain radiotherapy and radiosurgery, i.e., axial, coronal and sagittal magnetic resonance T1-weighted images, and comprising the brain volume for image registration. Image segmentation was performed by the application of the k-means procedure upon contrasted images. We analyzed glioblastomas, astrocytomas, metastases and benign brain tumors. The results show significant variations of the parameters depending on the tumor stage and histological origin.

  10. Differential labeling of methionine with technetium-99m using chelation and trans-chelation: Can it be used for brain tumor imaging in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A protein synthesis marker 11C-methionine-PET was used in differentiating residual post-radiotherapeutic viability and to differentiate the low-grade proliferating glioma with glioblastoma, SPECT facility has wider availability and reports with 201Thallium indicated that it can differentiate recurrence from necrosis. Since 11C and 201Thallium are cyclotron produced isotopes and in underdeveloped / developing countries, non-availability of cyclotron, PET cameras and their costing are the main constraints. With this aim studies were undertaken to label Methionine with technetium-99m for its possible use in brain tumor imaging. The l, methionine, was labeled with Technetium-99m after modifiying certain steps as reported by Tubis et al, and also by transchelating using a weak prochelator glucoheptonate. The labeling efficiencies were in order of 99 % and 97 % with chelating and transchelating mehods. In our studies we found that Tc-99m Methionine SPECT images are comparable with 11C - methionine PET images. The Methionine uptake index was calculated by drawing ROI around the tumor in the slice showing maximum activity and obtaining the counts. To know the background counts a similar ROI was drawn on the contra lateral side/lobe. The ratio of the two was obtained. The ratio as calculated in order of 6.0 and 8.2 for higher grade and low-grade glioma, respectively. The studies conducted so far in 150 patients indicated that this technology could be utilized further to (a) grading gliomas and (b) differentiating glioma from non-tumoral lesions and radiation necrosis.

  11. Electromagnetic brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present imaging methods of cerebral neuro-activity like brain functional MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) secondarily measure only average activities within a time of the second-order (low time-resolution). In contrast, the electromagnetic brain imaging (EMBI) directly measures the faint magnetic field (10-12-10-13 T) yielded by the cerebral activity with use of multiple arrayed sensors equipped on the head surface within a time of sub-millisecond order (high time-resolution). The sensor array technology to find the signal source from the measured data is common in wide areas like signal procession for radar, sonar, and epicenter detection by seismic wave. For estimating and reconstructing the active region in the brain in EMBI, the efficient method must be developed and this paper describes the direct and inverse problems concerned in signal and image processions of EMBI. The direct problem involves the cerebral magnetic field/lead field matrix and inverse problem for reconstruction of signal source, the MUSIC (multiple signal classification) algorithm, GLRT (generalized likelihood ratio test) scan, and adaptive beamformer. As an example, given are results of magnetic intensity changes (unit, fT) in the somatosensory cortex vs time (msec) measured by 160 sensors and of images reconstructed from EMBI and MRI during electric muscle afferent input from the hand. The real-time imaging is thus possible with EMBI and extremely, the EMBI image, the real-time cerebral signals, can inversely operate a machine, of which application directs toward the brain/machine interface development. (R.T.)

  12. Computed tomography of virally induced monkey brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-five (35) Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) were inoculated intracerebrally with chickembryo fibroblasts which were producing the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of the Rous sarcoma virus. These were then studied by means of computed tomography (CT) to detect brain tumors. Tumors were induced in 54.3% (19/35), with an average latency of 32.6 (15 - 43) days before a CT image appeared. The brains were sectioned into 5-mm slices, coplanar with the CT images. Various CT features, such as necrosis, hemorrhage, and peritumoral edema, correlated with the pathological findings. Contrast-enhanced CT detected tumors greater than 4-6 mm in diameter, and it was accurate within 2 mm in determining. Following brain tumors by CT in 6 monkeys revealed changes in the tumor size. One monkey was treated by differential hypothermia following craniectomy; the therapeutic effect and the tumor size, as subsequently evaluated for six months, revealed tumor regression during the initial 5 weeks, followed by stabilization and late (6 months) progression. The large brain size, 90-110 grams in adults, and the availability of these monkeys make them an excellent model system for neurological, neurosurgical, CT, and multimodality therapeutic experimentation. (author)

  13. The impact of dietary isoflavonoids on malignant brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehm, Tina; Fan, Zheng; Weiss, Ruth; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Hore, Nirjhar; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyüpoglu, Iiker Y; Savaskan, Nic E

    2014-08-01

    Poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options render malignant brain tumors one of the most devastating diseases in clinical medicine. Current treatment strategies attempt to expand the therapeutic repertoire through the use of multimodal treatment regimens. It is here that dietary fibers have been recently recognized as a supportive natural therapy in augmenting the body's response to tumor growth. Here, we investigated the impact of isoflavonoids on primary brain tumor cells. First, we treated glioma cell lines and primary astrocytes with various isoflavonoids and phytoestrogens. Cell viability in a dose-dependent manner was measured for biochanin A (BCA), genistein (GST), and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG). Dose-response action for the different isoflavonoids showed that BCA is highly effective on glioma cells and nontoxic for normal differentiated brain tissues. We further investigated BCA in ex vivo and in vivo experimentations. Organotypic brain slice cultures were performed and treated with BCA. For in vivo experiments, BCA was intraperitoneal injected in tumor-implanted Fisher rats. Tumor size and edema were measured and quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. In vascular organotypic glioma brain slice cultures (VOGIM) we found that BCA operates antiangiogenic and neuroprotective. In vivo MRI scans demonstrated that administered BCA as a monotherapy was effective in reducing significantly tumor-induced brain edema and showed a trend for prolonged survival. Our results revealed that dietary isoflavonoids, in particular BCA, execute toxicity toward glioma cells, antiangiogenic, and coevally neuroprotective properties, and therefore augment the range of state-of-the-art multimodal treatment approach. PMID:24898306

  14. Cognitive deficits in patients with brain tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Chao; BAO Wei-min; YANG Bo-jie; XIE Rong; CAO Xiao-yun; LUAN Shi-hai; MAO Ying

    2012-01-01

    Objective To discuss the present status and progress of clinical research on the cognitive effects caused by different types of brain tumors and common treatments.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English from 1990 to Febuary 2012.Research terms were "cognitive deficits" or "cognitive dysfunction".Study selection Articals including any information about brain tumor related cognitive deficits were selected.Results It is widely accepted that brain tumors and related treatments can impair cognitive function across manydomains,and can impact on patients' quality of life.Tumor localization,lateralization,surgery,drugs,radiotherapy and chemotherapy are all thought to be important factors in this process.However,some conflicting findings regarding brain tumor-related cognitive deficits have been reported.It can be difficult to determine the mechanism of these treatments,such as chemotherapy,antibiotics,antiepileptics,and steroids.Future research is needed to clarify these potential treatment effects.Conclusions Cognitive function is important for patients with brain tumor.Much more focus has been paid on this field.It should be regarded as an important prognostic index for the patients with brain tumor,and neuropsychological tests should be used in regular examinations.

  15. Intraoperative fluorescent imaging of intracranial tumors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahaninia, Milad; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Georges, Joseph; Udovich, Joshua A; Kalani, M Yashar S; Feuerstein, Burt G; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2013-05-01

    A review of fluorescent imaging for intracranial neoplasms is presented. Complete resection of brain cancer is seldom possible because of the goal to preserve brain tissue and the inability to visualize individual infiltrative tumor cells. Verification of histology and identification of tumor invasion in macroscopically normal-appearing brain tissue determine prognosis after resection of malignant gliomas. Therefore, imaging modalities aim to facilitate intraoperative decision-making. Intraoperative fluorescent imaging techniques have the potential to enable precise histopathologic diagnosis and to detect tumor remnants in the operative field. Macroscopic fluorescence imaging is effective for gross tumor detection. Microscopic imaging techniques enhance the sensitivity of the macroscopic observations and provide real-time histological information. Further development of clinical grade fluorescent agents specifically targeting tumor cells could improve the diagnostic and prognostic yield of intraoperative imaging. PMID:23523009

  16. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Membership Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    BTEC welcomes new members interested in the development of multi-center, inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes and prevention of all brain tumors.

  17. Brain imaging and autism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilbovicius, M. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), INSERM CEA 0205, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Autism is a neuro-developmental disorder with a range of clinical presentations, from mild to severe, referred to as autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The most common clinical ASD sign is social interaction impairment, which is associated with verbal and non-verbal communication deficits and stereotyped and obsessive behaviors. Thanks to recent brain imaging studies, scientists are getting a better idea of the neural circuits involved in ASD. Indeed, functional brain imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET), single positron emission tomograph y (SPECT) and functional MRI (fMRI) have opened a new perspective to study normal and pathological brain functions. Three independent studies have found anatomical and rest functional temporal abnormalities. These anomalies are localized in the superior temporal sulcus bilaterally which are critical for perception of key social stimuli. In addition, functional studies have shown hypo-activation of most areas implicated in social perception (face and voice perception) and social cognition (theory of mind). These data suggest an abnormal functioning of the social brain network. The understanding of such crucial abnormal mechanism may drive the elaboration of new and more adequate social re-educative strategies in autism. (author)

  18. Brain imaging and autism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autism is a neuro-developmental disorder with a range of clinical presentations, from mild to severe, referred to as autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The most common clinical ASD sign is social interaction impairment, which is associated with verbal and non-verbal communication deficits and stereotyped and obsessive behaviors. Thanks to recent brain imaging studies, scientists are getting a better idea of the neural circuits involved in ASD. Indeed, functional brain imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET), single positron emission tomograph y (SPECT) and functional MRI (fMRI) have opened a new perspective to study normal and pathological brain functions. Three independent studies have found anatomical and rest functional temporal abnormalities. These anomalies are localized in the superior temporal sulcus bilaterally which are critical for perception of key social stimuli. In addition, functional studies have shown hypo-activation of most areas implicated in social perception (face and voice perception) and social cognition (theory of mind). These data suggest an abnormal functioning of the social brain network. The understanding of such crucial abnormal mechanism may drive the elaboration of new and more adequate social re-educative strategies in autism. (author)

  19. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Guanqun; Li, Qingquan; Peng, Gang; Ma, Jun; Fan, Hongwei; Li, Yingbin

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are still unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain t...

  20. Molecular Imaging of Tumors Using a Quantitative T1 Mapping Technique via Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kelsey Herrmann; Johansen, Mette L.; Craig, Sonya E.; Jason Vincent; Michael Howell; Ying Gao; Lan Lu; Bernadette Erokwu; Agnes, Richard S.; Zheng-Rong Lu; Pokorski, Jonathan K.; James Basilion; Vikas Gulani; Mark Griswold; Chris Flask

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with molecular imaging agents would allow for the specific localization of brain tumors. Prior studies using T 1-weighted MR imaging demonstrated that the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 molecular imaging agent labeled heterotopic xenograft models of brain tumors more intensely than non-specific contrast agents using conventional T 1-weighted imaging techniques. In this study, we used a dynamic quantitative T 1 mapping strategy to more ob...

  1. Development of multifunctional nanoparticles for brain tumor diagnosis and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiseh, Omid

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a class of non-invasive imaging agents developed for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and drug delivery. MNPs have traditionally been developed for disease imaging via passive targeting, but recent advances in nanotechnology have enabled cellular-specific targeting, drug delivery and multi-modal imaging using these nanoparticles. Opportunities now exist to engineer MNP with designated features (e.g., size, coatings, and molecular functionalizations) for specific biomedical applications. The goal of this interdisciplinary research project is to develop targeting multifunctional nanoparticles, serving as both contrast agents and drug carriers that can effectively pass biological barriers, for diagnosis, staging and treatment of brain tumors. The developed nanoparticle system consists of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle core (NP) and a shell comprised of biodegradable polymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) and chitosan. Additionally, near-infrared fluorescing (NIRF) molecules were integrated onto the NP shell to enable optical detection. Tumor targeting was achieved by the addition of chlorotoxin, a peptide with that has high affinity to 74 out of the 79 classifications of primary brain tumors and ability to illicit a therapeutic effect. This novel NP system was tested both in vitro and in vivo and was shown to specifically target gliomas in tissue culture and medulloblastomas in transgenic mice with an intact blood brain barriers (BBB), and delineate tumor boundaries in both MR and optical imaging. Additionally, the therapeutic potential of this NP system was explored in vitro, which revealed a unique nanoparticle-enabled pathway that enhances the therapeutic potential of bound peptides by promoting the internalization of membrane bound cell surface receptors. This NP system was further modified with siRNA and evaluated as a carrier for brain tumor targeted gene therapy. Most significantly, the evaluation of

  2. Imaging brain plasticity after trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Kou, Zhifeng; Iraji, Armin

    2014-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic after stroke or epilepsy; however, there is a paucity of brain plasticity investigation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This mini review summarizes the most recent evidence of brain plasticity in human TBI patients from the perspective of advanced magnetic resonance imaging. Similar to other forms of acquired brain injury, TBI patients also demonstrated both structural reorganization as well as functional compensation by the recruitment of other brain regions. ...

  3. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanqun Qiao; Qingquan Li; Gang Peng; Jun Ma; Hongwei Fan; Yingbin Li

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are stil unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cel s and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain tumor stem cells. The numbers of cytolysosomes and autophagosomes in brain tumor stem cells and induced neural stem cel s were lower and the proliferative activity was obviously stronger than that in normal neural stem cells. Normal neural stem cells could differentiate into glial fibril ary acidic protein-positive and microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells, which were also negative for nestin. However, glial fibril ary acidic protein/nestin, microtubule associated protein-2/nestin, and glial fibril ary acidic protein/microtubule associated protein-2 double-positive cells were found in induced neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cel s. Results indicate that induced neural stem cells are similar to brain tumor stem cells, and are possibly the source of brain tumor stem cells.

  4. Bleomycin treatment of brain tumors: an evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnert, Mette; Gehl, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Bleomycin has been used in the treatment of brain tumors for over 30 years. Currently, we are evaluating electrochemotherapy (the use of electric pulses to enhance uptake of bleomycin) for patients with secondary brain tumors. We, therefore, reviewed the literature with specific reference...... to the tolerability and toxicity of bleomycin. Using the keywords 'brain' and 'bleomycin', a database search without date restriction was performed and over 500 articles were found. Twenty-five articles were used for this study based on relevance determined by: (i) clinical studies, (ii) use of bleomycin, and (iii...

  5. Soft tissue tumors - imaging methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soft Tissue Tumors - Imaging Methods: Imaging methods play an important diagnostic role in soft tissue tumors concerning a preoperative evaluation of localization, size, topographic relationship, dignity, and metastatic disease. The present paper gives an overview about diagnostic methods available today such as ultrasound, thermography, roentgenographic plain films and xeroradiography, radionuclide methods, computed tomography, lymphography, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Besides sonography particularly computed tomography has the most important diagnostic value in soft tissue tumors. The application of a recently developed method, the magnetic resonance imaging, cannot yet be assessed in its significance. (orig.)

  6. Imaging of soft tissue tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Einarsdóttir, Hildur

    2003-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this project on soft tissue tumors, was to evaluate existing imaging methods and test new Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences for diagnosis and assessment of cytotoxic therapy and to relate the imaging studies to cytology to explore the limitations of each procedure. Patients and method The studies were based on patients with a soft tissue lesion diagnosed and treated at the Orthopedic Tumor Service at the Karolinska Hospital 1990-2003. In 17...

  7. Recent developments in brain tumor predisposing syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Gunnar; Andersson, Ulrika; Melin, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    The etiologies of brain tumors are in the most cases unknown, but improvements in genetics and DNA screening have helped to identify a wide range of brain tumor predisposition disorders. In this review we are discussing some of the most common predisposition disorders, namely: neurofibromatosis type 1 and 2, schwannomatosis, rhabdoid tumor predisposition disorder, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin), tuberous sclerosis complex, von Hippel-Lindau, Li-Fraumeni and Turcot syndromes. Recent findings from the GLIOGENE collaboration and the newly identified glioma causing gene POT1, will also be discussed. Genetics. We will describe these disorders from a genetic and clinical standpoint, focusing on the difference in clinical symptoms depending on the underlying gene or germline mutation. Central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Most of these disorders predispose the carriers to a wide range of symptoms. Herein, we will focus particularly on tumors affecting the CNS and discuss improvements of targeted therapy for the particular disorders. PMID:26634384

  8. Brain Tumor Detection Based on Bilateral Symmetry Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narkhede Sachin,

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Advances in computing technology have allowed researchers across many fields of endeavor to collect and maintain vast amounts of observational statistical data such as clinical data, biological patient data, data regarding access of web sites , financial data, and the like. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI segmentation is a complex problem in the field of medical imaging despite various presented methods. MR image of human brain can be divided into several sub-regions especially soft tissues such as gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. Although edge information is the main clue in image segmentation, it can’t get a better result in analysis the content of images without combining other information. The segmentation of brain tissue in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is very important for detecting the existence and outlines of tumors. In this thesis , an algorithm about segmentation based on the symmetry character of brain MRI image is presented. Our goal is to detect the position and boundary of tumors automatically. Experiments were conducted on real pictures, and the results show that the algorithm is flexible and convenient.

  9. Imaging tumors of the patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Patellar tumors are rare; only a few series have been described in the literature and radiographic diagnosis can be challenging. We reviewed all patellar tumors at one institution and reviewed the literature. Materials and methods: In an evaluation of the database at one institution from 1916 to 2009, 23,000 bone tumors were found. Of these, 41 involved the patella. All had imaging studies and microscopic diagnostic confirmation. All medical records, imaging studies, and pathology were reviewed. Results: There were 15 females and 26 males, ranging from 8 to 68 years old (average 30). There were 30 benign tumors; eight giant cell tumors, eight chondroblastomas, seven osteoid osteomas, two aneurysmal bone cysts, two ganglions, one each of chondroma, exostosis, and hemangioma. There were 11 malignant tumors: five hemangioendotheliomas, three metastases, one lymphoma, one plasmacytoma, and one angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Patellar tumors are rare and usually benign. As the patella is an apophysis, the most frequent lesions are giant cell tumor in the adult and chondroblastoma in children. Osteoid osteomas were frequent in our series and easily diagnosed. Metastases are the most frequent malignant diagnoses in the literature; in our series malignant vascular tumors were more common. These lesions are often easily analyzed on radiographs. CT and MR define better the cortex, soft tissue extension, and fluid levels. This study presents the imaging patterns of the more common patellar tumors in order to help the radiologist when confronted with a lesion in this location

  10. Imaging Tumor Necrosis with Ferumoxytol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Aghighi

    Full Text Available Ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO are promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. USPIO mediated proton relaxation rate enhancement is strongly dependent on compartmentalization of the agent and can vary depending on their intracellular or extracellular location in the tumor microenvironment. We compared the T1- and T2-enhancement pattern of intracellular and extracellular USPIO in mouse models of cancer and pilot data from patients. A better understanding of these MR signal effects will enable non-invasive characterizations of the composition of the tumor microenvironment.Six 4T1 and six MMTV-PyMT mammary tumors were grown in mice and imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. R1 relaxation rates were calculated for different tumor types and different tumor areas and compared with histology. The transendothelial leakage rate of ferumoxytol was obtained by our measured relaxivity of ferumoxytol and compared between different tumor types, using a t-test. Additionally, 3 patients with malignant sarcomas were imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. T1- and T2-enhancement patterns were compared with histopathology in a descriptive manner as a proof of concept for clinical translation of our observations.4T1 tumors showed central areas of high signal on T1 and low signal on T2 weighted MR images, which corresponded to extracellular nanoparticles in a necrotic core on histopathology. MMTV-PyMT tumors showed little change on T1 but decreased signal on T2 weighted images, which correlated to compartmentalized nanoparticles in tumor associated macrophages. Only 4T1 tumors demonstrated significantly increased R1 relaxation rates of the tumor core compared to the tumor periphery (p<0.001. Transendothelial USPIO leakage was significantly higher for 4T1 tumors (3.4±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100cm3 compared to MMTV-PyMT tumors (1.0±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100 cm3. Likewise, ferumoxytol imaging in patients showed similar findings with

  11. Tumors of the corpus callosum: imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the imaging features of tumors in the corpus callosum. Methods: Different imaging data of 25 tumors in the corpus callosum were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of the 25 cases, 2 cases were anaplastic astrocytomas, 7 cases were glioblastomas, 10 cases were malignant lymphomas, 1 case for each in the following tumors: low grade astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, oligoastrocytoma, lipoma, and metastatic tumor. The lesion's size varied from 7 cm to 0.5 cm. These lesions were usually iso-or hypointense on T1-weighted images and hyper-in- tense on T1-weighted images with focal necrosis, and showed ring-like or 'butterfly sign' enhancement after administration of contract medium. Lipoma showed hypodensity on CT with attenuation value of -85 HU. Glioblastomas and malignant lymphomas usually infiltrated into cerebral ventricles and brain parenchyma. Conclusions: Tumors of the corpus callosum have characteristic imaging features. MRI exam before surgery is helpful for the surgical excision. (authors)

  12. Brain tumor and Gliadel wafer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Panigrahi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is a rapidly progressive and extremely fatal form of brain tumor with poor prognosis. It is the most common type of primary brain tumor. Even with the most aggressive conventional treatment that comprises surgery followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, most patients die within a year of diagnosis. Developments in molecular and cell biology have led to better understanding of tumor development, leading to novel treatment strategies including biological therapy and immunotherapy to combat the deadly disease. Targeted drug delivery strategies to circumvent the blood-brain barrier have shown efficiency in clinical trials. Gliadel wafer is a new approach to the treatment of glioblastoma, which involves controlled release delivery of carmustine from biodegradable polymer wafers. It has shown promising results and provides a silver lining for glioblastoma patients.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer

  14. Linac radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastatic brain tumors are usually the final stage in cancer progression. The aim of this study was to retrospectively determine optimal treatment strategies for linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and to investigate possible prognostic factors. Of 156 patients treated from 1990 to 2001, 124 patients with 312 lesions were treated with SRS alone, and followed-up for periods ranging from 15 days to 24 months (median 8.2 months). There were 86 males and 38 females, with a median age of 62.8 years. Tumor volume ranged from 0.04 to 50.5 ccm (median 7.9 ccm), and radiation doses ranged from 18 to 50 Gy (median 26.6 Gy in one fraction). Univariate and multivariate analyses of survival and tumor volume reduction rate were performed using Kaplan-Meier Curves, analysis of variance and log-rank test techniques. Median survival time was 8.2 months after SRS. The overall tumor control rate was 97.2%, with a complete or partial remission rate of 84.4%. The median follow-up time was 8.2 months following SRS. During follow-up, there was one case of fetal intracerebral hemorrhage (1.0%) and 6 cases of cerebral herniation (6.3%). Tumor reduction rate was related to tumor histology (p<0.01). Survival rate correlated with pre-SRS Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (p<0.01), a number of brain lesions (p=0.0075) and primary disease status (p<0.05), but was not related to progression of extracranial disease, age, lesion volume or lesion site. SRS is indicated for brain metastases under the following circumstances: lesions ≤40 mm in diameter, irradiation after reduction of tumor by paracentesis and suction of cystic lesion, a maximum of three tumors irradiated in one SRS, no concomitant whole brain irradiation, in general. (author)

  15. Delayed contrast extravasation MRI for depicting tumor and non-tumoral tissues in primary and metastatic brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leor Zach

    Full Text Available The current standard of care for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is resection followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. Recent studies suggest that nearly half of the patients with early radiological deterioration post treatment do not suffer from tumor recurrence but from pseudoprogression. Similarly, a significant number of patients with brain metastases suffer from radiation necrosis following radiation treatments. Conventional MRI is currently unable to differentiate tumor progression from treatment-induced effects. The ability to clearly differentiate tumor from non-tumoral tissues is crucial for appropriate patient management. Ten patients with primary brain tumors and 10 patients with brain metastases were scanned by delayed contrast extravasation MRI prior to surgery. Enhancement subtraction maps calculated from high resolution MR images acquired up to 75 min after contrast administration were used for obtaining stereotactic biopsies. Histological assessment was then compared with the pre-surgical calculated maps. In addition, the application of our maps for prediction of progression was studied in a small cohort of 13 newly diagnosed GBM patients undergoing standard chemoradiation and followed up to 19.7 months post therapy. The maps showed two primary enhancement populations: the slow population where contrast clearance from the tissue was slower than contrast accumulation and the fast population where clearance was faster than accumulation. Comparison with histology confirmed the fast population to consist of morphologically active tumor and the slow population to consist of non-tumoral tissues. Our maps demonstrated significant correlation with perfusion-weighted MR data acquired simultaneously, although contradicting examples were shown. Preliminary results suggest that early changes in the fast volumes may serve as a predictor for time to progression. These preliminary results suggest that

  16. [Chemotherapy for brain tumors in adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, M

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapy has become a third major treatment option for patients with brain tumors, in addition to surgery and radiotherapy. The role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gliomas is no longer limited to recurrent disease. Temozolomide has become the standard of care in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Several ongoing trials seek to define the role of chemotherapy in the primary care of other gliomas. Some of these studies are no longer only based on histological diagnoses, but take into consideration molecular markers such as MGMT promoter methylation and loss of genetic material on chromosomal arms 1p and 19q. Outside such clinical trials chemotherapy is used in addition to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic astrocytoma, medulloblastoma or germ cell tumors, or as an alternative to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors or low-grade gliomas. In contrast, there is no established role for chemotherapy in other tumors such as ependymomas, meningiomas or neurinomas. Primary cerebral lymphomas are probably the only brain tumors which can be cured by chemotherapy alone and only by chemotherapy. The chemotherapy of brain metastases follows the recommendations for the respective primary tumors. Further, strategies of combined radiochemotherapy using mainly temozolomide or topotecan are currently explored. Leptomeningeal metastases are treated by radiotherapy or systemic or intrathecal chemotherapy depending on their pattern of growth. PMID:18253773

  17. Functional brain imaging; Funktionelle Hirnbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, E.R. [Medizinische Universitaet Innsbruck, Universitaetsklinik fuer Neuroradiologie, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive method that has become one of the major tools for understanding human brain function and in recent years has also been developed for clinical applications. Changes in hemodynamic signals correspond to changes in neuronal activity with good spatial and temporal resolution in fMRI. Using high-field MR systems and increasingly dedicated statistics and postprocessing, activated brain areas can be detected and superimposed on anatomical images. Currently, fMRI data are often combined in multimodal imaging, e. g. with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequences. This method is helping to further understand the physiology of cognitive brain processes and is also being used in a number of clinical applications. In addition to the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals, this article deals with the construction of fMRI investigations, selection of paradigms and evaluation in the clinical routine. Clinically, this method is mainly used in the planning of brain surgery, analyzing the location of brain tumors in relation to eloquent brain areas and the lateralization of language processing. As the BOLD signal is dependent on the strength of the magnetic field as well as other limitations, an overview of recent developments is given. Increases of magnetic field strength (7 T), available head coils and advances in MRI analytical methods have led to constant improvement in fMRI signals and experimental design. Especially the depiction of eloquent brain regions can be done easily and quickly and has become an essential part of presurgical planning. (orig.) [German] Mittlerweile ist die funktionelle MRT (fMRT) eine Methode, die nicht mehr nur in der neurowissenschaftlichen Routine verwendet wird. Die fMRT ermoeglicht die nichtinvasive Darstellung der Hirnaktivitaet in guter raeumlicher und zeitlicher Aufloesung unter Ausnutzung der Durchblutungsaenderung aufgrund der erhoehten Nervenzellaktivitaet. Unter

  18. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  19. The impact of dietary isoflavonoids on malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options render malignant brain tumors one of the most devastating diseases in clinical medicine. Current treatment strategies attempt to expand the therapeutic repertoire through the use of multimodal treatment regimens. It is here that dietary fibers have been recently recognized as a supportive natural therapy in augmenting the body's response to tumor growth. Here, we investigated the impact of isoflavonoids on primary brain tumor cells. First, we treated glioma cell lines and primary astrocytes with various isoflavonoids and phytoestrogens. Cell viability in a dose-dependent manner was measured for biochanin A (BCA), genistein (GST), and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG). Dose–response action for the different isoflavonoids showed that BCA is highly effective on glioma cells and nontoxic for normal differentiated brain tissues. We further investigated BCA in ex vivo and in vivo experimentations. Organotypic brain slice cultures were performed and treated with BCA. For in vivo experiments, BCA was intraperitoneal injected in tumor-implanted Fisher rats. Tumor size and edema were measured and quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. In vascular organotypic glioma brain slice cultures (VOGIM) we found that BCA operates antiangiogenic and neuroprotective. In vivo MRI scans demonstrated that administered BCA as a monotherapy was effective in reducing significantly tumor-induced brain edema and showed a trend for prolonged survival. Our results revealed that dietary isoflavonoids, in particular BCA, execute toxicity toward glioma cells, antiangiogenic, and coevally neuroprotective properties, and therefore augment the range of state-of-the-art multimodal treatment approach

  20. Calcium-activated potassium channels mediated blood-brain tumor barrier opening in a rat metastatic brain tumor model

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Background The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) impedes the delivery of therapeutic agents to brain tumors. While adequate delivery of drugs occurs in systemic tumors, the BTB limits delivery of anti-tumor agents into brain metastases. Results In this study, we examined the function and regulation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels in a rat metastatic brain tumor model. We showed that intravenous infusion of NS1619, a KCa channel agonist, and bradykinin selectively enhanced BTB perm...

  1. Study of Inter- and Intra-fraction Motion in Brain Tumor Patients Undergoing VMAT Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conforming dose to the tumor and sparing normal tissue can be challenging for brain tumors with complex shapes in close proximity to critical structures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the inter- and intra-fraction motion in brain tumor patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The image matching software was found to be very sensitive to the choice of the region of matching. It is recommended to use the same region of interest for comparing the image sets and perform the automatic matching based on bony landmarks in brain tumor cases. (Author)

  2. MicroRNA and Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were first described in 1993 by Lee and colleagues, and the term microRNA was only introduced in 2001 in a set of three articles in Science[1]. One of the biggest surprises in the past few years has been the emergence of miRNAs as a major new class of gene expression regulators. Recent studies suggest that miRNA alterations are involved in the initiation and progression of human cancer. The brain tumor,glioblastoma multiforme, is the most malignant and deadly form of gliomas.The prognosis is poor and the median survival with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy is only 14.6 months. With the discovery of miRNA, the miRNA profiles may become useful biomarkers for brain tumor diagnostics,and miRNA therapy could be a powerful tool for brain tumor prevention and therapeutics. This review outlines the background of miRNA and its expression and therapeutic potential for brain tumors.

  3. The electroencephalogram in metastatic brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pinto Pupo

    1967-12-01

    Full Text Available Sixty cases of intracranial metastatic tumors diagnosed either clinically or by neurosurgery (28 operative cases, 26 with radiological contrast examinations and 6 with clinical diagnosis only are reported. The EEG tests had been made previously to the diagnosis of metastasis. The EEG results are analysed according to the previous impression gained from this test and are presented in 5 tables, on which the cases are divided as per the brain topography of the metastasis. The positive EEG data are analysed and the possibility of topographic diagnosis discussed. The results agree with those presented in the literature. The AA. reach the following conclusions: 1 in patients with suspect brain metastasis the normal EEG allows with great probability to exclude the possibility; 2 in patients with malignant tumor the EEG signs of involvement of the nervous parenchyma are the most important elements for positive diagnosis of brain metastasis; 3 in the cases of metastasis developing at the posterior fossa, either there were indicative signs of the process at that level or the EEG was normal; 4 the EEG signs of an irritant process at the brain cortex were less frequent and, in the majority of cases, appeared in the temporal and parietal areas; 5 the signs of involvement of the mesodiencephalic structures in tumors of the brain hemispheres appeared only when the tumor was located in the median part of the hemisphere (temporal or parietal lobes; 6 signs of depression of the basal electric brain activity in the affected areas appeared rarely and in cases of parietal or occipital tumors; 7 the electric brain activity of other areas of the involved hemisphere or in the opposite hemisphere was normal in the majority of the cases observed. Considering the results of the literature and their own the AA. believe that the EEG could be a semiological method to be used at the preoperative examinations of patients with malignant tumors, with a view at establishing the

  4. Technological progress in radiation therapy for brain tumors

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vernimmen, Frederik Jozef

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a good therapeutic ratio the radiation dose to the tumor should be as high as possible with the lowest possible dose to the surrounding normal tissue. This is especially the case for brain tumors. Technological ad- vancements in diagnostic imaging, dose calculations, and radiation delivery systems, combined with a better un- derstanding of the pathophysiology of brain tumors have led to improvements in the therapeutic results. The widely used technology of delivering 3-D conformal therapy with photon beams (gamma rays) produced by Li-near Accelerators has progressed into the use of Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Particle beams have been used for several decades for radiotherapy because of their favorable depth dose characteristics. The introduction of clinically dedicated proton beam therapy facilities has improved the access for cancer patients to this treatment. Proton therapy is of particular interest for pediatric malignancies. These technical improvements are further enhanced by the evolution in tumor physiology imaging which allows for improved delineation of the tumor. This in turn opens the potential to adjust the radiation dose to maximize the radiobiological effects. The advances in both imaging and radiation therapy delivery will be discussed.

  5. Imaging brain plasticity after trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Zhifeng; Iraji, Armin

    2014-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic after stroke or epilepsy; however, there is a paucity of brain plasticity investigation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This mini review summarizes the most recent evidence of brain plasticity in human TBI patients from the perspective of advanced magnetic resonance imaging. Similar to other forms of acquired brain injury, TBI patients also demonstrated both structural reorganization as well as functional compensation by the recruitment of other brain regions. However, the large scale brain network alterations after TBI are still unknown, and the field is still short of proper means on how to guide the choice of TBI rehabilitation or treatment plan to promote brain plasticity. The authors also point out the new direction of brain plasticity investigation. PMID:25206874

  6. Imaging brain plasticity after trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhifeng Kou; Armin Iraji

    2014-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic after stroke or epilepsy;however, there is a paucity of brain plasticity investigation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This mini review summarizes the most recent evidence of brain plasticity in human TBI patients from the perspective of advanced magnetic resonance imaging. Similar to other forms of acquired brain injury, TBI patients also demonstrat-ed both structural reorganization as well as functional compensation by the recruitment of other brain regions. However, the large scale brain network alterations after TBI are still unknown, and the ifeld is still short of proper means on how to guide the choice of TBI rehabilitation or treat-ment plan to promote brain plasticity. The authors also point out the new direction of brain plas-ticity investigation.

  7. Maleic anhydride proton sponge as a novel MALDI matrix for the visualization of small molecules (<250 m/z) in brain tumors by routine MALDI ToF imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampà, M; Lissel, M B; Patschkowski, T; Fuchser, J; Hans, V H; Gembruch, O; Bednarz, H; Niehaus, K

    2016-08-14

    A novel vacuum stable proton sponge, 4-maleicanhydridoproton sponge (MAPS), was prepared and applied as the matrix in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI) of an aggressive brain tumor tissue (glioblastoma multiforme). Ionic maps of lactate, 2-hydroxyglutarate and chloride anions (m/z 89, 147, 35, respectively) were obtained using a routine MALDI ToF mass spectrometer. PMID:27419250

  8. Malignant brain tumor treatments and hyperbaric oxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohshi, Kiyotaka [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Malignant brain tumor treatment and hyperbaric oxygenation: Combined hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) therapy and radiation therapy of malignant gliomas is reviewed. Malignant glioma tissue is hypoxic, and the efficacy of radiation therapy is increased by raising the oxygen density in glioma tissue. Residual tumor was reduced by a radiation dose of approximately 40 Gy in many cases when radiation therapy was begun within 15 minutes after HBO. In the experiment in animal models with different hypoxic fractions (HFs) of cells (SCCVII and 9L gliosarcoma), the tumor reduction effect was more significant in the SCCVII model, which has a higher HF. When the SCCVII model was irradiated within 30 minutes after HBO, the improvement effect was more significant (1.60-1.78 times) than by irradiation alone. HBO was effective in the treatment of radionecrosis of the brain. However, there were some cases in which radionecrosis progressed when the HBO treatments were discontinued, and the optimal duration of HBO treatment should be determined. It is difficult to differentiate between radionecrosis and tumor recurrence after radiosurgery of a malignant intracranial tumor. When no lesion reduction is observed in response to HBO treatment and steroid administration for about one month, the lesion is concluded to be a recurrence of the tumor, and additional irradiation should be performed. HBO treatment in combination with chemotherapy is also discussed. (K.H.)

  9. Malignant brain tumor treatments and hyperbaric oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant brain tumor treatment and hyperbaric oxygenation: Combined hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) therapy and radiation therapy of malignant gliomas is reviewed. Malignant glioma tissue is hypoxic, and the efficacy of radiation therapy is increased by raising the oxygen density in glioma tissue. Residual tumor was reduced by a radiation dose of approximately 40 Gy in many cases when radiation therapy was begun within 15 minutes after HBO. In the experiment in animal models with different hypoxic fractions (HFs) of cells (SCCVII and 9L gliosarcoma), the tumor reduction effect was more significant in the SCCVII model, which has a higher HF. When the SCCVII model was irradiated within 30 minutes after HBO, the improvement effect was more significant (1.60-1.78 times) than by irradiation alone. HBO was effective in the treatment of radionecrosis of the brain. However, there were some cases in which radionecrosis progressed when the HBO treatments were discontinued, and the optimal duration of HBO treatment should be determined. It is difficult to differentiate between radionecrosis and tumor recurrence after radiosurgery of a malignant intracranial tumor. When no lesion reduction is observed in response to HBO treatment and steroid administration for about one month, the lesion is concluded to be a recurrence of the tumor, and additional irradiation should be performed. HBO treatment in combination with chemotherapy is also discussed. (K.H.)

  10. Brain tumors in childhood; Hirntumoren im Kindesalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinzig, M.; Gasser, J.; Hausegger, K.A. [Landeskrankenhaus Klagenfurt, Kinderradiologie RZI, Klagenfurt (Austria); Jauk, B. [Landeskrankenhaus Klagenfurt, Abt. fuer Kinder- und Jugendheilkunde, Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2008-10-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors are the most common solid neoplasms in childhood and the second most common malignancies after leukemia in the pediatric age group. Supratentorial tumors are more common in children younger than 2 years old and in adolescents, whereas in patients between 2 and 12 years of age brain tumors originating in the posterior fossa dominate. This implies a relationship between the type of tumor, its location and the age of the patient, which has to be considered in differential diagnoses. Medulloblastoma represents the most common malignant brain tumor in childhood. In the posterior fossa medulloblastomas are approximately as frequent as astrocytomas. Supratentorial astrocytomas are by far the main tumor type. In this report some typical CNS neoplasms in children are discussed and their neuroradiological features are demonstrated. (orig.) [German] Hirntumoren sind die haeufigsten soliden Tumoren des Kindesalters und repraesentieren nach den Leukaemien die zweithaeufigsten malignen Erkrankungen bei Kindern. Waehrend bei Kleinkindern und Adoleszenten supratentorielle Hirntumoren ueberwiegen, ist bei Patienten zwischen 2 und 12 Jahren haeufiger die hintere Schaedelgrube Ursprungsort dieser Malignome. Daraus geht hervor, dass gewisse Tumortypen eine gewisse Alterspraedilektion aufweisen, was neben der radiologischen Morphologie der Raumforderung fuer differenzialdiagnostische Ueberlegungen ueberaus hilfreich sein kann. Das Medulloblastom ist das haeufigste ZNS-Malignom des Kindesalters und repraesentiert zusammen mit zerebellaeren Astrozytomen auch den haeufigsten Tumortyp der hinteren Schaedelgrube. Supratentoriell stehen die Astrozytome ganz im Vordergrund. In dieser Arbeit werden einige typische kindliche infra- und supratentorielle Hirntumoren diskutiert und ihre neuroradiologischen Merkmale dargestellt. (orig.)

  11. Dynamic Quantitative T1 Mapping in Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Herrmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human brain tumors such as glioblastomas are typically detected using conventional, nonquantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques, such as T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI. In this manuscript, we tested whether dynamic quantitative T1 mapping by MRI can localize orthotopic glioma tumors in an objective manner. Quantitative T1 mapping was performed by MRI over multiple time points using the conventional contrast agent Optimark. We compared signal differences to determine the gadolinium concentration in tissues over time. The T1 parametric maps made it easy to identify the regions of contrast enhancement and thus tumor location. Doubling the typical human dose of contrast agent resulted in a clearer demarcation of these tumors. Therefore, T1 mapping of brain tumors is gadolinium dose dependent and improves detection of tumors by MRI. The use of T1 maps provides a quantitative means to evaluate tumor detection by gadolinium-based contrast agents over time. This dynamic quantitative T1 mapping technique will also enable future quantitative evaluation of various targeted MRI contrast agents.

  12. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab)2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  13. Fluorine-18-labeled estrogens, progestins and corticosteroids for receptor-based imaging of breast tumors and target areas of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrogens can be labeled with the positron-emitting radionuclide fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 110 min) by fluoride ion (n-Bu4N18F) displacement of a 16β-trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate) derivative of the corresponding estrone 3-triflate, and purification by HPLC. That sequence has been used to synthesize the 11β-methoxy 1 and 11β-ethyl 2 analogues of the breast tumor imaging agent, 16α-[18F]fluoro-17β-estradiol (FES). Tissue distribution studies of 1 and 2 in immature female rats show high selectivity for target tissue (T, uterus) vs non-target (NT, muscle and lung), with T/NT ratios being 43 and 17 at one hour after injection for 1 and 2, respectively. The parent estrogen FES has previously been shown to display an intermediate value for tissue selectivity. The progestin 21-[18F] fluoro-16α-ethyl-19-nor progesterone (FENP), synthesized from the 21-triflate precursor, is a high affinity ligand for the progestin receptor, and in vivo, exhibits highly selective uptake by the uterus of estrogen-primed rats. Respective T/NT ratios of 16 and 41 at one and 3 hours after injection have been demonstrated. Two epimeric (at C-21) analogues of the high affinity progestin promegestone (R 5020) were prepared in fluorine-18 labeled form from the corresponding triflate precursors; while 21S-[18F]R 5020 3 showed a T/NT ratio of 4 at 3 hours after injection, 21R-[18F]R 5020 4 showed no selective uptake. Compounds 3 and 4 each suffered extensive in vivo defluorination. Derivatives of the high affinity Type I and Type II corticosteroid receptor ligands RU 26752 and RU 28362, respectively, were prepared in fluorine-18 labeled form from the corresponding 3'-methanesulfonates. Neither labeled compound showed selective target tissue (brain) uptake and each underwent substantial in vivo defluorination

  14. Targeted Toxins in Brain Tumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter A. Hall

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Targeted toxins, also known as immunotoxins or cytotoxins, are recombinant molecules that specifically bind to cell surface receptors that are overexpressed in cancer and the toxin component kills the cell. These recombinant proteins consist of a specific antibody or ligand coupled to a protein toxin. The targeted toxins bind to a surface antigen or receptor overexpressed in tumors, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor or interleukin-13 receptor. The toxin part of the molecule in all clinically used toxins is modified from bacterial or plant toxins, fused to an antibody or carrier ligand. Targeted toxins are very effective against cancer cells resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. They are far more potent than any known chemotherapy drug. Targeted toxins have shown an acceptable profile of toxicity and safety in early clinical studies and have demonstrated evidence of a tumor response. Currently, clinical trials with some targeted toxins are complete and the final results are pending. This review summarizes the characteristics of targeted toxins and the key findings of the important clinical studies with targeted toxins in malignant brain tumor patients. Obstacles to successful treatment of malignant brain tumors include poor penetration into tumor masses, the immune response to the toxin component and cancer heterogeneity. Strategies to overcome these limitations are being pursued in the current generation of targeted toxins.

  15. Utility of C-11 Choline PET for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the clinical potential of methyl-11C choline (C-11 choline) in brain tumors. The results of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in 23 patients suspected of having brain tumors were then compared to the results of C-11 choline and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). PET with C-11 choline and FDG, in addition to gadolinium-enhanced MR, were performed in these patients. A pathological diagnosis was made for each patient by open surgery. The standardized uptake values (SUVs) of brain tumors and the tumor-to-white matter count (T/W) ratios were determined. The degree of C-11 choline accumulation noted in PET images was compared to the gadolinium-enhanced areas of MR images. The mean T/W ratio of high-grade gliomas was found to be higher than that of low-grade gliomas. This difference was statistically significant (mean±SD: 8.7±6.2, n=9 versus 1.5±0.7 respectively, n=5, p<0.03) when data pertaining to the prominent uptake of C-11 choline by a patient with a pilocytic astrocytoma was excluded. C-11 choline PET failed to detect non-neoplastic lesions in two patients. Areas of C-11 choline accumulation in PET scans were longer than areas visualized by contrast enhancement on MR images in five cases involving high-grade gliomas. C-11 choline PET differentiated between low-grade gliomas and high-grade gliomas, but did not differentiate between low-grade gliomas and non-neoplasms. A combination of C-11 choline PET and MR imaging may provide investigators with accurate means to identify high-grade gliomas. (author)

  16. Utility of C-11 Choline PET for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtani, Toshiyuki; Hashiba, Yasuhiro; Tosaka, Masahiko; Fujimaki, Hiroya; Sasaki, Tomio; Oriuchi, Noboru [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine; Inoue, Tomio [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the clinical potential of methyl-{sup 11}C choline (C-11 choline) in brain tumors. The results of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in 23 patients suspected of having brain tumors were then compared to the results of C-11 choline and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). PET with C-11 choline and FDG, in addition to gadolinium-enhanced MR, were performed in these patients. A pathological diagnosis was made for each patient by open surgery. The standardized uptake values (SUVs) of brain tumors and the tumor-to-white matter count (T/W) ratios were determined. The degree of C-11 choline accumulation noted in PET images was compared to the gadolinium-enhanced areas of MR images. The mean T/W ratio of high-grade gliomas was found to be higher than that of low-grade gliomas. This difference was statistically significant (mean{+-}SD: 8.7{+-}6.2, n=9 versus 1.5{+-}0.7 respectively, n=5, p<0.03) when data pertaining to the prominent uptake of C-11 choline by a patient with a pilocytic astrocytoma was excluded. C-11 choline PET failed to detect non-neoplastic lesions in two patients. Areas of C-11 choline accumulation in PET scans were longer than areas visualized by contrast enhancement on MR images in five cases involving high-grade gliomas. C-11 choline PET differentiated between low-grade gliomas and high-grade gliomas, but did not differentiate between low-grade gliomas and non-neoplasms. A combination of C-11 choline PET and MR imaging may provide investigators with accurate means to identify high-grade gliomas. (author)

  17. A Correlative Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy Approach to Locating Nanoparticles in Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Kempen, Paul J.; Kircher, Moritz F; DE LA ZERDA, ADAM; Zavaleta, Cristina L.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Sinclair, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using b...

  18. Diagnostic significance of arterial spin labeling in the assessment of tumor grade in brain

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Fang Wang; Bo Hou; Su-Jun Yang; Xiao-Rui Zhang; Xiaolei Dong; Min Zhang; Gen-Dong Yao

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of the current meta.analysis was to assess the arterial spin labeling. (ASL) perfusion imaging measurement of cerebral blood flow. (CBF) in patients with brain tumors, and assessing preoperative tumor grade in brain. Materials and Methods: PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, China BioMedicine (CBM), CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases were chosen to evaluate the associations between ASL and brain cancer. Two reviewers...

  19. Efficient Analysis of Brain Tumor Detection and Identification Using Different Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Aggarwal*1

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumor is one of the major causes of death among people. It is evident that the chances of survival can be increased if the tumor is detected and classified correctly at its early stage. The segmentation of brain tumors in magnetic resonance images (MRI is a challenging and difficult task because of the variety of their possible shapes, locations, image intensities. In this paper, it is intended to summarize and compare the methods of automatic detection of brain tumor through Magnetic Resonance Image using Histogram Thresholding with Region growing and K-mean segmentation. The proposed method can be successfully applied to detect the contour of the tumor and its geometrical dimension. MRI brain tumor images detection is a difficult task due to the variance and complexity of tumors. This paper presents three techniques for the detection purpose; first one is Histogram Thresholding, second is Region growing technique and third is K-mean. In this paper, the purposed method is more accurate and effective for the brain tumor detection and segmentation for MRI (DICOM images. For the implementation of this proposed work we use the Image Processing Toolbox under Matlab Software.

  20. Perfusion and Volume Response of Canine Brain Tumors to Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Zwingenberger, AL; Pollard, RE; Taylor, SL; Chen, RX; Nunley, J; Kent, MS

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) are highly conformal, high-dose radiation treatment techniques used to treat people and dogs with brain tumors.To evaluate the response to SRS- and SRT-treated tumors using volume and perfusion variables and to measure the survival times of affected dogs.Prospective study of 34 dogs with evidence of brain tumors undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT).Computed tomography and MRI imaging w...

  1. Brain Tumor Extraction from T1- Weighted MRI using Co-clustering and Level Set Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Satheesh, S.; Dr.K.V.S.V.R Prasad; Dr.K.Jitender Reddy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to propose effective technique for tumor extraction from T1-weighted magnetic resonance brain images with combination of co-clustering and level set methods. The co-clustering is the effective region based segmentation technique for the brain tumor extraction but have a drawback at the boundary of tumors. While, the level set without re-initialization which is good edge based segmentation technique but have some drawbacks in providing initial contour. Therefore, in thi...

  2. Comparison of two brain tumor-localizing MRI agent. GD-BOPTA and GD-DTPA. MRI and ICP study of rat brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we compared the behavior of Gd-BOPTA as a brain tumor selective contrast agent with Gd-DTPA in a common dose of 0.1 mmol/kg. We performed a MRI study using those two agent as contrast material, and we measured tissue Gd-concentrations by ICP-AES. As a result, Gd-BOPTA showed a better MRI enhancement in brain tumor. ICP showed significantly greater uptake of Gd-BOPTA in tumor samples, at all time course peaked at 5 minutes after administration, Gd being retained for a longer time in brain tumor till 2 hours, without rapid elimination as Gd-DTPA. We conclude that Gd-BOPTA is a new useful contrast material for MR imaging in brain tumor and an effective absorption agent for neutron capture therapy for further research. (author)

  3. System a amino acid transport-targeted brain and systemic tumor PET imaging agents 2-amino-3-[18 F]fluoro-2-methylpropanoic acid and 3-[18 F]fluoro-2-methyl-2-(methylamino)propanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Amino acid based radiotracers target tumor cells through increased uptake by membrane-associated amino acid transport (AAT) systems. In the present study, four structurally related non-natural 18 F-labeled amino acids, (R)- and (S)-[18 F]FAMP 1 and (R)- and (S)-[18 F]MeFAMP 2 have been prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo for their potential utility in brain and systemic tumor imaging based upon primarily system A transport with positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: The transport of enantiomers of [18 F]FAMP 1 and [18 F]MeFAMP 2 was measured through in vitro uptake assays in human derived cancer cells including A549 (lung), DU145 (prostate), SKOV3 (ovary), MDA MB468 (breast) and U87 (brain) in the presence and absence of amino acid transporter inhibitors. The in vivo biodistribution of these tracers was evaluated using tumor mice xenografts at 15, 30, 60 and 120 min post injection. Results: All four tracers showed moderate to high levels of uptake (1–9%ID/5 × 105 cells) by the cancer cell lines tested in vitro. AAT cell inhibition assays demonstrated that (R)-[18 F]1 and (S)-[18 F]1 entered these tumor cells via mixed AATs, likely but not limited to system A and system L. In contrast, (R)-[18 F]2 and (S)-[18 F]2 showed high selectivity for system A AAT. Similar to the results of in vitro cell studies, the tumor uptake of all four tracers was good to high and persisted over the 2 hours time course of in vivo studies. The accumulation of these tracers was higher in tumor than most normal tissues including blood, brain, muscle, bone, heart, and lung, and the tracers with the highest in vitro selectivity for system A AAT generally demonstrated the best tumor imaging properties. Higher uptake of these tracers was observed in the pancreas, kidney and spleen compared to tumors. Conclusions: These preclinical studies demonstrate good imaging properties in a wide range of tumors for all four amino acids evaluated with (R)-[18 F]2 having the

  4. Brain tumors in man and animals: report of a workshop.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a workshop on brain tumors in man and animals. Animals, especially rodents are often used as surrogates for man to detect chemicals that have the potential to induce brain tumors in man. Therefore, the workshop was focused mainly on brain tumors in the F344 rat and B6C3F1 mouse because of the frequent use of these strains in long-term carcinogenesis studies. Over 100 brain tumors in F344 rats and more than 50 brain tumors in B6C3F1 mice were reviewed and ...

  5. Stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors with interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) using 125iodine seeds (125I) and analyzed prognostic factors. Between January 1991 and December 2010, 63 patients (median age 43.3 years, range 20.8-63.4 years) suffering from oligodendroglial brain tumors were treated with 125I IBT either as primary, adjuvantly after incomplete resection, or as salvage therapy after tumor recurrence. Possible prognostic factors influencing disease progression and survival were retrospectively investigated. The actuarial 2-, 5-, and 10-year overall and progression-free survival rates after IBT for WHO II tumors were 96.9, 96.9, 89.8 % and 96.9, 93.8, 47.3 %; for WHO III tumors 90.3, 77, 54.9 % and 80.6, 58.4, 45.9 %, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete remission in 2 patients, partial remission in 13 patients, stable disease in 17 patients and tumor progression in 31 patients. Median time to progression for WHO II tumors was 87.6 months and for WHO III tumors 27.8 months. Neurological status improved in 10 patients and remained stable in 20 patients, while 9 patients deteriorated. There was no treatment-related mortality. Treatment-related morbidity was transient in 11 patients. WHO II, KPS ≥ 90 %, frontal location, and tumor surface dose > 50 Gy were associated with increased overall survival (p ≤ 0.05). Oligodendroglioma and frontal location were associated with a prolonged progression-free survival (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that IBT achieves local control rates comparable to surgery and radio-/chemotherapy treatment, is minimally invasive, and safe. Due to the low rate of side effects, IBT may represent an attractive option as part of a multimodal treatment schedule, being supplementary to microsurgery or as a salvage therapy after chemotherapy and conventional irradiation. (orig.)

  6. Extracellular Vesicles in Brain Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Asti, Esterina; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Lee, Tae Hoon; Rak, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    Brain tumors can be viewed as multicellular 'ecosystems' with increasingly recognized cellular complexity and systemic impact. While the emerging diversity of malignant disease entities affecting brain tissues is often described in reference to their signature alterations within the cellular genome and epigenome, arguably these cell-intrinsic changes can be regarded as hardwired adaptations to a variety of cell-extrinsic microenvironmental circumstances. Conversely, oncogenic events influence the microenvironment through their impact on the cellular secretome, including emission of membranous structures known as extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs serve as unique carriers of bioactive lipids, secretable and non-secretable proteins, mRNA, non-coding RNA, and DNA and constitute pathway(s) of extracellular exit of molecules into the intercellular space, biofluids, and blood. EVs are also highly heterogeneous as reflected in their nomenclature (exosomes, microvesicles, microparticles) attempting to capture their diverse origin, as well as structural, molecular, and functional properties. While EVs may act as a mechanism of molecular expulsion, their non-random uptake by heterologous cellular recipients defines their unique roles in the intercellular communication, horizontal molecular transfer, and biological activity. In the central nervous system, EVs have been implicated as mediators of homeostasis and repair, while in cancer they may act as regulators of cell growth, clonogenicity, angiogenesis, thrombosis, and reciprocal tumor-stromal interactions. EVs produced by specific brain tumor cell types may contain the corresponding oncogenic drivers, such as epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) in glioblastoma (and hence are often referred to as 'oncosomes'). Through this mechanism, mutant oncoproteins and nucleic acids may be transferred horizontally between cellular populations altering their individual and collective phenotypes. Oncogenic pathways

  7. Imaging of brain tumors in AIDS patients by means of dual-isotope thallium-201 and technetium-99m sestamibi single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to evaluate the use of dual-isotope thallium-201 (Tl) and technetium-99m sestamibi (sestamibi) simultaneous acquisition in brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET) for the differentiation between brain lymphoma and benign central nervous system (CNS) lesions in AIDS patients. Thirty-six consecutive patients with enhancing mass lesions on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were included in the study. SPET of the brain was performed to obtain simultaneous Tl and sestamibi images. Regions-of-interest were drawn around the lesion and on the contralateral side to calculate uptake ratios. The final diagnosis was reached by pathologic findings in 17 patients and clinical and/or MR follow-up in 19 patients. Of the 36 patients, 11 had brain lymphoma, 1 glioblastoma multiforme, 15 toxoplasmosis and 9 other benign CNS lesions. Correlation between SPET and the final diagnosis revealed in 10 true-positive, 23 true-negative, 1 false-positive and 2 false-negative studies. All patients with toxoplasmosis had negative scans. A patient with a purulent infection had positive scans. Tl and sestamibi scans were concordant in every lesion. The same lesions that took up Tl were also visualized with sestamibi. However, sestamibi scans showed higher lesion-to-normal tissue uptake ratios (3.7±1.8) compared with those of Tl (2.3±0.8, P<0.002). Simultaneous acquisition of Tl and sestamibi can help differentiate CNS lymphoma from benign brain lesions in AIDS patients. (orig.)

  8. The diagnostic accuracy of multiparametric MRI to determine pediatric brain tumor grades and types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koob, Mériam; Girard, Nadine; Ghattas, Badih; Fellah, Slim; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Scavarda, Didier

    2016-04-01

    Childhood brain tumors show great histological variability. The goal of this retrospective study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of multimodal MR imaging (diffusion, perfusion, MR spectroscopy) in the distinction of pediatric brain tumor grades and types. Seventy-six patients (range 1 month to 18 years) with brain tumors underwent multimodal MR imaging. Tumors were categorized by grade (I-IV) and by histological type (A-H). Multivariate statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of single and combined MR modalities, and of single imaging parameters to distinguish the different groups. The highest diagnostic accuracy for tumor grading was obtained with diffusion-perfusion (73.24 %) and for tumor typing with diffusion-perfusion-MR spectroscopy (55.76 %). The best diagnostic accuracy was obtained for tumor grading in I and IV and for tumor typing in embryonal tumor and pilocytic astrocytoma. Poor accuracy was seen in other grades and types. ADC and rADC were the best parameters for tumor grading and typing followed by choline level with an intermediate echo time, CBV for grading and Tmax for typing. Multiparametric MR imaging can be accurate in determining tumor grades (primarily grades I and IV) and types (mainly pilocytic astrocytomas and embryonal tumors) in children. PMID:26732081

  9. Efficient multilevel brain tumor segmentation with integrated bayesian model classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, J J; Sharon, E; Dube, S; El-Saden, S; Sinha, U; Yuille, A

    2008-05-01

    We present a new method for automatic segmentation of heterogeneous image data that takes a step toward bridging the gap between bottom-up affinity-based segmentation methods and top-down generative model based approaches. The main contribution of the paper is a Bayesian formulation for incorporating soft model assignments into the calculation of affinities, which are conventionally model free. We integrate the resulting model-aware affinities into the multilevel segmentation by weighted aggregation algorithm, and apply the technique to the task of detecting and segmenting brain tumor and edema in multichannel magnetic resonance (MR) volumes. The computationally efficient method runs orders of magnitude faster than current state-of-the-art techniques giving comparable or improved results. Our quantitative results indicate the benefit of incorporating model-aware affinities into the segmentation process for the difficult case of glioblastoma multiforme brain tumor. PMID:18450536

  10. FCM Clustering Algorithms for Segmentation of Brain MR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita K. Dubey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of brain disorders requires accurate tissue segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR brain images which is very important for detecting tumors, edema, and necrotic tissues. Segmentation of brain images, especially into three main tissue types: Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF, Gray Matter (GM, and White Matter (WM, has important role in computer aided neurosurgery and diagnosis. Brain images mostly contain noise, intensity inhomogeneity, and weak boundaries. Therefore, accurate segmentation of brain images is still a challenging area of research. This paper presents a review of fuzzy c-means (FCM clustering algorithms for the segmentation of brain MR images. The review covers the detailed analysis of FCM based algorithms with intensity inhomogeneity correction and noise robustness. Different methods for the modification of standard fuzzy objective function with updating of membership and cluster centroid are also discussed.

  11. Gamma knife radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the effectiveness of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) alone for metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer. Two hundred thirty-one consecutive patients with metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer filling the following 4 criteria were analyzed for this study; no prior brain tumor treatment, 25 or fewer lesions, a maximum 5 tumors with diameter of 2 cm or more, no surgically inaccessible tumor 3 cm or greater in diameter. According to the same treatment protocol, large tumors (≥ 3 cm) were surgically removed and all the other small lesions (10 brain lesions. This study suggests the results of GKS for metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer are quite satisfactory considering prevention of neurological death and maintenance of QOL. But cases with carcinomatous meningitis and/or >10 brain lesions are not good candidates for GKS alone. (author)

  12. (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/Computed Tomography for Primary Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen Segtnan, Eivind; Hess, Søren; Grupe, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Structural imaging with computed tomography (CT) and MR imaging is the mainstay in primary diagnosis of primary brain tumors, but these modalities depend on morphologic appearance and an intact blood-brain barrier, and important aspects of tumor biology are not addressed. Such issues may be...... alleviated by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and FDG-PET/CT imaging, which may provide clinically important information with regard to primary differentiation between tumor types, initial staging and risk stratification, therapy planning, response evaluation, and recurrence detection. This article...

  13. Future of functional brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the living human brain's sensory, motor and cognitive interactions and to understand how activities in anatomically distinct neural processing regions are orchestrated to perform complex tasks represents a future challenge to neuroscientists. Until recently, functional brain imaging data have been constrained by the severely limited spatial (5-15 mm) and temporal resolution (from a few seconds to minutes) of the nuclear medicine methods, single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and positron emission tomography (PET). The advent of new non-invasive, fast imaging methods - functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), serial X-ray computed tomography ('cine' CT) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) - has created a need for a survey to compare these techniques with conventional SPET and PET. Each technique has unique advantages and simultaneously serious limitations. No method has achieved a clear supremacy in functional brain imaging. (orig.)

  14. Brain tumors induced by radiation in rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two out of four pubescent rhesus monkeys, which received 1,500 rads of supervoltage X-irradiation, showed malignant brain tumors afer the survival of 52 and 102 weeks each. Since the incidence of spontaneous developing brain tumors in monkeys cited in the literatures was quite low, the tumors in the present series may have been radiation induced. (author)

  15. Imaging of urinary bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Primary bladder neoplasms account for 2%-6% of all tumors, with urinary bladder cancer ranked as the fourth most common cancer in males. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common subtype of urothelial tumour accounting for approximately 90% of all urothelial cancers. It is typically observed in men aged 50-70 years with history of smoking or occupational exposure to carcinogens. Most urothelial neoplasms are low-grade papillary tumors, with high incidence of recurrence, requires rigorous follow-up but have a relatively good prognosis. Other bladder neoplasm include squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 2%-15% mainly according to geographic location; adenocarcinoma - less than 2% /both occurring in the context of chronic bladder infection and irritation/; mesenchymal tumors in 5%, with the most common examples being rhabdomyosarcoma in children and leiomyosarcoma in adults. More rare mesenchymal tumors include paraganglioma, lymphoma, leiomyoma and solitary fibrous tumor which have no specific typical imaging findings to be differentiated. Multidetector computed tomography urography is an efficient tool for diagnosis and follow-up in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and it can be considered the primary radiologic method for detection, staging and assessment of the entire urothelium regarding the multicentric nature of TCC. MRI is rapidly expanding modality of choice especially in locally staging the tumor and in controversies. Accurate TNM staging is primordial in choosing treatment and prognosis for patients with bladder carcinoma. Correct interpretation and classification of the tumour is helpful for the urologists to determine further management in these cases. The learning objectives of the presentation are: to illustrate the spectrum of CT and MRI findings and to assess their clinical value in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and some other bladder neoplasm; to discuss the TNM staging based on the imaging findings; to be

  16. Identifying brain neoplasms using dye-enhanced multimodal confocal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Dennis; Snuderl, Matija; Sheth, Sameer; Kwon, Churl-Su; Frosch, Matthew P.; Curry, William; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2012-02-01

    Brain tumors cause significant morbidity and mortality even when benign. Completeness of resection of brain tumors improves quality of life and survival; however, that is often difficult to accomplish. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using multimodal confocal imaging for intraoperative detection of brain neoplasms. We have imaged different types of benign and malignant, primary and metastatic brain tumors. We correlated optical images with histopathology and evaluated the possibility of interpreting confocal images in a manner similar to pathology. Surgical specimens were briefly stained in 0.05 mg/ml aqueous solution of methylene blue (MB) and imaged using a multimodal confocal microscope. Reflectance and fluorescence signals of MB were excited at 642 nm. Fluorescence emission of MB was registered between 670 and 710 nm. After imaging, tissues were processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. The results of comparison demonstrate good correlation between fluorescence images and histopathology. Reflectance images provide information about morphology and vascularity of the specimens, complementary to that provided by fluorescence images. Multimodal confocal imaging has the potential to aid in the intraoperative detection of microscopic deposits of brain neoplasms. The application of this technique may improve completeness of resection and increase patient survival.

  17. Photodynamic Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Jiro

    2016-04-15

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using talaporfin sodium together with a semiconductor laser was approved in Japan in October 2003 as a less invasive therapy for early-stage lung cancer. The author believes that the principle of PDT would be applicable for controlling the invading front of malignant brain tumors and verified its efficacy through experiments using glioma cell lines and glioma xenograft models. An investigator-initiated clinical study was jointly conducted with Tokyo Women's Medical University with the support of the Japan Medical Association. Patient enrollment was started in May 2009 and a total of 27 patients were enrolled by March 2012. Of 22 patients included in efficacy analysis, 13 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma showed progression-free survival of 12 months, progression-free survival at the site of laser irradiation of 20 months, 1-year survival of 100%, and overall survival of 24.8 months. In addition, the safety analysis of the 27 patients showed that adverse events directly related to PDT were mild. PDT was approved in Japan for health insurance coverage as a new intraoperative therapy with the indication for malignant brain tumors in September 2013. Currently, the post-marketing investigation in the accumulated patients has been conducted, and the preparation of guidelines, holding training courses, and dissemination of information on the safe implementation of PDT using web sites and videos, have been promoted. PDT is expected to be a breakthrough for the treatment of malignant glioma as a tumor cell-selective less invasive therapy for the infiltrated functional brain area. PMID:26888042

  18. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  19. Use of in vivo proton MR spectroscopy to monitor the response of brain tumors to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper compares the differences in proton MR spectra between normal brain and brain tumors as they respond to radiation therapy. The MESA three-dimensional technique was used to acquire proton MR spectra on five volunteers of five brain tumor patients undergoing radiation treatment. The brain tumor patients underwent MR spectroscopy before, twice during, and after treatment. All patients and volunteers underwent MR imaging to localize the spectroscopy voxels. The area of the brain imaged in each patient was matched by a similar area in a volunteer. The spectra were analyzed to determine the peak heights and peak height ratios of the metabolites choline, creatine, lactate, and NAA

  20. Linear-accelerator-based stereotactic irradiation for metastatic brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the safety and availability of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for metastatic brain tumors, we reviewed 54 consecutive cases with a total of 118 brain metastases treated with linear-accelerator-based stereotactic irradiation (STI). Nineteen patients with a total of 27 brain tumors that were larger than 3 cm or close to critical normal tissues were treated with SRT. The marginal dose of SRT was 15-21 Gy (median 21 Gy) in 3 fractions for 3 days. The median marginal dose of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was 20 Gy. Effective rates of imaging studies were 72.7% and 94.4%, and those of clinical symptoms were 46.7% and 55.6% for SRT and SRS, respectively. One-year and two-year survival rates of SRT were 40.9% and 17.6%, respectively, and the median follow-up period was 6.4 months. The one-year survival rate of SRS was 32.7%, with a median follow-up of 4.6 months. Fourteen cases (7 cases each) had recurrent tumors at STI sites. Early complications were observed in one case of SRT and 8 cases of SRS, and late complications occurred in 3 cases of SRS. There were no significant differences among effective rates, survival rates, median follow-up times, recurrence rates, and complications between SRT and SRS. We concluded that SRT is a safe, effective therapy for large or eloquent area metastases. (author)

  1. Linear-accelerator-based stereotactic irradiation for metastatic brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Katsui, Kuniaki; Yoshida, Atsushi [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    2003-05-01

    To assess the safety and availability of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for metastatic brain tumors, we reviewed 54 consecutive cases with a total of 118 brain metastases treated with linear-accelerator-based stereotactic irradiation (STI). Nineteen patients with a total of 27 brain tumors that were larger than 3 cm or close to critical normal tissues were treated with SRT. The marginal dose of SRT was 15-21 Gy (median 21 Gy) in 3 fractions for 3 days. The median marginal dose of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was 20 Gy. Effective rates of imaging studies were 72.7% and 94.4%, and those of clinical symptoms were 46.7% and 55.6% for SRT and SRS, respectively. One-year and two-year survival rates of SRT were 40.9% and 17.6%, respectively, and the median follow-up period was 6.4 months. The one-year survival rate of SRS was 32.7%, with a median follow-up of 4.6 months. Fourteen cases (7 cases each) had recurrent tumors at STI sites. Early complications were observed in one case of SRT and 8 cases of SRS, and late complications occurred in 3 cases of SRS. There were no significant differences among effective rates, survival rates, median follow-up times, recurrence rates, and complications between SRT and SRS. We concluded that SRT is a safe, effective therapy for large or eloquent area metastases. (author)

  2. Brain image Compression, a brief survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha Masood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain image compression is known as a subfield of image compression. It allows the deep analysis and measurements of brain images in different modes. Brain images are compressed to analyze and diagnose in an effective manner while reducing the image storage space. This survey study describes the different existing techniques regarding brain image compression. The techniques come under different categories. The study also discusses these categories.

  3. Imaging of brain tumors in AIDS patients by means of dual-isotope thallium-201 and technetium-99m sestamibi single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De La Pena, R.C.; Ketonen, L.; Villanueva-Meyer, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Texas, Galveston (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the use of dual-isotope thallium-201 (Tl) and technetium-99m sestamibi (sestamibi) simultaneous acquisition in brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET) for the differentiation between brain lymphoma and benign central nervous system (CNS) lesions in AIDS patients. Thirty-six consecutive patients with enhancing mass lesions on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were included in the study. SPET of the brain was performed to obtain simultaneous Tl and sestamibi images. Regions-of-interest were drawn around the lesion and on the contralateral side to calculate uptake ratios. The final diagnosis was reached by pathologic findings in 17 patients and clinical and/or MR follow-up in 19 patients. Of the 36 patients, 11 had brain lymphoma, 1 glioblastoma multiforme, 15 toxoplasmosis and 9 other benign CNS lesions. Correlation between SPET and the final diagnosis revealed in 10 true-positive, 23 true-negative, 1 false-positive and 2 false-negative studies. All patients with toxoplasmosis had negative scans. A patient with a purulent infection had positive scans. Tl and sestamibi scans were concordant in every lesion. The same lesions that took up Tl were also visualized with sestamibi. However, sestamibi scans showed higher lesion-to-normal tissue uptake ratios (3.7{+-}1.8) compared with those of Tl (2.3{+-}0.8, P<0.002). Simultaneous acquisition of Tl and sestamibi can help differentiate CNS lymphoma from benign brain lesions in AIDS patients. (orig.) With 2 figs., 2 tabs., 34 refs.

  4. Non-invasive quantification of brain tumor-induced astrogliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baird Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CNS injury including stroke, infection, and tumor growth lead to astrogliosis, a process that involves upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in astrocytes. However, the kinetics of astrogliosis that is related to these insults (i.e. tumor is largely unknown. Results Using transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the regulation of the GFAP promoter (GFAP-luc, we developed a model system to monitor astrogliosis upon tumor growth in a rapid, non-invasive manner. A biphasic induction of astrogliosis was observed in our xenograft model in which an early phase of activation of GFAP was associated with inflammatory response followed by a secondary, long-term upregulation of GFAP. These animals reveal GFAP activation with kinetics that is in parallel with tumor growth. Furthermore, a strong correlation between astrogliosis and tumor size was observed. Conclusions Our results suggest that non-invasive, quantitative bioluminescent imaging using GFAP-luc reporter animal is a useful tool to monitor temporal-spatial kinetics of host-mediated astrogliosis that is associated with glioma and metastatic brain tumor growth.

  5. Detection of brain tumors using fluorescence diffuse optical tomography and nanoparticles as contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Genevois, Coralie; Koenig, Anne; Heinrich, Emilie; Texier, Isabelle; Couillaud, Franck

    2012-12-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence-enhanced diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) is used to localize tumors in mice using fluorescent nanoparticles as a blood pool contrast agent. The infrared dye DiR is loaded in the lipid core of nontargeted nanoparticles (DiR-lipidots) and injected systemically via the tail vein in mice bearing U87 tumors. Distribution and time-course of DiR-lipidots are followed using in vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging and reveal enhanced fluorescent signal within the subcutaneous tumors up to seven days due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Tumor growth into the brain is followed using bioluminescent imaging, and tumor localization is further determined by magnetic resonance imaging. The fDOT provides three-dimensional fluorescent maps that allow for consistent localization for both subcutaneous and brain tumors.

  6. Peritumoral hemorrhage immediately after radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of a 44-year-old woman with metastatic brain tumors who suffered peri-tumoral hemorrhage soon after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). She had been suffering from breast cancer with multiple systemic metastasis. She started to have headache, nausea, dizziness and speech disturbance 1 month before admission. There was no bleeding tendency in the hematological examination and the patient was normotensive. Neurological examination disclosed headache and slightly aphasia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a large round mass lesion in the left temporal lobe. It was a well-demarcated, highly enhanced mass, 45 mm in diameter. SRS was performed on four lesions in a single session (Main mass: maximum dose was 30 Gy in the center and 20 Gy in the margin of the tumor. Others: maximum 25 Gy margin 20 Gy). After radiosurgery, she had severe headache, nausea and vomiting and showed progression of aphasia. CT scan revealed a peritumoral hemorrhage. Conservative therapy was undertaken and the patient's symptoms improved. After 7 days, she was discharged, able to walk. The patient died of extensive distant metastasis 5 months after SRS. Acute transient swelling following conventional radiotherapy is a well-documented phenomenon. However, the present case indicates that such an occurrence is also possible in SRS. We have hypothesized that acute reactions such as brain swelling occur due to breakdown of the fragile vessels of the tumor or surrounding tissue. (author)

  7. An integrative view on sex differences in brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Tao; Plutynski, Anya; Ward, Stacey; Rubin, Joshua B.

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in human health and disease can range from undetectable to profound. Differences in brain tumor rates and outcome are evident in males and females throughout the world and regardless of age. These observations indicate that fundamental aspects of sex determination can impact the biology of brain tumors. It is likely that optimal personalized approaches to the treatment of male and female brain tumor patients will require recognizing and understanding the ways in which the biol...

  8. Spectroscopy of brain tumors; Spektroskopie bei Hirntumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, Peter; Lanfermann, Heinrich [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie; Pilatus, Ulrich [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2008-09-15

    Metabolic imaging with NMR-spectroscopy has become a diagnostic tool that is used for the examination of cerebral pathologies. It is a non-invasive technique, which can detect and quantify biochemical changes. This paper describes the history of NMR-spectroscopy, its technical basis and possible areas of use for tumor diagnostics. An overview of the literature is given and upcoming developments are mentioned. (orig.)

  9. Progress in imaging of brain radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of brain radiation injury mainly include three hypotheses: vascular injury, glial cells damage and immune response. Most scholars' studies have recently supported the former two ones. Vascular injury plays a major role in the effect of delayed radiation injury. Focal brain injury and diffuse white matter injury can be definitely diagnosed by CT and MRI. T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) in MRI shows high sensitivity in water contents, and is not affected by the beam hardening artifacts from the cranial base. Compared with CT, the sensitivity of MR for detecting white matter lesions is two to threefold higher. When lesions occurs at the site of an irradiated cerebral tumor, tumor recurrence and focal cerebral necrosis cannot be differentiated by CT or MR, PET and MRS now present a certain advantage of differential diagnosis. Tumor presents high metabolism and necrosis demonstrates low metabolism by utilizing PET scanning, however PET's sensitivity and specificity are far from satisfactory. The amount or ratio of metabolic products in the region of interest measured by MRS contributes to the deferential diagnosis. In addition, PET functional imaging and MRS can also predict the early asymptomatic reversible radiation injury so as to allow the early therapy of steroids and possibly other drugs, prior to the development of irreversible changes

  10. Specific features of epilepsy in children with brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Kalmykova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of epilepsy in children and adolescents with brain tumors and to define the optimal tactics of management and antiepileptic therapy after surgical treatment. Patients and methods. Sixty-one patients aged 5 months to 15 years were examined. All the patients were diagnosed as having a brain tumor found in the presence of symptomatic epilepsy. They were all followed up for 5 years postsurgery or during their lifetime (in case of death. Comprehensive examination encompassing the assessment of history data and concomitant complaints, brain magnetic resonance imaging, video-EEC monitoring, and the neurological status (the presence of cognitive impairments and eye ground changes was done in all the cases. The probability of epileptic seizures in the clinical presentation of the disease, their semiology, and frequency were studied. Results and discussion. Epileptic seizures were the major complaint in all the patients at the first visit to their doctor. The disease occurred with status epilepticus in 9% of the patients. Different types of generalized seizures were more common (53%; p≥0.05. The tumor was located above the tentorium of the cerebellum in most examinees (77% and beneath it in the others (23%; p≤0.05. The significant clinical sign of a brain tumor in the epileptic children is focal neurological symptoms (72% of the cases. MRI was performed in children who had no focal neurological symptoms in the late periods. There was cerebrospinal fluid hypertension in 51% of the patients (p≥0.05 and cognitive impairments in 33% (p<0.05. The maximum number (74% of children with psycho-speech disorders and cognitive impairments were registered in the age group of 7–15 years. Eye ground changes characteristic of intracranial hypertension were identified in 19 epileptic children; they occurred in 27 patients more than 1 year after the onset of seizures. The late (few months-to-14 years diagnosis of a brain

  11. Functional Brain Imaging: A Comprehensive Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Sarraf, Saman

    2016-01-01

    Functional brain imaging allows measuring dynamic functionality in all brain regions. It is broadly used in clinical cognitive neuroscience as, well as in research. It will allow the observation of neural activities in the brain simultaneously. From the beginning when functional brain imaging was initiated by the mapping of brain functions proposed by phrenologists, many scientists were asking why we need to image brain functionality since we have already structural information. Simply, their important question was including a great answer. Functional information of the human brain would definitely complement structural information, helping to have a better understanding of what is happening in the brain. This paper, which could be useful to those who have an interest in functional brain imaging, such as engineers, will present a quick review of modalities used in functional brain imaging. We will concentrate on the most used techniques in functional imaging which are functional magnetic resonance imaging (fM...

  12. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  13. Neural Network Based Augmented Reality for Detection of Brain Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Mithun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development in technology opened the door of fiction and reached reality. Major medical applications deals on robot-assisted surgery and image guided surgery. Because of this, substantial research is going on to implement Augmented Reality (AR in instruments which incorporate the surgeon’s intuitive capabilities. Augmented reality is the grouping of virtual entity or 3D stuffs which are overlapped on live camera feed information. The decisive aim of augmented reality is to enhancing the virtual video and a 3D object onto a real world on which it will raise the person’s conceptual understanding of the subject. In this paper we described a solution for initial prediction of tumour cells in MRI images of human brain using image processing technique the output of which will be the 3D slicedimage of the human brain. The sliced image is then virtually embedded on the top of human head during the time of surgery so that the surgeon can exactly locate the spot to be operated. Before augmenting the 3D sliced image Artificial neural network is used to select the appropriate image that contains tumor automatically in order to make the system more efficient.

  14. Biphasic modeling of brain tumor biomechanics and response to radiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Stelios; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2016-06-14

    Biomechanical forces are central in tumor progression and response to treatment. This becomes more important in brain cancers where tumors are surrounded by tissues with different mechanical properties. Existing mathematical models ignore direct mechanical interactions of the tumor with the normal brain. Here, we developed a clinically relevant model, which predicts tumor growth accounting directly for mechanical interactions. A three-dimensional model of the gray and white matter and the cerebrospinal fluid was constructed from magnetic resonance images of a normal brain. Subsequently, a biphasic tissue growth theory for an initial tumor seed was employed, incorporating the effects of radiotherapy. Additionally, three different sets of brain tissue properties taken from the literature were used to investigate their effect on tumor growth. Results show the evolution of solid stress and interstitial fluid pressure within the tumor and the normal brain. Heterogeneous distribution of the solid stress exerted on the tumor resulted in a 35% spatial variation in cancer cell proliferation. Interestingly, the model predicted that distant from the tumor, normal tissues still undergo significant deformations while it was found that intratumoral fluid pressure is elevated. Our predictions relate to clinical symptoms of brain cancers and present useful tools for therapy planning. PMID:27086116

  15. Advances of molecular imaging in tumor angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor angiogenesis has a close relationship with tumor growth, progression, metastasis and the prognosis of tumor patients. Therefore, tumor anti-angiogenic treatment arouses great public interest. Molecular imaging can characteristically display and measure the biochemical process of organisms at cellular and molecular level in vivo,which is based on the specific binding of molecular probe with high affinity and target molecules. In recent years, molecular imaging has a certain progress on visual and quantitative research of tumor angiogenesis and it is expected to become an important technique in the efficacy evaluation and prognostic assessment. This article summarizes the new advances of molecular imaging technology in tumor angiogenesis. (authors)

  16. Imaging the Addicted Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Volkow, Nora D.; Kassed, Cheryl A; Chang, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques enable researchers to observe drug actions and consequences as they occur and persist in the brains of abusing and addicted individuals. This article presents the five most commonly used techniques, explains how each produces images, and describes how researchers interpret them. The authors give examples of key findings illustrating how each technique has extended and deepened our knowledge of the neurobiological bases of drug abuse and addiction, and they address po...

  17. Anatomically standardized statistical mapping of 123I-IMP SPECT in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    123I-iodoamphetamine Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (IMP SPECT) is used to evaluate cerebral blood flow. However, application of IMP SPECT to patients with brain tumors has been rarely reported. Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare tumor that shows delayed IMP uptake. The relatively low spatial resolution of SPECT is a clinical problem in diagnosing brain tumors. We examined anatomically standardized statistical mapping of IMP SPECT in patients with brain lesions. This study included 49 IMP SPECT images for 49 patients with brain lesions: 20 PCNSL, 1 Burkitt's lymphoma, 14 glioma, 4 other tumor, 7 inflammatory disease and 3 without any pathological diagnosis but a clinical diagnosis of PCNSL. After intravenous injection of 222 MBq of 123I-IMP, early (15 minutes) and delayed (4 hours) images were acquired using a multi-detector SPECT machine. All SPECT data were transferred to a newly developed software program iNeurostat+ (Nihon Medi-physics). SPECT data were anatomically standardized on normal brain images. Regions of increased uptake of IMP were statistically mapped on the tomographic images of normal brain. Eighteen patients showed high uptake in the delayed IMP SPECT images (16 PCNSL, 2 unknown). Other tumor or diseases did not show high uptake of delayed IMP SPECT, so there were no false positives. Four patients with pathologically proven PCNSL showed no uptake in original IMP SPECT. These tumors were too small to detect in IMP SPECT. However, statistical mapping revealed IMP uptake in 18 of 20 pathologically verified PCNSL patients. A heterogeneous IMP uptake was seen in homogenous tumors in MRI. For patients with a hot IMP uptake, statistical mapping showed clearer uptake. IMP SPECT is a sensitive test to diagnose of PCNSL, although it produced false negative results for small posterior fossa tumor. Anatomically standardized statistical mapping is therefore considered to be a useful method for improving the diagnostic

  18. Minireview of Stereoselective Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Donald F.; Jakobsen, Steen

    2014-01-01

    Stereoselectivity is a fundamental principle in living systems. Stereoselectivity reflects the dependence of molecular processes on the spatial orientation of constituent atoms. Stereoselective processes govern many aspects of brain function and direct the course of many psychotropic drugs. Today......, modern imaging techniques such as SPECT and PET provide a means for studying stereoselective processes in the living brain. Chemists have prepared numerous radiolabelled stereoisomers for use in SPECT and PET in order to explore various molecular processes in the living brain of anesthetized laboratory...... animals and awake humans. The studies have demonstrated how many aspects of neurotransmission consist of crucial stereoselective events that can affect brain function in health and disease. Here, we present a brief account of those findings in hope of stimulating further interest in the vital topic....

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-min Wang

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been used to treat primary brain tumors as standard primary and/or adjunctive therapies for decades. It is difficult for conventional radiotherapy to deliver a lethal dose of radiation to the tumors while sparing surrounding normal brain due to complicated structures and multifunction in human brain. With the understanding of radiation physics and computer technology, a number of novel and more precise radiotherapies have been developed in recent years. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of these strategies. The use of IMRT in the treatment of primary brain tumors is being increasing nowadays. It shows great promise for some of primary brain tumors and also presents some problems, This review highlights current IMRT in the treatment of mainly primary brain tumors.

  20. Increased expression of aquaporin-4 in human traumatic brain injury and brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuaHu; Wei-PingZhang; LeiZhang; ZhongChen; Er-QingWei

    2004-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is one of the aquaporins (AQPs), a water channel family. In the brain, AQP4 is expressed in astroeyte foot processes, and plays an important role in water homeostasis and in the formation of brain edema. In our study, AQP4 expression in human brain specimens from patients with traumatic brain injury or different brain tumors was detected

  1. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance reconstruction images before and after surgical therapy of spontaneous canine brain tumors Imagens de reconstrução tri-dimensional por ressonância magnética antes e depois de tratamento cirúrgico de tumores cerebrais espontâneos caninos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Carlos Canola

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Specific software was used for reconstruction of spontaneous intracranial tumor volume from magnetic resonance images (MRI in three dogs. Histopathologically confirmed meningioma, cystic meningioma, and choroid plexus tumors were evaluated before and after surgery. The software allowed the whole-volume segmentation of the skin, brain, tumor, edema, and cyst. Manipulation of the three-dimensional images (3D allowed visualization of all anatomical structures, aided clinical understanding, surgical planning, and treatment monitoring.Um programa de computador específico foi utilizado para reconstrução do volume tumoral intracraniano espontâneo por imagens de ressonância magnética (IRM em três cães. Tumores histopatologicamente confirmados como meningioma, meningioma cístico e tumor do plexo coróide foram avaliados antes e após cirurgia. O programa de computador permitiu a segmentação por completo da pele, do cérebro, do tumor, do edema e do cisto. A manipulação das imagens tridimensionais permitiu a visibilização de todas as estruturas anatômicas, além da compreensão clínica, do planejamento cirúrgico e da monitorização do tratamento.

  2. Awake brain tumor resection during pregnancy: Decision making and technical nuances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingzhong; Han, Seunggu J; Rollins, Mark D; Gelb, Adrian W; Chang, Edward F

    2016-02-01

    The co-occurrence of primary brain tumor and pregnancy poses unique challenges to the treating physician. If a rapidly growing lesion causes life-threatening mass effect, craniotomy for tumor debulking becomes urgent. The choice between awake craniotomy versus general anesthesia becomes complicated if the tumor is encroaching on eloquent brain because considerations pertinent to both patient safety and oncological outcome, in addition to fetal wellbeing, are involved. A 31-year-old female at 30 weeks gestation with twins presented to our hospital seeking awake craniotomy to resect a 7 × 6 × 5 cm left frontoparietal brain tumor with 7 mm left-to-right subfalcine herniation on imaging that led to word finding difficulty, dysfluency, right upper extremity paralysis, and right lower extremity weakness. She had twice undergone tumor debulking under general anesthesia during the same pregnancy at an outside hospital at 16 weeks and 28 weeks gestation. There were considerations both for and against awake brain tumor resection over surgery under general anesthesia. The decision-making process and the technical nuances related to awake brain tumor resection in this neurologically impaired patient are discussed. Awake craniotomy benefits the patient who harbors a tumor that encroaches on the eloquent brain by allowing a greater extent of resection while preserving the language and sensorimotor function. It can be successfully done in pregnant patients who are neurologically impaired. The patient should be motivated and well informed of the details of the process. A multidisciplinary and collaborative effort is also crucial. PMID:26498092

  3. Growth Patterns of Microscopic Brain Tumors

    CERN Document Server

    Sander, L M; Sander, Leonard M.; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2002-01-01

    Highly malignant brain tumors such as Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) form complex growth patterns in vitro in which invasive cells organize in tenuous branches. Here, we formulate a chemotaxis model for this sort of growth. A key element controlling the pattern is homotype attraction, i.e., the tendency for invasive cells to follow pathways previously explored. We investigate this in two ways: we show that there is an intrinsic instability in the model, which leads to branch formation. We also give a discrete description for the expansion of the invasive zone, and a continuum model for the nutrient supply. The results indicate that both, strong heterotype chemotaxis and strong homotype chemo-attraction are required for branch formation within the invasive zone. Our model thus can give a way to assess the importance of the various processes, and a way to explore and analyze transitions between different growth regimes.

  4. Anticonvulsant therapy in brain-tumor related epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröscher Walter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The lifetime risk of patients with brain tumors to have focal epileptic seizures is 10-100%; the risk depends on different histology. Specific guidelines for drug treatment of brain tumor-related seizures have not yet been established.

  5. Interphone study - on mobile phones and brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interphone study is the largest study on mobile phone use and risk of brain tumors that have been implemented. The study does not provide reliable answers to whether there is an increased risk of brain tumors using the mobile phone, but is an important contribution. (AG)

  6. Transcriptional signature of an adult brain tumor in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loop Thomas

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations and gene expression alterations in brain tumors have been extensively investigated, however the causes of brain tumorigenesis are largely unknown. Animal models are necessary to correlate altered transcriptional activity and tumor phenotype and to better understand how these alterations cause malignant growth. In order to gain insights into the in vivo transcriptional activity associated with a brain tumor, we carried out genome-wide microarray expression analyses of an adult brain tumor in Drosophila caused by homozygous mutation in the tumor suppressor gene brain tumor (brat. Results Two independent genome-wide gene expression studies using two different oligonucleotide microarray platforms were used to compare the transcriptome of adult wildtype flies with mutants displaying the adult bratk06028 mutant brain tumor. Cross-validation and stringent statistical criteria identified a core transcriptional signature of bratk06028 neoplastic tissue. We find significant expression level changes for 321 annotated genes associated with the adult neoplastic bratk06028 tissue indicating elevated and aberrant metabolic and cell cycle activity, upregulation of the basal transcriptional machinery, as well as elevated and aberrant activity of ribosome synthesis and translation control. One fifth of these genes show homology to known mammalian genes involved in cancer formation. Conclusion Our results identify for the first time the genome-wide transcriptional alterations associated with an adult brain tumor in Drosophila and reveal insights into the possible mechanisms of tumor formation caused by homozygous mutation of the translational repressor brat.

  7. Utility of 99mTc-GHA Brain SPECT in the grading of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Brain tumors are of diverse histological types, the most common being derived from glial tissue. The clinical management and prognosis of brain tumor patients is dependent on accurate neuro-pathologic diagnosis and grading. Radiological imaging is not always a good modality for assessing the exact nature and grade of a malignant tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a very high soft tissue resolution and is helpful in classifying the grade of tumor. Radionuclide imaging techniques that can reveal metabolic activity within tumor cells are very helpful in predicting the degree of malignancy. Usefulness of Tl-201 SPECT and FDG PET studies have been widely reported to evaluate malignant lesions by measuring increased regional glucose metabolism and amino acid uptake. 99mTc-GHA (Glucoheptonate), more or less analogous to 18F-FDG, may show increased glucose metabolism and help in grading tumors. This study was carried out to determine the utility of 99mTc-GHA SPECT for grading cerebral gliomas. Nineteen patients (12M, 7F) aged 22 to 51 years (36.1 ± 8.3) diagnosed clinically and radiologically to have a brain tumor were evaluated with 99mTc-GHA brain SPECT. All the patients had undergone CT/ MRI examination prior to the brain SPECT study. No patient had undergone surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy before the imaging studies. Brain SPECT was performed twice, i.e 40 min and 3 hours after intravenous administration of 20 mCi of Tc99m-GHA under a dual head SPECT gamma camera (Ecam, Siemens), with a low energy high-resolution collimator. A total of 128 frames of 30 seconds each, 64 per detector, were acquired in 128 x 128 matrix, with 360-degree rotation in step and shoot mode. Reconstruction of the SPECT data was done using standard software. Abnormal concentration of tracer at the tumor site was compared to normal uptake on the contralateral side, and ratios obtained for early (40 min) and delayed (3 hours) uptake of tracer. Retention ratio (RR), a

  8. Disseminated lesions of the central nervous system in course of pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS) are, apart from leukemia, the most frequent malignant disorders in the childhood. Among the brain tumors, those of poorly differentiated cells - give metastatic lesions to the CNS. The aim of the paper was to evaluate the features of CT and MR images detecting dissemination of the primary brain tumors. From 1993 to 2005 in the Department of Radiology of the Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital - Research Institute, the disseminations to CNS were observed in 35 children who were previously operated for primary brain tumors. CT and MR examinations of the brain were performed in all patients (22 males and 13 females; age: 5 mo - 18 y) and MR imaging of the spinal cord was done in 18 children. Multiple metastases to the cerebral structures were detected more often (in 23 patients - 66%) as compared to single lesions. The most frequent disseminations were observed in patients with diagnosis of medulloblastoma - 13 children, PNET - 4 and pineoblastoma - 3 patients. Twelve children had single metastatic tumors (out of the primary neoplasm location): in the course of medulloblastoma - 6, and PNET - 2 patients. Eighteen MR examinations of the spinal canal showed disseminations of the brain tumors in 9 children; concomitant metastatic nodules in the brain were detected in 4 patients. CT and MR imaging of the CNS enables evaluating the dissemination of primary brain tumors in children. Any asymptomatic progression of the primary neoplastic disease may be detected by means of control diagnostic imaging, which reveals the tumor spread. Especially in patients with medulloblastoma and pineoblastoma, the spine MR imaging with gadolinium is mandatory. (author)

  9. Complementary information from magnetic resonance imaging and {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography in the assessment of the response to an antiangiogenic treatment in a rat brain tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valable, Samuel, E-mail: valable@cyceron.fr [CERVOxy group, UMR 6232 CI-NAPS. CNRS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CEA. GIP CYCERON, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP5229, 14074 CAEN cedex (France); Petit, Edwige; Roussel, Simon; Marteau, Lena; Toutain, Jerome; Divoux, Didier [CERVOxy group, UMR 6232 CI-NAPS. CNRS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CEA. GIP CYCERON, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP5229, 14074 CAEN cedex (France); Sobrio, Franck; Delamare, Jerome; Barre, Louisa [GDM-TEP DSV/I2BM group, UMR 6232 CI-NAPS. CNRS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CEA. GIP CYCERON, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP5229, 14074 CAEN cedex (France); Bernaudin, Myriam [CERVOxy group, UMR 6232 CI-NAPS. CNRS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CEA. GIP CYCERON, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP5229, 14074 CAEN cedex (France)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: No direct proof has been brought to light in a link between hypoxic changes in glioma models and the effects of antiangiogenic treatments. Here, we assessed the sensitivity of the detection of hypoxia through the use of {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]-FMISO PET) in response to the evolution of the tumor and its vasculature. Methods: Orthotopic glioma tumors were induced in rats after implantation of C6 or 9L cells. Sunitinib was administered from day (D) 17 to D24. At D17 and D24, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was performed to characterize tumor growth and vasculature. Hypoxia was assessed by [{sup 18}F]-FMISO PET. Results: We showed that brain hypoxic volumes are related to glioma volume and its vasculature and that an antiangiogenic treatment, leading to an increase in cerebral blood volume and a decrease in vessel permeability, is accompanied by a decrease in the degree of hypoxia. Conclusions: We propose that [{sup 18}F]-FMISO PET and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging are pertinent complementary tools in the evaluation of the effects of an antiangiogenic treatment in glioma.

  10. Complementary information from magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography in the assessment of the response to an antiangiogenic treatment in a rat brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: No direct proof has been brought to light in a link between hypoxic changes in glioma models and the effects of antiangiogenic treatments. Here, we assessed the sensitivity of the detection of hypoxia through the use of 18F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography ([18F]-FMISO PET) in response to the evolution of the tumor and its vasculature. Methods: Orthotopic glioma tumors were induced in rats after implantation of C6 or 9L cells. Sunitinib was administered from day (D) 17 to D24. At D17 and D24, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was performed to characterize tumor growth and vasculature. Hypoxia was assessed by [18F]-FMISO PET. Results: We showed that brain hypoxic volumes are related to glioma volume and its vasculature and that an antiangiogenic treatment, leading to an increase in cerebral blood volume and a decrease in vessel permeability, is accompanied by a decrease in the degree of hypoxia. Conclusions: We propose that [18F]-FMISO PET and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging are pertinent complementary tools in the evaluation of the effects of an antiangiogenic treatment in glioma.

  11. Cerebral function estimation using electro-encephalography for the patients with brain tumor managed by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariya, Yasushi [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine; Saito, Fumio; Kimura, Tamaki (and others)

    1999-10-01

    Cerebral function of 12 patients accompanied with brain tumor, managed by radiotherapy, were serially estimated using electroencephalography (EEG), and the results were compared with tumor responses, analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical courses. After radiotherapy, EEG findings were improved in 7 patients, unchanged in 3, and worsened in 1. Clinical courses were generally correlated with serial changes in EEG findings and tumor responses. However, in 3 patients, clinical courses were explained better with EEG findings than tumor responses. It is suggested that the combination of EEG and image analysis is clinically useful for comprehensive estimation of radiotherapeutic effects. (author)

  12. Cerebral function estimation using electro-encephalography for the patients with brain tumor managed by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral function of 12 patients accompanied with brain tumor, managed by radiotherapy, were serially estimated using electroencephalography (EEG), and the results were compared with tumor responses, analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical courses. After radiotherapy, EEG findings were improved in 7 patients, unchanged in 3, and worsened in 1. Clinical courses were generally correlated with serial changes in EEG findings and tumor responses. However, in 3 patients, clinical courses were explained better with EEG findings than tumor responses. It is suggested that the combination of EEG and image analysis is clinically useful for comprehensive estimation of radiotherapeutic effects. (author)

  13. AN ANN BASED BRAIN ABNORMALITY DETECTION USING MR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Kulhalli

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Main purpose of this paper is to design, implement and evaluate a strong automatic diagnostic system that increases the accuracy of tumor diagnosis in brain using MR images. This presented work classifies the brain tissues as normal or abnormal automatically, using computer vision. This saves lot of radiologist time to carryout monotonous repeated job. The acquired MR images are processed using image preprocessing techniques. The preprocessed images are then segmented, and the various features are extracted. The extracted features are fed to the artificial neural network as input that trains the network using error back propagation algorithm for correct decision making.

  14. A study of ICAM expression in brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Hong, Seok Il [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the possibility of using sICAM-1 as a marker for follow-up of treatment. The micro-ELISA method was adopted. The brain stem gliomas showed positive results in 67%. Overall, 23% of brain tumors showed positive results. It is possible that we can use sICAM-1 as a marker for metastatic brain tumors, and measurement after radiation therapy is not reliable. 6 refs. (Author) (Author).

  15. Comparison of Swallowing Functions Between Brain Tumor and Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Dae Hwan; Chun, Min Ho; Lee, Sook Joung; Song, Yoon Bum

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the swallowing functions according to the lesion locations between brain tumor and stroke patients. Methods Forty brain tumor patients and the same number of age-, lesion-, and functional status-matching stroke patients were enrolled in this study. Before beginning the swallowing therapy, swallowing function was evaluated in all subjects by videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Brain lesions were classified as either supratentorial or in-fratentorial. We evaluated the follo...

  16. Yoga Therapy in Treating Patients With Malignant Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-27

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  17. Evaluation of brain tumor using technetium-99m-tetrofosmin SPECT. Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium-99m-Tetrofosmin (TF) is the tracer for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). It is commercially available in Japan and covered by Japanese health insurance only for ischemic heart diseases. In other countries, TF has been used for imaging of various brain tumors. We examined TF SPECT in patients with brain tumor and compared the image findings with other radiological image findings. The study population included 11 patients (4 men and 7 women) aged 48-87 years. The histological tumor diagnoses were as follows: glioblastoma multiforme (GBM; n=7), anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (n=1), meningioma (n=1), and metastasis (n=2). SPECT images were acquired using multidetector SPECT camera (E.CAM, Siemens) at 15 min and 3 h after intravenous injection of 740MBq of TF or 74MBq of Thallium chloride (Tl). The tracer uptakes of TF and Tl were almost similar. Both TF and Tl delayed SPECT images showed hot uptake in the tumors of GBM patients. In meningioma patients, both TF and Tl early images showed hot uptake, whereas the tracers were washed out in delayed images. TF SPECT images were clearer than Tl SPECT images. There was physiological uptake of TF in the normal choroid plexus; this finding helps in understanding the spatial correlation between the tumors and ventricles. No side effects with TF injection were observed. TF SPECT is better and more useful than Tl SPECT to diagnose location, extent, malignancy, and viability of tumors as well as the effects of anticancer therapies. (author)

  18. MR imaging of late radiation brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and four patients treated with radiotherapy for intracranial tumors and their related conditions were reviewed to evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in demonstrating increased signal intensity areas on T2-weighted images that were considered to be late adverse effects of irradiation of the brain. High signal intensity areas of the white matter were divided into five patterns according to their size and extension. Severity was found to increase with age and irradiation doses of more than 50 Gy. In patients with irradiation doses of more than 60 Gy, the severity of increased with shorter interval after radiotherapy than in those given low irradiation doses. Clinical findings such as mental deterioration, motor abnormality, and visual defect were observed in 12 patients. These findings were closely correlated with the severity of the MR pattern. In most patients, high signal intensity areas were stable or progressive during the course of follow-up. However, these areas were regressive in three patients. Imaging with Gd-DTPA was performed in 36 patients, six of whom showed enhancement. Pathological findings on enhancement included astrocyte proliferation and coalescing vacuoles in neural tissue. MR imaging is an excellent method with which to monitor the adverse effects of radiotherapy of the brain. (author)

  19. Fueling and imaging brain activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald A Dienel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron–astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models.

  20. Retrieval of Brain Tumors by Adaptive Spatial Pooling and Fisher Vector Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Yang, Wei; Huang, Meiyan; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Yujia; Yang, Ru; Zhao, Jie; Feng, Yanqiu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2016-01-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques have currently gained increasing popularity in the medical field because they can use numerous and valuable archived images to support clinical decisions. In this paper, we concentrate on developing a CBIR system for retrieving brain tumors in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI images. Specifically, when the user roughly outlines the tumor region of a query image, brain tumor images in the database of the same pathological type are expected to be returned. We propose a novel feature extraction framework to improve the retrieval performance. The proposed framework consists of three steps. First, we augment the tumor region and use the augmented tumor region as the region of interest to incorporate informative contextual information. Second, the augmented tumor region is split into subregions by an adaptive spatial division method based on intensity orders; within each subregion, we extract raw image patches as local features. Third, we apply the Fisher kernel framework to aggregate the local features of each subregion into a respective single vector representation and concatenate these per-subregion vector representations to obtain an image-level signature. After feature extraction, a closed-form metric learning algorithm is applied to measure the similarity between the query image and database images. Extensive experiments are conducted on a large dataset of 3604 images with three types of brain tumors, namely, meningiomas, gliomas, and pituitary tumors. The mean average precision can reach 94.68%. Experimental results demonstrate the power of the proposed algorithm against some related state-of-the-art methods on the same dataset. PMID:27273091

  1. Imaging appearance in papillary endolymphatic sac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging findings on CT, MRI, and angiography in patients with papillary, endolymphatic sac tumors (PELSTs) . Methods: CT and MR imaging studies in 5 patients (aged 12 - 41 years) with histopathologically proved papillary endolymphatic sac tumors were retrospectively reviewed, and four of the five also underwent angiograms. CT scans were evaluated for bone erosion and calcification, MR images for signal intensity changes, enhancement patterns, and flow voids, and angiograms for tumor blood supply. Results: All tumors were destructive, containing calcifications centered in the retrolabyrinthine region and showing irregular hone margins on CT. MR imaging appearance varied with lesion size and nature. Three of the five tumors showed a high-signal intensity margin on unenhanced T1 and T2-weighted images, and the margins were more clear with fat-suppress imaging. The others were heterogeneous and contained cystic high-signal intensity area on both T1 and T2 weighted images. All the tumors showed irregular low signal intensity within the endolymphatic sac anatomically and flow voids signals. The blood supply arose predominantly from the external carotid artery. Two tumors had additional supply from posterior circulation. Conclusion: Papillary endolymphatic sac tumors are destructive and hypervascular lesions that arise from the retrolabyrinthine region in the temporal hone. These imaging findings combined with the original location may help distinguish PELSTs from other more common arid aggressive temporal bone tumors

  2. Research on Perfusion CT in Rabbit Brain Tumor Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the vascular characteristics of tumors and normal tissue using perfusion CT in the rabbit brain tumor model. The VX2 carcinoma concentration of 1 x 107 cells/ml(0.1 ml) was implanted in the brain of nine New Zealand white rabbits (weight: 2.4 kg-3.0 kg, mean: 2.6 kg). The perfusion CT was scanned when the tumors were grown up to 5 mm. The tumor volume and perfusion value were quantitatively analyzed by using commercial workstation (advantage windows workstation, AW, version 4.2, GE, USA). The mean volume of implanted tumors was 316±181 mm3, and the biggest and smallest volumes of tumor were 497 mm3 and 195 mm3, respectively. All the implanted tumors in rabbits are single-nodular tumors, and intracranial metastasis was not observed. In the perfusion CT, cerebral blood volume (CBV) were 74.40±9.63, 16.8±0.64, 15.24±3.23 ml/100g in the tumor core, ipsilateral normal brain, and contralateral normal brain, respectively (p≤0.05). In the cerebral blood flow (CBF), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p≤0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (962.91±75.96 vs. 357.82±12.82 vs. 323.19±83.24 ml/100g/min). In the mean transit time (MTT), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p≤0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (4.37±0.19 vs. 3.02±0.41 vs. 2.86±0.22 sec). In the permeability surface (PS), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (47.23±25.44 vs. 14.54±1.60 vs. 6.81±4.20 ml/100g/min)(p≤0.05). In the time to peak (TTP) were no significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains. In the positive enhancement integral (PEI), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral brains (61.56±16.07 vs. 12.58±2.61 vs. 8.26±5

  3. Research on Perfusion CT in Rabbit Brain Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Bon Chul; Kwak, Byung Kook; Jung, Ji Sung [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Chung Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan; Jung, Hong Ryang [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    We investigated the vascular characteristics of tumors and normal tissue using perfusion CT in the rabbit brain tumor model. The VX2 carcinoma concentration of 1 x 10{sup 7} cells/ml(0.1 ml) was implanted in the brain of nine New Zealand white rabbits (weight: 2.4 kg-3.0 kg, mean: 2.6 kg). The perfusion CT was scanned when the tumors were grown up to 5 mm. The tumor volume and perfusion value were quantitatively analyzed by using commercial workstation (advantage windows workstation, AW, version 4.2, GE, USA). The mean volume of implanted tumors was 316{+-}181 mm{sup 3}, and the biggest and smallest volumes of tumor were 497 mm{sup 3} and 195 mm{sup 3}, respectively. All the implanted tumors in rabbits are single-nodular tumors, and intracranial metastasis was not observed. In the perfusion CT, cerebral blood volume (CBV) were 74.40{+-}9.63, 16.8{+-}0.64, 15.24{+-}3.23 ml/100g in the tumor core, ipsilateral normal brain, and contralateral normal brain, respectively (p{<=}0.05). In the cerebral blood flow (CBF), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p{<=}0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (962.91{+-}75.96 vs. 357.82{+-}12.82 vs. 323.19{+-}83.24 ml/100g/min). In the mean transit time (MTT), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p{<=}0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (4.37{+-}0.19 vs. 3.02{+-}0.41 vs. 2.86{+-}0.22 sec). In the permeability surface (PS), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (47.23{+-}25.44 vs. 14.54{+-}1.60 vs. 6.81{+-}4.20 ml/100g/min)(p{<=}0.05). In the time to peak (TTP) were no significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains. In the positive enhancement integral (PEI), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and

  4. Blood Brain Barrier: A Challenge for Effectual Therapy of Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Arijit Bhowmik; Rajni Khan; Mrinal Kanti Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumors are one of the most formidable diseases of mankind. They have only a fair to poor prognosis and high relapse rate. One of the major causes of extreme difficulty in brain tumor treatment is the presence of blood brain barrier (BBB). BBB comprises different molecular components and transport systems, which in turn create efflux machinery or hindrance for the entry of several drugs in brain. Thus, along with the conventional techniques, successful modification of drug delivery and n...

  5. Ex vivo brain tumor analysis using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Marcel; Krug, Robin; Welp, Hubert; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-03-01

    A big challenge during neurosurgeries is to distinguish between healthy tissue and cancerous tissue, but currently a suitable non-invasive real time imaging modality is not available. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a potential technique for such a modality. OCT has a penetration depth of 1-2 mm and a resolution of 1-15 μm which is sufficient to illustrate structural differences between healthy tissue and brain tumor. Therefore, we investigated gray and white matter of healthy central nervous system and meningioma samples with a Spectral Domain OCT System (Thorlabs Callisto). Additional OCT images were generated after paraffin embedding and after the samples were cut into 10 μm thin slices for histological investigation with a bright field microscope. All samples were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. In all cases B-scans and 3D images were made. Furthermore, a camera image of the investigated area was made by the built-in video camera of our OCT system. For orientation, the backsides of all samples were marked with blue ink. The structural differences between healthy tissue and meningioma samples were most pronounced directly after removal. After paraffin embedding these differences diminished. A correlation between OCT en face images and microscopy images can be seen. In order to increase contrast, post processing algorithms were applied. Hence we employed Spectroscopic OCT, pattern recognition algorithms and machine learning algorithms such as k-means Clustering and Principal Component Analysis.

  6. Diagnostic value of the fast-FLAIR sequence in MR imaging of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to quantify imaging characteristics of fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence in brain tumors compared with T1-postcontrast- and T2-sequences. Fast-FLAIR-, T2 fast spin echo (FSE)-, and T1 SE postcontrast images of 74 patients with intracranial neoplasms were analyzed. Four neuroradiologists rated signal intensity and inhomogeneity of the tumor, rendering of cystic parts, demarcation of the tumor vs brain, of the tumor vs edema and of brain vs edema, as well as the presence of motion and of other artifacts. Data analysis was performed for histologically proven astrocytomas, glioblastomas, and meningiomas, for tumors with poor contrast enhancement, and for all patients pooled. Only for tumors with poor contrast enhancement (n = 12) did fast FLAIR provide additional information about the lesion. In these cases, signal intensity, demarcation of the tumor vs brain, and differentiation of the tumor vs edema were best using fast FLAIR. In all cases, rendering of the tumor's inner structure was poor. For all other tumor types, fast FLAIR did not give clinically relevant information, the only exception being a better demarcation of the edema from brain tissue. Artifacts rarely interfered with evaluation of fast-FLAIR images. Thus, fast FLAIR cannot replace T2-weighted series. It provides additional information only in tumors with poor contrast enhancement. It is helpful for defining the exact extent of the edema of any tumor but gives little information about their inner structure. (orig.)

  7. PET imaging for evaluating tumor angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis, a main characteristic in tumors, plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis, which provides a new strategy for tumor treatment. By marking angiogenesis-related receptors, polypeptides, kinases or extracellular matrix proteins as high affinity molecular probes, PET imaging can noninvasively display integrin, VEGF/VEGFR, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and closely monitor tumor angiogenesis and vascular-targeted treatments on the molecular level. In this paper, research progress and future development of PET imaging for evaluating tumor angiogenesis are reviewed. (authors)

  8. Finite element modeling of haptic thermography: A novel approach for brain tumor detection during minimally invasive neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Goughari, Moslem; Mojra, Afsaneh

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative Thermal Imaging (ITI) is a novel neuroimaging method that can potentially locate tissue abnormalities and hence improves surgeon's diagnostic ability. In the present study, thermography technique coupled with artificial tactile sensing method called "haptic thermography" is utilized to investigate the presence of an abnormal object as a tumor with an elevated temperature relative to the normal tissue in the brain. The brain tissue is characterized as a hyper-viscoelastic material to be descriptive of mechanical behavior of the brain tissue during tactile palpation. Based on a finite element approach, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data of a patient diagnosed to have a brain tumor is utilized to simulate and analyze the capability of haptic thermography in detection and localization of brain tumor. Steady-state thermal results prove that temperature distribution is an appropriate outcome of haptic thermography for the superficial tumors while heat flux distribution can be used as an extra thermal result for deeply located tumors. PMID:26590456

  9. High Toxoplasma gondii Seropositivity among Brain Tumor Patients in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Bong-Kwang; Song, Hyemi; Kim, Min-Jae; Cho, Jaeeun; Shin, Eun-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular protozoan that can modulate the environment of the infected host. An unfavorable environment modulated by T. gondii in the brain includes tumor microenvironment. Literature has suggested that T. gondii infection is associated with development of brain tumors. However, in Korea, epidemiological data regarding this correlation have been scarce. In this study, in order to investigate the relationship between T. gondii infection and brain tumor development, we investigated the seroprevalence of T. gondii among 93 confirmed brain tumor patients (various histological types, including meningioma and astrocytoma) in Korea using ELISA. The results revealed that T. gondii seropositivity among brain tumor patients (18.3%) was significantly (P<0.05) higher compared with that of healthy controls (8.6%). The seropositivity of brain tumor patients showed a significant age-tendency, i.e., higher in younger age group, compared with age-matched healthy controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study supports the close relationship between T. gondii infection and incidence of brain tumors. PMID:27180580

  10. Absence of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations in mouse brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somatic mutations in the mitochondrial genome occur in numerous tumor types including brain tumors. These mutations are generally found in the hypervariable regions I and II of the displacement loop and unlikely alter mitochondrial function. Two hypervariable regions of mononucleotide repeats occur in the mouse mitochondrial genome, i.e., the origin of replication of the light strand (OL) and the Arg tRNA. In this study we examined the entire mitochondrial genome in a series of chemically induced brain tumors in the C57BL/6J strain and spontaneous brain tumors in the VM mouse strain. The tumor mtDNA was compared to that of mtDNA in brain mitochondrial populations from the corresponding syngeneic mouse host strain. Direct sequencing revealed a few homoplasmic base pair insertions, deletions, and substitutions in the tumor cells mainly in regions of mononucleotide repeats. A heteroplasmic mutation in the 16srRNA gene was detected in a spontaneous metastatic VM brain tumor. None of the mutations were considered pathogenic, indicating that mtDNA somatic mutations do not likely contribute to the initiation or progression of these diverse mouse brain tumors

  11. Absence of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations in mouse brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyfried Thomas N

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatic mutations in the mitochondrial genome occur in numerous tumor types including brain tumors. These mutations are generally found in the hypervariable regions I and II of the displacement loop and unlikely alter mitochondrial function. Two hypervariable regions of mononucleotide repeats occur in the mouse mitochondrial genome, i.e., the origin of replication of the light strand (OL and the Arg tRNA. Methods In this study we examined the entire mitochondrial genome in a series of chemically induced brain tumors in the C57BL/6J strain and spontaneous brain tumors in the VM mouse strain. The tumor mtDNA was compared to that of mtDNA in brain mitochondrial populations from the corresponding syngeneic mouse host strain. Results Direct sequencing revealed a few homoplasmic base pair insertions, deletions, and substitutions in the tumor cells mainly in regions of mononucleotide repeats. A heteroplasmic mutation in the 16srRNA gene was detected in a spontaneous metastatic VM brain tumor. Conclusion None of the mutations were considered pathogenic, indicating that mtDNA somatic mutations do not likely contribute to the initiation or progression of these diverse mouse brain tumors.

  12. Disappearance of enhancement of brain tumor in contrast CT scan after excessively high dosage of dexamethasone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of steroid administration was studied as suggested by CT findings in 5 cases of brain tumor. In the CT image 72 hours after administration of dexamethasone 96 mg/d, contrast enhancement (CE) disappeared nearly completely in 3 cases of malignant glioma, and the indentification of tumor image on CT became difficult. Two cases of pinealoblastoma and low grade astrocytoma, respectively, showed only a little decrease of CE. From the CT images of 201 cases, the correlation between peritumoral edema and CE was that both were strong in glioblastoma, the former stronger in metastatic brain tumor, the latter stronger in meningioma, and both weak in low grade glioma and medulloblastoma. Steroid administration is indicated in tumors supposed to have little vascular pooling and strong extravascular accumulation of a contrast medium from the mechanism of CE in CT, and marked suppression of permeability with excessively high dosage seems to be noted as the change of CT findings. (J.P.N.)

  13. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Oligoastrocytoma Oligodendroglioma Pineal Tumor Pituitary Tumor PNET Schwannoma Risk Factors Brain Tumor Facts Brain Tumor Dictionary ... Tumors Oligoastrocytoma Oligodendroglioma Pineal Tumor Pituitary Tumor PNET Schwannoma Risk Factors Brain Tumor Facts Brain Tumor Dictionary ...

  14. Computational modeling of brain tumors: discrete, continuum or hybrid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    In spite of all efforts, patients diagnosed with highly malignant brain tumors (gliomas), continue to face a grim prognosis. Achieving significant therapeutic advances will also require a more detailed quantitative understanding of the dynamic interactions among tumor cells, and between these cells and their biological microenvironment. Data-driven computational brain tumor models have the potential to provide experimental tumor biologists with such quantitative and cost-efficient tools to generate and test hypotheses on tumor progression, and to infer fundamental operating principles governing bidirectional signal propagation in multicellular cancer systems. This review highlights the modeling objectives of and challenges with developing such in silico brain tumor models by outlining two distinct computational approaches: discrete and continuum, each with representative examples. Future directions of this integrative computational neuro-oncology field, such as hybrid multiscale multiresolution modeling are discussed.

  15. Pituitary tumors: Diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a survey of the current status of the diagnosis of pituitary tumors by means of magnetic resonance imaging. It focuses on the clinical and practical aspects. The recommended procedure and the sequences and slice orientations for magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary gland are presented, and the features that are essential for the diagnosis of pituitary tumors are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Early dynamic Thallium-201 SPECT in evaluation of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We performed early dynamic 201TlCl SPECT studies on patients with brain tumors to determine the value of 201TlCl dynamics for 15 minutes in distinguishing and evaluating the histologic grade of brain tumors. Method: SPECT studies were performed on 69 patients with brain tumors prior to surgical resection. Histological diagnosis was as follows: 28 patients with glioblastoma (grade IV), 8 patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III), 5 patients with grade II astrocytoma, 1 patients with pilocytic astrocytoma (grade I), and 27 patients with meningioma. Pilocytic astrocytoma and grade II astrocytoma were grouped together as low-grade gliomas. Results: In glioblastomas, the Time-activity ratios(TARs) increased significantly at 6 min (99.2±6.0%, p<0.0001 ), 9 min (103.0±4.6%, p<0.0001), 12 min (102.1±6.4%, p<0.01), and 15 min (102.0±5.0%, p<0.001) after 201TlCl administration when compared to the TAR at 3 min (93.7±6.9%). Unchanged radioactivity was observed on the time-activity curve in anaplastic astrocytomas (3 min: 106.0±17.8%, 6 min: 103.8±9.4%, 9 min: 99.1±6.3%, 12 min: 95.0±11.0%, 15 min: 96.0±13.0%). The TARs decreased significantly at 6 min (104.0±7.1%, p<0.05), 9 min (96.1±4.9%, p<0.02), 12 min(95.0±6.5%, p<0.05), and 15 min (89.8±12.8%, p<0.05) compared to the TAR at 3 min (113.9±9.5%) in low grade gliomas. In meningiomas, the TARs decreased at 12 min (94.0±9.1%, p<0.01), and 15 min (93.6±12.8%, p<0.02) compared to the TAR at 3 min (108.6±18.5%) respectively. Conclusion: In this early dynamic SPECT study, the entire duration of the examination is short, 15 minutes, a period similar to other general laboratory tests. Moreover, there is no need for adjustments of the imaging location with this method since continuous scanning is utilized. This examination method indicated not only 201Tl uptake but accumulative dynamics and also offer more accurate assessment in the diagnosis of brain tumors

  17. Pre Operative Brain Mapping with Functional MRI in Patient with Brain Tumors: Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Hooshmand

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI plays a significant role in pre-neurosurgical planning at present. FMRI is a possible candidate to replace invasive methods for determination of the language dominant hemisphere and cortical areas associated with language and memory. We used this method to explore language and motor functions in healthy volunteers before creating standard paradigms for Persian language. In this study, we used the standard protocol of language and motor brain mapping in patients harboring brain tumors."nPatients and Methods: Ten patients with brain tumor were included in this study. Each subject performed three to five language related tasks during fMRI scan and also one motor related task. These tasks included; "Word Generation" (WG, "Object Naming" (ON, and "Word Reading" (WR, "Word Production" (WP and "Reverse Word Reading" (RWR. They also performed the thumb apposition task for activating primary sensory-motor areas. Fifteen continuous slices were acquired, and data analysis was carried out using FSL 4.1. After evaluating the individual results, the lateralization index (LI for each subject-task was calculated and the dominant hemisphere for language production was reported. Also localization of critical language areas in the cerebral cortex was performed and the coordinates of epicenter for language production in Broca's area was calculated."nResults: We found that WP, RWR, and WG activate language related areas in the dominant hemisphere robustly in patients with brain tumors and can predict the dominant hemisphere along with eloquent language cortices. However, ON and WR fail to delineate these activation areas optimally. In addition, the results reveal that higher activation intensities are obtained by WP in the frontal lobe including Broca's area, whereas RWR leads to the highest LI among all examined tasks. In patients harboring brain tumors, precise lateralization and

  18. Cilengitide in Treating Children With Refractory Primary Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  19. Application of 31P MR spectroscopy to the brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical feasibility and obtain useful parameters of 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study for making the differential diagnosis of brain tumors. Twenty-eight patients with brain tumorous lesions (22 cases of brain tumor and 6 cases of abscess) and 11 normal volunteers were included. The patients were classified into the astrocytoma group, lymphoma group, metastasis group and the abscess group. We obtained the intracellular pH and the metabolite ratios of phosphomonoesters/phosophodiesters (PME/PDE), PME/inorganic phosphate (Pi), PDE/Pi, PME/adenosine triphosphate (ATP), PDE/ATP, PME/phosphocreatine (PCr), PDE/PCr, PCr/ATP, PCr/Pi, and ATP/Pi, and evaluated the statistical significances. The brain tumors had a tendency of alkalization (pH = 7.28 ± 0.27, p = 0.090), especially the pH of the lymphoma was significantly increased (pH = 7.45 ± 0.32, p = 0.013). The brain tumor group showed increased PME/PDE ratio compared with that in the normal control group (p 0.012). The ratios of PME/PDE, PDE/Pi, PME/PCr and PDE/PCr showed statistically significant differences between each brain lesion groups (p 1'P MRS, and the pH, PME/PDE, PDE/Pi, PME/PCr, and PDE/PCr ratios are helpful for differentiating among the different types of brain tumors.

  20. A correlative study on the functional disturbances and the organic changes in patients with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a total of 132 patients with supratentorial tumors, tumor localization, pathology, and the presence of low density area surrounding the tumor were examined in relation to cerebral function, using conventional EEG, topographic EEG, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For superficial tumors, meningioma had less EEG abnormalities than glioma, regardless of the presence of low density area. Slow wave focus as shown by topographic EEG corresponded well with tumor localization detected on CT. For deep-seated tumors, topographic EEG showed diffuse δ waves and θ waves along the median. In 7 patients with meningioma, there was no uniform cerebral blood flow within the tumor; however, low blood flow surrounding the tumor was detected on CT, regardless of the presence of low density area. In 4 patients with intra-axial tumors, low blood flow was detected both within and surrounding the tumor. Location of tumors, as detected on CT, was well coincident with areas of decreased local cerebral blood flow and slow waves, as detected on topographic EEG. MRI was more reliable than CT in disclosing brain tumors, peritumoral edemas, and involvement of brain stem. (Namekawa, K)

  1. Quantitative imaging of brain chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We can now measure how chemicals affect different regions of the human brain. One area involves the study of drugs - in-vivo neuro-pharmacology; another involves the study of toxic chemical effects - in vivo neurotoxicology. The authors approach is to label drugs with positron-emitting radioactive tracers - chiefly carbon-11 with a half-life of 20 minutes and fluorine-18 with a half-life of 110 minutes. The labeled drugs are injected intravenously and a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is used to map out the distribution of the radioactivity within the brain from the moment of injection until about 90 minutes later. Mathematical models are used to calculate receptor concentrations and the affinity of the receptors for the injected radioactive tracer. By means of PET scanning, they look at cross sections or visual slices throughout the human brain, obtaining computer-generated images in any plane. The authors are investigating the functions of specific drugs or specific receptors, as well as looking at the metabolic activity in different parts of the brain as revealed in glucose metabolism. For example, the authors are studying opiate receptors in patients with a variety of conditions: those who suffer from chronic pain, those who are congenitally insensitive to pain and drug addicts. They are studying patients with schizophrenia, tardive dyskinesia, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, depressed patients and sex-offenders. They are relating the state of the neurotransmitter/neuroreceptor systems to behavior. In essence, they believe that they can now examine in living human beings what relates the structure of the brain to the function of the mind that is chemistry

  2. Improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery via Raman-based technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Todd; Lewis, Spencer; Freudiger, Christian W.; Xie, X. Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in the surgical management of brain tumors, achieving optimal surgical results and identification of tumor remains a challenge. Raman spectroscopy, a laser-based technique that can be used to nondestructively differentiate molecules based on the inelastic scattering of light, is being applied toward improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Here, the authors systematically review the application of Raman spectroscopy for guidance during brain tumor surgery. Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal brain from necrotic and vital glioma tissue in human specimens based on chemical differences, and has recently been shown to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues during surgery. Raman spectroscopy also forms the basis for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, a technique that amplifies spontaneous Raman signals by 10,000-fold, enabling real-time histological imaging without the need for tissue processing, sectioning, or staining. The authors review the relevant basic and translational studies on CRS microscopy as a means of providing real-time intraoperative guidance. Recent studies have demonstrated how CRS can be used to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues and that it has excellent agreement with traditional histology. Under simulated operative conditions, CRS has been shown to identify tumor margins that would be undetectable using standard bright-field microscopy. In addition, CRS microscopy has been shown to detect tumor in human surgical specimens with near-perfect agreement to standard H & E microscopy. The authors suggest that as the intraoperative application and instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy and imaging matures, it will become an essential component in the neurosurgical armamentarium for identifying residual tumor and improving the surgical management of brain tumors. PMID:26926067

  3. Imaging findings of primary retroperitoneal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoki, Takuya; Oka, Takaji [Osaka National Hospital (Japan); Nakamura, Hironobu; Okumura, Akihiko

    1999-03-01

    A retrospective study was conducted in 26 primary retroperitoneal tumors which had been histologically proved (5 leiomyosarcomas, 7 neurogenic tumors, 3 malignant fibrous histiocytomas, 4 liposarcomas, 5 malignant lymphomas, one lipoma, and one synovial sarcoma). The object of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of imaging findings in differentiation of the tumors. In case of neurogenic tumor, its location and CT density provided a better characterization of the tumor. The pattern of spread and relatively homogeneous interior can frequently suggest the likelihood of malignant lymphoma. Lipoma and most types of liposarcoma can be diagnosed on the basis of their lipid element. Apart from these tumors, few retroperitoneal tumors have imaging features that allow them to be histologically distinguished from other types. (author)

  4. SPECT quantitation of cobalt-57 bleomycin delivery to human brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A newly developed and validated noninvasive quantitative SPECT method was used to measure the in vivo uptake of [57Co]bleomycin (Co-bleo) in 13 human brain tumors and the uptake of [/sup 99m/Tc]glucoheptonate (GH) in 23 brain tumors. Significant differences in tumor uptake were found. The tumor concentration over time, the tumor to blood radioactivity at 30 min and the tumor cumulative concentration of radioactivity showed marked differences even between tumors with the same histology. Only a weak correlation was found between tumor concentration of Co-bleo and of GH. Therefore, a simple imaging agent such as GH cannot, at the present time, serve as an indicator of individual tumor uptake and further experience with other agents is still necessary. Contrary to the generally held view, no correlation was found between the concentration of drug in the blood and its tumor concentration. It is suggested, therefore, that the level of a drug in the blood cannot be used as a criterion of the amount that will penetrate the tumor. Direct SPECT measurement of the concentration of the drug in the tumor itself should be performed. The bioavailability of a drug is critical in order for it to exert it tumoricidal effect. The results, showing marked differences in uptake between brain tumors, suggest that before chemotherapy is administered, uptake of the chemotherapeutic drug in the individual tumor to be treated should be assessed and comparisons should be made between the uptake of a series of drugs to determine which drug would be most efficacious on the basis of its uptake as well as its tumor cell killing potential

  5. Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation and brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain has been categorized into the low risk group of radiogenic tumors. However, recent epidemiologic studies on the cancer risks among children who received repeated CT scans, radiotherapies and A-bomb have revealed that low-to-moderate dose of ionizing radiation is effective to induce brain tumors. Ionizing radiation is more strongly associated with risk for meningiomas and schwannomas compared to gliomas. While risk of meningiomas is independent of age at the time of exposure, that of gliomas is profoundly high after neonatal and infantile exposures. Inherited susceptibility to brain tumors is suggested by family history or cancer prone syndromes. People with certain gene mutations such as RB, NF1 or PTCH1 are associated with enhanced cancer risk after radiotherapies. Genetic polymorphism of cancer-related genes on brain tumor risk deserves further investigation. (author)

  6. Clinical results of BNCT for malignant brain tumors in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is very difficult to treat the patients with malignant brain tumor in children, especially under 3 years, because the conventional irradiation cannot be applied due to the damage of normal brain tissue. However, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has tumor selectivity such that it can make damage only in tumor cells. We evaluated the clinical results and courses in patients with malignant glioma under 15 years. Among 183 patients with brain tumors treated by our group using BSH-based intra-operative BNCT, 23 patients were under 15 years. They included 4 patients under 3 years. There were 3 glioblastomas (GBM), 6 anaplastic astrocytomas(AAS), 7 primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), 6 pontine gliomas and 1 anaplastic ependymoma. All GBM and PNET patients died due to CSF and/or CNS dissemination without local tumor regrowth. All pontine glioma patients died due to regrowth of the tumor. Four of 6 anaplastic astrocytoma and 1 anaplastic ependymoma patients alive without tumor recurrence. BNCT can be applied to malignant brain tumors in children, especially under 3 years instead of conventional radiation. Although it can achieve the local control in the primary site, it cannot prevent CSF dissemination in patients with glioblastoma.

  7. Clinical results of BNCT for malignant brain tumors in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Yoshinobu [Department of Neurosurgery, Kagawa National Children' s Hospital, Kagawa 765-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: ynakagawa0517@yahoo.co.jp; Kageji, Teruyoshi; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Kumada, Hiroaki [Department of Research Reactor, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaragi 319-1195 (Japan); Nakagawa, Yoshiaki [Department of Medical Informatics, Post Graduated School, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    It is very difficult to treat the patients with malignant brain tumor in children, especially under 3 years, because the conventional irradiation cannot be applied due to the damage of normal brain tissue. However, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has tumor selectivity such that it can make damage only in tumor cells. We evaluated the clinical results and courses in patients with malignant glioma under 15 years. Among 183 patients with brain tumors treated by our group using BSH-based intra-operative BNCT, 23 patients were under 15 years. They included 4 patients under 3 years. There were 3 glioblastomas (GBM), 6 anaplastic astrocytomas(AAS), 7 primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), 6 pontine gliomas and 1 anaplastic ependymoma. All GBM and PNET patients died due to CSF and/or CNS dissemination without local tumor regrowth. All pontine glioma patients died due to regrowth of the tumor. Four of 6 anaplastic astrocytoma and 1 anaplastic ependymoma patients alive without tumor recurrence. BNCT can be applied to malignant brain tumors in children, especially under 3 years instead of conventional radiation. Although it can achieve the local control in the primary site, it cannot prevent CSF dissemination in patients with glioblastoma.

  8. From reverse transcription to human brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrenko V. V.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase from avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV was the subject of the study, from which the investi- gations of the Department of biosynthesis of nucleic acids were started. Production of AMV in grams quantities and isolation of AMV reverse transcriptase were established in the laboratory during the seventies of the past cen- tury and this initiated research on the cDNA synthesis, cloning and investigation of the structure and functions of the eukaryotic genes. Structures of salmon insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF family genes and their transcripts were determined during long-term investigations. Results of two modern techniques, microarray-ba- sed hybridization and SAGE, were used for the identification of the genes differentially expressed in astrocytic gliomas and human normal brain. Comparison of SAGE results on the genes overexpressed in glioblastoma with the results of microarray analysis revealed a limited number of common genes. 105 differentially expressed genes, common to both methods, can be included in the list of candidates for the molecular typing of glioblastoma. The first experiments on the classification of glioblastomas based on the data of the 20 genes expression were conducted by using of artificial neural network analysis. The results of these experiments showed that the expression profiles of these genes in 224 glioblastoma samples and 74 normal brain samples could be according to the Koho- nen’s maps. The CHI3L1 and CHI3L2 genes of chitinase-like cartilage protein were revealed among the most overexpressed genes in glioblastoma, which could have prognostic and diagnostic potential. Results of in vitro experiments demonstrated that both proteins, CHI3L1 and CHI3L2, may initiate the phosphorylation of ERK1/ ERK2 and AKT kinases leading to the activation of MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling cascades in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, human glioblastoma U87MG, and U373 cells. The new human cell line

  9. Imaging diagnosis of nasopharyngeal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nasopharynx is located in the upper aero digestive tract. Its roof is formed by the basisphenoid, basiocciput and the anterior aspect of the first two cervical vertebrae, in front of the clivus. The lateral walls are formed by the margins of the superior constrictor muscle and the pharyngobasilar fascia, pharyngeal recess, torus tubarius and pharyngeal opening of auditory tube. The inferior margin of the nasopharynx is a horizontal plane passing through the hard palate and palatopharyngeal muscle. Anteriorly, it is in direct continuity with the nasal cavity through the posterior choanae. It is approximately 2.0 cm in anteroposterior diameter and about 4.0 cm in craniocaudal extent. Squamous cell carcinoma accounts for about 70% to 98% of nasopharyngeal malignant lesions found in adults. This tumor presents a high incidence in Asians, most frequently in men, and is the third most frequent cancer in women. The clinical presentation of this disease depends on the size and site of the lesion, with small-sized lesions being asymptomatic. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play essential and complementary roles in the staging and treatment of patients with nasopharyngeal cancer. (author)

  10. Semi-automatic segmentation of brain tumors using population and individual information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yao; Yang, Wei; Jiang, Jun; Li, Shuanqian; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2013-08-01

    Efficient segmentation of tumors in medical images is of great practical importance in early diagnosis and radiation plan. This paper proposes a novel semi-automatic segmentation method based on population and individual statistical information to segment brain tumors in magnetic resonance (MR) images. First, high-dimensional image features are extracted. Neighborhood components analysis is proposed to learn two optimal distance metrics, which contain population and patient-specific information, respectively. The probability of each pixel belonging to the foreground (tumor) and the background is estimated by the k-nearest neighborhood classifier under the learned optimal distance metrics. A cost function for segmentation is constructed through these probabilities and is optimized using graph cuts. Finally, some morphological operations are performed to improve the achieved segmentation results. Our dataset consists of 137 brain MR images, including 68 for training and 69 for testing. The proposed method overcomes segmentation difficulties caused by the uneven gray level distribution of the tumors and even can get satisfactory results if the tumors have fuzzy edges. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust to brain tumor segmentation. PMID:23319111

  11. A hybrid neural network analysis of subtle brain volume differences in children surviving brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, W E; Mulhern, R K; Elkin, T D; Glass, J O; Merchant, T E; Langston, J W

    1998-05-01

    In the treatment of children with brain tumors, balancing the efficacy of treatment against commonly observed side effects is difficult because of a lack of quantitative measures of brain damage that can be correlated with the intensity of treatment. We quantitatively assessed volumes of brain parenchyma on magnetic resonance (MR) images using a hybrid combination of the Kohonen self-organizing map for segmentation and a multilayer backpropagation neural network for tissue classification. Initially, we analyzed the relationship between volumetric differences and radiologists' grading of atrophy in 80 subjects. This investigation revealed that brain parenchyma and white matter volumes significantly decreased as atrophy increased, whereas gray matter volumes had no relationship with atrophy. Next, we compared 37 medulloblastoma patients treated with surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy to 19 patients treated with surgery and irradiation alone. This study demonstrated that, in these patients, chemotherapy had no significant effect on brain parenchyma, white matter, or gray matter volumes. We then investigated volumetric differences due to cranial irradiation in 15 medulloblastoma patients treated with surgery and radiation therapy, and compared these with a group of 15 age-matched patients with low-grade astrocytoma treated with surgery alone. With a minimum follow-up of one year after irradiation, all radiation-treated patients demonstrated significantly reduced white matter volumes, whereas gray matter volumes were relatively unchanged compared with those of age-matched patients treated with surgery alone. These results indicate that reductions in cerebral white matter: 1) are correlated significantly with atrophy; 2) are not related to chemotherapy; and 3) are correlated significantly with irradiation. This hybrid neural network analysis of subtle brain volume differences with magnetic resonance may constitute a direct measure of treatment-induced brain damage

  12. Clinical impact of anatomo-functional evaluation of brain function during brain tumor surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To attempt to improve surgical outcome of brain surgery, clinical significance of anatomo-functional evaluation of brain function during resection of brain tumors was assessed. Seventy four patients with glioma located near eloquent areas underwent surgery while awake. Intraoperative tractography-integrated functional neuronavigation and cortical/subcortical electrical stimulation were correlated with clinical symptoms during and after resection of tumors. Cortical functional areas were safely removed with negative electric stimulation and eloquent cortices could be removed in some circumstances. Subcortical functional mapping was difficult except for motor function. Studying cortical functional compensation allows more extensive removal of brain tumors located in the eloquent areas. (author)

  13. Proteomic and immunologic analyses of brain tumor exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Graner, Michael W.; Alzate, Oscar; Dechkovskaia, Angelika M.; Keene, Jack D.; Sampson, John H; Mitchell, Duane A; Bigner, Darell D.

    2009-01-01

    Brain tumors are horrific diseases with almost universally fatal outcomes; new therapeutics are desperately needed and will come from improved understandings of glioma biology. Exosomes are endosomally derived 30–100 nm membranous vesicles released from many cell types into the extracellular milieu; surprisingly, exosomes are virtually unstudied in neuro-oncology. These microvesicles were used as vaccines in other tumor settings, but their immunological significance is unevaluated in brain tu...

  14. Glutamate Release by Primary Brain Tumors Induces Epileptic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Buckingham, Susan C.; Campbell, Susan L.; Haas, Brian R.; Montana, Vedrana; Robel, Stefanie; Ogunrinu, Toyin; Sontheimer, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are a common and poorly understood co-morbidity for individuals with primary brain tumors. To investigate peritumoral seizure etiology, we implanted patient-derived glioma cells into scid mice. Within 14–18 days, glioma-bearing animals developed spontaneous, recurring abnormal EEG events consistent with epileptic activity that progressed over time. Acute brain slices from these animals showed significant glutamate release from the tumor mediated by the system xc − cystine/g...

  15. Specific features of epilepsy in children with brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    G. V. Kalmykova; A. F. Neretina; Zh. Yu. Chefranova

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to study the specific features of epilepsy in children and adolescents with brain tumors and to define the optimal tactics of management and antiepileptic therapy after surgical treatment. Patients and methods. Sixty-one patients aged 5 months to 15 years were examined. All the patients were diagnosed as having a brain tumor found in the presence of symptomatic epilepsy. They were all followed up for 5 years postsurgery or during their lifetime (in case of death). Comprehensive exa...

  16. FDTD analysis of a noninvasive hyperthermia system for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoob Sulafa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperthermia is considered one of the new therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment and is based on the difference in thermal sensitivity between healthy tissues and tumors. During hyperthermia treatment, the temperature of the tumor is raised to 40–45°C for a definite period resulting in the destruction of cancer cells. This paper investigates design, modeling and simulation of a new non-invasive hyperthermia applicator system capable of effectively heating deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors using inexpensive, simple, and easy to fabricate components without harming surrounding healthy brain tissues. Methods The proposed hyperthermia applicator system is composed of an air filled partial half ellipsoidal chamber, a patch antenna, and a head model with an embedded tumor at an arbitrary location. The irradiating antenna is placed at one of the foci of the hyperthermia chamber while the center of the brain tumor is placed at the other focus. The finite difference time domain (FDTD method is used to compute both the SAR patterns and the temperature distribution in three different head models due to two different patch antennas at a frequency of 915 MHz. Results The obtained results suggest that by using the proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system it is feasible to achieve sufficient and focused energy deposition and temperature rise to therapeutic values in deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors without harming surrounding healthy tissue. Conclusions The proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system proved suitable for raising the temperature in tumors embedded in the brain to therapeutic values by carefully selecting the systems components. The operator of the system only needs to place the center of the brain tumor at a pre-specified location and excite the antenna at a single frequency of 915 MHz. Our study may provide a basis for a clinical applicator prototype capable of heating brain tumors.

  17. MR to CT Registration of Brains using Image Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the standard imaging modality for patient dose calculation for radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) is used along with CT to identify brain structures due to its superior soft tissue contrast. Registration of MR and CT is necessary for accurate delineation of the tumor and other structures, and is critical in radiotherapy planning. Mutual information (MI) or its variants are typically used as a similarity metric to register MRI to CT. However, u...

  18. Optically enhanced blood-brain-barrier crossing of plasmonic-active nanoparticles in preclinical brain tumor animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Wilson, Christy M.; Li, Shuqin; Fales, Andrew M.; Liu, Yang; Grant, Gerald; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-02-01

    Nanotechnology provides tremendous biomedical opportunities for cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. In contrast to conventional chemotherapeutic agents where their actual target delivery cannot be easily imaged, integrating imaging and therapeutic properties into one platform facilitates the understanding of pharmacokinetic profiles, and enables monitoring of the therapeutic process in each individual. Such a concept dubbed "theranostics" potentiates translational research and improves precision medicine. One particular challenging application of theranostics involves imaging and controlled delivery of nanoplatforms across blood-brain-barrier (BBB) into brain tissues. Typically, the BBB hinders paracellular flux of drug molecules into brain parenchyma. BBB disrupting agents (e.g. mannitol, focused ultrasound), however, suffer from poor spatial confinement. It has been a challenge to design a nanoplatform not only acts as a contrast agent but also improves the BBB permeation. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of plasmonic gold nanoparticles as both high-resolution optical contrast agent and focalized tumor BBB permeation-inducing agent. We specifically examined the microscopic distribution of nanoparticles in tumor brain animal models. We observed that most nanoparticles accumulated at the tumor periphery or perivascular spaces. Nanoparticles were present in both endothelial cells and interstitial matrices. This study also demonstrated a novel photothermal-induced BBB permeation. Fine-tuning the irradiating energy induced gentle disruption of the vascular integrity, causing short-term extravasation of nanomaterials but without hemorrhage. We conclude that our gold nanoparticles are a powerful biocompatible contrast agent capable of inducing focal BBB permeation, and therefore envision a strong potential of plasmonic gold nanoparticle in future brain tumor imaging and therapy.

  19. A Comparison of Two Human Brain Tumor Segmentation Methods for MRI Data

    CERN Document Server

    Egger, Jan; Bauer, Miriam H A; Kuhnt, Daniela; Carl, Barbara; Freisleben, Bernd; Kolb, Andreas; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumors are gliomas, evolving from the cerebral supportive cells. For clinical follow-up, the evaluation of the preoperative tumor volume is essential. Volumetric assessment of tumor volume with manual segmentation of its outlines is a time-consuming process that can be overcome with the help of computerized segmentation methods. In this contribution, two methods for World Health Organization (WHO) grade IV glioma segmentation in the human brain are compared using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patient data from the clinical routine. One method uses balloon inflation forces, and relies on detection of high intensity tumor boundaries that are coupled with the use of contrast agent gadolinium. The other method sets up a directed and weighted graph and performs a min-cut for optimal segmentation results. The ground truth of the tumor boundaries - for evaluating the methods on 27 cases - is manually extracted by neurosurgeons with several years of experience in the resection of glio...

  20. Brain tumor classification and segmentation using sparse coding and dictionary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman Al-Shaikhli, Saif Dawood; Yang, Michael Ying; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel fully automatic framework for multi-class brain tumor classification and segmentation using a sparse coding and dictionary learning method. The proposed framework consists of two steps: classification and segmentation. The classification of the brain tumors is based on brain topology and texture. The segmentation is based on voxel values of the image data. Using K-SVD, two types of dictionaries are learned from the training data and their associated ground truth segmentation: feature dictionary and voxel-wise coupled dictionaries. The feature dictionary consists of global image features (topological and texture features). The coupled dictionaries consist of coupled information: gray scale voxel values of the training image data and their associated label voxel values of the ground truth segmentation of the training data. For quantitative evaluation, the proposed framework is evaluated using different metrics. The segmentation results of the brain tumor segmentation (MICCAI-BraTS-2013) database are evaluated using five different metric scores, which are computed using the online evaluation tool provided by the BraTS-2013 challenge organizers. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach achieves an accurate brain tumor classification and segmentation and outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26351901

  1. Tl-201 and Tc-99m-Sestamibi SPECT for brain tumor detection: Comparison using MRI coregistration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darcourt, J.; Itti, L.; Chang, L. [UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    Tl-201 (Tl) brain SPECT has been validated for the differential diagnosis of high versus low grade gliomas and recurrence versus radiation necrosis. We compared this technique to Tc-99m-Sestamibi (MIBI) SPECT in 9 patients (pts) with brain tumors using MRI coregistration. Pts were injected with 4 mCi of Tl and brain SPECT was performed using a dedicated brain system. This was immediately following by an injection of 20 mCi of MIBI and a brain SPECT using the same camera and with the pt in the same position. Four pts were studied for the diagnosis of radiation necrosis vs. tumor recurrence (2 had biopsy proven recurrence); 5 pts were studied for primary tumor evaluation: 2 meningiomas, 1 oligodendroglioma, 1 low-grade astrocytoma, 1 cysticercosis. Coregistration was performed for every pt by 3D surface fitting of the inner skull MIBI contour to the MRI brain surface extracted automatically. ROIs were drawn on the MRI and applied to the coregistered MIBI and Tl images for tumor to non-tumor ratios T/NT calculations. There was a tight correlation between MIBI and Tl T/NT (r-0.96) and a 1.5 threshold separated radiation necrosis from recurrence and low from high grade primary tumors. Therefore, the data already available on Tl brain tumor imaging can be used with MIBI SPECT with the advantage of a better image quality (2.5 to 4 times more counts).

  2. 功能磁共振成像/弥散张量成像图像融合:脑肿瘤治疗术前计划新方法%Image fusion of functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging: a new method of pretreatment planning for patient with brain tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志; 郭悦; 陈敏; 崔壮; 高鸿; 周诚

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop and test an image fusion software(fDf,fMRI/DTI fusion) which can overlap the anatomical(T1WI images), functional MRI(fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging( DTI) sim-ultaneously for preoperational evaluation of patients' tumor. Methods fMRI with bilateral hands grasp move-ment and DTI were performed using GE 1. 5 T magnetic resonance system on 10 subjects (5 healthy volun-teers and S patients with brain tumor,of which 3 were metastases, 1 was cavernous hemangioma and 1 was gli-oma). All data were input to the personal computer and off-line postprocessing of fMRI and DTI data was per-formed using SPM5 and Volume-One software package to visualize the activated functional cortex areas and corticospinal tracts. fDf was used to import the fMRI and structural images to Volume-One to show them sim-ultaneously. Results Brain functional activation maps and diffusion tensor fiber tracking images were ob-tained in all five healthy volunteers and four patients except one who suffered from left hemiplegia. The func-tional activation maps and the fiber tracking images were successfully fused by the fDf software,where the ac-tivations areas and the white matter fiber were displayed together. The fusion images of healthy volunteers showed the hand motion areas and corresponding corticospinal tracts, while that of the patients display the re-lationship of the eloquent cortex and peritumoral fiber tracts, which were useful in guiding the treatments for the surgeons and radiotherapists. It only took hours to present the fused images to the neurosurgeons or the ra-diotherapists. Conclusions All the results confirm that the image fusion software work well for all the data.It is an easy,free and fast way to realize the image fusion. The neurosurgeon and radiotherapist consider the software were very helpful for preoperative planning.

  3. Crossing the barrier: treatment of brain tumors using nanochain particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Ghaghada, Ketan B

    2016-09-01

    Despite advancements in surgery and radiotherapy, the aggressive forms of brain tumors, such as gliomas, are still uniformly lethal with current therapies offering only palliation complicated by significant toxicities. Gliomas are characteristically diffuse with infiltrating edges, resistant to drugs and nearly inaccessible to systemic therapies due to the brain-tumor barrier. Currently, aggressive efforts are underway to further understand brain-tumor's microenvironment and identify brain tumor cell-specific regulators amenable to pharmacologic interventions. While new potent agents are continuously becoming available, efficient drug delivery to brain tumors remains a limiting factor. To tackle the drug delivery issues, a multicomponent chain-like nanoparticle has been developed. These nanochains are comprised of iron oxide nanospheres and a drug-loaded liposome chemically linked into a 100-nm linear, chain-like assembly with high precision. The nanochain possesses a unique ability to scavenge the tumor endothelium. By utilizing effective vascular targeting, the nanochains achieve rapid deposition on the vascular bed of glioma sites establishing well-distributed drug reservoirs on the endothelium of brain tumors. After reaching the target sites, an on-command, external low-power radiofrequency field can remotely trigger rapid drug release, due to mechanical disruption of the liposome, facilitating widespread and effective drug delivery into regions harboring brain tumor cells. Integration of the nanochain delivery system with the appropriate combination of complementary drugs has the potential to unfold the field and allow significant expansion of therapies for the disease where success is currently very limited. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:678-695. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1387 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26749497

  4. Involvement of tumor acidification in brain cancer pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    AvinashHonasoge

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas, primary brain cancers, are characterized by remarkable invasiveness and fast growth. While they share many qualities with other solid tumors, gliomas have developed special mechanisms to convert the cramped brain space and other limitations afforded by the privileged central nervous system into pathophysiological advantages. In this review we discuss gliomas and other primary brain cancers in the context of acid-base regulation and interstitial acidification; namely, how the altered ...

  5. Imaging of pancreatic tumors; Diagnostik von Pankreastumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus [Universitaetklinik Ulm (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2010-12-15

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  6. Tl-201 SPECT for assessing tumor viability in recurrent malignant neoplasma of the brain and soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the usefulness of Tl-201 SPECT imaging in the detection of viable tumor vs necrosis and/or inflammation in brain and soft tissue tumors. Tl-201 SPECT, F-18-FDG PET, and CT with contrast medium were done 6 weeks prior to biopsy confirmation in 11 patients with suspected recurrent tumor (nine brain and two soft-tissue tumors). Tumor-nontumor ratios were obtained on attenuation-corrected transaxial images. The CT scans were reviewed prior to reading the SPECT and FDG PET scans. Seven of 11 patients had recurrent tumors (five brain and two soft tissue) on biopsy and all were positive on SPECT (mean ratio, 4.0 ± 0.8) and hypermetabolic on FDG PET scans. Two of seven had equivocal findings on CT

  7. Clinical application of several tumor imaging agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Neoplasms is one of the main diseases for harming health.It is difficult to prevent the neoplasms because the factors of bringing out them are complex.To raise survival rate the early diagnosis of tumors is very important.Radionuclide imaging is useful to detect recurrent or residual diseaseand to identificate benign or malignant tumor.Several tumorimaging agents as following have clinical significance indiagnosing tumors.

  8. Stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Majdoub, Faycal; Neudorfer, Clemens; Maarouf, Mohammad [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Center of Neurosurgery, Cologne-Merheim Medical Center (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Blau, Tobias; Deckert, Martina [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Neuropathology, Cologne (Germany); Hellmich, Martin [University Hospital of Cologne, Institute of Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology, Cologne (Germany); Buehrle, Christian [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); Sturm, Volker [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University Hospital of Wurzburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    We evaluated the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors with interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) using {sup 125}iodine seeds ({sup 125}I) and analyzed prognostic factors. Between January 1991 and December 2010, 63 patients (median age 43.3 years, range 20.8-63.4 years) suffering from oligodendroglial brain tumors were treated with {sup 125}I IBT either as primary, adjuvantly after incomplete resection, or as salvage therapy after tumor recurrence. Possible prognostic factors influencing disease progression and survival were retrospectively investigated. The actuarial 2-, 5-, and 10-year overall and progression-free survival rates after IBT for WHO II tumors were 96.9, 96.9, 89.8 % and 96.9, 93.8, 47.3 %; for WHO III tumors 90.3, 77, 54.9 % and 80.6, 58.4, 45.9 %, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete remission in 2 patients, partial remission in 13 patients, stable disease in 17 patients and tumor progression in 31 patients. Median time to progression for WHO II tumors was 87.6 months and for WHO III tumors 27.8 months. Neurological status improved in 10 patients and remained stable in 20 patients, while 9 patients deteriorated. There was no treatment-related mortality. Treatment-related morbidity was transient in 11 patients. WHO II, KPS ≥ 90 %, frontal location, and tumor surface dose > 50 Gy were associated with increased overall survival (p ≤ 0.05). Oligodendroglioma and frontal location were associated with a prolonged progression-free survival (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that IBT achieves local control rates comparable to surgery and radio-/chemotherapy treatment, is minimally invasive, and safe. Due to the low rate of side effects, IBT may represent an attractive option as part of a multimodal treatment schedule, being supplementary to microsurgery or as a salvage therapy after chemotherapy and conventional irradiation. (orig.) [German] Die Behandlung oligodendroglialer Hirntumoren durch die interstitielle Brachytherapie

  9. Clinical application of synthesized brain surface imaging for preoperative simulation of brain biopsy under local anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface anatomy scanning (SAS) is the technique which permits the direct visualization of brain surface structures, including cortical sulci, guri, subcortical lesions as well as skin markings for craniotomy. A synthesized brain surface image is a technique that combines MR angiography (MRA) with SAS, and it proposed by us for detecting cerebral superficial veins with these surface structures on the same image. The purpose of this report is to present the result of applying the synthesized brain surface image to the preoperative simulation of biopsy under local anesthesia in 2 cases of multiple metastatic brain tumors. The parameters for SAS were TR/TE=50/40 msec, flip angle=60deg by the fast T2 technique using refocused FID in steady-state (STERF technique). SAS images were processed by gray scale reversal. The MRA data were acquired with two-dimensional time of flight (TOF) sequence after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. Before imaging, the water-filled plastic tubes were placed on the patients scalp as markings for craniotomy. Their positions were planned by the neurosurgeons. On SAS, the markings for burr-hole appeared located above the tumors. However on the synthesized brain surface images, the positions of burr-hole were considered to be inadequate, since superficial cerebral vein and sinus were also visualized in the area of the markings. From these results, the positions of burr-hole were reset to avoid the venous structures, and so as to include the lesions in operations. The biopsies were performed successfully and safely because the venous structure could be excluded from the operative field. By this technique it was easy to confirm the relationships among lesions, skin markings and venous structures. The technique described appears to be a useful method for preoperative simulation of biopsies for multiple metastatic brain tumors under local anesthesia. (author)

  10. Subacute brain atrophy induced by radiation therapy to the malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to analyze brain atrophy after radiation therapy to the brain tumors, we calculated a CSF-cranial volume ratio on CT scan as an index of brain atrophy, and estimated dementia-score by Hasegawa's method in 91 post-irradiated patients with malignant brain tumors. Radiation-induced brain atrophy was observed in 51 out of 91 patients (56 %) and dementia in 23 out of 47 patients (49 %). These two conditions were closely related, and observed significantly more often in aged and whole-brain-irradiated patients. As radiation-induced brain atrophy accompanied by dementia appeared 2 - 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy, it should be regarded as a subacute brain injury caused by radiation therapy. (author)

  11. Gd-DOTA enhancement of cerebral and spinal tumors on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of Gd-DOTA as a contrast agent in MR imaging to improve the diagnosis of cerebral and spinal tumors was assessed in 20 patients, ten with brain tumors and ten with spinal tumors. Imaging was performed with a 0.5-T Magniscan 5000 unit. T1-weighted (spin-echo and gradient-echo) and T2-weighted (spin-echo) images were acquired before and after intravenous injection of Gd-DOTA, 0.1 mmol/kg. On T1-weighted images, Gd-DOTA enhanced sites of presumed disruption of the blood-brain barrier. This made some brain tumors more conspicuous and helped target biopsies, but did not reveal any additional lesions. On the other hand, the use of Gd-DOTA significantly improved the reliability of spinal tumor imaging compared to imaging performed without contrast agent, allowing delineation of abnormalities on T1-weighted images, which frequently contain fewer artifacts than the most sensitive T2-weighted images. Images obtained with Gd-DOTA could be used by the physician to rule out residual tumor after surgery and to assess recurrences. Additional work should be done to discover whether spinal tumor exploration with MR imaging could include solely T1-weighted sequences, performed before and after contrast agent administration, without T2-weighted sequences

  12. Differentiation of brain abscesses from glioblastomas and metastatic brain tumors: comparisons of diagnostic performance of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging before and after mathematic contrast leakage correction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Hong Toh

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the diagnostic performance of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI before and after mathematic contrast leakage correction in differentiating pyogenic brain abscesses from glioblastomas and/or metastatic brain tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cerebral blood volume (CBV, leakage-corrected CBV and leakage coefficient K2 were measured in enhancing rims, perifocal edema and contralateral normal appearing white matter (NAWM of 17 abscesses, 19 glioblastomas and 20 metastases, respectively. The CBV and corrected CBV were normalized by dividing the values in the enhancing rims or edema to those of contralateral NAWM. For each study group, a paired t test was used to compare the K2 of the enhancing rims or edema with those of NAWM, as well as between CBV and corrected CBV of the enhancing rims or edema. ANOVA was used to compare CBV, corrected CBV and K2 among three lesion types. The diagnostic performance of CBV and corrected CBV was assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis. RESULTS: The CBV and correction CBV of enhancing rim were 1.45±1.17 and 1.97±1.01 for abscesses, 3.85±2.19 and 4.39±2.33 for glioblastomas, and 2.39±0.90 and 2.97±0.78 for metastases, respectively. The CBV and corrected CBV in the enhancing rim of abscesses were significantly lower than those of glioblastomas and metastases (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively. In differentiating abscesses from glioblastomas and metastases, the AUC values of corrected CBV (0.822 were slightly higher than those of CBV (0.792. CONCLUSIONS: Mathematic leakage correction slightly increases the diagnostic performance of CBV in differentiating pyogenic abscesses from necrotic glioblastomas and cystic metastases. Clinically, DSC perfusion MRI may not need mathematic leakage correction in differentiating abscesses from glioblastomas and/or metastases.

  13. Imaging spectrum of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binit Sureka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs were first described by Clark and Mazur in 1983 for smooth muscle neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract differentiating them from leiomyoma, leiomyosarcomas and neurogenic tumors. GISTs can arise from the bowel, peritoneum, omentum or retroperitoneum. This article reviews the computed tomography imaging features of primary GISTs, response to treatment and highlights data on predicting the outcome to chemotherapeutic drugs on imaging.

  14. Imaging of cerebritis, encephalitis, and brain abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Tanya J; Hughes, Marion; Arabi, Mohammad; Shah, Gaurang V

    2012-11-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of brain abscess, pyogenic infection, and encephalitis. The role of CT and MRI in the diagnosis and management of pyogenic brain abscess and its complications is reviewed. The imaging appearances of several common and select uncommon infectious encephalitides are reviewed. Common causes of encephalitis in immunocompromised patients, and their imaging appearances, are also discussed. When combined with CSF, serologic studies and patient history, imaging findings can suggest the cause of encephalitis. PMID:23122258

  15. Stereotaxic interstitial implantation for the treatment of malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brain Tumor Study Group (BTSG) demonstrated that patients with malignant gliomas who were treated with radiation therapy to a dose of 50 Gray (Gy) or more to the whole brain survived significantly longer than patients treated with surgery alone. A dose-response analysis of the BTSG data for 621 patients, 90% of whom had glioblastoma multiforme, showed a stepwise improvement in survival in patient groups receiving 50, 55, or 60 Gy. The median survival times were 28, 36, and 42 weeks, respectively (difference between 50 and 60 Gy significant at rho = .004). However, all tumors recurred and all patients died of their disease. If higher doses of radiation therapy could be delivered, improved local tumor control might be achieved. However, the delivery of doses of external irradiation in excess of 60 Gy is accompanied by radiation-induced brain necrosis. Experimental therapeutic strategies in the treatment of malignant brain tumors have involved the use of systemic chemotherapy. However, because of the localized nature of malignant glial tumors, it would seem logical to consider additional local treatment modalities. As radiation therapy has proven to be the most effective adjunct to surgery in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, there has been considerable recent interest in interstitial radiation therapy. Using interstitial radiation sources, high-dose radiation therapy can be delivered to the primary tumor with relative sparing of surrounding normal tissues. Interstitial implantation could be employed alone or to augment the dose delivered by external beam irradiation for the treatment of primary brain tumors, and would allow radical re-irradiation of recurrent malignant gliomas

  16. MR spectroscopy in children: protocols and pitfalls in non-tumorous brain pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jacques F

    2016-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) delivers information about cell content and metabolism in a noninvasive manner. The diagnostic strength of MRS lies in its evaluation of pathologies in combination with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRS in children has been most widely used to evaluate brain conditions like tumors, infections, metabolic diseases or learning disabilities and especially in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. This article reviews some basic theoretical considerations, routine procedures, protocols and pitfalls and will illustrate the range of spectrum alterations occurring in some non-tumorous pediatric brain pathologies. PMID:27233789

  17. Development in NMR spiral imaging and application to the assessment of the permeability of the blood-brain barrier on 2 models of brain tumors; Developpements en imagerie RMN spirale et application a la caracterisation de la permeabilite de la barriere hemato-encephalique sur deux modeles de tumeurs intracerebrales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumont, M

    2007-12-15

    The results presented in this work were obtained as part of methodological developments in magnetic resonance imaging. First of all, the setting of the rapid imaging technique using a k-space sampling scheme along a variable density spiral is described. Numerical simulations were used to optimize the acquisitions parameters and to compare different reconstruction techniques. An original approach to calibrate the k-space trajectory was proposed. Then, spiral imaging was used to implement a method to measure the blood brain barrier permeability to Gd-DOTA. This protocol was combined to blood volume and vessel size index measurements using Sinerem. The results obtained highlighted differences between the microvascular parameters measured on C6 and RG2 tumor models. The presence of Sinerem induces a mean decrease of the transfer constant across the vascular wall (Ktrans), in the tumor, of 24 per cent. This study also showed extravasation of the Sinerem, during the first two hours after the product injection, only in the RG2 tumors. (author)

  18. Preliminary results of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for benign brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ock [College of Medicine, Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ki Mun [Cellege of Medicine, Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju, (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the role of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in the management of benign brain tumors, we reviewed the clinical, and radiographic responses of patients treated. Between March 1996 and March 2002, 36 patients with benign brain tumors were treated by FSRT. The pathological diagnoses consisted of pituitary adenomas (12 patients), craniopharyngiomas (5 patients), meningiomas (10 patients), and acoustic neurinomas (9 patients). Radiotherapy doses of 25 to 35 Gy (3-6 Gy/fraction, 5-10 fractions) were prescribed to the 85-90% isodose line, depending upon the location, size and volume of the tumors. The median clinical and radiographical followup periods were 31 [range, 2-74) and 21 (range, 4-56) months, respectively. In the 35 patients that could be evaluated for their clinical response, 13 (37.1%) were considered improved, 16 (45.7%) stable and 6 (17.2%) worse. Of the 33 patients who had radiographic studies, tumor shrinkage was noted in 17 (51.5%), tumor stabilization in 13 (39.4%), and tumor progression in 3 (9,1%). Of the 17 tumor shrinkage patients, 7 [21.2%) showed a complete response, Acute radiation-induced complications occurred in 11 (30.6%) patients. FSRT is considered a safe and effective treatment method for benign brain tumors but large numbers of patients, with relatively long follow-up periods are needed to assess the exact role or effect of FSRT.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of cystic ovarian tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied 48 cases of cystic ovarian tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with 0.15 T resistive system and examined the ability of qualitative diagnosis by means of signal intensities and caluculated T1 values. MRI supposed to discriminate among various kinds of cystic ovarian tumors in most cases, especially dermoid cysts, endometrial cysts and cystadenomas. MRI has lots of merits which other imaging methods cannot offer, though it takes a long scan time and high cost at the present time. It plays an important role in the diagnosis of cystic ovarian tumors. (author)

  20. Enhanced tumor imaging with pokeweed mitogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional tumor imaging with biotracer techniques relies solely on the target specificity of the biomolecule. We hypothesize that specific imaging is possible by altering the rate of tissue clearance of any given radiotracer. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM) as a biomodulator, represents a class of molecules which regulate cellular differentiation and cell-cell interactions and, as part of these mechanisms alter tissue clearance rates. Utilizing the B-16/C57BL/6 model, 7 days post-transplantation, 10 animals were imaged following an i.v. injection of 1-2 mCi 99mTc-PWM in order to visualize the tumors and determine the optimal imaging kinetics. A specific tumor image is achieved between 120 and 240 min post-injection. In addition, tumor imaging studies using a non-tumor-specific biomolecule were conducted by injecting 19 animals i.v. with 1-2 mCi of 99mTc-human serum albumin (HSA). Twelve of these animals were given 10 μg of PWM i.p. at various intervals prior to the 99mTc-HAS administration. Imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at various intervals up to 2 h post-99mTc-HSA injection. A 32-59% increase in the tumor-to-muscle ratio was observed in the PWM-treated animals relative to the non-treated controls. To further investigate the PWM-induced tissue clearance alteration hypothesis, tissue clearance studies using 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) were conducted in non-tumor bearing ICR mice and the B-16/C57BL/6 tumor bearing animals. 99mTc-DTPA normal tissue clearance rates were significantly increased in the PWM treated animals relative to the non-treated controls. (author)

  1. Dynamic CT and functional imaging with intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven cases with verified intracranial meningioma were examined by means of dynamic computed tomography using a GE CT/T 8800 scanner equipped with a special software program. The first scan of the dynamic CT was started simultaneously with the start of an intravenous injection of an iodinated contrast medium. Serial 4.8-sec. scans were repeated 6 times, the data for each scan were segmented into 2, and a series of 12 rapid-sequence scan images was generated. The time-density data were analyzed with multiple ROIs, and the flow parameters, such as the peak height (P), the area (A), the time-to-peak (TP), the first moment (M1), and the effective width (EW = A/P), were calculated. In addition, each parameter was reorganized, pixel by pixel, as a functional image for observation and storage. M1, A, and P were increased in the tumor, whereas P and A were low and M1 was high in the peritumoral edema. In cases where the tumor was associated with a marked edema and/or a shift of the midline structures, the flow through the contralateral hemisphere was also compromised. A disturbed blood flow through the peritumoral region as well as contralateral brain showed an improvement after the removal of the tumor. The functional image of A always showed the tumor as a high-density area with a clear margin. P seemed to correlate with the degree of tumor vascularity, as seen on the angiogram. The dynamic CT with functional imaging does not seem to be of particular value in predicting the histologic nature of the tumor, but it is useful in studying the disturbance of cerebral blood flow in patients with intracranial tumors, and its restoration following the removal of the tumor. (author)

  2. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography for ex vivo brain tumor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Marcel; Krug, Robin; Jaedicke, Volker; Stroop, Ralf; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2015-07-01

    Non-contact imaging methods to distinguish between healthy tissue and brain tumor tissue during surgery would be highly desirable but are not yet available. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technology with a resolution around 1-15 μm and a penetration depth of 1-2 mm that may satisfy the demands. To analyze its potential, we measured ex vivo human brain tumor tissue samples from 10 patients with a Spectral Domain OCT system (Thorlabs Callisto: center wavelength of 930 nm) and compared the results with standard histology. In detail, three different measurements were made for each sample. First the sample was measured directly after surgery. Then it was embedded in paraffin (also H and E staining) and examined for the second time. At last, the slices of each paraffin block cut by the pathology were measured. Each time a B-scan was created and for a better comparison with the histology a 3D image was generated, in order to get the corresponding en face images. In both, histopathological diagnosis and the analysis of the OCT images, different types of brain tumor showed difference in structure. This has been affirmed by two blinded investigators. Nevertheless the difference between two images of samples taken directly after surgery is less distinct. To enhance the contrast in the images further, we employ Spectroscopic OCT and pattern recognition algorithms and compare these results to the histopathological standard.

  3. Synchrotron supported DEI/KES of a brain tumor in an animal model: The search for a microimaging modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, K. A.; Schültke, E.; Menk, R. H.; Siu, K.; Pavlov, K.; Kelly, M.; McLoughlin, G.; Beveridge, T.; Tromba, G.; Juurlink, B. H.; Chapman, D.; Rigon, L.; Griebel, R. W.

    2005-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the commonest and most aggressive primary brain tumor in humans. The high rate of tumor recurrence results in a poor prognosis despite multimodality treatment. One reason for high rate of recurrence is the invasive nature of the tumor into the surrounding normal brain tissue or multifocal occurrence at sites remote from that of the primary tumor establishment. Existing imaging demonstrates the primary tumor but fail to show the residual tumor microaggregates left behind following initial treatment. In this study, we employed diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) in an attempt to find an imaging modality that will provide visualization of residual disease that is not be apparent on MRI or CT scans.

  4. Computed tomographic aspects of primary brain tumors in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the years, the Veterinary Medicine has made great advances, enabling thus the diagnosis of many diseases. As a result of this new situation, there was an increased expectation of life of animals resulting in an increase in the number of clinical care of older animals. Thus, diseases considered unusual in the past, begin to be diagnosed more frequently, as is the case of brain damage. Recently, computed tomography has been widely used in Brazil as a tool to aid in the diagnosis of several diseases. This noninvasive imaging technique allows the identification and evaluation of lesions of central nervous tissue such as brain tumors. This provides information about the size, shape and location of the lesion, in addition to the magnitude of compression and invasion of adjacent structures by the tumor and its side effects (such as the peritumoral edema and hydrocephalus). The image obtained from computed tomography may suggest the presence of a certain type brain tumor, data of great importance for the prognosis and treatment of the animal. This review covers the computed tomography aspects of primary brain tumors such as meningiomas, astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, choroid plexus tumors and ependymomas. However, despite the computed tomography provide much information about the changes inside the skull; no way replace histopathological examination in determining the definitive diagnosis. (author)

  5. CT-guided laser probe for ablation of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhadi Daneshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available   Abstract  In this study, 22 patients (15-75 years old were selected and transferred to CT scan for tumor ablation. For ablations, after prep and drep under the local anesthesia and mild sedation in proper position, small incision made and special needle inserted and guided by proper direction to the core of the tumor. Then, laser probe inserted through the needle and laser energy delivered. Although we have not a good prognosis in metastatic tumors but post-operative follow up and brain CT scan established the effect of laser on resection and evaporation and diminution of mass effect in tumor lesions.

  6. Imaging of childhood inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguz, Berna; Ozcan, Hatice Nursun; Omay, Burak; Ozgen, Burce; Haliloglu, Mithat [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Altindag / Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-10-15

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm and most commonly involves the lung but occurs in extrapulmonary locations. To present imaging findings in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors in children based on a single-centre experience. We retrospectively reviewed CT and MRI findings of children diagnosed with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a single institution. We identified 15 children (range: 1-17 years) with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The tumor was localized to the lung (n = 5), mediastinum (n = 3), trachea (n = 1), bronchus (n = 1), abdomen (n = 2) and orbit (n = 3). All the extraorbital tumors were solid masses with homogeneous or heterogeneous enhancement. Four lung tumors and one posterior mediastinal tumor contained calcification. Local recurrence following surgical removal occurred in two children with invasion of the esophagus and of the left atrium in one. Localized masses were seen in all children with orbital tumour. Two of these had episcleritis and perineuritis; one had episcleritis, tendonitis, perineuritis, myositis and dacryoadenitis. The locations and imaging features of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are variable. (orig.)

  7. Characterizing intraocular tumors with photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Xue, Yafang; Gursel, Zeynep; Slimani, Naziha; Wang, Xueding; Demirci, Hakan

    2016-03-01

    Intraocular tumors are life-threatening conditions. Long-term mortality from uveal melanoma, which accounts for 80% of primary intraocular tumors, could be as high as 25% depending on the size, ciliary body involvement and extraocular extension. The treatments of intraocular tumors include eye-sparing approaches such as radiotherapy and thermotherapy, and the more aggressive enucleation. The accurate diagnosis of intraocular tumors is thereby critical in the management and follow-up of the patients. The diagnosis of intraocular tumors is usually based on clinical examination with acoustic backscattering based ultrasonography. By analyzing the high frequency fluctuations within the ultrasound (US) signals, microarchitecture information inside the tumor can be characterized. However, US cannot interrogate the histochemical components formulating the microarchitecture. One representative example is the inability of US imaging (and other contemporary imaging modalities as well) in differentiating nevoid and melanoma cells as the two types of cells possesses similar acoustic backscattering properties. Combining optical and US imaging, photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode both the microarchitecture and histochemical component information in biological tissue. This study attempts to characterize ocular tumors by analyzing the high frequency signal components in the multispectral PA images. Ex vivo human eye globes with melanoma and retinoblastoma tumors were scanned using less than 6 mJ per square centimeters laser energy with tunable range of 600-1700 nm. A PA-US parallel imaging system with US probes CL15-7 and L22-14 were used to acquire the high frequency PA signals in real time. Preliminary results show that the proposed method can identify uveal melanoma against retinoblastoma tumors.

  8. Malignant primary germ-cell tumor of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unusual case of a 15 year old boy with three discrete paraventricular germ-cell tumors is reported.FThe first tumor was located just lateral to the left thalamus and included a massive cystic part around it, the second tumor in the paraventricular region above the head of the left caudate nucleus and the third tumor in the medial part of the left parietal lobe.FTotal removal of all tumors was successfully accomplished in stages at four separate operations, namely, the first tumor was removed through the left transsylvian approach, the second tumor via left superior frontal gyrus and the third tumor via left superior frontal gyrus and left superior parietal lobule.FHistological examination revealed that the first tumor was teratoma, the second was choriocarcinoma and the third was germinoma.FPrimary germ-cell tumors of the brain can be divided into 5 groups: 1) germinoma; 2) embryonal carcinoma; 3) choriocarcinoma; 4) yolk-sac tumor; or 5) teratoma.FIn this case, a combination of three different histological patterns was seen. If malignant germ-cell tumor is supected on CT, aggressive extirpation should be done, not only to determine the exact diagnosis, but also to provide the basis for subsequent adjunctive therapy. (author)

  9. Visualization of brain tumor using I-123-vascular endothelial growth factor scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Aim:Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a major angiogenic factor. VEGF receptors have been shown to be overexpressed in a variety of tumor vessels including glioblastoma, which may provide the molecular basis for a successful use of radiolabeled VEGF as tumor angiogenesis tracer. In this study we investigated the usefulness of 1231- VEGF as angiogenesis tracer for imaging brain tumors in vivo. Methods and Results: SPECT examinations were performed 30 minutes and 18 hours after intravenous application of 1231-VEGF (191 ± 15 MBq) in 20 patients with brain tumor. Glioblastomas were visualized in 7 of 8 patients (88 %) shortly after application of 1231- VEGF and were still clearly shown 18 hours post injection. Negative scan results were obtained in one patient with a small glioblastoma size (diameter <2.0 cm) and in 3 patients with benign glioma as well as in 5 patients with glioblastoma after receiving radiotherapy and for chemotherapy. Weak positive results were obtained in 3 patients with brain lymphoma or other tumors. No side effects were observed in patients after administration of 1231- VEG F. Conclusion: Our results indicate that 1231- VEGF scintigraphy may be useful to visualize the angiogenesis of brain tumors and to monitor the treatment response.

  10. Multidrug resistance (MDR) in brain tumors; its clinical importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MDR is one of the important factors affecting chemotherapy in high grade brain malignancies. Especially it affects commonly used agents such as vincristine, VP16, VM26, and cisplatin. MDR1 gene encoded P-glycoprotein (Pgp) prevents intratumoral retention of such drugs by expelling them at the plasma membrance of brain tumor cells. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate MDR in various brain tumors including metastatic tumors including metastatic tumors by dual isotope SPECT, Northern blotting or immunohistochemical staining (IHCS) using JSB-1 monoclonal antibody against MDR1 gene encoded Pgp. Twenty one patients with various brain tumors of primary, secondary, and recurrent tumors were included from 2 institutions. Whenever possible, surgical specimen from these patients were obtained to study MDR. SPET was performed with a tripple head system (Trionix, Twinsburg, Ohio or MultiSPECT 3, Siemens). Three millicuries of 201Tl chloride and 20 mCi of 99mTc-sestamibi were adminstered and SPET was performed in about 15 min. Nineteen percent of patients had MIBI (-) and Tl (+) suggesting MDR (+). MIBI tumor uptake was higher in recurrence (6.67 +/- 1.3) than the stable original tumors (3.12 +/-0.77) (For 201Tl, 3.65 +/-2.2 Vs 1.5 +/-0.41). Three recurrent gliomas biopsied showed positive blotting and these patients failed several courses of chemotherapy. Six patients with various tumors such as oligodendroglioma, meningioma, recurrent G-M (2), and astrocytoma (2) were studied by IHCS, Weakly positive MDR was seen in one recurrent G-M and an astrocytoma case. Positive MDR was seen in the other recurrent G-M and a meningioma. In conclusion, MDR in brain tumors is detected successfully by dual isotope SPECT studies in a limited number of patients. MDR in benign brain tumors has no clinical significance since they are cured by surgical removal. However, we believe its presence in metastatic and high grade especially recurrent tumors is an essential information

  11. Multidrug resistance (MDR) in brain tumors; its clinical importance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Z. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia (United States); Park, C. H.; Kim, S. M.; Cho, K. K.; Bai, M. S.; Yoon, S. N.; Cho, C. W.; Jin, Y. M.; Kim, Y. S. [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    MDR is one of the important factors affecting chemotherapy in high grade brain malignancies. Especially it affects commonly used agents such as vincristine, VP16, VM26, and cisplatin. MDR1 gene encoded P-glycoprotein (Pgp) prevents intratumoral retention of such drugs by expelling them at the plasma membrance of brain tumor cells. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate MDR in various brain tumors including metastatic tumors including metastatic tumors by dual isotope SPECT, Northern blotting or immunohistochemical staining (IHCS) using JSB-1 monoclonal antibody against MDR1 gene encoded Pgp. Twenty one patients with various brain tumors of primary, secondary, and recurrent tumors were included from 2 institutions. Whenever possible, surgical specimen from these patients were obtained to study MDR. SPET was performed with a tripple head system (Trionix, Twinsburg, Ohio or MultiSPECT 3, Siemens). Three millicuries of {sup 201}Tl chloride and 20 mCi of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi were adminstered and SPET was performed in about 15 min. Nineteen percent of patients had MIBI (-) and Tl (+) suggesting MDR (+). MIBI tumor uptake was higher in recurrence (6.67 +/- 1.3) than the stable original tumors (3.12 +/-0.77) (For {sup 201}Tl, 3.65 +/-2.2 Vs 1.5 +/-0.41). Three recurrent gliomas biopsied showed positive blotting and these patients failed several courses of chemotherapy. Six patients with various tumors such as oligodendroglioma, meningioma, recurrent G-M (2), and astrocytoma (2) were studied by IHCS, Weakly positive MDR was seen in one recurrent G-M and an astrocytoma case. Positive MDR was seen in the other recurrent G-M and a meningioma. In conclusion, MDR in brain tumors is detected successfully by dual isotope SPECT studies in a limited number of patients. MDR in benign brain tumors has no clinical significance since they are cured by surgical removal. However, we believe its presence in metastatic and high grade especially recurrent tumors is an

  12. MR imaging features of adrenal rest tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the imaging features of adrenal rest tumor. Methods: Twelve patients of adrenal rest tumor proved by surgery or clinical diagnosis were retrospectively analyzed. Among these 12 patients, 12 were examined with ultrasound, 11 with MR and 1 with CT. MR and CT were performed without and with intravenous injection of contrast material. The imaging features of adrenal rest tumor were retrospectively summarized and the relevant literatures reviewed. Results: The adrenal rest tumors were found in testis in 10 of the 12 patients, and in ovaries and broad ligament in the remaining two. The imaging features of the testicular adrenal rest tumor were summarized as following: all patients had bilateral testicular masses without change of the testicular contour. On ultrasonography, the lesions were hypoechoic, with some hyperechoic areas and appeared highly vascularized on Colour Doppler ultrasonography. The masses showed iso-density on plain CT, and avid enhancement on post-contrast CT images. The masses ranging in size from 0.7 cm×1.0 cm×2.2 cm to 2.3 cm ×2.7 cm ×2.9 cm with uniform signal intensity, lobulated margin on MRI. They exhibited iso- or slight hyperintensity on T1WI and hypointensity on T2WI relative to normal testicular parenchyma. The tumors showed intense enhancement on post-contrast MR images. No abnormality was detected with Colour Doppler ultrasonography and MR in 2 patients of adrenal rest tumor in ovaries and broad ligament. Conclusion: Combining imaging features with the typical clinical history,the diagnosis of adrenal rest tumor could be suggested pre-operatively. (authors)

  13. Development and characterization of non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS) for brain tumor margining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Sudhir

    During tumor removal surgery, due to the problems associated with obtaining high-resolution, real-time chemical images of where exactly the tumor ends and healthy tissue begins (tumor margining), it is often necessary to remove a much larger volume of tissue than the tumor itself. In the case of brain tumor surgery, however, it is extremely unsafe to remove excess tissue. Therefore, without an accurate image of the tumor margins, some of the tumor's finger-like projections are inevitably left behind in the surrounding parenchyma to grow again. For this reason, the development of techniques capable of providing high-resolution real-time images of tumor margins up to centimeters below the surface of a tissue is ideal for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors, as well as surgical guidance during brain tumor excision. A novel spectroscopic technique, non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS), is being developed with the capabilities of obtaining high-resolution subsurface chemical-based images of underlying tumors. This novel technique combines the strengths of multiphoton tissue spectroscopy and photoacoustic spectroscopy into a diagnostic methodology that will, ultimately, provide unparalleled chemical information and images to provide the state of sub-surface tissues. The NMPPAS technique employs near-infrared light (in the diagnostic window) to excite ultraviolet and/or visible light absorbing species deep below the tissue's surface. Once a multiphoton absorption event occurs, non-radiative relaxation processes generates a localized thermal expansion and subsequent acoustic wave that can be detected using a piezoelectric transducer. Since NMPPAS employs an acoustic detection modality, much deeper diagnoses can be performed than that is possible using current state of the art high-resolution chemical imaging techniques such as multiphoton fluorescence spectroscopy. NMPPAS was employed to differentiate between excised brain tumors (astrocytoma III

  14. Brain tumor segmentation in MR slices using improved GrowCut algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chunhong; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liang; Shi, Zhifeng; Mao, Ying

    2015-12-01

    The detection of brain tumor from MR images is very significant for medical diagnosis and treatment. However, the existing methods are mostly based on manual or semiautomatic segmentation which are awkward when dealing with a large amount of MR slices. In this paper, a new fully automatic method for the segmentation of brain tumors in MR slices is presented. Based on the hypothesis of the symmetric brain structure, the method improves the interactive GrowCut algorithm by further using the bounding box algorithm in the pre-processing step. More importantly, local reflectional symmetry is used to make up the deficiency of the bounding box method. After segmentation, 3D tumor image is reconstructed. We evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method on MR slices with synthetic tumors and actual clinical MR images. Result of the proposed method is compared with the actual position of simulated 3D tumor qualitatively and quantitatively. In addition, our automatic method produces equivalent performance as manual segmentation and the interactive GrowCut with manual interference while providing fully automatic segmentation.

  15. Multi-fractal texture features for brain tumor and edema segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, S.; Iftekharuddin, K. M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we propose a fully automatic brain tumor and edema segmentation technique in brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. Different brain tissues are characterized using the novel texture features such as piece-wise triangular prism surface area (PTPSA), multi-fractional Brownian motion (mBm) and Gabor-like textons, along with regular intensity and intensity difference features. Classical Random Forest (RF) classifier is used to formulate the segmentation task as classification of these features in multi-modal MRIs. The segmentation performance is compared with other state-of-art works using a publicly available dataset known as Brain Tumor Segmentation (BRATS) 2012 [1]. Quantitative evaluation is done using the online evaluation tool from Kitware/MIDAS website [2]. The results show that our segmentation performance is more consistent and, on the average, outperforms other state-of-the art works in both training and challenge cases in the BRATS competition.

  16. Health-related quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Tonny Solveig; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Nysom, Karsten; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2009-01-01

    -up were assessed for general intelligence (IQ) and administered the Minneapolis-Manchester Quality of Life (MMQL) questionnaire. RESULTS: In multivariate linear regression treatment with RT was the most important risk factor for reduced HRQOL. Lower scores for physical functioning and energy, social......BACKGROUND: To identify predictors for health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in survivors of childhood brain tumors and its relationship to cognitive function. PROCEDURE: One hundred twenty-six consecutive Danish childhood brain tumor patients treated 1970-1997 and being 7.9-40.4 years at follow...... functioning, cognitive functioning, body image, outlook of life, and intimate relations were significantly related to RT. Tumor location in the posterior fossa was associated with lower scores for physical functioning and energy, and tumor site in the third ventricle region was associated with lower scores...

  17. Fusing in vivo and ex vivo NMR sources of information for brain tumor classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we classify short echo-time brain magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data by applying a model-based canonical correlation analyses algorithm and by using, as prior knowledge, multimodal sources of information coming from high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS), MRSI and magnetic resonance imaging. The potential and limitations of fusing in vivo and ex vivo nuclear magnetic resonance sources to detect brain tumors is investigated. We present various modalities for multimodal data fusion, study the effect and the impact of using multimodal information for classifying MRSI brain glial tumors data and analyze which parameters influence the classification results by means of extensive simulation and in vivo studies. Special attention is drawn to the possibility of considering HR-MAS data as a complementary dataset when dealing with a lack of MRSI data needed to build a classifier. Results show that HR-MAS information can have added value in the process of classifying MRSI data

  18. Brain Tumor Detection Based on Bilateral Symmetry Information

    OpenAIRE

    Sachin, Narkhede; Shah, Deven; Khairnar, Vaishali; Kadu, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Advances in computing technology have allowed researchers across many fields of endeavor to collect and maintain vast amounts of observational statistical data such as clinical data,biological patient data,data regarding access of web sites,financial data,and the like.Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI)segmentation is a complex problem in the field of medical imaging despite various presented methods.MR image of human brain can be divided into several sub regions especially soft tissues suc...

  19. Assessment of serum L-fucose in brain tumor cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glycosylation of altered tumor cell in relation to cellular heterogeneity in human intracranial tumors remains relatively unexposed. Serum protein-bound carbohydrate, L-Fucose is reported to be overexpressed during tumor progression by many investigators. Therefore, there is a need to determine the diagnostic, prognostic, functional significance of glycoprotein elevations in various cases of tumors. Objective: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility of serum L-fucose in patients with brain tumor. Materials and Methods: Serum glyco-conjugate levels were estimated in 99 patients with brain tumors. Estimation of L-fucose was carried out colorimetrically by the method of Winzler using cysteine hydrochloride. Results: There was a significant increase in L-fucose level in most of the patients. In the posttreatment cases, the L-fucose levels were apparently low compared to preoperative values. Conclusion: Our results showed that the rise in serum L-fucose may be used as a general marker for brain tumors in addition to other markers.

  20. Update on imaging diagnosis of adrenal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging diagnosis of adrenal tumors is increasingly frequent. Characterization and differentiation of benign adenomas and malignant injures is very important, mainly in the patient with malignant or functioning disease. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography/computed tomography allowed greater precision in characterizing and differentiating the adrenal masses in a non-invasive way. This review explained the physiological principles supporting these techniques, its advantages and restrictions. The main characteristics of the most frequent adrenal tumor images were described, in addition to submitting an algorithm for the use of these diagnostic means

  1. Expression of iron-related genes in human brain and brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britton Robert S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defective iron homeostasis may be involved in the development of some diseases within the central nervous system. Although the expression of genes involved in normal iron balance has been intensively studied in other tissues, little is known about their expression in the brain. We investigated the mRNA levels of hepcidin (HAMP, HFE, neogenin (NEO1, transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, and hemojuvelin (HFE2 in normal human brain, brain tumors, and astrocytoma cell lines. The specimens included 5 normal brain tissue samples, 4 meningiomas, one medulloblastoma, 3 oligodendrocytic gliomas, 2 oligoastrocytic gliomas, 8 astrocytic gliomas, and 3 astrocytoma cell lines. Results Except for hemojuvelin, all genes studied had detectable levels of mRNA. In most tumor types, the pattern of gene expression was diverse. Notable findings include high expression of transferrin receptor 1 in the hippocampus and medulla oblongata compared to other brain regions, low expression of HFE in normal brain with elevated HFE expression in meningiomas, and absence of hepcidin mRNA in astrocytoma cell lines despite expression in normal brain and tumor specimens. Conclusion These results indicate that several iron-related genes are expressed in normal brain, and that their expression may be dysregulated in brain tumors.

  2. Comparison of brain activation to purposefully activate a tool in healthy subjects and brain tumor patients using fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the functional organization of the human brain involved in tool-manipulation. Blood Oxygen Level Dependent was measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging in seventeen right-handed healthy volunteers and two brain tumor patients during two tool-manipulation tasks: simulated tightening a bolt with a screwdriver (Simulation), and tightening a bolt with a screwdriver (Real). Subjects performed the experiment without watching the tasks. Bilateral pre-supplementary motor areas, bilateral cerebellar posterior lobes, right ventral premotor area, right calcarine sulcus, and cerebellar vermis were activated during Real but not during Simulation tasks in healthy volunteers. In addition, brain tumor patients activated the prefrontal areas. Our results suggest that the human brain mechanisms for tool-manipulation have a neural-network comprised of presupplementary motor area, ventral premotor area, and bilateral cerebellar posterior lobes. In the patients with brain dusfurction diee to tumors, activation at the prefrontal area provided function compensation without motor paralysis. (author)

  3. Assessment of tumors of the lung apex by imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the value of MR in the preoperative staging of tumors of the lung apex and detection of local invasion of adjacent structures to determine its influence on the therapeutic approach. We obtained plain X-ray images in two planes, as well as CT and Mr images, in 12 patients with Pan coast tumor in whom there was surgical (n=8) or clinical (n=4) evidence of invasion. The objective was to assess local infiltration of brain stem and chest wall soft tissue, enveloping of the subclavian artery, substantial involvement of the brachial plexus and destruction of the vertebral body. In our series, MR was superior to the other imaging techniques in predicting the involvement of the structures surrounding the tumor. In conclusion, MR should be performed in a patient diagnosed by plain radiography as having an apical tumors to assess local tumor extension, while CT should be done to detect mediastinal lymph node involvement and distant metastases. 19 refs

  4. Functional imaging in tumor-associated lymphatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in cancer cell dissemination; however whether lymphatic drainage pathways and function change during tumor progression and metastasis remains to be elucidated. In this report, we employed a non-invasive, dynamic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging technique for functional lymphatic imaging. Indocyanine green (ICG) was intradermally injected into tumor-free mice and mice bearing C6/LacZ rat glioma tumors in the tail or hindlimb. Our imaging data showed abnormal lymphatic drainage pathways and reduction/loss of lymphatic contractile function in mice with lymph node (LN) metastasis, indicating that cancer metastasis to the draining LNs is accompanied by transient changes of the lymphatic architectural network and its function. Therefore, functional lymphatic imaging may provide a role in the clinical staging of cancer.

  5. MR imaging of synovial tumors and tumor-like lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narvaez, J.A. [Dept. of CT and MR Imaging, Ciutat Sanitaria i Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Ciutat Sanitaria i Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Narvaez, J. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Ciutat Sanitaria i Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Dept. of Rheumatology, Clinica Delfos, Barcelona (Spain); Aguilera, C.; De Lama, E. [Dept. of CT and MR Imaging, Ciutat Sanitaria i Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Portabella, F. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Ciutat Sanitaria i Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain)

    2001-12-01

    The clinical diagnosis of synovial tumors and tumorlike lesions is difficult, and radiographic findings may establish a confident diagnosis only in some cases. MR imaging has become the modality of choice in evaluating these lesions, because with it a presumptive diagnosis can be made in most cases. Our goal is to review the MR features of pigmented villonodular synovitis, giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath, synovial chondromatosis, synovial hemangioma, lipoma arborescens, synovial cysts and synovial sarcoma, emphasizing those findings that suggest a specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. MR imaging of synovial tumors and tumor-like lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical diagnosis of synovial tumors and tumorlike lesions is difficult, and radiographic findings may establish a confident diagnosis only in some cases. MR imaging has become the modality of choice in evaluating these lesions, because with it a presumptive diagnosis can be made in most cases. Our goal is to review the MR features of pigmented villonodular synovitis, giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath, synovial chondromatosis, synovial hemangioma, lipoma arborescens, synovial cysts and synovial sarcoma, emphasizing those findings that suggest a specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor: A rare brain tumor not to be misdiagnosed

    OpenAIRE

    Sukheeja, Deepti; Mehta, Jayanti

    2016-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET) is a recently described, morphologically unique, and surgically curable low-grade brain tumor which is included in the latest WHO classification as neuronal and mixed neuronal-glial tumor. It is usually seen in children and young adults. The importance of this particular entity is that it is a surgically curable neuroepithelial neoplasm. When recognized, the need for adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is obviated. We hereby present a case repo...

  8. A prospective evaluation of thallium-201 single photon emission computerized tomography for brain tumor burden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The follow-up of patients with malignant brain tumors after surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy has been inadequate for evaluating brain tumor burden using computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thallium-201 has been shown to concentrate in viable tumor, and Tl-201 single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging can identify tumor burden more accurately than CT. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients with glioblastoma and three patients with low grade astrocytoma were studied with Tl-201 SPECT. Histololgic diagnosis was obtained in all patients by biopsy and all patients had CT scans within 2 weeks of the SPECT study. Seventeen patients were followed with one or more SPECT and CT evaluations. Results: Single photon emission computerized tomography studies, after surgery, radiotherapy, and/or chemotherapy, were more accurate than CT in identifying progression or regression of disease. Twenty-three patients had evidence of disease and 11 patients had no evidence of recurrent disease in the initial Tl-201 SPECT study following therapy. Computerized tomography identified 20 of the 23 patients with disease and 6 of 11 patients with no recurrent disease. Follow-up with Tl-201 SPECT in 17 patients suggested progression of disease in 9 patients, while CT showed progression in only 3 patients. Clinical examinations and repeat CT studies confirmed the accuracy of Tl-201 SPECT images. Conclusion: We found Tl-201 SPECT more accurate than CT scans in a prospective evaluation of 34 patients with brain tumor. Follow-up studies with both Tl-201 SPECT and CT imaging in 17 patients demonstrated that SPECT was more reliable than CT in identifying progression, improvement, or no change in brain tumor burden

  9. Evaluation of the pyramidal tract in patients with brain tumor in terms of diffusion anisotropy, apparent diffusion coefficient and eigenvalues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion anisotropy index, diffusion trace and eigenvalues of the pyramidal tracts were measured in 19 patients with supratentorial brain tumor using diffusion tensor MR imaging. These indices reflected condition of pyramidal tract, being compressed and/or being T2-high. Estimation of eigenvalues, in addition to diffusion anisotropy and the trace, should provide more detailed information about the pyramidal tract in brain tumor cases. (author)

  10. Brain MR imaging in dietarily treated phenylketonuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breysem, L. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Smet, M.H. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Johannik, K. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Hecke, P. van [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Francois, B. [L. Willems Inst., Diepenbeek (Belgium); Wilms, G. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Bosmans, H. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Marchal, G. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Jaeken, J. [Dept. of Pediatrics, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Demaerel, P. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1994-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the most efficient imaging modality to evaluate brain gray and white matter of patients with metabolic diseases. The main purpose of our study was to investigate the relation between brain MRI abnormalities and the phenylalanine (phe) and tyrosine (tyr) blood levels in 38 phenylketonuria (PKU) patients. Increased periventricular white matter intensity on T2-weighted brain images was the only pathologic finding in 24 patients. Brain MRI abnormalities were scored (4) and correlated with the individual mean phe and phe/tyr levels during 1 year preceding MR examination and with phe tolerance. The residual activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase was defined for each patient by an oral phe tolerance. The appearance of MRI abnormalities on brain T2-weighted images correlates with a threshold mean phe level (averaged over the year preceding the examination). (orig.)

  11. Photon spectrum and absorbed dose in brain tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva S, A. [General Electric Healthcare, Antonio Dovali Jaime 70, Torre A 3er. piso, Col. Santa Fe, 01210 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria No. 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Using Monte Carlo methods a BOMAB phantom inside a treatment hall with a brain tumor nearby the pituitary gland was treated with photons produced by a Varian 6 MV linac. The photon spectrum and the absorbed dose were calculated in the tumor, pituitary gland and the head. The treatment beam was collimated to illuminate only the tumor volume; however photons were noticed in the gland. Photon fluence reaching the tumor is 78.1 times larger than the fluence in the pituitary gland, on the other hand the absorbed dose in the tumor is 188 times larger than the dose in the gland because photons that reach the pituitary gland are scattered, by the head and the tumor, through Compton effect. (Author)

  12. Photon spectrum and absorbed dose in brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using Monte Carlo methods a BOMAB phantom inside a treatment hall with a brain tumor nearby the pituitary gland was treated with photons produced by a Varian 6 MV linac. The photon spectrum and the absorbed dose were calculated in the tumor, pituitary gland and the head. The treatment beam was collimated to illuminate only the tumor volume; however photons were noticed in the gland. Photon fluence reaching the tumor is 78.1 times larger than the fluence in the pituitary gland, on the other hand the absorbed dose in the tumor is 188 times larger than the dose in the gland because photons that reach the pituitary gland are scattered, by the head and the tumor, through Compton effect. (Author)

  13. Air pollution from traffic and risk for brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Sørensen, Mette; Andersen, Zorana J;

    2016-01-01

    residential nitrogen oxides (NO x ) concentrations since 1971 with a validated dispersion model. Categorical and linear odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) were calculated with conditional logistic regression models. RESULTS: The highest risk estimates for any brain cancer were observed among......PURPOSE: Air pollution is an established lung carcinogen, and there is increasing evidence that air pollution also negatively affects the brain. We have previously reported an association between air pollution and risk of brain tumors in a cohort study based on only 95 cases. We set out to...... replicate that finding in a large nationwide case-control study. METHODS: We identified all 4,183 adult brain tumor cases in Denmark in the years 2000-2009 and 8,018 risk set sampled population controls matched on gender and year of birth. We extracted residential address histories and estimated mean...

  14. Application Of Fuzzy System In Segmentation Of MRI Brain Tumor

    CERN Document Server

    Rajya, Mrigank; Sheoran, Swati

    2010-01-01

    Segmentation of images holds an important position in the area of image processing. It becomes more important whi le typically dealing with medical images where presurgery and post surgery decisions are required for the purpose of initiating and speeding up the recovery process. Segmentation of 3-D tumor structures from magnetic resonance images (MRI) is a very challenging problem due to the variability of tumor geometry and intensity patterns. Level set evolution combining global smoothness with the flexibility of topology changes offers significant advantages over the conventional statistical classification followed by mathematical morphology. Level set evolution with constant propagation needs to be initialized either completely inside or outside the tumor and can leak through weak or missing boundary parts. Replacing the constant propagation term by a statistical force overcomes these limitations and results in a convergence to a stable solution. Using MR images presenting tumors, probabilities for backgr...

  15. Pediatric brain stem gliomas: Comparison of evaluation by CT and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a direct comparison of the role of CT and MR imaging in the pretreatment and posttreatment evaluation of pediatric brain-stem gliomas. Thirty-four patients with presumed brain-stem gliomas were imaged by both CT and MR over the past 53 months. Twenty-two males and 12 females ranged in age from 3 to 17 years. Fifteen patients had tumor confirmed by biopsy. Thirteen children with nonneoplastic brain-stem lesions were imaged. MR proved superior to CT in both the pretreatment and posttreatment evaluation of patients with brain-stem gliomas. Pathologic correlation to the images is made in selected cases

  16. Clinical Evaluation of a Fully-automatic Segmentation Method for Longitudinal Brain Tumor Volumetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Raphael; Knecht, Urspeter; Loosli, Tina; Bauer, Stefan; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Reyes, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Information about the size of a tumor and its temporal evolution is needed for diagnosis as well as treatment of brain tumor patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of a fully-automatic segmentation method, called BraTumIA, for longitudinal brain tumor volumetry by comparing the automatically estimated volumes with ground truth data acquired via manual segmentation. Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging data of 14 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma encompassing 64 MR acquisitions, ranging from preoperative up to 12 month follow-up images, was analysed. Manual segmentation was performed by two human raters. Strong correlations (R = 0.83–0.96, p < 0.001) were observed between volumetric estimates of BraTumIA and of each of the human raters for the contrast-enhancing (CET) and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments (NCE-T2). A quantitative analysis of the inter-rater disagreement showed that the disagreement between BraTumIA and each of the human raters was comparable to the disagreement between the human raters. In summary, BraTumIA generated volumetric trend curves of contrast-enhancing and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments comparable to estimates of human raters. These findings suggest the potential of automated longitudinal tumor segmentation to substitute manual volumetric follow-up of contrast-enhancing and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments. PMID:27001047

  17. Clinical Evaluation of a Fully-automatic Segmentation Method for Longitudinal Brain Tumor Volumetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Raphael; Knecht, Urspeter; Loosli, Tina; Bauer, Stefan; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Reyes, Mauricio

    2016-03-01

    Information about the size of a tumor and its temporal evolution is needed for diagnosis as well as treatment of brain tumor patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of a fully-automatic segmentation method, called BraTumIA, for longitudinal brain tumor volumetry by comparing the automatically estimated volumes with ground truth data acquired via manual segmentation. Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging data of 14 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma encompassing 64 MR acquisitions, ranging from preoperative up to 12 month follow-up images, was analysed. Manual segmentation was performed by two human raters. Strong correlations (R = 0.83–0.96, p human raters for the contrast-enhancing (CET) and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments (NCE-T2). A quantitative analysis of the inter-rater disagreement showed that the disagreement between BraTumIA and each of the human raters was comparable to the disagreement between the human raters. In summary, BraTumIA generated volumetric trend curves of contrast-enhancing and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments comparable to estimates of human raters. These findings suggest the potential of automated longitudinal tumor segmentation to substitute manual volumetric follow-up of contrast-enhancing and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments.

  18. Gonadal status in male survivors following childhood brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, M; Lassen, S; Poulsen, H S; Schmiegelow, K; Hertz, H; Andersson, A M; Skakkebaek, N E; Müller, J

    2001-01-01

    The effect of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) on gonadal function was assessed in males treated for a childhood brain tumor not directly involving the hypothalamus/pituitary (HP) axis in a population-based study with a long follow-up time. All males......The effect of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) on gonadal function was assessed in males treated for a childhood brain tumor not directly involving the hypothalamus/pituitary (HP) axis in a population-based study with a long follow-up time. All males...

  19. CADrx for GBM Brain Tumors: Predicting Treatment Response from Changes in Diffusion-Weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S. Brown

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop a computer-aided therapeutic response (CADrx system for early prediction of drug treatment response for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM brain tumors with diffusion weighted (DW MR images. In conventional Macdonald assessment, tumor response is assessed nine weeks or more post-treatment. However, we will investigate the ability of DW-MRI to assess response earlier, at five weeks post treatment. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC map, calculated from DW images, has been shown to reveal changes in the tumor’s microenvironment preceding morphologic tumor changes. ADC values in treated brain tumors could theoretically both increase due to the cell kill (and thus reduced cell density and decrease due to inhibition of edema. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of features that quantify changes from pre- and post-treatment tumor ADC histograms to detect treatment response. There are three parts to this study: first, tumor regions were segmented on T1w contrast enhanced images by Otsu’s thresholding method, and mapped from T1w images onto ADC images by a 3D region of interest (ROI mapping tool using DICOM header information; second, ADC histograms of the tumor region were extracted from both pre- and five weeks post-treatment scans, and fitted by a two-component Gaussian mixture model (GMM. The GMM features as well as standard histogram-based features were extracted. Finally, supervised machine learning techniques were applied for classification of responders or non-responders. The approach was evaluated with a dataset of 85 patients with GBM under chemotherapy, in which 39 responded and 46 did not, based on tumor volume reduction. We compared adaBoost, random forest and support vector machine classification algorithms, using ten-fold cross validation, resulting in the best accuracy of 69.41% and the corresponding area under the curve (Az of 0.70.

  20. [Imaging of brain changes in chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Nuutti; Forss, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Modern methods of brain imaging have enabled objective measurements of functional and structural brain changes associated with chronic pain conditions. According to recent investigations, chronic pain is not only associated with abnormally strong or prolonged activity of regions processing acute pain, but also with activation of brain networks that are characteristic for each pain state, changes in cortical remodeling, as well as local reduction of grey matter in several regions of the brain. Brain changes associated with chronic pain facilitate the understanding of mechanisms of various chronic pain conditions. PMID:25211820

  1. Clinical features of depressive disorders in patients with brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogorenko V.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the structure of psychopathology and clinical features of depressive disorders in patients with brain oncopathology. Polymorphic mental disorders of various clinical content and severity in most cases not only are comorbid to oncological pathology of the brain, but most often are the first clinical signs of early tumors. The study was conducted using the following methods: clinical psychiatric, questionnaire Simptom Check List- 90 -Revised-SCL- 90 -R, Luscher test and mathematical processing methods. Sample included 175 patients with brain tumors with non-psychotic level of mental disorders. The peculiarities of mental disorders and psychopathological structure of nonpsychotic depressive disorders have been a clinical option of cancer debut in patients with brain tumors. We found that nonpsychotic depression is characterized by polymorphism and syndromal incompletion; this causes ambiguity of diagnoses interpretation on stages of diagnostic period. Features of depressive symptoms depending on the signs of malignancy / nonmalignancy of brain tumor were defined.

  2. Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengwen; Calvin; Li; Mustafa; H; Kabeer; Long; T; Vu; Vic; Keschrumrus; Hong; Zhen; Yin; Brent; A; Dethlefs; Jiang; F; Zhong; John; H; Weiss; William; G; Loudon

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of malignant brain tumors remains a challenge. Stem cell technology has been applied in the treatment of brain tumors largely because of the ability of some stem cells to infiltrate into regions within the brain where tumor cells migrate as shown in preclinical studies. However, not all of these efforts can translate in the effective treatment that improves the quality of life for pa-tients. Here, we perform a literature review to identify the problems in the field. Given the lack of efficacy of most stem cell-based agents used in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we found that stem cell distribution(i.e., only a fraction of stem cells applied capable of targeting tumors) are among the limiting factors. We provide guidelines for potential improvements in stem cell distribution. Specifically, we use an engineered tissue graft platform that replicates the in vivo microenvironment, and provide our data to validate that this culture platform is viable for producing stem cells that have better stem cell distribution than with the Petri dish culture system.

  3. Evaluation of brain metastases with dynamic susceptibility-contrast MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the characteristics of dynamic susceptibility-contrast (DSC) MR perfusion curves, color images and perfusion values in pre-operative brain metastasis. Methods: Twenty- eight brain metastases underwent DSC MR perfusion imaging by using a first-pass T2* echo-planar sequence. The patients' data were transferred to on-line workstation. Time-signal intensity curves, color perfusion maps and rCBV, rMTT values in both tumor parenchyma and peri-tumor edema were analyzed, and independent t- test was used and P0.05). Conclusion: Different originated brain metastases have nearly same characteristics in DSC MR perfusion imaging. (authors)

  4. Childhood kidney tumors - the relevance of imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidney tumors represent 6.2% of malignant tumors in children. History, clinical course and radiological findings are necessary elements in the differential diagnosis of the different renal tumors. In the case of nephroblastoma, chemotherapy is based solely on the radiological diagnosis without prior histology. In therapy-optimizing studies of the Society of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, preoperative chemotherapy is performed. Therapy monitoring is performed in the course of and after preoperative chemotherapy to verify tumor response. Radiological staging plays a significant role in deciding on further treatment and in operative planning. Three-dimensional visualization of the abdominal situs can assist preoperative planning. In summary, diagnostic imaging in renal tumors in children plays a role in differential diagnosis, staging, monitoring of therapy, and surgical planning. (orig.)

  5. Staging Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests to check the brain, spinal cord, and nerve function. The exam checks a person’s mental status, coordination, and ability to walk normally, and how well the muscles, senses, and reflexes work. This may also be called a neuro ...

  6. Brain tumors induced in rats by human adenovirus type 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murao,Tsuyoshi

    1974-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenesis of human adenovirus type 12 in the brain of rats was examined. Newborn rats of Sprague-Dawley and Donryu strains were injected intracranially with human adenovirus type 12. The incidence of intracranial tumors was 91% (30/33 in SpragueDawley and 56% (14/25 in Donryu rats. Except for one tumor nodule located in the parietal cortex of a Sprague.Dawley rat, all tumors developed in the paraventricular areas or in the meninges. Tumors were quite similar histologically to those induced in hamsters and mice resembling the undifferentiated human brain tumors such as medulloblastoma, ependymoblastoma and embryonic gliomas. From the histological features and primary sites of tumor development, it is suggested that the tumors in the brain of rats induced by adenovirus type 12 originate from the embryonic cells in the paraventricular area and also from the undifferentiated supporting cells of the peripheral nerves in the leptomeninges.

  7. Image Processing Technique for Brain Abnormality Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Anwar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging is expensive and very much sophisticated because of proprietary software and expert personalities. This paper introduces an inexpensive, user friendly general-purpose image processing tool and visualization program specifically designed in MATLAB to detect much of the brain disorders as early as possible. The application provides clinical and quantitative analysis of medical images. Minute structural difference of brain gradually results in major disorders such as schizophrenia, Epilepsy, inherited speech and language disorder, Alzheimer's dementia etc. Here the main focusing is given to diagnose the disease related to the brain and its psychic nature (Alzheimer’s disease.

  8. Clinical value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for differentiating recurrent or residual brain tumor from delayed cerebral necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Delayed cerebral necrosis (DN) is a significant risk for brain tumor patients treated with high-dose irradiation. Although differentiating DN from tumor progression is an important clinical question, the distinction cannot be made reliably by conventional imaging techniques. We undertook a pilot study to assess the ability of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) to differentiate prospectively between DN or recurrent/residual tumor in a series of children treated for primary brain tumors with high-dose irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twelve children (ages 3-16 years), who had clinical and MR imaging (MRI) changes that suggested a diagnosis of either DN or progressive/recurrent brain tumor, underwent localized 1H MRS prior to planned biopsy, resection, or other confirmatory histological procedure. Prospective 1H MRS interpretations were based on comparison of spectral peak patterns and quantitative peak area values from normalized spectra: a marked depression of the intracellular metabolite peaks from choline, creatine, and N-acetyl compounds was hypothesized to indicate DN, and median-to-high choline with easily visible creatine metabolite peaks was labeled progressive/recurrent tumor. Subsequent histological studies identified the brain lesion as DN or recurrent/residual tumor. Results: The patient series included five cases of DN and seven recurrent/residual tumor cases, based on histology. The MRS criteria prospectively identified five out of seven patients with active tumor, and four out of five patients with histologically proven DN correctly. Discriminant analysis suggested that the primary diagnostic information for differentiating DN from tumor lay in the normalized MRS peak areas for choline and creatine compounds. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy shows promising sensitivity and selectivity for differentiating DN from recurrent/progressive brain tumor. A novel diagnostic index based on peak areas for choline and creatine

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy for children with malignant brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the 131 cases with brain tumors treated by boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT), seventeen were children. Eight supratentorial tumors included five astrocytomas(grade 2-4), two primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) and one rhabdomyosarcoma. Seven pontine tumors included one astrocytoma, one PNET and 5 unverified gliomas. Two cerebellar tumors (PNET and astrocytoma) were also treated. All pontine tumors showed remarkable decrease in size after BNCT. However, most of them showed regrowth of the tumors because the neutrons were insufficient due to the depth. Four cases with cerebral tumor died of remote cell dissemination, although they all responded to BNCT. One of them survived 7 years after repeated BNCTs. An 11 years old girl with a large astrocytoma in the right frontal lobe has lived more than 11 years and is now a draftswoman at a civil engineering company after graduating from a technical college. An 8 years old girl with an astrocytoma in the left occipital lobe has no recurrence of the tumor for 2 years and attends on elementary school without mental and physical problems. Two children (one year old girl and four years old boy) with cerebellar tumors have shown showed an excellent growth after BNCT and had no neurological deficits. Mental and physical development in patients treated by BNCT is usually better than that in patients treated by conventional radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Imaging diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the feature of solitary fibrous tumor on CT and MRI. Methods: The clinical and imaging data A of 10 cases with pathologically confirmed solitary fibrous tumor analyzed retrospectively. All patients underwent un-enhanced and dual-phase enhanced CT scanning, and post-processing reconstruction were done in 7 cases. 5 cases underwent plain enhanced MRI simultaneously. Results: The tumor located in pleural in 5 cases, lung in 2 cases, retroperitoneal in 2 cases, peritoneum in 1 cases. The diameter of tumor was of 5.5-27 cm range. The boundary was clear in 8 cases not in 2 cases. The density was even in 6 cases, and with cystic necrosis in 5 cases. The solid components of tumor was homogeneous enhanced lightly to moderately with continued strengthen in parenchymal phase. Obviously enhancement was found in 1 case and calcification appeared in 1 case. Conclusion: Imaging findings solitary fibrous tumor are characteristic. CT and MRI have a great diagnostic and differential diagnostic value in solitary fibrous tumor. (authors)

  11. Intra-operative visualization of brain tumors with 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhalm, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Precise histopathological diagnosis of brain tumors is essential for the correct patient management. Furthermore, complete resection of brain tumors is associated with an improved patient prognosis. However, histopathological undergrading and incomplete tumor removal are not uncommon, especially due to insufficient intra-operative visualization of brain tumor tissue. The fluorescent dye 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is currently applied for fluorescence-guided resections of high-grade gliomas. The value of 5-ALA-induced protoporphyrin (PpIX) fluorescence for intra-operative visualization of other tumors than high-grade gliomas remains unclear. Within the frame of this thesis, we found a significantly higher rate of complete resections of our high-grade gliomas as compared to control cases by using the newly established 5-ALA fluorescence technology at our department. Additionally, we showed that MRI spectroscopy-based chemical shift imaging (CSI) is capable to identify intratumoral high-grade glioma areas (= anaplastic foci) during navigation guided resections to avoid histopathological undergrading. However, the accuracy of navigation systems with integrated pre-operative imaging data such as CSI declines during resections due to intra-operative brainshift. In two further studies, we found that 5-ALA induced PpIX fluorescence is capable as a novel intra-operative marker to detect anaplastic foci within initially suspected low-grade gliomas independent of brainshift. Finally, we showed that the application of 5-ALA is also of relevance in needle biopsies for intra-operative identification of representative brain tumor tissue. These data indicate that 5-ALA is not only of major importance for resection of high-grade gliomas, but also for intra-operative visualization of anaplastic foci as well as representative brain tumor tissue in needle biopsies unaffected by brainshift. Consequently, this new technique might become a novel standard in brain tumor surgery that

  12. Semiquantitative Analysis Using Thallium-201 SPECT for Differential Diagnosis Between Tumor Recurrence and Radiation Necrosis After Gamma Knife Surgery for Malignant Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Semiquantitative analysis of thallium-201 chloride single photon emission computed tomography (201Tl SPECT) was evaluated for the discrimination between recurrent brain tumor and delayed radiation necrosis after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The medical records were reviewed of 75 patients, including 48 patients with metastatic brain tumor and 27 patients with high-grade glioma who underwent GKS in our institution, and had suspected tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis on follow-up neuroimaging and deteriorating clinical status after GKS. Analysis of 201Tl SPECT data used the early ratio (ER) and the delayed ratio (DR) calculated as tumor/normal average counts on the early and delayed images, and the retention index (RI) as the ratio of DR to ER. Results: A total of 107 tumors were analyzed with 201Tl SPECT. Nineteen lesions were removed surgically and histological diagnoses established, and the other lesions were evaluated with follow-up clinical and neuroimaging examinations after GKS. The final diagnosis was considered to be recurrent tumor in 65 lesions and radiation necrosis in 42 lesions. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated significant differences in DR (P=.002) and RI (P201Tl SPECT provides useful information for the differentiation between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis in metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas after GKS, and the RI may be the most valuable index for this purpose.

  13. Effect of tumor resection on the characteristics of functional brain networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Douw, L.; Hernández, J.M.; Reijneveld, J.C.; Stam, C.J.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2010-01-01

    Brain functioning such as cognitive performance depends on the functional interactions between brain areas, namely, the functional brain networks. The functional brain networks of a group of patients with brain tumors are measured before and after tumor resection. In this work, we perform a weighted

  14. Molecular Imaging of Tumors Using a Quantitative T1 Mapping Technique via Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Herrmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM with molecular imaging agents would allow for the specific localization of brain tumors. Prior studies using T1-weighted MR imaging demonstrated that the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 molecular imaging agent labeled heterotopic xenograft models of brain tumors more intensely than non-specific contrast agents using conventional T1-weighted imaging techniques. In this study, we used a dynamic quantitative T1 mapping strategy to more objectively compare intra-tumoral retention of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time in comparison to non-targeted control agents. Our results demonstrate that the targeted SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent, a scrambled-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 control agent, and the non-specific clinical contrast agent Optimark™ all enhanced flank tumors of human glioma cells with similar maximal changes on T1 mapping. However, the retention of the agents differs. The non-specific agents show significant recovery within 20 min by an increase in T1 while the specific agent SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 is retained in the tumors and shows little recovery over 60 min. The retention effect is demonstrated by percent change in T1 values and slope calculations as well as by calculations of gadolinium concentration in tumor compared to muscle. Quantitative T1 mapping demonstrates the superior binding and retention in tumors of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time compared to the non-specific contrast agent currently in clinical use.

  15. American brain tumor patients treated with BNCT in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to establish and maintain a database for patients from the United States who have received BNCT in Japan for malignant gliomas of the brain. This database will serve as a resource for the DOE to aid in decisions relating to BNCT research in the United States, as well as assisting the design and implementation of clinical trials of BNCT for brain cancer patients in this country. The database will also serve as an information resource for patients with brain tumors and their families who are considering this form of therapy

  16. American brain tumor patients treated with BNCT in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laramore, G.E.; Griffin, B.R.; Spence, A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish and maintain a database for patients from the United States who have received BNCT in Japan for malignant gliomas of the brain. This database will serve as a resource for the DOE to aid in decisions relating to BNCT research in the United States, as well as assisting the design and implementation of clinical trials of BNCT for brain cancer patients in this country. The database will also serve as an information resource for patients with brain tumors and their families who are considering this form of therapy.

  17. Multimodal Brain-Tumor Segmentation Based on Dirichlet Process Mixture Model with Anisotropic Diffusion and Markov Random Field Prior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yisu Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-tumor segmentation is an important clinical requirement for brain-tumor diagnosis and radiotherapy planning. It is well-known that the number of clusters is one of the most important parameters for automatic segmentation. However, it is difficult to define owing to the high diversity in appearance of tumor tissue among different patients and the ambiguous boundaries of lesions. In this study, a nonparametric mixture of Dirichlet process (MDP model is applied to segment the tumor images, and the MDP segmentation can be performed without the initialization of the number of clusters. Because the classical MDP segmentation cannot be applied for real-time diagnosis, a new nonparametric segmentation algorithm combined with anisotropic diffusion and a Markov random field (MRF smooth constraint is proposed in this study. Besides the segmentation of single modal brain-tumor images, we developed the algorithm to segment multimodal brain-tumor images by the magnetic resonance (MR multimodal features and obtain the active tumor and edema in the same time. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using 32 multimodal MR glioma image sequences, and the segmentation results are compared with other approaches. The accuracy and computation time of our algorithm demonstrates very impressive performance and has a great potential for practical real-time clinical use.

  18. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of metastatic brain tumors. Variations of metabolic profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectroscopic imaging can be helpful for the noninvasive identification of parenchymal brain tumors. The objective of the present study was the characterization of the metabolic profile of intracranial metastases, based on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). One hundred and four metastatic brain tumors were evaluated by long-echo (TR, 2000 ms; TE, 136 ms) single-voxel volume-selected proton MRS. In 83 patients the tumor fraction within the MRS voxel constituted more than 50%. Compared to normal brain, the tumors showed statistically significant decreases of N-acetylaspartate (P<0.0001), creatine (P<0.0001), and the [NAA]/choline-containing compounds ratio (P<0.0001), increases of [Cho] (P<0.0001) and the mobile lipids/[Cr] ratio (P<0.0001) and the lactate/[Cr] ratio (P<0.05), and the more frequent presence of [Lip] (P<0.0001) and [Lac] (P<0.0001) resonances. However, the majority of these differences were lost when data for patients whose tumor fraction within the MRS voxel constituted less than 50% were analyzed separately. Determination of the predominant metabolite peak on the MR spectrum [NAA, Cho, Lip] permitted us to define three general metabolic patterns of brain metastases, which, showed statistically significant associations with the size of the neoplasm (P<0.001), type of its contrast enhancement (P<0.01), and the extent of perilesional edema (P<0.05). Proton MRS can define metabolically different subsets of metastatic brain tumors, and these characteristics should be taken into consideration during the differential diagnosis of parenchymal brain lesions. (author)

  19. Imaging Brain Development: Benefiting from Individual Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Megha Sharda; Nicholas E.V. Foster; Hyde, Krista L.

    2015-01-01

    Human brain development is a complex process that evolves from early childhood to young adulthood. Major advances in brain imaging are increasingly being used to characterize the developing brain. These advances have further helped to elucidate the dynamic maturational processes that lead to the emergence of complex cognitive abilities in both typical and atypical development. However, conventional approaches involve categorical group comparison models and tend to disregard the role of widesp...

  20. Disruption of White Matter Integrity in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors: Correlates with Long-Term Intellectual Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    King, Tricia Z.; Liya Wang; Hui Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background Although chemotherapy and radiation treatment have contributed to increased survivorship, treatment-induced brain injury has been a concern when examining long-term intellectual outcomes of survivors. Specifically, disruption of brain white matter integrity and its relationship to intellectual outcomes in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors needs to be better understood. Methods Fifty-four participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging in addition to structural MRI and an in...

  1. Modeling tumor-associated edema in gliomas during anti-angiogenic therapy and its impact on imageable tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eHawkins-Daarud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically-driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor-cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR for tumors with lower proliferation rates.

  2. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  3. Application of nanoparticles in brain tumor treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    Despite progress in surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, an effective treatment of gliomas does not yet exist. This new monograph in the ASME-Momentum Press series on Biomedical & Nanomedical Technologies book shows how nanotechnology could be used both to improve the treatment efficacy and to reduce the adverse side effects. It will explain how nanotechnology-based approaches to targeted delivery of drugs across the brain-blood barrier may potentially be engineered to carry out specific functions as needed.

  4. Brain hyaluronan binding protein inhibits tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锋; 曹曼林; 王蕾

    2004-01-01

    Background Great efforts have been made to search for the angiogenic inhibitors in avascular tissues. Several proteins isolated from cartilage have been proved to have anti-angiogenic or anti-tumour effects. Because cartilage contains a great amount of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligosaccharides and abundant HA binding proteins (HABP), therefore, we speculated that HABP might be one of the factors regulating vascularization in cartilage or anti-angiogenesis in tumours. The purpose of this research was to evaluale the effects of hyaluronan binding protein on inhibiting tumour growth both in vivo and vitro. Methods A unique protein termed human brain hyaluronan (HA) binding protein (b-HABP) was cloned from human brain cDNA library. MDA-435 human breast cancer cell line was chosen as a transfectant. The in vitro underlying mechanisms were investigated by determining the possibilities of MDA-435/b-HABP colony formation on soft agar, the effects of the transfectant on the proliferation of endothelial cells and the expression levels of caspase 3 and FasL from MDA-435/b-HABP. The in vivo study included tumour growth on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and nude mice. Results Colony formation assay revealed that the colonies formed by MDA-435/b-HABP were greatly reduced compared to mock transfectants. The conditioned media from MDA-435/b-HABP inhibited the growth of endothelial cells in culture. Caspase 3 and FasL expressions were induced by MDA-435/b-HABP. The size of tumours of MDA-435/b-HABP in both CAM and nude mice was much smaller than that of MDA-435 alone. Conclusions Human brain hyaluronan binding protein (b-HABP) may represent a new kind of naturally existing anti-tumour substance. This brain-derived glycoprotein may block tumour growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells or by decreasing angiogenesis in tumour tissue via inhibiting proliferation of endothelial cells.

  5. Imaging findings in primary intracranial atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Hemant; Shroff, Manohar [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hawkins, Cynthia [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neuropathology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bouffet, Eric [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neuro-Oncology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rutka, James [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neurosurgery, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-02-01

    Intracranial atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) are rare and extremely aggressive neoplasms seen primarily in childhood. Imaging features are often considered non-specific. However, correct diagnosis of AT/RT is important because these tumors have a markedly different clinical prognosis and require more aggressive therapy. To determine the imaging features of AT/RT. We retrospectively analyzed imaging findings in 11 patients with primary intracranial AT/RT presenting over a period of 5 years. CT (n=11), MR (n=7), clinical (n=11) and pathological (n=11) features were evaluated. FISH analysis showing monosomy of chromosome 22 (absence of bcr 22q11 locus) was available for three patients. Immunohistochemical staining for INI-1 (BAF47) was performed on all tumors. There were 11 patients, 6 boys and 5 girls. The age of presentation varied from 1 month to 15 years (average age 3 years 8 months). Six tumors were located in the posterior fossa and five in the supratentorial compartment. The tumors showed a hyperdense solid component (64%) that showed moderate to marked enhancement with contrast medium. On MR imaging, the predominant signal pattern was isointensity on T1-weighted images (57%) and T2 shortening with heterogeneity on T2-weighted images (86%). All tumors were large in size (average 4.2 x 3.7 cm), and there was a tendency for calcification (36%), hemorrhage (46%), necrosis (46%) and perifocal edema (100%). There was also a high tendency for subarachnoid dissemination, with five patients (46%) demonstrating brain and/or spinal metastasis. At follow-up (n=7), six patients showed local recurrence. At the time of recurrence, all these patients showed extensive leptomeningeal spread of the disease in both intracranial and intraspinal compartments. There are no specific imaging features for intracranial AT/RT. But a high tendency toward large size, a hyperdense solid component on CT scan with calcification, hemorrhage, necrosis and subarachnoid spread suggest

  6. [Suspicion of anorexia nervosa as a cause of delayed diagnosis of brain tumor. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielska, Ewa; Węcławek-Tompol, Jadwiga; Kazanowska, Bernarda; Barg, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) are the most common solid tumors diagnosed in children. The most frequent symptoms of brain tumors in this age group are headaches and vomiting, regardless of the location of the lesions. These symptoms are non-specific, and in each case require differential diagnosis, especially if there is no gradual improvement in the patient's condition or progression. The most common signs of anorexia nervosa are chronic vomiting, weakness of the body, pain and in extreme cases cachexia. These symptoms are similar to the clinical image of CNS tumor. Teenager, described in our case report presented the following signs for several weeks prior to the diagnosis of a brain tumor: vomiting (especially after meals), non-specific headache and epigastric pain. No significant progression in the patient's condition oriented the diagnostic process towards anorexia nervosa. Although anorexia in this age group is much more common disease, compared to a brain tumor, it is vital to ruled out/ exclude organic disorders prior to diagnosis of psychogenic disorder. At the same time the waiting for the specialist consultations (ophthalmologist, neurologist) and test results (head CT, head NMR) should not prolong the patients referral to a specialist center. PMID:26615049

  7. Inorganic nanomaterials for tumor angiogenesis imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer development and metastasis. Noninvasive detection of angiogenic activities is thus of great importance in cancer diagnosis as well as evaluation of cancer therapeutic responses. Various angiogenesis-related molecular targets have been identified and used in tumor vasculature targeting and imaging. Recently, inorganic nanomaterials with various unique intrinsic physical properties have attracted growing interest in biomedical imaging applications. This article will review current progresses in the applications of inorganic nanoprobes in molecular angiogenesis imaging. Several types of nanomaterials with various optical properties, including semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles, have been used as novel optical probes to image angiogenic events. Besides optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of angiogenesis using magnetic nanoparticles has also been intensively investigated. Moreover, nanomaterials provide unique platforms for the integration of various imaging modalities together with therapeutic functionalities for multi-modality imaging and therapy. Although the application of inorganic nanomaterials in clinical imaging and diagnosis is still facing many challenges, the unique properties and functions of these novel nanoprobes make them very promising agents in angiogenesis imaging and could bring great opportunities to this fast-growing field. (orig.)

  8. Quantum dot loaded immunomicelles for tumor imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levchenko Tatyana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical imaging is a promising method for the detection of tumors in animals, with speed and minimal invasiveness. We have previously developed a lipid coated quantum dot system that doubles the fluorescence of PEG-grafted quantum dots at half the dose. Here, we describe a tumor-targeted near infrared imaging agent composed of cancer-specific monoclonal anti-nucleosome antibody 2C5, coupled to quantum dot (QD-containing polymeric micelles, prepared from a polyethylene glycol/phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE conjugate. Its production is simple and involves no special equipment. Its imaging potential is great since the fluorescence intensity in the tumor is twofold that of non-targeted QD-loaded PEG-PE micelles at one hour after injection. Methods Para-nitrophenol-containing (5% PEG-PE quantum dot micelles were produced by the thin layer method. Following hydration, 2C5 antibody was attached to the PEG-PE micelles and the QD-micelles were purified using dialysis. 4T1 breast tumors were inoculated subcutaneously in the flank of the animals. A lung pseudometastatic B16F10 melanoma model was developed using tail vein injection. The contrast agents were injected via the tail vein and mice were depilated, anesthetized and imaged on a Kodak Image Station. Images were taken at one, two, and four hours and analyzed using a methodology that produces normalized signal-to-noise data. This allowed for the comparison between different subjects and time points. For the pseudometastatic model, lungs were removed and imaged ex vivo at one and twenty four hours. Results The contrast agent signal intensity at the tumor was double that of the passively targeted QD-micelles with equally fast and sharply contrasted images. With the side views of the animals only tumor is visible, while in the dorsal view internal organs including liver and kidney are visible. Ex vivo results demonstrated that the agent detects melanoma nodes in a lung

  9. Effect of steroid on brain tumors and surround edemas : observation with regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps of perfusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To observe the hemodynamic change in brain tumors and peritumoral edemas after steroid treatment, and then investigate the clinical usefulness of perfusion MRI. We acquired conventional and perfusion MR images in 15 patients with various intracranial tumors (4 glioblastoma multiformes, 4 meningiomas, 3 metastatic tumors, 1 anaplastic ependymoma, 1 anaplastic astrocytoma, 1 hemangioblastoma, and 1 pilocytic astrocytoma). For perfusion MR imaging, a 1.5T unit employing the gradient-echo EPI technique was used, and further perfusion MR images were obtained 2-10 days after intravenous steroid therapy. After processing of the raw data, regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps were reconstructed. The maps were visually evaluated by comparing relative perfusion in brain tumors and peritumoral edemas with that in contralateral white matter. Objective evaluations were performed by comparing the perfusion ratios of brain tumors and peritumoral edemas. Visual evaluations of rCBV maps, showed that in most brain tumors (67%, 10/15), perfusion was high before steroid treatment and showed in (80%, 12/15) decreased afterwards. Objective evaluation, showed that in all brain tumors, perfusion decreased. Visual evaluation of perfusion change in peritumoral edemas revealed change in only one case, but objective evaluation indicated that perfusion decreased significantly in all seven cases. rCBV maps acquired by perfusion MR imaging can provide hemodynamic information about brain tumors and peritumoral edemas. Such maps could prove helpful in the preoperative planning of brain tumor surgery and the monitoring of steroid effects during conservative treatment. (author)

  10. Effect of steroid on brain tumors and surround edemas : observation with regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps of perfusion MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ju Youl; Sun, Joo Sung; Kim, Sun Yong; Kim, Ji Hyung; Suh, Jung Ho; Cho, Kyung Gi; Kim, Jang Sung [Ajou University, School of Medicine, Su won (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-01

    To observe the hemodynamic change in brain tumors and peritumoral edemas after steroid treatment, and then investigate the clinical usefulness of perfusion MRI. We acquired conventional and perfusion MR images in 15 patients with various intracranial tumors (4 glioblastoma multiformes, 4 meningiomas, 3 metastatic tumors, 1 anaplastic ependymoma, 1 anaplastic astrocytoma, 1 hemangioblastoma, and 1 pilocytic astrocytoma). For perfusion MR imaging, a 1.5T unit employing the gradient-echo EPI technique was used, and further perfusion MR images were obtained 2-10 days after intravenous steroid therapy. After processing of the raw data, regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps were reconstructed. The maps were visually evaluated by comparing relative perfusion in brain tumors and peritumoral edemas with that in contralateral white matter. Objective evaluations were performed by comparing the perfusion ratios of brain tumors and peritumoral edemas. Visual evaluations of rCBV maps, showed that in most brain tumors (67%, 10/15), perfusion was high before steroid treatment and showed in (80%, 12/15) decreased afterwards. Objective evaluation, showed that in all brain tumors, perfusion decreased. Visual evaluation of perfusion change in peritumoral edemas revealed change in only one case, but objective evaluation indicated that perfusion decreased significantly in all seven cases. rCBV maps acquired by perfusion MR imaging can provide hemodynamic information about brain tumors and peritumoral edemas. Such maps could prove helpful in the preoperative planning of brain tumor surgery and the monitoring of steroid effects during conservative treatment. (author)

  11. A CLINICAL STUDY FOR EVALUATING EARLY RADIOTHERAPY EFFECT IN PATIENTS WITH BRAIN TUMOR USING 99Tcm-HL91 SPECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ming; ZHANG Yong-xue; ZHANG Cheng-gang; LAN Sheng-min; WANG Zhong-min; ZHANG Xiu-fu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the early radiotherapy effect using 99Tcm-HL91 SPECT in patients with brain tumors. Methods: Twenty-one patients with brain tumors who were treated by radiotherapy were studied. KPS grade, tumor size on 99Tcm-HL91 SPECT , tumor size on MRI, and ratio of T/N (tumor counts/sec over normal brain tissue counts/sec) were investigated before ,during and after radiotherapy. Results: The average tumor size on 99Tcm-HL91 SPECT and MRI was 11.34(5.88 cm2, 9.46(5.66 cm2, respectively before radiotherapy. The tumor size on 99Tcm-HL91 SPECT was not in accordance with to that on MRI (P<0.05). KPS grade, tumor size on 99Tcm-HL91 SPECT and ratio of T/N had significance differences before, during and after radiotherapy (P<0.05), but the tumor size on MRI imaging had no significance differences before, during and after radiotherapy (P>0.05). The rate of symptom improvement was 80% during radiotherapy and 100% after radiotherapy. The rates of imaging remission based on the brain tumor size on 99Tcm-HL91 SPECT, MRI and T/N were 75%, 15%, and 80%, respectively during radiotherapy. The agreement rates between imaging remission diagnosed by those three methods and symptom improvement were 70%, 40%, and 60% respectively during radiotherapy. The rates of imaging remission based on the brain tumor sizes on 99Tcm-HL91 SPECT, MRI and T/N were 100%, 25%, and 95% respectively after radiotherapy. The agreement rates between imaging remission diagnosed by those three methods and symptoms improvement were 100%, 20%, and 95% respectively after radiotherapy. Conclusion: The tumor size on 99Tcm-HL91 SPECT is a valuable tool for evaluating early radiotherapy effect of brain tumor in process of radiotherapy. T/N is not a feasible method in evaluating radiotherapy effect of brain tumor because it may show elevation unrelated to the curative effect during radiotherapy.

  12. Radiotherapy combined with Tegafur (FT-207s) for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has anti-tumor effects as an anti-metabolite, but it cannot pass the Blood-Brain-Barrier (BBB). FT-207 a masked-compound of 5-FU, is easily lipid soluble and is able to pass the BBB. Twenty eight patients of primary brain tumor and 8 patients of metastatic brain tumor were treated with irradiation combined with 750 mg of FT-207 suppository. Twenty four patients of primary brain tumor were treated only with irradiation as control. The mean survival time was 20.4 +- 11.8 months for the combined therapy group and 17.6 +- 8.6 months for the control. The concentration of FT-207 and 5-FU in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was investigated after administration of 750 mg of FT-207 suppository per annum. The maximum concentration of FT-207 and of 5-FU in serum was 20.4 +- 11.8 mcg/ml and 0.06 +- 0.02 mcg/ml, respectively. There were observed several side effects, such as anorexia, nausea, exanthema and etc. These side effects were not so great as to interrupt the therapy at the dose level of 750 mg of FT-207. However, at the dose of 1500 mg, one case showed disturbance of consciousness, to which attention should be called. (author)

  13. Genetic abnormality predicts benefit for a rare brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    A clinical trial has shown that addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy leads to a near doubling of median survival time in patients with a form of brain tumor (oligodendroglioma) that carries a chromosomal abnormality called the 1p19q co-deletion.

  14. Learning Profiles of Survivors of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkon, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    By 2010 it is predicted that one in 900 adults will be survivors of some form of pediatric cancer. The numbers are somewhat lower for survivors of brain tumors, though their numbers are increasing. Schools mistakenly believe that these children easily fit pre-existing categories of disability. Though these students share some of the…

  15. Automated 3D Brain Tumor Edema Segmentation in FLAIR MRI

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, P.; Bartušek, Karel

    Vol. S1. Berlin : Springer-Verlag, 2013, s. 489. ISSN 1352-8661. [ESMRMB 2013. Congress. Tolouse (FR), 03.10.2013-05.10.2013] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Automated 3D * brain tumor edema segmentation * FLAIR MRI Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  16. Association Between PARP1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Zhang, Kun; Qin, Haifeng; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Liyu; Cao, Yanyan

    2016-05-01

    To systematically evaluate the association between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) rs1136410 T>C and brain tumor risk, a meta-analysis has been carried out. We performed a meta-analysis of 2004 brain tumor patients and 2944 controls by use of STATA version 12.0 to determine whether the risk of brain tumors was associated with the genotypes or alleles of rs1136410 T>C. We found a significantly decreased risk (ranging from 0.18- to 0.16-fold) in the dominant model (OR = 0.84, 95 % CI = 0.75-0.95), the C vs. T model (OR = 0.82, 95 % CI = 0.74-0.91), and the CT vs. TT model (OR = 0.86, 95 % CI = 0.76-0.98). The same genetic models demonstrated noteworthy associations when analysis was restrained to glioma (OR = 0.85, 95 % CI = 0.75-0.96; OR = 0.83, 95 % CI = 0.74-0.92; OR =