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Sample records for brain stem implant

  1. Activity-dependent developmental plasticity of the auditory brain stem in children who use cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Karen A; Papsin, Blake C; Harrison, Robert V

    2003-12-01

    1) To determine if a period of early auditory deprivation influences neural activity patterns as revealed by human auditory brain stem potentials evoked by electrical stimulation from a cochlear implant. 2) To examine the potential for plasticity in the human auditory brain stem. Specifically, we asked if electrically evoked auditory potentials from the auditory nerve and brain stem in children show evidence of development as a result of implant use. 3) To assess whether a sensitive or critical period exists in auditory brain stem development. Specifically, is there an age of implantation after which there are no longer developmental changes in auditory brain stem activity as revealed by electrically evoked potentials? The electrically evoked compound potential of the auditory nerve (ECAP) and the electrically evoked auditory brain stem response (EABR) were recorded repeatedly during the first year of implant use in each of 50 children. The children all had pre- or peri-lingual onset of severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss and received their implants at ages ranging from 12 mo to 17 yr. All children received Nucleus cochlear implant devices. All children were in therapy and in school programs that emphasized listening and required the children to wear their implants consistently. Initial stimulation from the cochlear implant evoked clear responses from the auditory nerve and auditory brain stem in most children. There was no correlation between minimum latency, maximum amplitude, or slope of amplitude growth of initial responses with age at implantation for ECAP eN1, EABR eIII and eV components (p > 0.05). During the first year of implant use, minimum latency of these waves significantly decreased (p brain stem and EABR eIII-eV for upper brain stem, decreased during the period of 6 to 12 mo of cochlear implant use (p children underwent implantation (p plasticity that we have shown in the human auditory brain stem does not appear from EABR data to be

  2. De Novo Arteriovenous Malformation Growth Secondary to Implantation of Genetically Modified Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Samii, Amir; Lang, Josef M; Götz, Friedrich; Samii, Madjid; Krauss, Joachim K

    2016-04-01

    Local biological drug delivery in the brain is an innovative field of medicine that developed rapidly in recent years. Our report illustrates a unique case of de novo development of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) after implantation of genetically modified allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells in the brain. A 50-year-old man was included in a prospective clinical study (study ID number CM GLP-1/01, 2007-004516-31) investigating a novel neuroprotective approach in stroke patients to prevent perihematomal neuronal damage. In this study, alginate microcapsules containing genetically modified allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells producing the neuroprotective glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were implanted. Three years later, the patient presented with aphasia and a focal seizure due to a new left frontal intracerebral hemorrhage. Angiography revealed a de novo left frontal AVM. The development of an AVM within a period of 3 years after implantation of the glucagon-like peptide-1-secreting mesenchymal stem cells suggests a possible relationship. This case exemplifies that further investigations are necessary to assess the safety of genetically modified cell lines for local biological drug delivery in the brain.

  3. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... is used to treat DIPG. External and/or internal radiation therapy may be used to treat focal brain stem ...

  4. Brain tumor stem cell dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzuto, Giuseppina; Toccacieli, Laura; Mazzoleni, Stefania; Frustagli, Gianluca; Chistolini, Pietro; Galli, Rossella; Molinari, Agnese

    2014-01-01

    Issues regarding cancer stem cell (CSC) movement are important in neurosphere biology as cell-cell or cell-environment interactions may have significant impacts on CSC differentiation and contribute to the heterogeneity of the neurosphere. Despite the growing body of literature data on the biology of brain tumor stem cells, floating CSC-derived neurospheres have been scarcely characterized from a morphological and ultrastructural point of view. Here we report a morphological and ultrastructural characterization performed by live imaging and scanning electron microscopy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) CSC-derived neurospheres are heterogeneous and are constituted by cells, morphologically different, capable of forming highly dynamic structures. These dynamic structures are regulated by not serendipitous cell-cell interactions, and they synchronously pulsate following a cyclic course made of "fast" and "slow" alternate phases. Autocrine/paracrine non canonical Wnt signalling appears to be correlated with the association status of neurospheres. The results obtained suggest that GBM CSCs can behave both as independents cells and as "social" cells, highly interactive with other members of its species, giving rise to a sort of "multicellular organism".

  5. Brain stem type neuro-Behcet's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Satoshi; Hirose, Genjiro; Kosoegawa, Hiroshi; Oda, Rokuhei; Yoshioka, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Two cases of brain stem type Neuro-Behcet's syndrome were evaluated by brain CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Super-conducting type, 0.5 tesla) to correlate with the neurological findings. In the acute phase, low density area with peripheral enhancement effect and mass effect were seen at the brain stem in brain CT. MRI revealed a extensive high intensity signal area mainly involving the corticospinal tract in the meso-diencephalon as well as pons by T 2 weighted images (spin echo, TR = 1, 600 msec, TE = 90 msec) and the value of T 1 , T 2 , at the brain stem lesion were prolonged moderately. After high dose steroid treatment, the low density area in brain CT and high signal area in MRI were gradually reduced in its size. Peripheral enhancement effect in brain CT disappeared within 10 months in case 1, one month in the other case. In the chronic stage, the reduction of low density area and atrophy of brain stem were noted in brain CT. The lesion in chronic stage had low intensity in T 1 , T 2 weighted images and the T 1 , T 2 values at the lesion were mildly prolonged in MRI. Sequentially CT with enhancement and MRI examinations with T 1 , T 2 weighted images were useful to detect the lesion and to evaluate the activity, evolution of brain stem type Neuro-Behcet's syndrome. (author)

  6. Somatosensory and acoustic brain stem reflex myoclonus.

    OpenAIRE

    Shibasaki, H; Kakigi, R; Oda, K; Masukawa, S

    1988-01-01

    A patient with brain stem reflex myoclonus due to a massive midbrain infarct was studied electrophysiologically. Myoclonic jerks were elicited at variable latencies by tapping anywhere on the body or by acoustic stimuli, and mainly involved flexor muscles of upper extremities. The existence of convergence of somatosensory and acoustic inputs in the brain stem was suggested. This myoclonus seemed to be mediated by a mechanism similar to the spino-bulbo-spinal reflex.

  7. Stem cells to regenerate the newborn brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velthoven, C.T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is a frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality with limited therapeutic options. In this thesis we investigate whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) regenerate the neonatal brain after HI injury. We show that transplantation of MSC after neonatal brain injury

  8. Auditory brain stem responses in the detection of brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgirgin, O Nuri; Ozçelik, Tuncay; Sevimli, Nilay Kizilkaya

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated comatose patients by auditory brain stem responses (ABR) to determine the role of ABR in the diagnosis of impending brain death. Sixty comatose patients in the intensive care unit were evaluated by brain stem evoked response audiometry. Correlations were sought between the absence or presence of ABRs and the presenting pathology, the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, and ultimate diagnoses. The brain stem responses were totally absent in 41 patients. Presence of wave I could be obtained in only 10 patients. All the waveforms were found in nine patients; however, in eight patients the potentials disappeared as the GCS scores decreased to 3. Detection of wave I alone strongly suggested dysfunction of the brain stem. However, loss of wave I particularly in trauma patients aroused doubt as to whether the absence was associated with auditory end organ injury or brain stem dysfunction. The results suggest that evaluation of ABR may support brain death in a comatose patient (i) when wave I is present alone, (ii) the absence of wave I is accompanied by a documented auditory end organ injury, or (iii) when previously recorded potentials are no longer detectable.

  9. Neurofibromatosis type 1: brain stem tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilaniuk, L.T.; Molloy, P.T.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Phillips, P.C.; Vaughan, S.N.; Liu, G.T.; Sutton, L.N.; Needle, M.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the clinical and imaging findings of brain stem tumours in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The NF1 patients imaged between January 1984 and January 1996 were reviewed and 25 patients were identified with a brain stem tumour. Clinical, radiographical and pathological results were obtained by review of records and images. Brain stem tumour identification occurred much later than the clinical diagnosis of NF1. Medullary enlargement was most frequent (68 %), followed by pontine (52 %) and midbrain enlargement (44 %). Patients were further subdivided into those with diffuse (12 patients) and those with focal (13 patients) tumours. Treatment for hydrocephalus was required in 67 % of the first group and only 15 % of the second group. Surgery was performed in four patients and revealed fibrillary astrocytomas, one of which progressed to an anaplastic astrocytoma. In 40 % of patients both brain stem and optic pathway tumours were present. The biological behaviour of brain stem tumours in NF1 is unknown. Diffuse tumours in the patients with NF1 appear to have a much more favourable prognosis than patients with similar tumours without neurofibromatosis type 1. (orig.). With 7 figs., 3 tabs

  10. The brain stem function in patients with brain bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshihiro

    1990-01-01

    A syndrome of detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) is occasionally found in patients with brain bladder. To evaluate the brain stem function in cases of brain bladder, urodynamic study, dynamic CT scan of the brain stem (DCT) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) were performed. The region of interest of DCT aimed at the posterolateral portion of the pons. The results were analysed in contrast with the presense of DSD in urodynamic study. DCT studies were performed in 13 cases with various brain diseases and 5 control cases without neurological diseases. Abnormal patterns of the time-density curve consisted of low peak value, prolongation of filling time and low rapid washout ratio (low clearance ratio) of the contrast medium. Four of 6 cases with DSD showed at least one of the abnormal patterns of the time-density curve bilaterally. In 7 cases without DSD none showed bilateral abnormality of the curve and in 2 of 7 cases only unilateral abnormality was found. ABR was performed in 8 patients with brain diseases. The interpeak latency of the wave I-V (I-V IPL) was considered to be prolonged in 2 cases with DSD compared to that of 4 without DSD. In 2 cases with DSD who had normal DCT findings, measurement of the I-V IPL was impossible due to abnormal pattern of the ABR wave. Above mentioned results suggests the presence of functional disturbance at the posterolateral portion of the pons in cases of brain bladder with DSD. (author)

  11. Failure of Emperion modular femoral stem with implant analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Stronach, MD, MS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modularity in total hip arthroplasty provides multiple benefits to the surgeon in restoring the appropriate alignment and position to a previously damaged hip joint. The vast majority of modern implants incorporate modularity into their design with some implants having multiple modular interfaces. There is the potential for failure at modular junctions because of fretting and crevice corrosion in combination with mechanical loading. This case report details the failure of an Emperion (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, TN femoral stem in a 67-year-old male patient 6 years after total hip replacement. Analysis of the implant revealed mechanically assisted crevice corrosion that likely accelerated fatigue crack initiation in the hip stem. The benefits of modularity come with the potential drawback of a combination of fretting and crevice corrosion at the modular junction, which may accelerate fatigue, crack initiation and ultimately reduce the hip longevity.

  12. Effects of new beta-type Ti-40Nb implant materials, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, acetylcholine and nicotine on human mesenchymal stem cells of osteoporotic and non osteoporotic donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauschke, Vivien; Gebert, Annett; Calin, Mariana; Eckert, Jürgen; Scheich, Sebastian; Heiss, Christian; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of osteoporotic fractures is still challenging and an urgent need exists for new materials, better adapted to osteoporotic bone by adjusted Young's modulus, appropriate surface modification and pharmaceuticals. Titanium-40-niobium alloys, mechanically ground or additionally etched and titanium-6-aluminium-4-vanadium were analyzed in combination with brain-derived neurotrophic factor, acetylcholine and nicotine to determine their effects on human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro over 21 days using lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase assays, live cell imaging and immunofluorescence microscopy. Cell number of human mesenchymal stem cells of osteoporotic donors was increased after 14 d in presence of ground titanium-40-niobium or titanium-6-aluminium-4-vanadium, together with brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Cell number of human mesenchymal stem cells of non osteoporotic donors increased after 21 d in presence of titanium-6-aluminium-4-vanadium without pharmaceuticals. No significant increase was measured for ground or etched titanium-40-niobium after 21 d. Osteoblast differentiation of osteoporotic donors was significantly higher than in non osteoporotic donors after 21 d in presence of etched, ground titanium-40-niobium or titanium-6-aluminium-4-vanadium accompanied by all pharmaceuticals tested. In presence of all alloys tested brain-derived neurotrophic factor, acetylcholine and nicotine increased differentiation of cells of osteoporotic donors and accelerated it in non osteoporotic donors. We conclude that ground titanium-40-niobium and brain-derived neurotrophic factor might be most suitable for subsequent in vivo testing.

  13. Characterization of Cancer Stem Cells in Patients with Brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gliomas, in general, and astrocytomas, in particular, represent the most frequent primary brain tumors. Nowadays, it is increasingly believed that gliomas may arise from cancer stem cells, which share several characteristics with normal neural stem cells. Brain tumor stem cells have been found to express a ...

  14. Correlation of brain stem diffusion-weighted imaging score with vertebrobasilar artery stenosis in patients with acute brain stem infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-sheng YU; Hui-sheng CHEN

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation of brain stem diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesion score with vertebrobasilar artery stenosis as revealed by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in patients with acute brain stem infarction. Methods A total of 253 patients diagnosed as acute brain stem infarction by means of brain magnetic resonance imaging were analyzed retrospectively. Of them 211 patients were enrolled in the present study, and they were qualified with the enrolling standard, an...

  15. Effect of occlusal support by implant prostheses on brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Naoko

    2011-10-01

    The present study was carried out to identify how gum chewing with and without occlusal support by implant prostheses affects brain function as well as chewing function. Twenty-four subjects rehabilitated with implant-supported fixed prostheses were evaluated. An electroencephalograph (EEG) (ESA-Pro) and mandibular kinesiograph (Bio PAK(®)) wear used to measure brain function and chewing function, respectively, before and after gum chewing with and without an implant superstructure. Based on brain function estimated by the Dα values derived from measurement data, the subjects were divided into the normal region group (including the sub-normal region group) (n=15; Dα≥0.952) and the impaired region group (n=9; DαBrain function in the normal region group showed no change after gum chewing, whether or not an implant superstructure was in place (p>0.05). However, brain function in the impaired region group showed significant improvement after gum chewing (pbrain function compared to the results without an implant superstructure. In the impaired region group, there was a high positive correlation between brain function and masticatory movement (γ=0.75). Subjects in the impaired region group revealed a strong positive correlation between brain function and masticatory movement, indicating that occlusal support by implant-supported fixed prostheses has the potential to enhance brain function. Copyright © 2011 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract in the brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Akira; Onomura, Kentaro; Ohno, Masato

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract in the brain stem was studied in 25 patients with chronic supratentorial vascular accidents. In the relatively early stages, at least three months after ictus, increased signal intensities in axial T 2 -weighted images - with or without decreased signal intensities in axial T 1 -weighted images - were observed in the brain stem ipsilaterally. In later stages, at least six months after ictus, shrinkage of the brain stem ipsilaterally - with or without decreased signal intensities - was clearly observed in axial T 1 -weighted images. MRI is therefore regarded a sensitive diagnostic modality for evaluating wallerian degeneration in the brain stem. (author)

  17. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Human Adult Stem Cells in the Mammalian Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Karlea L; Smith, Ashleigh E; Sandeman, Lauren; Inglis, Joshua M; Ridding, Michael C; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-01-01

    The burden of stroke on the community is growing, and therefore, so is the need for a therapy to overcome the disability following stroke. Cellular-based therapies are being actively investigated at a pre-clinical and clinical level. Studies have reported the beneficial effects of exogenous stem cell implantation, however, these benefits are also associated with limited survival of implanted stem cells. This exploratory study investigated the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a complementary therapy to increase stem cell survival following implantation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) in the rodent cortex. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and injected with 6 × 10(5) DPSC or control media via an intracranial injection, and then received real TMS (TMS0.2 Hz) or sham TMS (TMSsham) every 2nd day beginning on day 3 post DPSC injection for 2 weeks. Brain sections were analyzed for the survival, migration and differentiation characteristics of the implanted cells. In animals treated with DPSC and TMS0.2 Hz there were significantly less implanted DPSC and those that survived remained in the original cerebral hemisphere compared to animals that received TMSsham. The surviving implanted DPSC in TMS0.2 Hz were also found to express the apoptotic marker Caspase-3. We suggest that TMS at this intensity may cause an increase in glutamate levels, which promotes an unfavorable environment for stem cell implantation, proliferation and differentiation. It should be noted that only one paradigm of TMS was tested as this was conducted as a exploratory study, and further TMS paradigms should be investigated in the future.

  18. Electrical Guidance of Human Stem Cells in the Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Feng Feng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Limited migration of neural stem cells in adult brain is a roadblock for the use of stem cell therapies to treat brain diseases and injuries. Here, we report a strategy that mobilizes and guides migration of stem cells in the brain in vivo. We developed a safe stimulation paradigm to deliver directional currents in the brain. Tracking cells expressing GFP demonstrated electrical mobilization and guidance of migration of human neural stem cells, even against co-existing intrinsic cues in the rostral migration stream. Transplanted cells were observed at 3 weeks and 4 months after stimulation in areas guided by the stimulation currents, and with indications of differentiation. Electrical stimulation thus may provide a potential approach to facilitate brain stem cell therapies.

  19. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

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    SHIH-MIN eWANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection.

  20. Neural Stem Cells in the Diabetic Brain

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    Tomás P. Bachor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental diabetes in rodents rapidly affects the neurogenic niches of the adult brain. Moreover, behavioral disorders suggest that a similar dysfunction of the neurogenic niches most likely affects diabetic and prediabetic patients. Here, we review our present knowledge about adult neural stem cells, the methods used for their study in diabetic models, and the effects of experimental diabetes. Variations in diet and even a short hyperglycemia profoundly change the structure and the proliferative dynamics of the neurogenic niches. Moreover, alterations of diabetic neurogenic niches appear to be associated with diabetic cognitive disorders. Available evidence supports the hypothesis that, in the adult, early changes of the neurogenic niches might enhance development of the diabetic disease.

  1. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection.

  2. Hydrogel limits stem cell dispersal in the deaf cochlea: implications for cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Bryony A; Backhouse, Steven S; Cimenkaya, Cengiz; Shepherd, Robert K

    2012-12-01

    Auditory neurons provide the critical link between a cochlear implant and the brain in deaf individuals, therefore their preservation and/or regeneration is important for optimal performance of this neural prosthesis. In cases where auditory neurons are significantly depleted, stem cells (SCs) may be used to replace the lost population of neurons, thereby re-establishing the critical link between the periphery (implant) and the brain. For such a therapy to be therapeutically viable, SCs must be differentiated into neurons, retained at their delivery site and damage caused to the residual auditory neurons minimized. Here we describe the transplantation of SC-derived neurons into the deaf cochlea, using a peptide hydrogel to limit their dispersal. The described approach illustrates that SCs can be delivered to and are retained within the basal turn of the cochlea, without a significant loss of endogenous auditory neurons. In addition, the tissue response elicited from this surgical approach was restricted to the surgical site and did not extend beyond the cochlear basal turn. Overall, this approach illustrates the feasibility of targeted cell delivery into the mammalian cochlea using hydrogel, which may be useful for future cell-based transplantation strategies, for combined treatment with a cochlear implant to restore function.

  3. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchino, Sabrina; Abdouh, Mohamed; Bernier, Gilbert

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings

  4. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Shah, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on

  5. Osseointegration of a 3D Printed Stemmed Titanium Dental Implant: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Tedesco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this pilot study, a 3D printed Grade V titanium dental implant with a novel dual-stemmed design was investigated for its biocompatibility in vivo. Both dual-stemmed (n = 12 and conventional stainless steel conical (n = 4 implants were inserted into the tibial metaphysis of New Zealand white rabbits for 3 and 12 weeks and then retrieved with the surrounding bone, fixed, dehydrated, and embedded into epoxy resin. The implants were analyzed using correlative histology, microcomputed tomography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The histological presence of multinucleated osteoclasts and cuboidal osteoblasts revealed active bone remodeling in the stemmed implant starting at 3 weeks and by 12 weeks in the conventional implant. Bone-implant contact values indicated that the stemmed implants supported bone growth along the implant from the coronal crest at both 3- and 12-week time periods and showed bone growth into microporosities of the 3D printed surface after 12 weeks. In some cases, new bone formation was noted in between the stems of the device. Conventional implants showed mechanical interlocking but did have indications of stress cracking and bone debris. This study demonstrates the comparable biocompatibility of these 3D printed stemmed implants in rabbits up to 12 weeks.

  6. Osseointegration of a 3D Printed Stemmed Titanium Dental Implant: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, James; Lee, Bryan E J; Lin, Alex Y W; Binkley, Dakota M; Delaney, Kathleen H; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    In this pilot study, a 3D printed Grade V titanium dental implant with a novel dual-stemmed design was investigated for its biocompatibility in vivo. Both dual-stemmed ( n  = 12) and conventional stainless steel conical ( n  = 4) implants were inserted into the tibial metaphysis of New Zealand white rabbits for 3 and 12 weeks and then retrieved with the surrounding bone, fixed, dehydrated, and embedded into epoxy resin. The implants were analyzed using correlative histology, microcomputed tomography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The histological presence of multinucleated osteoclasts and cuboidal osteoblasts revealed active bone remodeling in the stemmed implant starting at 3 weeks and by 12 weeks in the conventional implant. Bone-implant contact values indicated that the stemmed implants supported bone growth along the implant from the coronal crest at both 3- and 12-week time periods and showed bone growth into microporosities of the 3D printed surface after 12 weeks. In some cases, new bone formation was noted in between the stems of the device. Conventional implants showed mechanical interlocking but did have indications of stress cracking and bone debris. This study demonstrates the comparable biocompatibility of these 3D printed stemmed implants in rabbits up to 12 weeks.

  7. Mechanical and Biological Interactions of Implants with the Brain and Their Impact on Implant Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodanov, Dimiter; Delbeke, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Neural prostheses have already a long history and yet the cochlear implant remains the only success story about a longterm sensory function restoration. On the other hand, neural implants for deep brain stimulation are gaining acceptance for variety of disorders including Parkinsons disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It is anticipated that the progress in the field has been hampered by a combination of technological and biological factors, such as the limited understanding of the longterm behavior of implants, unreliability of devices, biocompatibility of the implants among others. While the field's understanding of the cell biology of interactions at the biotic-abiotic interface has improved, relatively little attention has been paid on the mechanical factors (stress, strain), and hence on the geometry that can modulate it. This focused review summarizes the recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms of mechanical interaction between the implants and the brain. The review gives an overview of the factors by which the implants interact acutely and chronically with the tissue: blood-brain barrier (BBB) breach, vascular damage, micromotions, diffusion etc. We propose some design constraints to be considered in future studies. Aspects of the chronic cell-implant interaction will be discussed in view of the chronic local inflammation and the ways of modulating it.

  8. The effect of distal ulnar implant stem material and length on bone strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austman, Rebecca L; Beaton, Brendon J B; Quenneville, Cheryl E; King, Graham J W; Gordon, Karen D; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2007-01-01

    Implant design parameters can greatly affect load transfer from the implant stem to the bone. We have investigated the effect of length or material of distal ulnar implant stems on the surrounding bone strains. Eight cadaveric ulnas were instrumented with 12 strain gauges and secured in a customized jig. Strain data were collected while loads (5-30 N) were applied to the medial surface of the native ulnar head. The native ulnar head was removed, and a stainless steel implant with an 8-cm-long finely threaded stem was cemented into the canal. After the cement had cured, the 8-cm stem was removed, leaving a threaded cement mantle in the canal that could accept shorter threaded stems of interest. The loading protocol was then repeated for stainless steel stems that were 7, 5, and 3 cm in length, as well as for a 5-cm-long titanium alloy (TiAl(6)V(4)) stem. Other stainless steel stem lengths between 3 and 7 cm were tested at intervals of 0.5 cm, with only a 20 N load applied. No stem length tested matched the native strains at all gauge locations. No significant differences were found between any stem length and the native bone at the 5th and 6th strain gauge positions. Strains were consistently closer to the native bone strains with the titanium stem than the stainless steel stem for each gauge pair that was positioned on the bone overlying the stem. The 3-cm stem results were closer to the native strains than the 7-cm stem for all loads at gauges locations that were on top of the stem. The results from this study suggest that the optimal stem characteristics for distal ulnar implants from a load transfer point of view are possessed by shorter (approximately 3 to 4 cm) titanium stems.

  9. Combination cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells for brain stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-05-01

    Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stroke. The Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adult rat bone marrow and the neural stem cells were isolated from ganglion eminence of rat embryo 14 days. The Mesenchymal stem cells were injected 1 day after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and the neural stem cells transplanted 7 day after MCAO. After 28 days, the neurological outcomes and brain lesion volumes were evaluated. Also, the activity of Caspase 3 was assessed in different groups. The group which received combination cell therapy had better neurological examination and less brain lesion. Also the combination cell therapy group had the least Caspase 3 activity among the groups. The combination cell therapy is more effective than Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and neural stem cell therapy separately in treating the brain stroke in rats.

  10. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Sang; Heo, Sung Hyuk [Dept. of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  11. Neonatal bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis caused by brain stem haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Blazer, S; Hemli, J A; Sujov, P O; Braun, J

    1989-01-01

    We describe a neonate with severe bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis caused by haemorrhage in the lower brain stem. To our knowledge this association has not been previously reported in the English medical literature.

  12. Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Kabeer, Mustafa H; Vu, Long T; Keschrumrus, Vic; Yin, Hong Zhen; Dethlefs, Brent A; Zhong, Jiang F; Weiss, John H; Loudon, William G

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of malignant brain tumors remains a challenge. Stem cell technology has been applied in the treatment of brain tumors largely because of the ability of some stem cells to infiltrate into regions within the brain where tumor cells migrate as shown in preclinical studies. However, not all of these efforts can translate in the effective treatment that improves the quality of life for patients. Here, we perform a literature review to identify the problems in the field. Given the lack of efficacy of most stem cell-based agents used in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we found that stem cell distribution (i.e., only a fraction of stem cells applied capable of targeting tumors) are among the limiting factors. We provide guidelines for potential improvements in stem cell distribution. Specifically, we use an engineered tissue graft platform that replicates the in vivo microenvironment, and provide our data to validate that this culture platform is viable for producing stem cells that have better stem cell distribution than with the Petri dish culture system. PMID:25258664

  13. Brain micromotion around implants in the rodent somatosensory cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilletti, Aaron; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2006-09-01

    The magnitude of brain tissue micromotion relative to stationary brain implants and its impact on the viability and function of the surrounding brain tissue due to mechanical stresses is poorly understood. The central goal of this study is to characterize surface micromotion in the somatosensory cortex against stationary cylindrical implants. We used a differential variable reluctance transducer (DVRT) in adult rats (n = 6) to monitor micromotion normal to the somatosensory cortex surface. Experiments were performed both in the presence and in the absence of dura mater and displacement measurements were made at three different locations within craniotomies of two different sizes. In anesthetized rats, pulsatile surface micromotion was observed to be in the order of 10-30 µm due to pressure changes during respiration and 2-4 µm due to vascular pulsatility. Brain displacement values due to respiration were significantly lower in the presence of the dura compared to those without the dura. In addition, large inward displacements of brain tissue between 10-60 µm were observed in n = 3 animals immediately following the administration of anesthesia. Such significant micromotion can impact a wide variety of acute and chronic procedures involving any brain implants, precise neurosurgery or imaging and therefore has to be factored in the design of such procedures.

  14. A Wireless 32-Channel Implantable Bidirectional Brain Machine Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Routhu, Sudhamayee; Moon, Kee S.; Lee, Sung Q.; Youm, WooSub; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    All neural information systems (NIS) rely on sensing neural activity to supply commands and control signals for computers, machines and a variety of prosthetic devices. Invasive systems achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by eliminating the volume conduction problems caused by tissue and bone. An implantable brain machine interface (BMI) using intracortical electrodes provides excellent detection of a broad range of frequency oscillatory activities through the placement of a sensor in direct contact with cortex. This paper introduces a compact-sized implantable wireless 32-channel bidirectional brain machine interface (BBMI) to be used with freely-moving primates. The system is designed to monitor brain sensorimotor rhythms and present current stimuli with a configurable duration, frequency and amplitude in real time to the brain based on the brain activity report. The battery is charged via a novel ultrasonic wireless power delivery module developed for efficient delivery of power into a deeply-implanted system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo tests on a behaving primate to record the local field potential (LFP) oscillation and stimulate the target area at the same time. PMID:27669264

  15. A Wireless 32-Channel Implantable Bidirectional Brain Machine Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Routhu, Sudhamayee; Moon, Kee S; Lee, Sung Q; Youm, WooSub; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2016-09-24

    All neural information systems (NIS) rely on sensing neural activity to supply commands and control signals for computers, machines and a variety of prosthetic devices. Invasive systems achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by eliminating the volume conduction problems caused by tissue and bone. An implantable brain machine interface (BMI) using intracortical electrodes provides excellent detection of a broad range of frequency oscillatory activities through the placement of a sensor in direct contact with cortex. This paper introduces a compact-sized implantable wireless 32-channel bidirectional brain machine interface (BBMI) to be used with freely-moving primates. The system is designed to monitor brain sensorimotor rhythms and present current stimuli with a configurable duration, frequency and amplitude in real time to the brain based on the brain activity report. The battery is charged via a novel ultrasonic wireless power delivery module developed for efficient delivery of power into a deeply-implanted system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo tests on a behaving primate to record the local field potential (LFP) oscillation and stimulate the target area at the same time.

  16. Correlation of brain stem diffusion-weighted imaging score with vertebrobasilar artery stenosis in patients with acute brain stem infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-sheng YU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the correlation of brain stem diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI lesion score with vertebrobasilar artery stenosis as revealed by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA in patients with acute brain stem infarction. Methods A total of 253 patients diagnosed as acute brain stem infarction by means of brain magnetic resonance imaging were analyzed retrospectively. Of them 211 patients were enrolled in the present study, and they were qualified with the enrolling standard, and they underwent examination of brain DWI and MRA simultaneously. The DWI lesion scores and imaging data were analyzed comparatively and statistically. Results Significant correlation was found between DWI lesion score and the main trunk stenosis degree of vertebrobasilar artery in patients with acute brain stem infarction (P=0.009. An increase in overall stenosis degree was found along with an increase in DWI lesion score (P=0.005. When the DWI lesion score was ≥4, occlusion of the main trunk of vertebrobasilar artery could be predicted with sensitivity of 74.5% and specificity of 93.2%, respectively (P=0.000. Conclusions  The DWI lesion score increases as the degree of main trunk stenosis of vertebrobasilar artery increased in patients with acute brain stem infarction. The DWI lesion score, in certain extent, may predict the existence and degree of stenosis of the main trunk of vertebrobasilar artery. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.06.04

  17. Brain stem hypoplasia associated with Cri-du-Chat syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries.

  18. Brain stem hypoplasia associated with Cri-du-Chat syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu [Dept. of Radiology, Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries.

  19. Discovery of Undescribed Brain Tissue Changes Around Implanted Microelectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshi Desai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-implantable microelectrode arrays are devicesdesigned to record or electrically stimulate the activity ofneurons in the brain. These devices hold the potential tohelp treat epilepsy, paralysis, blindness, and deafness, andalso provide researchers with insights into a varietyof neural processes, such as memory formation.While these devices have a very promising future,researchers are discovering that their long-termfunctionality is greatly limited by the brain’s naturalimmune response to foreign objects. To improve thefunctional lifetime of these devices, one solution lies infully characterizing and understanding this tissue response.Roles for microglia and astrocytes in this biologicalresponse have been characterized. However, changesto oligodendrocytes, cells that myelinate axons, remainpoorly understood. These cells provide insulationto the axons, which is required for proper neuralfunctioning. Here we report on the changes that occurwith oligodendrocyte processes in tissue aroundmicroelectrode implants in the brain.Six rats were surgically implanted with microelectrodearrays and allowed to recover for 1, 2, or 4 weeks.Subjects were then sacrificed and the brain tissue wasprocessed using our recently developed method, Device-Capture Histology. Immunohistochemistry and confocalmicroscopy was employed to assess the responsearound the device. Results indicated a decrease inoligodendrocyte density and a loss in typical directionalorientation of oligodendrocyte processes in tissue near thedevice. These results suggest alterations in the underlyingneuronal networks around these devices, which maygreatly impact the current functional utility of thesepromising devices.

  20. Head Stabilization Reflex in Patients with Brain Stem Vascular Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferah Kızılay

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The head stabilization reflex (HSR elicited by stimulating the accessory nerve is an oligo-polysynaptic/plurisegmental flexor reflex, which brings the head back to its previous position in response to a variety of sudden head position changes. This reflex was studied in numerous diseases and was inhibited in patients with cerebellar lesions. The present study aimed to investigate how HSR is affected in patients with brain stem vascular lesions. METHODS: The study included 18 patients with brain stem vascular lesions and 18 normal control subjects. Concentric needle electrodes were inserted into the belly of both the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the accessory nerve, and were stimulated separately from the posterior triangle. In all, 8 HSR responses were recorded and mean onset latencies were measured. RESULTS: By stimulating the left accessory nerve in patients with brain stem vascular lesions, contralateral HSR could not be elicited. Similarly, by stimulating the right accessory nerve, contralateral HSR response was elicited only in 3 of the 18 patients. In contrast, stimulation of both the left and right accessory nerves elicited contralateral HSR in all the controls. CONCLUSION: HSR was inhibited in patients with brain stem vascular lesions. This observation shows that the descending pathways in the brain stem facilitate HSR in a similar fashion as the cerebellum was shown to do in a previous study

  1. Mapping the calcitonin receptor in human brain stem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, Rebekah L; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Waldvogel, Henry J

    2016-01-01

    receptors (AMY) are a heterodimer formed by the coexpression of CTR with receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). CTR with RAMP1 responds potently to both amylin and CGRP. The brain stem is a major site of action for circulating amylin and is a rich site of CGRP binding. This study aimed to enhance our...... understanding of these hormone systems by mapping CTR expression in the human brain stem, specifically the medulla oblongata. Widespread CTR-like immunoreactivity was observed throughout the medulla. Dense CTR staining was noted in several discrete nuclei, including the nucleus of the solitary tract...

  2. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  3. Human Brain Stem Structures Respond Differentially to Noxious Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eRitter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Concerning the physiological correlates of pain, the brain stem is considered to be one core region that is activated by noxious input. In animal studies, different slopes of skin heating (SSH with noxious heat led to activation in different columns of the midbrain periaqueductal grey (PAG. The present study aimed at finding a method for differentiating structures in PAG and other brain stem structures, which are associated with different qualities of pain in humans according to the structures that were associated with different behavioral significances to noxious thermal stimulation in animals. Brain activity was studied by fMRI in healthy subjects in response to steep and shallow SSH with noxious heat. We found differential activation to different SSH in the PAG and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM. In a second experiment we demonstrate that the different SSH were associated with different pain qualities. Our experiments provide evidence that brainstem structures, i.e. the PAG and the RVM, become differentially activated by different SSH. Therefore, different SSH can be utilized when brain stem structures are investigated and when it is aimed to activate these structures differentially. Moreover, percepts of first pain were elicited by shallow SSH whereas percepts of second pain were elicited by steep SSH. The stronger activation of these brain stem structures to SSH, eliciting percepts of second vs. first pain, might be of relevance for activating different coping strategies in response to the noxious input with the two types of SSH.

  4. The biomechanical effect of anteversion and modular neck offset on stress shielding for short-stem versus conventional long-stem hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshulak, Peter; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Aziz, Mina S R; Bougherara, Habiba; Zdero, Radovan; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2016-03-01

    Short-stem hip implants are increasingly common since they preserve host bone stock and presumably reduce stress shielding by improving load distribution in the proximal femur. Stress shielding may lead to decreased bone density, implant loosening, and fracture. However, few biomechanical studies have examined short-stem hip implants. The purpose of this study was to compare short-stem vs. standard length stemmed implants for stress shielding effects due to anteversion-retroversion, anterior-posterior position, and modular neck offset. Twelve artificial femurs were implanted with either a short-stem modular-neck implant or a conventional length monolithic implant in 0° or 15° of anteversion. Three modular neck options were tested in the short-stem implants. Three control femurs remained intact. Femurs were mounted in adduction and subjected to axial loading. Strain gauge values were collected to validate a Finite Element (FE) model, which was used to simulate the full range of physiologically possible anteversion and anterior-posterior combinations (n = 25 combinations per implant). Calcar stress was compared between implants and across each implant's range of anteversion using one and two-way ANOVA. Stress shielding was defined as the overall change in stress compared to an intact femur. The FE model compared well with experimental strains (intact: slope = 0.898, R = 0.943; short-stem: slope = 0.731, R = 0.948; standard-stem: slope = 0.743, R = 0.859); correction factors were used to adjust slopes to unity. No implant anteversion showed significant reduction in stress shielding (α = 0.05, p > 0.05). Stress shielding was significantly higher in the standard-stem implant (63% change from intact femur, p short-stem implants (29-39% change, p Short-stem implants reduce stress shielding compared to standard length stemmed implants, while implant anteversion and anterior-posterior position had no effect. Therefore, short-stem implants have a greater likelihood of

  5. Characterization of Cancer Stem Cells in Patients with Brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brain tumor stem cells have been found to express a variety of markers including Nestin, which can be potentially used as therapeutic targets. Dysregulation of the intermediate filament protein Nestin, the tumor-suppressor gene TP53, and Ki67 labeling index are implicated in glioma genesis and therapeutic resistance.

  6. CT findings of traumatic primary brain-stem injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, Yasuaki; Hatashita, Shizuo; Bandou, Kuniaki; Ueki, Yasuyuki; Abe, Kouzou; Koga, Nobunori; Sugimura, Jun; Sakakibara, Tokiwa; Takagi, Suguru

    1984-01-01

    A series of 27 consecutive patients with traumatic primary brain stem injuries was studied. They were diagnosed by means of clinical signs, neurological examination, and computerized tomography (CT). The CT findings of the brain-stem lesions were classified into 4 types: Type H, spotty, high-density; Type H and L, high- and low-densities; Type L, low-density; Type I, isodensity. The Glasgow coma scale (GCS), neurological findings on admission, CT findings (findings in the brain stem, obliteration of perimesencephalic cistern (PMC), and other findings), and the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) were examined. In the 9 cases of Type H, there was a correlation between the GCS and the GOS, and the spotty, high-density lesions were localized mainly in the dorsal and/or ventral midbrain parenchyma, but these lesions did not show focal signs and symptoms. Without an obliteration of the PMC, Type-H patients did not always have a bad outcome. In the 4 cases of Type H and L, the 2 cases of Type L, and the 12 cases of Type I, there was an obliteration of the PMC. All of the these cases had a bad outcome (1 case of moderate disability, 3 cases of severe disability, and 14 cases of death). The mechanism producing a spotty, high-density area was discussed. The weaker impact (than the other types) and individual anatomical differences weresupposed to make for a spotty, high-density are in the brain stem. (author)

  7. Growth hormone (GH), brain development and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, M J; Blackmore, D G

    2011-12-01

    A range of observations support a role for GH in development and function of the brain. These include altered brain structure in GH receptor null mice, and impaired cognition in GH deficient rodents and in a subgroup of GH receptor defective patients (Laron dwarfs). GH has been shown to alter neurogenesis, myelin synthesis and dendritic branching, and both the GH receptor and GH itself are expressed widely in the brain. We have found a population of neural stem cells which are activated by GH infusion, and which give rise to neurons in mice. These stem cells are activated by voluntary exercise in a GH-dependent manner. Given the findings that local synthesis of GH occurs in the hippocampus in response to a memory task, and that GH replacement improves memory and cognition in rodents and humans, these new observations warrant a reappraisal of the clinical importance of GH replacement in GH deficient states.

  8. A miniaturized neuroprosthesis suitable for implantation into the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Binkley, David; Blalock, Benjamin; Andersen, Richard; Ulshoefer, Norbert; Johnson, Travis; Del Castillo, Linda

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents current research on a miniaturized neuroprosthesis suitable for implantation into the brain. The prosthesis is a heterogeneous integration of a 100-element microelectromechanical system (MEMS) electrode array, front-end complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit for neural signal preamplification, filtering, multiplexing and analog-to-digital conversion, and a second CMOS integrated circuit for wireless transmission of neural data and conditioning of wireless power. The prosthesis is intended for applications where neural signals are processed and decoded to permit the control of artificial or paralyzed limbs. This research, if successful, will allow implantation of the electronics into the brain, or subcutaneously on the skull, and eliminate all external signal and power wiring. The neuroprosthetic system design has strict size and power constraints with each of the front-end preamplifier channels fitting within the 400 x 400-microm pitch of the 100-element MEMS electrode array and power dissipation resulting in less than a 1 degree C temperature rise for the surrounding brain tissue. We describe the measured performance of initial micropower low-noise CMOS preamplifiers for the neuroprosthetic.

  9. The short stem GHEs in total hip replacement – experience after 380 implantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Standard straight stems have been recognized as a gold standard implant in the field of hip replacement surgery. However, lately uncemented bone-preserving short stems started to gain more and more popularity. This was reflected in the increasing variety of available models. Up till now, short and mid-term results are available.Patients and methods: In 2002, the cementless short stemmed GHEs was introduced. 380 patients were included in our study between 2002 and 2008. Only GHEs short stems were implanted. The clinical and radiological evaluations were performed in the Orthopaedic Department, Leipzig University Hospitals, on the average of 24 months (3 to 60 months postoperatively.Results: 365 primary implantations and 15 revision implantations were carried out. Average age 60 years. Favourable clinical and radiological outcome was seen in 361/380 patients (95%. Postoperative complications were seen in 19/380 patients (5%: 8 fissures/fractures (2.1%, 5 infections (1.3%, 4 aseptic loosenings (1.1%, 2 dislocations (0.5%.Conclusions: Short stem implants, including our own experience with GHEs model, are satisfying and promising. They represent a valuable supplementation of the treatment modalities in hip replacement surgery. However, long term results are still awaited.

  10. Pathological and immunohistochemical study of lethal primary brain stem injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongchao Sun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the deaths that occur shortly after injury or in hospitals are caused by mild trauma. Slight morphological changes are often found in the brain stems of these patients during autopsy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the histopathological changes involved in primary brain stem injuries (PBSI and their diagnostic significance. Methods A total of 65 patients who had died of PBSI and other conditions were randomly selected. They were divided into 2 groups, an injury group (25 cases and a control group (20 cases. Slides of each patient’s midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata were prepared and stained with HE, argentaffin, and immunohistochemical agents (GFAP, NF, amyloid-ß, MBP. Under low power (×100 and NF staining, the diameter of the thickest longitudinal axon was measured at its widest point. Ten such diameters were collected for each part of the brain (midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. Data were recorded and analyzed statistically. Results Brain stem contusions, astrocyte activity, edema, and pathological changes in the neurons were visibly different in the injury and control groups (P P  Conclusions These histopathological changes may prove beneficial to the pathological diagnosis of PBSI during autopsy. The measurement of axon diameters provides a referent quantitative index for the diagnosis of the specific causes of death involved in PBSI. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1345298818712204

  11. Stem Cell Technology for (Epi)genetic Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemens, Renzo J M; Soares, Edilene S; Esteller, Manel; Delgado-Morales, Raul

    2017-01-01

    Despite the enormous efforts of the scientific community over the years, effective therapeutics for many (epi)genetic brain disorders remain unidentified. The common and persistent failures to translate preclinical findings into clinical success are partially attributed to the limited efficiency of current disease models. Although animal and cellular models have substantially improved our knowledge of the pathological processes involved in these disorders, human brain research has generally been hampered by a lack of satisfactory humanized model systems. This, together with our incomplete knowledge of the multifactorial causes in the majority of these disorders, as well as a thorough understanding of associated (epi)genetic alterations, has been impeding progress in gaining more mechanistic insights from translational studies. Over the last years, however, stem cell technology has been offering an alternative approach to study and treat human brain disorders. Owing to this technology, we are now able to obtain a theoretically inexhaustible source of human neural cells and precursors in vitro that offer a platform for disease modeling and the establishment of therapeutic interventions. In addition to the potential to increase our general understanding of how (epi)genetic alterations contribute to the pathology of brain disorders, stem cells and derivatives allow for high-throughput drugs and toxicity testing, and provide a cell source for transplant therapies in regenerative medicine. In the current chapter, we will demonstrate the validity of human stem cell-based models and address the utility of other stem cell-based applications for several human brain disorders with multifactorial and (epi)genetic bases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), fragile X syndrome (FXS), Angelman syndrome (AS), Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), and Rett syndrome (RTT).

  12. Implanted neural progenitor cells regulate glial reaction to brain injury and establish gap junctions with host glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaverón, Rocío; Matarredona, Esperanza R; de la Cruz, Rosa R; Macías, David; Gálvez, Victoria; Pastor, Angel M

    2014-04-01

    Transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) in the lesioned brain is able to restore morphological and physiological alterations induced by different injuries. The local microenvironment created at the site of grafting and the communication between grafted and host cells are crucial in the beneficial effects attributed to the NPC implants. We have previously described that NPC transplantation in an animal model of central axotomy restores firing properties and synaptic coverage of lesioned neurons and modulates their trophic factor content. In this study, we aim to explore anatomical relationships between implanted NPCs and host glia that might account for the implant-induced neuroprotective effects. Postnatal rat subventricular zone NPCs were isolated and grafted in adult rats after transection of the medial longitudinal fascicle. Brains were removed and analyzed eight weeks later. Immunohistochemistry for different glial markers revealed that NPC-grafted animals displayed significantly greater microglial activation than animals that received only vehicle injections. Implanted NPCs were located in close apposition to activated microglia and reactive astrocytes. The gap junction protein connexin43 was present in NPCs and glial cells at the lesion site and was often found interposed within adjacent implanted and glial cells. Gap junctions were identified between implanted NPCs and host astrocytes and less frequently between NPCs and microglia. Our results show that implanted NPCs modulate the glial reaction to lesion and establish the possibility of communication through gap junctions between grafted and host glial cells which might be involved in the restorative effects of NPC implants. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Stereotactic technique of RF antenna implantation for brain hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Uzuka, T.; Grinev, I.; Tanaka, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We have tried 13.56 MHz RF interstitial hyperthermia for the patients with malignant brain tumor. The purpose of this report is to assess the complication risk rate and the achievement yield of stereotactic procedure for RF antenna implantation into the deep-seated brain tumor. One hundred and twenty-five patients underwent 144 stereotactic RF antenna implantation procedures for interstitial hyperthermia for malignant brain tumors at Niigata University, Japan. One hundred and eight patients had malignant gliomas (54 primary, 54 recurrent), 24 had metastatic tumors, 5 had malignant lymphomas, 5 had meningiomas and 2 had miscellaneous tumors. Indication of this trial was the tumor with inoperative deep-seated tumor or elderly patients. RF antennas and catheters for thermistor probes were set into the tumor with stereotactic apparatus under local anesthesia. Postoperative CT scan underwent in order to assess the accuracy of antenna setting and to check the complications. The hyperthermic treatment underwent with a single antenna in 85 patients, 2 antennas in 43 patients, 3 in 2, 4 in 12, 5 in 1 and 6 antennas in 1 patient. Appropriate RF antenna positioning was obtained in 138 of 144 procedures (95.8 %). Six patients incurred complications (4.2 %). Three patients suffered intratumoral hemorrhage. RF antennas were set into the inappropriate position in 2 cases, hyperthermia was not achieved. One patient occurred with liquorrhea. However, six patients (4.2 %) incurred complications, stereotactic RF antenna setting was a safe and reliable technique of the hyperthermic treatment for the patients with malignant brain tumors. (author)

  14. Primary brain tumors, neural stem cell, and brain tumor cancer cells: where is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Isabelle; Swiss, Victoria; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of brain tumor-derived cells (BTSC) with the properties of stem cells has led to the formulation of the hypothesis that neural stem cells could be the cell of origin of primary brain tumors (PBT). In this review we present the most common molecular changes in PBT, define the criteria of identification of BTSC and discuss the similarities between the characteristics of these cells and those of the endogenous population of neural stem cells (NPCs) residing in germinal areas of the adult brain. Finally, we propose possible mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression and suggest a model of tumor initiation that includes intrinsic changes of resident NSC and potential changes in the microenvironment defining the niche where the NSC reside. PMID:20045420

  15. Implant Surface Design Regulates Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyan, B D; Cheng, A; Olivares-Navarrete, R; Schwartz, Z

    2016-03-01

    Changes in dental implant materials, structural design, and surface properties can all affect biological response. While bulk properties are important for mechanical stability of the implant, surface design ultimately contributes to osseointegration. This article reviews the surface parameters of dental implant materials that contribute to improved cell response and osseointegration. In particular, we focus on how surface design affects mesenchymal cell response and differentiation into the osteoblast lineage. Surface roughness has been largely studied at the microscale, but recent studies have highlighted the importance of hierarchical micron/submicron/nanosurface roughness, as well as surface roughness in combination with surface wettability. Integrins are transmembrane receptors that recognize changes in the surface and mediate downstream signaling pathways. Specifically, the noncanonical Wnt5a pathway has been implicated in osteoblastic differentiation of cells on titanium implant surfaces. However, much remains to be elucidated. Only recently have studies been conducted on the differences in biological response to implants based on sex, age, and clinical factors; these all point toward differences that advocate for patient-specific implant design. Finally, challenges in implant surface characterization must be addressed to optimize and compare data across studies. An understanding of both the science and the biology of the materials is crucial for developing novel dental implant materials and surface modifications for improved osseointegration. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  16. Implanted miniaturized antenna for brain computer interface applications: analysis and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yujuan; Rennaker, Robert L; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are designed to provide real-time control signals for prosthetic devices, study brain function, and/or restore sensory information lost as a result of injury or disease. Using Radio Frequency (RF) to wirelessly power a BCI could widely extend the number of applications and increase chronic in-vivo viability. However, due to the limited size and the electromagnetic loss of human brain tissues, implanted miniaturized antennas suffer low radiation efficiency. This work presents simulations, analysis and designs of implanted antennas for a wireless implantable RF-powered brain computer interface application. The results show that thin (on the order of 100 micrometers thickness) biocompatible insulating layers can significantly impact the antenna performance. The proper selection of the dielectric properties of the biocompatible insulating layers and the implantation position inside human brain tissues can facilitate efficient RF power reception by the implanted antenna. While the results show that the effects of the human head shape on implanted antenna performance is somewhat negligible, the constitutive properties of the brain tissues surrounding the implanted antenna can significantly impact the electrical characteristics (input impedance, and operational frequency) of the implanted antenna. Three miniaturized antenna designs are simulated and demonstrate that maximum RF power of up to 1.8 milli-Watts can be received at 2 GHz when the antenna implanted around the dura, without violating the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) limits.

  17. A glucose fuel cell for implantable brain-machine interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin I Rapoport

    Full Text Available We have developed an implantable fuel cell that generates power through glucose oxidation, producing 3.4 μW cm(-2 steady-state power and up to 180 μW cm(-2 peak power. The fuel cell is manufactured using a novel approach, employing semiconductor fabrication techniques, and is therefore well suited for manufacture together with integrated circuits on a single silicon wafer. Thus, it can help enable implantable microelectronic systems with long-lifetime power sources that harvest energy from their surrounds. The fuel reactions are mediated by robust, solid state catalysts. Glucose is oxidized at the nanostructured surface of an activated platinum anode. Oxygen is reduced to water at the surface of a self-assembled network of single-walled carbon nanotubes, embedded in a Nafion film that forms the cathode and is exposed to the biological environment. The catalytic electrodes are separated by a Nafion membrane. The availability of fuel cell reactants, oxygen and glucose, only as a mixture in the physiologic environment, has traditionally posed a design challenge: Net current production requires oxidation and reduction to occur separately and selectively at the anode and cathode, respectively, to prevent electrochemical short circuits. Our fuel cell is configured in a half-open geometry that shields the anode while exposing the cathode, resulting in an oxygen gradient that strongly favors oxygen reduction at the cathode. Glucose reaches the shielded anode by diffusing through the nanotube mesh, which does not catalyze glucose oxidation, and the Nafion layers, which are permeable to small neutral and cationic species. We demonstrate computationally that the natural recirculation of cerebrospinal fluid around the human brain theoretically permits glucose energy harvesting at a rate on the order of at least 1 mW with no adverse physiologic effects. Low-power brain-machine interfaces can thus potentially benefit from having their implanted units

  18. Brain tissue banking for stem cells for our future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Emily; Palmero, Sheryl; Murrell, Wayne

    2016-12-19

    In our lab we study neurogenesis and the development of brain tumors. We work towards treatment strategies for glioblastoma and towards using autologous neural stem cells for tissue regeneration strategies for brain damage and neurodegenerative disorders. It has been our policy to try to establish living cell cultures from all human biopsy material that we obtain. We hypothesized that small pieces of brain tissue could be cryopreserved and that live neural stem cells could be recovered at a later time. DMSO has been shown to possess a remarkable ability to diffuse through cell membranes and pass into cell interiors. Its chemical properties prevent the formation of damaging ice crystals thus allowing cell storage at or below -180 C. We report here a protocol for successful freezing of small pieces of tissue derived from human brain and human brain tumours. Virtually all specimens could be successfully revived. Assays of phenotype and behaviour show that the cell cultures derived were equivalent to those cultures previously derived from fresh tissue.

  19. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan) Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Hasuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Uchida, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Matsumoto, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Tsukamoto, Y. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Ohno, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Masuda, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven patients with olivary degeneration caused by cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhages were reviewed. In four patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, old haematomas were identified as being located in the dentate nucleus; the contralateral inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense on proton-density- and T2-weighted images. In two patients with pontine haemorrhages, the old haematomas were in the tegmentum and the ipsilateral inferior olivary nuclei, which were hyperintense. In one case of midbrain haemorrhage, the inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense bilaterally. The briefest interval from the ictus to MRI was 2 months. Hypertrophic olivary nuclei were observed only at least 4 months after the ictus. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage should not be confused with ischaemic, neoplastic, or other primary pathological conditions of the medulla. (orig.)

  20. Influence of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells pre-implantation differentiation approach on periodontal regeneration in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, X; Yang, F.; Yan, X.; Yang, W; Yu, N.; Oortgiesen, D.A.; Wang, Y.; Jansen, J.A.; Walboomers, X.F.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has previously been shown successful to achieve periodontal regeneration. However, the preferred pre-implantation differentiation strategy (e.g. maintenance of stemness, osteogenic or chondrogenic induction) to obtain optimal

  1. Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Jens F; Sunde, Niels A; Bergholt, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation......Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation...

  2. [15-year results following implantation of a stem type AML hip prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerter, K; Meyenberg, A; Sander, K; Layher, F; Roth, A

    2013-06-01

    The trend in arthroplasty of the hip joint to implement new models is partly based on theoretical considerations. In order to verify to which extent the philosophy of individual models is ultimately successful, the presentation of long-term results is required. In the years 1991 and 1992, 433 patients with primary implantation of an uncemented total hip replacement in primary coxarthrosis with a stem type AML (anatomic medullary locking) were treated surgically. 283 of them got a cementless cup type Duraloc. In 311 (71.8 %) patients the mean survival rate of the prosthesis could be determined at a mean follow-up of 15.5 years. 145 (33.5 %) patients were followed up completely both clinically and radiologically. Radiographically, the stem position, changes of the periprosthetic bone of the stem and the cup, as well as the wear of the cups were examined. The cumulative survival rate of the AML stem after 15.5 years was 97.5 %, of the Duraloc cup 88.2 %. The clinical results of the hip scores according to Harris and Merle d'Aubigné were good and excellent and patient satisfaction was very high. There was no relationship between stem position, stress shielding and surrounding lyses at the femur and the acetabulum and survival of stem or cup. There was no correlation between inlay wear and survival of the Duraloc cup. A subsiding of the stem in 2 cases had no effect on the clinical symptoms and quality of life. The press-fit implanted AML stem and the Duraloc cup revealed very good results during the investigation period. Like other implants, the survival rate is limited at the presented implant mainly by the cup. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Acute traumatic brain-stem hemorrhage produced by sudden caudal displacement of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirvis, S.E.; Wolf, A.L.; Thompson, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines in an experimental canine study and a clinical review, whether acute caudal displacement of the brain following blunt trauma produces hemorrhage in the rostral anterior midline of the brain stem by tethering the basilar to the fixed carotid arteries. In four dogs, a balloon catheter was suddenly inflated over the frontal lobe; in two, the carotid-basilar vascular connections were severed prior to balloon inflation. ICP was monitored during and after balloon inflation. Hemorrhage was verified by MR imaging and direct inspection of the fixed brain specimens. Admission CT scans demonstrating acute traumatic brain stem hemorrhage (TBH) in human patients were reviewed to determine the site of TBH, predominant site of impact, and neurologic outcome

  4. Copine1 regulates neural stem cell functions during brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Sung, Soo-Eun; Cheal Yoo, Jae; Park, Jae-Yong; Yi, Gwan-Su; Heo, Jun Young; Lee, Jae-Ran; Kim, Nam-Soon; Lee, Da Yong

    2018-01-01

    Copine 1 (CPNE1) is a well-known phospholipid binding protein in plasma membrane of various cell types. In brain cells, CPNE1 is closely associated with AKT signaling pathway, which is important for neural stem cell (NSC) functions during brain development. Here, we investigated the role of CPNE1 in the regulation of brain NSC functions during brain development and determined its underlying mechanism. In this study, abundant expression of CPNE1 was observed in neural lineage cells including NSCs and immature neurons in human. With mouse brain tissues in various developmental stages, we found that CPNE1 expression was higher at early embryonic stages compared to postnatal and adult stages. To model developing brain in vitro, we used primary NSCs derived from mouse embryonic hippocampus. Our in vitro study shows decreased proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation potential in CPNE1 deficient NSCs. Finally, we found that the deficiency of CPNE1 downregulated mTOR signaling in embryonic NSCs. These data demonstrate that CPNE1 plays a key role in the regulation of NSC functions through the activation of AKT-mTOR signaling pathway during brain development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of adrenal catecholamines in cerebrovasodilation evoked from brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iadecola, C.; Lacombe, P.M.; Underwood, M.D.; Ishitsuka, T.; Reis, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors studied whether adrenal medullary catecholamines (CAs) contribute to the metabolically linked increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal medullary reticular formation (DMRF). Rats were anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated. The DMRF was electrically stimulated with intermittent trains of pulses through microelectrodes stereotaxically implanted. Blood gases were controlled and, during stimulation, arterial pressure was maintained within the autoregulated range for rCBF. rCBF and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability were determined in homogenates of brain regions by using [ 14 C]iodoantipyrine and α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), respectively, as tracers. Plasma CAs (epinephrine and norepinephrine) were measured radioenzymatically. DMRF stimulation increased rCBF throughout the brain and elevated plasma CAs substantially. Acute bilateral adrenalectomy abolished the increase in plasma epinephrine, reduced the increases in flow in cerebral cortex, and abolished them elsewhere in brain. They conclude that the increases in rCBF elicited from the DMRF has two components, one dependent on, and the other independent of CAs. Since the BBB is impermeable to CAs and DMRF stimulation fails to open the BBB, the results suggest that DMRF stimulations allows, through a mechanism not yet determined, circulating CAs to act on brain and affect brain function

  6. Therapeutic interaction of systemically-administered mesenchymal stem cells with peri-implant mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Kondo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of systemically transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on the peri-implant epithelial sealing around dental implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of donor rats and expanded in culture. After recipient rats received experimental titanium dental implants in the bone sockets after extraction of maxillary right first molars, donor rat MSCs were intravenously transplanted into the recipient rats. RESULTS: The injected MSCs were found in the oral mucosa surrounding the dental implants at 24 hours post-transplantation. MSC transplantation accelerated the formation of the peri-implant epithelium (PIE-mediated mucosa sealing around the implants at an early stage after implantation. Subsequently, enhanced deposition of laminin-332 was found along the PIE-implant interface at 4 weeks after the replacement. We also observed enhanced attachment and proliferation of oral mucous epithelial cells. CONCLUSION: Systemically transplanted MSCs might play a critical role in reinforcing the epithelial sealing around dental implants.

  7. Therapeutic Interaction of Systemically-Administered Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Peri-Implant Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Ryosuke; Atsuta, Ikiru; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Matsuura, Yuri; Furuhashi, Akihiro; Tsukiyama, Yoshihiro; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of systemically transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on the peri-implant epithelial sealing around dental implants. Materials and Methods MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of donor rats and expanded in culture. After recipient rats received experimental titanium dental implants in the bone sockets after extraction of maxillary right first molars, donor rat MSCs were intravenously transplanted into the recipient rats. Results The injected MSCs were found in the oral mucosa surrounding the dental implants at 24 hours post-transplantation. MSC transplantation accelerated the formation of the peri-implant epithelium (PIE)-mediated mucosa sealing around the implants at an early stage after implantation. Subsequently, enhanced deposition of laminin-332 was found along the PIE-implant interface at 4 weeks after the replacement. We also observed enhanced attachment and proliferation of oral mucous epithelial cells. Conclusion Systemically transplanted MSCs might play a critical role in reinforcing the epithelial sealing around dental implants. PMID:24651408

  8. In-vitro chondrogenic potential of synovial stem cells and chondrocytes allocated for autologous chondrocyte implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubosch, Eva Johanna; Heidt, Emanuel; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The use of passaged chondrocytes is the current standard for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). De-differentiation due to amplification and donor site morbidity are known drawbacks highlighting the need for alternative cell sources. Methods: Via clinically validated flow cytometry...... analysis, we compared the expression of human stem cell and cartilage markers (collagen type 2 (Col2), aggrecan (ACAN), CD44) of chondrocytes (CHDR), passaged chondrocytes for ACI (CellGenix™), bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), and synovial derived stem cells (SDSC). Results: Primary...

  9. Modeling Stem/Progenitor Cell-Induced Neovascularization and Oxygenation Around Solid Implants

    KAUST Repository

    Jain, Harsh Vardhan

    2012-07-01

    Tissue engineering constructs and other solid implants with biomedical applications, such as drug delivery devices or bioartificial organs, need oxygen (O(2)) to function properly. To understand better the vascular integration of such devices, we recently developed a novel model sensor containing O(2)-sensitive crystals, consisting of a polymeric capsule limited by a nanoporous filter. The sensor was implanted in mice with hydrogel alone (control) or hydrogel embedded with mouse CD117/c-kit+ bone marrow progenitor cells in order to stimulate peri-implant neovascularization. The sensor provided local partial O(2) pressure (pO(2)) using noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance signal measurements. A consistently higher level of peri-implant oxygenation was observed in the cell-treatment case than in the control over a 10-week period. To provide a mechanistic explanation of these experimental observations, we present in this article a mathematical model, formulated as a system of coupled partial differential equations, that simulates peri-implant vascularization. In the control case, vascularization is considered to be the result of a foreign body reaction, while in the cell-treatment case, adipogenesis in response to paracrine stimuli produced by the stem cells is assumed to induce neovascularization. The model is validated by fitting numerical predictions of local pO(2) to measurements from the implanted sensor. The model is then used to investigate further the potential for using stem cell treatment to enhance the vascular integration of biomedical implants. We thus demonstrate how mathematical modeling combined with experimentation can be used to infer how vasculature develops around biomedical implants in control and stem cell-treated cases.

  10. Modeling Stem/Progenitor Cell-Induced Neovascularization and Oxygenation Around Solid Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Nicanor I.; Byrne, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering constructs and other solid implants with biomedical applications, such as drug delivery devices or bioartificial organs, need oxygen (O2) to function properly. To understand better the vascular integration of such devices, we recently developed a novel model sensor containing O2-sensitive crystals, consisting of a polymeric capsule limited by a nanoporous filter. The sensor was implanted in mice with hydrogel alone (control) or hydrogel embedded with mouse CD117/c-kit+ bone marrow progenitor cells in order to stimulate peri-implant neovascularization. The sensor provided local partial O2 pressure (pO2) using noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance signal measurements. A consistently higher level of peri-implant oxygenation was observed in the cell-treatment case than in the control over a 10-week period. To provide a mechanistic explanation of these experimental observations, we present in this article a mathematical model, formulated as a system of coupled partial differential equations, that simulates peri-implant vascularization. In the control case, vascularization is considered to be the result of a foreign body reaction, while in the cell-treatment case, adipogenesis in response to paracrine stimuli produced by the stem cells is assumed to induce neovascularization. The model is validated by fitting numerical predictions of local pO2 to measurements from the implanted sensor. The model is then used to investigate further the potential for using stem cell treatment to enhance the vascular integration of biomedical implants. We thus demonstrate how mathematical modeling combined with experimentation can be used to infer how vasculature develops around biomedical implants in control and stem cell-treated cases. PMID:22224628

  11. Rescue of Brain Function Using Tunneling Nanotubes Between Neural Stem Cells and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Xie, Chong; Tan, Zijian; Tian, Qi; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Mingyuan; Guan, Yangtai

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that neural stem cells (NSCs) can ameliorate cerebral ischemia in animal models. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying one of the neuroprotective effects of NSCs: tunneling nanotube (TNT) formation. We addressed whether the control of cell-to-cell communication processes between NSCs and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and, particularly, the control of TNT formation could influence the rescue function of stem cells. In an attempt to mimic the cellular microenvironment in vitro, a co-culture system consisting of terminally differentiated BMECs from mice in a distressed state and NSCs was constructed. Additionally, engraftment experiments with infarcted mouse brains revealed that control of TNT formation influenced the effects of stem cell transplantation in vivo. In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that TNTs exist between NSCs and BMECs and that regulation of TNT formation alters cell function.

  12. Oral Implant-Prostheses: New Teeth for a Brighter Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Cicco

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated that chewing can be regarded as a preventive measure for cognitive impairment, whereas masticatory deficiency, associated with soft-diet feeding, is a risk factor for the development of dementia. At present the link between orofacial sensorimotor activity and cognitive functions is unknown. In subjects with unilateral molar loss we have shown asymmetries in both pupil size and masticatory muscles electromyographic (EMG activity during clenching: the molar less side was characterized by a lower EMG activity and a smaller pupil. Since implant-prostheses, greatly reduced both the asymmetry in EMG activity and in pupil's size, trigeminal unbalance, leading to unbalance in the activity of the Locus Coeruleus (LC, may be responsible for the pupil's asymmetry. According to the findings obtained in animal models, we propose that the different activity of the right and left LC may induce an asymmetry in brain activity, thus leading to cognitive impairment. According to this hypothesis, prostheses improved the performance in a complex sensorimotor task and increased the mydriasis associated with haptic tasks. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the implant-prosthesis therapy, which reduces the unbalance of trigeminal proprioceptive afferents and the asymmetry in pupil's size, may improve arousal, boosting performance in a complex sensorimotor task.

  13. Mechanism and Clinical Properties of StemBios Cell Therapy: Induction of Early Osseointegration in Novel Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chao-Chia; Ou, Keng-Liang; Wu, Chia-Yu; Huang, Yen-Heng; Wang, James; Yen, Yun; Cheng, Han-Yi; Lin, Yun-Ho

    To examine early bone tissue healing in dental implants incorporating StemBios cell therapy. SLAffinity samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The clinical trial comprised 11 patients, who each received a dental implant in the mandible. Only one of these 11 patients received StemBios cell therapy in combination with the dental implant. The patients continued to be observed over a 4-month period after implantation using computed tomography and resonance frequency analysis. It was found that StemBios cell therapy promoted bone tissue healing in the case of the treated dental implant. The data indicated that stress altered more smoothly and declined faster in the patient who received the StemBios cell therapy than those without StemBios cell therapy over 4 months. A dental implant with SLAffinity surface treatment, in combination with StemBios cell therapy, significantly promoted bone tissue healing, especially at early osseointegration compared with that of implants without StemBios cell therapy when monitored over a 4-month period.

  14. Isolated brain stem edema in a pediatric patient with head trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarslan, K; Basarslan, F; Karakus, A; Yilmaz, C

    2015-01-01

    Brain stem is the most vital part of our body and is a transitional region of the brain that connects the cerebrum with the spinal cord. Though, being small in size, it is full of indispensible functions such as the breathing, heart beat. Injury to the brain stem has similar effects as a brain injury, but it is more fatal. Use of the Glasgow Coma Score as a prognostic indicator of outcome in patients with head injuries is widely accepted in clinical practice. Traumatic brain stem edema in children is rare, but is associated with poor outcome. The question is that whether it is being aware of computerized tomography appearance of the posterior fossa when initial evaluating pediatric patients with head trauma at emergency clinics. Normal and edematous brain stem without an additional pathology are slightly different and not distinguished easily. On the other hand, brain stem edema should be promptly identified and appropriately treated in a short time.

  15. Machine learning techniques for the optimization of joint replacements: Application to a short-stem hip implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilla, Myriam; Borgiani, Edoardo; Martínez, Javier; Duda, Georg N; Checa, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Today, different implant designs exist in the market; however, there is not a clear understanding of which are the best implant design parameters to achieve mechanical optimal conditions. Therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate if the geometry of a commercial short stem hip prosthesis can be further optimized to reduce stress shielding effects and achieve better short-stemmed implant performance. To reach this aim, the potential of machine learning techniques combined with parametric Finite Element analysis was used. The selected implant geometrical parameters were: total stem length (L), thickness in the lateral (R1) and medial (R2) and the distance between the implant neck and the central stem surface (D). The results show that the total stem length was not the only parameter playing a role in stress shielding. An optimized implant should aim for a decreased stem length and a reduced length of the surface in contact with the bone. The two radiuses that characterize the stem width at the distal cross-section in contact with the bone were less influential in the reduction of stress shielding compared with the other two parameters; but they also play a role where thinner stems present better results.

  16. Machine learning techniques for the optimization of joint replacements: Application to a short-stem hip implant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Cilla

    Full Text Available Today, different implant designs exist in the market; however, there is not a clear understanding of which are the best implant design parameters to achieve mechanical optimal conditions. Therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate if the geometry of a commercial short stem hip prosthesis can be further optimized to reduce stress shielding effects and achieve better short-stemmed implant performance. To reach this aim, the potential of machine learning techniques combined with parametric Finite Element analysis was used. The selected implant geometrical parameters were: total stem length (L, thickness in the lateral (R1 and medial (R2 and the distance between the implant neck and the central stem surface (D. The results show that the total stem length was not the only parameter playing a role in stress shielding. An optimized implant should aim for a decreased stem length and a reduced length of the surface in contact with the bone. The two radiuses that characterize the stem width at the distal cross-section in contact with the bone were less influential in the reduction of stress shielding compared with the other two parameters; but they also play a role where thinner stems present better results.

  17. Brain stem evoked response to forward and reversed speech in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Gary C; Amaya, Elizabeth M; de Rivera, Jacinta M Diaz; Donan, Namee M; Duong, Mylien T; Hsu, Jeffrey N; Tran, Kim; Tsang, Lian P

    2004-09-15

    Speech stimuli played in reverse are perceived as unfamiliar and alien-sounding, even though phoneme duration and fundamental voicing frequency are preserved. Although language perception ultimately resides in the neocortex, the brain stem plays a vital role in processing auditory information, including speech. The present study measured brain stem frequency-following responses (FFR) evoked by forward and reverse speech stimuli recorded from electrodes oriented horizontally and vertically to measure signals with putative origins in auditory nerve and rostral brain stem, respectively. The vertical FFR showed increased amplitude due to forward speech. It is concluded that familiar phonological and prosodic properties of forward speech selectively activate central brain stem neurons.

  18. Changes in strain patterns after implantation of a short stem with metaphyseal anchorage compared to a standard stem: an experimental study in synthetic bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Gronewold

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Short stem hip arthroplasties with predominantly metaphyseal fixation, such as the METHA® stem (Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany, are recommended because they are presumed to allow a more physiologic load transfer and thus a reduction of stress-shielding. However, the hypothesized metaphyseal anchorage associated with the aforementioned benefits still needs to be verified. Therefore, the METHA short stem and the Bicontact® standard stem (Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany were tested biomechanically in synthetic femora while strain gauges monitored their corresponding strain patterns. For the METHA stem, the strains in all tested locations including the region of the calcar (87% of the non-implanted femur were similar to conditions of synthetic bone without implanted stem. The Bicontact stem showed approximately the level of strain of the non-implanted femur on the lateral and medial aspect in the proximal diaphysis of the femur. On the anterior and posterior aspect of the proximal metaphysis the strains reached averages of 78% and 87% of the non-implanted femur, respectively. This study revealed primary metaphyseal anchorage of the METHA short stem, as opposed to a metaphyseal-diaphyseal anchorage of the Bicontact stem.

  19. Tomographic criteria of gliomas in the brain stem in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado Junior, M.A.; Bracchi, M.; D'Incerti, L.; Passerini, A.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between Computed Tomography Imaging, histopathological and prognostic data is evaluated by reviewing 37 cases of brain stem neoplasm in infants. The results indicate a presence of a cystic lesion with solid mural nodule as the single prognostic criteria of a greater survival rate. Such finding frequently corresponds to Pilocytic Astrocytomas. No correlations between contrast enhancement and prognostic was found. The association between the prognostic value to the densitometric characteristics of the lesions was not possible. It was concluded that the evaluations of the extension of such lesion is fundamental. Therefore, Magnetic Resonance Imaging has more value than computed tomography. (M.A.C.)

  20. Stem cell-paved biobridges facilitate stem transplant and host brain cell interactions for stroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kelsey; Gonzales-Portillo, Gabriel S; Acosta, Sandra A; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V; Tajiri, Naoki

    2015-10-14

    Distinguished by an infarct core encased within a penumbra, stroke remains a primary source of mortality within the United States. While our scientific knowledge regarding the pathology of stroke continues to improve, clinical treatment options for patients suffering from stroke are extremely limited. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the sole FDA-approved drug proven to be helpful following stroke. However, due to the need to administer the drug within 4.5h of stroke onset its usefulness is constrained to less than 5% of all patients suffering from ischemic stroke. One experimental therapy for the treatment of stroke involves the utilization of stem cells. Stem cell transplantation has been linked to therapeutic benefit by means of cell replacement and release of growth factors; however the precise means by which this is accomplished has not yet been clearly delineated. Using a traumatic brain injury model, we recently demonstrated the ability of transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to form a biobridge connecting the area of injury to the neurogenic niche within the brain. We hypothesize that MSCs may also have the capacity to create a similar biobridge following stroke; thereby forming a conduit between the neurogenic niche and the stroke core and peri-infarct area. We propose that this biobridge could assist and promote interaction of host brain cells with transplanted stem cells and offer more opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of stem cell therapy in stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Cell Interactions In Stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Establishment of 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-yu XIAO

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish the 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells.  Methods Rat 9L gliosarcoma stem-like cells were cultured in serum-free suspension. The expression of CD133 and nestin were tested by immunohistochemistry. A total of 48 inbredline male F344 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, and 9L tumor sphere cells and 9L monolayer cells were respectively implanted into the right caudate nucleus of F344 rats in 2 groups. Survival time was observed and determined using the method of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Fourteen days after implantation or when the rats were dying, their brains were perfused and sectioned for HE staining, and CD133 and nestin were detected by immunohistochemistry.  Results Rat 9L tumor spheres were formed with suspension culture in serum-free medium. The gliomas formed in both groups were invasive without obvious capsule. More new vessels, bleeding and necrosis could be detected in 9L tumor spheres group. The tumor cells in both groups were positive for CD133 and nestin. There was no significant difference in the expression of CD133 and nestin between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. According to the expression of nestin, the tumors formed by 9L tumor sphere cells were more invasive. The median survival time of the rats bearing 9L tumor sphere cells was 15 d (95%CI: 15.219-15.781, and the median survival time of the rats bearing 9L monolayer cells was 21 d (95%CI: 20.395-21.605. There was significant difference between 2 groups (χ2 = 12.800, P = 0.000.  Conclusions 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells is successfully established, which provides a glioma model for the future research. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.012

  2. The Effects of Interlocking a Universal Hip Cementless Stem on Implant Subsidence and Mechanical Properties of Cadaveric Canine Femora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buks, Yonathan; Wendelburg, Kirk L; Stover, Susan M; Garcia-Nolen, Tanya C

    2016-02-01

    To determine if an interlocking bolt would limit subsidence of the biological fixation universal hip (BFX(®)) femoral stem under cyclic loading and enhance construct stiffness, yield, and failure properties. Ex vivo biomechanical study. Cadaveric canine femora (10 pairs). Paired femora implanted with a traditional stem or an interlocking stem (constructs) were cyclically loaded at walk, trot, and gallop loads while implant and bone motions were captured using kinematic markers and high-speed video. Constructs were then loaded to failure to evaluate failure mechanical properties. Implant subsidence was greater (P = .037) for the traditional implant (4.19 mm) than the interlocking implant (0.78 mm) only after gallop cyclic loading, and cumulatively after walk, trot, and gallop cyclic loads (5.20 mm vs. 1.28 mm, P = .038). Yield and failure loads were greater (P = .029 and .002, respectively) for the interlocking stem construct (1155 N and 2337 N) than the traditional stem construct (816 N and 1405 N). Version angle change after cyclic loading was greater (P = .020) for the traditional implant (3.89 degrees) than for the interlocking implant (0.16 degrees), whereas stem varus displacement at failure was greater (P = .008) for the interlocking implant (1.5 degrees) than the traditional implant (0.17 degrees). Addition of a stabilizing bolt enhanced construct stability and limited subsidence of a BFX(®) femoral stem. Use of the interlocking implant may decrease postoperative subsidence. However, in vivo effects of the interlocking bolt on osseointegration, bone remodeling, and stress shielding are unknown. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  3. Intravitreal Implantation of Genetically Modified Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells for Treating Retinal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Christopher J; Sanders, Douglas N; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Jensen, Cheryl A; Castaner, Leilani J; Kirk, Mark D; Katz, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    A number of retinal degenerative diseases may be amenable to treatment with continuous intraocular delivery of therapeutic agents that cannot be delivered effectively to the retina via systemic or topical administration. Among these disorders are lysosomal storage diseases resulting from deficiencies in soluble lysosomal enzymes. Most cells, including those of the retina, are able to take up these enzymes and incorporate them in active form into their lysosomes. In theory, therefore, continuous intraocular administration of a normal form of a soluble lysosomal enzyme should be able to cure the molecular defect in the retinas of subjects lacking this enzyme. Experiments were conducted to determine whether genetically modified bone marrow-derived stem cells implanted into the vitreous could be used as -vehicles for continuous delivery of such enzymes to the retina. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from normal mice were implanted into the vitreous of mice undergoing retinal degeneration as a result of a mutation in the PPT1 gene. The implanted cells appeared to survive indefinitely in the vitreous without proliferating or invading the retina. This indicates that intravitreal implantation of MSCs is likely a safe means of long-term delivery of proteins synthesized by the implanted cells. Experiments have been initiated to test the efficacy of using genetically modified autologous MSCs to inhibit retinal degeneration in a canine model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

  4. The modulation of stem cell behaviors by functionalized nanoceramic coatings on Ti-based implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangmei Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanoceramic coating on the surface of Ti-based metallic implants is a clinical potential option in orthopedic surgery. Stem cells have been found to have osteogenic capabilities. It is necessary to study the influences of functionalized nanoceramic coatings on the differentiation and proliferation of stem cells in vitro or in vivo. In this paper, we summarized the recent advance on the modulation of stem cells behaviors through controlling the properties of nanoceramic coatings, including surface chemistry, surface roughness and microporosity. In addition, mechanotransduction pathways have also been discussed to reveal the interaction mechanisms between the stem cells and ceramic coatings on Ti-based metals. In the final part, the osteoinduction and osteoconduction of ceramic coating have been also presented when it was used as carrier of BMPs in new bone formation.

  5. Cytokine Immunopathogenesis of Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Min Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is one of the most important causes of herpangina and hand, foot, and mouth disease. It can also cause severe complications of the central nervous system (CNS. Brain stem encephalitis with pulmonary edema is the severe complication that can lead to death. EV71 replicates in leukocytes, endothelial cells, and dendritic cells resulting in the production of immune and inflammatory mediators that shape innate and acquired immune responses and the complications of disease. Cytokines, as a part of innate immunity, favor the development of antiviral and Th1 immune responses. Cytokines and chemokines play an important role in the pathogenesis EV71 brain stem encephalitis. Both the CNS and the systemic inflammatory responses to infection play important, but distinctly different, roles in the pathogenesis of EV71 pulmonary edema. Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and milrinone, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has been shown to modulate inflammation, to reduce sympathetic overactivity, and to improve survival in patients with EV71 autonomic nervous system dysregulation and pulmonary edema.

  6. Age and Gender Effects On Auditory Brain Stem Response (ABR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yones Lotfi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Auditory Brain Stem Response (ABR is a result of eight nerve and brain stem nuclei stimulation. Several factors may affect the latencies, interpeak latencies and amplitudes in ABR especially sex and age. In this study, age and sex influence on ABR were studied. Methods: This study was performed on 120 cases (60 males and 60 females at Akhavan rehabilitation center of university of welfare and rehabilitation sciences, Tehran, Iran. Cases were divided in three age groups: 18-30, 31-50 and 51-70 years old. Each age group consists of 20 males and 20 females. Age and sex influences on absolute latency of wave I and V, and IPL of I-V were examined. Results: Independent t test showed that females have significantly shorter latency of wave I, V, and IPL I-V latency (P<0.001 than males. Two way ANOVA showed that latency of wave I, V and IPL I-V in 51-70 years old group was significantly higher than 18-30 and 31-50 years old groups (P<0.001 Discussion: According to the results of present study and similar studies, in clinical practice, different norms for older adults and both genders should be established.

  7. [Relationship between anti-myelin basic protein antibody and myelinoclasis in rat brain stem after brain trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Shan-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Song, Xiu-Bao; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhang, Mei

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the relations between anti-myelin basic protein antibody (anti-MBP) variation and myelinoclasis in the brain stem following brain trauma. In rat models of brain trauma, MBP content and anti-MBP titer in the blood were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at different time points after brain trauma, and the degree of myelinoclasis in the brain stem slices was assessed with osmic acid staining. Early after brain trauma, MBP content in the blood increased followed by significant reduction 10 days later. Four days after the trauma, anti-MBP titer was markedly increased, accompanied by obvious exacerbation of myelinoclasis in the brain stem, both reaching the highest levels on day 10, at the point of which anti-MBP titer increased by 4 folds and the number of myelinoclasis by 10 folds compared with the control group. Anti-MBP titer and brain stem myelinolysis both lowered 30 days later. Correlation analysis showed an intimate positive correlation between anti-MBP titer and the degree of myelinoclasis. After brain trauma, MBP is released as a specific antigen into the blood to stimulate the immune system for anti-MBP production, and the antibody is intimately related to the brain stem myelinoclasis.

  8. Synaptic inputs from stroke-injured brain to grafted human stem cell-derived neurons activated by sensory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero, Daniel; Tsupykov, Oleg; Granmo, Marcus; Rodriguez, Cristina; Grønning-Hansen, Marita; Thelin, Jonas; Smozhanik, Ekaterina; Laterza, Cecilia; Wattananit, Somsak; Ge, Ruimin; Tatarishvili, Jemal; Grealish, Shane; Brüstle, Oliver; Skibo, Galina; Parmar, Malin; Schouenborg, Jens; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2017-03-01

    Transplanted neurons derived from stem cells have been proposed to improve function in animal models of human disease by various mechanisms such as neuronal replacement. However, whether the grafted neurons receive functional synaptic inputs from the recipient's brain and integrate into host neural circuitry is unknown. Here we studied the synaptic inputs from the host brain to grafted cortical neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells after transplantation into stroke-injured rat cerebral cortex. Using the rabies virus-based trans-synaptic tracing method and immunoelectron microscopy, we demonstrate that the grafted neurons receive direct synaptic inputs from neurons in different host brain areas located in a pattern similar to that of neurons projecting to the corresponding endogenous cortical neurons in the intact brain. Electrophysiological in vivo recordings from the cortical implants show that physiological sensory stimuli, i.e. cutaneous stimulation of nose and paw, can activate or inhibit spontaneous activity in grafted neurons, indicating that at least some of the afferent inputs are functional. In agreement, we find using patch-clamp recordings that a portion of grafted neurons respond to photostimulation of virally transfected, channelrhodopsin-2-expressing thalamo-cortical axons in acute brain slices. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that the host brain regulates the activity of grafted neurons, providing strong evidence that transplanted human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons can become incorporated into injured cortical circuitry. Our findings support the idea that these neurons could contribute to functional recovery in stroke and other conditions causing neuronal loss in cerebral cortex. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Pathological and immunohistochemical study of lethal primary brain stem injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongchao, Sun; Shudong, Yang; Zhiyi, Zhou

    2012-05-21

    Many of the deaths that occur shortly after injury or in hospitals are caused by mild trauma. Slight morphological changes are often found in the brain stems of these patients during autopsy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the histopathological changes involved in primary brain stem injuries (PBSI) and their diagnostic significance. A total of 65 patients who had died of PBSI and other conditions were randomly selected. They were divided into 2 groups, an injury group (25 cases) and a control group (20 cases). Slides of each patient's midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata were prepared and stained with HE, argentaffin, and immunohistochemical agents (GFAP, NF, amyloid-β, MBP). Under low power (×100) and NF staining, the diameter of the thickest longitudinal axon was measured at its widest point. Ten such diameters were collected for each part of the brain (midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata). Data were recorded and analyzed statistically. Brain stem contusions, astrocyte activity, edema, and pathological changes in the neurons were visibly different in the injury and control groups (P < 0.05). Characteristic changes occurred in the neural axons, axon diameter varied from axon to axon and even over different segments of one axon, and several pathological phenomena were observed. These included segmental thickening and curving, wave-like processing, disarrangement, and irregular swelling. A few axons ruptured and intumesced into retraction balls. Immunohistochemical MBP staining showed enlargement and curving of spaces between the myelin sheaths and axons in certain areas. The myelin sheaths lining the surfaces of the axons were in some cases incomplete and even exfoliated, and segmentation disappeared. These pathological changes increased in severity over time (P < 0.05). These histopathological changes may prove beneficial to the pathological diagnosis of PBSI during autopsy. The measurement of axon diameters provides a referent quantitative index

  10. Typical and atypical stem cells in the brain, vitamin C effect and neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Nualart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are considered a valuable cellular resource for tissue replacement therapies in most brain disorders. Stem cells have the ability to self-replicate and differentiate into numerous cell types, including neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. As a result, stem cells have been considered the "holy grail" of modern medical neuroscience. Despite their tremendous therapeutic potential, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate their differentiation. In this review, we analyze stem cells in embryonic and adult brains, and illustrate the differentiation pathways that give origin to most brain cells. We also evaluate the emergent role of the well known anti-oxidant, vitamin C, in stem cell differentiation. We believe that a complete understanding of all molecular players, including vitamin C, in stem cell differentiation will positively impact on the use of stem cell transplantation for neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Comparison of biological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells grown on two different titanium implant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chengyue; Zhao Baohong; Ai Hongjun; Wang Yiwei

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the biological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown on sand-blasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) surface and hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on the SLA (HA/SLA) surface of titanium dental implants. The HA/SLA surfaces of titanium dental implants were formed by the ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) method. Rabbit bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells cultured in vitro were seeded onto the surface of SLA and HA/SLA; the growth states of MSCs on the two samples were observed by a scanning electron microscope; the proliferation index, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin (OCN) content of MSCs and mRNA relative expression level of osteopontin (opn) were compared between two groups. MSCs were found to be easier to adhere to the HA/SLA surface compared to the SLA surface. At the same time, the ALP activity and the OCN content of MSCs grown on the HA/SLA surface were obviously higher, and the relative expression level of opn mRNA was 4.78 times higher than that on the SLA surface. The HA coating formed by the IBAD method on the SLA surface of titanium dental implants significantly improves proliferation and well-differentiated osteoblastic phenotype of MSCs, which indicates a promising method for the surface modification of titanium dental implants

  12. Stereotaxic implantation of dispersed cell suspensions into brain. A systematic appraisal of cell placement and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plunkett, R.J.; Weber, R.J.; Oldfield, E.H.

    1988-01-01

    The application of several recent advances in cell biology, brain implantation, and cell-mediated tumor immunotherapy requires successful and reproducible placement of viable cell suspensions into brain. Stereotaxic implantation is being used to inject cytotoxic lymphocytes into gliomas and to replace dopaminergic cells in parkinsonian models. Systematic assessment of the factors that influence success in implantation of cell suspensions into solid tissues is needed. A model was developed for investigation of stereotaxic implantation using radiolabeled rat lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. Anesthetized rats received microliter injections of cell suspension into the right caudate nucleus. The injection volume, cell concentration, infusion rate, and needle size were varied systematically. The animals were sacrificed 1 hour after injection; the brain was removed and sectioned, and the radioactivity was counted. Three aliquots of the suspension were injected into counting tubes for control analysis. Recovery of radioactivity was expressed as the percent of mean counts per minute (cpm) in the right frontal lobe/mean cpm in the three control tubes. To assess the viability of implanted cells, the right frontal region was mechanically dissociated in media and centrifuged, and the pellet and supernatant were counted. By using small needles and slow infusion of volumes of 10 microliters or less, 85% to 90% of the radioactivity was recovered in the caudate nucleus. At least half of the implanted cells were viable. Consistent, accurate implantation of dispersed cells into brain over a range of volumes, cell concentrations, infusion rates, and needle sizes was achieved

  13. Semiautomated volumetry of the cerebrum, cerebellum-brain stem, and temporal lobe on brain magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Norio; Matsuura, Yukihiro; Kawahara, Kazuhiro; Tsujii, Hideo; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Sanada, Shigeru; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an automated method of segmenting the cerebrum, cerebellum-brain stem, and temporal lobe simultaneously on magnetic resonance (MR) images. We obtained T1-weighted MR images from 10 normal subjects and 19 patients with brain atrophy. To perform automated volumetry from MR images, we performed the following three steps: segmentation of the brain region; separation between the cerebrum and the cerebellum-brain stem; and segmentation of the temporal lobe. Evaluation was based on the correctly recognized region (CRR) (i.e., the region recognized by both the automated and manual methods). The mean CRRs of the normal and atrophic brains were 98.2% and 97.9% for the cerebrum, 87.9% and 88.5% for the cerebellum-brain stem, and 76.9% and 85.8% for the temporal lobe, respectively. We introduce an automated volumetric method for the cerebrum, cerebellum-brain stem, and temporal lobe on brain MR images. Our method can be applied to not only the normal brain but also the atrophic brain. (author)

  14. The NCI-atlas of dose distributions for regular 125I brain implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenow, U.F.; Wright, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    In connection with the development of an optimization method for 125 I brain implants in irregulary shaped target volumes, a systematic study was conducted toward optimizing seed configurations for regular target volumes. The intention was to find basic rules for the positioning of strings of seeds in the cylindrical implant pattern of the stereotactic neurosurgical procedure in use, and in accordance with the following criteria: (i) steep dose fall-off outside the target volume; (ii) coverage of the target volume by making the prescribed dose surface coincident with the target volume surface within 1 mm; (iii) uniformity of the dose distribution in the target volume as far as achievable with a seed implant. As a result of this study, an atlas of optimized angular 125 I brain implant configurations was compiled. Regular implants were understood as being cylindrical or spherical. Diameters and heights from 2 to 5 cm were covered. 8 refs.; 11 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. Prospects and Limitations of Using Endogenous Neural Stem Cells for Brain Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Naoko; Kako, Eisuke; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are capable of producing a variety of neural cell types, and are indispensable for the development of the mammalian brain. NSCs can be induced in vitro from pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells and induced-pluripotent stem cells. Although the transplantation of these exogenous NSCs is a potential strategy for improving presently untreatable neurological conditions, there are several obstacles to its implementation, including tumorigenic, immunologica...

  16. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy limited to the brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastrup, O.; Maschke, M.; Diener, H.C.; Wanke, I.

    2002-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a subacute demyelinating slow-virus encephalitis caused by the JC polyomavirus in 2-5% of patients with AIDS. MRI typically shows multiple lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. We present a rare case of rapidly evolving and lethal PML with a severe bulbar syndrome and spastic tetraparesis in a patient with AIDS. MRI showed high-signal lesions on T2-weighted images confined to the brain stem, extending from the medulla oblongata to the midbrain. JC virus polymerase chain reaction in cerebrospinal fluid was positive, and neuropathology showed the findings of PML. This case was also notable because of the rapid progression despite improved immune status with antiretroviral therapy. (orig.)

  17. Line-scan diffusion tensor imaging of the posttraumatic brain stem: changes with neuropathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, K; Weis, J; Kreis, R; Aghayev, E; Jackowski, C; Thali, M; Boesch, C; Maier, S E; Dirnhofer, R; Lövblad, K O

    2006-01-01

    Following trauma, imaging of brain stem lesions is often inconclusive. In a man who suffered a lethal accident, postmortem MR diffusion tensor (DT) imaging of the brain and neuropathologic examination were performed. DT imaging showed a disorganization of fibers in the brain stem that was not found in 2 controls and corresponded to changes on neuropathologic correlation. Diffusion tensor imaging provides an insight into the organization of myelinated structures of the CNS, potentially allowing diagnosis of traumatic fiber tract rupture.

  18. Anaesthetic management of a patient with deep brain stimulation implant for radical nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Khetarpal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old man with severe Parkinson′s disease (PD who had been implanted with deep brain stimulators into both sides underwent radical nephrectomy under general anaesthesia with standard monitoring. Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an alternative and effective treatment option for severe and refractory PD and other illnesses such as essential tremor and intractable epilepsy. Anaesthesia in the patients with implanted neurostimulator requires special consideration because of the interaction between neurostimulator and the diathermy. The diathermy can damage the brain tissue at the site of electrode. There are no standard guidelines for the anaesthetic management of a patient with DBS electrode in situ posted for surgery.

  19. Gait assessment in patients with thrust plate prosthesis and intramedullary stemmed prosthesis implanted to each hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Salih; Karatosun, Vasfi; Unver, Bayram; Gunal, Izge

    2007-02-01

    There has not been any study regarding comparative gait analysis in patients with intramedullary stemmed prosthesis (ISP) and thrust plate prosthesis (TPP) implanted to each hip. Four patients (three females and one male) who had undergone operation due to coxarthrosis were selected. The mean age was 60.5 (37-78) years. TPP and ISP had been implanted to the left and right hip, respectively, in three patients, and one patient received TPP to the right and ISP to the left hip. Gait was analyzed with a BTS Elite System consisting six cameras and two Kistler force plates using Helen Hayes marker set to assess the gait parameters. The clinical outcome was also evaluated according to Harris hip score (HHS). The average HHS was 95.0 (82-100) points after a mean follow-up of 45.0 (30-50) months for TPP and 94.5 (80-100) points after a follow-up of 60.0 (14-122) months for ISP. Neither of the HHS scores and follow-up time nor gait parameters obtained from the TPP-implanted side were statistically different when compared to those of the ISP-implanted side. TPP and ISP as the implants with their own biomechanical specifications did not produce any remarkable difference in gait.

  20. Implantation of Neural Probes in the Brain Elicits Oxidative Stress

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    Evon S. Ereifej

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Clinical implantation of intracortical microelectrodes has been hindered, at least in part, by the perpetual inflammatory response occurring after device implantation. The neuroinflammatory response observed after device implantation has been correlated to oxidative stress that occurs due to neurological injury and disease. However, there has yet to be a definitive link of oxidative stress to intracortical microelectrode implantation. Thus, the objective of this study is to give direct evidence of oxidative stress following intracortical microelectrode implantation. This study also aims to identify potential molecular targets to attenuate oxidative stress observed postimplantation. Here, we implanted adult rats with silicon non-functional microelectrode probes for 4 weeks and compared the oxidative stress response to no surgery controls through postmortem gene expression analysis and qualitative histological observation of oxidative stress markers. Gene expression analysis results at 4 weeks postimplantation indicated that EH domain-containing 2, prion protein gene (Prnp, and Stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (Scd1 were all significantly higher for animals implanted with intracortical microelectrode probes compared to no surgery control animals. To the contrary, NADPH oxidase activator 1 (Noxa1 relative gene expression was significantly lower for implanted animals compared to no surgery control animals. Histological observation of oxidative stress showed an increased expression of oxidized proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids concentrated around the implant site. Collectively, our results reveal there is a presence of oxidative stress following intracortical microelectrode implantation compared to no surgery controls. Further investigation targeting these specific oxidative stress linked genes could be beneficial to understanding potential mechanisms and downstream therapeutics that can be utilized to reduce oxidative stress-mediated damage

  1. A reliable method for intracranial electrode implantation and chronic electrical stimulation in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Melanie; Lang, Min; Gane, Jonathan; Wu, Chiping; Burnham, W McIntyre; Zhang, Liang

    2013-08-06

    Electrical stimulation of brain structures has been widely used in rodent models for kindling or modeling deep brain stimulation used clinically. This requires surgical implantation of intracranial electrodes and subsequent chronic stimulation in individual animals for several weeks. Anchoring screws and dental acrylic have long been used to secure implanted intracranial electrodes in rats. However, such an approach is limited when carried out in mouse models as the thin mouse skull may not be strong enough to accommodate the anchoring screws. We describe here a screw-free, glue-based method for implanting bipolar stimulating electrodes in the mouse brain and validate this method in a mouse model of hippocampal electrical kindling. Male C57 black mice (initial ages of 6-8 months) were used in the present experiments. Bipolar electrodes were implanted bilaterally in the hippocampal CA3 area for electrical stimulation and electroencephalographic recordings. The electrodes were secured onto the skull via glue and dental acrylic but without anchoring screws. A daily stimulation protocol was used to induce electrographic discharges and motor seizures. The locations of implanted electrodes were verified by hippocampal electrographic activities and later histological assessments. Using the glue-based implantation method, we implanted bilateral bipolar electrodes in 25 mice. Electrographic discharges and motor seizures were successfully induced via hippocampal electrical kindling. Importantly, no animal encountered infection in the implanted area or a loss of implanted electrodes after 4-6 months of repetitive stimulation/recording. We suggest that the glue-based, screw-free method is reliable for chronic brain stimulation and high-quality electroencephalographic recordings in mice. The technical aspects described this study may help future studies in mouse models.

  2. Neurodevelopment. Live imaging of adult neural stem cell behavior in the intact and injured zebrafish brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Joana S; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Rosario; Di Giaimo, Rossella; Baumgart, Emily Violette; Theis, Fabian J; Götz, Magdalena; Ninkovic, Jovica

    2015-05-15

    Adult neural stem cells are the source for restoring injured brain tissue. We used repetitive imaging to follow single stem cells in the intact and injured adult zebrafish telencephalon in vivo and found that neurons are generated by both direct conversions of stem cells into postmitotic neurons and via intermediate progenitors amplifying the neuronal output. We observed an imbalance of direct conversion consuming the stem cells and asymmetric and symmetric self-renewing divisions, leading to depletion of stem cells over time. After brain injury, neuronal progenitors are recruited to the injury site. These progenitors are generated by symmetric divisions that deplete the pool of stem cells, a mode of neurogenesis absent in the intact telencephalon. Our analysis revealed changes in the behavior of stem cells underlying generation of additional neurons during regeneration. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Auditory Brain-Stem and Middle-and Long-Latency Evoked Potentials in Coma

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, C; Wogensen, K; Starr, A

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-five patients in coma, each with a Glascow Coma Scale measure less than or equal to five, were studied within the first three days of hospitalization with auditory brain-stem and middle- and long-latency evoked potentials. Survival was related to the simultaneous preservation of long- and middle-latency and brain-stem evoked potentials. The preservation of just middle-latency and/or brain-stem components did not correlate with survival. However, if the group of patients in coma due to ...

  4. Breaking the Blood-Brain Barrier With Mannitol to Aid Stem Cell Therapeutics in the Chronic Stroke Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Naoki; Lee, Jea Young; Acosta, Sandra; Sanberg, Paul R; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeabilizers, such as mannitol, can facilitate peripherally delivered stem cells to exert therapeutic benefits on the stroke brain. Although this BBB permeation-aided stem cell therapy has been demonstrated in the acute stage of stroke, such BBB permeation in the chronic stage of the disease remains to be examined. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats initially received sham surgery or experimental stroke via the 1-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model. At 1 month after the MCAo surgery, stroke animals were randomly assigned to receive human umbilical cord stem cells only (2 million viable cells), mannitol only (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), combined human umbilical cord stem cells (200,000 viable cells) and mannitol (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), and vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) only. Stroke animals that received human umbilical cord blood cells alone or combined human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol exhibited significantly improved motor performance and significantly better brain cell survival in the peri-infarct area compared to stroke animals that received vehicle or mannitol alone, with mannitol treatment reducing the stem cell dose necessary to afford functional outcomes. Enhanced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone accompanied the combined treatment of human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol. We showed that BBB permeation facilitates the therapeutic effects of a low dose of peripherally transplanted stem cells to effectively cause functional improvement and increase neurogenesis in chronic stroke.

  5. Mg ion implantation on SLA-treated titanium surface and its effects on the behavior of mesenchymal stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong; Park, Young Min; Choi, Bo-Young; Lee, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important ions associated with bone osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of Mg implantation in titanium (Ti) surfaces treated with sand blast using large grit and acid etching (SLA). Mg ions were implanted into the surface via vacuum arc source ion implantation. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and the amount of Mg ion release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were used to evaluate cellular parameters such as proliferation, cytotoxicity, and adhesion morphology by MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM. Furthermore, osteoblast differentiation was determined on the basis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the degree of calcium accumulation. In the Mg ion-implanted disk, 2.3 × 10 16 ions/cm 2 was retained. However, after Mg ion implantation, the surface morphology did not change. Implanted Mg ions were rapidly released during the first 7 days in vitro. The MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM demonstrated increased cell attachment and growth on the Mg ion-implanted surface. In particular, Mg ion implantation increased the initial cell adhesion, and in an osteoblast differentiation assay, ALP activity and calcium accumulation. These findings suggest that Mg ion implantation using the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique may be useful for SLA-treated Ti dental implants to improve their osseointegration capacity. - Highlights: ► Mg ion was coated onto surface of SLA treated titanium via vacuum arc source ion implantation method. ► The morphological characteristics did not change after Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implanted SLA Ti is highly cytocompatible. ► Initial cell adhesion of MSCs is improved by Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implantation improved

  6. Mg ion implantation on SLA-treated titanium surface and its effects on the behavior of mesenchymal stem cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong [Wonkwang Bone Regeneration Research Institute, Wonkwang University, Iksan 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bonecell Biotech Inc., 77, Dunsan-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Min [DIO Corporation, 66, Centum seo-ro, Haeundae-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bo-Young [Department of Oral and maxillofacial Surgery, Wonkwang University Daejeon Dental Hospital, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun, E-mail: omslee@wku.ac.kr [Wonkwang Bone Regeneration Research Institute, Wonkwang University, Iksan 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bonecell Biotech Inc., 77, Dunsan-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important ions associated with bone osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of Mg implantation in titanium (Ti) surfaces treated with sand blast using large grit and acid etching (SLA). Mg ions were implanted into the surface via vacuum arc source ion implantation. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and the amount of Mg ion release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were used to evaluate cellular parameters such as proliferation, cytotoxicity, and adhesion morphology by MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM. Furthermore, osteoblast differentiation was determined on the basis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the degree of calcium accumulation. In the Mg ion-implanted disk, 2.3 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} was retained. However, after Mg ion implantation, the surface morphology did not change. Implanted Mg ions were rapidly released during the first 7 days in vitro. The MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM demonstrated increased cell attachment and growth on the Mg ion-implanted surface. In particular, Mg ion implantation increased the initial cell adhesion, and in an osteoblast differentiation assay, ALP activity and calcium accumulation. These findings suggest that Mg ion implantation using the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique may be useful for SLA-treated Ti dental implants to improve their osseointegration capacity. - Highlights: ► Mg ion was coated onto surface of SLA treated titanium via vacuum arc source ion implantation method. ► The morphological characteristics did not change after Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implanted SLA Ti is highly cytocompatible. ► Initial cell adhesion of MSCs is improved by Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implantation

  7. NFL-lipid nanocapsules for brain neural stem cell targeting in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carradori, Dario; Saulnier, Patrick; Préat, Véronique; des Rieux, Anne; Eyer, Joel

    2016-09-28

    The replacement of injured neurons by the selective stimulation of neural stem cells in situ represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 showed specific interactions towards neural stem cells of the subventricular zone. The aim of our work was to produce a NFL-based drug delivery system able to target neural stem cells through the selective affinity between the peptide and these cells. NFL-TBS.40-63 (NFL) was adsorbed on lipid nanocapsules (LNC) whom targeting efficiency was evaluated on neural stem cells from the subventricular zone (brain) and from the central canal (spinal cord). NFL-LNC were incubated with primary neural stem cells in vitro or injected in vivo in adult rat brain (right lateral ventricle) or spinal cord (T10). NFL-LNC interactions with neural stem cells were different depending on the origin of the cells. NFL-LNC showed a preferential uptake by neural stem cells from the brain, while they did not interact with neural stem cells from the spinal cord. The results obtained in vivo correlate with the results observed in vitro, demonstrating that NFL-LNC represent a promising therapeutic strategy to selectively deliver bioactive molecules to brain neural stem cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro osteoinduction of human mesenchymal stem cells in biomimetic surface modified titanium alloy implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Sonia; Alcaine, Clara; Lyahyai, Jaber; Pérez, Maria Angeles; Rodellar, Clementina; Doblaré, Manuel; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between cells and implant surface is crucial for clinical success. This interaction and the associated surface treatment are essential for achieving a fast osseointegration process. Several studies of different topographical or chemical surface modifications have been proposed previously in literature. The Biomimetic Advanced Surface (BAS) topography is a combination of a shot blasting and anodizing procedure. Macroroughness, microporosity of titanium oxide and Calcium/Phosphate ion deposition is obtained. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMCSs) response in vitro to this treatment has been evaluated. The results obtained show an improved adhesion capacity and a higher proliferation rate when hMSCs are cultured on treated surfaces. This biomimetic modification of the titanium surface induces the expression of osteblastic differentiation markers (RUNX2 and Osteopontin) in the absence of any externally provided differentiation factor. As a main conclusion, our biomimetic surface modification could lead to a substantial improvement in osteoinduction in titanium alloy implants.

  9. Identification of Multipotent Stem Cells in Human Brain Tissue Following Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatebayashi, Kotaro; Tanaka, Yasue; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Sakuma, Rika; Kamachi, Saeko; Shirakawa, Manabu; Uchida, Kazutaka; Kageyama, Hiroto; Takagi, Toshinori; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Nakagomi, Takayuki

    2017-06-01

    Perivascular regions of the brain harbor multipotent stem cells. We previously demonstrated that brain pericytes near blood vessels also develop multipotency following experimental ischemia in mice and these ischemia-induced multipotent stem cells (iSCs) can contribute to neurogenesis. However, it is essential to understand the traits of iSCs in the poststroke human brain for possible applications in stem cell-based therapies for stroke patients. In this study, we report for the first time that iSCs can be isolated from the poststroke human brain. Putative iSCs were derived from poststroke brain tissue obtained from elderly stroke patients requiring decompressive craniectomy and partial lobectomy for diffuse cerebral infarction. Immunohistochemistry showed that these iSCs were localized near blood vessels within poststroke areas containing apoptotic/necrotic neurons and expressed both the stem cell marker nestin and several pericytic markers. Isolated iSCs expressed these same markers and demonstrated high proliferative potential without loss of stemness. Furthermore, isolated iSCs expressed other stem cell markers, such as Sox2, c-myc, and Klf4, and differentiated into multiple cells in vitro, including neurons. These results show that iSCs, which are likely brain pericyte derivatives, are present within the poststroke human brain. This study suggests that iSCs can contribute to neural repair in patients with stroke.

  10. Enhanced osseointegration of titanium implants in a rat model of osteoporosis using multilayer bone mesenchymal stem cell sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yan; Ma, Wei; Li, Dehua; Wang, Tongfei; Liu, Baolin

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets combined with titanium implants enhanced implant osseointegration in an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of osteoporosis. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into a test group and control group. Allogenic BMSCs were collected from the rats, cultured and stored via cryopreservation. At 6 months post-ovariectomy, establishment of the OVX model was confirmed by micro-computed tomography (CT) measurements. BMSC sheets were subsequently layered and wrapped over titanium implants for implantation. Unmodified implants served as the control. At 8 weeks post-implantation, samples were observed by micro-CT reconstruction and histomorphometric evaluation. Micro-CT reconstruction identified a marked improvement in the surrounding bone volume following treatment, with data analyses indicating a significant increase in bone volume in the BMSC-implant group compared with the control implant group (Pimplant contact surrounding the BMSC-implant constructs. These results indicate that the use of BMSC sheets as a novel tissue engineering approach improves the osseointegration of titanium implants in an osteoporosis model. This method may expand the operative indications in patients with osteoporosis and improve the success rate of clinical dental implant treatments. PMID:29250137

  11. Biodegradable seeds of holmium don't change neurological function after implant in brain of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Mirla Fiuza; Ferreira, Diogo Milioli; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; de Almeida Araujo, Stanley; Sampaio, Kinulpe Honorato; de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro; Siqueira, Savio Lana

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the surgical procedure and parenchymal abnormalities related to implantation of ceramic seeds with holmium-165 in rats' brain. An effective method of cancer treatment is brachytherapy in which radioactive seeds are implanted in the tumor, generating a high local dose of ionizing radiation that can eliminate tumor cells while protecting the surrounding healthy tissue. Biodegradable Ho 166 -ceramic-seeds have been addressed recently. The experiments in this study were approved by the Ethics Committee on Animal Use at the Federal University of Ouro Preto, protocol number 2012/034. Twenty-one adult Fischer rats were divided into Naive Group, Sham Group and Group for seed implants (ISH). Surgical procedures for implantation of biodegradable seeds were done and 30 days after the implant radiographic examination and biopsy of the brain were performed. Neurological assays were also accomplished to exclude any injury resulting from either surgery or implantation of the seeds. Radiographic examination confirmed the location of the seeds in the brain. Neurological assays showed animals with regular spontaneous activity. The histological analysis showed an increase of inflammatory cells in the brain of the ISH group. Electron microscopy evidenced cytoplasmic organelles to be unchanged. Biochemical analyzes indicate there was neither oxidative stress nor oxidative damage in the ISH brain. CAT activity showed no difference between the groups as well as lipid peroxidation measured by TBARS. The analysis of the data pointed out that the performed procedure is safe as no animal showed alterations of the neurological parameters and the seeds did not promote histological architectural changes in the brain tissue.

  12. Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract in the brain stem; MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Akira; Onomura, Kentaro; Ohno, Masato (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1989-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract in the brain stem was studied in 25 patients with chronic supratentorial vascular accidents. In the relatively early stages, at least three months after ictus, increased signal intensities in axial T{sub 2}-weighted images - with or without decreased signal intensities in axial T{sub 1}-weighted images - were observed in the brain stem ipsilaterally. In later stages, at least six months after ictus, shrinkage of the brain stem ipsilaterally - with or without decreased signal intensities - was clearly observed in axial T{sub 1}-weighted images. MRI is therefore regarded a sensitive diagnostic modality for evaluating wallerian degeneration in the brain stem. (author).

  13. Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation in the first Polish patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierzewska, H.; van der Knaap, M.S.; Scheper, G.C.; Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Szczepanik, E.; Jurkiewicz, E.

    2011-01-01

    Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and elevated white matter lactate (LBSL) is a very rare autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder. Clinically patients have slowly progressive ataxia, pyramidal syndrome and dorsal column dysfunction. The disease is defined on the

  14. Auditory Brain Stem Processing in Reptiles and Amphibians: Roles of Coupled Ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Katie L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Carr, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Comparative approaches to the auditory system have yielded great insight into the evolution of sound localization circuits, particularly within the nonmammalian tetrapods. The fossil record demonstrates multiple appearances of tympanic hearing, and examination of the auditory brain stem of variou...

  15. High-fat diet-induced downregulation of anorexic leukemia inhibitory factor in the brain stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licursi, Maria; Alberto, Christian O; Dias, Alex; Hirasawa, Kensuke; Hirasawa, Michiru

    2016-11-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) is known to induce low-grade hypothalamic inflammation. Whether inflammation occurs in other brain areas remains unknown. This study tested the effect of short-term HFD on cytokine gene expression and identified leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) as a responsive cytokine in the brain stem. Thus, functional and cellular effects of LIF in the brain stem were investigated. Male rats were fed chow or HFD for 3 days, and then gene expression was analyzed in different brain regions for IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and LIF. The effect of intracerebroventricular injection of LIF on chow intake and body weight was also tested. Patch clamp recording was performed in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). HFD increased pontine TNF-α mRNA while downregulating LIF in all major parts of the brain stem, but not in the hypothalamus or hippocampus. LIF injection into the cerebral aqueduct suppressed food intake without conditioned taste aversion, suggesting that LIF can induce anorexia via lower brain regions without causing malaise. In the NTS, a key brain stem nucleus for food intake regulation, LIF induced acute changes in neuronal excitability. HFD-induced downregulation of anorexic LIF in the brain stem may provide a permissive condition for HFD overconsumption. This may be at least partially mediated by the NTS. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  16. Strategies to Enhance Implantation and Survival of Stem Cells After Their Injection in Ischemic Neural Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvig, Ioanna; Gadjanski, Ivana; Vlaski-Lafarge, Marija; Buzanska, Leonora; Loncaric, Darija; Sarnowska, Ana; Rodriguez, Laura; Sandvig, Axel; Ivanovic, Zoran

    2017-04-15

    High post-transplantation cell mortality is the main limitation of various approaches that are aimed at improving regeneration of injured neural tissue by an injection of neural stem cells (NSCs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MStroCs) in and/or around the lesion. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to identify efficient ways to increase cell transplant viability. We have previously proposed the "evolutionary stem cell paradigm," which explains the association between stem cell anaerobic/microaerophilic metabolic set-up and stem cell self-renewal and inhibition of differentiation. Applying these principles, we have identified the main critical point in the collection and preparation of these cells for experimental therapy: exposure of the cells to atmospheric O 2 , that is, to oxygen concentrations that are several times higher than the physiologically relevant ones. In this way, the primitive anaerobic cells become either inactivated or adapted, through commitment and differentiation, to highly aerobic conditions (20%-21% O 2 in atmospheric air). This inadvertently compromises the cells' survival once they are transplanted into normal tissue, especially in the hypoxic/anoxic/ischemic environment, which is typical of central nervous system (CNS) lesions. In addition to the findings suggesting that stem cells can shift to glycolysis and can proliferate in anoxia, recent studies also propose that stem cells may be able to proliferate in completely anaerobic or ischemic conditions by relying on anaerobic mitochondrial respiration. In this systematic review, we propose strategies to enhance the survival of NSCs and MStroCs that are implanted in hypoxic/ischemic neural tissue by harnessing their anaerobic nature and maintaining as well as enhancing their anaerobic properties via appropriate ex vivo conditioning.

  17. Possible role of brain stem respiratory neurons in mediating vomiting during space motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. D.; Tan, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine if brain stem expiratory neurons control abdominal muscle activity during vomiting. The activity of 27 ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons, which are known to be of primary importance for control of abdominal muscle activity during respiration, was recorded. It is concluded that abdominal muscle activity during vomiting must be controlled not only by some brain stem expiratory neurons but also by other input(s).

  18. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood brain stem glioma presents as a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG; a fast-growing tumor that is difficult to treat and has a poor prognosis) or a focal glioma (grows more slowly, is easier to treat, and has a better prognosis). Learn about the diagnosis, cellular classification, staging, treatment, and clinical trials for pediatric brain stem glioma in this expert-reviewed summary.

  19. [The forensic medical assessment of the micromorphology of brain stem hemorrhages in craniocerebral trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushakov, S M

    1999-01-01

    Microscopic features of primary and secondary hemorrhages in the stem portion of the brain in craniocerebral injuries are described. Criteria of differential diagnosis between primary and secondary hemorrhages in the stem in subjects dead during 24 h after isolated and combined craniocerebral injuries are defined. The forensic medical significance of differential diagnosis of hemorrhages in the stem for the solution of many expert problems is evaluated.

  20. [Isolation and identification of brain tumor stem cells from human brain neuroepithelial tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jia-sheng; Deng, Yong-wen; Li, Ming-chu; Chen, Feng-Hua; Wang, Yan-jin; Lu, Ming; Fang, Fang; Wu, Jun; Yang, Zhuan-yi; Zhou, Xang-yang; Wang, Fei; Chen, Cheng

    2007-01-30

    To establish a simplified culture system for the isolation of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) from the tumors of human neuroepithelial tissue, to observe the growth and differentiation pattern of BTSCs, and to investigate their expression of the specific markers. Twenty-six patients with brain neuroepithelial tumors underwent tumor resection. Two pieces of tumor tissues were taken from each tumor to be dissociated, triturated into single cells in sterile DMEM-F12 medium, and then filtered. The tumor cells were seeded at a concentration of 200,000 viable cells per mL into serum-free DMEM-F12 medium simply supplemented with B27, human basic fibroblast growth factor (20 microg/L), human epidermal growth factor (20 microg /L), insulin (4 U/L), L-glutamine, penicillin and streptomycin. After the primary brain tumor spheres (BTSs) were generated, they were triturated again and passed in fresh medium. Limiting dilution assay was performed to observe the monoclone formation. 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test was performed to observe the proliferation of the BTS. The BTSCs were cultured in mitogen-free DMEM-F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum to observe their differentiation. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of CD133 and nestin, specific markers of BTSC, and the rate of CD133 positive cells. Only a minority of subsets of cells from the tumors of neuroepithelial tissue had the capacity to survive, proliferate, and generate free-floating neurosphere-like BTSs in the simplified serum-free medium. These cells attached to the poly-L-lysine coated coverslips in the serum-supplemented medium and differentiated. The BTSCs were CD133 and nestin positive. The rate of CD133 positive cells in the tumor specimens was (21 +/- 6.2)% - (38 +/- 7.0)%. A new simplified culture system for the isolation of BTSCs is established. The tumors of human neuroepithelial tissue contain CD133 and nestin positive tumor stem cells which can be isolated

  1. Extraction force and cortical tissue reaction of silicon microelectrode arrays implanted in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, George C; Schneider, Thomas M; Owens, D Jason; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2007-06-01

    Micromotion of implanted silicon multielectrode arrays (Si MEAs) is thought to influence the inflammatory response they elicit. The degree of strain that micromotion imparts on surrounding tissue is related to the extent of mechanical integration of the implanted electrodes with the brain. In this study, we quantified the force of extraction of implanted four shank Michigan electrodes in adult rat brains and investigated potential cellular and extracellular matrix contributors to tissue-electrode adhesion using immunohistochemical markers for microglia, astrocytes and extracellular matrix deposition in the immediate vicinity of the electrodes. Our results suggest that the peak extraction force of the implanted electrodes increases significantly from the day of implantation (day 0) to the day of extraction (day 7 and day 28 postimplantation) (1.68 +/- 0.54 g, 3.99 +/- 1.31 g, and 4.86 +/- 1.49 g, respectively; mean +/- SD; n = 4). For an additional group of four shank electrode implants with a closer intershank spacing we observed a significant increase in peak extraction force on day 28 postimplantation compared to day 0 and day 7 postimplantation (5.56 +/- 0.76 g, 0.37 +/- 0.12 g and 1.87 +/- 0.88 g, respectively; n = 4). Significantly, only glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was correlated with peak extraction force in both electrode designs of all the markers of astroglial scar studied. For studies that try to model micromotion-induced strain, our data implies that adhesion between tissue and electrode increases after implantation and sheds light on the nature of implanted electrode-elicited brain tissue reaction.

  2. Cochlear Implant Outcomes and Genetic Mutations in Children with Ear and Brain Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micol Busi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Specific clinical conditions could compromise cochlear implantation outcomes and drastically reduce the chance of an acceptable development of perceptual and linguistic capabilities. These conditions should certainly include the presence of inner ear malformations or brain abnormalities. The aims of this work were to study the diagnostic value of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in children with sensorineural hearing loss who were candidates for cochlear implants and to analyse the anatomic abnormalities of the ear and brain in patients who underwent cochlear implantation. We also analysed the effects of ear malformations and brain anomalies on the CI outcomes, speculating on their potential role in the management of language developmental disorders. Methods. The present study is a retrospective observational review of cochlear implant outcomes among hearing-impaired children who presented ear and/or brain anomalies at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. Furthermore, genetic results from molecular genetic investigations (GJB2/GJB6 and, additionally, in selected cases, SLC26A4 or mitochondrial-DNA mutations on this study group were herein described. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis was conducted using statistical tests. Results. Between January 1, 1996 and April 1, 2012, at the ENT-Audiology Department of the University Hospital of Ferrara, 620 cochlear implantations were performed. There were 426 implanted children at the time of the present study (who were <18 years. Among these, 143 patients (64 females and 79 males presented ear and/or brain anomalies/lesions/malformations at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. The age of the main study group (143 implanted children ranged from 9 months and 16 years (average = 4.4; median = 3.0. Conclusions. Good outcomes with cochlear implants are possible in patients who present with inner ear or brain abnormalities

  3. Implantation of stem cells in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obregon Santos, Angel; Wilford de Leon, Mario; Aroche Aportela, Ronald; Isla Garcia, Rosa; Conde Cerdeira, Hector; Vila Garcia, Elena

    2007-01-01

    A lot of investigations demonstrate the possibility of regeneration of the cardiomiocity from stem cells. A longitudinal, prospective, observational study was conducted in patients with acute myocardial infarction in CIMEQ'S hospital since January 2004 up to January 2007 with the purpose to evaluate the security and efficacy of the intracoronary transfer of autologous bone-marrow-cells during acute myocardial infarction. Patients within seven days of the onset of symptoms of a first ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, and between 18 and 70 years old. The patients are evaluated previous to apply the procedure and 6 months for clinic, electrocardiography, echocardiography, ergometry and coronariography. The drug eluting stent is placed on the culprit lesion and the bone marrow is stimulated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The mononuclear's cells which are obtained have been implanted using the intracoronary way. The implantation by means of the intracoronary way of stem cells, after of stimulation of bone marrow during acute myocardial infarction demonstrated to be an effective and safety procedure

  4. Osteogenic potential of effective bone engineering using dental pulp stem cells, bone marrow stem cells, and periosteal cells for osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenji; Yamada, Yoichi; Nakamura, Sayaka; Ueda, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this comparative study was to investigate cell-based effective bone engineering and the correlation between the osseointegration of dental implants and tissue-engineered bone using dental pulp stem cells (DPSC), bone marrow stem cells (BMSC), and periosteal cells (PC). The first molar and all premolars were extracted from the mandibles of three dogs, and in each dog, six bone defects (three on each side) were prepared with a 10-mm-diameter trephine bur after 4 weeks. Different materials were implanted in the defects and the sites were allowed to heal. The experimental groups were as follows: (1) dog DPSC and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) (dDPSC/PRP), (2) dog BMSC and PRP (dBMSC/PRP), (3) dog PC and PRP (dPC/PRP), and (4) control (defect only). Eight weeks later, dental implants were placed in the defects. After another 8 weeks, the amount of bone regeneration was assessed by histologic and histomorphometric analyses (bone-implant contact). The mean bone-implant contact values were 66.7% ± 3.6% for group 1 (dDPSC/PRP), 62.5% ± 3.1% for group 2 (dBMSC/PRP), 39.4% ± 2.4% for group 3 (dPC/PRP), and 30.3% ± 2.6% for the control group. DPSC showed the highest osteogenic potential and may be a useful cell source for tissue-engineered bone around dental implants.

  5. A simple implantation method for flexible, multisite microelectrodes into rat brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eRichter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A long term functional and reliable coupling between neural tissue and implanted microelectrodes is the key issue in acquiring neural electrophysiological signals or therapeutically excite neural tissue. The currently often used rigid micro-electrodes are thought to cause a severe foreign body reaction resulting in a thick glial scar and consequently a poor tissue-electrode coupling in the chronic phase. We hypothesize, that this adverse effect might be remedied by probes compliant to the soft brain tissue, i.e. replacing rigid electrodes by flexible ones. Unfortunately, this flexibility comes at the price of a low stiffness, which makes targeted low trauma implantation very challenging. In this study, we demonstrate an adaptable and simple method to implant extremely flexible microprobes even to deep areas of rat’s brain. Implantation of flexible probes is achieved by rod supported stereotactic insertion fostered by a hydrogel (2% agarose in PBS cushion on the exposed skull. We were thus able to implant very flexible micro-probes in 70 rats as deep as the rodent's subthalamic nucleus. This work describes in detail the procedures and steps needed for minimal invasive, but reliable implantation of flexible probes.

  6. 3D brain Organoids derived from pluripotent stem cells: promising experimental models for brain development and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Bendriem, Raphael M; Wu, Wells W; Shen, Rong-Fong

    2017-08-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) brain organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), appear to recapitulate the brain's 3D cytoarchitectural arrangement and provide new opportunities to explore disease pathogenesis in the human brain. Human iPSC (hiPSC) reprogramming methods, combined with 3D brain organoid tools, may allow patient-derived organoids to serve as a preclinical platform to bridge the translational gap between animal models and human clinical trials. Studies using patient-derived brain organoids have already revealed novel insights into molecular and genetic mechanisms of certain complex human neurological disorders such as microcephaly, autism, and Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, the combination of hiPSC technology and small-molecule high-throughput screening (HTS) facilitates the development of novel pharmacotherapeutic strategies, while transcriptome sequencing enables the transcriptional profiling of patient-derived brain organoids. Finally, the addition of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing provides incredible potential for personalized cell replacement therapy with genetically corrected hiPSCs. This review describes the history and current state of 3D brain organoid differentiation strategies, a survey of applications of organoids towards studies of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders, and the challenges associated with their use as in vitro models of neurological disorders.

  7. Self-organized amniogenesis by human pluripotent stem cells in a biomimetic implantation-like niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yue; Taniguchi, Kenichiro; Gurdziel, Katherine; Townshend, Ryan F.; Xue, Xufeng; Yong, Koh Meng Aw; Sang, Jianming; Spence, Jason R.; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Fu, Jianping

    2017-04-01

    Amniogenesis--the development of amnion--is a critical developmental milestone for early human embryogenesis and successful pregnancy. However, human amniogenesis is poorly understood due to limited accessibility to peri-implantation embryos and a lack of in vitro models. Here we report an efficient biomaterial system to generate human amnion-like tissue in vitro through self-organized development of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in a bioengineered niche mimicking the in vivo implantation environment. We show that biophysical niche factors act as a switch to toggle hPSC self-renewal versus amniogenesis under self-renewal-permissive biochemical conditions. We identify a unique molecular signature of hPSC-derived amnion-like cells and show that endogenously activated BMP-SMAD signalling is required for the amnion-like tissue development by hPSCs. This study unveils the self-organizing and mechanosensitive nature of human amniogenesis and establishes the first hPSC-based model for investigating peri-implantation human amnion development, thereby helping advance human embryology and reproductive medicine.

  8. Self-organized amniogenesis by human pluripotent stem cells in a biomimetic implantation-like niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yue; Taniguchi, Kenichiro; Gurdziel, Katherine; Townshend, Ryan F; Xue, Xufeng; Yong, Koh Meng Aw; Sang, Jianming; Spence, Jason R; Gumucio, Deborah L; Fu, Jianping

    2017-04-01

    Amniogenesis-the development of amnion-is a critical developmental milestone for early human embryogenesis and successful pregnancy. However, human amniogenesis is poorly understood due to limited accessibility to peri-implantation embryos and a lack of in vitro models. Here we report an efficient biomaterial system to generate human amnion-like tissue in vitro through self-organized development of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in a bioengineered niche mimicking the in vivo implantation environment. We show that biophysical niche factors act as a switch to toggle hPSC self-renewal versus amniogenesis under self-renewal-permissive biochemical conditions. We identify a unique molecular signature of hPSC-derived amnion-like cells and show that endogenously activated BMP-SMAD signalling is required for the amnion-like tissue development by hPSCs. This study unveils the self-organizing and mechanosensitive nature of human amniogenesis and establishes the first hPSC-based model for investigating peri-implantation human amnion development, thereby helping advance human embryology and reproductive medicine.

  9. Fully implanted brain-computer interface in a locked-in patient with ALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vansteensel, Mariska J.; Pels, Elmar G M; Bleichner, Martin G.; Branco, Mariana P.; Denison, Timothy; Freudenburg, Zachary V.; Gosselaar, Peter; Leinders, Sacha; Ottens, Thomas H.; Van Den Boom, Max A.; Van Rijen, Peter C.; Aarnoutse, Erik J.; Ramsey, Nick F.

    2016-01-01

    Options for people with severe paralysis who have lost the ability to communicate orally are limited. We describe a method for communication in a patient with late-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), involving a fully implanted brain-computer interface that consists of subdural electrodes

  10. Brain Implants for Prediction and Mitigation of Epileptic Seizures - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa

    2016-09-29

    This is a CRADA final report on C0100901 between Argonne National Laboratory and Flint Hills Scientific, LLC of Lawrence, Kansas. Two brain implantable probes, a surface acoustic wave probe and a miniature cooling probe, were designed, built, and tested with excellent results.

  11. Early metabolic/cellular-level resuscitation following terminal brain stem herniation: implications for organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Patients with terminal brain stem herniation experience global physiological consequences and represent a challenging population in critical care practice as a result of multiple factors. The first factor is severe depression of consciousness, with resulting compromise in airway stability and lung ventilation. Second, with increasing severity of brain trauma, progressive brain edema, mass effect, herniation syndromes, and subsequent distortion/displacement of the brain stem follow. Third, with progression of intracranial pathophysiology to terminal brain stem herniation, multisystem consequences occur, including dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, depletion of stress hormones, and decreased thyroid hormone bioavailability as well as biphasic cardiovascular state. Cardiovascular dysfunction in phase 1 is a hyperdynamic and hypertensive state characterized by elevated systemic vascular resistance and cardiac contractility. Cardiovascular dysfunction in phase 2 is a hypotensive state characterized by decreased systemic vascular resistance and tissue perfusion. Rapid changes along the continuum of hyperperfusion versus hypoperfusion increase risk of end-organ damage, specifically pulmonary dysfunction from hemodynamic stress and high-flow states as well as ischemic changes consequent to low-flow states. A pronounced inflammatory state occurs, affecting pulmonary function and gas exchange and contributing to hemodynamic instability as a result of additional vasodilatation. Coagulopathy also occurs as a result of consumption of clotting factors as well as dilution of clotting factors and platelets consequent to aggressive crystalloid administration. Each consequence of terminal brain stem injury complicates clinical management within this patient demographic. In general, these multisystem consequences are managed with mechanism-based interventions within the context of caring for the donor's organs (liver, kidneys, heart, etc.) after death by neurological

  12. Imaging of human glioblastoma cells and their interactions with mesenchymal stem cells in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryonic brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittori, Milos; Breznik, Barbara; Gredar, Tajda; Hrovat, Katja; Bizjak Mali, Lilijana; Lah, Tamara T

    2016-01-01

    An attractive approach in the study of human cancers is the use of transparent zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, which enable the visualization of cancer progression in a living animal. We implanted mixtures of fluorescently labeled glioblastoma (GBM) cells and bonemarrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into zebrafish embryos to study the cellular pathways of their invasion and the interactions between these cells in vivo. By developing and applying a carbocyanine-dye-compatible clearing protocol for observation of cells in deep tissues, we showed that U87 and U373 GBM cells rapidly aggregated into tumor masses in the ventricles and midbrain hemispheres of the zebrafish embryo brain, and invaded the central nervous system, often using the ventricular system and the central canal of the spinal cord. However, the GBM cells did not leave the central nervous system. With co-injection of differentially labeled cultured GBM cells and MSCs, the implanted cells formed mixed tumor masses in the brain. We observed tight associations between GBM cells and MSCs, and possible cell-fusion events. GBM cells and MSCs used similar invasion routes in the central nervous system. This simple model can be used to study the molecular pathways of cellular processes in GBM cell invasion, and their interactions with various types of stromal cells in double or triple cell co-cultures, to design anti-GBM cell therapies that use MSCs as vectors

  13. Severe traumatic head injury: prognostic value of brain stem injuries detected at MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilario, A; Ramos, A; Millan, J M; Salvador, E; Gomez, P A; Cicuendez, M; Diez-Lobato, R; Lagares, A

    2012-11-01

    Traumatic brain injuries represent an important cause of death for young people. The main objectives of this work are to correlate brain stem injuries detected at MR imaging with outcome at 6 months in patients with severe TBI, and to determine which MR imaging findings could be related to a worse prognosis. One hundred and eight patients with severe TBI were studied by MR imaging in the first 30 days after trauma. Brain stem injury was categorized as anterior or posterior, hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic, and unilateral or bilateral. Outcome measures were GOSE and Barthel Index 6 months postinjury. The relationship between MR imaging findings of brain stem injuries, outcome, and disability was explored by univariate analysis. Prognostic capability of MR imaging findings was also explored by calculation of sensitivity, specificity, and area under the ROC curve for poor and good outcome. Brain stem lesions were detected in 51 patients, of whom 66% showed a poor outcome, as expressed by the GOSE scale. Bilateral involvement was strongly associated with poor outcome (P brain stem injuries detected at MR imaging are poor prognostic signs. Nonhemorrhagic injuries showed the highest positive predictive value for good outcome.

  14. Implant for autologous soft tissue reconstruction using an adipose-derived stem cell-colonized alginate scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Tobias; Laemmle, Christine; Behr, Bjoern; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Jacobsen, Frank; Hoefer, Dirk; Kueckelhaus, Maximilian

    2018-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells represent an interesting option for soft tissue replacement as they are easy to procure and can generate their own blood supply through the production of angiogenic factors. We seeded adipose-derived stem cells on a bioresorbable, biocompatible polymer alginate scaffold to generate autologous soft tissue constructs for repair. We built and optimized an alginate scaffold and tested its biocompatibility using the MTT assay and its hydration capacity. We then isolated, characterized, and differentiated murine, porcine, and human adipose-derived stem cells. We characterized their angiogenic potential in vitro by VEGF ELISA and HUVEC tube formation assay in traditional cell culture substrate and in the actual three-dimensional scaffold. We assessed the angiogenic potential of adipose-derived stem cell-colonized scaffolds in ovo by chorion allantois membrane angiogenesis assay. Adipose-derived stem cells differentiated into adipocytes within the alginate scaffolds and demonstrated angiogenic activity. VEGF secretion by adipose-derived stem cells decreased significantly over the 21-day course of adipocyte differentiation in traditional cell culture substrate, but not in scaffolds. Adipose-derived stem cells differentiated for 21 days in scaffolds led to the longest HUVEC tube formation. Scaffolds colonized with adipose-derived stem cells resulted in significantly improved vascularization in ovo. We demonstrate the feasibility of implant production based on adipose-derived stem cell-colonized alginate scaffolds. The implants demonstrate biocompatibility and promote angiogenesis in vitro and in ovo. Therefore, they provide a combination of essential properties for an implant intended for soft tissue replacement. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Four cases with localized brain-stem lesion on CT scan following closed head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Naokatsu; Odaki, Masaru; Oka, Nobuo; Takase, Manabu; Ono, Junichi.

    1981-01-01

    Cases of primary brain-stem injury following closed head injury, verified by a CT scan, have been increasingly reported. However, most of them have other intracranial lesions in addition to the brain stem, resulting in a poor outcome. The CT scan of 200 cases with severe head injury-Araki's classification of types 3 and 4 - were analysed. Four cases out of them had localized brain-stem lesion without any other significant intracranial injury on a CT scan at the acute stage and had a better outcome than had previously been reported. In this analysis, these 4 cases were studied, and the CT findings, prognosis, and pathogenesis of the localized brain-stem injury were discussed. Follow-up CT of three cases, and taken one month or more later, showed diffuse cortical atrophy. This may indicate the presence of diffuse cerebral injury which could not be seen on CT scans at the acute stage. This atrophic change may also be related with the mechanism of posttraumatic conscious impairment and posttraumatic neurological deficits, such as mental symptoms and impairment of the higher cortical function. Shearing injury is a probable pathogenesis for this diffuse cortical injury. On the other hand, one case did not have any cortical atrophy on a follow-up CT scan. Therefore, this is a case with a localized primary brain-stem injury. Coup injury against the brain stem by a tentorial margin in a case with a small tentorial opening is a possible mechanism producing the localized brain-stem injury. (J.P.N.)

  16. Invasion Precedes Tumor Mass Formation in a Malignant Brain Tumor Model of Genetically Modified Neural Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oltea Sampetrean

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasiveness, cellular atypia, and proliferation are hallmarks of malignant gliomas. To effectively target each of these characteristics, it is important to understand their sequence during tumorigenesis. However, because most gliomas are diagnosed at an advanced stage, the chronology of gliomagenesis milestones is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the onset of these characteristics during tumor development. Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs were established by overexpressing H-RasV12 in normal neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mice harboring a homozygous deletion of the Ink4a/Arf locus. High-grade malignant brain tumors were then created by orthotopic implantation of 105 BTICs into the forebrain of 6-week-old wild-type mice. Micewere killed every week for 5 weeks, and tumors were assessed for cellular atypia, proliferation, hemorrhage, necrosis, and invasion. All mice developed highly invasive, hypervascular glioblastoma-like tumors. A 100% penetrance rate and a 4-week median survival were achieved. Tumor cell migration along fiber tracts started within days after implantation and was followed by perivascular infiltration of tumor cells with marked recruitment of reactive host cells. Next, cellular atypia became prominent. Finally, mass proliferation and necrosis were observed in the last stage of the disease. Video monitoring of BTICs in live brain slices confirmed the early onset of migration, as well as the main cell migration patterns. Our results showed that perivascular and intraparenchymal tumor cell migration precede tumor mass formation in the adult brain, suggesting the need for an early and sustained anti-invasion therapy.

  17. STEM Tones Pre-Activate Suffixes in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Pelle; Horne, Merle; Roll, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    Results from the present event-related potentials (ERP) study show that tones on Swedish word stems can rapidly pre-activate upcoming suffixes, even when the word stem does not carry any lexical meaning. Results also show that listeners are able to rapidly restore suffixes which are replaced with a cough. Accuracy in restoring suffixes correlated…

  18. Influence of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells pre-implantation differentiation approach on periodontal regeneration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xinjie; Yang, Fang; Yan, Xiangzhen; Yang, Wanxun; Yu, Na; Oortgiesen, Daniel A W; Wang, Yining; Jansen, John A; Walboomers, X Frank

    2015-04-01

    The implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has previously been shown successful to achieve periodontal regeneration. However, the preferred pre-implantation differentiation strategy (e.g. maintenance of stemness, osteogenic or chondrogenic induction) to obtain optimal periodontal regeneration is still unknown. This in vivo study explored which differentiation approach is most suitable for periodontal regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from Fischer rats and seeded onto poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) electrospun scaffolds, and then pre-cultured under different in vitro conditions: (i) retention of multilineage differentiation potential; (ii) osteogenic differentiation approach; and (iii) chondrogenic differentiation approach. Subsequently, the cell-scaffold constructs were implanted into experimental periodontal defects of Fischer rats, with empty scaffolds as controls. After 6 weeks of implantation, histomorphometrical analyses were applied to evaluate the regenerated periodontal tissues. The chondrogenic differentiation approach showed regeneration of alveolar bone and ligament tissues. The retention of multilineage differentiation potential supported only ligament regeneration, while the osteogenic differentiation approach boosted alveolar bone regeneration. Chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs before implantation is a useful strategy for regeneration of alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, in the currently used rat model. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells as a Tool for Dental Implant Osseointegration: an Experimental Study in the Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Eriberto; Botticelli, Daniele; Sivolella, Stefano; Bengazi, Franco; Guazzo, Riccardo; Sbricoli, Luca; Ricci, Sara; Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Velez, Joaquin Urbizo; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The biological interaction between the jaw bones and dental implant is fundamental for the long-term success of dental implant placement. Nevertheless, the insufficient bone volume remains a major clinical problem, especially in case of immediate dental implant. Using a canine model, the present study proves the regenerative potential of adipose- derived stem cells (ADSCs) to repair peri-implant bone defects occurring in immediate dental implant placement. In six labradors, all mandibular premolars and the first molars were extracted bilaterally and three months later dental implants were installed with a marginal gap. The marginal defects were filled with hydroxyapatite (HA)-based scaffolds previously seeded with ADSCs. After one month of healing, specimens were prepared for histological and histomorphometric evaluations. Histological analyses of ground sections show that ADSCs significantly increase bone regeneration. Several new vessels, osteoblasts and new bone matrix were detected. By contrast, no inflammatory cells have been revealed. ADSCs could be used to accelerate bone healing in peri- implant defects in case of immediate dental implant placement. PMID:27014644

  20. Autologous bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cell implantation and endothelial function in a rabbit ischemic limb model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Mikami

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs implantation improves endothelial dysfunction in a rabbit ischemic limb model. METHODS: We evaluated the effect of MSC implantation on limb blood flow (LBF responses to acetylcholine (ACh, an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an endothelium-independent vasodilator, in rabbits with limb ischemia in which cultured MSCs were implanted (n = 20 or saline was injected as a control group (n = 20. LBF was measured using an electromagnetic flowmeter. A total of 10(6 MSCs were implanted into each ischemic limb. RESULTS: Histological sections of ischemic muscle showed that capillary index (capillary/muscle fiber was greater in the MSC implantation group than in the control group. Laser Doppler blood perfusion index was significantly increased in the MSC implantation group compared with that in the control group. LBF response to ACh was greater in the MSC group than in the control group. After administration of N(G-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, LBF response to ACh was similar in the MSC implantation group and control group. Vasodilatory effects of SNP in the two groups were similar. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that MSC implantation induces angiogenesis and augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in a rabbit ischemic model through an increase in nitric oxide production.

  1. Development and Characterization of a Brain Endothelial Cell Phenotype using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldeman, Charlotte; Saaby, Lasse; Holst, Bjørn

    The transport of substances from blood to brain is regulated by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), i.e. the barrier properties of the brain endothelium. The endothelium restricts the transport into the brain of the majority of new drug candidates. Cultured monolayers of brain endothelial cells can...... be used to investigate drug transport in vitro, and screen candidates for permeation properties. One recent approach is to develop in vitro models of the BBB using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) as described by Stebbins et al. (2015).The aim of the present study was to investigate whether...... the published protocols were generically applicable and thus to develop and characterize in vitro models of the BBB using hIPSCs from different sources. Two stem cell lines, Bioni010-C and WTSli024-A, were seeded and maintained on Matrigel in mTesR1 media. Cells were then seeded as single cells at different...

  2. Implantation of Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Foot Fat Pad in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molligan, Jeremy; Mitchell, Reed; Bhasin, Priya; Lakhani, Aliya; Schon, Lew; Zhang, Zijun

    2015-11-01

    The foot fat pad (FFP) bears body weight and may become a source of foot pain during aging. This study investigated the regenerative effects of autologous adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) in the FFP of rats. Fat tissue was harvested from a total of 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats for isolation of AT-MSCs. The cells were cultured, adipogenic differentiation was induced for 1 week, and the AT-MSCs were labeled with fluorescent dye before injection. AT-MSCs (5 × 10(4) in 50 µL of saline) were injected into the second infradigital pad in the right hindfoot of the rat of origin. Saline only (50 µL) was injected into the corresponding fat pad in the left hind paw of each rat. Rats (n = 10) were euthanized at 1, 2, and 3 weeks, and the second infradigital fat pads were dissected for histologic examination. The fluorescence-labeled AT-MSCs were present in the foot pads throughout the 3-week experimental period. On histologic testing, the area of fat pad units (FPUs) in the fat pads that received AT-MSC injections was greater than that in the control fat pads. Although the thickness of septae was not changed by AT-MSC injections, the density of elastic fibers in the septae was increased in the fat pads with implanted AT-MSCs. In this short-term study, the implanted AT-MSCs largely survived and might have stimulated the expansion of individual FPUs and increased the density of elastic fibers in the FFP in this rat model. These data support the development of stem cell therapies for age-associated degeneration in FFP in humans. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. [Stem Cells in the Brain of Mammals and Human: Fundamental and Applied Aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, M A; Marey, M V

    2015-01-01

    Brain stem cells represent an extremely intriguing phenomenon. The aim of our review is to present an integrity vision of their role in the brain of mammals and humans, and their clinical perspectives. Over last two decades, investigations of biology of the neural stem cells produced significant changes in general knowledge about the processes of development and functioning of the brain. Researches on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of NSC differentiation and behavior led to new understanding of their involvement in learning and memory. In the regenerative medicine, original therapeutic approaches to neurodegenerative brain diseases have been elaborated due to fundamental achievements in this field. They are based on specific regenerative potential of neural stem cells and progenitor cells, which possess the ability to replace dead cells and express crucially significant biologically active factors that are missing in the pathological brain. For the needs of cell substitution therapy in the neural diseases, adequate methods of maintaining stem cells in culture and their differentiation into different types of neurons and glial cells, have been developed currently. The success of modern cellular technologies has significantly expanded the range of cells used for cell therapy. The near future may bring new perspective and distinct progress in brain cell therapy due to optimizing the cells types most promising for medical needs.

  4. The brain stem function in patients with brain bladder; Clinical evaluation using dynamic CT scan and auditory brainstem response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshihiro (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1990-11-01

    A syndrome of detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) is occasionally found in patients with brain bladder. To evaluate the brain stem function in cases of brain bladder, urodynamic study, dynamic CT scan of the brain stem (DCT) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) were performed. The region of interest of DCT aimed at the posterolateral portion of the pons. The results were analysed in contrast with the presense of DSD in urodynamic study. DCT studies were performed in 13 cases with various brain diseases and 5 control cases without neurological diseases. Abnormal patterns of the time-density curve consisted of low peak value, prolongation of filling time and low rapid washout ratio (low clearance ratio) of the contrast medium. Four of 6 cases with DSD showed at least one of the abnormal patterns of the time-density curve bilaterally. In 7 cases without DSD none showed bilateral abnormality of the curve and in 2 of 7 cases only unilateral abnormality was found. ABR was performed in 8 patients with brain diseases. The interpeak latency of the wave I-V (I-V IPL) was considered to be prolonged in 2 cases with DSD compared to that of 4 without DSD. In 2 cases with DSD who had normal DCT findings, measurement of the I-V IPL was impossible due to abnormal pattern of the ABR wave. Above mentioned results suggests the presence of functional disturbance at the posterolateral portion of the pons in cases of brain bladder with DSD. (author).

  5. Novel Cranial Implants of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia as Acoustic Windows for Ultrasonic Brain Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Mario I; Penilla, Elias H; Leija, Lorenzo; Vera, Arturo; Garay, Javier E; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2017-11-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound can induce changes in tissues by means of thermal and nonthermal effects. It is proposed for treatment of some brain pathologies such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's diseases, and cancer. However, cranium highly absorbs ultrasound reducing transmission efficiency. There are clinical applications of transcranial focused ultrasound and implantable ultrasound transducers proposed to address this problem. In this paper, biocompatible materials are proposed for replacing part of the cranium (cranial implants) based on low porosity polycrystalline 8 mol% yttria-stabilized-zirconia (8YSZ) ceramics as acoustic windows for brain therapy. In order to assess the viability of 8YSZ implants to effectively transmit ultrasound, various 8YSZ ceramics with different porosity are tested; their acoustic properties are measured; and the results are validated using finite element models simulating wave propagation to brain tissue through 8YSZ windows. The ultrasound attenuation is found to be linearly dependent on ceramics' porosity. Results for the nearly pore-free case indicate that 8YSZ is highly effective in transmitting ultrasound, with overall maximum transmission efficiency of ≈81%, compared to near total absorption of cranial bone. These results suggest that 8YSZ polycrystals could be suitable acoustic windows for ultrasound brain therapy at 1 MHz. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Implantation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Tracheal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshie, Susumu; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Omori, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    Compared with using autologous tissue, the use of artificial materials in the regeneration of tracheal defects is minimally invasive. However, this technique requires early epithelialization on the inner side of the artificial trachea. After differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), tracheal epithelial tissues may be used to produce artificial tracheas. Herein, we aimed to demonstrate that after differentiation from fluorescent protein-labeled iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in nude rats with tracheal defects. Red fluorescent tdTomato protein was electroporated into mouse iPSCs to produce tdTomato-labeled iPSCs. Embryoid bodies derived from these iPSCs were then cultured in differentiation medium supplemented with growth factors, followed by culture on air-liquid interfaces for further differentiation into tracheal epithelium. The cells were implanted with artificial tracheas into nude rats with tracheal defects on day 26 of cultivation. On day 7 after implantation, the tracheas were exposed and examined histologically. Tracheal epithelial tissue derived from tdTomato-labeled iPSCs survived in the tracheal defects. Moreover, immunochemical analyses showed that differentiated tissues had epithelial structures similar to those of proximal tracheal tissues. After differentiation from iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in rat bodies, warranting the use of iPSCs for epithelial regeneration in tracheal defects.

  7. Sumoylation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α ameliorates failure of brain stem cardiovascular regulation in experimental brain death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Y H Chan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available One aspect of brain death is cardiovascular deregulation because asystole invariably occurs shortly after its diagnosis. A suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation of this aspect of brain death resides in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM. RVLM is the origin of a life-and-death signal that our laboratory detected from blood pressure of comatose patients that disappears before brain death ensues. At the same time, transcriptional upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 in RVLM by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α plays a pro-life role in experimental brain death, and HIF-1α is subject to sumoylation activated by transient cerebral ischemia. It follows that sumoylation of HIF-1α in RVLM in response to hypoxia may play a modulatory role on brain stem cardiovascular regulation during experimental brain death.A clinically relevant animal model that employed mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rat was used. Biochemical changes in RVLM during distinct phenotypes in systemic arterial pressure spectrum that reflect maintained or defunct brain stem cardiovascular regulation were studied. Western blot analysis, EMSA, ELISA, confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that drastic tissue hypoxia, elevated levels of proteins conjugated by small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1, Ubc9 (the only known conjugating enzyme for the sumoylation pathway or HIF-1α, augmented sumoylation of HIF-1α, nucleus-bound translocation and enhanced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α in RVLM neurons took place preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain death. Furthermore, loss-of-function manipulations by immunoneutralization of SUMO-1, Ubc9 or HIF-1α in RVLM blunted the upregulated nitric oxide synthase I/protein kinase G signaling cascade, which sustains the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery during the pro-life phase.We conclude that sumoylation of HIF-1α in RVLM ameliorates brain stem

  8. Transcriptional profiling of adult neural stem-like cells from the human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilie Jonsgar Sandberg

    Full Text Available There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33-60. Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate. We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6, foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1 and human brain tissues (n = 12. The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular

  9. Patient-derived stem cells: pathways to drug discovery for brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eMackay-Sim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of drug discovery through stem cell biology is based on technological developments whose genesis is now coincident. The first is automated cell microscopy with concurrent advances in image acquisition and analysis, known as high content screening (HCS. The second is patient-derived stem cells for modelling the cell biology of brain diseases. HCS has developed from the requirements of the pharmaceutical industry for high throughput assays to screen thousands of chemical compounds in the search for new drugs. HCS combines new fluorescent probes with automated microscopy and computational power to quantify the effects of compounds on cell functions. Stem cell biology has advanced greatly since the discovery of genetic reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. There is now a rush of papers describing their generation from patients with various diseases of the nervous system. Although the majority of these have been genetic diseases, iPSCs have been generated from patients with complex diseases (schizophrenia and sporadic Parkinson’s disease. Some genetic diseases are also modelled in embryonic stem cells generated from blastocysts rejected during in vitro fertilisation. Neural stem cells have been isolated from post-mortem brain of Alzheimer’s patients and neural stem cells generated from biopsies of the olfactory organ of patients is another approach. These olfactory neurosphere-derived cells demonstrate robust disease-specific phenotypes in patients with schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. High content screening is already in use to find small molecules for the generation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenges for using stem cells for drug discovery are to develop robust stem cell culture methods that meet the rigorous requirements for repeatable, consistent quantities of defined cell types at the industrial scale necessary for high

  10. Brain-stem atrophy secondary to supratentorial cerebrovascular diseases as demonstrated by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Machida, Tohru; Iio, Masahiro.

    1985-01-01

    We reviewed the CT findings of 9 cases with supratentorial cerebrovascular diseases which also showed atrophic changes in their ipsilateral brain stem due to a Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract. Although similar findings have been reported in cases of supratentorial infarcts, our cases consisted of 5 old intracerebral hemorrhages and 4 old infarcts. This finding can occur at any level of the supratentorial corticospinal tract, but the volume changes in the brain stem seemed to be prominent in cases where the motor cortex was involved. A correlation was found between the duration of the supratentorial disease and the volume loss of the brain stem. The shortest duration of our cases was 12 months. This CT finding is considered to be that of the chronic stage of the supratentorial lesion involving the corticospinal tract. (author)

  11. Control of abdominal muscles by brain stem respiratory neurons in the cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alan D.; Ezure, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the control of abdominal muscles by the brain stem respiratory neurons was investigated in decerebrate unanesthetized cats. First, it was determined which of the brain stem respiratory neurons project to the lumbar cord (from which the abdominal muscles receive part of their innervation), by stimulating the neurons monopolarly. In a second part of the study, it was determined if lumbar-projecting respiratory neurons make monosynaptic connections with abdominal motoneurons; in these experiments, discriminate spontaneous spikes of antidromically acivated expiratory (E) neurons were used to trigger activity from both L1 and L2 nerves. A large projection was observed from E neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group to the contralateral upper lumber cord. However, cross-correlation experiments found only two (out of 47 neuron pairs tested) strong monosynaptic connections between brain stem neurons and abdominal motoneurons.

  12. MRI of the brain stem using fluid attenuated inversion recivery pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Coene, B.; Hajnal, J.V.; Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Heavily T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences with inversion times of 2000-2500 ms and echo times of 130-200 ms were used to image the brain stem of a normal adult and five patients. These sequences produce high signal from many white matter tracts and display high lesion contrast. The corticospinal and parietopontine tracts, lateral and medial lemnisci, superior and inferior cerebellar peduncles, medial longitudinal fasciculi, thalamo-olivary tracts the cuneate and gracile fasiculi gave high signal and were directly visualised. The oculomotor and trigeminal nerves were demonstrated within the brain stem. Lesions not seen with conventional T2-weighted spin echo sequences were seen with high contrast in patients with infarction, multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, chunt obstruction and metastatic tumour. The anatomical detail and high lesion contrast given by the FLAIR pulse sequence appear likely to be of value in diagnosis of disease in the brain stem. (orig.)

  13. Paving the way towards complex blood-brain barrier models using pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauschke, Karin; Frederiksen, Lise; Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2017-01-01

    to the unique tightness and selective permeability of the BBB and has been shown to be disrupted in many diseases and brain disorders, such as, vascular dementia, stroke, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Given the progress that pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have made in the last two decades......A tissue with great need to be modelled in vitro is the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a tight barrier that covers all blood vessels in the brain and separates the brain microenvironment from the blood system. It consists of three cell types (neurovascular unit (NVU)) that contribute...

  14. Spatially controlled delivery of siRNAs to stem cells in implants generated by multi-component additive manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Østergaard; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Chen, Muwan

    2013-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a promising technique in tissue engineering, as it enables truly individualized implants to be made to fit a particular defect. As previously shown, a feasible strategy to produce complex multicellular tissues is to deposit different small interfering RNA (siRNA) in porous...... implants that are subsequently sutured together. In this study, an additive manufacturing strategy to deposit carbohydrate hydrogels containing different siRNAs is applied into an implant, in a spatially controlled manner. When the obtained structures are seeded with mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells......, the selected siRNAs are delivered to the cells and induces specific and localized gene silencing. Here, it is demonstrated how to replicate part of a patient's spinal cord from a computed tomography scan, using an additive manufacturing technique to produce an implant with compartmentalized si...

  15. Electrochemical behavior and biological response of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on cp-Ti after N-ions implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizwan, M.; Ahmad, A. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Engineering and Technology, 54890 Lahore (Pakistan); Deen, K.M. [Corrosion Control Research Cell, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, CEET, University of the Punjab, 54590 Lahore (Pakistan); Haider, W., E-mail: haiderw@utpa.edu [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Texas Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539 (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Nitrogen ions of known dosage were implanted on cp-Ti. • Increase in surface roughness with increase in ions dose was confirmed by AFM. • TiN{sub 0.3} and Ti{sub 3}N{sub 2−x} nitride phases were formed and validated by XRD. • The ions implantation reduced the corrosion rate and stabilized the passive film. • Surface roughness greatly affected the morphology and growth of Mesenchymal Stem Cells. - Abstract: Titanium and its alloys are most widely used as implant materials due to their excellent biocompatibility, mechanical properties and chemical stability. In this study Nitrogen ions of known dosage were implanted over cp-Ti by Pelletron accelerator with beam energy of 0.25 MeV.The atomic force microscopy of bare and nitrogen implanted specimens confirmed increase in surface roughness with increase in nitrogen ions concentration. X-ray diffraction patterns of ions implanted surfaces validated the formation of TiN{sub 0.3} and Ti{sub 3}N{sub 2-x}nitride phases. The tendency to form passive film and electrochemical behavior of these surfaces in ringer lactate (RL) solution was evaluated by Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy respectively. It is proved that nitrogen ions implantation was beneficial to reduce corrosion rate and stabilizing passive film by increasing charge transfer resistance in RL. It was concluded that morphology and proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on nitrogen ions implanted surfaces strongly depends on surface roughness and nitride phases.

  16. Correlation of auditory brain stem response and the MRI measurements in neuro-degenerative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Hidekazu

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate correlations of several MRI measurements of the cranium and brain, functioning as a volume conductor, to the auditory brain stem response (ABR) in neuro-degenerative disorders. The subjects included forty-seven patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and sixteen of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between I-V and III-V interpeak latencies (IPLs) and the area of cranium and brain in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between I-III and III-V IPLs and the area in the longitudinal section of those with ALS. And, also there were statistically significant correlations between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of brain stem as well as that of the cranium in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of the cerebrum in the longitudinal section of ALS. In conclusion, in the ABR, the IPLs were prolonged and the amplitude of the V wave was decreased while the MRI size of the cranium and brain increased. When the ABR is applied to neuro-degenerative disorders, it might be important to consider not only the conduction of the auditory tracts in the brain stem, but also the correlations of the size of the cranium and brain which act as a volume conductor. (author)

  17. Isolation of a Pluripotent Neural Stem Cell from the Embryonic Bovine Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Gao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We recently isolated stem cells derived from the brain of a bovine fetus, utilizing a particular mechanical separation method. After improving our experimental conditions, we obtained neural stem cells using an optimized culture medium system. The cells were expanded, established in continuous cell culture and used for immunofluorescence cytochemistry. RT-PCR showed that embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs not only expresses the protein Sox2, Nestin but also Pax6, Musashi proteins and were differentiated into the three classical neuronal phenotypes (neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes.

  18. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewchand, W.; Drzymala, R.E.; Amin, P.P.; Salcman, M.; Salazar, O.M.

    1987-01-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent 192 Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent 192 Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent 192 Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various 192 Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from 192 Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable

  19. Artificial dural sealant that allows multiple penetrations of implantable brain probes

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Nathan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2008-01-01

    This study reports extensive characterization of the silicone gel (3−4680, Dow Corning, Midland, MI), for potential use as an artificial dural sealant in long-term electrophysiological experiments in neurophysiology. Dural sealants are important to preserve the integrity of the intra-cranial space after a craniotomy and in prolonging the lifetime and functionality of implanted brain probes. In this study, we report results of our tests on a commercially available silicone gel with unique prop...

  20. Electromagnetic interference of GSM mobile phones with the implantable deep brain stimulator, ITREL-III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alesch François

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose was to investigate mobile phone interference with implantable deep brain stimulators by means of 10 different 900 Mega Hertz (MHz and 10 different 1800 MHz GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications mobile phones. Methods All tests were performed in vitro using a phantom especially developed for testing with deep brain stimulators. The phantom was filled with liquid phantom materials simulating brain and muscle tissue. All examinations were carried out inside an anechoic chamber on two implants of the same type of deep brain stimulator: ITREL-III from Medtronic Inc., USA. Results Despite a maximum transmitted peak power of mobile phones of 1 Watt (W at 1800 MHz and 2 W at 900 MHz respectively, no influence on the ITREL-III was found. Neither the shape of the pulse form changed nor did single pulses fail. Tests with increased transmitted power using CW signals and broadband dipoles have shown that inhibition of the ITREL-III occurs at frequency dependent power levels which are below the emissions of GSM mobile phones. The ITREL-III is essentially more sensitive at 1800 MHz than at 900 MHz. Particularly the frequency range around 1500 MHz shows a very low interference threshold. Conclusion These investigations do not indicate a direct risk for ITREL-III patients using the tested GSM phones. Based on the interference levels found with CW signals, which are below the mobile phone emissions, we recommend similar precautions as for patients with cardiac pacemakers: 1. The phone should be used at the ear at the opposite side of the implant and 2. The patient should avoid carrying the phone close to the implant.

  1. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  2. Stem Tones Pre-activate Suffixes in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Pelle; Horne, Merle; Roll, Mikael

    2017-04-01

    Results from the present event-related potentials (ERP) study show that tones on Swedish word stems can rapidly pre-activate upcoming suffixes, even when the word stem does not carry any lexical meaning. Results also show that listeners are able to rapidly restore suffixes which are replaced with a cough. Accuracy in restoring suffixes correlated positively with the amplitude of an anterior negative ERP elicited by stem tones. This effect is proposed to reflect suffix pre-activation. Suffixes that were cued by an incorrect tone elicited a left-anterior negativity and a P600, suggesting that the correct processing of the suffix is crucially tied to the activation of the preceding validly associated tone.

  3. Gap junction proteins in the blood-brain barrier control nutrient-dependent reactivation of Drosophila neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spéder, Pauline; Brand, Andrea H

    2014-08-11

    Neural stem cells in the adult brain exist primarily in a quiescent state but are reactivated in response to changing physiological conditions. How do stem cells sense and respond to metabolic changes? In the Drosophila CNS, quiescent neural stem cells are reactivated synchronously in response to a nutritional stimulus. Feeding triggers insulin production by blood-brain barrier glial cells, activating the insulin/insulin-like growth factor pathway in underlying neural stem cells and stimulating their growth and proliferation. Here we show that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier glia mediate the influence of metabolic changes on stem cell behavior, enabling glia to respond to nutritional signals and reactivate quiescent stem cells. We propose that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier are required to translate metabolic signals into synchronized calcium pulses and insulin secretion. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Further In-vitro Characterization of an Implantable Biosensor for Ethanol Monitoring in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Rocchitta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ethyl alcohol may be considered one of the most widespread central nervous system (CNS depressants in Western countries. Because of its toxicological and neurobiological implications, the detection of ethanol in brain extracellular fluid (ECF is of great importance. In a previous study, we described the development and characterization of an implantable biosensor successfully used for the real-time detection of ethanol in the brain of freely-moving rats. The implanted biosensor, integrated in a low-cost telemetry system, was demonstrated to be a reliable device for the short-time monitoring of exogenous ethanol in brain ECF. In this paper we describe a further in-vitro characterization of the above-mentioned biosensor in terms of oxygen, pH and temperature dependence in order to complete its validation. With the aim of enhancing ethanol biosensor performance, different enzyme loadings were investigated in terms of apparent ethanol Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters, viz. IMAX, KM and linear region slope, as well as ascorbic acid interference shielding. The responses of biosensors were studied over a period of 28 days. The overall findings of the present study confirm the original biosensor configuration to be the best of those investigated for in-vivo applications up to one week after implantation.

  5. Brain abscess following dental implant placement via crestal sinus lift - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Yifat; Garfunkel, Adi A

    2018-01-01

    To describe a rare case of odontogenic brain abscess. A healthy, 35-year-old male had two dental implants placed in a simultaneously augmented maxillary sinus. One implant failed and the patient developed a maxillary sinusitis that failed to improve following antibiotic treatment at home. The neglected sinus infection led to formation of a brain abscess. The patient was hospitalised only when he had pan sinusitis with neurological signs. Symptoms were headache attacks, a subfebrile fever and a purulent secretion from the left nostril. The osteomeatal complex was blocked, the maxillary sinus was filled with pus and the Schneiderian membrane thickened. The patient was treated with intravenous antibiotic treatment. Computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS), were implemented. When his conditions worsened, the patient underwent a left frontal mini craniotomy. Following the craniotomy and antibiotic treatment, there was a gradual resolution and the patient was dismissed after 2 months in hospital with no neurological deficit or signs of sinusitis. Maxillary sinusitis following dental implant insertion and concomitant maxillary sinus elevation should be treated immediately and thoroughly since untreated sinusitis may cause life-threatening situations such as a brain abscess. In case of severe infection, clinicians should refer immediately the patient to hospital specialists. Conflict-of-interest statement: The authors have stated explicitly that there are no conflicts of interest. The manuscript was self-funded.

  6. Physics strategies for sparing neural stem cells during whole-brain radiation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Neil; Chuang, Cynthia; Pouliot, Jean; Hwang, Andrew; Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Currently, there are no successful long-term treatments or preventive strategies for radiation-induced cognitive impairments, and only a few possibilities have been suggested. One such approach involves reducing the dose to neural stem cell compartments (within and outside of the hippocampus) during whole-brain radiation treatments for brain metastases. This study investigates the fundamental physics issues associated with the sparing of neural stem cells during photon radiotherapy for brain metastases. Methods: Several factors influence the stem cell dose: intracranial scattering, collimator leakage, beam energy, and total number of beams. The relative importance of these factors is investigated through a set of radiation therapy plans, which are all variations of an initial 6 MV intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan designed to simultaneously deliver a whole-brain dose of 30 Gy and maximally reduce stem cell compartment dose. Additionally, an in-house leaf segmentation algorithm was developed that utilizes jaw motion to minimize the collimator leakage. Results: The plans are all normalized such that 50% of the PTV receives 30 Gy. For the initial 6 MV IMRT plan, 50% of the stem cells receive a dose greater than 6.3 Gy. Calculations indicate that 3.6 Gy of this dose originates from intracranial scattering. The jaw-tracking segmentation algorithm, used in conjunction with direct machine parameter optimization, reduces the 50% stem cell dose to 4.3 and 3.7 Gy for 6 and 10 MV treatment beams, respectively. Conclusions: Intracranial scattering alone is responsible for a large dose contribution to the stem cell compartment. It is, therefore, important to minimize other contributing factors, particularly the collimator leakage, to maximally reduce dose to these critical structures. The use of collimator jaw tracking in conjunction with modern collimators can minimize this leakage.

  7. Physics strategies for sparing neural stem cells during whole-brain radiation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Neil; Chuang, Cynthia; Pouliot, Jean; Hwang, Andrew; Barani, Igor J

    2011-10-01

    Currently, there are no successful long-term treatments or preventive strategies for radiation-induced cognitive impairments, and only a few possibilities have been suggested. One such approach involves reducing the dose to neural stem cell compartments (within and outside of the hippocampus) during whole-brain radiation treatments for brain metastases. This study investigates the fundamental physics issues associated with the sparing of neural stem cells during photon radiotherapy for brain metastases. Several factors influence the stem cell dose: intracranial scattering, collimator leakage, beam energy, and total number of beams. The relative importance of these factors is investigated through a set of radiation therapy plans, which are all variations of an initial 6 MV intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan designed to simultaneously deliver a whole-brain dose of 30 Gy and maximally reduce stem cell compartment dose. Additionally, an in-house leaf segmentation algorithm was developed that utilizes jaw motion to minimize the collimator leakage. The plans are all normalized such that 50% of the PTV receives 30 Gy. For the initial 6 MV IMRT plan, 50% of the stem cells receive a dose greater than 6.3 Gy. Calculations indicate that 3.6 Gy of this dose originates from intracranial scattering. The jaw-tracking segmentation algorithm, used in conjunction with direct machine parameter optimization, reduces the 50% stem cell dose to 4.3 and 3.7 Gy for 6 and 10 MV treatment beams, respectively. Intracranial scattering alone is responsible for a large dose contribution to the stem cell compartment. It is, therefore, important to minimize other contributing factors, particularly the collimator leakage, to maximally reduce dose to these critical structures. The use of collimator jaw tracking in conjunction with modern collimators can minimize this leakage.

  8. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoto, Masafumi, E-mail: mkanoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki, E-mail: thosoya@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Toyoguchi, Yuuki, E-mail: c-elegans_0201g@mail.goo.ne.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Oda, Atsuko, E-mail: a.oda@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis.

  9. Stem cells and treatment of brain and spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Suppl.1 (2009), s. 40-40 ISSN 1742-464X. [Congress of the Federation-of-European-Biochemical-Societies /34./. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor ameliorates brain stem cardiovascular dysregulation during experimental temporal lobe status epilepticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yi Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Status epilepticus (SE is an acute, prolonged epileptic crisis with a mortality rate of 20-30%; the underlying mechanism is not completely understood. We assessed the hypothesis that brain stem cardiovascular dysregulation occurs during SE because of oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, a key nucleus of the baroreflex loop; to be ameliorated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF via an antioxidant action. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a clinically relevant experimental model of temporal lobe SE (TLSE using Sprague-Dawley rats, sustained hippocampal seizure activity was accompanied by progressive hypotension that was preceded by a reduction in baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone; heart rate and baroreflex-mediated cardiac responses remained unaltered. Biochemical experiments further showed concurrent augmentation of superoxide anion, phosphorylated p47(phox subunit of NADPH oxidase and mRNA or protein levels of BDNF, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB, angiotensin AT1 receptor subtype (AT1R, nitric oxide synthase II (NOS II or peroxynitrite in RVLM. Whereas pretreatment by microinjection bilaterally into RVLM of a superoxide dismutase mimetic (tempol, a specific antagonist of NADPH oxidase (apocynin or an AT1R antagonist (losartan blunted significantly the augmented superoxide anion or phosphorylated p47(phox subunit in RVLM, hypotension and the reduced baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone during experimental TLSE, pretreatment with a recombinant human TrkB-Fc fusion protein or an antisense bdnf oligonucleotide significantly potentiated all those events, alongside peroxynitrite. However, none of the pretreatments affected the insignificant changes in heart rate and baroreflex-mediated cardiac responses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that formation of peroxynitrite by a reaction between superoxide anion generated by NADPH oxidase in RVLM on activation by AT1R and NOS II

  11. Neural stem cells improve neuronal survival in cultured postmortem brain tissue from aged and Alzheimer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, L.; Sluiter, A.A.; Guo, Ho Fu; Balesar, R. A.; Swaab, D. F.; Zhou, Jiang Ning; Verwer, R. W H

    Neurodegenerative diseases are progressive and incurable and are becoming ever more prevalent. To study whether neural stem cell can reactivate or rescue functions of impaired neurons in the human aging and neurodegenerating brain, we co-cultured postmortem slices from Alzheimer patients and control

  12. Combined high cervical spine and brain stem injuries: a complex and devastating injury in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Philippe-Gabriel; Meyer, Fabien; Orliaguet, Gilles; Blanot, Stéphane; Renier, Dominique; Carli, Pierre

    2005-10-01

    In young children, high cervical spine injuries (HCSI) can result in inaugural reversible, cardiac arrest or apnea. We noted in children sustaining such injuries an unusual incidence of associated brain stem injuries and defined a special pattern of combined lesions. Children with HSCI surviving inaugural cardiac arrest/apnea were selected for a retrospective analysis of a trauma data bank. Epidemiologic, clinical, and radiological characteristics, and outcome were reviewed and compared with those of the rest of the trauma population with severe neurologic injuries (defined by a Glasgow Coma Scale brain stem injury in all patients. Children with combined lesions had more frequent severe facial and skull base fractures compared with the rest of the population. They also were younger and sustained more frequent severe distracting injury to the neck than the rest of the population. Mortality rate (69%) was 2.6-fold higher than that observed in children without HCSI. In survivors, none demonstrated spinal cord injury resulting in persistent peripheral neurologic deficits, but only one achieved a good recovery. Combined HCSI and brain stem injuries must be suspected in young children sustaining a severe distracting injury to the craniocervical junction. Early recognition of these catastrophic injuries by systematic spiral cervical spine and brain stem computed tomographic scan evaluation is mandatory.

  13. Conductive Hearing Loss during Infancy: Effects on Later Auditory Brain Stem Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarson, Adele D.; Finitzo, Terese

    1991-01-01

    Long-term effects on auditory electrophysiology from early fluctuating hearing loss were studied in 27 children, aged 5 to 7 years, who had been evaluated originally in infancy. Findings suggested that early fluctuating hearing loss disrupts later auditory brain stem electrophysiology. (Author/DB)

  14. Cell Therapy in Parkinson's Disease: Host Brain Repair Machinery Gets a Boost From Stem Cell Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Eleonora; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2017-06-01

    This commentary highlights the major findings and future research directions arising from the recent publication by Zuo and colleagues in Stem Cells 2017 (in press). Here, we discuss the novel observations that transplanted human neural stem cells can induce endogenous brain repair by specifically stimulating a host of regenerative processes in the neurogenic niche (i.e., subventricular zone [SVZ]) in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. That the identified therapeutic proteomes, neurotrophic factors, and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the SVZ may facilitate brain regeneration and behavioral recovery open a new venue of research for our understanding of the pathology and treatment of Parkinson's disease. Stem Cells 2017;35:1443-1445. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Electrochemical behavior and biological response of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on cp-Ti after N-ions implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, M.; Ahmad, A.; Deen, K. M.; Haider, W.

    2014-11-01

    Titanium and its alloys are most widely used as implant materials due to their excellent biocompatibility, mechanical properties and chemical stability. In this study Nitrogen ions of known dosage were implanted over cp-Ti by Pelletron accelerator with beam energy of 0.25 MeV.The atomic force microscopy of bare and nitrogen implanted specimens confirmed increase in surface roughness with increase in nitrogen ions concentration. X-ray diffraction patterns of ions implanted surfaces validated the formation of TiN0.3 and Ti3N2-xnitride phases. The tendency to form passive film and electrochemical behavior of these surfaces in ringer lactate (RL) solution was evaluated by Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy respectively. It is proved that nitrogen ions implantation was beneficial to reduce corrosion rate and stabilizing passive film by increasing charge transfer resistance in RL. It was concluded that morphology and proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on nitrogen ions implanted surfaces strongly depends on surface roughness and nitride phases.

  16. Breath-holding spells may be associated with maturational delay in myelination of brain stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurucu, Sebahattin; Karaoglu, Abdulbaki; Paksu, Sukru M; Oz, Oguzhan; Yaman, Halil; Gulgun, Mustafa; Babacan, Oguzhan; Unay, Bulent; Akin, Ridvan

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate possible contribution of maturational delay of brain stem in the etiology of breath-holding spells in children using brain stem auditory evoked potentials. The study group included children who experienced breath-holding spells. The control group consisted of healthy age- and sex-matched children. Age, gender, type and frequency of spell, hemoglobin, and ferritin levels in study group and brain stem auditory evoked potentials results in both groups were recorded. Study group was statistically compared with control group for brain stem auditory evoked potentials. The mean age of study and control groups was 26.3 ± 14.6 and 28.9 ± 13.9 months, respectively. The III-V and I-V interpeak latencies were significantly prolonged in the study group compared with the control group (2.07 ± 0.2 milliseconds; 1.92 ± 0.13 milliseconds and 4.00 ± 0.27 milliseconds; 3.83 ± 0.19 milliseconds; P = 0.009 and P = 0.03, respectively). At the same time, III-V and I-V interpeak latencies of patients without anemia in the study group compared with those of control group were significantly prolonged (2.09 ± 0.24 milliseconds; 1.92 ± 0.13 milliseconds and 4.04 ± 0.28 milliseconds; 3.83 ± 0.19 milliseconds; P = 0.007 and P = 0.01, respectively). Our results consider that maturational delay in myelination of brain stem may have a role in the etiology of breath-holding spells in children.

  17. External fixation of femoral defects in athymic rats: Applications for human stem cell implantation and bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terasa Foo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate animal model is critical for the research of stem/progenitor cell therapy and tissue engineering for bone regeneration in vivo. This study reports the design of an external fixator and its application to critical-sized femoral defects in athymic rats. The external fixator consists of clamps and screws that are readily available from hardware stores as well as Kirschner wires. A total of 35 rats underwent application of the external fixator with creation of a 6-mm bone defect in one femur of each animal. This model had been used in several separate studies, including implantation of collagen gel, umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or bone morphogenetic protein-2. One rat developed fracture at the proximal pin site and two rats developed deep tissue infection. Pin loosening was found in nine rats, but it only led to the failure of external fixation in two animals. In 8 to 10 weeks, various degrees of bone growth in the femoral defects were observed in different study groups, from full repair of the bone defect with bone morphogenetic protein-2 implantation to fibrous nonunion with collagen gel implantation. The external fixator used in these studies provided sufficient mechanical stability to the bone defects and had a comparable complication rate in athymic rats as in immunocompetent rats. The external fixator does not interfere with the natural environment of a bone defect. This model is particularly valuable for investigation of osteogenesis of human stem/progenitor cells in vivo.

  18. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Tayama, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Masahito; Murakawa, Kazuyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    1994-01-01

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author)

  19. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Tayama, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Masahito; Murakawa, Kazuyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-01-01

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author).

  20. First Evidence of Cardiac Stem Cells From the Left Ventricular Apical Tip in Patients With Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameli, M; Righini, F M; Sparla, S; Tacchini, D; Dokollari, A; Sassi, C G; Di Tommaso, C; Curci, V; Censini, S; Incampo, E; Cassano, F; Droandi, G; Bernazzali, S; Focardi, M; Ietta, F; Sartiani, L; Romagnoli, R; Marotta, G; Mugelli, A; Paulesu, L; Sani, G; Tanganelli, P; Maccherini, M; Mondillo, S

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have challenged the dogma that the adult heart is a postmitotic organ and raise the possibility of the existence of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs). Our study aimed to explore if these CSCs are present in the "ventricular tip" obtained during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation from patients with end-stage heart failure (HF) and the relationship with LV dysfunctional area extent. Four consecutive patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and end-stage HF submitted to LVAD implantation were studied. The explanted "ventricular tip" was used as a sample of apical myocardial tissue for the pathological examination. Patients underwent clinical and echocardiographic examination, both standard transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and speckle tracking echocardiography (STE), before LVAD implantation. All patients presented severe apical dysfunction, with apical akinesis/diskinesis and very low levels of apical longitudinal strain (-3.5 ± 2.9%). Despite this, the presence of CSCs was demonstrated in pathological myocardial samples of "ventricular tip" in all 4 of the patients. It was found to be a mean of 6 c-kit cells in 10 fields magnification 40×. Cardiac stem cells can be identified in the LV apical segment of patients who have undergone LVAD implantation despite LV apical fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Brain Tumor Tropism of Transplanted Human Neural Stem Cells Is Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Ole Schmidt

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs offers a new potential therapeutic approach as a cell-based delivery system for gene therapy in brain tumors. This is based on the unique capacity of NSCs to migrate throughout the brain and to target invading tumor cells. However, the signals controlling the targeted migration of transplanted NSCs are poorly defined. We analyzed the in vitro and in vivo effects of angiogenic growth factors and protein extracts from surgical specimens of brain tumor patients on NSC migration. Here, we demonstrate that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is able to induce a long-range attraction of transplanted human NSCs from distant sites in the adult brain. Our results indicate that tumorupregulated VEGF and angiogenic-activated microvasculature are relevant guidance signals for NSC tropism toward brain tumors.

  2. Neurotransmission to parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons in the brain stem is altered with left ventricular hypertrophy-induced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, Edmund; Wang, Xin; Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Sun, Ke; Garrott, Kara; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Kay, Matthew W; Mendelowitz, David

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF) are widespread and debilitating cardiovascular diseases that affect nearly 23 million people worldwide. A distinctive hallmark of these cardiovascular diseases is autonomic imbalance, with increased sympathetic activity and decreased parasympathetic vagal tone. Recent device-based approaches, such as implantable vagal stimulators that stimulate a multitude of visceral sensory and motor fibers in the vagus nerve, are being evaluated as new therapeutic approaches for these and other diseases. However, little is known about how parasympathetic activity to the heart is altered with these diseases, and this lack of knowledge is an obstacle in the goal of devising selective interventions that can target and selectively restore parasympathetic activity to the heart. To identify the changes that occur within the brain stem to diminish the parasympathetic cardiac activity, left ventricular hypertrophy was elicited in rats by aortic pressure overload using a transaortic constriction approach. Cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the brain stem that generate parasympathetic activity to the heart were identified with a retrograde tracer and studied using patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings in vitro. Animals with left cardiac hypertrophy had diminished excitation of CVNs, which was mediated both by an augmented frequency of spontaneous inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission (with no alteration of inhibitory glycinergic activity) as well as a diminished amplitude and frequency of excitatory neurotransmission to CVNs. Opportunities to alter these network pathways and neurotransmitter receptors provide future targets of intervention in the goal to restore parasympathetic activity and autonomic balance to the heart in cardiac hypertrophy and other cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Basal ganglia germinoma in children with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozelame, Rodrigo V.; Shroff, Manohar; Wood, Bradley; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Drake, James M.; Hawkins, Cynthia; Blaser, Susan [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-04-15

    Germinoma is the most common and least-malignant intracranial germ cell tumor, usually found in the midline. Germinoma that arises in the basal ganglia, called ectopic germinoma, is a rare and well-documented entity representing 5% to 10% of all intracranial germinomas. The association of cerebral and/or brain stem atrophy with basal ganglia germinoma on CT and MRI is found in 33% of the cases. To review the literature and describe the CT and MRI findings of basal ganglia germinoma in children, known as ectopic germinoma, with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy. Three brain CT and six brain MRI studies performed in four children at two institutions were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were male (case 1, 14 years; case 2, 13 years; case 3, 9 years; case 4, 13 years), with pathologically proved germinoma arising in the basal ganglia, and associated ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy on the first imaging study. It is important to note that three of these children presented with cognitive decline, psychosis and slowly progressive hemiparesis as their indication for imaging. Imaging results on initial scans were varied. In all patients, the initial study showed ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy, representing Wallerian degeneration. All patients who underwent CT imaging presented with a hyperdense or calcified lesion in the basal ganglia on unenhanced scans. Only one of these lesions had a mass effect on the surrounding structures. In one of these patients a large, complex, heterogeneous mass appeared 15 months later. Initial MR showed focal or diffusely increased T2 signal in two cases and heterogeneous signal in the other two. (orig.)

  4. Basal ganglia germinoma in children with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozelame, Rodrigo V.; Shroff, Manohar; Wood, Bradley; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Drake, James M.; Hawkins, Cynthia; Blaser, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Germinoma is the most common and least-malignant intracranial germ cell tumor, usually found in the midline. Germinoma that arises in the basal ganglia, called ectopic germinoma, is a rare and well-documented entity representing 5% to 10% of all intracranial germinomas. The association of cerebral and/or brain stem atrophy with basal ganglia germinoma on CT and MRI is found in 33% of the cases. To review the literature and describe the CT and MRI findings of basal ganglia germinoma in children, known as ectopic germinoma, with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy. Three brain CT and six brain MRI studies performed in four children at two institutions were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were male (case 1, 14 years; case 2, 13 years; case 3, 9 years; case 4, 13 years), with pathologically proved germinoma arising in the basal ganglia, and associated ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy on the first imaging study. It is important to note that three of these children presented with cognitive decline, psychosis and slowly progressive hemiparesis as their indication for imaging. Imaging results on initial scans were varied. In all patients, the initial study showed ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy, representing Wallerian degeneration. All patients who underwent CT imaging presented with a hyperdense or calcified lesion in the basal ganglia on unenhanced scans. Only one of these lesions had a mass effect on the surrounding structures. In one of these patients a large, complex, heterogeneous mass appeared 15 months later. Initial MR showed focal or diffusely increased T2 signal in two cases and heterogeneous signal in the other two. (orig.)

  5. Nanoporous metals for biodegradable implants: Initial bone mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and degradation behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiden, Michael; Huang, Sabrina; Nauman, Eric; Johnson, David; Stanciu, Lia

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured Fe-Mn and Fe-Mn-Zn metal scaffolds were generated through a well-controlled selective leaching process in order to fulfill the growing demand for adjustable degradation rates and improved cellular response of resorbable materials. Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (D1 ORL UVA) were seeded onto eleven, carefully chosen nanoporous surfaces for 24 h in vitro. Using a combination of fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and an MTS assay, it was discovered that scaffolds with nanoscale roughened surfaces had increased cell attachment by up to 123% compared to polished smooth Fe-Mn surfaces. Significant cell spreading and construction of cell multilayers were also apparent after 24 h, suggesting better adhesion. Additionally, static electrochemical polarization experiments revealed an improvement of up to 26% in the actual rate of biodegradation for Fe-Mn surface-modified materials. However, any residual concentration of zinc after leaching was shown to slightly increase corrosion resistance. The results demonstrate that selectively leached, nanostructured Fe-Mn surfaces have the potential of being tailored to a diverse set of transient implant scenarios, while also effectively boosting overall biocompatibility, initial cell attachment, and degradation rate. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1747-1758, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Does State Merit-Based Aid Stem Brain Drain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Ness, Erik C.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors use college enrollment and migration data to test the brain drain hypothesis. Their results suggest that state merit scholarship programs do indeed stanch the migration of "best and brightest" students to other states. In the aggregate and on average, the implementation of state merit aid programs increases the…

  7. A pelvic implant orthosis in rodents, for spinal cord injury rehabilitation, and for brain machine interface research: construction, surgical implantation and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoekwere, Ubong Ime; Oza, Chintan S; Giszter, Simon F

    2014-01-30

    Rodents are important model systems used to explore spinal cord injury (SCI) and rehabilitation, and brain machine interfaces (BMI). We present a new method to provide mechanical interaction for BMI and rehabilitation in rat models of SCI. We present the design and implantation procedures for a pelvic orthosis that allows direct force application to the skeleton in brain machine interface and robot rehabilitation applications in rodents. We detail the materials, construction, machining, surgery and validation of the device. We describe the statistical validation of the implant procedures by comparing stepping parameters of 8 rats prior to and after implantation and surgical recovery. An ANOVA showed no effects of the implantation on stepping. Paired tests in the individual rats also showed no effect in 7/8 rats and minor effects in the last rat, within the group's variance. Our method allows interaction with rats at the pelvis without any perturbation of normal stepping in the intact rat. The method bypasses slings, and cuffs, avoiding cuff or slings squeezing the abdomen, or other altered sensory feedback. Our implant osseointegrates, and thus allows an efficient high bandwidth mechanical coupling to a robot. The implants support quadrupedal training and are readily integrated into either treadmill or overground contexts. Our novel device and procedures support a range of novel experimental designs and motor tests for rehabilitative and augmentation devices in intact and SCI model rats, with the advantage of allowing direct force application at the pelvic bones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A short-stem hip implant with metaphyseal anchorage in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Stefan; Floerkemeier, Thilo; Thorey, Fritz; Ezechieli, Marco; Claassen, Leif; Ettinger, Max; Bredow, Jan; Windhagen, Henning; Lewinski, Gabriela von

    2016-03-18

    Short-stem implants are routinely used for total hip arthroplasty in younger patients that are more likely to have secondary osteoarthritis than older patients. To investigate the applicability of short-stem hip implants for secondary osteoarthritis due to developmental dysplasia of the hip. This study analyzed the clinical and radiological results of patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH, 58 hips) and compared them to those of patients with primary osteoarthritis (POA, 59 hips) treated with the metaphyseal total hip arthroplasty (Metha®) short stem with metaphyseal fixation. The mean clinical and radiological follow-up periods were 2.9 ± 1.1 years and 3.8 ± 1.9 years, respectively. The mean Harris Hip Score (HHS) significantly increased in both groups over this period (p< 0.0001). The caput-collum-diaphysis (CCD) angle was significantly lower in the POA group prior to surgery and significantly increased in the POA and and decreased in DDH groups, respectively. The preoperative femoral offset was lower in the DDH group and increased significantly after surgery. The Metha® short stem in patients with DDH allows good reconstruction of joint biomechanics with a good clinical outcome.

  9. Frequency of primary brain stem lesions after head injuries. A CT scan analysis from 186 cases of severe head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, B.; Thurel, C.; Pierron, D.; Ragueneau, J.L. (Hopital Lariboisiere, 75 - Paris (France))

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of level of brain stem dysfunction, evolution, and CT scan profile was made on 76 cases of head injuries with prolonged unconsciousness and without hemispheric focal lesion and midline shift on CT scan. Eleven cases were considered normal on CT scan. The CT scan aspect of primary brain stem lesion was identified in 31.5% of these series, and in 14.5% of all severe head traumas (186 cases), from which this series is taken. Primary and secondary CT scan profiles were observed whatever the clinical level of dysfunction and its evolution. Pontine lesions were mainly associated with haemorrhage in the brain stem and diffuse brain swelling; but minimal signs (cortical level) and benign outcome can also be related to axial haemorrhage. These results emphasize the frequency of primary brain stem lesions and the value of CT scan in head injuries.

  10. Aberrant brain-stem morphometry associated with sleep disturbance in drug-naïve subjects with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JH

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ji Han Lee,1 Won Sang Jung,2 Woo Hee Choi,3 Hyun Kook Lim4 1Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA; 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Nuclear Medicine, 4Department of Psychiatry, Saint Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, South Korea Objective: Among patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, sleep disturbances are common and serious noncognitive symptoms. Previous studies of AD patients have identified deformations in the brain stem, which may play an important role in the regulation of sleep. The aim of this study was to further investigate the relationship between sleep disturbances and alterations in brain stem morphology in AD.Materials and methods: In 44 patients with AD and 40 healthy elderly controls, sleep disturbances were measured using the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep subscale. We employed magnetic resonance imaging-based automated segmentation tools to examine the relationship between sleep disturbances and changes in brain stem morphology.Results: Analyses of the data from AD subjects revealed significant correlations between the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep-subscale scores and structural alterations in the left posterior lateral region of the brain stem, as well as normalized brain stem volumes. In addition, significant group differences in posterior brain stem morphology were observed between the AD group and the control group.Conclusion: This study is the first to analyze an association between sleep disturbances and brain stem morphology in AD. In line with previous findings, this study lends support to the possibility that brain stem structural abnormalities might be important neurobiological mechanisms underlying sleep disturbances associated with AD. Further longitudinal research is needed to confirm these findings. Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, sleep, brain stem, MRI, shape analysis

  11. A low power flash-FPGA based brain implant micro-system of PID control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijuan Xia; Fattah, Nabeel; Soltan, Ahmed; Jackson, Andrew; Chester, Graeme; Degenaar, Patrick

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a low power flash FPGA based micro-system can provide a low power programmable interface for closed-loop brain implant inter- faces. The proposed micro-system receives recording local field potential (LFP) signals from an implanted probe, performs closed-loop control using a first order control system, then converts the signal into an optogenetic control stimulus pattern. Stimulus can be implemented through optoelectronic probes. The long term target is for both fundamental neuroscience applications and for clinical use in treating epilepsy. Utilizing our device, closed-loop processing consumes only 14nJ of power per PID cycle compared to 1.52μJ per cycle for a micro-controller implementation. Compared to an application specific digital integrated circuit, flash FPGA's are inherently programmable.

  12. BLINK REFLEX IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS: AN ANCILLARY TEST FOR DETECTING BRAIN STEM LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M ETEMEDYFAR

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Electrodiagnostic tests are one of the ancillary procedures that are used for diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS. This study investigates the frequency of abnormal blink reflex in patients with MS. Methods. In this cross sectional diagnostic study, 100 patients (26 male and 74 female with definite MS were selected based on clinical and MRI findings. they were referred to Al- zahra hospital (affiliated to iUMSHS during year 2000. Blink reflex (BR waves including R1, R2, R2 were recorded inpatients through the stimulation of supraorbital nerve. Results. The frequency of abnormal BR in MS patients with brain stem involvement was 77.9 percent and in those without brain stem involvement was 36.6 percent (P < 0.001. There was a significant relationship between the duration of MS and the abnormality in BR. Discussion. The frequency of abnormal blink reflex in MS is significantly associated with site of involvement in the brain. The majority of MS patients with brain stem involvement have abnormal BR. It is proposed that in patients with symptoms and signs of MS if there was no accessibility for MRI or if the results of MRI were equivocal, blink reflex test should be performed in addition to other ancillary tests.

  13. Dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells mediated by co-cultured rat striatal brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Mohammad Raffaqat; Andreasen, Christian Maaløv; Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa

    2008-01-01

    differentiation, we co-cultured cells from a human neural forebrain-derived stem cell line (hNS1) with rat striatal brain slices. In brief, coronal slices of neonatal rat striatum were cultured on semiporous membrane inserts placed in six-well trays overlying monolayers of hNS1 cells. After 12 days of co......Properly committed neural stem cells constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but a protocol for controlled dopaminergic differentiation is not yet available. To establish a setting for identification of secreted neural compounds promoting dopaminergic...

  14. Dosimetric response of radioactive bio glass seeds implants on rabbit brain; Resposta radiodosimetrica de implantes de sementes de biovidros radioativos no cerebro de coelhos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, I.T.; Campos, T.P.R., E-mail: itemponi@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.br [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    Interstitial implants of radioactive seeds are used as an efficient way of treating brain tumors. Bio glasses is an interesting alternative to the metallic implanted materials, because they can be absorbed by the organism, reducing the possibilities of side effects. The present paper investigates the dosimetry by the implants performed on rabbit's brain on the NRI/UFMG research group. The spatial distribution of the specific ionizing energy deposited per unit of mass generated by Sm-153 seeds were evaluated. A computational model of the brain's region was built using the software SISCODES produced by the research group. The sections of the computer tomography of a rabbit, which was included on the experiment, were digitalized. Those were converted in a three dimensional voxel model, including the tissues, its chemical composition and density. A simulation of the particles transport is performed by the stochastic code MCNP5. The implants consist of 15 ceramic Ca-Si-Sm seeds enriched with Sm-153, with 1.1.6 mm of length and 0.3 mm diameter, implanted on the rabbit's brain. It was predicted on the model three ribbons of 5 seeds each, spaced by 1.1.2 mm, since the ribbons were in a triangular topology whose vertices were spaced by 8 mm. The activities were 120 MBq/seed. The results show isodose regions superposed over the rabbits' model, reproducing the spatial energy deposition on the brain region. The absorbed dose predicted was 3.2 Gy per 15 seed; however it was not enough to tumor control. The authors suggest to increase the number of seeds and activity, reduction of the space to 5-6 mm among ribbons, improving dose with the beta emitting. (author)

  15. Neurogenesis in the brain stem of the rabbit: an autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblinger, M.M.; Das, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    With the aid of ( 3 H)-thymidine autoradiography, neurogenesis was documented in the nuclear groups of the medulla oblongata, pons, and mid-brain, as well as in the brain stem reticular formation of the rabbit. Following single injections of ( 3 H)-thymidine, counts were taken of intensely labeled neurons within the nuclei of the functional columns related to the cranial nerves, nuclei of several other functional classifications, and nuclei that did not fit into a functional category. In the brain stem as a whole, neurogenesis was found to occur between days 10.0 and 18.5 of gestation: however, the majority of nuclei studied contained intensely neurons only between days 12.0 and 15.0. Only in the pontine nucleus and the tectum were intensely labeled cells observed as late as day 18.5. Directional gradients of histogenesis were often observed within, as well as between, various nuclei. Within the nuclear columns related to the cranial nerves, a clear mediolateral spread of neurogenesis was observable such that nuclei of the motor columns reached a peak in neurogenesis before those in the sensory columns. Likewise, a mediolateral proliferation pattern was seen in the brain stem reticular formation. Other individual directional gradients were discernible; however, in the brain stem as a whole, distinct overall gradients were not observable. In many individual nuclei, gradients in neuron size were observed such that large neurons preferentially arose prior to smaller neurons. Information pertaining to gradients in neurogenesis, as well as to relationships among functionally related nuclei, are discussed

  16. Interactive, three dimensional, CT-based treatment planning of stereotaxic I-125 brain implants. 132

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulu, B.; Lewis, J.; Smith, V.; Stuart, A.

    1987-01-01

    Brain implants of I-125 seeds are done with the Brown-Roberts-Wells stereotaxic frame. The patient is CT scanned with the frame bolted to the skull. In the time between the scan and surgery, while the patient is under anesthesia, an interactive three dimensional CT-based treatment plan is performed on a VAX computer. The program is menu driven, easy to use, and easily modifiable. Device dependencies are limited to a small number of subroutines, and an array processor is used to speed dose calculations

  17. Identifying endogenous neural stem cells in the adult brain in vitro and in vivo: novel approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueger, Maria Adele; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, Joseph Altman reported that the adult mammalian brain is capable of generating new neurons. Today it is understood that some of these neurons are derived from uncommitted cells in the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricles, and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The first area generates new neuroblasts which migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas hippocampal neurogenesis seems to play roles in particular types of learning and memory. A part of these uncommitted (immature) cells is able to divide and their progeny can generate all three major cell types of the nervous system: neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes; these properties define such cells as neural stem cells. Although the roles of these cells are not yet clear, it is accepted that they affect functions including olfaction and learning/memory. Experiments with insults to the central nervous system also show that neural stem cells are quickly mobilized due to injury and in various disorders by proliferating, and migrating to injury sites. This suggests a role of endogenous neural stem cells in disease. New pools of stem cells are being discovered, suggesting an even more important role for these cells. To understand these cells and to coax them to contribute to tissue repair it would be very useful to be able to image them in the living organism. Here we discuss advances in imaging approaches as well as new concepts that emerge from stem cell biology with emphasis on the interface between imaging and stem cells.

  18. Contacting the brain--aspects of a technology assessment of neural implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Michael; Fleischer, Torsten

    2008-12-01

    last years, neural implants became a subject for TA since they have gained a higher attention in both the political arena and the general public. Especially the ethical and social implications of technologies that electrically stimulate the brain and the possibilities of changing personality traits, changing moods, and perhaps enhancing human cognitive capabilities are central issues in related discussions. In this paper, we want to briefly summarize some of the key arguments as well as topics for future discussion and research.

  19. Graphene Functionalized Scaffolds Reduce the Inflammatory Response and Supports Endogenous Neuroblast Migration when Implanted in the Adult Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhou

    Full Text Available Electroactive materials have been investigated as next-generation neuronal tissue engineering scaffolds to enhance neuronal regeneration and functional recovery after brain injury. Graphene, an emerging neuronal scaffold material with charge transfer properties, has shown promising results for neuronal cell survival and differentiation in vitro. In this in vivo work, electrospun microfiber scaffolds coated with self-assembled colloidal graphene, were implanted into the striatum or into the subventricular zone of adult rats. Microglia and astrocyte activation levels were suppressed with graphene functionalization. In addition, self-assembled graphene implants prevented glial scarring in the brain 7 weeks following implantation. Astrocyte guidance within the scaffold and redirection of neuroblasts from the subventricular zone along the implants was also demonstrated. These findings provide new functional evidence for the potential use of graphene scaffolds as a therapeutic platform to support central nervous system regeneration.

  20. Long-term meditation is associated with increased gray matter density in the brain stem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Beek, Martijn van; Skewes, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    density in lower brain stem regions of experienced meditators compared with age-matched nonmeditators. Our findings show that long-term practitioners of meditation have structural differences in brainstem regions concerned with cardiorespiratory control. This could account for some......Extensive practice involving sustained attention can lead to changes in brain structure. Here, we report evidence of structural differences in the lower brainstem of participants engaged in the long-term practice of meditation. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we observed higher gray matter...

  1. From pluripotent stem cells to multifunctional cordocytic phenotypes in the human brain: an ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Viorel; Danaila, Leon; Pais, Emil

    2012-08-01

    Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate surgical cases in a variety of pathological conditions (thromboses, tumors, cerebrovascular malformations, Moyamoya disease) to identify and characterize different phenotypes belonging to a new interstitial cell recently described ultrastructurally in the brain and here named "cordocyte." Also, this work is an attempt to identify and characterize precursor/stem cells for cordocytic lineage in the perivascular areas, within perivascular nerves and pia mater (now considered a cordocytic-vascular tissue). Unexpected relationships and functions emerge from observations concerning these phenotypes, almost ubiquitous, but not yet fully studied in the brain.

  2. Early changes of auditory brain stem evoked response after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma - a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, S.K.; Wei, W.I.; Sham, J.S.T.; Choy, D.T.K.; Hui, Y. (Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong))

    1992-10-01

    A prospective study of the effect of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma on hearing was carried out on 49 patients who had pure tone, impedance audiometry and auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR) recordings before, immediately, three, six and 12 months after radiotherapy. Fourteen patients complained of intermittent tinnitus after radiotherapy. We found that 11 initially normal ears of nine patients developed a middle ear effusion, three to six months after radiotherapy. There was mixed sensorineural and conductive hearing impairment after radiotherapy. Persistent impairment of ABR was detected immediately after completion of radiotherapy. The waves I-III and I-V interpeak latency intervals were significantly prolonged one year after radiotherapy. The study shows that radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma impairs hearing by acting on the middle ear, the cochlea and the brain stem auditory pathway. (Author).

  3. Early changes of auditory brain stem evoked response after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma - a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, S.K.; Wei, W.I.; Sham, J.S.T.; Choy, D.T.K.; Hui, Y.

    1992-01-01

    A prospective study of the effect of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma on hearing was carried out on 49 patients who had pure tone, impedance audiometry and auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR) recordings before, immediately, three, six and 12 months after radiotherapy. Fourteen patients complained of intermittent tinnitus after radiotherapy. We found that 11 initially normal ears of nine patients developed a middle ear effusion, three to six months after radiotherapy. There was mixed sensorineural and conductive hearing impairment after radiotherapy. Persistent impairment of ABR was detected immediately after completion of radiotherapy. The waves I-III and I-V interpeak latency intervals were significantly prolonged one year after radiotherapy. The study shows that radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma impairs hearing by acting on the middle ear, the cochlea and the brain stem auditory pathway. (Author)

  4. Endovascular treatment of brain-stem arteriovenous malformations: safety and efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.M.; Wang, Y.H.; Chen, Y.F.; Huang, K.M. [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, 7 Chung-Shan South Road, 10016, Taipei (Taiwan); Tu, Y.K. [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, 7 Chung-Shan South Road, 1001, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2003-09-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endovascular treatment of brain-stem arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), reviewing six cases managed in the last 5 years. There were four patients who presented with bleeding, one with a progressive neurological deficit and one with obstructive hydrocephalus. Of the six patients, one showed 100%, one 90%, two 75% and two about 50% angiographic obliteration of the AVM after embolisation; the volume decreased about 75% on average. Five patients had a good outcome and one an acceptable outcome, with a mild postprocedure neurological deficit; none had further bleeding during midterm follow-up. Endovascular management of a brain-stem AVM may be an alternative to treatment such as radiosurgery and microsurgery in selected cases. It may be not as risky as previously thought. Embolisation can reduce the size of the AVM and possibly make it more treatable by radiosurgery and decrease the possibility of radiation injury. (orig.)

  5. Robotics, Stem Cells and Brain Computer Interfaces in Rehabilitation and Recovery from Stroke; Updates and Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boninger, Michael L; Wechsler, Lawrence R.; Stein, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the current state and latest advances in robotics, stem cells, and brain computer interfaces in rehabilitation and recovery for stroke. Design The authors of this summary recently reviewed this work as part of a national presentation. The paper represents the information included in each area. Results Each area has seen great advances and challenges as products move to market and experiments are ongoing. Conclusion Robotics, stem cells, and brain computer interfaces all have tremendous potential to reduce disability and lead to better outcomes for patients with stroke. Continued research and investment will be needed as the field moves forward. With this investment, the potential for recovery of function is likely substantial PMID:25313662

  6. Murine cytomegalovirus infection of neural stem cells alters neurogenesis in the developing brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar B Mutnal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV brain infection causes serious neuro-developmental sequelae including: mental retardation, cerebral palsy, and sensorineural hearing loss. But, the mechanisms of injury and pathogenesis to the fetal brain are not completely understood. The present study addresses potential pathogenic mechanisms by which this virus injures the CNS using a neonatal mouse model that mirrors congenital brain infection. This investigation focused on, analysis of cell types infected with mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV and the pattern of injury to the developing brain.We used our MCMV infection model and a multi-color flow cytometry approach to quantify the effect of viral infection on the developing brain, identifying specific target cells and the consequent effect on neurogenesis. In this study, we show that neural stem cells (NSCs and neuronal precursor cells are the principal target cells for MCMV in the developing brain. In addition, viral infection was demonstrated to cause a loss of NSCs expressing CD133 and nestin. We also showed that infection of neonates leads to subsequent abnormal brain development as indicated by loss of CD24(hi cells that incorporated BrdU. This neonatal brain infection was also associated with altered expression of Oct4, a multipotency marker; as well as down regulation of the neurotrophins BDNF and NT3, which are essential to regulate the birth and differentiation of neurons during normal brain development. Finally, we report decreased expression of doublecortin, a marker to identify young neurons, following viral brain infection.MCMV brain infection of newborn mice causes significant loss of NSCs, decreased proliferation of neuronal precursor cells, and marked loss of young neurons.

  7. Wireless image-data transmission from an implanted image sensor through a living mouse brain by intra body communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, Hajime; Takehara, Hiroaki; Nagata, Kengo; Haruta, Makito; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Intra body communication technology allows the fabrication of compact implantable biomedical sensors compared with RF wireless technology. In this paper, we report the fabrication of an implantable image sensor of 625 µm width and 830 µm length and the demonstration of wireless image-data transmission through a brain tissue of a living mouse. The sensor was designed to transmit output signals of pixel values by pulse width modulation (PWM). The PWM signals from the sensor transmitted through a brain tissue were detected by a receiver electrode. Wireless data transmission of a two-dimensional image was successfully demonstrated in a living mouse brain. The technique reported here is expected to provide useful methods of data transmission using micro sized implantable biomedical sensors.

  8. Calcium-dependent plateau potentials in rostral ambiguus neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Feldman, J L

    1997-01-01

    Calcium-dependent plateau potentials in rostral ambiguus neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro. J. Neurophysiol. 78: 2483-2492, 1997. The nucleus ambiguus contains vagal and glossopharyngeal motoneurons and preganglionic neurons involved in respiration, swallowing, vocalization...

  9. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin, on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Theophilidis, G

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the action of deltamethrin on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice. Deltamethrin depolarized the hypoglossal motoneurons, increased the background synaptic noise and reduced the frequency and amplitude of current elicited action...

  10. Stem cells distribution, cellular proliferation and migration in the adult Austrolebias charrua brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Pérez, Maximiliano; Rosillo, Juan Carlos; Berrosteguieta, Ines; Olivera-Bravo, Silvia; Casanova, Gabriela; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Fernández, Anabel Sonia

    2017-10-15

    Our previous studies demonstrated that Austrolebias charrua annual fish is an excellent model to study adult brain cell proliferation and neurogenesis due to the presence of active and fast neurogenesis in several regions during its short lifespan. Our main goal was to identify and localize the cells that compose the neurogenic areas throughout the Austrolebias brain. To do this, we used two thymidine halogenated analogs to detect cell proliferation at different survival times: 5-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine (CldU) at 1day and 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IdU) at 30days. Three types of proliferating cells were identified: I - transient amplifying or fast cycling cells that uptake CldU; II - stem cells or slow cycling cells, that were labeled with both CldU and IdU and did not migrate; and III - migrant cells that uptake IdU. Mapping and 3D-reconstruction of labeled nuclei showed that type I and type II cells were preferentially found close to ventricle walls. Type III cells appeared widespread and migrating in tangential and radial routes. Use of proliferation markers together with Vimentin or Nestin evidenced that type II cells are the putative stem cells that are located at the ventricular lumen. Double label cells with IdU+ and NeuN or HuC/D allowed us identify migrant neurons. Quantitation of labeled nuclei indicates that the proportion of putative stem cells is around 10% in all regions of the brain. This percentage of stem cells suggests the existence of a constant brain cell population in Austrolebias charrua that seems functional to the maintainance of adult neurogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Astrocytic Calcium Waves Signal Brain Injury to Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kraft; Eduardo Rosales Jubal; Ruth von Laer; Claudia Döring; Adriana Rocha; Moyo Grebbin; Martin Zenke; Helmut Kettenmann; Albrecht Stroh; Stefan Momma

    2017-01-01

    Summary Brain injuries, such as stroke or trauma, induce neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) to a neurogenic response. Very little is known about the molecular cues that signal tissue damage, even over large distances, to the SVZ. Based on our analysis of gene expression patterns in the SVZ, 48?hr after an ischemic lesion caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion, we hypothesized that the presence of an injury might be transmitted by an astrocytic traveling calcium wave rather...

  12. Vagally mediated effects of brain stem dopamine on gastric tone and phasic contractions of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, L; Toti, L; Bove, C; Travagli, R A

    2017-11-01

    Dopamine (DA)-containing fibers and neurons are embedded within the brain stem dorsal vagal complex (DVC); we have shown previously that DA modulates the membrane properties of neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) via DA1 and DA2 receptors. The vagally dependent modulation of gastric tone and phasic contractions, i.e., motility, by DA, however, has not been characterized. With the use of microinjections of DA in the DVC while recording gastric tone and motility, the aims of the present study were 1 ) assess the gastric effects of brain stem DA application, 2 ) identify the DA receptor subtype, and, 3 ) identify the postganglionic pathway(s) activated. Dopamine microinjection in the DVC decreased gastric tone and motility in both corpus and antrum in 29 of 34 rats, and the effects were abolished by ipsilateral vagotomy and fourth ventricular treatment with the selective DA2 receptor antagonist L741,626 but not by application of the selective DA1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Systemic administration of the cholinergic antagonist atropine attenuated the inhibition of corpus and antrum tone in response to DA microinjection in the DVC. Conversely, systemic administration of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester did not alter the DA-induced decrease in gastric tone and motility. Our data provide evidence of a dopaminergic modulation of a brain stem vagal neurocircuit that controls gastric tone and motility. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Dopamine administration in the brain stem decreases gastric tone and phasic contractions. The gastric effects of dopamine are mediated via dopamine 2 receptors on neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. The inhibitory effects of dopamine are mediated via inhibition of the postganglionic cholinergic pathway. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis stimulates neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the premature brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jinqiao; Sha, Bin; Zhou, Wenhao; Yang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of angiogenesis on the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the premature brain. We observed the changes in neurogenesis that followed the stimulation and inhibition of angiogenesis by altering vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in a 3-day-old rat model. VEGF expression was overexpressed by adenovirus transfection and down-regulated by siRNA interference. Using immunofluorescence assays, Western blot analysis, and real-time PCR methods, we observed angiogenesis and the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Immunofluorescence assays showed that the number of vWF-positive areas peaked at day 7, and they were highest in the VEGF up-regulation group and lowest in the VEGF down-regulation group at every time point. The number of neural stem cells, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes in the subventricular zone gradually increased over time in the VEGF up-regulation group. Among the three groups, the number of these cells was highest in the VEGF up-regulation group and lowest in the VEGF down-regulation group at the same time point. Western blot analysis and real-time PCR confirmed these results. These data suggest that angiogenesis may stimulate the proliferation of neural stem cells and differentiation into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes in the premature brain.

  14. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  15. Electrothermal Microactuators With Peg Drive Improve Performance for Brain Implant Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sindhu; Sutanto, Jemmy; Baker, Michael S; Okandan, Murat; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2012-07-13

    This paper presents a new actuation scheme for in-plane bidirectional translation of polysilicon microelectrodes. The new Chevron-peg actuation scheme uses microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based electrothermal microactuators to move microelectrodes for brain implant applications. The design changes were motivated by specific needs identified by the in vivo testing of an earlier generation of MEMS microelectrodes that were actuated by the Chevron-latch type of mechanism. The microelectrodes actuated by the Chevron-peg mechanism discussed here show improved performance in the following key areas: higher force generation capability (111 μ N per heat strip compared to 50 μ N), reduced power consumption (91 mW compared to 360 mW), and reliable performance with consistent forward and backward movements of microelectrodes. Failure analysis of the Chevron-latch and the Chevron-peg type of actuation schemes showed that the latter is more robust to wear over four million cycles of operation. The parameters for the activation waveforms for Chevron-peg actuators were optimized using statistical analysis. Waveforms with a 1-ms time period and a 1-Hz frequency of operation showed minimal error between the expected and the actual movement of the microelectrodes. The new generation of Chevron-peg actuators and microelectrodes are therefore expected to enhance the longevity and performance of implanted microelectrodes in the brain.  [2011-0341].

  16. Manufacturing, assembling and packaging of miniaturized implants for neural prostheses and brain-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Implantable medical devices to interface with muscles, peripheral nerves, and the brain have been developed for many applications over the last decades. They have been applied in fundamental neuroscientific studies as well as in diagnosis, therapy and rehabilitation in clinical practice. Success stories of these implants have been written with help of precision mechanics manufacturing techniques. Latest cutting edge research approaches to restore vision in blind persons and to develop an interface with the human brain as motor control interface, however, need more complex systems and larger scales of integration and higher degrees of miniaturization. Microsystems engineering offers adequate tools, methods, and materials but so far, no MEMS based active medical device has been transferred into clinical practice. Silicone rubber, polyimide, parylene as flexible materials and silicon and alumina (aluminum dioxide ceramics) as substrates and insulation or packaging materials, respectively, and precious metals as electrodes have to be combined to systems that do not harm the biological target structure and have to work reliably in a wet environment with ions and proteins. Here, different design, manufacturing and packaging paradigms will be presented and strengths and drawbacks will be discussed in close relation to the envisioned biological and medical applications.

  17. 1.5-T high-resolution MR imaging of oculomotor disturbances due to intrinsic brain-stem disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, S.C.; Quint, D.J.; Sanders, W.P.; Mehta, B.A.; Boulos, R.S.; Froelich, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen patients who presented with oculomotor disturbances (internuclear ophthalmoplegia, ophthalmoparesis) underwent MR imaging, which demonstrated brain-stem abnormalities in 11 cases. Lesions identified included occult vascular malformation with hemorrhage (two), hypertensive hemorrhage (one), infarction (two), neoplasm (two), and demyelinating disease (four). The authors' exhibit illustrates the exquisite anatomic detail displayed by high-field MR imaging in localizing various intrinsic brain-stem lesions in the region of the third, fourth, and sixth cranial nuclei and the medial longitudinal fasciculus

  18. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) depolarizes a subset of inspiratory neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Champagnat, J; Denavit-Saubié, M

    1996-01-01

    in a thick brain stem slice preparation from the newborn mouse. The action of TRH on the respiratory output from the slice was investigated by recordings from the XII nerve. Cellular responses to TRH were investigated using whole cell recordings from hypoglossal motoneurons and three types of inspiratory...... mice through an action at the level of the brain stem.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  19. Influence of Brain Stem on Axial and Hindlimb Spinal Locomotor Rhythm Generating Circuits of the Neonatal Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Jean-Xavier

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The trunk plays a pivotal role in limbed locomotion. Yet, little is known about how the brain stem controls trunk activity during walking. In this study, we assessed the spatiotemporal activity patterns of axial and hindlimb motoneurons (MNs during drug-induced fictive locomotor-like activity (LLA in an isolated brain stem-spinal cord preparation of the neonatal mouse. We also evaluated the extent to which these activity patterns are affected by removal of brain stem. Recordings were made in the segments T7, L2, and L5 using calcium imaging from individual axial MNs in the medial motor column (MMC and hindlimb MNs in lateral motor column (LMC. The MN activities were analyzed during both the rhythmic and the tonic components of LLA, the tonic component being used as a readout of generalized increase in excitability in spinal locomotor networks. The most salient effect of brain stem removal was an increase in locomotor rhythm frequency and a concomitant reduction in burst durations in both MMC and LMC MNs. The lack of effect on the tonic component of LLA indicated specificity of action during the rhythmic component. Cooling-induced silencing of the brain stem reproduced the increase in rhythm frequency and accompanying decrease in burst durations in L2 MMC and LMC, suggesting a dependency on brain stem neuron activity. The work supports the idea that the brain stem locomotor circuits are operational already at birth and further suggests an important role in modulating trunk activity. The brain stem may influence the axial and hindlimb spinal locomotor rhythm generating circuits by extending their range of operation. This may represent a critical step of locomotor development when learning how to walk in different conditions and environments is a major endeavor.

  20. MRI findings of radiation encephalopathy of brain stem after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Changhong; Li Guoye; Huang Biao; Huang Meiping; Zheng Junhui; Tan Shaoheng; Zeng Qiongxin

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study MRI findings and clinical manifestation of radiation encephalopathy (RE) of brain stem. Methods: MRI findings and clinical symptoms in 51 patients with RE of brain stem after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer were reviewed. Results: Clinical symptoms included number weakness or paralysis in the limbs and symptoms of damaged cranial nerves. All lesions appeared hypo- or iso-intense on spin echo(SE) T 1 -weighted images and inhomogeneous and mixed hyper- and iso-intense on Turbo spin echo (TSE) T 2 -weighted images. The lesions were located in mesencephalon, pons, medulla, basilar part of pons, basilar part of pons and medulla oblongata in 2,7,3,9 and 30 patients respectively. The enhancement patterns included irregular rings in 39 patients, spotty in 3 and no enhancement in 9 patients. Mass effect was minimal in all patients. On follow-up MRI, the lesions disappeared in 4 patients, did not change in size and shape in 8 patients and enlarged in 2 patients. Conclusion: MRI could demonstrate the characteristic findings of RE of brain stem. MRI findings sometimes are not consistent with the clinical symptoms

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging for nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem and spinocerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Tsuguo

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can create an image of the anisotropic nature of diffusion and express it quantitatively. Nerve fibers have a large anisotropic diffusion, and it is possible to obtain images of the nerve fiber bundle. The purpose of this study is to observe the nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem using DTI and study its potential for diagnosing the type of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps and 3D-tractography images were obtained for 41 subjects with no brain stem abnormalities. We created an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map and an FA map using DTI for 16 subjects in the disease group (11 with hereditary SCD and 5 with non-hereditary SCD) and 25 in the control group. The diffusion value of the pons and middle cerebellar peduncle was measured using ADC, and the degree of anisotropic diffusion was measured using FA. The pyramidal tract, superior cerebellar peduncle, and inferior cerebellar peduncle were clearly demonstrated for all cases. ADC for the middle cerebellar peduncle in spinocerebellar ataxin (SCA)1 was significantly higher, similar to that for the pons in dentatorubro-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). In MSA-C, ADC for both the pons and middle cerebellar peduncle was significantly elevated and FA was significantly decreased. There were no significant changes in SCA3. We could observe the nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem using DTI. FA and ADC measurements with DTI can aid in diagnosing the type of SCD. (author)

  2. Can mobile phone emissions affect auditory functions of cochlea or brain stem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Uwe; Eggert, Siegfried; Pau, Hans Wilhelm

    2005-03-01

    Despite their abundant spread, mobile phones are suspected by a major share of the population to cause adverse effects on health and welfare. The ear as the sense organ next to the individual device has rarely been investigated for short-term effects in this regard. In a previous article, we could not prove any impact on the vestibular part of the inner ear. Our present examinations are concerned with the question whether mobile phone emissions could affect cochlear or auditory brain stem functions. In 12 healthy test persons with normal hearing, auditory brain stem reflexes recordings were performed before, during, and after exposure to electromagnetic emissions by standardized mobile phone devices. Two modes of electromagnetic emissions fields were administered: pulsed and continuous. For acoustic stimulation simultaneous to field exposure, special "plug-in" earphones had to be used. No impact on auditory brain stem reflexes recordings in terms of absolute and interpeak latencies could be found. Together with the results of a previous article concerned with the vestibular part of the inner ear, we can state that there are no adverse effects of mobile phone emissions on the ear function, at least on a short-term range. Of course, any long-term effects cannot be excluded by our study.

  3. [Distribution of human enterovirus 71 in brainstem of infants with brain stem encephalitis and infection mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Bo; Gao, Di; Tang, Da-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Shui-Ping; Kong, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jing-Lu; Bi, Qi-Ming; Quan, Li; Luo, Bin

    2012-04-01

    To explore the mechanism that how human enterovirus 71 (EV71) invades the brainstem and how intercellular adhesion molecules-1 (ICAM-1) participates by analyzing the expression and distribution of human EV71, and ICAM-1 in brainstem of infants with brain stem encephalitis. Twenty-two brainstem of infants with brain stem encephalitis were collected as the experimental group and 10 brainstems of fatal congenital heart disease were selected as the control group. The sections with perivascular cuffings were selected to observe EV71-VP1 expression by immunohistochemistry method and ICAM-1 expression was detected for the sections with EV71-VP1 positive expression. The staining image analysis and statistics analysis were performed. The experiment and control groups were compared. (1) EV71-VP1 positive cells in the experimental group were mainly astrocytes in brainstem with nigger-brown particles, and the control group was negative. (2) ICAM-1 positive cells showed nigger-brown. The expression in inflammatory cells (around blood vessels of brain stem and in glial nodules) and gliocytes increased. The results showed statistical difference comparing with control group (P diagnose fatal EV71 infection in infants. EV71 can invade the brainstem via hematogenous route. ICAM-1 may play an important role in the pathogenic process.

  4. A technique for accurate planning of stereotactic brain implants prior to head ring fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulin, Kenneth; Bornstein, Linda E.; Ling, Marilyn N.; Saris, Stephen; Wu, Julian K.; Curran, Bruce H.; Wazer, David E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A two-step procedure is described for accurate planning of stereotactic brain implants prior to head-ring fixation. Methods and Materials: Approximately 2 weeks prior to implant a CT scan without the head ring is performed for treatment-planning purposes. An entry point and a reference point, both marked with barium and later tattooed, facilitate planning and permit correlation of the images with a later CT scan. A plan is generated using a conventional treatment-planning system to determine the number and activity of I-125 seeds required and the position of each catheter. I-125 seed anisotropy is taken into account by means of a modification to the treatment planning program. On the day of the implant a second CT scan is performed with the head ring affixed to the skull and with the same points marked as in the previous scan. The planned catheter coordinates are then mapped into the coordinate system of the second CT scan by means of a manual translational correction and a computer-calculated rotational correction derived from the reference point coordinates in the two scans. Results: The rotational correction algorithm was verified experimentally in a Rando phantom before it was used clinically. For analysis of the results with individual patients a third CT scan is performed 1 day following the implant and is used for calculating the final dosimetry. Conclusion: The technique that is described has two important advantages: 1) the number and activity of seeds required can be accurately determined in advance; and 2) sufficient time is allowed to derive the best possible plan

  5. Assessment of clinical and MRI outcomes after mesenchymal stem cell implantation in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y S; Choi, Y J; Lee, S W; Kwon, O R; Suh, D S; Heo, D B; Koh, Y G

    2016-02-01

    Cartilage regenerative procedures using the cell-based tissue engineering approach involving mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been receiving increased interest because of their potential for altering the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) by repairing cartilage lesions. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcomes of MSC implantation in OA knees and to determine the association between clinical and MRI outcomes. Twenty patients (24 knees) who underwent arthroscopic MSC implantation for cartilage lesions in their OA knees were evaluated at 2 years after surgery. Clinical outcomes were evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and the Tegner activity scale, and cartilage repair was assessed according to the MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score (MOAKS) and Magnetic Resonance Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue (MOCART) score. The clinical outcomes significantly improved (P Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro analysis with human bone marrow stem cells on Ti-15Mo alloy for dental and orthopedic implants application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.T.C. Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Nowadays, research on orthopedic and dental implants is focused on titanium alloys for their mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in the human body environment. Another important aspect to be investigated is their surface topography, which is very important to osseointegration. With laser beam irradiation for roughening the implants surface an easier control of the microtopography is achieved, and surface contamination is avoided. The aim of this study was to assess human bone marrow stem cells response to a newly developed titanium alloy, Ti-15Mo, with surface topography modified by laser beam irradiation. Materials and methods: A total of 10 Ti machined disks (control, 10 Ti-15Mo machined disks and 10 Ti-15Mo disks treated by laser beam-irradiation were prepared. To study how Ti-15Mo surface topografy can induce osteoblast differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells, the expression levels of bone related genes and mesenchymal stem cells marker were analyzed, using real time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction. Results: In Test 1 (comparison between Ti-15Mo machined disks and Ti-machined disks quantitative real-time RT–PCR showed a significant induction of ALPL, FOSL1 and SPP1, which increase 20% or more. In Test 2 (comparison between Ti-15Mo laser treated disks and Ti-machined disks all investigated genes were up-regulated. By comparing Test 1 and Test 2 it was detected that COL1A1, COL3A1, FOSL1 and ENG sensibly increased their expression whereas RUNX2, ALPL and SPP1 expression remained substantially unchanged. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that laser treated Ti-15Mo alloys are promising materials for implants application.

  7. Therapeutic Potential of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells on Brain Damage of a Model of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Nikravesh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human cord blood-derived stem cells are a rich source of stem cells as well as precursors. With regard to the researchers have focused on the therapeutic potential of stem cell in the neurological disease such as stroke, the aim of this study was the investiga-tion of the therapeutic effects of human cord blood-derived stem cells in cerebral ischemia on rat. Methods: This study was carried out on young rats. Firstly, to create a laboratory model of ischemic stroke, carotid artery of animals was occluded for 30 minutes. Then, umbilical cord blood cells were isolated and labeled using bromodeoxyuridine and 2×105 cells were injected into the experimental group via the tail vein. Rats with hypoxic condi-tions were used as a sham group. A group of animals did not receive any injection or sur-geries were used as a control. Results: Obtained results were evaluated based on behavior-al responses and immunohistochemistry, with emphasis on areas of putamen and caudate nucleus in the control, sham and experimental groups. Our results indicated that behavioral recovery was observed in the experimental group compared to the either the sham or the control group. However, histological studies demonstrated a low percent of tissue injury in the experimental group in comparison with the sham group. Conclusion: Stem cell trans-plantation is beneficial for the brain tissue reparation after hypoxic ischemic cell death.

  8. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  9. The integral biologically effective dose to predict brain stem toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, B. G.; Souhami, L.; Pla, C.; Al-Amro, A.; Bahary, J-P.; Villemure, J-G.; Caron, J-L.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this work is to develop a parameter for use during hypofractionated stereotactic treatment planning to predict brain stem toxicity prior to treatment and to aid in the determination of the appropriate treatment volume and fractionation regimen which will minimize risk of late damage to normal tissue. Materials and Methods: We have used the linear quadratic model to provide a simple and convenient method for assessing the dose in volumes with rapidly changing dose gradients. Although the steep dose fall-off at the edge of stereotactic radiotherapy treatment volumes provides a measure of protection for normal tissue surrounding the target, accurate dose-volume analysis prior to treatment is essential to assess clinical tolerance. In cases where the treatment volume is very close to or in contact with sensitive structures, relatively small portions of these structures may receive high doses and appropriate methods of analysis have not yet been established. This paper reports a retrospective study of 57 patients with malignant and benign intracranial lesions treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The treatments were delivered between June 1989 and February 1993 with the dynamic rotation technique in 6 fractions over a period of 2 weeks, to a total dose of 42 Gy prescribed at the 90% isodose surface. All treatment volumes were spherical, irradiated with a single isocentre and circular collimators ranging in diameter from 2 to 4 cm. The treatment plans were repeated using a new planning system considerably more sophisticated than that used at the time of treatment. On each axial image slice, the tumor and the normal structures at risk for each patient were delineated. We calculated differential dose volume histograms to divide the structures into dose-bands and to determine the fractional volume within each dose band. Using the linear quadratic model, a biologically effective dose (BED) was evaluated for each of these dose

  10. Neural Progenitor Cell Implants Modulate Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in Rat Axotomized Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaverón, Rocío; Matarredona, Esperanza R.; de la Cruz, Rosa R.; Pastor, Angel M.

    2013-01-01

    Axotomy of central neurons leads to functional and structural alterations which largely revert when neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are implanted in the lesion site. The new microenvironment created by NPCs in the host tissue might modulate in the damaged neurons the expression of a high variety of molecules with relevant roles in the repair mechanisms, including neurotrophic factors. In the present work, we aimed to analyze changes in neurotrophic factor expression in axotomized neurons induced by NPC implants. For this purpose, we performed immunofluorescence followed by confocal microscopy analysis for the detection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on brainstem sections from rats with axotomy of abducens internuclear neurons that received NPC implants (implanted group) or vehicle injections (axotomized group) in the lesion site. Control abducens internuclear neurons were strongly immunoreactive to VEGF and BDNF but showed a weak staining for NT-3 and NGF. Comparisons between groups revealed that lesioned neurons from animals that received NPC implants showed a significant increase in VEGF content with respect to animals receiving vehicle injections. However, the immunoreactivity for BDNF, which was increased in the axotomized group as compared to control, was not modified in the implanted group. The modifications induced by NPC implants on VEGF and BDNF content were specific for the population of axotomized abducens internuclear neurons since the neighboring abducens motoneurons were not affected. Similar levels of NT-3 and NGF immunolabeling were obtained in injured neurons from axotomized and implanted animals. Among all the analyzed neurotrophic factors, only VEGF was expressed by the implanted cells in the lesion site. Our results point to a role of NPC implants in the modulation of neurotrophic factor expression by lesioned central neurons, which might

  11. Neural progenitor cell implants modulate vascular endothelial growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in rat axotomized neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Talaverón

    Full Text Available Axotomy of central neurons leads to functional and structural alterations which largely revert when neural progenitor cells (NPCs are implanted in the lesion site. The new microenvironment created by NPCs in the host tissue might modulate in the damaged neurons the expression of a high variety of molecules with relevant roles in the repair mechanisms, including neurotrophic factors. In the present work, we aimed to analyze changes in neurotrophic factor expression in axotomized neurons induced by NPC implants. For this purpose, we performed immunofluorescence followed by confocal microscopy analysis for the detection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 and nerve growth factor (NGF on brainstem sections from rats with axotomy of abducens internuclear neurons that received NPC implants (implanted group or vehicle injections (axotomized group in the lesion site. Control abducens internuclear neurons were strongly immunoreactive to VEGF and BDNF but showed a weak staining for NT-3 and NGF. Comparisons between groups revealed that lesioned neurons from animals that received NPC implants showed a significant increase in VEGF content with respect to animals receiving vehicle injections. However, the immunoreactivity for BDNF, which was increased in the axotomized group as compared to control, was not modified in the implanted group. The modifications induced by NPC implants on VEGF and BDNF content were specific for the population of axotomized abducens internuclear neurons since the neighboring abducens motoneurons were not affected. Similar levels of NT-3 and NGF immunolabeling were obtained in injured neurons from axotomized and implanted animals. Among all the analyzed neurotrophic factors, only VEGF was expressed by the implanted cells in the lesion site. Our results point to a role of NPC implants in the modulation of neurotrophic factor expression by lesioned central neurons

  12. Macrophage enzyme and reduced inflammation drive brain correction of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB by stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Rebecca J; Ellison, Stuart M; Fil, Daniel; O'Leary, Claire; McDermott, John; Senthivel, Nishanthi; Langford-Smith, Alexander W W; Wilkinson, Fiona L; D'Souza, Zelpha; Parker, Helen; Liao, Aiyin; Rowlston, Samuel; Gleitz, Hélène F E; Kan, Shih-Hsin; Dickson, Patricia I; Bigger, Brian W

    2018-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB is a paediatric lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the enzyme α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU), involved in the degradation of the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulphate. Absence of NAGLU leads to accumulation of partially degraded heparan sulphate within lysosomes and the extracellular matrix, giving rise to severe CNS degeneration with progressive cognitive impairment and behavioural problems. There are no therapies. Haematopoietic stem cell transplant shows great efficacy in the related disease mucopolysaccharidosis I, where donor-derived monocytes can transmigrate into the brain following bone marrow engraftment, secrete the missing enzyme and cross-correct neighbouring cells. However, little neurological correction is achieved in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB. We have therefore developed an ex vivo haematopoietic stem cell gene therapy approach in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, using a high-titre lentiviral vector and the myeloid-specific CD11b promoter, driving the expression of NAGLU (LV.NAGLU). To understand the mechanism of correction we also compared this with a poorly secreted version of NAGLU containing a C-terminal fusion to IGFII (LV.NAGLU-IGFII). Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB haematopoietic stem cells were transduced with vector, transplanted into myeloablated mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB mice and compared at 8 months of age with mice receiving a wild-type transplant. As the disease is characterized by increased inflammation, we also tested the anti-inflammatory steroidal agent prednisolone alone, or in combination with LV.NAGLU, to understand the importance of inflammation on behaviour. NAGLU enzyme was substantially increased in the brain of LV.NAGLU and LV.NAGLU-IGFII-treated mice, with little expression in wild-type bone marrow transplanted mice. LV.NAGLU treatment led to behavioural correction, normalization of heparan sulphate and sulphation patterning, reduced inflammatory cytokine

  13. Classic and novel stem cell niches in brain homeostasis and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruihe; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2015-12-02

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) critical for the continued production of new neurons and glia are sequestered in distinct areas of the brain called stem cell niches. Until recently, only two forebrain sites, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus, have been recognized adult stem cell niches (Alvarez-Buylla and Lim, 2004; Doetsch et al., 1999a, 1999b; Doetsch, 2003a, 2003b; Lie et al., 2004; Ming and Song, 2005). Nonetheless, the last decade has been witness to a growing literature suggesting that in fact the adult brain contains stem cell niches along the entire extent of the ventricular system. These niches are capable of widespread neurogenesis and gliogenesis, particularly after injury (Barnabé-Heider et al., 2010; Carlén et al., 2009; Decimo et al., 2012; Lin et al., 2015; Lindvall and Kokaia, 2008; Robins et al., 2013) or other inductive stimuli (Bennett et al., 2009; Cunningham et al., 2012; Decimo et al., 2011; Kokoeva et al., 2007, 2005; Lee et al., 2012a, 2012b; Migaud et al., 2010; Pencea et al., 2001b; Sanin et al., 2013; Suh et al., 2007; Sundholm-Peters et al., 2004; Xu et al., 2005; Zhang et al., 2007). This review focuses on the role of these novel and classic brain niches in maintaining adult neurogenesis and gliogenesis in response to normal physiological and injury-related pathological cues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prostate stem cell antigen is expressed in normal and malignant human brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiroe; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Saeki, Norihisa

    2018-03-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface protein and exhibits an organ-dependent expression pattern in cancer. PSCA is upregulated in prostate cancer and downregulated in gastric cancer. PSCA is expressed in a variety of human organs. Although certain studies previously demonstrated its expression in the mammalian and avian brain, its expression in the human brain has not been thoroughly elucidated. Additionally, it was previously reported that PSCA is weakly expressed in the astrocytes of the normal human brain but aberrantly expressed in glioma, suggesting that PSCA is a promising target of glioma therapy and prostate cancer therapy. The current study identified PSCA expression in the neural and choroid plexus cells of the normal human brain by immunohistochemistry. In brain tumors, PSCA was expressed in medulloblastoma and glioma, and its expression was also observed in papilloma and papillary carcinoma of the choroid plexus, ependymoma and meningioma. The results suggest that PSCA may have a tumor-promoting function in brain tumors and is a potential target for their therapy. However, its expression in normal neuronal and choroid plexus cells implies that a PSCA-targeted therapy may lead to certain adverse phenomena.

  15. Using induced pluripotent stem cells derived neurons to model brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy E McKinney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC to model brain diseases is a powerful tool for unraveling mechanistic alterations in these disorders. Rodent models of brain diseases have spurred understanding of pathology but the concern arises that they may not recapitulate the full spectrum of neuron disruptions associated with human neuropathology. iPSC derived neurons, or other neural cell types, provide the ability to access pathology in cells derived directly from a patient's blood sample or skin biopsy where availability of brain tissue is limiting. Thus, utilization of iPSC to study brain diseases provides an unlimited resource for disease modelling but may also be used for drug screening for effective therapies and may potentially be used to regenerate aged or damaged cells in the future. Many brain diseases across the spectrum of neurodevelopment, neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric are being approached by iPSC models. The goal of an iPSC based disease model is to identify a cellular phenotype that discriminates the disease-bearing cells from the control cells. In this mini-review, the importance of iPSC cell models validated for pluripotency, germline competency and function assessments is discussed. Selected examples for the variety of brain diseases that are being approached by iPSC technology to discover or establish the molecular basis of the neuropathology are discussed.

  16. Hybrid approach of ventricular assist device and autologous bone marrow stem cells implantation in end-stage ischemic heart failure enhances myocardial reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayat Andre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We challenge the hypothesis of enhanced myocardial reperfusion after implanting a left ventricular assist device together with bone marrow mononuclear stem cells in patients with end-stage ischemic cardiomyopathy. Irreversible myocardial loss observed in ischemic cardiomyopathy leads to progressive cardiac remodelling and dysfunction through a complex neurohormonal cascade. New generation assist devices promote myocardial recovery only in patients with dilated or peripartum cardiomyopathy. In the setting of diffuse myocardial ischemia not amenable to revascularization, native myocardial recovery has not been observed after implantation of an assist device as destination therapy. The hybrid approach of implanting autologous bone marrow stem cells during assist device implantation may eventually improve native cardiac function, which may be associated with a better prognosis eventually ameliorating the need for subsequent heart transplantation. The aforementioned hypothesis has to be tested with well-designed prospective multicentre studies.

  17. Nanoparticle-mediated transcriptional modification enhances neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells following transplantation in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Liu, Xiaoyan; Tammia, Markus; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Rolfe, Andrew; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Ning; Green, Jordan J; Wen, Xuejun; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2016-04-01

    Strategies to enhance survival and direct the differentiation of stem cells in vivo following transplantation in tissue repair site are critical to realizing the potential of stem cell-based therapies. Here we demonstrated an effective approach to promote neuronal differentiation and maturation of human fetal tissue-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs) in a brain lesion site of a rat traumatic brain injury model using biodegradable nanoparticle-mediated transfection method to deliver key transcriptional factor neurogenin-2 to hNSCs when transplanted with a tailored hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel, generating larger number of more mature neurons engrafted to the host brain tissue than non-transfected cells. The nanoparticle-mediated transcription activation method together with an HA hydrogel delivery matrix provides a translatable approach for stem cell-based regenerative therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Minimal modulation of the host immune response to SIS matrix implants by mesenchymal stem cells from the amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, F; Pranpanus, S; Bosisio, F M; Jacobs, M; Ospitalieri, S; Toelen, J; Deprest, J

    2017-12-01

    Surgical restoration of soft tissue defects often requires implantable devices. The clinical outcome of the surgery is determined by the properties inherent to the used matrix. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) modulate the immune processes after in vivo transplantation and their addition to matrices is associated with constructive remodeling. Herein we evaluate the potential of MSC derived from the amniotic fluid (AF-MSC), an interesting MSC source for cell therapeutic applications in the perinatal period, for immune modulation when added to a biomaterial. We implant cell free small intestinal submucosa (SIS) or SIS seeded with AF-MSC at a density of 1 × 10 5 /cm 2 subcutaneously at the abdominal wall in immune competent rats. The host immune response is evaluated at 3, 7 and 14 days postoperatively. The matrix-specific or cellular characteristics are not altered after 24 h of in vitro co-culture of SIS with AF-MSC. The host immune response was not different between animals implanted with cell free or AF-MSC-seeded SIS in terms of cellular infiltration, vascularity, macrophage polarization or scaffold replacement. Profiling the mRNA expression level of inflammatory cytokines at the matrix interface shows a significant reduction in the expression of the pro-inflammatory marker Tnf-α and a trend towards lower iNos expression upon AF-MSC-seeding of the SIS matrix. Anti-inflammatory marker expression does not alter upon cell seeding of matrix implants. We conclude that SIS is a suitable substrate for in vitro culture of AF-MSC and fibroblasts. AF-MSC addition to SIS does not significantly modulate the host immune response after subcutaneous implantation in rats.

  19. Initial Attempts of Development and Characterization of an In Vitro Blood Brain Barrier Model Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldeman, Charlotte; Saaby, Lasse; Hall, Vanessa Jane

    The human blood brain barrier has yet to be successfully replicated as an in vitro model. One of the more promising approaches has been to develop an in vitro model derived from human pluripotent stem cells. However, as promising as this model may be, a successful replication of the differentiation...... method on different kinds of pluripotent stem cell lines have yet to be accomplished. We try to approach the promising method as described by Stebbins et al. (2015) to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells into brain like endothelial cells (BECs). Five different human pluripotent stem cell lines...... were screened for the possibility to differentiate into BECs. Tüb1159, Tüb16423, Bioni010-C, WTSli024-A and WTSli002-A stem cell lines were initially seeded on Matrigel cultured with mTESR1 media to confluence, then seeded on Matrigel as a single cell suspension. After two-three days of culture we...

  20. Reestablishing speech understanding through musical ear training after cochlear implantation: a study of the potential cortical plasticity in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bjørn; Mortensen, Malene V; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) provide impressive speech perception for persons with severe hearing loss, but many CI recipients fail in perceiving speech prosody and music. Successful rehabilitation depends on cortical plasticity in the brain and postoperative measures. The present study evaluates...... and children with CIs....

  1. Me, Myself and My Brain Implant: Deep Brain Stimulation Raises Questions of Personal Authenticity and Alienation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Felicitas

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I explore select case studies of Parkinson patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) in light of the notions of alienation and authenticity. While the literature on DBS has so far neglected the issues of authenticity and alienation, I argue that interpreting these cases in terms of these concepts raises new issues for not only the philosophical discussion of neuro-ethics of DBS, but also for the psychological and medical approach to patients under DBS. In particular, I suggest that the experience of alienation and authenticity varies from patient to patient with DBS. For some, alienation can be brought about by neurointerventions because patients no longer feel like themselves. But, on the other hand, it seems alienation can also be cured by DBS as other patients experience their state of mind as authentic under treatment and retrospectively regard their former lives without stimulation as alienated. I argue that we must do further research on the relevance of authenticity and alienation to patients treated with DBS in order to gain a deeper philosophical understanding, and to develop the best evaluative criterion for the behavior of DBS patients.

  2. Long-term survival of human neural stem cells in the ischemic rat brain upon transient immunosuppression.

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    Laura Rota Nodari

    Full Text Available Understanding the physiology of human neural stem cells (hNSCs in the context of cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders is of paramount importance, yet large-scale studies are hampered by the slow-expansion rate of these cells. To overcome this issue, we previously established immortal, non-transformed, telencephalic-diencephalic hNSCs (IhNSCs from the fetal brain. Here, we investigated the fate of these IhNSC's immediate progeny (i.e. neural progenitors; IhNSC-Ps upon unilateral implantation into the corpus callosum or the hippocampal fissure of adult rat brain, 3 days after global ischemic injury. One month after grafting, approximately one fifth of the IhNSC-Ps had survived and migrated through the corpus callosum, into the cortex or throughout the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. By the fourth month, they had reached the ipsilateral subventricular zone, CA1-3 hippocampal layers and the controlateral hemisphere. Notably, these results could be accomplished using transient immunosuppression, i.e administering cyclosporine for 15 days following the ischemic event. Furthermore, a concomitant reduction of reactive microglia (Iba1+ cells and of glial, GFAP+ cells was also observed in the ipsilateral hemisphere as compared to the controlateral one. IhNSC-Ps were not tumorigenic and, upon in vivo engraftment, underwent differentiation into GFAP+ astrocytes, and β-tubulinIII+ or MAP2+ neurons, which displayed GABAergic and GLUTAmatergic markers. Electron microscopy analysis pointed to the formation of mature synaptic contacts between host and donor-derived neurons, showing the full maturation of the IhNSC-P-derived neurons and their likely functional integration into the host tissue. Thus, IhNSC-Ps possess long-term survival and engraftment capacity upon transplantation into the globally injured ischemic brain, into which they can integrate and mature into neurons, even under mild, transient immunosuppressive conditions. Most notably

  3. Acute and Subacute Presentations of Cerebral Edema following Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoy, Albert J; Villarreal, Sebastian J; Schiess, Mya C

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative cerebral edema around a deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode is an uncommon reported complication. The goal of this study was to identify instances of postoperative edema based on clinical presentation, and to remark on their management. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients who underwent DBS electrode implantation over a 3-year period. Routine CT imaging on postoperative day (POD) 1 was negative. Patients were identified based on clinical neurological changes, leading to imaging and subsequent diagnosis. Five of 145 patients (3.4%) presented with new neurological symptoms from POD 1 to 14, which were confirmed by CT imaging to show perilead and/or subcortical edema around 6 of 281 electrodes (2.1%). Four of 5 patients had unilateral edema despite bilateral implantation. Clinical presentations varied widely. Two patients presenting on POD 1 with deteriorating conditions required longer inpatient stays with supportive measures than those presenting later (p = 0.0002). All patients were treated with corticosteroids and returned to baseline by 3 months after surgery. Acute instances of DBS lead edema may occur as early as POD 1 and can rapidly progress into profound deficits. Treatment with supportive care and corticosteroids is otherwise identical to those cases presenting later. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Neuroversion: using electroconvulsive therapy as a bridge to deep brain stimulation implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nolan R; Sahlem, Greg; Pannu, Jaspreet; Takacs, Istvan; Short, Baron; Revuelta, Gonzalo; George, Mark S

    2017-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a movement disorder with significant neuropsychiatric comorbidities. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is effective in treating these neuropsychiatric symptoms; however, clinicians are reluctant to use ECT in patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) implantations for fear of damaging the device, as well as potential cognitive side effects. Right unilateral ultra-brief pulse (RUL UBP) ECT has a more favorable cognitive side-effect profile yet has never been reported in PD patients with DBS implants. We present a case series of three patients with a history of PD that all presented with psychiatric decompensation immediately prior to planned DBS surgery. All three patients had DBS electrode(s) in place at the time and an acute course of ECT was utilized in a novel method to "bridge" these individuals to neurosurgery. The patients all experienced symptom resolution (psychosis and/or depression and/or anxiety) without apparent cognitive side effects. This case series not only illustrates that right unilateral ultra-brief pulse can be utilized in patients with DBS electrodes but also illustrates that this intervention can be utilized as a neuromodulatory "bridge", where nonoperative surgical candidates with unstable psychiatric symptoms can be converted to operative candidates in a manner similar to electrical cardioversion.

  5. Glial cells as progenitors and stem cells: new roles in the healthy and diseased brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimou, Leda; Götz, Magdalena

    2014-07-01

    The diverse functions of glial cells prompt the question to which extent specific subtypes may be devoted to a specific function. We discuss this by reviewing one of the most recently discovered roles of glial cells, their function as neural stem cells (NSCs) and progenitor cells. First we give an overview of glial stem and progenitor cells during development; these are the radial glial cells that act as NSCs and other glial progenitors, highlighting the distinction between the lineage of cells in vivo and their potential when exposed to a different environment, e.g., in vitro. We then proceed to the adult stage and discuss the glial cells that continue to act as NSCs across vertebrates and others that are more lineage-restricted, such as the adult NG2-glia, the most frequent progenitor type in the adult mammalian brain, that remain within the oligodendrocyte lineage. Upon certain injury conditions, a distinct subset of quiescent astrocytes reactivates proliferation and a larger potential, clearly demonstrating the concept of heterogeneity with distinct subtypes of, e.g., astrocytes or NG2-glia performing rather different roles after brain injury. These new insights not only highlight the importance of glial cells for brain repair but also their great potential in various aspects of regeneration. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Brain stem and cerebellum volumetric analysis of Machado Joseph disease patients

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    S T Camargos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3(MJD/SCA3, is the most frequent late onset spinocerebellar ataxia and results from a CAG repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 gene. Previous studies have found correlation between atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem with age and CAG repeats, although no such correlation has been found with disease duration and clinical manifestations. In this study we test the hypothesis that atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem in MJD/SCA3 is related to clinical severity, disease duration and CAG repeat length as well as to other variables such as age and ICARS (International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Whole brain high resolution MRI and volumetric measurement with cranial volume normalization were obtained from 15 MJD/SCA3 patients and 15 normal, age and sex-matchedcontrols. We applied ICARS and compared the score with volumes and CAG number, disease duration and age. We found significant correlation of both brain stem and cerebellar atrophy with CAG repeat length, age, disease duration and degree of disability. The Spearman rank correlation was stronger with volumetric reduction of the cerebellum than with brain stem. Our data allow us to conclude that volumetric analysis might reveal progressive degeneration after disease onset, which in turn is linked to both age and number of CAG repeat expansions in SCA 3.

  7. Stemming the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa: a systemic review of policy options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Zimbudzi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Africa has been losing professionally trained health workers who are the core of the health system of this continent for many years. Faced with an increased burden of disease and coupled by a massive exodus of the health workforce, the health systems of many African nations are risking complete paralysis. Several studies have suggested policy options to reduce brain drain from Africa. The purpose of this paper is to review possible policies, which can stem the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa. A systemic literature review was conducted. Cinahl, Science Direct and PubMed databases were searched with the following terms: health professional brain drain from Africa and policies for reducing impact of brain drain from Africa. References were also browsed for relevant articles. A total of 425 articles were available for the study but only 23 articles met the inclusion criteria. The review identified nine policy options, which were being implemented in Africa, but the most common was task shifting which had success in several African countries. This review has demonstrated that there is considerable consensus on task shifting as the most appropriate and sustainable policy option for reducing the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa.

  8. Taurine Induces Proliferation of Neural Stem Cells and Synapse Development in the Developing Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaraj, Mattu Chetana; Marcy, Guillaume; Low, Guoliang; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Zhao, Xianfeng; Rosales, Francisco J.; Goh, Eyleen L. K.

    2012-01-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid present in high concentrations in mammalian tissues. It has been implicated in several processes involving brain development and neurotransmission. However, the role of taurine in hippocampal neurogenesis during brain development is still unknown. Here we show that taurine regulates neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the developing brain as well as in cultured early postnatal (P5) hippocampal progenitor cells and hippocampal slices derived from P5 mice brains. Taurine increased cell proliferation without having a significant effect on neural differentiation both in cultured P5 NPCs as well as cultured hippocampal slices and in vivo. Expression level analysis of synaptic proteins revealed that taurine increases the expression of Synapsin 1 and PSD 95. We also found that taurine stimulates the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 indicating a possible role of the ERK pathway in mediating the changes that we observed, especially in proliferation. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for taurine in neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in developing brain and suggest the involvement of the ERK1/2 pathways in mediating these actions. Our study also shows that taurine influences the levels of proteins associated with synapse development. This is the first evidence showing the effect of taurine on early postnatal neuronal development using a combination of in vitro, ex-vivo and in vivo systems. PMID:22916184

  9. Taurine induces proliferation of neural stem cells and synapse development in the developing mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattu Chetana Shivaraj

    Full Text Available Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid present in high concentrations in mammalian tissues. It has been implicated in several processes involving brain development and neurotransmission. However, the role of taurine in hippocampal neurogenesis during brain development is still unknown. Here we show that taurine regulates neural progenitor cell (NPC proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the developing brain as well as in cultured early postnatal (P5 hippocampal progenitor cells and hippocampal slices derived from P5 mice brains. Taurine increased cell proliferation without having a significant effect on neural differentiation both in cultured P5 NPCs as well as cultured hippocampal slices and in vivo. Expression level analysis of synaptic proteins revealed that taurine increases the expression of Synapsin 1 and PSD 95. We also found that taurine stimulates the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 indicating a possible role of the ERK pathway in mediating the changes that we observed, especially in proliferation. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for taurine in neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in developing brain and suggest the involvement of the ERK1/2 pathways in mediating these actions. Our study also shows that taurine influences the levels of proteins associated with synapse development. This is the first evidence showing the effect of taurine on early postnatal neuronal development using a combination of in vitro, ex-vivo and in vivo systems.

  10. Neuroengineering tools/applications for bidirectional interfaces, brain computer interfaces, and neuroprosthetic implants - a review of recent progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Rothschild

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of this review is to provide a holistic amalgamated overview of the most recent human in vivo techniques for implementing brain-computer interfaces (BCIs, bidirectional interfaces and neuroprosthetics. Neuroengineering is providing new methods for tackling current difficulties; however neuroprosthetics have been studied for decades. Recent progresses are permitting the design of better systems with higher accuracies, repeatability and system robustness. Bidirectional interfaces integrate recording and the relaying of information from and to the brain for the development of BCIs. The concepts of non-invasive and invasive recording of brain activity are introduced. This includes classical and innovative techniques like electroencephalography (EEG and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. Then the problem of gliosis and solutions for (semi- permanent implant biocompatibility such as innovative implant coatings, materials and shapes are discussed. Implant power and the transmission of their data through implanted pulse generators (IPGs and wireless telemetry are taken into account. How sensation can be relayed back to the brain to increase integration of the neuroengineered systems with the body by methods such as micro-stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS are then addressed. The neuroprosthetic section discusses some of the various types and how they operate. Visual prosthetics are discussed and the three types, dependant on implant location, are examined. Auditory prosthetics, being cochlear or cortical, are then addressed. Replacement hand and limb prosthetics are then considered. These are followed by sections concentrating on the control of wheelchairs, computers and robotics directly from brain activity as recorded by non-invasive and invasive techniques.

  11. Minimally-invasive implantation of living tissue engineered heart valves: a comprehensive approach from autologous vascular cells to stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Dörthe; Dijkman, Petra E; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Stenger, Rene; Mariani, Christine; Puolakka, Arja; Rissanen, Marja; Deichmann, Thorsten; Odermatt, Bernhard; Weber, Benedikt; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Zund, Gregor; Baaijens, Frank P T; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2010-08-03

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of combining the novel heart valve replacement technologies of: 1) tissue engineering; and 2) minimally-invasive implantation based on autologous cells and composite self-expandable biodegradable biomaterials. Minimally-invasive valve replacement procedures are rapidly evolving as alternative treatment option for patients with valvular heart disease. However, currently used valve substitutes are bioprosthetic and as such have limited durability. To overcome this limitation, tissue engineering technologies provide living autologous valve replacements with regeneration and growth potential. Trileaflet heart valves fabricated from biodegradable synthetic scaffolds, integrated in self-expanding stents and seeded with autologous vascular or stem cells (bone marrow and peripheral blood), were generated in vitro using dynamic bioreactors. Subsequently, the tissue engineered heart valves (TEHV) were minimally-invasively implanted as pulmonary valve replacements in sheep. In vivo functionality was assessed by echocardiography and angiography up to 8 weeks. The tissue composition of explanted TEHV and corresponding control valves was analyzed. The transapical implantations were successful in all animals. The TEHV demonstrated in vivo functionality with mobile but thickened leaflets. Histology revealed layered neotissues with endothelialized surfaces. Quantitative extracellular matrix analysis at 8 weeks showed higher values for deoxyribonucleic acid, collagen, and glycosaminoglycans compared to native valves. Mechanical profiles demonstrated sufficient tissue strength, but less pliability independent of the cell source. This study demonstrates the principal feasibility of merging tissue engineering and minimally-invasive valve replacement technologies. Using adult stem cells is successful, enabling minimally-invasive cell harvest. Thus, this new technology may enable a valid alternative to current bioprosthetic devices

  12. Fatigue fracture of a cemented Omnifit CoCr femoral stem: implant and failure analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Bonnheim, MS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A cemented, cast CoCr alloy, Omnifit Plus femoral stem was retrieved following mid-stem fracture after 24 years in vivo. The patient was an active 55-year-old male with a high body mass index (31.3 and no traumatic incidents before stem fracture. Fractographic and fatigue-based failure analyses were performed to illuminate the etiology of fracture and retrospectively predict the device lifetime. The fracture surfaces show evidence of a coarse grain microstructure, intergranular fracture, and regions of porosity. The failure analysis suggests that stems with similar metallurgical characteristics, biomechanical environments, and in vivo durations may be abutting their functioning lifetimes, raising the possibility of an increased revision burden. Keywords: Fatigue fracture, Total hip arthroplasty, Stem fracture

  13. The extracellular matrix niche microenvironment of neural and cancer stem cells in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Jacqueline; Brösicke, Nicole; Theocharidis, Ursula; Faissner, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that neural stem cells and cancer stem cells (NSCs/CSCs) share several overlapping characteristics such as self-renewal, multipotency and a comparable molecular repertoire. In addition to the intrinsic cellular properties, NSCs/CSCs favor a similar environment to acquire and maintain their characteristics. In the present review, we highlight the shared properties of NSCs and CSCs in regard to their extracellular microenvironment called the NSC/CSC niche. Moreover, we point out that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and their complementary receptors influence the behavior of NSCs/CSCs as well as brain tumor progression. Here, we focus on the expression profile and functional importance of the ECM glycoprotein tenascin-C, the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan DSD-1-PG/phosphacan but also on other important glycoprotein/proteoglycan constituents. Within this review, we specifically concentrate on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults and is associated with poor prognosis despite intense and aggressive surgical and therapeutic treatment. Recent studies indicate that GBM onset is driven by a subpopulation of CSCs that display self-renewal and recapitulate tumor heterogeneity. Based on the CSC hypothesis the cancer arises just from a small subpopulation of self-sustaining cancer cells with the exclusive ability to self-renew and maintain the tumor. Besides the fundamental stem cell properties of self-renewal and multipotency, GBM stem cells share further molecular characteristics with NSCs, which we would like to review in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Regional brain stem atrophy in idiopathic Parkinson's disease detected by anatomical MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jubault

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the dysfunction of dopaminergic dependent cortico-basal ganglia loops and diagnosed on the basis of motor symptoms (tremors and/or rigidity and bradykinesia. Post-mortem studies tend to show that the destruction of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra constitutes an intermediate step in a broader neurodegenerative process rather than a unique feature of Parkinson's disease, as a consistent pattern of progression would exist, originating from the medulla oblongata/pontine tegmentum. To date, neuroimaging techniques have been unable to characterize the pre-symptomatic stages of PD. However, if such a regular neurodegenerative pattern were to exist, consistent damages would be found in the brain stem, even at early stages of the disease. We recruited 23 PD patients at Hoenn and Yahr stages I to II of the disease and 18 healthy controls (HC matched for age. T1-weighted anatomical scans were acquired (MPRAGE, 1 mm3 resolution and analyzed using an optimized VBM protocol to detect white and grey matter volume reduction without spatial a priori. When the HC group was compared to the PD group, a single cluster exhibited statistical difference (p<0.05 corrected for false detection rate, 4287 mm3 in the brain stem, between the pons and the medulla oblongata. The present study provides in-vivo evidence that brain stem damage may be the first identifiable stage of PD neuropathology, and that the identification of this consistent damage along with other factors could help with earlier diagnosis in the future. This damage could also explain some non-motor symptoms in PD that often precede diagnosis, such as autonomic dysfunction and sleep disorders.

  15. Dosimetric analysis of trigeminal nerve, brain stem doses in CyberKnife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudahar, H.; Kurup, P.G.G.; Murali, V.; Velmurugan, J.

    2012-01-01

    CyberKnife radiosurgery treatment of Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is performed as a non-invasive image guided procedure. The prescription dose for TN is very high. The brainstem is the adjacent critical organ at risk (OAR) which is prone to receive the very high target dose of TN. The present study is to analyze the dose distribution inside the tiny trigeminal nerve target and also to analyze the dose fall off in the brain stem. Seven TN cases treated between November 2010 and January 2012 were taken for this study retrospectively. The treatment plans were analyzed for target dose conformity, homogeneity and dose coverage. In the brainstem the volume doses D 1% and D 2% were taken for analyzing the higher doses in the brain stem. The dose fall off was analyzed in terms of D 5% and D 10% . The mean value of maximum dose within the trigeminal nerve target was 73.5±2.1 Gy (P=0.0007) and the minimum dose was 50.0±4.1Gy (P=0.1315). The mean conformity index was 2.19 and the probable reason could be the smallest CyberKnife collimator of 5mm used in the treatment plan. The mean D 1% , of the brainstem was 10.5±2.1Gy(P=0.5316) and the mean value of the maximum point dose within the brainstem was 35.6±3.8Gy. This shows the degree of dose fall off within the brainstem. Though the results of the present study are showing superior sparing of brain stem and reasonable of target coverage, it is necessary to execute the treatment plan with greater accuracy in CyberKnife as the immobilization is noninvasive and frameless. (author)

  16. The treatment of brain stem and thalamic gliomas with 78 Gy of hyperfractionated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prados, Michael D.; Wara, William M.; Edwards, Michael S. B.; Larson, David A.; Lamborn, Kathleen; Levin, Victor A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To see whether increasing the dose of hyperfractionated radiation therapy from 72 to 78 Gy would increase survival time in patients with gliomas, particularly those with brain stem or thalamic tumors. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of a brain stem or thalamic glioma were enrolled in a trial to receive 78 Gy (1.0 Gy twice a day). Six patients with disease in other sites were also treated. The initial response to therapy was determined by comparing pretreatment magnetic resonance images and neurological examinations with those obtained within 2 weeks of completing therapy; subsequent responses were determined from bimonthly follow-up images. Time-to-tumor progression was measured from the date radiation therapy began until the date of documented radiographic or clinical progression. Survival time was measured from the date radiation therapy began until the date of death. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to estimate the effects of specific variables on survival. Results: Of 81 evaluable patients, 68 received ≥ 76 Gy, 10 received between 70 and 75 Gy, and 3 received between 60 and 68 Gy. The overall response or stabilization rate was 70.4%. Tumor size decreased in 30.8% of patients; 39.5% had stable disease, and 29.6% had immediate progression. The median survival time was 12.7 months (16.1 months for adults and 10.8 months for children). The median time to tumor progression was 9.0 months (11.4 months for adults and 8.4 months for children). A duration of symptoms ≤ 2 months and a diffuse lesion were each associated with shorter survival and progression times. Conclusions: For patients with brain stem or thalamic gliomas, increasing the dose of radiation therapy from 72 to 78 Gy did not significantly improve survival. Different treatment strategies are clearly needed

  17. A Randomized Seven-Year Study on Performance of the Stemmed Metal M2a-Magnum and Ceramic C2a-Taper, and the Resurfacing ReCap Hip Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Arne; Borgwardt, Lotte; Zerahn, Bo

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The large-diameter metal-on-metal hip prostheses were expected to have low wear and reduced dislocation rate compared to the traditional metal-on-polyethylene implants. We compare 2 such prostheses, the ReCap resurfacing implant and the M2a-Magnum stemmed implant, with the C2a ceramic...

  18. Ex vivo bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene delivery using periodontal ligament stem cells for enhanced re-osseointegration in the regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Gwak, Eun-Hye; Rhee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Jeong-Cheol; Shin, Seung-Yun; Koo, Ki-Tae; Lee, Yong-Moo; Seol, Yang-Jo

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a chronic inflammatory process with advanced bone loss and impaired healing potential. For peri-implantitis treatment, tissue engineering can be applied to enhance bone regeneration of peri-implant defects. This study aimed to evaluate ex vivo bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) gene delivery using canine periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) for regeneration of peri-implantitis defects. Canine PDLSCs were transduced with adenoviral vectors containing BMP2 (BMP2/PDLSCs). After peri-implantitis was induced by ligature placement in six beagle dogs, regenerative procedures were performed; hydroxyapatite (HA) particles and collagen gel with autologous canine PDLSCs (PDLSC group) or BMP2/PDLSCs (BMP/PDLSC group) or without cells (control group) were grafted into the defects and covered by an absorbable membrane. Three months later, the animals were sacrificed. In vitro, BMP2/PDLSCs showed similar levels of stem cell properties to PDLSCs, such as colony-forming efficiency and expression of MSC markers STRO-1 and CD 146. BMP2/PDLSCs produced BMP-2 until day 21 at a concentration of 4-8 ng/mL. In vivo, the BMP2/PDLSC group showed significantly more new bone formation and re-osseointegration in peri-implantitis defects compared to the other groups. In conclusion, ex vivo BMP2 gene delivery using PDLSCs enhanced new bone formation and re-osseointegration in peri-implantitis defects. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Promotes Functional Recovery from Traumatic Brain Injury via Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Mediated Neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liu-Lin; Hu, Yue; Zhang, Piao; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Li-Hong; Gao, Guo-Dong; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2017-04-18

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces cognitive impairments, motor and behavioral deficits. Previous evidences have suggested that neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation could facilitate functional recovery from brain insults, but their underlying mechanisms remains to be elucidated. Here, we established TBI model by an electromagnetic-controlled cortical impact device in the rats. Then, 5 μl NSCs (5.0 × 10 5 /μl), derived from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mouse, was transplanted into the traumatic brain regions of rats at 24 h after injury. After differentiation of the NSCs was determined using immunohistochemistry, neurological severity scores (NSS) and rotarod test were conducted to detect the neurological behavior. Western blot and RT-PCR as well as ELASA were used to evaluate the expression of synaptophysin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In order to elucidate the role of BDNF on the neural recovery after NSC transplantation, BDNF knockdown in NSC was performed and transplanted into the rats with TBI, and potential mechanism for BDNF knockdown in the NSC was analyzed using microassay analysis. Meanwhile, BDNF antibody blockade was conducted to further confirm the effect of BDNF on neural activity. As a result, an increasing neurological function improvement was seen in NSC transplanted rats, which was associated with the upregulation of synaptophysin and BDNF expression. Moreover, transplantation of BDNF knockdown NSCs and BDNF antibody block reduced not only the level of synaptophysin but also exacerbated neurological function deficits. Microassay analysis showed that 14 genes such as Wnt and Gsk3-β were downregulated after BDNF knockdown. The present data therefore showed that BDNF-mediated neuroplasticity underlie the mechanism of NSC transplantation for the treatment of TBI in adult rats.

  20. Adult neurogenesis in the crayfish brain: the hematopoietic anterior proliferation center has direct access to the brain and stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves da Silva, Paula Grazielle; Benton, Jeanne L; Sandeman, David C; Beltz, Barbara S

    2013-04-01

    Neuronal stem cells residing in a niche on the surface of the adult crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) brain are not self-renewing. However, the neuronal precursors in the niche are not depleted despite continued neurogenesis and the exit of precursor cells from the niche throughout the organism's life. The neurogenic niche is therefore not a closed system, and we have previously proposed that the stem cell pool is replenished from the hematopoietic system. Noonin et al. (2012) demonstrated that the hematopoietic system in the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus includes an anterior proliferation center (APC) lying near the brain; they suggest that multipotent stem cells are concentrated in this region, and that the APC may provide neuronal stem cells for adult neurogenesis. The present study extends this work by describing the location and cellular organization of hematopoietic tissues in P. clarkii. We find that the APC lies within the cor frontale, or auxiliary heart, which pumps hemolymph to the brain and eyes through the cerebral and ophthalmic arteries, respectively. Vascular extensions of the cerebral artery converge on the neurogenic niche. APC cells lie in layered sheets within the cor frontale and form rosette-like structures reminiscent of stem cells in other developing tissues. We confirm here that APC cells in P. clarkii have characteristics of multipotent stem cells, and that their location within the cor frontale allows direct access to regions in the central nervous system in which adult neurogenesis occurs.

  1. Music modulation of pain perception and pain-related activity in the brain, brain stem, and spinal cord: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobek, Christine E; Beynon, Michaela E; Bosma, Rachael L; Stroman, Patrick W

    2014-10-01

    The oldest known method for relieving pain is music, and yet, to date, the underlying neural mechanisms have not been studied. Here, we investigate these neural mechanisms by applying a well-defined painful stimulus while participants listened to their favorite music or to no music. Neural responses in the brain, brain stem, and spinal cord were mapped with functional magnetic resonance imaging spanning the cortex, brain stem, and spinal cord. Subjective pain ratings were observed to be significantly lower when pain was administered with music than without music. The pain stimulus without music elicited neural activity in brain regions that are consistent with previous studies. Brain regions associated with pleasurable music listening included limbic, frontal, and auditory regions, when comparing music to non-music pain conditions. In addition, regions demonstrated activity indicative of descending pain modulation when contrasting the 2 conditions. These regions include the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, periaqueductal gray matter, rostral ventromedial medulla, and dorsal gray matter of the spinal cord. This is the first imaging study to characterize the neural response of pain and how pain is mitigated by music, and it provides new insights into the neural mechanism of music-induced analgesia within the central nervous system. This article presents the first investigation of neural processes underlying music analgesia in human participants. Music modulates pain responses in the brain, brain stem, and spinal cord, and neural activity changes are consistent with engagement of the descending analgesia system. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Brain activation in response to visceral stimulation in rats with amygdala implants of corticosterone: an FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony C Johnson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although visceral pain of gastrointestinal (GI origin is the major complaint in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS it remains poorly understood. Brain imaging studies suggest a defect in brain-gut communication in IBS with a greater activation of central arousal circuits including the amygdala. Previously, we found that stereotaxic implantation of corticosterone (CORT onto the amygdala in rats induced anxiety and colonic hypersensitivity. In the present study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to identify specific brain sites activated in a rat model characterized by anxiety and colonic hypersensitivity.Anesthetized male rats received micropellets (30 microg each of either CORT or cholesterol (CHOL, to serve as a control, implanted stereotaxically on the dorsal margin of each amygdala. Seven days later, rats were anesthetized and placed in the fMRI magnet (7T. A series of isobaric colorectal balloon distensions (CRD - 90s 'off', 30s 'on', 8 replicates at two pressures (40 and 60 mmHg were performed in a standard block-design. Cross correlation statistical analysis was used to determine significant differences between distended and non-distended states in CORT and CHOL-treated animals. Analysis of the imaging data demonstrated greater overall brain activation in response to CRD in rats with CORT implants compared to CHOL controls. Additionally, CORT implants produced significant positive bilateral increases in MRI signal in response to CRD in specific nuclei known as integration sites important in anxiety and pain perception.These data indicate that chronic exposure of the amygdala to elevated levels of CORT enhances overall brain activation in response to CRD, and identified other specific brain regions activated in response to mechanical distension of the colon. These results demonstrate the feasibility of performing fMRI imaging in a rodent model that supports clinical observations in IBS patients with enhanced

  3. A prospective dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry study of bone remodeling after implantation of the Nanos short-stemmed prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeh, Alexander; Pankow, Franziska; Röllinhoff, Marc; Delank, Stefan; Wohlrab, David

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the bone remodeling around the Nanos stem (Smith & Nephew, Marl, Germany) after primary total hip arthroplasty for coxarthrosis. In 25 patients (15 male, 10 female, mean age 59.9 years) with the diagnosis of coxarthrosis, a DEXA scan was performed immediately after surgery, 97 days (SD 6.1 days) and 368 days (SD 6.2 days) after implantation of a Nanos prosthesis. Plain radiographs were analyzed digitally for radiolucent lines, varus-valgus femoral stem alignment, measurement of stem migration and changes in varus-valgus femoral stem alignment. The position of the center of rotation (COR) and the offset were assessed pre- and postoperatively. Harris Hip Score was used to evaluate the clinical outcome. The DEXA scan showed a significant and relevant increase in BMD (Bone Mineral Density) in Gruen-Zone 6 (12%) and a decrease in Zone 1 (15%), 2 (5%) and 7 (12%), which was interpreted as reflecting a distal load transfer in the metaphysis of the femur. There was no clinically relevant migration or tilting of the Nanos stem. Radiolucent lines were noted in 12 cases, mainly at the polished tip area of the prosthesis; this was not regarded as a sign of impaired osseointegration. There was no significant difference between the position of the COR and the pre- and postoperative offset. The absence of stem migration, angulation, or relevant radiolucent lines is seen as evidence for an unimpaired osseointegration of the Nanos stem approximately 12 months after implantation. It is concluded that the Nanos prosthesis can reduce loss of BMD of the proximal femur composed with conventional stems or other short-stemmed implants.

  4. Reelin signaling in the migration of ventral brain stem and spinal cord neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eBlaess

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix protein Reelin is an important orchestrator of neuronal migration during the development of the central nervous system. While its role and mechanism of action have been extensively studied and reviewed in the formation of dorsal laminar brain structures like the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, its functions during the neuronal migration events that result in the nuclear organization of the ventral central nervous system are less well understood. In an attempt to delineate an underlying pattern of Reelin action in the formation of neuronal cell clusters, this review highlights the role of Reelin signaling in the migration of neuronal populations that originate in the ventral brain stem and the spinal cord.

  5. Artificial dural sealant that allows multiple penetrations of implantable brain probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Nathan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2008-06-15

    This study reports extensive characterization of the silicone gel (3-4680, Dow Corning, Midland, MI), for potential use as an artificial dural sealant in long-term electrophysiological experiments in neurophysiology. Dural sealants are important to preserve the integrity of the intracranial space after a craniotomy and in prolonging the lifetime and functionality of implanted brain probes. In this study, we report results of our tests on a commercially available silicone gel with unique properties that make it an ideal dural substitute. The substitute is transparent, elastic, easy to apply, and has re-sealing capabilities, which makes it desirable for applications where multiple penetrations by the brain probe is desirable over an extended period of time. Cytotoxicity tests (for up to 10 days) with fibroblasts and in vivo tests (for 12 weeks) show that the gel is non-toxic and does not produce any significant neuronal degeneration when applied to the rodent cortex even after 12 weeks. In vivo humidity testing showed no sign of CSF leakage for up to 6 weeks. The gel also allows silicon microprobes to penetrate with forces less than 0.5 mN, and a 200-microm diameter stainless steel microprobe with a blunt tip to penetrate with a force less than 2.5 mN. The force dependency on the velocity of penetration and thickness of the gel was also quantified and empirically modeled. The above results demonstrate that the silicone gel (3-4680) can be a viable dural substitute in long-term electrophysiology of the brain.

  6. An in vivo-like tumor stem cell-related glioblastoma in vitro model for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Nørregaard, Annette

    the effects of new drugs on tumor cells including tumor stem cells. Implantation of glioblastoma cells into organotypic brain slice cultures has previously been published as a model system, but not using a stem cell favourable environment. Organotypic corticostriatal rat brain slice cultures were prepared...... and cultured in a serum containing medium replaced after three days with a serum-free stem cell medium. Thereafter fluorescent DiI labelled glioblastoma spheroids from the cell line U87 and the tumor stem cell line SJ-1 established in our laboratory were implanted into the brain slices between cortex...... growth of the U87 implants, but no invasion of cells into the brain tissue, neither in vitro nor in vivo. In contrast, SJ-1 was clearly invasive both in vitro and in vivo, but not very expansive. The co-cultures and brains with xenografts were immunohistochemically stained with anti-human vimentin...

  7. Paving the Way Toward Complex Blood-Brain Barrier Models Using Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauschke, Karin; Frederiksen, Lise; Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2017-06-15

    A tissue with great need to be modeled in vitro is the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a tight barrier that covers all blood vessels in the brain and separates the brain microenvironment from the blood system. It consists of three cell types [neurovascular unit (NVU)] that contribute to the unique tightness and selective permeability of the BBB and has been shown to be disrupted in many diseases and brain disorders, such as vascular dementia, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Given the progress that pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have made in the past two decades, it is now possible to produce many cell types from the BBB and even partially recapitulate this complex tissue in vitro. In this review, we summarize the most recent developments in PSC differentiation and modeling of the BBB. We also suggest how patient-specific human-induced PSCs could be used to model BBB dysfunction in the future. Lastly, we provide perspectives on how to improve production of the BBB in vitro, for example by improving pericyte differentiation protocols and by better modeling the NVU in the dish.

  8. Injection of SDF-1 loaded nanoparticles following traumatic brain injury stimulates neural stem cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamproni, Laura N; Mundim, Mayara V; Porcionatto, Marimelia A; des Rieux, Anne

    2017-03-15

    Recruiting neural stem cell (NSC) at the lesion site is essential for central nervous system repair. This process could be triggered by the local delivery of the chemokine SDF-1. We compared two PLGA formulations for local brain SDF-1 delivery: SDF-1 loaded microspheres (MS) and SDF-1 loaded nanoparticles (NP). Both formulations were able to encapsulate more than 80% of SDF-1 but presented different release profiles, with 100% of SDF-1 released after 6days for the MS and with 25% of SDF-1 released after 2 weeks for NP. SDF-1 bioactivity was demonstrated by a chemotactic assay. When injected in mouse brain after traumatic brain injury, only SDF-1 nanoparticles induced NSC migration to the damage area. More neuroblasts (DCX+ cells) could be visualized around the lesions treated with NP SDF-1 compared to the other conditions. Rostral migratory stream destabilization with massive migration of DCX+ cell toward the perilesional area was observed 2 weeks after NP SDF-1 injection. Local injection of SDF-1-loaded nanoparticles induces recruitment of NSC and could be promising for brain injury lesion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sex differences in morphology of the brain stem and cerebellum with normal ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguro, H.; Okada, K.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kobayashi, S.

    1998-01-01

    The cerebral hemispheres become atrophic with age. The sex of the individual may affect this process. There are few studies of the effects of age and sex on the brain stem and cerebellum. We used MRI morphometry to study changes in these structures in 152 normal subjects over 40 years of age. In the linear measurements, men showed significant age-associated atrophy in the tegmentum and pretectum of the midbrain and the base of the pons. In women, only the pretectum of the midbrain showed significant ageing effects after the age of 50 years, and thereafter remained rather constant. Only men had significant age-associated reduction in area of the crebellar vermis area after the age of 70 years. Both men and women showed supratentorial brain atrophy that progressed by decades. There were significant correlations between supratentorial brain atrophy and the diameter of the ventral midbrain, pretectum, and base of the pons in men, and between brain atrophy and the diameter of the fourth ventricle in women. (orig.)

  10. Brain Cancer Stem Cells in Adults and Children: Cell Biology and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Antoun, Tamara J; Hale, James S; Lathia, Justin D; Dombrowski, Stephen M

    2017-04-01

    Brain tumors represent some of the most malignant cancers in both children and adults. Current treatment options target the majority of tumor cells but do not adequately target self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have been reported to resist the most aggressive radiation and chemotherapies, and give rise to recurrent, treatment-resistant secondary malignancies. With advancing technologies, we now have a better understanding of the genetic, epigenetic and molecular signatures and microenvironmental influences which are useful in distinguishing between distinctly different tumor subtypes. As a result, efforts are now underway to identify and target CSCs within various tumor subtypes based on this foundation. This review discusses progress in CSC biology as it relates to targeted therapies which may be uniquely different between pediatric and adult brain tumors. Studies to date suggest that pediatric brain tumors may benefit more from genetic and epigenetic targeted therapies, while combination treatments aimed specifically at multiple molecular pathways may be more effective in treating adult brain tumors which seem to have a greater propensity towards microenvironmental interactions. Ultimately, CSC targeting approaches in combination with current clinical therapies have the potential to be more effective owing to their ability to compromise CSCs maintenance and the mechanisms which underlie their highly aggressive and deadly nature.

  11. Is reverse total shoulder arthroplasty a feasible treatment option for failed shoulder arthroplasty? A retrospective study of 44 cases with special regards to stemless and stemmed primary implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holschen, M; Franetzki, B; Witt, K-A; Liem, D; Steinbeck, J

    2017-08-01

    Is reverse total shoulder arthroplasty a feasible treatment option for failed shoulder arthroplasty? A retrospective study of 44 cases with special regards to stemless and stemmed primary implants. Due to humeral or glenoid bone-loss and rotator cuff insufficiency reverse total shoulder arthroplasty often means the only remaining treatment option in revision shoulder arthroplasty. This study investigates the clinical outcome of patients treated with a reverse total shoulder in revision cases with special regard to stemless and stemmed primary implants. From 2010 to 2012 60 failed shoulder arthroplasties were converted to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Forty-four patients were available for follow-up after a mean of 24 months. Patients were assessed with X-rays, Constant- and ASES Score and a questionnaire about their subjective satisfaction. The total number of observed complications was seven (16%). Ninety-eight percent of the patients were satisfied with their clinical result. Patients achieved a mean normalized constant score of 70.2% and a mean ASES Score of 65.3. Patients with stemless primary implants achieved a higher normalized constant score than patients with stemmed primary implants (82 vs. 61.8%; p = 0009). Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty provides satisfactory clinical results and a high patient satisfaction in revision shoulder arthroplasty. The complication rate needs to be considered and discussed with the patient prior to surgery. Presence or absence of a stem of revised shoulder arthroplasties interferes with the outcome. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE IV: (Retrospective study).

  12. Cerebral transplantation of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells improves cellular pathology after experimental traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heile, Anna M B; Wallrapp, Christine; Klinge, Petra M

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: "Naked" human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are neuro-protective in experimental brain injury (TBI). In a controlled cortical impact (CCI) rat model, we investigated whether encapsulated MSC (eMSC) act similarly, and whether efficacy is augmented using cells transfected to produce the neuro......-protective substance glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). METHODS: Thirty two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to five groups: controls (no CCI), CCI-only, CCI+eMSC, CCI+GLP-1 eMSC, and CCI+empty capsules. On day 14, cisternal cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) was sampled for measurement of GLP-1 concentration. Brains were....../capsule/h. Cells were still secreting GLP-1 at a rate of 3.68+/-0.49, 2.85+/-0.45 and 3.53+/-0.55 after 2, 7 and 14 days, respectively. In both of the stem cell treated CCI groups, hippocampal cell loss was reduced, along with an attenuation of cortical neuronal and glial abnormalities, as measured by MAP-2...

  13. Morphological and histochemical changes in the brain stem in case of experimental hemispheric intracerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Tertishniy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Investigation of the extent of morphological changes and activity of biogenic amines (according to the intensity of luminescence in the neurons of the brain stem in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. Methods and results. ICH was designed on 29 white rats of Vistar line by the administration of autologous blood in the cerebral hemisphere. It was revealed that increased luminescence intensity by 18.4±5.5% was registered in monoaminergic neurons in 1–6 hours after experimental ICH. After 12 hours – 1 day development of dislocation syndrome leads to mosaic focal ischemic neuronal injuries with maximum reduction in the level of catecholamines by 29.5±5.0% compared with control cases. Three–6 days after ICH on a background of selective neuronal necrosis in substantial number of neurons in the nuclei of the brainstem the level of catecholamines is significantly reduced. Conclusion. Disclosed observations reflect significant functional pathology of neurons responsible for the regulation of cardiorespiratory function and may underlie disturbances of integrative activity in the brain stem in general.

  14. Report of whole-brain radiation therapy in a patient with an implanted deep brain stimulator: important neurosurgical considerations and radiotherapy practice principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Berriochoa, Camille A; Murphy, Erin S; Machado, Andre G; Chao, Samuel T; Suh, John H; Stephans, Kevin L

    2016-04-01

    Patients with implanted neuromodulation devices present potential challenges for radiation therapy treatment planning and delivery. Although guidelines exist regarding the irradiation of cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators, fewer data and less clinical experience exist regarding the effects of radiation therapy on less frequently used devices, such as deep brain stimulators. A 79-year-old woman with a history of coarse tremors effectively managed with deep brain stimulation presented with multiple intracranial metastases from a newly diagnosed lung cancer and was referred for whole-brain radiation therapy. She was treated with a German helmet technique to a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 6 MV photons via opposed lateral fields with the neurostimulator turned off prior to delivery of each fraction. The patient tolerated the treatment well with no acute complications and no apparent change in the functionality of her neurostimulator device or effect on her underlying neuromuscular disorder. This represents the first reported case of the safe delivery of whole-brain radiation therapy in a patient with an implanted neurostimulator device. In cases such as this, neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists should have discussions with patients about the risks of brain injury, device malfunction or failure of the device, and plans for rigorous testing of the device before and after radiation therapy.

  15. A semi-supervised Support Vector Machine model for predicting the language outcomes following cochlear implantation based on pre-implant brain fMRI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lirong; Holland, Scott K; Deshpande, Aniruddha K; Chen, Ye; Choo, Daniel I; Lu, Long J

    2015-12-01

    We developed a machine learning model to predict whether or not a cochlear implant (CI) candidate will develop effective language skills within 2 years after the CI surgery by using the pre-implant brain fMRI data from the candidate. The language performance was measured 2 years after the CI surgery by the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Preschool, Second Edition (CELF-P2). Based on the CELF-P2 scores, the CI recipients were designated as either effective or ineffective CI users. For feature extraction from the fMRI data, we constructed contrast maps using the general linear model, and then utilized the Bag-of-Words (BoW) approach that we previously published to convert the contrast maps into feature vectors. We trained both supervised models and semi-supervised models to classify CI users as effective or ineffective. Compared with the conventional feature extraction approach, which used each single voxel as a feature, our BoW approach gave rise to much better performance for the classification of effective versus ineffective CI users. The semi-supervised model with the feature set extracted by the BoW approach from the contrast of speech versus silence achieved a leave-one-out cross-validation AUC as high as 0.97. Recursive feature elimination unexpectedly revealed that two features were sufficient to provide highly accurate classification of effective versus ineffective CI users based on our current dataset. We have validated the hypothesis that pre-implant cortical activation patterns revealed by fMRI during infancy correlate with language performance 2 years after cochlear implantation. The two brain regions highlighted by our classifier are potential biomarkers for the prediction of CI outcomes. Our study also demonstrated the superiority of the semi-supervised model over the supervised model. It is always worthwhile to try a semi-supervised model when unlabeled data are available.

  16. Perivascular Mesenchymal Stem Cells From the Adult Human Brain Harbor No Instrinsic Neuroectodermal but High Mesodermal Differentiation Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lojewski, Xenia; Srimasorn, Sumitra; Rauh, Juliane; Francke, Silvan; Wobus, Manja; Taylor, Verdon; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Hallmeyer-Elgner, Susanne; Kirsch, Matthias; Schwarz, Sigrid; Schwarz, Johannes; Storch, Alexander; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Brain perivascular cells have recently been identified as a novel mesodermal cell type in the human brain. These cells reside in the perivascular niche and were shown to have mesodermal and, to a lesser extent, tissue-specific differentiation potential. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely proposed for use in cell therapy in many neurological disorders; therefore, it is of importance to better understand the "intrinsic" MSC population of the human brain. We systematically characterized adult human brain-derived pericytes during in vitro expansion and differentiation and compared these cells with fetal and adult human brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and adult human bone marrow-derived MSCs. We found that adult human brain pericytes, which can be isolated from the hippocampus and from subcortical white matter, are-in contrast to adult human NSCs-easily expandable in monolayer cultures and show many similarities to human bone marrow-derived MSCs both regarding both surface marker expression and after whole transcriptome profile. Human brain pericytes showed a negligible propensity for neuroectodermal differentiation under various differentiation conditions but efficiently generated mesodermal progeny. Consequently, human brain pericytes resemble bone marrow-derived MSCs and might be very interesting for possible autologous and endogenous stem cell-based treatment strategies and cell therapeutic approaches for treating neurological diseases. Perivascular mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) recently gained significant interest because of their appearance in many tissues including the human brain. MSCs were often reported as being beneficial after transplantation in the central nervous system in different neurological diseases; therefore, adult brain perivascular cells derived from human neural tissue were systematically characterized concerning neural stem cell and MSC marker expression, transcriptomics, and mesodermal and inherent neuroectodermal differentiation

  17. Intravascular ultrasound-guided stenting of left main stem dissection after medtronic corevalve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. van Mieghem (Nicolas); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTranscatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) implies the introduction, positioning, and deployment of a stented bioprosthesis in the (calcified) native aortic valve. We report an at first glance uneventful TAVI with the Medtronic Corevalve System, which was followed by transient

  18. Brain response to a rhythm deviant in adolescent cochlear implant users before and after an intensive musical training program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bjørn; Weed, Ethan; Hansen, Mads

    Music and prosody share many of the same relevant acoustic features: pitch, rhythm, and timbre. For cochlear implant (CI) users perception of all of these is challenging. While previous studies have primarily examined implant outcome in adult CI-recipients with an acquired hearing loss (HL), few...... studies have investigated perception of music, prosody, and speech in the growing population of adolescent CI users with a congenital HL. However, recent studies indicate that to keep pace with their normal hearing (NH) peers, supplementary measures of rehabilitation are important throughout adolescence....... This study aimed to investigate auditory brain processing of musical sounds relevant to prosody processing in adolescent CI-users who have received their implant in childhood. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate the potential impact of intensive musical training on adolescent CI-users’ discrimination...

  19. Fractones: extracellular matrix niche controlling stem cell fate and growth factor activity in the brain in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    The stem cell niche refers to a specific microenvironment where stem cells proliferate and differentiate to produce new specialized cells throughout an organism's adulthood. Growth factors are crucial signaling molecules that diffuse through the extracellular space, reach the stem cell niche, and ultimately promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation. However, it is not well known how multiple growth factors, often with antagonistic activities, work together in the stem cell niche to select target stem cell populations and determine stem cell fate. There is accumulating evidence suggesting that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules play an important role in promoting growth factor access and activity in the stem cell niche. In the adult brain neurogenic zone, where neural stem cells (NSCs) reside, there exist specialized ECM structures, which we have named fractones. The processes of NSC allow them to come into contact with fractones and interact with its individual components, which include heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and laminins. We have demonstrated that fractone-associated HSPGs bind growth factors and regulate NSC proliferation in the neurogenic zone. Moreover, emerging results show that fractones are structurally altered in animal models with autism and adult hydrocephalus, as demonstrated by changes in fractone size, quantity, or HSPG content. Interestingly, ECM structures similar to fractones have been found throughout β-amyloid plaques in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Pathological fractones may cause imbalances in growth factor activity and impair neurogenesis, leading to inflammation and disorder. Generally speaking, these stem cell niche structures play a potentially vital role in controlling growth factor activity during both health and disease.

  20. Comparative Matched-Pair Analysis of the Injection Versus Implantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sang; Kwon, Oh Ryong; Choi, Yun Jin; Suh, Dong Suk; Heo, Dong Beom; Koh, Yong Gon

    2015-11-01

    The mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based tissue engineering approach has been developed to address the problem of articular cartilage repair in knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, the most effective method of MSC application has not yet been established. To compare the injection and implantation of MSCs in patients with knee OA in terms of clinical and second-look arthroscopic outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Among 182 patients treated with arthroscopic surgery using MSCs for knee OA from October 2010 to August 2012, patients treated with an injection of MSCs in combination with platelet-rich plasma (injection group; n = 20) were pair-matched with patients who underwent MSC implantation on a fibrin glue scaffold (implantation group; n = 20) based on sex, age, and lesion size. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and Tegner activity scale, and cartilage repair was assessed arthroscopically with the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grading system. The mean (±SD) IKDC and Tegner activity scores significantly improved from 38.5 ± 9.2 to 55.2 ± 15.0 and from 2.5 ± 1.2 to 3.5 ± 1.2, respectively, in the injection group and from 36.6 ± 4.9 to 62.7 ± 14.1 and from 2.3 ± 0.9 to 3.6 ± 1.1, respectively, in the implantation group at the time of second-look arthroscopic surgery (mean, 12.6 months postoperatively) (P < .001 in all cases). At final follow-up (mean, 28.6 months postoperatively), the mean IKDC and Tegner activity scores in the implantation group had improved further to 64.8 ± 13.4 and 3.9 ± 1.0, respectively (P < .001 and P = .035, respectively), while no significant improvements were found in the injection group (P = .130 and P = .655, respectively). At final follow-up, there was a significant difference in the mean IKDC score between groups (P = .049). Significant correlations between the number of administered MSCs and the postoperative clinical outcomes were found

  1. Physical weight loading induces expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 in the brain stem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon W Shim

    Full Text Available Sustaining brain serotonin is essential in mental health. Physical activities can attenuate mental problems by enhancing serotonin signaling. However, such activity is not always possible in disabled individuals or patients with dementia. Knee loading, a form of physical activity, has been found to mimic effects of voluntary exercise. Focusing on serotonergic signaling, we addressed a question: Does local mechanical loading to the skeleton elevate expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (tph2 that is a rate-limiting enzyme for brain serotonin? A 5 min knee loading was applied to mice using 1 N force at 5 Hz for 1,500 cycles. A 5-min treadmill running was used as an exercise (positive control, and a 90-min tail suspension was used as a stress (negative control. Expression of tph2 was determined 30 min - 2 h in three brain regions --frontal cortex (FC, ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH, and brain stem (BS. We demonstrated for the first time that knee loading and treadmill exercise upregulated the mRNA level of tph2 in the BS, while tail suspension downregulated it. The protein level of tph2 in the BS was also upregulated by knee loading and downregulated by tail suspension. Furthermore, the downregulation of tph2 mRNA by tail suspension can be partially suppressed by pre-application of knee loading. The expression of tph2 in the FC and VMH was not significantly altered with knee loading. In this study we provided evidence that peripheral mechanical loading can activate central tph2 expression, suggesting that physical cues may mediate tph2-cathalyzed serotonergic signaling in the brain.

  2. Guidelines for the pathoanatomical examination of the lower brain stem in ingestive and swallowing disorders and its application to a dysphagic spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rub, U; Brunt, ER; Del Turco, D; de Vos, RAI; Gierga, K; Paulson, H; Braak, H

    Despite the fact that considerable progress has been made in the last 20 years regarding the three-phase process of ingestion and the lower brain stem nuclei involved in it, no comprehensive descriptions of the ingestion-related lower brain stem nuclei are available for neuropathologists confronted

  3. Implantation of Neuronal Stem Cells Enhances Object Recognition without Increasing Neurogenesis after Lateral Fluid Percussion Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B. Ngwenya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits after traumatic brain injury (TBI are debilitating and contribute to the morbidity and loss of productivity of over 10 million people worldwide. Cell transplantation has been linked to enhanced cognitive function after experimental traumatic brain injury, yet the mechanism of recovery is poorly understood. Since the hippocampus is a critical structure for learning and memory, supports adult neurogenesis, and is particularly vulnerable after TBI, we hypothesized that stem cell transplantation after TBI enhances cognitive recovery by modulation of endogenous hippocampal neurogenesis. We performed lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI in adult mice and transplanted embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells (NPC. Our data confirm an injury-induced cognitive deficit in novel object recognition, a hippocampal-dependent learning task, which is reversed one week after NPC transplantation. While LFPI alone promotes hippocampal neurogenesis, as revealed by doublecortin immunolabeling of immature neurons, subsequent NPC transplantation prevents increased neurogenesis and is not associated with morphological maturation of endogenous injury-induced immature neurons. Thus, NPC transplantation enhances cognitive recovery early after LFPI without a concomitant increase in neuron numbers or maturation.

  4. Intra-articular Implantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Part 1: A Review of the Literature for Prevention of Postmeniscectomy Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Mitchell, Justin J; Chahla, Jorge; McCarty, Eric C; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) after a partial or total meniscectomy procedure is a common pathology. Because of the high incidence of meniscectomy in the general population, as well as the significant burden of knee OA, there is increasing interest in determining methods for delaying postmeniscectomy OA. Biological therapies, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), have been proposed as possible therapies that could delay OA in this and other settings. Several studies in various animal models have evaluated the effect of injecting MSCs into the knee joints of animals with OA induced either by meniscal excision with or without anterior cruciate ligament transection. When compared with control groups receiving injections without progenitor cells, short-term benefits in the experimental groups have been reported. In human subjects, there are limited data to determine the effect of biological therapies for use in delaying or preventing the onset of OA after a meniscectomy procedure. The purpose of this review is to highlight the findings in the presently available literature on the use of intra-articular implantation of MSCs postmeniscectomy and to offer suggestions for future research with the goal of delaying or treating early OA postmeniscectomy with MSCs.

  5. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin, on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Theophilidis, G

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the action of deltamethrin on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice. Deltamethrin depolarized the hypoglossal motoneurons, increased the background synaptic noise and reduced the frequency and amplitude of current elicited action pot...

  6. Nop2 is expressed during proliferation of neural stem cells and in adult mouse and human brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kosi, N.; Alic, I.; Kolacevic, M.; Vrsaljko, N.; Milosevic, N.J.; Sobol, Margaryta; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozák, Pavel; Gajovic, S.; Pochet, R.; Mitrecic, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1597, FEB 9 (2015), s. 65-76 ISSN 1872-6240 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MPO FR-TI3/588 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Nop2 * Brain * Stem cells * Stroke * Nucleolus * Cell cycle Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Nop2 is expressed during proliferation of neural stem cells and in adult mouse and human brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kosi, N.; Alic, I.; Kolačevic, M.; Vrsaljko, N.; Miloševic, N.J.; Sobol, Margaryta; Filimonenko, Anatolij; Hozák, Pavel; Gajovic, S.; Pochet, R.; Mitrečic, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1597, February (2015), s. 65-76 ISSN 1872-6240 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MPO FR-TI3/588 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Nop2 * Brain * Stem cells * Stroke Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Evaluation of quality of life in long-term survivors of paediatric brain stem tumors, treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronska-Gardas, Anna; Pedziwiatr, Katarzyna; Chojnacka, Marzanna

    2004-01-01

    The quality of life in long-term survivors of paediatric brain stem tumors, treated with radiotherapy is evaluated. They suffer predominantly from pre-treatment neurological impairments, which seriously influence their quality of life. The most often observed treatment sequelae are pituitary insufficiency and hearing loss

  9. Electroresponsive properties and membrane potential trajectories of three types of inspiratory neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Champagnat, J; Denavit-Saubié, M

    1996-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological properties of inspiratory neurons were studied in a rhythmically active thick-slice preparation of the newborn mouse brain stem maintained in vitro. Whole cell patch recordings were performed from 60 inspiratory neurons within the rostral ventrolateral part of the slice...

  10. Collateralization of the pathways descending from the cerebral cortex to brain stem and spinal cord in cat and monkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Keizer (Koos)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe present study deals with the collateralization of the descending pathways from the cerebral cortex to the brain stem and the spinal cord in cat and monkey. The distributions of the branching cortical neurons were studied using retrograde fluorescent tracers. In addition, a new

  11. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury: a biomechanical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-jun; Li, Ya-jun; Liu, Xiao-guang; Huang, Feng-xiao; Liu, Tie-jun; Jiang, Dong-mei; Lv, Xue-man; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, maximum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, improve biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury. PMID:26330839

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles ameliorate inflammation-induced preterm brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drommelschmidt, Karla; Serdar, Meray; Bendix, Ivo; Herz, Josephine; Bertling, Frederik; Prager, Sebastian; Keller, Matthias; Ludwig, Anna-Kristin; Duhan, Vikas; Radtke, Stefan; de Miroschedji, Kyra; Horn, Peter A; van de Looij, Yohan; Giebel, Bernd; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula

    2017-02-01

    Preterm brain injury is a major cause of disability in later life, and may result in motor, cognitive and behavioural impairment for which no treatment is currently available. The aetiology is considered as multifactorial, and one underlying key player is inflammation leading to white and grey matter injury. Extracellular vesicles secreted by mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC-EVs) have shown therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine. Here, we investigated the effects of MSC-EV treatment on brain microstructure and maturation, inflammatory processes and long-time outcome in a rodent model of inflammation-induced brain injury. 3-Day-old Wistar rats (P3) were intraperitoneally injected with 0.25mg/kg lipopolysaccharide or saline and treated with two repetitive doses of 1×10 8 cell equivalents of MSC-EVs per kg bodyweight. Cellular degeneration and reactive gliosis at P5 and myelination at P11 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Long-term cognitive and motor function was assessed by behavioural testing. Diffusion tensor imaging at P125 evaluated long-term microstructural white matter alterations. MSC-EV treatment significantly ameliorated inflammation-induced neuronal cellular degeneration reduced microgliosis and prevented reactive astrogliosis. Short-term myelination deficits and long-term microstructural abnormalities of the white matter were restored by MSC-EV administration. Morphological effects of MSC-EV treatment resulted in improved long-lasting cognitive functions INTERPRETATION: MSC-EVs ameliorate inflammation-induced cellular damage in a rat model of preterm brain injury. MSC-EVs may serve as a novel therapeutic option by prevention of neuronal cell death, restoration of white matter microstructure, reduction of gliosis and long-term functional improvement. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomimetic brain tumor niche regulates glioblastoma cells towards a cancer stem cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yung-Chiang; Lee, I-Chi; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2018-05-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant primary brain tumor and contains tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs), which support the progression of tumor growth. The selection of CSCs and facilitation of the brain tumor niches may assist the development of novel therapeutics for GBM. Herein, hydrogel materials composed of agarose and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HMC) in different concentrations were established and compared to emulate brain tumor niches and CSC microenvironments within a label-free system. Human GBM cell line, U-87 MG, was cultured on a series of HMC-agarose based culture system. Cell aggregation and spheroids formation were investigated after 4 days of culture, and 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system demonstrated the largest spheroids number and size. Moreover, CD133 marker expression of GBM cells after 6 days of culture in 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system was 60%, relatively higher than the control group at only 15%. Additionally, cells on 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system show the highest chemoresistance, even at the high dose of 500 µM temozolomide for 72 h, the live cell ratio was still > 80%. Furthermore, the results also indicate that the expression of ABCG2 gene was up-regulated after culture in 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system. Therefore, our results demonstrated that biomimetic brain tumor microenvironment may regulate GBM cells towards the CSC phenotype and expression of CSC characteristics. The microenvironment selection and spheroids formation in HMC-agarose based culture system may provide a label-free CSC selection strategy and drug testing model for future biomedical applications.

  14. Modeling learning in brain stem and cerebellar sites responsible for VOR plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, K. J.; Didier, A. J.; Baker, J. F.; Peterson, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    A simple model of vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) function was used to analyze several hypotheses currently held concerning the characteristics of VOR plasticity. The network included a direct vestibular pathway and an indirect path via the cerebellum. An optimization analysis of this model suggests that regulation of brain stem sites is critical for the proper modification of VOR gain. A more physiologically plausible learning rule was also applied to this network. Analysis of these simulation results suggests that the preferred error correction signal controlling gain modification of the VOR is the direct output of the accessory optic system (AOS) to the vestibular nuclei vs. a signal relayed through the cerebellum via floccular Purkinje cells. The potential anatomical and physiological basis for this conclusion is discussed, in relation to our current understanding of the latency of the adapted VOR response.

  15. Exogenous stem cells pioneer a biobridge to the advantage of host brain cells following stroke: New insights for clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marci G Crowley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke continues to maintain its status as one of the top causes of mortality within the United States. Currently, the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drug in place for stroke patients, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, has a rigid therapeutic window, closing at approximately 4.5 h after stroke onset. Due to this short time frame and other restrictions, such as any condition that increases a patient's risk for hemorrhaging, it has been predicted that <5% of ischemic stroke patients benefit from tPA. Given that rehabilitation therapy remains the only other option for stroke victims, there is a clear unmet clinical need for treatment available for the remaining 95%. While still considered an experimental treatment, the utilization of stem cell therapies for stroke holds consistent promise. Copious preclinical studies report the capacity for transplanted stem cells to rescue the brain parenchyma surrounding the stroke-induced infarct core. At present, the exact mechanisms in which stem cells contribute a robust therapeutic benefit remains unclear. Following stem cell administration, researchers have observed cell replacement, an increase in growth factors, and a reduction in inflammation. With a deeper understanding of the precise mechanism of stem cells, these therapies can be optimized in the clinic to afford the greatest therapeutic benefit. Recent studies have depicted a unique method of endogenous stem cell activation as a result of stem cell therapy. In both traumatic brain injury and stroke models, transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs facilitated a pathway between the neurogenic niches of the brain and the damaged area through extracellular matrix remodeling. The biobridge pioneered by the MSCs was utilized by the endogenous stem cells, and these cells were able to travel to the damaged areas distal to the neurogenic niches, a feat unachievable without prior remodeling. These studies broaden our understanding of stem

  16. Control of abdominal muscles by brain stem respiratory neurons in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A D; Ezure, K; Suzuki, I

    1985-07-01

    Control of abdominal musculature by brain stem respiratory neurons was studied in decerebrate unanesthetized cats by determining 1) which brain stem respiratory neurons could be antidromically activated from the lumbar cord, from which the abdominal muscles receive part of their innervation, and 2) if lumbar-projecting respiratory neurons make monosynaptic connections with abdominal motoneurons. A total of 462 respiratory neurons, located between caudal C2 and the retrofacial nucleus (Bötzinger complex), were tested for antidromic activation from the upper lumbar cord. Fifty-eight percent of expiratory (E) neurons (70/121) in the caudal ventral respiratory group (VRG) between the obex and rostral C1 were antidromically activated from contralateral L1. Eight of these neurons were activated at low thresholds from lamina VIII and IX in the L1-2 gray matter. One-third (14/41) of the E neurons that projected to L1 could also be activated from L4-5. Almost all antidromic E neurons had an augmenting firing pattern. Ten scattered inspiratory (I) neurons projected to L1 but could not be activated from L4-5. No neurons that fired during both E and I phases (phase-spanning neurons) were antidromically activated from the lumbar cord. In order to test for possible monosynaptic connections between descending E neurons and abdominal motoneurons, cross-correlations were obtained between 27 VRG E neurons, which were antidromically activated from caudal L2 and contralateral L1 and L2 abdominal nerve activity (47 neuron-nerve combinations). Only two neurons showed a correlation with one of the two nerves tested. Although there is a large projection to the lumbar cord from expiratory neurons in the ventral respiratory group caudal to the obex, cross-correlation analyses suggest that strong monosynaptic connections between these neurons and abdominal motoneurons are scarce.

  17. Differential Responses of Human Fetal Brain Neural Stem Cells to Zika Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L. McGrath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV infection causes microcephaly in a subset of infants born to infected pregnant mothers. It is unknown whether human individual differences contribute to differential susceptibility of ZIKV-related neuropathology. Here, we use an Asian-lineage ZIKV strain, isolated from the 2015 Mexican outbreak (Mex1-7, to infect primary human neural stem cells (hNSCs originally derived from three individual fetal brains. All three strains of hNSCs exhibited similar rates of Mex1-7 infection and reduced proliferation. However, Mex1-7 decreased neuronal differentiation in only two of the three stem cell strains. Correspondingly, ZIKA-mediated transcriptome alterations were similar in these two strains but significantly different from that of the third strain with no ZIKV-induced neuronal reduction. This study thus confirms that an Asian-lineage ZIKV strain infects primary hNSCs and demonstrates a cell-strain-dependent response of hNSCs to ZIKV infection.

  18. Differential Responses of Human Fetal Brain Neural Stem Cells to Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Erica L; Rossi, Shannan L; Gao, Junling; Widen, Steven G; Grant, Auston C; Dunn, Tiffany J; Azar, Sasha R; Roundy, Christopher M; Xiong, Ying; Prusak, Deborah J; Loucas, Bradford D; Wood, Thomas G; Yu, Yongjia; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Weaver, Scott C; Vasilakis, Nikos; Wu, Ping

    2017-03-14

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection causes microcephaly in a subset of infants born to infected pregnant mothers. It is unknown whether human individual differences contribute to differential susceptibility of ZIKV-related neuropathology. Here, we use an Asian-lineage ZIKV strain, isolated from the 2015 Mexican outbreak (Mex1-7), to infect primary human neural stem cells (hNSCs) originally derived from three individual fetal brains. All three strains of hNSCs exhibited similar rates of Mex1-7 infection and reduced proliferation. However, Mex1-7 decreased neuronal differentiation in only two of the three stem cell strains. Correspondingly, ZIKA-mediated transcriptome alterations were similar in these two strains but significantly different from that of the third strain with no ZIKV-induced neuronal reduction. This study thus confirms that an Asian-lineage ZIKV strain infects primary hNSCs and demonstrates a cell-strain-dependent response of hNSCs to ZIKV infection. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Recovery from a possible cytomegalovirus meningoencephalitis-induced apparent brain stem death in an immunocompetent man: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahardjo, Theresia Monica; Maskoen, Tinni Trihartini; Redjeki, Ike Sri

    2016-08-26

    Recovery from cytomegalovirus meningoencephalitis with brain stem death in an immunocompetent patient is almost impossible. We present a remarkable recovery from a possible cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent man who had severe neurological syndromes, suggesting brain stem death complicated by pneumonia and pleural effusion. A 19-year-old Asian man presented at our hospital's emergency department with reduced consciousness and seizures following high fever, headache, confusion, and vomitus within a week before arrival. He was intubated and sent to our intensive care unit. He had nuchal rigidity and tetraparesis with accentuated tendon reflexes. Electroencephalography findings suggested an acute structural lesion at his right temporal area or an epileptic state. A cerebral spinal fluid examination suggested viral infection. A computed tomography scan was normal at the early stage of disease. Immunoglobulin M, immunoglobulin G anti-herpes simplex virus, and immunoglobulin M anti-cytomegalovirus were negative. However, immunoglobulin G anti-cytomegalovirus was positive, which supported a diagnosis of cytomegalovirus meningoencephalitis. His clinical condition deteriorated, spontaneous respiration disappeared, cranial reflexes became negative, and brain stem death was suspected. Therapy included antivirals, corticosteroids, antibiotics, anticonvulsant, antipyretics, antifungal agents, and a vasopressor to maintain hemodynamic stability. After 1 month, he showed a vague response to painful stimuli at his supraorbital nerve and respiration started to appear the following week. After pneumonia and pleural effusion were resolved, he was weaned from the ventilator and moved from the intensive care unit on day 90. This case highlights several important issues that should be considered. First, the diagnosis of brain stem death must be confirmed with caution even if there are negative results of brain stem death test for a long period. Second, cytomegalovirus

  20. Skeletal stem cell and bone implant interactions are enhanced by LASER titanium modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisti, Karin E., E-mail: karinellensisti@gmail.com [Bone and Joint Research Group, Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration, Institute of Developmental Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD (United Kingdom); Biomaterials Group, Institute of Chemistry, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Box 355, Araraquara (Brazil); Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande (Brazil); Andrés, María C. de; Johnston, David [Bone and Joint Research Group, Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration, Institute of Developmental Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD (United Kingdom); Almeida-Filho, Edson; Guastaldi, Antonio C. [Biomaterials Group, Institute of Chemistry, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Box 355, Araraquara (Brazil); Oreffo, Richard O.C. [Bone and Joint Research Group, Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration, Institute of Developmental Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-06

    Purpose: To evaluate the osteo-regenerative potential of Titanium (Ti) modified by Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) beam (Yb-YAG) upon culture with human Skeletal Stem Cells (hSSCs{sup 1}). Methods: Human skeletal cell populations were isolated from the bone marrow of haematologically normal patients undergoing primary total hip replacement following appropriate consent. STRO-1{sup +} hSSC{sup 1} function was examined for 10 days across four groups using Ti discs: i) machined Ti surface group in basal media (Mb{sup 2}), ii) machined Ti surface group in osteogenic media (Mo{sup 3}), iii) LASER-modified Ti group in basal media (Lb{sup 4}) and, iv) LASER-modified Ti group in osteogenic media (Lo{sup 5}). Molecular analysis and qRT-PCR as well as functional analysis including biochemistry (DNA, Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP{sup 6}) specific activity), live/dead immunostaining (Cell Tracker Green (CTG{sup 7})/Ethidium Homodimer-1 (EH-1{sup 8})), and fluorescence staining (for vinculin and phalloidin) were undertaken. Inverted, confocal and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) approaches were used to characterise cell adherence, proliferation, and phenotype. Results: Enhanced cell spreading and morphological rearrangement, including focal adhesions were observed following culture of hSSCs{sup 1} on LASER surfaces in both basal and osteogenic conditions. Biochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced ALP{sup 6} specific activity on the hSSCs{sup 1}-seeded on LASER-modified surface in basal culture media. Molecular analysis demonstrated enhanced ALP{sup 6} and osteopontin expression on titanium LASER treated surfaces in basal conditions. SEM, inverted microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed extensive proliferation and migration of human bone marrow stromal cells on all surfaces evaluated. Conclusions: LASER-modified Ti surfaces modify the behaviour of hSSCs.{sup 1} In particular, SSC{sup 1} adhesion, osteogenic gene expression, cell

  1. Implantation of undifferentiated and pre-differentiated human neural stem cells in the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Akabawy Gehan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell therapy is a potential therapeutic approach for several neurodegenetative disease, including Huntington Disease (HD. To evaluate the putative efficacy of cell therapy in HD, most studies have used excitotoxic animal models with only a few studies having been conducted in genetic animal models. Genetically modified animals should provide a more accurate representation of human HD, as they emulate the genetic basis of its etiology. Results In this study, we aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of a human striatal neural stem cell line (STROC05 implanted in the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of HD. As DARPP-32 GABAergic output neurons are predominately lost in HD, STROC05 cells were also pre-differentiated using purmorphamine, a hedgehog agonist, to yield a greater number of DARPP-32 cells. A bilateral injection of 4.5x105 cells of either undifferentiated or pre-differentiated DARPP-32 cells, however, did not affect outcome compared to a vehicle control injection. Both survival and neuronal differentiation remained poor with a mean of only 161 and 81 cells surviving in the undifferentiated and differentiated conditions respectively. Only a few cells expressed the neuronal marker Fox3. Conclusions Although the rapid brain atrophy and short life-span of the R6/2 model constitute adverse conditions to detect potentially delayed treatment effects, significant technical hurdles, such as poor cell survival and differentiation, were also sub-optimal. Further consideration of these aspects is therefore needed in more enduring transgenic HD models to provide a definite assessment of this cell line’s therapeutic relevance. However, a combination of treatments is likely needed to affect outcome in transgenic models of HD.

  2. The surgical viability and radiological monitoring of brain implants of bioactive micro-seeds in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giane X. O. Silva

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The interstitial implant is a therapeutic modality in brachytherapy of the head and neck. Presently, the seeds implanted in tumors in the central nervous system are metallic I-125. After the full emission of the radionuclide, the seed remains inert in the implanted area. Bioactive ceramic seeds have been prepared for this research group incorporating Sm-152 to be active in Sm-153. The main goal of the present study is the development of a the surgical technique for implanting the biodegradable radioactive micro-seeds in the brains of rabbits, as well as the observation of the clinical reactions of the animal after implantation of two sets of three seeds. The surgical procedure consisted of performing two separate perforations 10 mm from each other in the skull, permitting the implantation of two groups of three seeds, totaling six seeds. The results of the pilot study showed the effectiveness of the surgical procedure and of the biocompatibility of the seeds and the lack of presence of adverse reactions, functional sequels, or inflammation in a follow up 50 days post-surgery. Such seeds of reduced volume, 0.2 x 1.6 mm, could be monitored by computerized tomography 30 days after implanting.Os implantes intersticiais podem ser utilizados em braquiterapia de cabeça e pescoço. Atualmente as sementes implantadas no CNS são de I-125 metálicas. Após o decaimento do radioisótopo, a semente fica inerte na região implantada. Sementes cerâmicas bioativas tem sido preparadas pelo grupo de pesquisa incorporando Sm-152. O presente estudo tem o objetivo de viabilizar a técnica cirúrgica de implantes de microsementes biodegradáveis não radioativas no cérebro de coelhos, bem como verificar as reações clínicas e funcionais do animal ao corpo estranho implantado. O procedimento cirúrgico compreendeu em proceder duas perfurações separadas em 10mm na calota craniana onde foi possível a implantação de dois conjuntos de três sementes

  3. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, Elke R. [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Maderwald, Stefan [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Linn, Jennifer; Bochmann, Katja [LMU Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Dassinger, Benjamin [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Giessen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  4. Gold nanoparticle-cell labeling methodology for tracking stem cells within the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzer, Oshra; Meir, Rinat; Motiei, Menachem; Yadid, Gal; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2017-02-01

    Cell therapy provides a promising approach for diseases and injuries that conventional therapies cannot cure effectively. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used as effective targeted therapy, as they exhibit homing capabilities to sites of injury and inflammation, exert anti-inflammatory effects, and can differentiate in order to regenerate damaged tissue. Despite the potential efficacy of cell therapy, applying cell-based therapy in clinical practice is very challenging; there is a need to uncover the mystery regarding the fate of the transplanted cells. Therefore, in this study, we developed a method for longitudinal and quantitative in vivo cell tracking, based on the superior visualization abilities of classical X-ray computed tomography (CT), and combined with gold nanoparticles as labeling agents. We applied this technique for non-invasive imaging of MSCs transplanted in a rat model for depression, a highly prevalent and disabling neuropsychiatric disorder lacking effective treatment. Our results, which demonstrate that cell migration could be detected as early as 24 hours and up to one month post-transplantation, revealed that MSCs specifically navigated and homed to distinct depression related brain regions. This research further reveals that cell therapy is a beneficial approach for treating neuropsychiatric disorders; Behavioral manifestations of core symptoms of depressive behavior, were significantly attenuated following treatment. We expect This CT-based technique to lead to a significant enhancement in cellular therapy both for basic research and clinical applications of brain pathologies.

  5. Transmigration of neural stem cells across the blood brain barrier induced by glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Díaz-Coránguez

    Full Text Available Transit of human neural stem cells, ReNcell CX, through the blood brain barrier (BBB was evaluated in an in vitro model of BBB and in nude mice. The BBB model was based on rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMECs cultured on Millicell inserts bathed from the basolateral side with conditioned media (CM from astrocytes or glioma C6 cells. Glioma C6 CM induced a significant transendothelial migration of ReNcells CX in comparison to astrocyte CM. The presence in glioma C6 CM of high amounts of HGF, VEGF, zonulin and PGE2, together with the low abundance of EGF, promoted ReNcells CX transmigration. In contrast cytokines IFN-α, TNF-α, IL-12p70, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10, as well as metalloproteinases -2 and -9 were present in equal amounts in glioma C6 and astrocyte CMs. ReNcells expressed the tight junction proteins occludin and claudins 1, 3 and 4, and the cell adhesion molecule CRTAM, while RBMECs expressed occludin, claudins 1 and 5 and CRTAM. Competing CRTAM mediated adhesion with soluble CRTAM, inhibited ReNcells CX transmigration, and at the sites of transmigration, the expression of occludin and claudin-5 diminished in RBMECs. In nude mice we found that ReNcells CX injected into systemic circulation passed the BBB and reached intracranial gliomas, which overexpressed HGF, VEGF and zonulin/prehaptoglobin 2.

  6. Transmigration of neural stem cells across the blood brain barrier induced by glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Coránguez, Mónica; Segovia, José; López-Ornelas, Adolfo; Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Ludert, Juan; Chávez, Bibiana; Meraz-Cruz, Noemi; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2013-01-01

    Transit of human neural stem cells, ReNcell CX, through the blood brain barrier (BBB) was evaluated in an in vitro model of BBB and in nude mice. The BBB model was based on rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMECs) cultured on Millicell inserts bathed from the basolateral side with conditioned media (CM) from astrocytes or glioma C6 cells. Glioma C6 CM induced a significant transendothelial migration of ReNcells CX in comparison to astrocyte CM. The presence in glioma C6 CM of high amounts of HGF, VEGF, zonulin and PGE2, together with the low abundance of EGF, promoted ReNcells CX transmigration. In contrast cytokines IFN-α, TNF-α, IL-12p70, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10, as well as metalloproteinases -2 and -9 were present in equal amounts in glioma C6 and astrocyte CMs. ReNcells expressed the tight junction proteins occludin and claudins 1, 3 and 4, and the cell adhesion molecule CRTAM, while RBMECs expressed occludin, claudins 1 and 5 and CRTAM. Competing CRTAM mediated adhesion with soluble CRTAM, inhibited ReNcells CX transmigration, and at the sites of transmigration, the expression of occludin and claudin-5 diminished in RBMECs. In nude mice we found that ReNcells CX injected into systemic circulation passed the BBB and reached intracranial gliomas, which overexpressed HGF, VEGF and zonulin/prehaptoglobin 2.

  7. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiation and proliferation on the surface of coral implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Salihi, K.A.; Samsudin, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the ability of natural coral implant to provide an environment for marrow cells to differentiate into osteoblasts and function suitable for mineralized tissue formation. DNA content, alkaline phosptatase (ALP) activity, calcium (Ca) content and mineralized nodules, were measured at day 3, day 7 and day 14, in rat bone marrow stromal cells cultured with coral discs glass discs, while cells alone and coral disc alone cultured as control. DNA content, ALP activity, Ca content measurements showed no difference between coral, glass and cells groups at 3 day which were higher than control (coral disc alone), but there were higher asurement at day 7 and 14 in the cell cultured on coral than on glass discs, control cells and control coral discs. Mineralized nodules formation (both in area and number) was more predominant on the coral surface than in control groups. These results showed that natural coral implant provided excellent and favorable situation for marrow cell to differentiate to osteoblasts, lead to large amount of mineralized tissue formation on coral surface. This in vitro result could explain the rapid bone bonding of coral in vivo. (Author)

  8. Successful outcomes of cochlear implantation in long-term unilateral deafness: brain plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Távora-Vieira, Dayse; Boisvert, Isabelle; McMahon, Catherine M; Maric, Vesna; Rajan, Gunesh P

    2013-09-11

    To investigate the implications of duration of deafness in the rehabilitation of unilateral deafness utilizing cochlear implantation. From the ongoing prospective cochlear implantation in unilateral deafness study, we looked at five adults who received a cochlear implant for long-term unilateral deafness. Speech perception in noise and subjective evaluation of the benefits of cochlear implantation were measured at 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation. The results were analyzed and compared with published data from normal hearing individuals and adults using cochlear implants bilaterally. Analysis of speech perception in noise showed significant improvement for three spatial configurations: speech and noise from the front (S0/N0; P=0.003), speech from the front and noise from the normal hearing ear (S0/NHE; P=0.001), speech from the implanted ear, and noise from the normal hearing ear (SCI/NHE; Pdeafness obtained scores in speech perception testing and in subjective evaluation that are similar to those attained by individuals with normal hearing and/or those with bilateral cochlear implants. Therefore, patients with postlingual unilateral deafness should not be excluded as cochlear implant candidates on the basis of a long duration of deafness.

  9. Can human mesenchymal stem cells survive on a NiTi implant material subjected to cyclic loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habijan, T; Glogowski, T; Kühn, S; Pohl, M; Wittsiepe, J; Greulich, C; Eggeler, G; Schildhauer, T A; Köller, M

    2011-06-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi-SMAs) exhibit mechanical and chemical properties which make them attractive candidate materials for various types of biomedical applications. However, the high nickel content of NiTi-SMAs may result in adverse tissue reactions, especially when they are considered for load-bearing implants. It is generally assumed that a protective titanium oxide layer separates the metallic alloy from its environment and that this explains the good biocompatibility of NiTi. Cyclic loading may result in failure of the protective oxide layer. The scientific objective of this work was to find out whether cyclic dynamic strain, in a range relevant for orthopedic implants, diminishes the biocompatibility of NiTi-SMAs. In order to analyze the biocompatibility of NiTi-SMA surfaces subjected to cyclic loading, NiTi-SMA tensile specimens were preloaded with mesenchymal stem cells, transferred to a sterile cell culture system and fixed to the pull rods of a tensile testing machine. Eighty-six thousand and four hundred strain cycles at 2% pseudoelastic strain were performed for a period of 24 h or 7 days. Cytokines (IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF) and nickel ion release were determined within the cell culture medium. Adherent cells on the tensile specimens were stained with calcein-AM and propidium iodide to determine cell viability. Dynamic loading of the tensile specimens did not influence the viability of adherent human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) after 24 h or 7 days compared with the non-strained control. Dynamic cycles of loading and unloading did not affect nickel ion release from the tensile specimens. The release of IL-6 from hMSCs cultured under dynamic conditions was significantly higher after mechanical load (873 pg ml(-1)) compared with static conditions (323 pg ml(-1)). The present work demonstrates that a new type of mechanical in vitro cell culture experiment can provide information which previously could only be obtained in large animal

  10. Regional Susceptibility to Domoic Acid in Primary Astrocyte Cells Cultured from the Brain Stem and Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Pulido

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid is a marine biotoxin associated with harmful algal blooms and is the causative agent of amnesic shellfish poisoning in marine animals and humans. It is also an excitatory amino acid analog to glutamate and kainic acid which acts through glutamate receptors eliciting a very rapid and potent neurotoxic response. The hippocampus, among other brain regions, has been identified as a specific target site having high sensitivity to DOM toxicity. Histopathology evidence indicates that in addition to neurons, the astrocytes were also injured. Electron microscopy data reported in this study further supports the light microscopy findings. Furthermore, the effect of DOM was confirmed by culturing primary astrocytes from the hippocampus and the brain stem and subsequently exposing them to domoic acid. The RNA was extracted and used for biomarker analysis. The biomarker analysis was done for the early response genes including c-fos, c-jun, c-myc, Hsp-72; specific marker for the astrocytes- GFAP and the glutamate receptors including GluR 2, NMDAR 1, NMDAR 2A and B. Although, the astrocyte-GFAP and c-fos were not affected, c-jun and GluR 2 were down-regulated. The microarray analysis revealed that the chemokines / cytokines, tyrosine kinases (Trk, and apoptotic genes were altered. The chemokines that were up-regulated included - IL1-a, IL-1B, IL-6, the small inducible cytokine, interferon protein IP-10, CXC chemokine LIX, and IGF binding proteins. The Bax, Bcl-2, Trk A and Trk B were all downregulated. Interestingly, only the hippocampal astrocytes were affected. Our findings suggest that astrocytes may present a possible target for pharmacological interventions for the prevention and treatment of amnesic shellfish poisoning and for other brain pathologies involving excitotoxicity

  11. Guided Bone Regeneration Using Collagen Scaffolds, Growth Factors, and Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells for Treatment of Peri-Implant Bone Defects In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer W. Kämmerer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was an evaluation of different approaches for guided bone regeneration (GBR of peri-implant defects in an in vivo animal model. Materials and Methods. In minipigs (n=15, peri-implant defects around calcium phosphate- (CaP-; n=46 coated implants were created and randomly filled with (1 blank, (2 collagen/hydroxylapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate scaffold (CHT, (3 CHT + growth factor cocktail (GFC, (4 jellyfish collagen matrix, (5 jellyfish collagen matrix + GFC, (6 collagen powder, and (7 collagen powder + periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC. Additional collagen membranes were used for coverage of the defects. After 120 days of healing, bone growth was evaluated histologically (bone to implant contact (BIC;%, vertical bone apposition (VBA; mm, and new bone height (NBH; %. Results. In all groups, new bone formation was seen. Though, when compared to the blank group, no significant differences were detected for all parameters. BIC and NBH in the group with collagen matrix as well as the group with the collagen matrix + GFC were significantly less when compared to the collagen powder group (all: p<0.003. Conclusion. GBR procedures, in combination with CaP-coated implants, will lead to an enhancement of peri-implant bone growth. There was no additional significant enhancement of osseous regeneration when using GFC or PDLSC.

  12. Surface Characterization and Human Stem Cell Behaviors of Zirconia Implant Disks Biomimetic-Treated in Simulated Body Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Hongxuan; Park, Yoon-Kyung; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Joo-Hee

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of biomimetic deposition on a zirconia surface in simulated body fluid (SBF) and assessed the proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on the SBF-treated zirconia disks. Corrected SBF was prepared according to Kokubo's recipe. Eighty yttrium oxide-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline disks were prepared and divided into two groups: (1) the test group with SBF-treated disks and (2) the control group with nontreated disks. Zirconia disks were soaked in SBF for 1, 4, 7, and 14 days at 36.5°C, and the hydroxyapatite (HA) precipitation was verified by analyzing the surface morphology. For more in-depth validation of HA formation, the surface roughness, composition, and crystallization of the 7-day treated disks were analyzed. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were used to further evaluate cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteoblast gene expression on the 7-day treated zirconia disks. Disks showed different surface morphologies after soaking for different time periods. As the SBF soaking time increased, the amount of HA coverage increased gradually, uniformly covering the disks by day 7. There was no difference in surface roughness between the two groups (P > .05). Cell proliferation was higher on the SBF-treated disks (P .05). This study demonstrated that biomimetic deposition has an effect on the formation of HA on zirconia disks. The cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of SBF-treated zirconia disks was superior to that of nontreated disks, which indicates that SBF-treated zirconia implants have long-term clinical value.

  13. Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cell (GMSC) Delivery System Based on RGD-Coupled Alginate Hydrogel with Antimicrobial Properties: A Novel Treatment Modality for Peri-Implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Ivana M A; Chen, Chider; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Chee, Daniel; Marques, Márcia M; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2016-02-01

    Peri-implantitis is one of the most common inflammatory complications in dental implantology. Similar to periodontitis, in peri-implantitis, destructive inflammatory changes take place in the tissues surrounding a dental implant. Bacterial flora at the failing implant sites resemble the pathogens in periodontal disease and consist of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of a silver lactate (SL)-containing RGD-coupled alginate hydrogel scaffold as a promising stem cell delivery vehicle with antimicrobial properties. Gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) or human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) were encapsulated in SL-loaded alginate hydrogel microspheres. Stem cell viability, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation capacity were analyzed. Our results showed that SL exhibited antimicrobial properties against Aa in a dose-dependent manner, with 0.50 mg/ml showing the greatest antimicrobial properties while still maintaining cell viability. At this concentration, SL-containing alginate hydrogel was able to inhibit Aa growth on the surface of Ti discs and significantly reduce the bacterial load in Aa suspensions. Silver ions were effectively released from the SL-loaded alginate microspheres for up to 2 weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of GMSCs and hBMMSCs encapsulated in the SL-loaded alginate microspheres were confirmed by the intense mineral matrix deposition and high expression of osteogenesis-related genes. Taken together, our findings confirm that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel containing SL show promise for bone tissue engineering with antimicrobial properties against Aa bacteria in vitro. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. An in vivo-like tumor stem cell-related glioblastoma in vitro model for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Nørregaard, Annette

    the effects of new drugs on tumor cells including tumor stem cells. Implantation of glioblastoma cells into organotypic brain slice cultures has previously been published as a model system, but not using a stem cell favourable environment. Organotypic corticostriatal rat brain slice cultures were prepared...... and cultured in a serum containing medium replaced after three days with a serum-free stem cell medium. Thereafter fluorescent DiI labelled glioblastoma spheroids from the cell line U87 and the tumor stem cell line SJ-1 established in our laboratory were implanted into the brain slices between cortex......The discovery of tumor stem cells being highly resistant against therapy makes new demands to model systems suitable for evaluation of the effects of new drugs on tumor stem cells. The aim of the present study was therefore to develop an in vivo-like in vitro glioblastoma model for testing...

  15. Recent advances in the involvement of long non-coding RNAs in neural stem cell biology and brain pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne eAntoniou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of non-coding genome has recently uncovered a growing list of formerly unknown regulatory long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs with important functions in stem cell pluripotency, development and homeostasis of several tissues. Although thousands of lncRNAs are expressed in mammalian brain in a highly patterned manner, their roles in brain development have just begun to emerge. Recent data suggest key roles for these molecules in gene regulatory networks controlling neuronal and glial cell differentiation. Analysis of the genomic distribution of genes encoding for lncRNAs indicates a physical association of these regulatory RNAs with transcription factors (TFs with well-established roles in neural differentiation, suggesting that lncRNAs and TFs may form coherent regulatory networks with important functions in neural stem cells (NSCs. Additionally, many studies show that lncRNAs are involved in the pathophysiology of brain-related diseases/disorders. Here we discuss these observations and investigate the links between lncRNAs, brain development and brain-related diseases. Understanding the functions of lncRNAs in NSCs and brain organogenesis could revolutionize the basic principles of developmental biology and neuroscience.

  16. Store-Operated Calcium Entries Control Neural Stem Cell Self-Renewal in the Adult Brain Subventricular Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenichini, Florence; Terrié, Elodie; Arnault, Patricia; Harnois, Thomas; Magaud, Christophe; Bois, Patrick; Constantin, Bruno; Coronas, Valérie

    2018-01-23

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is the major stem cell niche in the brain of adult mammals. Within this region, neural stem cells (NSC) proliferate, self-renew and give birth to neurons and glial cells. Previous studies underlined enrichment in calcium signaling-related transcripts in adult NSC. Because of their ability to mobilize sustained calcium influxes in response to a wide range of extracellular factors, store-operated channels (SOC) appear to be, among calcium channels, relevant candidates to induce calcium signaling in NSC whose cellular activities are continuously adapted to physiological signals from the microenvironment. By Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting and immunocytochemistry experiments, we demonstrate that SVZ cells express molecular actors known to build up SOC, namely transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1) and Orai1, as well as their activator stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). Calcium imaging reveals that SVZ cells display store-operated calcium entries. Pharmacological blockade of SOC with SKF-96365 or YM-58483 (also called BTP2) decreases proliferation, impairs self-renewal by shifting the type of SVZ stem cell division from symmetric proliferative to asymmetric, thereby reducing the stem cell population. Brain section immunostainings show that TRPC1, Orai1, and STIM1 are expressed in vivo, in SOX2-positive SVZ NSC. Injection of SKF-96365 in brain lateral ventricle diminishes SVZ cell proliferation and reduces the ability of SVZ cells to form neurospheres in vitro. The present study combining in vitro and in vivo approaches uncovers a major role for SOC in the control of SVZ NSC population and opens new fields of investigation for stem cell biology in health and disease. Stem Cells 2018. © AlphaMed Press 2018.

  17. Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Endogenous Lipids from Rat Brain Tissue Implanted with Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Ludovic; Baldwin, Kathrine; Barbacci, Damon C.; Jackson, Shelley N.; Roux, Aurélie; Balaban, Carey D.; Brinson, Bruce E.; McCully, Michael I.; Lewis, Ernest K.; Schultz, J. Albert; Woods, Amina S.

    2017-08-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of tissue implanted with silver nanoparticulate (AgNP) matrix generates reproducible imaging of lipids in rodent models of disease and injury. Gas-phase production and acceleration of size-selected 8 nm AgNP is followed by controlled ion beam rastering and soft landing implantation of 500 eV AgNP into tissue. Focused 337 nm laser desorption produces high quality images for most lipid classes in rat brain tissue (in positive mode: galactoceramides, diacylglycerols, ceramides, phosphatidylcholines, cholesteryl ester, and cholesterol, and in negative ion mode: phosphatidylethanolamides, sulfatides, phosphatidylinositol, and sphingomyelins). Image reproducibility in serial sections of brain tissue is achieved within imaging of brain tissues spotted with pure standards was used to demonstrate that Ag cationized ceramide and diacylglycerol ions are from intact, endogenous species. In contrast, almost all Ag cationized fatty acid ions are a result of fragmentations of numerous lipid types having the fatty acid as a subunit. Almost no argentated intact fatty acid ions come from the pure fatty acid standard on tissue.

  18. A phase I trial of etanidazole and hyperfractionated radiotherapy in children with diffuse brain stem glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, S.C.; Pomeroy, S.L.; Billett, A.L.; Barnes, P.; Kuhlman, C.; Riese, N.E.; Goumnerova, L.; Scott, R.M.; Coleman, C.N.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Prospective phase I study to evaluate the toxicity and maximum tolerated dose of etanidazole administered concurrently with hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HRT) for children with brain stem glioma. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients with brain stem glioma were treated with etanidazole and HRT from 1990-1996. Eligibility required MRI confirmation of diffuse glioma of medulla, pons or mesencephalon, and signs/symptoms of cranial nerve deficit, ataxia or long tract signs of ≤ 6 months duration. Cervico-medullary tumors were excluded. Patients (median age 8.5 years; 11 males, 7 females) received HRT to the tumor volume plus a 2 cm margin with parallel opposed 6-15 MV photons. The total dose was 66 Gy for the first 3 patients, followed by 63 Gy over 4.2 weeks (1.5 Gy BID with 6 hours between fractions) for the subsequent 15 patients. Etanidazole was administered as a rapid IV infusion 30 minutes prior to the morning fraction of HRT at doses of 1.8 gm/m2 x 17 doses (30.6 gm/m2) at step 1 to a maximum of 2.4 gm/m2 x 21 doses (50.4 gm/m2) at step 8. Dose escalation was planned with 3 patients at each of the 8 levels. Results: Three patients were treated at each dose level except level 2, on which only one patient was treated. The highest dose level achieved was step 7 which delivered a total etanidazole dose of 46.2 gm/m2. Two patients were treated at this level, and both patients experienced grade 3 toxicity in the form of a diffuse cutaneous rash. Three patients received a lower dose of 42 gm/m2 without significant toxicity, and this represents the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). There were 24 cases of grade 1 toxicity (10 vomiting, 5 peripheral neuropathy, 2 rash, 2 constipation, 1 skin erythema, 1 weight loss, 3 other), eleven cases of grade 2 toxicity (4 vomiting, 2 skin erythema, 2 constipation, 1 arthalgia, 1 urinary retention, 1 hematologic), and four grade b 3 toxicities (2 rash, 1 vomiting, 1 skin desquamation). Grade 2 or 3 peripheral

  19. A cGMP-applicable expansion method for aggregates of human neural stem and progenitor cells derived from pluripotent stem cells or fetal brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Brandon C; Gowing, Geneviève; Svendsen, Clive N

    2014-06-15

    A cell expansion technique to amass large numbers of cells from a single specimen for research experiments and clinical trials would greatly benefit the stem cell community. Many current expansion methods are laborious and costly, and those involving complete dissociation may cause several stem and progenitor cell types to undergo differentiation or early senescence. To overcome these problems, we have developed an automated mechanical passaging method referred to as "chopping" that is simple and inexpensive. This technique avoids chemical or enzymatic dissociation into single cells and instead allows for the large-scale expansion of suspended, spheroid cultures that maintain constant cell/cell contact. The chopping method has primarily been used for fetal brain-derived neural progenitor cells or neurospheres, and has recently been published for use with neural stem cells derived from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. The procedure involves seeding neurospheres onto a tissue culture Petri dish and subsequently passing a sharp, sterile blade through the cells effectively automating the tedious process of manually mechanically dissociating each sphere. Suspending cells in culture provides a favorable surface area-to-volume ratio; as over 500,000 cells can be grown within a single neurosphere of less than 0.5 mm in diameter. In one T175 flask, over 50 million cells can grow in suspension cultures compared to only 15 million in adherent cultures. Importantly, the chopping procedure has been used under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP), permitting mass quantity production of clinical-grade cell products.

  20. Metformin and Ara-a Effectively Suppress Brain Cancer by Targeting Cancer Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek H. Mouhieddine

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gliomas and neuroblastomas pose a great health burden worldwide with a poor and moderate prognosis, respectively. Many studies have tried to find effective treatments for these primary malignant brain tumors. Of interest, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK pathway was found to be associated with tumorigenesis and tumor survival, leading to many studies on AMPK drugs, especially Metformin, and their potential role as anti-cancer treatments. Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small population of slowly-dividing, treatment-resistant, undifferentiated cancer cells that are being discovered in a multitude of cancers. They are thought to be responsible for replenishing the tumor with highly proliferative cells and increasing the risk of recurrence. Methods: Metformin and 9-β-d-Arabinofuranosyl Adenine (Ara-a were used to study the role of the AMPK pathway in vitro on U251 (glioblastoma and SHSY-5Y (neuroblastoma cell lines.Results: We found that both drugs are able to decrease the survival of U251 and SH-SY5Y cell lines in a 2D as well as a 3D culture model. Metformin and Ara-a significantly decreased the invasive ability of these cancer cell lines. Treatment with these drugs decreased the sphere-forming units (SFU of U251 cells, with Ara-a being more efficient, signifying the extinction of the CSC population. However, if treatment is withdrawn before all SFUs are extinguished, the CSCs regain some of their sphere-forming capabilities in the case of Metformin but not Ara-a treatment. Conclusion: Metformin and Ara-a have proved to be effective in the treatment of glioblastomas and neuroblastomas, in vitro, by targeting their cancer stem/progenitor cell population, which prevents recurrence.

  1. Presenilins are required for maintenance of neural stem cells in the developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Woo-Young

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The early embryonic lethality of mutant mice bearing germ-line deletions of both presenilin genes precluded the study of their functions in neural development. We therefore employed the Cre-loxP technology to generate presenilin conditional double knockout (PS cDKO mice, in which expression of both presenilins is inactivated in neural progenitor cells (NPC or neural stem cells and their derivative neurons and glia beginning at embryonic day 11 (E11. In PS cDKO mice, dividing NPCs labeled by BrdU are decreased in number beginning at E13.5. By E15.5, fewer than 20% of NPCs remain in PS cDKO mice. The depletion of NPCs is accompanied by severe morphological defects and hemorrhages in the PS cDKO embryonic brain. Interkinetic nuclear migration of NPCs is also disrupted in PS cDKO embryos, as evidenced by displacement of S-phase and M-phase nuclei in the ventricular zone of the telencephalon. Furthermore, the depletion of neural progenitor cells in PS cDKO embryos is due to NPCs exiting cell cycle and differentiating into neurons rather than reentering cell cycle between E13.5 and E14.5 following PS inactivation in most NPCs. The length of cell cycle, however, is unchanged in PS cDKO embryos. Expression of Notch target genes, Hes1 and Hes5, is significantly decreased in PS cDKO brains, whereas Dll1 expression is up-regulated, indicating that Notch signaling is effectively blocked by PS inactivation. These findings demonstrate that presenilins are essential for neural progenitor cells to re-enter cell cycle and thus ensure proper expansion of neural progenitor pool during embryonic neural development.

  2. Estradiol receptors mediate estradiol-induced inhibition of mitochondrial Ca^{2+} efflux in rat caudate nucleus and brain stem

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC, SNJEZANA; MILOSEVIC, MAJA; RISTIC-MEDIC, DANIJELA; VELICKOVIC, NATASA; DRAKULIC, DUNJA; GRKOVIC, IVANA; HORVAT, ANICA

    2015-01-01

    Our earlier studies found that in vitro estradiol modulates mitochondrial Ca2+ transport in discrete brain regions. The present study examined the role of estradiol receptors (ERs) in estradiol-induced inhibition of Ca^{2+} efflux from synaptosomal mitochondria isolated from rat caudate nuclei and brain stems. Radioactively labeled CaCl_2 (0.6?0.75 µCi ^45CaCl_{2}) was used for Ca^{2+} transport monitoring. The results revealed that in the presence of ER antagonist 7\\alpha,17ß-[9[(4,4,5,5,5-...

  3. Robotics, stem cells, and brain-computer interfaces in rehabilitation and recovery from stroke: updates and advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boninger, Michael L; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Stein, Joel

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the current state and latest advances in robotics, stem cells, and brain-computer interfaces in rehabilitation and recovery for stroke. The authors of this summary recently reviewed this work as part of a national presentation. The article represents the information included in each area. Each area has seen great advances and challenges as products move to market and experiments are ongoing. Robotics, stem cells, and brain-computer interfaces all have tremendous potential to reduce disability and lead to better outcomes for patients with stroke. Continued research and investment will be needed as the field moves forward. With this investment, the potential for recovery of function is likely substantial.

  4. Pathophysiological changes of the cerebellum and brain stem in a rabbit model after superior petrosal vein sacrifice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Guo, Pin; Liao, Yi-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Li, Huan-Ting; Yuan, Xianrui

    2017-11-13

    In certain surgical procedures sacrifice of the superior petrosal vein (SPV) is required. Previous studies have reported transient cerebellar edema, venous infarction or hemorrhage might occur after sectioning of the SPV. This study investigated the pathophysiological changes of cerebellum and brain stem after SPV sacrifice. Rabbits were divided into the operation group where the SPV was sacrificed and the control group where the SPV remained intact. Each group was further subdivided into 4, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours groups which represented the time period from sacrifice of the SPV to sacrifice of the rabbits. The water content (WC), Na + content, K + content and pathophysiological changes of cerebellum and brain stem tissue were measured. In comparison to the control, the WC and Na + content of cerebellar tissue were increased in the 4h, 8h, 12h and 24h operation subgroups (psacrifice of the SPV in the rabbit model. ©2017 The Author(s).

  5. Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation is associated with cell-type-dependent splicing of mtAspRS mRNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berge, Laura; Dooves, Stephanie; van Berkel, Carola G. M.; Polder, Emiel; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Scheper, Gert C.

    2012-01-01

    LBSL (leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation) is an autosomal recessive white matter disorder with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, spasticity and dorsal column dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging shows characteristic abnormalities in the

  6. Tipifarnib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, or Brain Stem Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-07

    Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  7. Brain plasticity, cognitive functions and neural stem cells: a pivotal role for the brain-specific neural master gene |-SRGAP2-FAM72-|.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Kutzner, Arne; Heese, Klaus

    2017-12-20

    Due to an aging society with an increased dementia-induced threat to higher cognitive functions, it has become imperative to understand the molecular and cellular events controlling the memory and learning processes in the brain. Here, we suggest that the novel master gene pair |-SRGAP2-FAM72-| (SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating the protein 2, family with sequence similarity to 72) reveals a new dogma for the regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) gene expression and is a distinctive player in the control of human brain plasticity. Insight into the specific regulation of the brain-specific neural master gene |-SRGAP2-FAM72-| may essentially contribute to novel therapeutic approaches to restore or improve higher cognitive functions.

  8. Biocompatibility of magnesium implants in primary human reaming debris-derived cells stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charyeva, Olga; Dakischew, Olga; Sommer, Ursula; Heiss, Christian; Schnettler, Reinhard; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Use of magnesium for resorbable metal implants is a new concept in orthopaedic and dental medicine. The majority of studies on magnesium's biocompatibility in vitro have assessed the short-term effect of magnesium extract on cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of direct exposure to magnesium alloys on the bioactivity of primary human reaming debris-derived (HRD) cells. Pure Mg, Mg2Ag, WE43 and Mg10Gd were tested for biocompatibility. The study consisted of assessment of cell viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, evaluation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content, and study of cell morphology under light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), along with determination of calcification and pH changes induced by magnesium. The number of viable cells in the presence of Mg2Ag was high over the entire observation period. Inhibition of ALP content in osteogenic differentiating HRD was caused by pure Mg at day 14 and 28. All other magnesium alloys did not affect the ALP content. Exposure of HRD to magnesium increased the amount of lysosomes and endocytotic vesicles. Cellular attachment was generally the best for those crystals that formed on the surface of all materials. A decrease was observed in Ca(2+) in the medium from day 1 to day 14. In terms of cell morphology, cell viability and differentiation, cell density and the effect on the surrounding pH, Mg2Ag showed the most promising results. All magnesium materials induced calcification, which is beneficial for orthopaedic and dental applications.

  9. Primary and Secondary Vestibular Connections in the Brain Stem and Cerebellum: An Axoplasmic Transport Study in the Monkey and Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-25

    CONTINUING EDUCATION TEACHINQ HOSPITALS WALTER REED ARMY MEDICAL CENTER NATIONAL NAVAL MEDICAL CENTER MALCOLM GROW AIR FORCE MEDICAL CENTER WILFORD HALL...AIR FORCE MEDICAL CENTER APPROVAL SHEET Title of Thesis: Primary and Secondary Vestibular Connections in the Brain Stem and Cerebellum Name of...the Labyrinth 11 TABLE II: HRP Injections of the Labyrinth , 12 TABLE III: HRP Injections of the Vestibular Nuclei 13 TABLE IV: I, sotope Injections

  10. Neuroanesthesia management of neurosurgery of brain stem tumor requiring neurophysiology monitoring in an iMRI OT setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabbagh Abdulrahman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a rare case of ventrally exophytic pontine glioma describing operative and neuroanesthesia management. The combination of intraoperative neuromonitoring was used. It constituted: Brain stem evoked responses/potentials, Motor EP: recording from cranial nerve supplied muscle, and Sensory EP: Medial/tibial. Excision of the tumor was done with intra-operative magnatic resonance imaging (iMRI, which is considered a new modality.

  11. CRISPR/Cas9-induced disruption of gene expression in mouse embryonic brain and single neural stem cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalebic, Nereo; Taverna, Elena; Tavano, Stefania; Wong, Fong Kuan; Suchold, Dana; Winkler, Sylke; Huttner, Wieland B; Sarov, Mihail

    2016-03-01

    We have applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system in vivo to disrupt gene expression in neural stem cells in the developing mammalian brain. Two days after in utero electroporation of a single plasmid encoding Cas9 and an appropriate guide RNA (gRNA) into the embryonic neocortex of Tis21::GFP knock-in mice, expression of GFP, which occurs specifically in neural stem cells committed to neurogenesis, was found to be nearly completely (≈ 90%) abolished in the progeny of the targeted cells. Importantly, upon in utero electroporation directly of recombinant Cas9/gRNA complex, near-maximal efficiency of disruption of GFP expression was achieved already after 24 h. Furthermore, by using microinjection of the Cas9 protein/gRNA complex into neural stem cells in organotypic slice culture, we obtained disruption of GFP expression within a single cell cycle. Finally, we used either Cas9 plasmid in utero electroporation or Cas9 protein complex microinjection to disrupt the expression of Eomes/Tbr2, a gene fundamental for neocortical neurogenesis. This resulted in a reduction in basal progenitors and an increase in neuronal differentiation. Thus, the present in vivo application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in neural stem cells provides a rapid, efficient and enduring disruption of expression of specific genes to dissect their role in mammalian brain development. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  12. Recovery function of the human brain stem auditory-evoked potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevanishvili, Z; Lagidze, Z

    1979-01-01

    Amplitude reduction and peak latency prolongation were observed in the human brain stem auditory-evoked potential (BEP) with preceding (conditioning) stimulation. At a conditioning interval (CI) of 5 ms the alteration of BEP was greater than at a CI of 10 ms. At a CI of 10 ms the amplitudes of some BEP components (e.g. waves I and II) were more decreased than those of others (e.g. wave V), while the peak latency prolongation did not show any obvious component selectivity. At a CI of 5 ms, the extent of the amplitude decrement of individual BEP components differed less, while the increase in the peak latencies of the later components was greater than that of the earlier components. The alterations of the parameters of the test BEPs at both CIs are ascribed to the desynchronization of intrinsic neural events. The differential amplitude reduction at a CI of 10 ms is explained by the different durations of neural firings determining various effects of desynchronization upon the amplitudes of individual BEP components. The decrease in the extent of the component selectivity and the preferential increase in the peak latencies of the later BEP components observed at a CI of 5 ms are explained by the intensification of the mechanism of the relative refractory period.

  13. Neural stem cells show bidirectional experience-dependent plasticity in the perinatal mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippin, Tod E; Cain, Sean W; Masum, Zahra; Ralph, Martin R

    2004-03-17

    Many of the effects of prenatal stress on the endocrine function, brain morphology, and behavior in mammals can be reversed by brief sessions of postnatal separation and handling. We have tested the hypothesis that the effects of both the prenatal and postnatal experiences are mediated by negative and positive regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) number during critical stages in neurodevelopment. We used the in vitro clonal neurosphere assay to quantify NSCs in hamsters that had experienced prenatal stress (maternal restraint stress for 2 hr per day, for the last 7 d of gestation), postnatal handling (maternal-offspring separation for 15 min per day during postnatal days 1-21), orboth. Prenatal stress reduced the number of NSCs derived from the subependyma of the lateral ventricle. The effect was already present at postnatal day 1 and persisted into adulthood (at least 14 months of age). Similarly, prenatal stress reduced in vivo proliferation in the adult subependyma of the lateral ventricle. Conversely, postnatal handling increased NSC number and reversed the effect of prenatal stress. The effects of prenatal stress on NSCs and proliferation and the effect of postnatal handling on NSCs did not differ between male and females. The findings demonstrate that environmental factors can produce changes in NSC number that are present at birth and endure into late adulthood. These changes may underlie some of the behavioral effects produced by prenatal stress and postnatal handling.

  14. Moving stem cells to the clinic: potential and limitations for brain repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Julius A; Studer, Lorenz

    2015-04-08

    Stem cell-based therapies hold considerable promise for many currently devastating neurological disorders. Substantial progress has been made in the derivation of disease-relevant human donor cell populations. Behavioral data in relevant animal models of disease have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy for several cell-based approaches. Consequently, cGMP grade cell products are currently being developed for first in human clinical trials in select disorders. Despite the therapeutic promise, the presumed mechanism of action of donor cell populations often remains insufficiently validated. It depends greatly on the properties of the transplanted cell type and the underlying host pathology. Several new technologies have become available to probe mechanisms of action in real time and to manipulate in vivo cell function and integration to enhance therapeutic efficacy. Results from such studies generate crucial insight into the nature of brain repair that can be achieved today and push the boundaries of what may be possible in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Susceptibility-weighted imaging of the venous networks around the brain stem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Ming; Lin, Zhong-Xiao; Zhang, Nu [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China); Zhang, Xiao-Fen; Qiao, Hui-Huang; Chen, Cheng-Chun [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Human Anatomy, Wenzhou (China); Ren, Chuan-Gen; Li, Jian-Ce [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Radiology, The 1nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China)

    2014-10-18

    The venous network of the brainstem is complex and significant. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a practical technique which is sensitive to veins, especially tiny veins. Our purpose of this study was to evaluate the visualization of the venous network of brainstem by using SWI at 3.0 T. The occurrence rate of each superficial veins of brainstem was evaluated by using SWI on a 3 T MR imaging system in 60 volunteers. The diameter of the lateral mesencephalic vein and peduncular vein were measured by SWI using the reconstructed mIP images in the sagittal view. And the outflow of the veins of brainstem were studied and described according to the reconstructed images. The median anterior pontomesencephalic vein, median anterior medullary vein, peduncular vein, right vein of the pontomesencephalic sulcus, and right lateral anterior pontomesencephalic vein were detected in all the subjects (100 %). The outer diameter of peduncular vein was 1.38 ± 0.26 mm (range 0.8-1.8 mm). The lateral mesencephalic vein was found in 75 % of the subjects and the mean outer diameter was 0.81 ± 0.2 mm (range 0.5-1.2 mm). The inner veins of mesencephalon were found by using SWI. The venous networks around the brain stem can be visualized by SWI clearly. This result can not only provide data for anatomical study, but also may be available for the surgical planning in the infratentorial region. (orig.)

  16. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xue-man; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fei; Yuan, Yi; Luo, Min

    2016-01-01

    The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 μg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery. PMID:27212930

  17. Brain stem tumors in children - therapeutic results in patients of the University Children's Hospital of Cracow in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korab-Chrzanowska, E.; Bartoszewska, J.; Kwiatkowski, S.

    2005-01-01

    To analyse the treatment results achieved in children treated for brain stem tumours at one institution between the years 1990 and 2004. Material. 20 patients (10 girls, 10 boys) aged 2.8-15.6 years were treated for brain stem tumors at the University Children's Hospital of Cracow (UCHC) in the years 1990-2004. The tumour type was defined basing on imaging studies (CT, MRI), and, in the case of 7 patients, additionally basing on histopathological results. In the collected material the predominant tumor type was benign glioma, detected in 17 patients. Malignant gliomas were diagnosed in 3 children. 7 children were treated by radiotherapy only. Surgical procedures and adjuvant radiotherapy were employed in 3 patients. 6 children underwent radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Combined surgical treatment followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy was employed in 4 patients. Of the 20 patients 6 have died (30%). The surviving group (70%) includes 1 patient with tumor progression (5%), 5 - with stable tumors (25%), and 8 (40%) - with tumor regression. The probability of three-year overall survival for the entire group as calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method was 70% while the probability of three-year progression-free survival was 65%. Conclusions. Diffuse brain stem tumors, mostly those involving the pons, and malignant gliomas have poor prognosis. In the presented material we achieved the best treatment results in patients with exophytic or focal tumors, treated surgically with adjuvant therapy. (author)

  18. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-man Lv

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 µg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery.

  19. [Comprehensive management of a child with a post-traumatic brain stem and spinal cord injury. A case study and presentation of current therapeutic modalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylarz, Krzysztof; Kwiatkowski, Stanisław; Inglot, Barbara; Mróz, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Less than twenty years ago, a high spinal cord injury accompanied by paralysis of the diaphragm and the resulting apnea and tetraplegia led to certain death within a short time after the trauma, mostly due to respiratory complications associated with ventilatory therapy in hospitals. The objective of this paper is to present the case of a paediatric brain stem trauma with spinal cord injury, consisting of spinal cord rupture in the upper cervical segment. Thanks to appropriate management at all treatment stages (prompt, fully professional assistance in the ambulance, followed by appropriate management at ICU), the child survived. Owing to currently available technical solutions, the boy has achieved considerable self-dependence and an opportunity of having post-traumatic complications treated using a diaphragm pacing stimulator and a baclofen pump. The report presents therapeutic problems encountered in children with post-traumatic spinal cord injury, emphasizing technical opportunities of managing diaphragm paralysis, as exemplified by the five-year treatment and rehabilitation process of a boy with spinal cord injury at C1 level managed at the University Children's Hospital of Cracow, Poland, in whom phrenic nerve stimulation was employed. The implanted stimulator and a specially constructed controller have allowed the boy to achieve mobility using a wheelchair, being able to use a PC and being taught by an individual teacher at home despite his tetraparesis. Recurrent respiratory tract infections and occasional decubitus required periodic hospitalizations. As the patient grew, in consequence of uncontrolled sudden increases of muscle tone of the trunk spine. Increased muscle tone was increasingly resistant to pharmacotherapy and negatively affected the effectiveness of home rehabilitation. In consequence, a decision was made to implant an intraspinal baclofen pump.

  20. Nonhermetic Encapsulation Materials for MEMS-Based Movable Microelectrodes for Long-Term Implantation in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Nathan; Anand, Sindhu; Okandan, Murat; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we have fabricated and tested several composite materials with a mesh matrix, which are used as encapsulation materials for a novel implantable movable-microelectrode microelectromechanical-system (MEMS) device. Since movable microelectrodes extend off the edge of the MEMS chip and penetrate the brain, a hermetically sealed encapsulation was not feasible. An encapsulation material is needed to prevent cerebral-spinal-fluid entry that could cause failure of the MEMS device and, at the same time, allow for penetration by the microelectrodes. Testing of potential encapsulation materials included penetration-force measurements, gross-leak testing, maximum-pressure testing, and biocompatibility testing. Penetration-force tests showed that untreated mesh matrices and silicone-gel-mesh composites required the least amount of force to penetrate for both nylon 6,6 and polypropylene meshes. The silicone-gel-, poly(dimethylsiloxane)-, polyimide-, and fluoroacrylate-mesh composites with the nylon-mesh matrix were all able to withstand pressures above the normal intracranial pressures. Fourier-transform infrared-spectroscopy analysis and visual inspection of the implanted devices encapsulated by the silicone-gel-mesh composite showed that there was no fluid or debris entry at two and four weeks postimplantation. We conclude that a composite of nylon and silicone-gel meshes will meet the needs of the new generation of implantable devices that require nonhermetic encapsulation. PMID:20414474

  1. Construction and modeling of a reconfigurable MRI coil for lowering SAR in patients with deep brain stimulation implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Iacono, Maria Ida; Keil, Boris; Angelone, Leonardo M; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Fox, Michael D; Herrington, Todd; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; LaPierre, Cristen; Mareyam, Azma; Wald, Lawrence L

    2017-02-15

    Post-operative MRI of patients with deep brain simulation (DBS) implants is useful to assess complications and diagnose comorbidities, however more than one third of medical centers do not perform MRIs on this patient population due to stringent safety restrictions and liability risks. A new system of reconfigurable magnetic resonance imaging head coil composed of a rotatable linearly-polarized birdcage transmitter and a close-fitting 32-channel receive array is presented for low-SAR imaging of patients with DBS implants. The novel system works by generating a region with low electric field magnitude and steering it to coincide with the DBS lead trajectory. We demonstrate that the new coil system substantially reduces the SAR amplification around DBS electrodes compared to commercially available circularly polarized coils in a cohort of 9 patient-derived realistic DBS lead trajectories. We also show that the optimal coil configuration can be reliably identified from the image artifact on B 1 + field maps. Our preliminary results suggest that such a system may provide a viable solution for high-resolution imaging of DBS patients in the future. More data is needed to quantify safety limits and recommend imaging protocols before the novel coil system can be used on patients with DBS implants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Real Time Imaging of Biomarkers in the Parkinson's Brain Using Mini-Implantable Biosensors. II. Pharmaceutical Therapy with Bromocriptine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Broderick

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We used Neuromolecular Imaging (NMI and trademarked BRODERICK PROBE® mini-implantable biosensors, to selectively and separately detect neurotransmitters in vivo, on line, within seconds in the dorsal striatal brain of the Parkinson’s Disease (PD animal model. We directly compared our results derived from PD to the normal striatal brain of the non-Parkinson’s Disease (non-PD animal. This advanced biotechnology enabled the imaging of dopamine (DA, serotonin (5-HT, homovanillic acid (HVA a metabolite of DA, L-tryptophan (L-TP a precursor to 5-HT and peptides, dynorphin A 1-17 (Dyn A and somatostatin (somatostatin releasing inhibitory factor (SRIF. Each neurotransmitter and neurochemical was imaged at a signature electroactive oxidation/half-wave potential in dorsal striatum of the PD as compared with the non-PD animal. Both endogenous and bromocriptine-treated neurochemical profiles in PD and non-PD were imaged using the same experimental paradigm and detection sensitivities. Results showed that we have found significant neurotransmitter peptide biomarkers in the dorsal striatal brain of endogenous and bromocriptine-treated PD animals. The peptide biomarkers were not imaged in dorsal striatal brain of non-PD animals, either endogenously or bromocriptine-treated. These findings provide new pharmacotherapeutic strategies for PD patients. Thus, our findings are highly applicable to the clinical treatment of PD.

  3. Influence of the implanted pulse generator as reference electrode in finite element model of monopolar deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walckiers, Grégoire; Fuchs, Benjamin; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Mosig, Juan R; Pollo, Claudio

    2010-01-30

    Electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an efficient method to treat movement disorders. Many models of DBS, based mostly on finite elements, have recently been proposed to better understand the interaction between the electrical stimulation and the brain tissues. In monopolar DBS, clinically widely used, the implanted pulse generator (IPG) is used as reference electrode (RE). In this paper, the influence of the RE model of monopolar DBS is investigated. For that purpose, a finite element model of the full electric loop including the head, the neck and the superior chest is used. Head, neck and superior chest are made of simple structures such as parallelepipeds and cylinders. The tissues surrounding the electrode are accurately modelled from data provided by the diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). Three different configurations of RE are compared with a commonly used model of reduced size. The electrical impedance seen by the DBS system and the potential distribution are computed for each model. Moreover, axons are modelled to compute the area of tissue activated by stimulation. Results show that these indicators are influenced by the surface and position of the RE. The use of a RE model corresponding to the implanted device rather than the usually simplified model leads to an increase of the system impedance (+48%) and a reduction of the area of activated tissue (-15%). (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Scientific and ethical issues related to stem cell research and interventions in neurodegenerative disorders of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Roger A; de Beaufort, Inez

    2013-11-01

    Should patients with Parkinson's disease participate in research involving stem cell treatments? Are induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) the ethical solution to the moral issues regarding embryonic stem cells? How can we adapt trial designs to best assess small numbers of patients in receipt of invasive experimental therapies? Over the last 20 years there has been a revolution in our ability to make stem cells from different sources and use them for therapeutic gain in disorders of the brain. These cells, which are defined by their capacity to proliferate indefinitely as well as differentiate into selective phenotypic cell types, are viewed as being especially attractive for studying disease processes and for grafting in patients with chronic incurable neurodegenerative disorders of the CNS such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In this review we briefly discuss and summarise where our understanding of stem cell biology has taken us relative to the clinic and patients, before dealing with some of the major ethical issues that work of this nature generates. This includes issues to do with the source of the cells, their ownership and exploitation along with questions about patient recruitment, consent and trial design when they translate to the clinic for therapeutic use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Learning and memory amelioration of transplantation of the neural stem cells modified with human brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene on Alzheimer disease model rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiying; Hu, Haitao; Feng, Gaifeng

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the memory amelioration of the Alzheimer disease (AD) model rat after being transplanted the single neural stem cells (NSC) and NSC modified with human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) gene. Forty SD rats were divided evenly into 4 groups randomly. The AD model rats were made by cutting unilaterally the fibria-fornix of male rats. Ten to twelve days after surgery, the genetically modified and unmodified NSC were implanted into the lateral cerebral ventricle of group III and group IV respectively. Two weeks after transplantation, the amelioration of memory impairment of the rats was detected by Morris water maze. The average escaping latency of the group III and group IV (41.84 +/- 21.76 s, 25.23 +/- 17.06 s respectively) was shorter than that of the group II (70.91 +/- 23.67 s) (P0.05). More lineal and oriented strategies were used in group IV. The behavioral amelioration of AD model rat was obtained by transplanting single NSC and hBDNF-gene-modified NSC. The effect of the NSC group modified with hBDNF gene is better than that of the group III.

  6. Study of the bone behavior around a neck preserving short stem implant: bone densitometric analysis over a span of two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafy, Tarek Abdel; Sayed, Adel; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Study the bone mineral density (BMD) changes and the remodelling process after implantation of a neck preserving short stem implant over a period of two years. Using specific patients' selection criterion, a prospective study was done including 26 patients. All were operated upon by a single surgeon using the MiniHipTM, (Corin, Cirencester, UK). Mean age was 42.5 years. Clinical and radiological evaluation was done. Periprosthetic bone density was measured by DEXA. First scan was obtained within 10 days after surgery and served as a baseline for comparison. The mean pre-operative Harris Hip score of 37.8 increased to 95.1 points two years post-operatively. BMD in the overall periprosthetic area showed a significant reduction during the first three months. Restoration to the original levels was reached in all zones except the most proximal zones at one year. A net increase was detected (+3%) after two years. The neck preserving MiniHip short stem implant has proven to be a bone-friendly design. Significant bone remodeling process continues after the first year. Although bone resorption in the greater trochanteric region is still a problem, however, it has proven that the BMD in all the other periprosthetic regions including the calcar and the lesser trochanteric regions, are subjected to bone formation process over a period of two years. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2016.

  7. Imaging long-term fate of intramyocardially implanted mesenchymal stem cells in a porcine myocardial infarction model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson C Perin

    Full Text Available The long-term fate of stem cells after intramyocardial delivery is unknown. We used noninvasive, repetitive PET/CT imaging with [(18F]FEAU to monitor the long-term (up to 5 months spatial-temporal dynamics of MSCs retrovirally transduced with the sr39HSV1-tk gene (sr39HSV1-tk-MSC and implanted intramyocardially in pigs with induced acute myocardial infarction. Repetitive [(18F]FEAU PET/CT revealed a biphasic pattern of sr39HSV1-tk-MSC dynamics; cell proliferation peaked at 33-35 days after injection, in periinfarct regions and the major cardiac lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes. The sr39HSV1-tk-MSC-associated [(18F]FEAU signals gradually decreased thereafter. Cardiac lymphography studies using PG-Gd-NIRF813 contrast for MRI and near-infrared fluorescence imaging showed rapid clearance of the contrast from the site of intramyocardial injection through the subepicardial lymphatic network into the lymphatic vessels and periaortic lymph nodes. Immunohistochemical analysis of cardiac tissue obtained at 35 and 150 days demonstrated several types of sr39HSV1-tk expressing cells, including fibro-myoblasts, lymphovascular cells, and microvascular and arterial endothelium. In summary, this study demonstrated the feasibility and sensitivity of [(18F]FEAU PET/CT imaging for long-term, in-vivo monitoring (up to 5 months of the fate of intramyocardially injected sr39HSV1-tk-MSC cells. Intramyocardially transplanted MSCs appear to integrate into the lymphatic endothelium and may help improve myocardial lymphatic system function after MI.

  8. Atomic layer deposited TiO2 for implantable brain-chip interfacing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianci, E.; Lattanzio, S.; Seguini, G.; Vassanelli, S.; Fanciulli, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigated atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO 2 thin films deposited on implantable neuro-chips based on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor (EOS) junctions, implementing both efficient capacitive neuron-silicon coupling and biocompatibility for long-term implantable functionality. The ALD process was performed at 295 °C using titanium tetraisopropoxide and ozone as precursors on needle-shaped silicon substrates. Engineering of the capacitance of the EOS junctions introducing a thin Al 2 O 3 buffer layer between TiO 2 and silicon resulted in a further increase of the specific capacitance. Biocompatibility for long-term implantable neuroprosthetic systems was checked upon in-vitro treatment.

  9. Atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} for implantable brain-chip interfacing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianci, E., E-mail: elena.cianci@mdm.imm.cnr.it [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Lattanzio, S. [Istituto di Fisiologia, Dipartimento di Anatomia Umana e Fisiologia, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Seguini, G. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Vassanelli, S. [Istituto di Fisiologia, Dipartimento di Anatomia Umana e Fisiologia, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we investigated atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited on implantable neuro-chips based on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor (EOS) junctions, implementing both efficient capacitive neuron-silicon coupling and biocompatibility for long-term implantable functionality. The ALD process was performed at 295 Degree-Sign C using titanium tetraisopropoxide and ozone as precursors on needle-shaped silicon substrates. Engineering of the capacitance of the EOS junctions introducing a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer between TiO{sub 2} and silicon resulted in a further increase of the specific capacitance. Biocompatibility for long-term implantable neuroprosthetic systems was checked upon in-vitro treatment.

  10. Early morphologic and spectroscopic magnetic resonance in severe traumatic brain injuries can detect "invisible brain stem damage" and predict "vegetative states".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Galanaud, Damien; Puybasset, Louis; Muller, Jean-Charles; Lescot, Thomas; Boch, Anne-Laure; Riedl, Valentin; Riedl, Vincent; Cornu, Philippe; Coriat, Pierre; Dormont, Didier; van Effenterre, Remy

    2006-05-01

    A precise evaluation of the brain damage in the first days of severe traumatic brain injured (TBI) patients is still uncertain despite numerous available cerebral evaluation methods and imaging. In 5-10% of severe TBI patients, clinicians remain concerned with prolonged coma and long-term marked cognitive impairment unexplained by normal morphological T2 star, flair, and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this reason, we prospectively assessed the potential value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain stem to evaluate the functionality of the consciousness areas. Forty consecutive patients with severe TBI were included. Single voxel proton MRS of the brain stem and morphological MRI of the whole brain were performed at day 17.5 +/- 6.4. Disability Rating Scale and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) were evaluated at 18 months posttrauma. MRS appeared to be a reliable tool in the exploration of brainstem metabolism in TBI. Three different spectra were observed (normal, cholinergic reaction, or neuronal damage) allowing an evaluation of functional damage. MRS disturbances were not correlated with anatomical MRI lesions suggesting that the two techniques are strongly complementarity. In two GOS 2 vegetative patients with normal morphological MRI, MRS detected severe functional damage of the brainstem (NAA/Cr brain stem damage." MRI and MRS taken separately could not distinguish patients GOS 3 (n = 7) from GOS 1-2 (n = 11) and GOS 4-5 (n = 20). However, a principal component analysis of combined MRI and MRS data enabled a clear-cut separation between GOS 1-2, GOS 3, and GOS 4-5 patients with no overlap between groups. This study showed that combined MRI and MRS provide a reliable evaluation of patients presenting in deep coma, specially when there are insufficient MRI lesions of the consciousness pathways to explain their status. In the first few days post-trauma metabolic (brainstem spectroscopy) and morphological (T2 star and Flair) MRI studies

  11. The role of CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)12-CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)4 signalling in the migration of neural stem cells towards a brain tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, A. A. E.; Biber, K.; Lukovac, S.; Balasubramaniyan, V.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Mooij, J. J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: It has been shown that neural stem cells (NSCs) migrate towards areas of brain injury or brain tumours and that NSCs have the capacity to track infiltrating tumour cells. The possible mechanism behind the migratory behaviour of NSCs is not yet completely understood. As chemokines are involved

  12. Fine Adhesion Patterning and Aligned Nuclei Orientation of Mesenchymal Stem Cell on Narrow Line-Width of Silicone Rubber Implanted by Carbon Negative Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommani, Piyanuch; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Takaoka, Gikan H.

    Fine cell-adhesion patterning and nuclei orientation control on silicone rubber were investigated by limiting line-width of carbon negative-ion implantation. The ions were implanted at 3×1015 ions/cm2 and 10 keV through masks of ridge-pattern and rectangle-pattern with various slit apertures of 0-40 μm in width. After 2 days culture, nuclei of rat mesenchymal stem cells were stained with fluorescent dye to evaluate the nuclei positions at each tip ridge-region and the relative angles between the major axis of ellipse-shape nuclei and the implanted line-region. Results showed the individual nucleus arrangement along the narrow line-widths of 3-12 μm and the gathered one on the wider line-width. Number of nuclei orientation in the angle range of 0°-10° increased to 79% on the line-width of 10 μm. As a result, the fine cell-adhesion patterning and nuclei orientation could be achieved by decreasing the implanted line-width to 10 μm.

  13. Development of an implantable wireless ECoG 128ch recording device for clinical brain machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kojiro; Hirata, Masayuki; Suzuki, Takafumi; Ando, Hiroshi; Ota, Yuki; Sato, Fumihiro; Morris, Shyne; Yoshida, Takeshi; Matsuki, Hidetoshi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2013-01-01

    Brain Machine Interface (BMI) is a system that assumes user's intention by analyzing user's brain activities and control devices with the assumed intention. It is considered as one of prospective tools to enhance paralyzed patients' quality of life. In our group, we especially focus on ECoG (electro-corti-gram)-BMI, which requires surgery to place electrodes on the cortex. We try to implant all the devices within the patient's head and abdomen and to transmit the data and power wirelessly. Our device consists of 5 parts: (1) High-density multi-electrodes with a 3D shaped sheet fitting to the individual brain surface to effectively record the ECoG signals; (2) A small circuit board with two integrated circuit chips functioning 128 [ch] analogue amplifiers and A/D converters for ECoG signals; (3) A Wifi data communication & control circuit with the target PC; (4) A non-contact power supply transmitting electrical power minimum 400[mW] to the device 20[mm] away. We developed those devices, integrated them, and, investigated the performance.

  14. Real-time monitoring of brain tissue oxygen using a miniaturized biotelemetric device implanted in freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzu, Gianfranco; Puggioni, Giulia G M; Dedola, Sonia; Calia, Giammario; Rocchitta, Gaia; Migheli, Rossana; Desole, Maria S; Lowry, John P; O'Neill, Robert D; Serra, Pier A

    2009-03-15

    A miniaturized biotelemetric device for the amperometric detection of brain tissue oxygen is presented. The new system, derived from a previous design, has been coupled with a carbon microsensor for the real-time detection of dissolved O(2) in the striatum of freely moving rats. The implantable device consists of a single-supply sensor driver, a current-to-voltage converter, a microcontroller, and a miniaturized data transmitter. The oxygen current is converted to a digital value by means of an analog-to-digital converter integrated in a peripheral interface controller (PIC). The digital data is sent to a personal computer using a six-byte packet protocol by means of a miniaturized 434 MHz amplitude modulation (AM) transmitter. The receiver unit is connected to a personal computer (PC) via a universal serial bus. Custom developed software allows the PC to store and plot received data. The electronics were calibrated and tested in vitro under different experimental conditions and exhibited high stability, low power consumption, and good linear response in the nanoampere current range. The in vivo results confirmed previously published observations on oxygen dynamics in the striatum of freely moving rats. The system serves as a rapid and reliable model for studying the effects of different drugs on brain oxygen and brain blood flow and it is suited to work with direct-reduction sensors or O(2)-consuming biosensors.

  15. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Meyer, Morten; Petterson, Stine Asferg

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking...... invasion and tumor stemness into account. METHODS: Glioblastoma stem cell-like containing spheroid (GSS) cultures derived from three different patients were established and characterized. The spheroids were implanted in vitro into rat brain slice cultures grown in stem cell medium and in vivo into brains...... of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models. RESULTS: We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice...

  16. Near-Field Inductive-Coupling Link to Power a Three-Dimensional Millimeter-Size Antenna for Brain Implantable Medical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoufali, Mohamed; Bialkowski, Konstanty; Mohammed, Beadaa Jasem; Mills, Paul C; Abbosh, Amin

    2018-01-01

    Near-field inductive-coupling link can establish a reliable power source to a batteryless implantable medical device based on Faraday's law of induction. In this paper, the design, modeling, and experimental verification of an inductive-coupling link between an off-body loop antenna and a 0.9  three-dimensional (3-D) bowtie brain implantable antenna is presented. To ensure reliability of the design, the implantable antenna is embedded in the cerebral spinal fluid of a realistic human head model. Exposure, temperature, and propagation simulations of the near electromagnetic fields in a frequency-dispersive head model were carried out to comply with the IEEE safety standards. Concertedly, a fabrication process for the implantable antenna is proposed, which can be extended to devise and miniaturize different 3-D geometric shapes. The performance of the proposed inductive link was tested in a biological environment; in vitro measurements of the fabricated prototypes were carried in a pig's head and piglet. The measurements of the link gain demonstrated   in the pig's head and   in piglet. The in vitro measurement results showed that the proposed 3-D implantable antenna is suitable for integration with a miniaturized batteryless brain implantable medical device (BIMD).

  17. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Brain Imaging Investigation of Phonological Awareness and Passage Comprehension Abilities in Adult Recipients of Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisconti, Silvia; Shulkin, Masha; Hu, Xiaosu; Basura, Gregory J.; Kileny, Paul R.; Kovelman, Ioulia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine how the brains of individuals with cochlear implants (CIs) respond to spoken language tasks that underlie successful language acquisition and processing. Method: During functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging, CI recipients with hearing impairment (n = 10, mean age: 52.7 ± 17.3 years) and…

  18. Variation of radiation-sensitivity of neural stem and progenitor cell populations within the developing mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etienne, Olivier; Roque, Telma; Haton, Celine; Boussin, Francois D.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the DNA damage response (DDR) of fetal neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPC), since exposure to ionizing radiation can severely impair the brain development. We compared apoptosis induction in the dorsal tel-encephalon and the lateral ganglionic eminences (LGE) of mouse embryos after an in utero irradiation. We used two thymidine analogs, together with the physical position of nuclei within brain structures, to determine the fate of irradiated NSPC. NSPC did not activate an apparent protein 21(p21)- dependent G1/S checkpoint within the LGE as their counterparts within the dorsal tel-encephalon. However, the levels of radiation induced apoptosis differed between the two tel-encephalic regions, due to the high radiation sensitivity of intermediate progenitors of the LGE. Besides radial glial cells, that function as neural stem cells, were more resistant and were reoriented toward self-renewing within hours following irradiation. The lack of the p21-dependent-cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition appears to be a general feature of NSPC in the developing brain. However, we found variation of radiation response in function of the types of NSPC. Factors involved in DDR and those involved in the regulation of neurogenesis are intricately linked in determining the cell fate after irradiations. (authors)

  19. Human Neural Stem Cell Transplantation-Mediated Alteration of Microglial/Macrophage Phenotypes after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junling; Grill, Raymond J; Dunn, Tiffany J; Bedi, Supinder; Labastida, Javier Allende; Hetz, Robert A; Xue, Hasen; Thonhoff, Jason R; DeWitt, Douglas S; Prough, Donald S; Cox, Charles S; Wu, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) promote recovery from brain trauma, but neuronal replacement is unlikely the sole underlying mechanism. We hypothesize that grafted NSCs enhance neural repair at least partially through modulating the host immune response after traumatic brain injury (TBI). C57BL/6 mice were intracerebrally injected with primed human NSCs (hNSCs) or vehicle 24 h after a severe controlled cortical impact injury. Six days after transplantation, brain tissues were collected for Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Observations included indicators of microglia/macrophage activation, M1 and M2 phenotypes, axonal injury detected by amyloid precursor protein (APP), lesion size, and the fate of grafted hNSCs. Animals receiving hNSC transplantation did not show significant decreases of brain lesion volumes compared to transplantation procedures with vehicle alone, but did show significantly reduced injury-dependent accumulation of APP. Furthermore, intracerebral transplantation of hNSCs reduced microglial activation as shown by a diminished intensity of Iba1 immunostaining and a transition of microglia/macrophages toward the M2 anti-inflammatory phenotype. The latter was represented by an increase in the brain M2/M1 ratio and increases of M2 microglial proteins. These phenotypic switches were accompanied by the increased expression of anti-inflammatory interleukin-4 receptor α and decreased proinflammatory interferon-γ receptor β. Finally, grafted hNSCs mainly differentiated into neurons and were phagocytized by either M1 or M2 microglia/macrophages. Thus, intracerebral transplantation of primed hNSCs efficiently leads host microglia/macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory phenotype that presumably contributes to stem cell-mediated neuroprotective effects after severe TBI in mice.

  20. Deep brain stimulation: custom-made silicone-coated pulse-generator implantation after allergic reaction to generator compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthofer, Judith; Herbst, Andreas; Janzen, Annettte; Lange, Max; Brawanski, Alexander; Schlaier, Juergen

    2018-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease has become an established treatment option in recent years. The method and its application in clinical practice has proved to be safe and effective. Nevertheless, procedure-related and hardware-related complications occur. We present a rare case of a patient with an allergic reaction to the impulse generator. The patient suffered from delayed wound-healing deficits with several wound revisions and generator repositionings. After diagnosis of an allergic reaction to components of the generator, a custom-made silicon-coated model was implanted. Hereafter, no wound healing-deficit occurred throughout long-term follow-up. Allergic reaction to hardware components may lead to wound-healing deficits. In such cases, custom-made silicon-coated models may be an effective treatment option.

  1. Auditory neuroplasticity, hearing loss and cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryugo, David

    2015-07-01

    Data from our laboratory show that the auditory brain is highly malleable by experience. We establish a base of knowledge that describes the normal structure and workings at the initial stages of the central auditory system. This research is expanded to include the associated pathology in the auditory brain stem created by hearing loss. Utilizing the congenitally deaf white cat, we demonstrate the way that cells, synapses, and circuits are pathologically affected by sound deprivation. We further show that the restoration of auditory nerve activity via electrical stimulation through cochlear implants serves to correct key features of brain pathology caused by hearing loss. The data suggest that rigorous training with cochlear implants and/or hearing aids offers the promise of heretofore unattained benefits.

  2. A Hardware-Efficient Scalable Spike Sorting Neural Signal Processor Module for Implantable High-Channel-Count Brain Machine Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuning; Boling, Sam; Mason, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    Next-generation brain machine interfaces demand a high-channel-count neural recording system to wirelessly monitor activities of thousands of neurons. A hardware efficient neural signal processor (NSP) is greatly desirable to ease the data bandwidth bottleneck for a fully implantable wireless neural recording system. This paper demonstrates a complete multichannel spike sorting NSP module that incorporates all of the necessary spike detector, feature extractor, and spike classifier blocks. To meet high-channel-count and implantability demands, each block was designed to be highly hardware efficient and scalable while sharing resources efficiently among multiple channels. To process multiple channels in parallel, scalability analysis was performed, and the utilization of each block was optimized according to its input data statistics and the power, area and/or speed of each block. Based on this analysis, a prototype 32-channel spike sorting NSP scalable module was designed and tested on an FPGA using synthesized datasets over a wide range of signal to noise ratios. The design was mapped to 130 nm CMOS to achieve 0.75 μW power and 0.023 mm 2 area consumptions per channel based on post synthesis simulation results, which permits scalability of digital processing to 690 channels on a 4×4 mm 2 electrode array.

  3. CD44v6 regulates growth of brain tumor stem cells partially through the AKT-mediated pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Jijiwa

    Full Text Available Identification of stem cell-like brain tumor cells (brain tumor stem-like cells; BTSC has gained substantial attention by scientists and physicians. However, the mechanism of tumor initiation and proliferation is still poorly understood. CD44 is a cell surface protein linked to tumorigenesis in various cancers. In particular, one of its variant isoforms, CD44v6, is associated with several cancer types. To date its expression and function in BTSC is yet to be identified. Here, we demonstrate the presence and function of the variant form 6 of CD44 (CD44v6 in BTSC of a subset of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Patients with CD44(high GBM exhibited significantly poorer prognoses. Among various variant forms, CD44v6 was the only isoform that was detected in BTSC and its knockdown inhibited in vitro growth of BTSC from CD44(high GBM but not from CD44(low GBM. In contrast, this siRNA-mediated growth inhibition was not apparent in the matched GBM sample that does not possess stem-like properties. Stimulation with a CD44v6 ligand, osteopontin (OPN, increased expression of phosphorylated AKT in CD44(high GBM, but not in CD44(low GBM. Lastly, in a mouse spontaneous intracranial tumor model, CD44v6 was abundantly expressed by tumor precursors, in contrast to no detectable CD44v6 expression in normal neural precursors. Furthermore, overexpression of mouse CD44v6 or OPN, but not its dominant negative form, resulted in enhanced growth of the mouse tumor stem-like cells in vitro. Collectively, these data indicate that a subset of GBM expresses high CD44 in BTSC, and its growth may depend on CD44v6/AKT pathway.

  4. Brain implants for substituting lost motor function: state of the art and potential impact on the lives of motor-impaired seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, N F; Aarnoutse, E J; Vansteensel, M J

    2014-01-01

    Recent scientific achievements bring the concept of neural prosthetics for reinstating lost motor function closer to medical application. Current research involves severely paralyzed people under the age of 65, but implications for seniors with stroke or trauma-induced impairments are clearly on the horizon. Demographic changes will lead to a shortage of personnel to care for an increasing population of senior citizens, threatening maintenance of an acceptable level of care and urging ways for people to live longer at their home independent from personal assistance. This is particularly challenging when people suffer from disabilities such as partial paralysis after stroke or trauma, where daily personal assistance is required. For some of these people, neural prosthetics can reinstate some lost motor function and/or lost communication, thereby increasing independence and possibly quality of life. In this viewpoint article, we present the state of the art in decoding brain activity in the service of brain-computer interfacing. Although some noninvasive applications produce good results, we focus on brain implants that benefit from better quality brain signals. Fully implantable neural prostheses for home use are not available yet, but clinical trials are being prepared. More sophisticated systems are expected to follow in the years to come, with capabilities of interest for less severe paralysis. Eventually the combination of smart robotics and brain implants is expected to enable people to interact well enough with their environment to live an independent life in spite of motor disabilities. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Motor-Evoked Potential Confirmation of Functional Improvement by Transplanted Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell in the Ischemic Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dong-Kyu; Park, Sang-In; Han, Young-Min; Jang, Kyung-Sool; Park, Moon-Seo; Chung, Young-An; Kim, Min-Wook; Maeng, Lee-So; Huh, Pil-Woo; Yoo, Do-Sung; Jung, Seong-Whan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on the motor pathway in the transient ischemic rat brain that were transplanted through the carotid artery, measuring motor-evoked potential (MEP) in the four limbs muscle and the atlantooccipital membrane, which was elicited after monopolar and bipolar transcortical stimulation. After monopolar stimulation, the latency of MEP was significantly prolonged, and the amplitude was less reduced in the BMSC group in comparison with the control group (P < .05). MEPs induced by bipolar stimulation in the left forelimb could be measured in 40% of the BMSC group and the I wave that was not detected in the control group was also detected in 40% of the BMSC group. Our preliminary results imply that BMSCs transplanted to the ischemic rat brain mediate effects on the functional recovery of the cerebral motor cortex and the motor pathway. PMID:21772790

  6. Motor-Evoked Potential Confirmation of Functional Improvement by Transplanted Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell in the Ischemic Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Kyu Jang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs on the motor pathway in the transient ischemic rat brain that were transplanted through the carotid artery, measuring motor-evoked potential (MEP in the four limbs muscle and the atlantooccipital membrane, which was elicited after monopolar and bipolar transcortical stimulation. After monopolar stimulation, the latency of MEP was significantly prolonged, and the amplitude was less reduced in the BMSC group in comparison with the control group (<.05. MEPs induced by bipolar stimulation in the left forelimb could be measured in 40% of the BMSC group and the I wave that was not detected in the control group was also detected in 40% of the BMSC group. Our preliminary results imply that BMSCs transplanted to the ischemic rat brain mediate effects on the functional recovery of the cerebral motor cortex and the motor pathway.

  7. Implanted, inductively-coupled, radiofrequency coils fabricated on flexible polymeric material: Application to in vivo rat brain MRI at 7 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginefri, J.-C.; Rubin, A.; Tatoulian, M.; Woytasik, M.; Boumezbeur, F.; Djemaï, B.; Poirier-Quinot, M.; Lethimonnier, F.; Darrasse, L.; Dufour-Gergam, E.

    2012-11-01

    Combined with high-field MRI scanners, small implanted coils allow for high resolution imaging with locally improved SNR, as compared to external coils. Small flexible implantable coils dedicated to in vivo MRI of the rat brain at 7 T were developed. Based on the Multi-turn Transmission Line Resonator design, they were fabricated with a Teflon substrate using copper micromolding process and a specific metal-polymer adhesion treatment. The implanted coils were made biocompatible by PolyDimethylSiloxane (PDMS) encapsulation. The use of low loss tangent material achieves low dielectric losses within the substrate and the use of the PDMS layer reduces the parasitic coupling with the surrounding media. An implanted coil was implemented in a 7 T MRI system using inductive coupling and a dedicated external pick-up coil for signal transmission. In vivo images of the rat brain acquired with in plane resolution of (150 μm)2 thanks to the implanted coil revealed high SNR near the coil, allowing for the visualization of fine cerebral structures.

  8. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Skov Jensen

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking invasion and tumor stemness into account.Glioblastoma stem cell-like containing spheroid (GSS cultures derived from three different patients were established and characterized. The spheroids were implanted in vitro into rat brain slice cultures grown in stem cell medium and in vivo into brains of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models.We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice cultures both by confocal time-lapse microscopy and immunohistochemistry. This invasion closely resembled the invasion in vivo. The Ki-67 proliferation indexes in spheroids implanted into brain slices were lower than in free-floating spheroids. The expression of stem cell markers varied between free-floating spheroids, spheroids implanted into brain slices and tumors in vivo.The established invasion model kept in stem cell medium closely mimics tumor cell invasion into the brain in vivo preserving also to some extent the expression of stem cell markers. The model is feasible and robust and we suggest the model as an in vivo-like model with a great potential in glioma studies and drug discovery.

  9. Is this a brain which I see before me? Modeling human neural development with pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ikuo K; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre

    2015-09-15

    The human brain is arguably the most complex structure among living organisms. However, the specific mechanisms leading to this complexity remain incompletely understood, primarily because of the poor experimental accessibility of the human embryonic brain. Over recent years, technologies based on pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have been developed to generate neural cells of various types. While the translational potential of PSC technologies for disease modeling and/or cell replacement therapies is usually put forward as a rationale for their utility, they are also opening novel windows for direct observation and experimentation of the basic mechanisms of human brain development. PSC-based studies have revealed that a number of cardinal features of neural ontogenesis are remarkably conserved in human models, which can be studied in a reductionist fashion. They have also revealed species-specific features, which constitute attractive lines of investigation to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the human brain, and its link with evolution. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. A retinoic acid-enhanced, multicellular human blood-brain barrier model derived from stem cell sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2014-02-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) models are often used to investigate BBB function and screen brain-penetrating therapeutics, but it has been difficult to construct a human model that possesses an optimal BBB phenotype and is readily scalable. To address this challenge, we developed a human in vitro BBB model comprising brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), pericytes, astrocytes and neurons derived from renewable cell sources. First, retinoic acid (RA) was used to substantially enhance BBB phenotypes in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived BMECs, particularly through adherens junction, tight junction, and multidrug resistance protein regulation. RA-treated hPSC-derived BMECs were subsequently co-cultured with primary human brain pericytes and human astrocytes and neurons derived from human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to yield a fully human BBB model that possessed significant tightness as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (~5,000 Ωxcm2). Overall, this scalable human BBB model may enable a wide range of neuroscience studies.

  11. Overexpression of HIF-1α in mesenchymal stem cells contributes to repairing hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Deju; Zhou, Liping; Wang, Biao; Liu, Lizhen; Cong, Li; Hu, Chuanqin; Ge, Tingting; Yu, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical researches on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation, which is used to treat hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage, have received inspiring achievements. However, the insufficient migration of active cells to damaged tissues has limited their potential therapeutic effects. There are some evidences that hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) promotes the viability and migration of the cells. Here, we aim to investigate whether overexpression of HIF-1α in MSCs could improve the viability and migration capacity of cells, and its therapeutic efficiency on HI brain damage. In the study, MSCs with HIF-1α overexpression was achieved by recombinant lentiviral vector and transplanted to the rats subsequent to HI. Our data indicated that overexpression of HIF-1α promoted the viability and migration of MSCs, HIF-1α overexpressed MSCs also had a stronger therapeutic efficiency on HI brain damaged treatment by mitigating the injury on behavioral and histological changes evoked by HI insults, accompanied with more MSCs migrating to cerebral damaged area. This study demonstrated that HIF-1α overexpression could increase the MSCs' therapeutic efficiency in HI and the promotion of the cells' directional migration to cerebral HI area by overexpression may be responsible for it, which showed that transplantation of MSCs with HIF-1α overexpression is an attractive therapeutic option to treat HI-induced brain injury in the future. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical significance of measurement of serum NSE, NPY and TNF-α levels in pediatric patients with hand-foot and mouth disease complicated with brain stem encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Peiguang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum NSE, NPY and TNF-α levels in pediatric patients with hand-foot and mouth disease complicated with brain stem encephalitis. Methods: Serum NSE, NPY and TNF-α levels were determined with RIA in 34 pediatric patients with hand-foot and mouth disease complicated with brain stem encephalitis and 30 controls. Results: The serum NSE, NPY and TNF-α levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.01), Serum TNF-α and NSE, NPY levels were mutually positively correlated (r=0.4716, 0.5184, P<0.01). Conclusion: Detection of NSE, NPY and TNF-α levels was helpful for the prediction of treatment efficacy in patients with hand-foot and mouth disease complicated with brain stem encephalitis. (authors)

  13. A case of hypertrophic olivary degeneration after resection of cavernomas of the brain stem and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Meng Zhang, Gengfan Ye, Lin Deng, Shuo Xu, Yunyan Wang Department of Neurosurgery, Qi Lu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Hypertrophic olivary degeneration is a transsynaptic form of degeneration, which is also a result of primary or secondary lesion and can damage the dento-rubro-olivary pathway. The dento-rubro-olivary pathway was first described by Guillain and Mollaret and is referred to as “the triangle of Guillain and Mollaret”. Multiple factors can destroy the dento-rubro-olivary pathway, such as surgical operation, hemorrhage, tumor, trauma, inflammation, demyelination, degeneration, and radiation damage. All of the above factors can result in delayed hypertrophic olivary degeneration. Articles related to this disease cover etiology, clinical presentation, pathology changes, etc. However, to our knowledge, there has been no literature reporting the use of diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion tensor tractography to improve the diagnosis of hypertrophic olivary degeneration following resection of cavernomas in the brain stem. Herein, we report a case who was diagnosed with hypertrophic olivary degeneration following resection of cavernomas of the brain stem, verify the significance of diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion tensor tractography, and review previous literature. The development of imageology promotes and improves hypertrophic olivary degeneration diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Keywords: HOD, diffusion tensor imaging, diffusion tensor tractography

  14. Engineered HA hydrogel for stem cell transplantation in the brain: Biocompatibility data using a design of experiment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nih, Lina R; Moshayedi, Pouria; Llorente, Irene L; Berg, Andrew R; Cinkornpumin, Jessica; Lowry, William E; Segura, Tatiana; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2017-02-01

    This article presents data related to the research article "Systematic optimization of an engineered hydrogel allows for selective control of human neural stem cell survival and differentiation after transplantation in the stroke brain" (P. Moshayedi, L.R. Nih, I.L. Llorente, A.R. Berg, J. Cinkornpumin, W.E. Lowry et al., 2016) [1] and focuses on the biocompatibility aspects of the hydrogel, including its stiffness and the inflammatory response of the transplanted organ. We have developed an injectable hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel for stem cell culture and transplantation, to promote brain tissue repair after stroke. This 3D biomaterial was engineered to bind bioactive signals such as adhesive motifs, as well as releasing growth factors while supporting cell growth and tissue infiltration. We used a Design of Experiment approach to create a complex matrix environment in vitro by keeping the hydrogel platform and cell type constant across conditions while systematically varying peptide motifs and growth factors. The optimized HA hydrogel promoted survival of encapsulated human induced pluripotent stem cell derived-neural progenitor cells (iPS-NPCs) after transplantation into the stroke cavity and differentially tuned transplanted cell fate through the promotion of glial, neuronal or immature/progenitor states. The highlights of this article include: (1) Data of cell and bioactive signals addition on the hydrogel mechanical properties and growth factor diffusion, (2) the use of a design of Experiment (DOE) approach (M.W. 2 Weible and T. Chan-Ling, 2007) [2] to select multi-factorial experimental conditions, and (3) Inflammatory response and cell survival after transplantation.

  15. Intramyocardial implantation of differentiated rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells enhanced by TGF-β1 improves cardiac function in heart failure rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Y. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China); Liu, B. [Department of Pathology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou, Hebei (China); Wang, H.P. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou, Hebei (China); Zhang, L. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-05-31

    The present study tested the hypotheses that i) transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) enhances differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) towards the cardiomyogenic phenotype and ii) intramyocardial implantation of the TGF-β1-treated MSCs improves cardiac function in heart failure rats. MSCs were treated with different concentrations of TGF-β1 for 72 h, and then morphological characteristics, surface antigens and mRNA expression of several transcription factors were assessed. Intramyocardial implantation of these TGF-β1-treated MSCs to infarcted heart was also investigated. MSCs were initially spindle-shaped with irregular processes. On day 28 after TGF-β1 treatment, MSCs showed fusiform shape, orientating parallel with one another, and were connected with adjoining cells forming myotube-like structures. Immunofluorescence revealed the expression of cardiomyocyte-specific proteins, α-sarcomeric actin and troponin T, in these cells. The mRNA expression of GATA4 and Nkx2.5 genes was slightly increased on day 7, enhanced on day 14 and decreased on day 28 while α-MHC gene was not expressed on day 7, but expressed slightly on day 14 and enhanced on day 28. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the induced cells had myofilaments, z line-like substances, desmosomes, and gap junctions, in contrast with control cells. Furthermore, intramyocardial implantation of TGF-β1-treated MSCs to infarcted heart reduced scar area and increased the number of muscle cells. This structure regeneration was concomitant with the improvement of cardiac function, evidenced by decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, increased left ventricular systolic pressure and increased maximal positive pressure development rate. Taken together, these results indicate that intramyocardial implantation of differentiated MSCs enhanced by TGF-β1 improved cardiac function in heart failure rats.

  16. Biphasic response in number of stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells after left ventricular assist device implantation: A 6month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivak, Peter; Pitha, Jan; Wohlfahrt, Peter; Kralova Lesna, Ivana; Stavek, Petr; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Dorazilova, Zora; Hegarova, Marketa; Stepankova, Jitka; Maly, Jiri; Sekerkova, Alena; Turcani, Dominika; Netuka, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Continuous blood flow could have deleterious effects on endothelium and vascular health. This could have serious consequences in patients with heart failure treated with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). Therefore, we studied effect of LVAD on three circulating vascular biomarkers: stem cells (SC), endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and microparticles (MP). In 23 patients (5 women) with end-stage heart failure, SC, EPC and MP were measured before, and 3 and 6months after implantation of LVAD (HeartMate II). SC were defined using determination of surface antigen expression as mononuclear CD34+/CD45low+ cells and EPC as mononuclear CD34+/CD45low+/KDR+ cells. MP concentrations were determined by ELISA method. Three months after LVAD implantation numbers of SC and EPC significantly decreased (p=0.01 and p=0.001, respectively). On the contrary, between 3rd and 6th month after implantation they significantly increased (p=0.006 and p=0.003, respectively).MP did not change significantly during the study despite exerting similar trend as SC and EPC. Observed biphasic changes of SC and EPC might reflect two processes. First, shortly after LVAD implantation, improved tissue perfusion could lead to decrease in ischemic stimuli and ensuing decrease of SC and EPC. Second, continuous flow between 3rd and 6th month produced by LVAD could lead to increase of SC and EPC through activation of endothelium. This explanation could be supported also by similar trend in the changes of concentrations of MP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An interactive program system for the stereotactic interstitial implantation of radionuclids in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birg, W.; Schneider, J.; Bauer, S.; Mundinger, F.

    1979-01-01

    The dose-volume calculation in interstitial long time irradiation (Ir-192 and I-125) poses special problems in the case of cerebral tumors, due to the functional importance of neighboring structures. The knowledge of the isodose distribution is of vital importance. To overcome these problems the authors have developed an interactive program system using the data from CT-scans to localize the radioactive implants and to calculate the therapeutic activities. The CT-picture is projected by means of an epidiascope onto the working board of a digitizer. Then the tumor contours are fed in the computer under program control and the computer calculates the ''activity'' center of the tumor contour previously stored together with its mean radius. The corresponding isodose curves are plotted onto the graphic screen together with the tumor contours, and these can then be plotted onto a transparent X-ray film. (Auth.)

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ferumoxytol-Labeled Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Kyung; Kim, Hyeong Seop; Yoo, Dongkyeom; Hwang, Jung Won; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Chang, Jong Wook; Na, Duk L

    2017-02-01

    The success of stem cell therapy is highly dependent on accurate delivery of stem cells to the target site of interest. Possible ways to track the distribution of MSCs in vivo include the use of reporter genes or nanoparticles. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved ferumoxytol (Feraheme® [USA], Rienso® [UK]) as a treatment for iron deficiency anemia. Ferumoxytol is an ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (USPIO) that has recently been used to track the fate of transplanted cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The major objectives of this study were to demonstrate the feasibility of labeling hUCB-MSCs with ferumoxytol and to observe, through MRI, the engraftment of ferumoxytol-labeled human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) delivered via stereotactic injection into the hippocampi of a transgenic mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease (5XFAD). Ferumoxytol had no toxic effects on the viability or stemness of hUCB-MSCs when assessed in vitro. Through MRI, hypointense signals were discernible at the site where ferumoxytol-labeled human MSCs were injected. Iron-positive areas were also observed in the engrafted hippocampi. The results from this study support the use of nanoparticle labeling to monitor transplanted MSCs in real time as a follow-up for AD stem cell therapy in the clinical field.

  19. IL-6 deficiency leads to reduced metallothionein-I+II expression and increased oxidative stress in the brain stem after 6-aminonicotinamide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Hidalgo, J

    2000-01-01

    in brain stem gray matter areas and BM toxicity. In both normal and genetically IL-6-deficient mice (IL-6 knockout (IL-6KO) mice), the extent of astroglial degeneration/cell death in the brain stem was similar as determined from disappearance of GFAP immunoreactivity. In 6-AN-injected normal mice reactive......We examined the effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) deficiency on brain inflammation and the accompanying bone marrow (BM) leukopoiesis and spleen immune reaction after systemic administration of a niacin antagonist, 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN), which causes both astroglial degeneration/cell death...... tyrosine and malondialdehyde, was increased by 6-AN to a greater extent in IL-6KO mice. The blood-brain barrier to albumin was only disrupted in 6-AN-injected normal mice, which likely is due to the substantial migration of blood-derived inflammatory cells into the CNS. The present results demonstrate...

  20. Safety and complications reporting update on the re-implantation of culture-expanded mesenchymal stem cells using autologous platelet lysate technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Christopher J; Schultz, John R; Cheever, Michelle; Freeman, Michael; Faulkner, Stephen; Robinson, Brent; Hanson, Ronald

    2011-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great promise as therapeutic agents in regenerative medicine. Numerous animal studies have documented the multipotency of MSCs, showing their capabilities for differentiating into orthopedic tissues such as muscle, bone, cartilage, and tendon. However, the safety of culture expanded MSC's for human use has only just begun to be reported. Between 2006 and 2010, two groups of patients were treated for various orthopedic conditions with culture-expanded, autologous, bone marrow-derived MSCs (group 1: n=50; group 2: n=290-one patient in both groups). Cells were cultured in monolayer culture flasks using an autologous platelet lysate technique and re-injected into peripheral joints or into intervertebral discs with use of c-arm fluoroscopy. While both groups had prospective surveillance for complications, Group 1 additionally underwent 3.0T MRI tracking of the re-implant sites. The mean age of patients treated was 53 +/- 13.85 years; 214 were males and 125 females with mean follow-up time from any procedure being 435 days +/- 261 days. Number of contacts initiated based on time from first procedure was 482 at 3 months, 433 at 6 months, 316 contacts at 12 months, 110 contacts at 24 months, and 22 contacts at 36 months. For Group 1, 50 patients underwent 210 MRI surveillance procedures at 3 months, 6 months, 1, 2, and 3 years which failed to demonstrate any tumor formation at the re-implant sites. Formal disease surveillance for adverse events based on HHS criteria documented significantly less morbidity than is commonly reported for more invasive surgical procedures, all of which were either self-limited or were remedied with therapeutic measures. Two patients were diagnosed with cancer out of 339 patients treated since study inception; however, this was almost certainly unrelated to the MSC therapy and the neoplasm rate in similar to that seen in the U.S. Caucasian population. Knee outcome data was collected on a subset of patients

  1. Effects of a hybrid micro/nanorod topography-modified titanium implant on adhesion and osteogenic differentiation in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang WJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wenjie Zhang,1,2,* Zihui Li,3,* Qingfeng Huang,1 Ling Xu,1 Jinhua Li,3 Yuqin Jin,1,2 Guifang Wang,1,2 Xuanyong Liu,2 Xinquan Jiang11Department of Prosthodontics, 2Oral Bioengineering Laboratory, Shanghai Research Institute of Stomatology, Ninth People’s Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, 3State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground and methods: Various methods have been used to modify titanium implant surfaces with the aim of achieving better osseointegration. In this study, we fabricated a clustered nanorod structure on an acid-etched, microstructured titanium plate surface using hydrogen peroxide. We also evaluated biofunctionalization of the hybrid micro/nanorod topography on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to investigate the surface topography and phase composition of the modified titanium plate. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and seeded on the plate. The adhesion ability of the cells was then assayed by cell counting at one, 4, and 24 hours after cell seeding, and expression of adhesion-related protein integrin β1 was detected by immunofluorescence. In addition, a polymerase chain reaction assay, alkaline phosphatase and Alizarin Red S staining assays, and osteopontin and osteocalcin immunofluorescence analyses were used to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation behavior of the cells.Results: The hybrid micro/nanoscale texture formed on the titanium surface enhanced the initial adhesion activity of the rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Importantly, the hierarchical structure promoted osteogenic differentiation of these cells.Conclusion: This study suggests that a hybrid micro/nanorod topography on a titanium surface fabricated by

  2. A comparative historical and demographic study of the neuromodulation management techniques of deep brain stimulation for dystonia and cochlear implantation for sensorineural deafness in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, V E; Elniel, A; Ughratdar, I; Zebian, B; Selway, R; Lin, J P

    2017-01-01

    Cochlear implants for sensorineural deafness in children is one of the most successful neuromodulation techniques known to relieve early chronic neurodisability, improving activity and participation. In 2012 there were 324,000 recipients of cochlear implants globally. To compare cochlear implant (CI) neuromodulation with deep brain stimulation (DBS) for dystonia in childhood and explore relations between age and duration of symptoms at implantation and outcome. Comparison of published annual UK CI figures for 1985-2009 with a retrospective cohort of the first 9 years of DBS for dystonia in children at a single-site Functional Neurosurgery unit from 2006 to 14. From 2006 to 14, DBS neuromodulation of childhood dystonia increased by a factor of 3.8 to a total of 126 cases over the first 9 years, similar to the growth in cochlear implants which increased by a factor of 4.1 over a similar period in the 1980s rising to 527 children in 2009. The CI saw a dramatic shift in practice from implantation at >5 years of age at the start of the programme towards earlier implantation by the mid-1990s. Best language results were seen for implantation 4 years, hence implantation children could benefit from cochlear neuromodulation if implanted early. Similar to initial CI use, the majority of children receiving DBS for dystonia in the first 9 years were 5-15 years of age, when the proportion of life lived with dystonia exceeds 90% thus limiting benefits. Early DBS neuromodulation for acquired motor disorders should be explored to maximise the benefits of dystonia reduction in a period of maximal developmental plasticity before the onset of disability. Learning from cochlear implantation, DBS can become an accepted management option in children under the age of 5 years who have a reduced proportion of life lived with dystonia, and not viewed as a last resort reserved for only the most severe cases where benefits may be at their most limited. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric

  3. Neural stem cells and neuro/gliogenesis in the central nervous system: understanding the structural and functional plasticity of the developing, mature, and diseased brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Seki, Tatsunori; Imayoshi, Itaru; Tamamaki, Nobuaki; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Hitoshi, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    Neurons and glia in the central nervous system (CNS) originate from neural stem cells (NSCs). Knowledge of the mechanisms of neuro/gliogenesis from NSCs is fundamental to our understanding of how complex brain architecture and function develop. NSCs are present not only in the developing brain but also in the mature brain in adults. Adult neurogenesis likely provides remarkable plasticity to the mature brain. In addition, recent progress in basic research in mental disorders suggests an etiological link with impaired neuro/gliogenesis in particular brain regions. Here, we review the recent progress and discuss future directions in stem cell and neuro/gliogenesis biology by introducing several topics presented at a joint meeting of the Japanese Association of Anatomists and the Physiological Society of Japan in 2015. Collectively, these topics indicated that neuro/gliogenesis from NSCs is a common event occurring in many brain regions at various ages in animals. Given that significant structural and functional changes in cells and neural networks are accompanied by neuro/gliogenesis from NSCs and the integration of newly generated cells into the network, stem cell and neuro/gliogenesis biology provides a good platform from which to develop an integrated understanding of the structural and functional plasticity that underlies the development of the CNS, its remodeling in adulthood, and the recovery from diseases that affect it.

  4. Regulating the balance between symmetric and asymmetric stem cell division in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Boris; Gold, Katrina S; Brand, Andrea H

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells proliferate through symmetric division or self-renew through asymmetric division whilst generating differentiating cell types. The balance between symmetric and asymmetric division requires tight control to either expand a stem cell pool or to generate cell diversity. In the Drosophila optic lobe, symmetrically dividing neuroepithelial cells transform into asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts. The switch from neuroepithelial cells to neuroblasts is triggered by a proneural wave that sweeps across the neuroepithelium. Here we review recent findings showing that the orchestrated action of the Notch, EGFR, Fat-Hippo, and JAK/STAT signalling pathways controls the progression of the proneural wave and the sequential transition from symmetric to asymmetric division. The neuroepithelial to neuroblast transition in the optic lobe bears many similarities to the switch from neuroepithelial cell to radial glial cell in the developing mammalian cerebral cortex. The Notch signalling pathway has a similar role in the transition from proliferating to differentiating stem cell pools in the developing vertebrate retina and in the neural tube. Therefore, findings in the Drosophila optic lobe provide insights into the transitions between proliferative and differentiative division in the stem cell pools of higher organisms.

  5. Severe encephalopathy after high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support for brain tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berkmortel, F.; Gidding, C.; de Kanter, M.; Punt, C. J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Recurrent medulloblastoma carries a poor prognosis. Long-term survival has been obtained with high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation and secondary irradiation. A 21-year-old woman with recurrent medulloblastoma after previous chemotherapy and radiotherapy is presented. The

  6. Neural Stem Cell Delivery of Therapeutic Antibodies to Treat Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    deliver antineoplastic gene products directly to the tumor-producing cells. This potential therapeutic strategy may safely eradicate tumor-producing cells...surgical manipulation since activated microglial cells were never detected in the same brain regions of animals injected with medium alone (Fig. 4B-a right...steps of metastatic invasion remain to be elucidated. Unraveling the underlying mechanisms in vivo might lead to targeted manipulation of the brain

  7. Reconstruction of orbital defects by implantation of antigen-free bovine cancellous bone scaffold combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yang, Chunbo; Su, Chang; Yu, Min; Zhang, Xiaomin; Huang, Shuo; Li, Gang; Yu, Meili; Li, Xiaorong

    2013-05-01

    Tissue-engineering approach can result in significant bone regeneration. We aimed to reconstruct the segmental orbital rim defects with antigen-free bovine cancellous bone (BCB) scaffolds combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in rats. BCB was prepared by degreasing, deproteinization and partly decalcification. BMSCs isolated from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats were osteogenically induced and seeded onto BCB scaffolds to construct induced BMSCs/BCB composites. An 8-mm full-thickness defect on the rat inferior-orbit rim was established. Induced BMSCs/BCB composites cultured for 5 days were implanted into the orbital defects as the experimental group. Noninduced BMSCs/BCB group, BCB group and exclusive group were set. General condition, spiral CT, 3D orbital reconstruction, histological and histomorphometric analysis were performed after implantation. BCB presented reticular porous structure. GFP-BMSCs adhering to BCB appeared bright green fluorescence and grew vigorously. Infection and graft dislocation were not observed. In induced BMSCs/BCB group, CT and 3D reconstruction showed perfect orbital repair situation. Histological analysis indicated BCB was mostly biodegraded; newly formed bone and complete synostosis were observed. The percentage of newly formed bone was (57.12 ± 6.28) %. In contrast, more residual BCB, less newly formed bone and nonunion were observed in the noninduced BMSCs/BCB group. Slowly absorbed BCB enwrapped by fibrous connective tissue and a small amount of new bone occurred in BCB group. Fibrous connective tissue appeared in exclusive group. Antigen-free bovine cancellous bone that retains natural bone porous structure and moderate mechanical strength with elimination of antigen is the ideal carrier for mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. BCB combined with BMSCs is a promising composite for tissue engineering, and can effectively reconstruct the orbit rim defects in rats.

  8. Beyond The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying: A Theoretical and Methodological Intervention into the Sociology of Brain Implant Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Black Hawk; Morrison, Daniel R

    2016-12-01

    Drawing on and extending the Foucaultian philosophical framework that Jeffrey Bishop develops in his masterful book, The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying, we undertake a sociological analysis of the neurological procedure-deep brain stimulation (DBS)-which implants electrodes in the brain, powered by a pacemaker-like device, for the treatment of movement disorders. Following Bishop's work, we carry out this analysis through a two-fold strategy. First, we examine how a multidisciplinary team evaluates candidates for this implant at a major medical center. We present excerpts from an ethnographic study of the "case conference" where disease entities are presented, contested, ratified, and made objects for intervention with this technology. The case conference becomes the key site in the transition from "person-with-illness" to "person-with-brain-implant" as a team of health professionals determines a plan of action by interpreting both statistical and "quality of life" data regarding their patients. Second, this article explores these decision-making processes through Bishop's conceptualization of evidence-based medicine, which relies on statistical approaches as the ultimate authority in knowledge production and medical decisions. We then reflect on Bishop's critique of the social sciences and the methodological, analytical, and substantive ramifications that The Anticipatory Corpse can offer future sociological work. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Calcium-microRNA Complexes Functionalized Nanotubular Implant Surface for Highly Efficient Transfection and Enhanced Osteogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Wen; Yang, Chuanxu; Svend Le, Dang Quang

    2018-01-01

    effective delivery method of small RNA therapeutics into hMSCs from an implant surface by calcium ions. First, we demonstrated that simple Ca/siGFP nanocomplexes were able to efficiently silence GFP in GFP-expressing hMSCs with adequate Ca2+ concentration (>5 mM). In addition, a single transfection could...

  10. A novel bioelectronic nose based on brain-machine interface using implanted electrode recording in vivo in olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qi; Du, Liping; Zhuang, Liujing; Li, Rong; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Ping

    2013-11-15

    The mammalian olfactory system has merits of higher sensitivity, selectivity and faster response than current electronic nose system based on chemical sensor array. It is advanced and feasible to detect and discriminate odors by mammalian olfactory system. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel bioelectronic nose based on the brain-machine interface (BMI) technology for odor detection by in vivo electrophysiological measurements of olfactory bulb. In this work, extracellular potentials of mitral/tufted (M/T) cells in olfactory bulb (OB) were recorded by implanted 16-channel microwire electrode arrays. The odor-evoked response signals were analyzed. We found that neural activities of different neurons showed visible different firing patterns both in temporal features and rate features when stimulated by different small molecular odorants. The detection low limit is below 1 ppm for some specific odors. Odors were classified by an algorithm based on population vector similarity and support vector machine (SVM). The results suggested that the novel bioelectonic nose was sensitive to odorant stimuli. The best classifying accuracy was up to 95%. With the development of the BMI and olfactory decoding methods, we believe that this system will represent emerging and promising platforms for wide applications in medical diagnosis and security fields. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. In vivo Brain Delivery of v-myc Overproduced Human Neural Stem Cells via the Intranasal Pathway: Tumor Characteristics in the Lung of a Nude Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Seong Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to monitor the successful brain delivery of stem cells via the intranasal route and to observe the long-term consequence of the immortalized human neural stem cells in the lungs of a nude mouse model. Stably immortalized HB1.F3 human neural stem cells with firefly luciferase gene (F3-effluc were intranasally delivered to BALB/c nude mice. Bioluminescence images were serially acquired until 41 days in vivo and at 4 hours and 41 days ex vivo after intranasal delivery. Lungs were evaluated by histopathology. After intranasal delivery of F3-effluc cells, the intense in vivo signals were detected in the nasal area, migrated toward the brain areas at 4 hours (4 of 13, 30.8%, and gradually decreased for 2 days. The brain signals were confirmed by ex vivo imaging (2 of 4, 50%. In the mice with initial lung signals (4 of 9, 44.4%, the lung signals disappeared for 5 days but reappeared 2 weeks later. The intense lung signals were confirmed to originate from the tumors in the lungs formed by F3-effluc cells by ex vivo imaging and histopathology. We propose that intranasal delivery of immortalized stem cells should be monitored for their successful delivery to the brain and their tumorigenicity longitudinally.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells induce T-cell tolerance and protect the preterm brain after global hypoxia-ischemia.

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    Reint K Jellema

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in preterm infants is a severe disease for which no curative treatment is available. Cerebral inflammation and invasion of activated peripheral immune cells have been shown to play a pivotal role in the etiology of white matter injury, which is the clinical hallmark of HIE in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to assess the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of intravenously delivered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in an ovine model of HIE. In this translational animal model, global hypoxia-ischemia (HI was induced in instrumented preterm sheep by transient umbilical cord occlusion, which closely mimics the clinical insult. Intravenous administration of 2 x 10(6 MSC/kg reduced microglial proliferation, diminished loss of oligodendrocytes and reduced demyelination, as determined by histology and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI, in the preterm brain after global HI. These anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of MSC were paralleled by reduced electrographic seizure activity in the ischemic preterm brain. Furthermore, we showed that MSC induced persistent peripheral T-cell tolerance in vivo and reduced invasion of T-cells into the preterm brain following global HI. These findings show in a preclinical animal model that intravenously administered MSC reduced cerebral inflammation, protected against white matter injury and established functional improvement in the preterm brain following global HI. Moreover, we provide evidence that induction of T-cell tolerance by MSC might play an important role in the neuroprotective effects of MSC in HIE. This is the first study to describe a marked neuroprotective effect of MSC in a translational animal model of HIE.

  13. Pivotal Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Secreted by Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Severe Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Newborn Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, So Yoon; Chang, Yun Sil; Sung, Dong Kyung; Sung, Se In; Ahn, Jee-Yin; Park, Won Soon

    2017-01-24

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation protects against neonatal severe intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH)-induced brain injury by a paracrine rather than regenerative mechanism; however, the paracrine factors involved and their roles have not yet been delineated. This study aimed to identify the paracrine mediator(s) and to determine their role in mediating the therapeutic effects of MSCs in severe IVH. We first identified significant upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in MSCs compared with fibroblasts, in both DNA and antibody microarrays, after thrombin exposure. We then knocked down BDNF in MSCs by transfection with small interfering (si)RNA specific for human BDNF. The therapeutic effects of MSCs with or without BDNF knockdown were evaluated in vitro in rat neuronal cells challenged with thrombin, and in vivo in newborn Sprague-Dawley rats by injecting 200 μl of blood on postnatal day 4 (P4), and transplanting MSCs (1 × 105 cells) intraventricularly on P6. siRNA-induced BDNF knockdown abolished the in vitro benefits of MSCs on thrombin-induced neuronal cell death. BDNF knockdown also abolished the in vivo protective effects against severe IVH-induced brain injuries such as the attenuation of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus, impaired behavioral test performance, increased astrogliosis, increased number of TUNEL cells, ED-1+ cells, and inflammatory cytokines, and reduced myelin basic protein expression. Our data indicate that BDNF secreted by transplanted MSCs is one of the critical paracrine factors that play a seminal role in attenuating severe IVH-induced brain injuries in newborn rats.

  14. Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Associated with Tantalum Rod Implantation and Vascularized Iliac Grafting for the Treatment of End-Stage Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

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    Dewei Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tantalum rod implantation with vascularized iliac grafting has been reported to be an effective method for the treatment of young patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH to avert the need for total hip arthroplasty (THA. However, there have been unsatisfactory success rates for end-stage ONFH. The authors describe a modified technique using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs associated with porous tantalum rod implantation combined with vascularized iliac grafting for the treatment of end-stage ONFH. A total of 24 patients (31 hips with end-stage ONFH were treated with surgery; ARCO IIIc stage was observed in 19 hips and ARCO IV stage was observed in 12 hips. All patients were followed for a mean time of 64.35 ± 13.03 months (range 26–78. Operations on only five hips were converted to THA. The joint-preserving success rate of the entire group was 89.47% for ARCO stage IIIc and 75% for ARCO stage IV. The mean Harris hip score of the 31 hips improved significantly from 38.74 ± 5.88 points (range 22–50 to 77.23 ± 14.75 points (range 33–95. This intervention was safe and effective in delaying or avoiding total hip replacement for end-stage ONFH.

  15. Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Associated with Tantalum Rod Implantation and Vascularized Iliac Grafting for the Treatment of End-Stage Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dewei; Liu, Baoyi; Wang, Benjie; Yang, Lei; Xie, Hui; Huang, Shibo; Zhang, Yao; Wei, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Tantalum rod implantation with vascularized iliac grafting has been reported to be an effective method for the treatment of young patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) to avert the need for total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, there have been unsatisfactory success rates for end-stage ONFH. The authors describe a modified technique using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) associated with porous tantalum rod implantation combined with vascularized iliac grafting for the treatment of end-stage ONFH. A total of 24 patients (31 hips) with end-stage ONFH were treated with surgery; ARCO IIIc stage was observed in 19 hips and ARCO IV stage was observed in 12 hips. All patients were followed for a mean time of 64.35 ± 13.03 months (range 26–78). Operations on only five hips were converted to THA. The joint-preserving success rate of the entire group was 89.47% for ARCO stage IIIc and 75% for ARCO stage IV. The mean Harris hip score of the 31 hips improved significantly from 38.74 ± 5.88 points (range 22–50) to 77.23 ± 14.75 points (range 33–95). This intervention was safe and effective in delaying or avoiding total hip replacement for end-stage ONFH. PMID:25802840

  16. Effects of root and stem extracts of Asparagus cochinchinensis on biochemical indicators related to aging in the brain and liver of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Dasheng; Yu, Long-Xi; Yan, Xiao; Guo, Chunqiu; Xiong, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Asparagus cochinchinensis is a traditional Chinese medicine used for treating lung and spleen-related diseases. In this study, we compared the medicinal effects of A. cochinchinensis root and stem extracts on the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), the content of malonaldehyde (MDA) and total protein content in the brain, liver and plasma of mice. Polysaccharides and aqueous extracts of the roots significantly increased the spleen index and the SOD activity but reduced the MDA content and slowed down the aging process. In contrast, feeding with the stem extracts significantly reduced the SOD activity and increased the MDA accumulation in the brain and liver of mice, suggesting that the stem extracts may not be appropriate for treating aging-related diseases.

  17. Blindness, dancing extremities, and corpus callosum and brain stem involvement: an unusual presentation of fulminant subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sankhyan, Naveen; Gupta, Pankaj; Vyas, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl presented with acute visual loss followed 2 weeks later with loss of speech and audition, fulminant neuroregression, and choreo-athetoid movements of extremities. Fundus showed bilateral chorioretinitis. Electroencephalography showed periodic complexes. Measles antibody titers were elevated in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid, consistent with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Neuroimaging showed discontiguous involvement of splenium of the corpus callosum and ventral pons with sparing of cortical white matter. Our case highlights the atypical clinical and radiologic presentations of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Pediatricians need to be aware that necrotizing chorioretinitis in a child and/or atypical brain stem changes could be the heralding feature of this condition in endemic countries. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Calcium-dependent plateau potentials in rostral ambiguus neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Feldman, J L

    1997-01-01

    Calcium-dependent plateau potentials in rostral ambiguus neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro. J. Neurophysiol. 78: 2483-2492, 1997. The nucleus ambiguus contains vagal and glossopharyngeal motoneurons and preganglionic neurons involved in respiration, swallowing, vocalization......, and control of heart beat. Here we show that the rostral compact formation's ambiguus neurons, which control the esophageal phase of swallowing, display calcium-dependent plateau potentials in response to tetanic orthodromic stimulation or current injection. Whole cell recordings were made from visualized...... neurons in the rostral nucleus ambiguus using a slice preparation from the newborn mouse. Biocytin-labeling revealed dendritic trees with pronounced rostrocaudal orientations confined to the nucleus ambiguus, a morphological profile matching that of vagal motoneurons projecting to the esophagus. Single...

  19. Fatal injuries of the brain stem and/or upper cervical spinal cord in traffic accidents: nine autopsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, T; Saito, K; Nishigami, J; Ohshima, T

    1995-01-01

    Nine forensic autopsy cases were studied. All had injuries of the brain stem and/or upper cervical spinal cord due to traffic accidents. Among the nine subjects, eight were pedestrians and one was a left, front seat occupant of a vehicle. Examination of these 9 cases revealed that three had ponto-medullary avulsion, two had medullary avulsion and the other four had laceration of the upper cervical spinal cord. Atlanto-occipital dislocation was observed in five cases, and a ring fracture around the foramen magnum in the other two cases. Intraventricular haemorrhage, probably due to tears of the choroid plexus caused by hyperextension or hyperflexion of the head, was found in seven cases. In just one of these seven cases, both of the lateral ventricles were filled with dark red haemocoagulum. Hyperextension is considered to occur more commonly in road trauma cases where the victim is alcoholically intoxicated.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 plays a pro-life role in experimental brain stem death via nitric oxide synthase I/protein kinase G signaling at rostral ventrolateral medulla

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    Dai Kuang-Yu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its clinical importance, a dearth of information exists on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underpin brain stem death. A suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation on brain stem death resides in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM because it is the origin of a life-and-death signal that sequentially increases (pro-life and decreases (pro-death to reflect the advancing central cardiovascular regulatory dysfunction during the progression towards brain stem death in critically ill patients. The present study evaluated the hypothesis that heme oxygnase-1 (HO-1 may play a pro-life role as an interposing signal between hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 and nitric oxide synthase I (NOS I/protein kinase G (PKG cascade in RVLM, which sustains central cardiovascular regulatory functions during brain stem death. Methods We performed cardiovascular, pharmacological, biochemical and confocal microscopy experiments in conjunction with an experimental model of brain stem death that employed microinjection of the organophosphate insecticide mevinphos (Mev; 10 nmol bilaterally into RVLM of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Results Western blot analysis coupled with laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that augmented HO-1 expression that was confined to the cytoplasm of RVLM neurons occurred preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain stem death and was antagonized by immunoneutralization of HIF-1α or HIF-1β in RVLM. On the other hand, the cytoplasmic presence of HO-2 in RVLM neurons manifested insignificant changes during both phases. Furthermore, immunoneutralization of HO-1 or knockdown of ho-1 gene in RVLM blunted the augmented life-and-death signals exhibited during the pro-life phase. Those pretreatments also blocked the upregulated pro-life NOS I/PKG signaling without affecting the pro-death NOS II/peroxynitrite cascade in RVLM. Conclusions We conclude that transcriptional

  1. [Comparative study between auditory steady-state responses, auditory brain-stem responses and liminar tonal audiometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Fernández, Asunción; Alañón Fernández, Miguel Angel; Ayala Martínez, Luis Félix; Alvarez Alvarez, Ana Belén; Miranda León, María Teresa; Sainz Quevedo, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) using frequencies of modulation between 70-110 Hz are a new auditive exploration technique. The aim of the study was to evaluate the contribution of the ASSR to diagnostic of the audition. Different aportations of auditory steady-states responses (ASSR) and auditory brain-stem responses (ABR) to diagnostic of threshold of audition were studied Differences between these thresholds and thresholds obtained by liminar tonal audiometry (LTA) were studied too. Correlations between thresholds obtained by ASSR and LTA were studied. ASSR detected rest of audition that transients ABR did not detect. Differences about -13.750 dB HL (-5.209 to -22.291) and -13.250 dB HL (-7.337 to -19.163) were found between registered values for carriers of 500 and 1000 Hz and the thresholds by LTA for these carriers. Differences about 1.625 dB HL (-6.967 to 10.217) and -2.875 dB HL (-7.446 to 1.696) were found between estimations for the carries of 500 and 1000 Hz and thresholds by TLA. Statistically very significant (P=.01) coefficients of correlation were found between registered and estimated thresholds by ASSR for carrier of 500 and 1000 Hz and threshold by TLA for these frequencies. Auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) using frequencies of modulation between 70-110 Hz are a new auditive technique of exploration. This stimulus is more frequency-specific than clicks for auditory brain-stem responses (ABR). Response is not modificated by steady of consciousness. The technique is doublely objective. Thresholds obtained by ASSR permits to estimation of the audition threshold.

  2. Engineered HA hydrogel for stem cell transplantation in the brain: Biocompatibility data using a design of experiment approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina R. Nih

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents data related to the research article “Systematic optimization of an engineered hydrogel allows for selective control of human neural stem cell survival and differentiation after transplantation in the stroke brain” (P. Moshayedi, L.R. Nih, I.L. Llorente, A.R. Berg, J. Cinkornpumin, W.E. Lowry et al., 2016 [1] and focuses on the biocompatibility aspects of the hydrogel, including its stiffness and the inflammatory response of the transplanted organ. We have developed an injectable hyaluronic acid (HA-based hydrogel for stem cell culture and transplantation, to promote brain tissue repair after stroke. This 3D biomaterial was engineered to bind bioactive signals such as adhesive motifs, as well as releasing growth factors while supporting cell growth and tissue infiltration. We used a Design of Experiment approach to create a complex matrix environment in vitro by keeping the hydrogel platform and cell type constant across conditions while systematically varying peptide motifs and growth factors. The optimized HA hydrogel promoted survival of encapsulated human induced pluripotent stem cell derived-neural progenitor cells (iPS-NPCs after transplantation into the stroke cavity and differentially tuned transplanted cell fate through the promotion of glial, neuronal or immature/progenitor states. The highlights of this article include: (1 Data of cell and bioactive signals addition on the hydrogel mechanical properties and growth factor diffusion, (2 the use of a design of Experiment (DOE approach (M.W. 2 Weible and T. Chan-Ling, 2007 [2] to select multi-factorial experimental conditions, and (3 Inflammatory response and cell survival after transplantation.

  3. Quiescent Oct4+ Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) Repopulate Ablated Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein+ NSCs in the Adult Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Rachel L; Yammine, Samantha Z; Morshead, Cindi M; van der Kooy, Derek

    2017-09-01

    Adult primitive neural stem cells (pNSCs) are a rare population of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) - Oct4 + cells in the mouse forebrain subependymal zone bordering the lateral ventricles that give rise to clonal neurospheres in leukemia inhibitory factor in vitro. pNSC neurospheres can be passaged to self-renew or give rise to GFAP + NSCs that form neurospheres in epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2, which we collectively refer to as definitive NSCs (dNSCs). Label retention experiments using doxycycline-inducible histone-2B (H2B)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice and several chase periods of up to 1 year quantified the adult pNSC cell cycle time as 3-5 months. We hypothesized that while pNSCs are not very proliferative at baseline, they may exist as a reserve pool of NSCs in case of injury. To test this function of pNSCs, we obtained conditional Oct4 knockout mice, Oct4 fl/fl ;Sox1 Cre (Oct4 CKO ), which do not yield adult pNSC-derived neurospheres. When we ablated the progeny of pNSCs, namely all GFAP + dNSCs, in these Oct4 CKO mice, we found that dNSCs did not recover as they do in wild-type mice, suggesting that pNSCs are necessary for dNSC repopulation. Returning to the H2B-GFP mice, we observed that the cytosine β-d-arabinofuranoside ablation of proliferating cells including dNSCs-induced quiescent pNSCs to proliferate and significantly dilute their H2B-GFP label. In conclusion, we demonstrate that pNSCs are the most quiescent stem cells in the adult brain reported to date and that their lineage position upstream of GFAP + dNSCs allows them to repopulate a depleted neural lineage. Stem Cells 2017;35:2071-2082. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  4. MR tracking of stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic nanoparticles in ischemic brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jendelová, Pavla; Růžičková, Kateřina; Urdzíková, Lucia; Kroupová, Jana; Herynek, V.; Dvořák, Petr; Hájek, M.; Syková, Eva

    č. 2 (2003), s. 35 ISSN 0894-1491. [European Meeting on Glial Cell Function in Health and Disease /6./. Berlín, 03.09.2003-06.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA ČR GA304/03/1189 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:MSM 111300004 Keywords : Stem cells * Nanoparticles Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.677, year: 2003

  5. Geminin Participates in Differentiation Decisions of Adult Neural Stem Cells Transplanted in the Hemiparkinsonian Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taouki, Ioanna; Tasiudi, Eve; Lalioti, Maria-Eleni; Kyrousi, Christina; Skavatsou, Eleni; Kaplani, Konstantina; Lygerou, Zoi; Kouvelas, Elias D; Mitsacos, Adamantia; Giompres, Panagiotis; Taraviras, Stavros

    2017-08-15

    Neural stem cells have been considered as a source of stem cells that can be used for cell replacement therapies in neurodegenerative diseases, as they can be isolated and expanded in vitro and can be used for autologous grafting. However, due to low percentages of survival and varying patterns of differentiation, strategies that will enhance the efficacy of transplantation are under scrutiny. In this article, we have examined whether alterations in Geminin's expression, a protein that coordinates the balance between self-renewal and differentiation, can improve the properties of stem cells transplanted in 6-OHDA hemiparkinsonian mouse model. Our results indicate that, in the absence of Geminin, grafted cells differentiating into dopaminergic neurons were decreased, while an increased number of oligodendrocytes were detected. The number of proliferating multipotent cells was not modified by the absence of Geminin. These findings encourage research related to the impact of Geminin on transplantations for neurodegenerative disorders, as an important molecule in influencing differentiation decisions of the cells composing the graft.

  6. Three-dimensional simulated microgravity culture improves the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cell in PLGA scaffolds implanted in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanping; He, Lina; Pan, Shuang; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Weiwei; Yi, Hong; Niu, Yumei

    2017-02-01

    Tooth regeneration through stem cell-based therapy is a promising treatment for tooth decay and loss. Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) have been widely identified as the stem cells with the most potential for tooth tissue regeneration. However, the culture of hDPSCs in vitro for tissue engineering is challenging, as cells may proliferate slowly or/and differentiate poorly in vivo. Dynamic three‑dimensional (3D) simulated microgravity (SMG) created using the rotary cell culture system is considered to an effective tool, which contributes to several cell functions. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of dynamic 3D SMG culture on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation abilities of hDPSCs in poly (lactic‑co‑glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds in nude mice. The hDPSCs on PLGA scaffolds were maintained separately in the 3D SMG culture system and static 3D cultures with osteogenic medium for 7 days in vitro. Subsequently, the cell‑PLGA complexes were implanted subcutaneously on the backs of nude mice for 4 weeks. The results of histological and immunohistochemical examinations of Ki‑67, type I collagen, dentin sialoprotein and DMP‑1 indicated that the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation abilities of the hDPSCs prepared in the 3D SMG culture system were higher, compared with those prepared in the static culture system. These findings suggested that dynamic 3D SMG culture likely contributes to tissue engineering by improving the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation abilities of hDPSCs in vivo.

  7. Variation in Deep Brain Stimulation Electrode Impedance over Years Following Electrode Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satzer, David; Lanctin, David; Eberly, Lynn E.; Abosch, Aviva

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode impedance is a major determinant of current delivery to target tissues, but long-term variation in impedance has received little attention. Objectives To assess the relationship between electrode impedance and time in a large DBS patient population and characterize the relationship between contact activity and impedance. Methods We collected retrospective impedance and programming data from 128 electrodes in 84 patients with Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, or dystonia. Effects of time, contact activity, stimulation voltage, and other parameters on impedance were assessed. We also examined impedance changes following contact activation and deactivation. Results Impedance decreased by 73 Ω/year (P Impedance was on average 163 Ω lower in active contacts (P impedance, respectively. Higher stimulation voltages were associated with lower impedance values (P impedance. Conclusions Impedance decreases gradually in a stimulation-dependent manner. These trends have implications for long-term programming, the development of a closed-loop DBS device, and current understanding of the electrode-tissue interface. PMID:24503709

  8. Controlling micro- and nano-environment of tumor and stem cells for novel research and therapy of brain cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher Lloyd

    The use of modern technologies in cancer research has engendered a great deal of excitement. Many of these advanced approaches involve in-depth mathematical analyses of the inner working of cells, via genomic and proteomic analyses. However these techniques may not be ideal for the study of complex cell phenotypes and behaviors. This dissertation explores cancer and potential therapies through phenotypic analysis of cell behaviors, an alternative approach. We employ this experimental framework to study brain cancer (glioma), a particularly formidable example of this diverse ailment. Through the application of micro- and nanotechnology, we carefully control the surrounding environments of cells to understand their responses to various cues and to manipulate their behaviors. Subsequently we obtain clinically relevant information that allows better understanding of glioma, and enhancement of potential therapies. We first aim to address brain tumor dispersal, through analysis of cell migration. Utilizing nanometer-scale topographic models of the extracellular matrix, we study the migratory response of glioma cells to various stimuli in vitro. Second, we implement knowledge gained from these investigations to define characteristics of tumor progression in patients, and to develop treatments inhibiting cell migration. Next we use microfluidic and nanotopographic models to study the behaviors of stem cells in vitro. Here we attempt to improve their abilities to deliver therapeutic proteins to cancer, an innovative treatment approach. We analyze the multi-step process by which adipose-derived stem cells naturally home to tumor sites, and identify numerous environmental perturbations to enhance this behavior. Finally, we attempt to demonstrate that these cell culture-based manipulations can enhance the localization of adipose stem cells to glioma in vivo using animal models. Throughout this work we utilize environmental cues to analyze and induce particular behaviors in

  9. Reduced 5-HT(1B) receptor binding in the dorsal brain stem after cognitive behavioural therapy of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiger, Mikael; Rück, Christian; Forsberg, Anton; Varrone, Andrea; Lindefors, Nils; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars; Lundberg, Johan

    2014-08-30

    Major depression is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease, and its pathophysiology is largely unknown. The serotonin hypothesis is, however, the model with most supporting data, although the details are only worked out to some extent. Recent clinical imaging measurements indeed imply a role in major depressive disorder (MDD) for the inhibitory serotonin autoreceptor 5-hydroxytryptamine1B (5-HT1B). The aim of the current study was to examine 5-HT1B receptor binding in the brain of MDD patients before and after psychotherapy. Ten patients with an ongoing untreated moderate depressive episode were examined with positron emission tomography (PET) and the 5-HT1B receptor selective radioligand [(11)C]AZ10419369, before and after treatment with internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy. All of the patients examined responded to treatment, and 70% were in remission by the time of the second PET measurement. A statistically significant 33% reduction of binding potential (BPND) was found in the dorsal brain stem (DBS) after treatment. No other significant changes in BPND were found. The DBS contains the raphe nuclei, which regulate the serotonin system. This study gives support for the importance of serotonin and the 5-HT1B receptor in the biological response to psychological treatment of MDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Perforating eyelid injury extending to the brain stem in a 17-year-old woman: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikawa-Kobayashi Izumi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This case report describes a patient who had a perforating eyelid injury that extended to the brain stem. Case presentation A 17-year-old Japanese woman complained of decreased vision in her right eye, with severe ocular pain and headaches, after the metal tip of an umbrella struck her upper right eyelid accidentally. Her vision in the right eye decreased to light perception with commotio retinae, intraretinal hemorrhage, and severe lid swelling. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated edema of the head of the caudate nucleus and putamen, and the edema extended to the hypothalamus. The MRI findings indicated that the umbrella tip had penetrated through the eyelid and the posterior orbital wall. Vision improved to 20/50 in the right eye, with subretinal fibrosis caused by the choroidal rupture. Conclusions We recommend that MRI be performed on the orbit and brain in patients who appear to have symptoms that are inconsistent with the observed injury and when a severe orbitocranial injury is suspected.

  11. Astroglial Activation by an Enriched Environment after Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhances Angiogenesis after Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Rae Cho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has paracrine effects; however, the effects are known to be largely limited. Here we investigated the combination effects of cell transplantation and enriched environment (EE in a model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Brain damage was induced in seven-day-old mice by unilateral carotid artery ligation and exposure to hypoxia (8% O2 for 90 min. At six weeks of age, the mice were randomly assigned to four groups: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS-control (CON, PBS-EE, MSC-CON, and MSC-EE. Rotarod and grip strength tests were performed to evaluate neurobehavioral functions. Histologic evaluations were also performed to confirm the extent of astrocyte activation and endogenous angiogenesis. An array-based multiplex ELISA and Western blot were used to identify growth factors in vivo and in vitro. Two weeks after treatment, levels of astrocyte density and angiogenic factors were increased in MSC-EE mice, but glial scarring was not increased. Eight weeks after treatment, angiogenesis was increased, and behavioral outcomes were synergistically improved in the MSC-EE group. Astrocytes co-cultured with MSCs expressed higher levels of angiogenic factors than astrocytes cultured alone. The mechanisms of this synergistic effect included enhanced repair processes, such as increased endogenous angiogenesis and upregulation of angiogenic factors released from activated astrocytes.

  12. MRI/DTI of the Brain Stem Reveals Reversible and Irreversible Disruption of the Baroreflex Neural Circuits: Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H

    2016-01-01

    Baroreflex is the physiological mechanism for the maintenance of blood pressure and heart rate. Impairment of baroreflex is not a disease per se. However, depending on severity, the eventuality of baroreflex dysfunction varies from inconvenience in daily existence to curtailment of mobility to death. Despite universal acceptance, neuronal traffic within the contemporary neural circuits during the execution of baroreflex has never been visualized. By enhancing signal detection and fine-tuning the scanning parameters, we have successfully implemented tractographic analysis of the medulla oblongata in mice that allowed for visualization of connectivity between key brain stem nuclei in the baroreflex circuits. When viewed in conjunction with radiotelemetric analysis of the baroreflex, we found that under pathophysiological conditions when the disrupted connectivity between key nuclei in the baroreflex circuits was reversible, the associated disease condition (e.g. neurogenic hypertension) was amenable to remedial measures. Nevertheless, fatality ensues under pathological conditions (e.g. hepatic encephalopathy) when the connectivity between key substrates in the baroreflex circuits was irreversibly severed. MRI/DTI also prompted partial re-wiring of the contemporary circuit for baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone, and unearthed an explanation for the time lapse between brain death and the inevitable asystole signifying cardiac death that follows.

  13. Repair of neonatal brain injury : bringing stem cell-based therapy into clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, Nienke; Nijboer, Cora H.; van Bel, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury is one of most important causes of neonatal mortality and long-term neurological morbidity in infants born at term. At present, only hypothermia in infants with perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy has shown benefit as a neuroprotective strategy. Otherwise,

  14. Cortical and brain stem changes in neural activity during static handgrip and postexercise ischemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Mikael; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2010-01-01

    , and to differentiate between central command and reflex inputs, we used blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) of the whole brain (3 T). Subjects performed submaximal static handgrip exercise for 2 min followed by 6 min of PEI; MSNA was recorded on a separate day. During the contraction phase...

  15. Keeping Disability in Mind: A Case Study in Implantable Brain-Computer Interface Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Laura Specker; Klein, Eran; Brown, Tim; Sample, Matthew; Pham, Michelle; Tubig, Paul; Folland, Raney; Truitt, Anjali; Goering, Sara

    2017-06-22

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research is an interdisciplinary area of study within Neural Engineering. Recent interest in end-user perspectives has led to an intersection with user-centered design (UCD). The goal of user-centered design is to reduce the translational gap between researchers and potential end users. However, while qualitative studies have been conducted with end users of BCI technology, little is known about individual BCI researchers' experience with and attitudes towards UCD. Given the scientific, financial, and ethical imperatives of UCD, we sought to gain a better understanding of practical and principled considerations for researchers who engage with end users. We conducted a qualitative interview case study with neural engineering researchers at a center dedicated to the creation of BCIs. Our analysis generated five themes common across interviews. The thematic analysis shows that participants identify multiple beneficiaries of their work, including other researchers, clinicians working with devices, device end users, and families and caregivers of device users. Participants value experience with device end users, and personal experience is the most meaningful type of interaction. They welcome (or even encourage) end-user input, but are skeptical of limited focus groups and case studies. They also recognize a tension between creating sophisticated devices and developing technology that will meet user needs. Finally, interviewees espouse functional, assistive goals for their technology, but describe uncertainty in what degree of function is "good enough" for individual end users. Based on these results, we offer preliminary recommendations for conducting future UCD studies in BCI and neural engineering.

  16. Hypoxia-Mediated Epigenetic Regulation of Stemness in Brain Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Pankaj; Mittal, Shivani Arora; Chongtham, Jonita; Mohanty, Sujata; Srivastava, Tapasya

    2017-06-01

    Activation of pluripotency regulatory circuit is an important event in solid tumor progression and the hypoxic microenvironment is known to enhance the stemness feature of some cells. The distinct population of cancer stem cells (CSCs)/tumor initiating cells exist in a niche and augment invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance. Previously, studies have reported global hypomethylation and site-specific aberrant methylation in gliomas along with other epigenetic modifications as important contributors to genomic instability during glioma progression. Here, we have demonstrated the role of hypoxia-mediated epigenetic modifications in regulating expression of core pluripotency factors, OCT4 and NANOG, in glioma cells. We observe hypoxia-mediated induction of demethylases, ten-eleven-translocation (TET) 1 and 3, but not TET2 in our cell-line model. Immunoprecipitation studies reveal active demethylation and direct binding of TET1 and 3 at the Oct4 and Nanog regulatory regions. Tet1 and 3 silencing assays further confirmed induction of the pluripotency pathway involving Oct4, Nanog, and Stat3, by these paralogues, although with varying degrees. Knockdown of Tet1 and Tet3 inhibited the formation of neurospheres in hypoxic conditions. We observed independent roles of TET1 and TET3 in differentially regulating pluripotency and differentiation associated genes in hypoxia. Overall, this study demonstrates an active demethylation in hypoxia by TET1 and 3 as a mechanism of Oct4 and Nanog overexpression thus contributing to the formation of CSCs in gliomas. Stem Cells 2017;35:1468-1478. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  17. Effect of all-trans retinoic acid on the proliferation and differentiation of brain tumor stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Chao

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To investigate the effect of all-trans retinoic acid(ATRA on the proliferation and differentiation of brain tumor stem cells(BTSCs in vitro. Methods Limiting dilution and clonogenic assay were used to isolate and screen BTSCs from the fresh specimen of human brain glioblastoma. The obtained BTSCs, which were cultured in serum-free medium, were classified into four groups in accordance with the composition of the different treatments. The proliferation of the BTSCs was evaluated by MTT assay. The BTSCs were induced to differentiate in serum-containing medium, and classified into the ATRA group and control group. On the 10th day of induction, the expressions of CD133 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in the differentiated BTSCs were detected by immunofluorescence. The differentiated BTSCs were cultured in serum-free medium, the percentage and the time required for formation of brain tumor spheres (BTS were observed. Results BTSCs obtained by limiting dilution were all identified as CD133-positive by immunofluorescence. In serum-free medium, the proliferation of BTSCs in the ATRA group was observed significantly faster than that in the control group, but slower than that in the growth factor group and ATRA/growth factor group, and the size of the BTS in the ATRA group was smaller than that in the latter two groups(P P P P Conclusion ATRA can promote the proliferation and induce the differentiation of BTSCs, but the differentiation is incomplete, terminal differentiation cannot be achieved and BTSs can be formed again.

  18. Large-scale automated image analysis for computational profiling of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices using Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Somasundar, Vinay; Megjhani, Murad; Xu, Yan; Lu, Yanbin; Padmanabhan, Raghav; Trett, Kristen; Shain, William; Roysam, Badri

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe the use of Python for large-scale automated server-based bio-image analysis in FARSIGHT, a free and open-source toolkit of image analysis methods for quantitative studies of complex and dynamic tissue microenvironments imaged by modern optical microscopes, including confocal, multi-spectral, multi-photon, and time-lapse systems. The core FARSIGHT modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, tracking, and machine learning are written in C++, leveraging widely used libraries including ITK, VTK, Boost, and Qt. For solving complex image analysis tasks, these modules must be combined into scripts using Python. As a concrete example, we consider the problem of analyzing 3-D multi-spectral images of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices, acquired using high-throughput multi-spectral spinning disk step-and-repeat confocal microscopy. The resulting images typically contain 5 fluorescent channels. Each channel consists of 6000 × 10,000 × 500 voxels with 16 bits/voxel, implying image sizes exceeding 250 GB. These images must be mosaicked, pre-processed to overcome imaging artifacts, and segmented to enable cellular-scale feature extraction. The features are used to identify cell types, and perform large-scale analysis for identifying spatial distributions of specific cell types relative to the device. Python was used to build a server-based script (Dell 910 PowerEdge servers with 4 sockets/server with 10 cores each, 2 threads per core and 1TB of RAM running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux linked to a RAID 5 SAN) capable of routinely handling image datasets at this scale and performing all these processing steps in a collaborative multi-user multi-platform environment. Our Python script enables efficient data storage and movement between computers and storage servers, logs all the processing steps, and performs full multi-threaded execution of all codes, including open and closed-source third party libraries.

  19. Large-scale automated image analysis for computational profiling of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices using Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eRey-Villamizar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe use of Python for large-scale automated server-based bio-image analysis in FARSIGHT, a free and open-source toolkit of image analysis methods for quantitative studies of complex and dynamic tissue microenvironments imaged by modern optical microscopes including confocal, multi-spectral, multi-photon, and time-lapse systems. The core FARSIGHT modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, tracking, and machine learning are written in C++, leveraging widely used libraries including ITK, VTK, Boost, and Qt. For solving complex image analysis task, these modules must be combined into scripts using Python. As a concrete example, we consider the problem of analyzing 3-D multi-spectral brain tissue images surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices, acquired using high-throughput multi-spectral spinning disk step-and-repeat confocal microscopy. The resulting images typically contain 5 fluorescent channels, 6,000$times$10,000$times$500 voxels with 16 bits/voxel, implying image sizes exceeding 250GB. These images must be mosaicked, pre-processed to overcome imaging artifacts, and segmented to enable cellular-scale feature extraction. The features are used to identify cell types, and perform large-scale analytics for identifying spatial distributions of specific cell types relative to the device. Python was used to build a server-based script (Dell 910 PowerEdge servers with 4 sockets/server with 10 cores each, 2 threads per core and 1TB of RAM running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux linked to a RAID 5 SAN capable of routinely handling image datasets at this scale and performing all these processing steps in a collaborative multi-user multi-platform environment consisting. Our Python script enables efficient data storage and movement between compute and storage servers, logging all processing steps, and performs full multi-threaded execution of all codes, including open and closed-source third party libraries.

  20. Atorvastatin treatment improves effects of implanted mesenchymal stem cells: meta-analysis of animal models with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guo; Xu, Qing; Luo, Rong; Gao, Jianfang; Chen, Hui; Deng, Yun; Li, Yongqing; Wang, Yuequn; Yuan, Wuzhou; Wu, Xiushan

    2015-12-14

    Previous studies reported that Atorvastatin (ATOR) can improve the efficacy of Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, the results of those studies were inconsistent. To clarify the beneficial effects of atorvastatin added to the cell therapy with MSCs in animal model of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies. Searches were performed using the PubMed database, the Excerpta Medica Database (Embase), the Science Citation Index, the China National Knowledge Information database, the Wanfang database, and the Chinese Scientific and Technological Journal Database (VIP database). The search term included "Atorvastatin (or Ator)", "Mesenchymal Stem Cells (or Mesenchymal Stem Cell or MSC or MSCs)" and "Acute Myocardial Infarction (or Myocardial Infarction or AMI or MI)". The endpoints were the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in animal model with AMI. In total, 5 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled analysis indicated a significant LVEF difference at 4 weeks follow-up between MSCs + ATOR combine group and MSCs alone group (95 % CI, 9.09-13.62 %; P 0.05) and inconsistency (I(2): 22 %). Atorvastatin can enhance the existing effects of MSCs transplantation, and this combinational therapy is a superior cell/pharmacological therapeutic approach that merits future preclinical and clinical studies.

  1. 2D and 3D nanopatterning of titanium for enhancing osteoinduction of stem cells at implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, Terje; McNamara, Laura E; Meek, R M Dominic; Dalby, Matthew J; Su, Bo

    2013-09-01

    The potential for the use of well-defined nanopatterns to control stem cell behaviour on surfaces has been well documented on polymeric substrates. In terms of translation to orthopaedic applications, there is a need to develop nanopatterning techniques for clinically relevant surfaces, such as the load-bearing material titanium (Ti). In this work, a novel nanopatterning method for Ti surfaces is demonstrated, using anodisation in combination with PS-b-P4VP block copolymer templates. The block copolymer templates allows for fabrication of titania nanodot patterns with precisely controlled dimensions and positioning which means that this technique can be used as a lithography-like patterning method of bulk Ti surfaces on both flat 2D and complex shaped 3D surfaces. In vitro studies demonstrate that precise tuning of the height of titania nanodot patterns can modulate the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Cells on both the 8 nm and 15 nm patterned surfaces showed a trend towards a greater number of the large, super-mature osteogenic focal adhesions than on the control polished Ti surface, but the osteogenic effect was more pronounced on the 15 nm substrate. Cells on this surface had the longest adhesions of all and produced larger osteocalcin deposits. The results suggest that nanopatterning of Ti using the technique of anodisation through a block copolymer template could provide a novel way to enhance osteoinductivity on Ti surfaces. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Visualization of cortical, subcortical and deep brain neural circuit dynamics during naturalistic mammalian behavior with head-mounted microscopes and chronically implanted lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendez, Shanna L; Jennings, Josh H; Ung, Randall L; Namboodiri, Vijay Mohan K; Zhou, Zhe Charles; Otis, James M; Nomura, Hiroshi; McHenry, Jenna A; Kosyk, Oksana; Stuber, Garret D

    2016-03-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators for visualizing dynamic cellular activity have greatly expanded our understanding of the brain. However, owing to the light-scattering properties of the brain, as well as the size and rigidity of traditional imaging technology, in vivo calcium imaging has been limited to superficial brain structures during head-fixed behavioral tasks. These limitations can now be circumvented by using miniature, integrated microscopes in conjunction with an implantable microendoscopic lens to guide light into and out of the brain, thus permitting optical access to deep brain (or superficial) neural ensembles during naturalistic behaviors. Here we describe steps to conduct such imaging studies using mice. However, we anticipate that the protocol can be easily adapted for use in other small vertebrates. Successful completion of this protocol will permit cellular imaging of neuronal activity and the generation of data sets with sufficient statistical power to correlate neural activity with stimulus presentation, physiological state and other aspects of complex behavioral tasks. This protocol takes 6-11 weeks to complete.

  3. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells in a fibrin implant enhance neovascularization in a peritoneal grafting site: a potential way to improve ovarian tissue transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manavella, D D; Cacciottola, L; Desmet, C M; Jordan, B F; Donnez, J; Amorim, C A; Dolmans, M M

    2018-02-01

    Do two different concentrations of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) embedded inside a fibrin scaffold have the potential to differentiate into vessels and aid vascularization in a peritoneal grafting site intended for ovarian tissue transplantation? Human ASCs in low and high concentrations differentiated into vessels when transplanted to mouse peritoneum inside a fibrin matrix, but only high ASC concentrations significantly increased human vessel area 14 days after transplantation. ASCs have multilineage differentiation potential, including proangiogenic properties and have been used in tissue engineering to enhance vascularization in transplanted tissues. Fibrin has been studied and used as an ASC-compatible biomaterial. In vivo experimental model using 22 severe combined immunodeficient mice. In total, 16 mice (eight per group) were intraperitoneally grafted with a fibrin scaffold loaded with two different human ASC concentrations (either 150 000 [L-ASC] or 1 500 000 [H-ASC] cells) and lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) crystals as oxygen-sensitive probes. Six mice were grafted with an empty fibrin (EF) implant containing only LiPc and served as controls. Levels of partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in implants were monitored in vivo by electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry (EPR). ASC identification, proliferation, and host and human vascularization were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). All analyses were performed on post-grafting Days 3, 7 and 14. Prospective experimental study conducted at the Gynecology Research Unit, Université Catholique de Louvain. All materials were used to perform pO2 measurements (EPR oximetry), as well as histological (hematoxylin-eosin staining) and IHC (anti-human vimentin, anti-human Ki67, anti-mouse and human double CD34) analyses. A significant increase in pO2 in implants was observed in all groups between Days 3 and 7 (P Scientifique de Belgique (FNRS-PDR Convention T.0077.14, Télévie Grant no. 7.6515.16F

  4. A functional study of EGFR and Notch signaling in brain cancer stem-like cells from glioblastoma multiforme (Ph.d.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Karina

    2013-01-01

    for new molecular and cellular targets that can improve the prognosis for GBM patients. One such target is the brain cancer stem-like cells (bCSC) that are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation, progression, treatment resistance and ultimately relapse. bCSC are identified based......Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumor in adults with a median survival for newly diagnosed GBM patients at less than 1.5 year. Despite intense treatment efforts the vast majority of patients will experience relapse and much research today is therefore searching...... on their resemblance to normal neural stem cells (NSC) and their tumorigenic potential. Like for NSC, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Notch receptor signaling pathways are believed to be important for the maintenance of bCSC. These pathways as such present promising targets in a future anti-bCSC GBM...

  5. Exophytic pilocytic astrocytoma of the brain stem in an adult with encasement of the caudal cranial nerve complex (IX-XII): presurgical anatomical neuroimaging using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousry, Indra; Yousry, Tarek A. [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); Muacevic, Alexander; Olteanu-Nerbe, Vlad [Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Naidich, Thomas P. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York (United States)

    2004-07-01

    We describe a rare case of adult pilocytic astrocytoma in which exophytic growth from the brain stem presented as a right cerebellopontine angle mass. An initial MRI examination using T2- and T1-weighted images without and with contrast suggested the diagnosis of schwannoma. Subsequent use of 3D CISS (three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state) and T1-weighted contrast-enhanced 3D MP-RAGE (three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo) sequences led to the diagnosis of an exophytic brain stem tumor, documented the precise relationships of the tumor to cranial nerve VIII, revealed encasement of cranial nerves IX-XII (later confirmed intraoperatively), and provided the proper basis for planning surgical management. (orig.)

  6. Brain responses to language-relevant musical features in adolescent cochlear implant users before and after an intensive music training program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bjørn; Weed, Ethan; Hansen, Mads

    Brain responses to language-relevant musical features in adolescent cochlear implant users before and after an intensive music training program Petersen B.1,2, Weed E.1,3, Hansen M.1,4, Sørensen S.D.3 , Sandmann P.5 , Vuust P.1,2 1Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University...... musical training. The finding points toward the possibility of improving appreciation of music in general for adolescent CI users, and using music as a motivating element in speech therapy programs....

  7. It takes two to tango, a dance between the cells of origin and cancer stem cells in the Drosophila larval brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Derek H; Lee, Cheng-Yu

    2014-04-01

    During malignant transformation the cells of origin give rise to cancer stem cells which possess the capacity to undergo limitless rounds of self-renewing division, regenerating themselves while producing more tumor cells. Within normal tissues, a limitless self-renewal capacity is unique to the stem cells, which divide asymmetrically to produce more restricted progenitors. Accumulating evidence suggests that misregulation of the self-renewal machinery in stem cell progeny can lead to tumorigenesis, but how it influences the properties of the resulting tumors remains unclear. Studies of the type II neural stem cell (neuroblast) lineages in the Drosophila larval brain have identified a regulatory cascade that promotes commitment to a progenitor cell identity by restricting their response to the self-renewal machinery. Brain tumor (Brat) and Numb initiate this cascade by asymmetrically extinguishing the activity of the self-renewal factors. Subsequently, Earmuff (Erm) and the SWI/SNF complex stably restrict the competence of the progenitor cell to respond to reactivation of self-renewal mechanisms. Together, this cascade programs the progenitor cell to undergo limited rounds of division, generating exclusive differentiated progeny. Here we review how defects in this cascade lead to tumor initiation and how inhibiting the self-renewal mechanisms may be an effective strategy to block CSC expansion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative transcriptome analysis in induced neural stem cells reveals defined neural cell identities in vitro and after transplantation into the adult rodent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Anna-Lena; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Zerfass, Christina; Senner, Volker; Ehrlich, Marc; Psathaki, Olympia E; Han, Dong Wook; Tapia, Natalia; Zaehres, Holm; Schöler, Hans R; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Hargus, Gunnar

    2016-05-01

    Reprogramming technology enables the production of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from somatic cells by direct transdifferentiation. However, little is known on how neural programs in these induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) differ from those of alternative stem cell populations in vitro and in vivo. Here, we performed transcriptome analyses on murine iNSCs in comparison to brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and pluripotent stem cell-derived NPCs, which revealed distinct global, neural, metabolic and cell cycle-associated marks in these populations. iNSCs carried a hindbrain/posterior cell identity, which could be shifted towards caudal, partially to rostral but not towards ventral fates in vitro. iNSCs survived after transplantation into the rodent brain and exhibited in vivo-characteristics, neural and metabolic programs similar to transplanted NSCs. However, iNSCs vastly retained caudal identities demonstrating cell-autonomy of regional programs in vivo. These data could have significant implications for a variety of in vitro- and in vivo-applications using iNSCs. Copyright © 2016 Roslin Cells Ltd. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuronal coupling by endogenous electric fields: cable theory and applications to coincidence detector neurons in the auditory brain stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwyn, Joshua H; Rinzel, John

    2016-04-01

    The ongoing activity of neurons generates a spatially and time-varying field of extracellular voltage (Ve). This Ve field reflects population-level neural activity, but does it modulate neural dynamics and the function of neural circuits? We provide a cable theory framework to study how a bundle of model neurons generates Ve and how this Ve feeds back and influences membrane potential (Vm). We find that these "ephaptic interactions" are small but not negligible. The model neural population can generate Ve with millivolt-scale amplitude, and this Ve perturbs the Vm of "nearby" cables and effectively increases their electrotonic length. After using passive cable theory to systematically study ephaptic coupling, we explore a test case: the medial superior olive (MSO) in the auditory brain stem. The MSO is a possible locus of ephaptic interactions: sounds evoke large (millivolt scale)Vein vivo in this nucleus. The Ve response is thought to be generated by MSO neurons that perform a known neuronal computation with submillisecond temporal precision (coincidence detection to encode sound source location). Using a biophysically based model of MSO neurons, we find millivolt-scale ephaptic interactions consistent with the passive cable theory results. These subtle membrane potential perturbations induce changes in spike initiation threshold, spike time synchrony, and time difference sensitivity. These results suggest that ephaptic coupling may influence MSO function. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. [A case of primary brain-stem injury recovered from persistent vegetative state after L-dopa administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, W; Sugimoto, K; Sato, N; Watanabe, T; Yanaka, K; Matsumura, A; Nose, T

    1999-12-01

    A 51-year-old male was transferred to our hospital just after traffic accident. On admission, the patient was comatose (Glasgow Coma Scale of 6) and showed a left hemiparesis with a left oculomotor nerve palsy. Computed tomography demonstrated a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage without mass lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high intensity lesions on the left dorsolateral midbrain and the right cerebral peduncle. The distribution of lesions implied diffuse axonal injury involving dopaminergic systems such as the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area. After several months of conservative management, the patient showed no recovery and was diagnosed as persistent vegetable state. The administration of L-dopa was then started and the patient showed remarkable neurological improvement. Therefore the patient's neurological status was thought to be modified with primary brain stem injury and accompanying traumatic Parkinson's syndrome. It is important to understand "pseudo" persistent vegetative state in the management of patients showing prolonged consciousness disturbance. L-dopa should be considered as the drugs of pharmacological intervention for the patients of masked parkinsonism behind "pseudo" persistent vegetative state whose dopaminergic systems might have been damaged.

  11. Transplantation of Hypoxic-Preconditioned Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retards Intervertebral Disc Degeneration via Enhancing Implanted Cell Survival and Migration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiheng Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Special hypoxic and hypertonic microenvironment in intervertebral discs (IVDs decreases the treatment effect of cell transplantation. We investigated the hypothesis that hypoxic preconditioning (HP could improve the therapeutic effect of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs to IVD degeneration. Methods. BMSCs from green fluorescent protein-transgenic rats were pretreated with cobalt chloride (CoCl2, 100 μM, 24 h for hypoxic conditions in vitro. Apoptosis (related pathways of caspase-3 and bcl-2 and migration (related pathways of HIF-1α and CXCR4 were detected in BMSCs. In vivo, BMSCs and HP BMSCs (H-BMSCs were injected into the rat model of IVD degeneration. The IVD height, survival, migration, and differentiation of transplanted BMSCs and matrix protein expression (collagen II, aggrecan, and MMP-13 were tested. Results. H-BMSCs could extensively decrease IVD degeneration by increasing IVD height and collagen II and aggrecan expressions when compared with BMSCs. Significantly, more GFP-positive BMSCs were observed in the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus regions of IVD. HP could significantly decrease BMSC apoptosis (activating bcl-2 and inhibiting caspase-3 and improve BMSC migration (increasing HIF-1α and CXCR4 in vitro. Conclusion. HP could significantly enhance the capacity of BMSCs to repair DDD by increasing the survival and migration of implanted cells and increasing matrix protein expression.

  12. In vivo near-infrared imaging for the tracking of systemically delivered mesenchymal stem cells: tropism for brain tumors and biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Muk; Jeong, Chang Hyun; Woo, Ji Sun; Ryu, Chung Heon; Lee, Jeong-Hwa; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based gene therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of various neurological diseases, including brain tumors. However, the tracking of in vivo stem cell migration, distribution, and survival need to be defined for their clinical application. The systemic routes of stem cell delivery must be determined because direct intracerebral injection as a cure for brain tumors is an invasive method. In this study, we show for the first time that near-infrared (NIR) imaging can reveal the distribution and tumor tropism of intravenously injected MSCs in an intracranial xenograft glioma model. MSCs were labeled with NIR fluorescent nanoparticles, and the effects of the NIR dye on cell proliferation and migratory capacity were evaluated in vitro. We investigated the tumor-targeting properties and tissue distribution of labeled MSCs introduced by intravenous injection and followed by in vivo imaging analysis, histological analysis, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed no cytotoxicity or change in the overall growth rate and characteristics of labeled MSCs compared with control MSCs. NIR fluorescent imaging showed the organ distribution and targeted tumor tropism of systemically injected human MSCs. A significant number of MSCs accumulated specifically at the tumor site in the mouse brain. These results suggest that NIR-based cell tracking is a potentially useful imaging technique to visualize cell survival, migration, and distribution for the application of MSC-mediated therapies in the treatment of malignant gliomas.

  13. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  14. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  15. Systematic optimization of an engineered hydrogel allows for selective control of human neural stem cell survival and differentiation after transplantation in the stroke brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshayedi, Pouria; Nih, Lina R.; Llorente, Irene L.; Berg, Andrew R.; Cinkornpumin, Jessica; Lowry, William E.; Segura, Tatiana; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapies have shown promise in promoting recovery in stroke but have been limited by poor cell survival and differentiation. We have developed a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based self-polymerizing hydrogel that serves as a platform for adhesion of structural motifs and a depot release for growth factors to promote transplant stem cell survival and differentiation. We took an iterative approach in optimizing the complex combination of mechanical, biochemical and biological properties of an HA cell scaffold. First, we optimized stiffness for a minimal reaction of adjacent brain to the transplant. Next hydrogel crosslinkers sensitive to matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) were incorporated as they promoted vascularization. Finally, candidate adhesion motifs and growth factors were systemically changed in vitro using a design of experiment approach to optimize stem cell survival or proliferation. The optimized HA hydrogel, tested in vivo, promoted survival of encapsulated human neural progenitor cells (iPS-NPCs) after transplantation into the stroke core and differentially tuned transplanted cell fate through the promotion of glial, neuronal or immature/progenitor states. This HA hydrogel can be tracked in vivo with MRI. A hydrogel can serve as a therapeutic adjunct in a stem cell therapy through selective control of stem cell survival and differentiation in vivo. PMID:27521617

  16. Gene targeting study reveals unexpected expression of brain-expressed X-linked 2 in endocrine and tissue stem/progenitor cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Keiichi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Ryo; Tajima, Yoko; Yanagida, Ayaka; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Kakuta, Shigeru; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2014-10-24

    Identification of genes specifically expressed in stem/progenitor cells is an important issue in developmental and stem cell biology. Genome-wide gene expression analyses in liver cells performed in this study have revealed a strong expression of X-linked genes that include members of the brain-expressed X-linked (Bex) gene family in stem/progenitor cells. Bex family genes are expressed abundantly in the neural cells and have been suggested to play important roles in the development of nervous tissues. However, the physiological role of its individual members and the precise expression pattern outside the nervous system remain largely unknown. Here, we focused on Bex2 and examined its role and expression pattern by generating knock-in mice; the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) was inserted into the Bex2 locus. Bex2-deficient mice were viable and fertile under laboratory growth conditions showing no obvious phenotypic abnormalities. Through an immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry-based approach, we observed unique EGFP reporter expression patterns in endocrine and stem/progenitor cells of the liver, pyloric stomach, and hematopoietic system. Although Bex2 seems to play redundant roles in vivo, these results suggest the significance and potential applications of Bex2 in studies of endocrine and stem/progenitor cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. SU-E-T-570: Management of Radiation Oncology Patients with Cochlear Implant and Other Bionic Devices in the Brain and Head and Neck Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, F.Q; Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the current status of clinical usage of cochlear implant (CI) and other bionic devices (BD) in the brain and head and neck regions (BH and N) and their management in patients during radiotherapy to ensure patient health and safety as well as optimum radiation delivery. Methods: Literature review was performed with both CIs and radiotherapy and their variants as keywords in PubMed, INSPEC and other sources. The focus was on CIs during radiotherapy, but it also included other BDs in BHȦN, such as auditory brainstem implant, bionic retinal implant, and hearing aids, among others. Results: Interactions between CIs and radiation may cause CIs malfunction. The presence of CIs may also cause suboptimum dose distribution if a treatment plan was not well designed. A few studies were performed for the hearing functions of CIs under irradiations of 4 MV and 6 MV x-rays. However, x-rays with higher energies (10 to 18 MV) broadly used in radiotherapy have not been explored. These higher energetic beams are more damaging to electronics due to strong penetrating power and also due to neutrons generated in the treatment process. Modern CIs are designed with more and more complicated integrated circuits, which may be more susceptible to radiation damage and malfunction. Therefore, careful management is important for safety and treatment outcomes. Conclusion: Although AAPM TG-34, TG-63, and TG-203 (update of TG-34, not published yet) reports may be referenced for management of CIs and other BDs in the brain and H and N regions, a site- and device-specified guideline should be developed for CIs and other BDs. Additional evaluation of CI functions under clinically relevant set-ups should also be performed to provide clinicians with better knowledge in clinical decision making

  18. SU-E-T-570: Management of Radiation Oncology Patients with Cochlear Implant and Other Bionic Devices in the Brain and Head and Neck Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, F.Q; Chen, Z; Nath, R [Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Yale UniversitySchool of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the current status of clinical usage of cochlear implant (CI) and other bionic devices (BD) in the brain and head and neck regions (BH and N) and their management in patients during radiotherapy to ensure patient health and safety as well as optimum radiation delivery. Methods: Literature review was performed with both CIs and radiotherapy and their variants as keywords in PubMed, INSPEC and other sources. The focus was on CIs during radiotherapy, but it also included other BDs in BHȦN, such as auditory brainstem implant, bionic retinal implant, and hearing aids, among others. Results: Interactions between CIs and radiation may cause CIs malfunction. The presence of CIs may also cause suboptimum dose distribution if a treatment plan was not well designed. A few studies were performed for the hearing functions of CIs under irradiations of 4 MV and 6 MV x-rays. However, x-rays with higher energies (10 to 18 MV) broadly used in radiotherapy have not been explored. These higher energetic beams are more damaging to electronics due to strong penetrating power and also due to neutrons generated in the treatment process. Modern CIs are designed with more and more complicated integrated circuits, which may be more susceptible to radiation damage and malfunction. Therefore, careful management is important for safety and treatment outcomes. Conclusion: Although AAPM TG-34, TG-63, and TG-203 (update of TG-34, not published yet) reports may be referenced for management of CIs and other BDs in the brain and H and N regions, a site- and device-specified guideline should be developed for CIs and other BDs. Additional evaluation of CI functions under clinically relevant set-ups should also be performed to provide clinicians with better knowledge in clinical decision making.

  19. IL4/STAT6 Signaling Activates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Neurogenesis upon Amyloid-β42 Aggregation in Adult Zebrafish Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabesh Bhattarai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human brains are prone to neurodegeneration, given that endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs fail to support neurogenesis. To investigate the molecular programs potentially mediating neurodegeneration-induced NSPC plasticity in regenerating organisms, we generated an Amyloid-β42 (Aβ42-dependent neurotoxic model in adult zebrafish brain through cerebroventricular microinjection of cell-penetrating Aβ42 derivatives. Aβ42 deposits in neurons and causes phenotypes reminiscent of amyloid pathophysiology: apoptosis, microglial activation, synaptic degeneration, and learning deficits. Aβ42 also induces NSPC proliferation and enhanced neurogenesis. Interleukin-4 (IL4 is activated primarily in neurons and microglia/macrophages in response to Aβ42 and is sufficient to increase NSPC proliferation and neurogenesis via STAT6 phosphorylation through the IL4 receptor in NSPCs. Our results reveal a crosstalk between neurons and immune cells mediated by IL4/STAT6 signaling, which induces NSPC plasticity in zebrafish brains.

  20. Effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma on bone regeneration for osseointegration of dental implants: preliminary study in canine three-wall intrabony defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeong-Ho; Han, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Seong-Ho; Lee, Myung-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Jin; Song, Sun U; Oh, Namsik

    2014-07-01

    Tissue engineering has been applied to overcome the obstacles encountered with bone regeneration for the placement of dental implants. The purpose of this study was to determine the bone formation ability of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) when applied separately or together to the intrabony defect around dental implants with a porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold. Standardized three-wall intrabony defects (4 × 4 × 4 mm) were created at the mesial of each dental implant site in four mongrel dogs. Defects were then grafted with the following materials: HA + BMMSCs (HS group), HA + PRP (HP group), HA + BMMSCs + PRP (HSP group), and HA scaffold alone (HA group). The level of bone formation (bone density) and osseointegration (bone-to-implant contact [BIC]) in bone defects around the implants were evaluated by histological and histometric analysis at 6 and 12 weeks after the placement of implants. HA, HS, HP, and HSP groups generally showed an increase in bone density and BIC between 6 and 12 weeks, except BIC in the HS group. Although no statistically significant differences were found among HA, HS, HP, and HSP groups (p > 0.05), the highest level of bone density and BIC were observed in the HSP group after the 12-week healing period. Furthermore, the level of bone maturation was higher in the HSP group than in the other groups as determined histologically. The findings of this preliminary study suggest that BMMSCs and PRP combined with HA scaffold may provide additional therapeutic effects on bone regeneration and improve osseointegration in bone defects around dental implants. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Comparison of registration accuracy of skin- and bone-implanted fiducials for frameless stereotaxis of the brain: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammirati, Mario; Gross, Jeffrey D; Ammirati, Giuseppe; Dugan, Sharon

    2002-08-01

    The registration accuracy of skin- and bone-implanted fiducials using a frameless stereotactic system were analyzed prospectively.Twenty-eight patients underwent resection of intra-axial neoplasmas after both skin- and bone-implantable fiducial markers were placed. Both sets of fiducials were independently co-registered to a magnetic resonance imaging data set acquired preoperatively using the ISG Viewing Wandtrade mark. Root mean square errors were recorded as an objective measure of registration accuracy of the two types of fiducials.Root mean square errors of bone-implanted fiducials registration were lower than those of skin fiducials; however, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.206).The registration accuracy of skin- and bone-implanted fiducials appears to be similar. Still, bone-implanted fiducials may be advantageous compared to skin fiducials when re-registration of the patient-image space is desired intraoperatively such as during major drift in the patient's position or after surgical repositioning.

  2. Bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction resulting from vertebral artery injury following cervical trauma without radiographic damage of the spinal column: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimata, Yoshikuni; Sato, Kotaro; Suzuki, Yoshiaki [Iwate Prefectural Chubu Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kitakami (Japan); Murakami, Hideki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    Vertebral artery injury can be a complication of cervical spine injury. Although most cases are asymptomatic, the rare case progresses to severe neurological impairment and fatal outcomes. We experienced a case of bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction with fatal outcome resulting from vertebral artery injury associated with cervical spine trauma. A 69-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of tetraplegia after falling down the stairs and hitting his head on the floor. Marked bony damage of the cervical spine was not apparent on radiographs and CT scans, so the injury was initially considered to be a cervical cord injury without bony damage. However, an intensity change in the intervertebral disc at C5/C6, and a ventral epidural hematoma were observed on MRI. A CT angiogram of the neck showed the right vertebral artery was completely occluded at the C4 level of the spine. Forty-eight hours after injury, the patient lapsed into drowsy consciousness. The cranial CT scan showed a massive low-density area in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and brain stem. Anticoagulation was initiated after a diagnosis of the right vertebral artery injury, but the patient developed bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction. The patient's brain herniation progressed and the patient died 52 h after injury. We considered that not only anticoagulation but also treatment for thrombosis would have been needed to prevent cranial embolism. We fully realize that early and appropriate treatment are essential to improve the treatment results, and constructing a medical system with a team of orthopedists, radiologists, and neurosurgeons is also very important. (orig.)

  3. Bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction resulting from vertebral artery injury following cervical trauma without radiographic damage of the spinal column: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimata, Yoshikuni; Murakami, Hideki; Sato, Kotaro; Suzuki, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral artery injury can be a complication of cervical spine injury. Although most cases are asymptomatic, the rare case progresses to severe neurological impairment and fatal outcomes. We experienced a case of bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction with fatal outcome resulting from vertebral artery injury associated with cervical spine trauma. A 69-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of tetraplegia after falling down the stairs and hitting his head on the floor. Marked bony damage of the cervical spine was not apparent on radiographs and CT scans, so the injury was initially considered to be a cervical cord injury without bony damage. However, an intensity change in the intervertebral disc at C5/C6, and a ventral epidural hematoma were observed on MRI. A CT angiogram of the neck showed the right vertebral artery was completely occluded at the C4 level of the spine. Forty-eight hours after injury, the patient lapsed into drowsy consciousness. The cranial CT scan showed a massive low-density area in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and brain stem. Anticoagulation was initiated after a diagnosis of the right vertebral artery injury, but the patient developed bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction. The patient's brain herniation progressed and the patient died 52 h after injury. We considered that not only anticoagulation but also treatment for thrombosis would have been needed to prevent cranial embolism. We fully realize that early and appropriate treatment are essential to improve the treatment results, and constructing a medical system with a team of orthopedists, radiologists, and neurosurgeons is also very important.

  4. Bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction resulting from vertebral artery injury following cervical trauma without radiographic damage of the spinal column: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimata, Yoshikuni; Sato, Kotaro; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Murakami, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral artery injury can be a complication of cervical spine injury. Although most cases are asymptomatic, the rare case progresses to severe neurological impairment and fatal outcomes. We experienced a case of bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction with fatal outcome resulting from vertebral artery injury associated with cervical spine trauma. A 69-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of tetraplegia after falling down the stairs and hitting his head on the floor. Marked bony damage of the cervical spine was not apparent on radiographs and CT scans, so the injury was initially considered to be a cervical cord injury without bony damage. However, an intensity change in the intervertebral disc at C5/C6, and a ventral epidural hematoma were observed on MRI. A CT angiogram of the neck showed the right vertebral artery was completely occluded at the C4 level of the spine. Forty-eight hours after injury, the patient lapsed into drowsy consciousness. The cranial CT scan showed a massive low-density area in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and brain stem. Anticoagulation was initiated after a diagnosis of the right vertebral artery injury, but the patient developed bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction. The patient's brain herniation progressed and the patient died 52 h after injury. We considered that not only anticoagulation but also treatment for thrombosis would have been needed to prevent cranial embolism. We fully realize that early and appropriate treatment are essential to improve the treatment results, and constructing a medical system with a team of orthopedists, radiologists, and neurosurgeons is also very important. (orig.)

  5. Merging DBS with viral vector or stem cell implantation: “hybrid” stereotactic surgery as an evolution in the surgical treatment of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Rowland

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that is currently managed using a broad array of symptom-based strategies. However, targeting its molecular origins represents the potential to discover disease-modifying therapies. Deep brain stimulation (DBS, a highly successful treatment modality for PD symptoms, addresses errant electrophysiological signaling pathways in the basal ganglia. In contrast, ongoing clinical trials testing gene and cell replacement therapies propose to protect or restore neuronal-based physiologic dopamine transmission in the striatum. Given promising new platforms to enhance target localization'such as interventional MRI-guided stereotaxy'the opportunity now exists to create hybrid therapies that combine DBS with gene therapy and/or cell implantation. In this mini-review, we discuss approaches used for central nervous system biologic delivery in PD patients in previous trials and propose a new set of strategies based on novel molecular targets. A multifaceted approach, if successful, may not only contribute to our understanding of PD pathology but could introduce a new era of disease modification.

  6. Conventional and cross-correlation brain-stem auditory evoked responses in the white leghorn chick: rate manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, R.; Jones, S.; Jones, T.

    1994-01-01

    Rate-dependent changes in the chick brain-stem auditory evoked response (BAER) using conventional averaging and a cross-correlation technique were investigated. Five 15- to 19-day-old white leghorn chicks were anesthetized with Chloropent. In each chick, the left ear was acoustically stimulated. Electrical pulses of 0.1-ms duration were shaped, attenuated, and passed through a current driver to an Etymotic ER-2 which was sealed in the ear canal. Electrical activity from stainless-steel electrodes was amplified, filtered (300-3000 Hz) and digitized at 20 kHz. Click levels included 70 and 90 dB peSPL. In each animal, conventional BAERs were obtained at rates ranging from 5 to 90 Hz. BAERs were also obtained using a cross-correlation technique involving pseudorandom pulse sequences called maximum length sequences (MLSs). The minimum time between pulses, called the minimum pulse interval (MPI), ranged from 0.5 to 6 ms. Two BAERs were obtained for each condition. Dependent variables included the latency and amplitude of the cochlear microphonic (CM), wave 2 and wave 3. BAERs were observed in all chicks, for all level by rate combinations for both conventional and MLS BAERs. There was no effect of click level or rate on the latency of the CM. The latency of waves 2 and 3 increased with decreasing click level and increasing rate. CM amplitude decreased with decreasing click level, but was not influenced by click rate for the 70 dB peSPL condition. For the 90 dB peSPL click, CM amplitude was uninfluenced by click rate for conventional averaging. For MLS BAERs, CM amplitude was similar to conventional averaging for longer MPIs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  7. Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Breast Implants Breast Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Breast implants are medical devices that are implanted under the ...

  8. Implantation of glioblastoma spheroids into organotypic brain slice cultures as a model for investigating effects of irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petterson, Stine Asferg; Jakobsen, Ida Pind; Jensen, Stine Skov

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent malignant brain tumor with an overall survival of only 14.6 months. Novel in vitro models preserving both tumor tissue and the interface between tumor and brain tissue are highly needed in order to develop novel efficient therapeutic strategies. Additionally, mod...

  9. Comparing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor secretion of induced neurotrophic factor secreting cells from human adipose and bone marrow-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Razavi, Mohamad Reza; Zarkesh Esfahani, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad; Mostafavi, Fatemeh Sadat

    2013-08-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) may be equally beneficial in treating neurodegenerative diseases. However, ADSCs have practical advantages. In this study, we aimed to induce neurotrophic factors secreting cells in human ADSCs. Then, we compared the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) secretion in neurotrophic factors secreting cells from human adipose and bone marrow-derived stem cells. Isolated human ADSCs and BMSCs were induced to neurotrophic factor (NTF)-secreting cells. The levels of expression and secretion of BDNF and CTNF of induced cells were assessed using immunocytochemical, Real-Time polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The level of BDNF significantly increased in both the induced mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) relative to ADSCs and the BMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, ELISA analysis showed that the release of BDNF in the induced BMSCs was almost twofold more than the induced ADSCs. Overall, NTF-secreting factor cells derived BMSCs and ADSCs could secret a range of different growth factors. Therefore, the variation in neurotrophic factors of different induced MSC populations suggest the possible beneficial effect of each specific kind of neurotrophic factor secreting cells for the treatment of a particular neurodegenerative disease. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  10. Comparative study of expression and activity of glucose transporters between stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells and hCMEC/D3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmad, Abraham J

    2017-10-01

    Glucose constitutes a major source of energy of mammalian brains. Glucose uptake at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) occurs through a facilitated glucose transport, through glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), although other isoforms have been described at the BBB. Mutations in GLUT1 are associated with the GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, yet none of the current in vitro models of the human BBB maybe suited for modeling such a disorder. In this study, we investigated the expression of glucose transporters and glucose diffusion across brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) derived from healthy patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We investigated the expression of different glucose transporters at the BBB using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry and measured glucose uptake and diffusion across BMEC monolayers obtained from two iPSC lines and from hCMEC/D3 cells. BMEC monolayers showed expression of several glucose transporters, in particular GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. Diffusion of glucose across the monolayers was mediated via a saturable transcellular mechanism and partially inhibited by pharmacological inhibitors. Taken together, our study suggests the presence of several glucose transporters isoforms at the human BBB and demonstrates the feasibility of modeling glucose across the BBB using patient-derived stem cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. A Randomized Seven-Year Study on Performance of the Stemmed Metal M2a-Magnum and Ceramic C2a-Taper, and the Resurfacing ReCap Hip Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgwardt, Arne; Borgwardt, Lotte; Zerahn, Bo; Daugaard, Henrik; Borgwardt, Lise; Ribel-Madsen, Søren

    2017-12-05

    The large-diameter metal-on-metal hip prostheses were expected to have low wear and reduced dislocation rate compared to the traditional metal-on-polyethylene implants. We compare 2 such prostheses, the ReCap resurfacing implant and the M2a-Magnum stemmed implant, with the C2a ceramic-on-ceramic stemmed implant as to clinical performance, serum concentrations of prosthesis metals, and the durability of the implants in a randomized, controlled clinical trial at 7 years of follow-up. All included patients had osteoarthritis. Preoperatively, the size of the implants was estimated from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Follow-up data included serum cobalt and chromium concentrations, Oxford and Harris Hip Scores, leg press and abduction force, 6-minute walk distance, WOMAC and SF-36 self-assessment scores, and from the 7th postoperative year also ultrasonography (US) examination of the soft tissue adjacent to the implant as well as MRI with metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS-MRI) when indicated. One hundred fifty-two hips in 146 patients were included. The serum cobalt and chromium concentrations were significantly higher for the 2 metal-on-metal prostheses than for the ceramic-on-ceramic, with the M2a-Magnum as the highest. No significant difference was found between the groups concerning physical performance measurements and scores as well as dislocations and prosthesis survival. Five revisions were done and concerned all groups, for reasons of pain, high serum cobalt and chromium concentrations, cystic fluid collection around the joint, and infection. Metal concentrations, US, and MARS-MRI contributed to the decision making regarding prosthesis revision. Metal concentrations were significantly higher for the metal-on-metal prostheses than for the ceramic-on-ceramic. The clinical performance was good in all 3 prosthesis groups. Metal concentrations, US, and MARS-MRI findings were of use to identify hips needing revision. ID Number in Clinical

  12. PTEN, a negative regulator of PI3K/Akt signaling, sustains brain stem cardiovascular regulation during mevinphos intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ching-Yi; Wu, Jacqueline C C; Fang, Chi; Chang, Alice Y W

    2017-09-01

    Activation of PI3K/Akt signaling, leading to upregulation of nitric oxide synthase II (NOS II)/peroxynitrite cascade in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the brain stem site that maintains blood pressure and sympathetic vasomotor tone, underpins cardiovascular depression induced by the organophosphate pesticide mevinphos. By exhibiting dual-specificity protein- and lipid-phosphatase activity, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) directly antagonizes the PI3K/Akt signaling by dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate, the lipid product of PI3K. Based on the guiding hypothesis that PTEN may sustain brain stem cardiovascular regulation during mevinphos intoxication as a negative regulator of PI3K/Akt signaling in the RVLM, we aimed in this study to clarify the mechanistic role of PTEN in mevinphos-induced circulatory depression. Microinjection bilaterally of mevinphos (10 nmol) into the RVLM of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats induced a progressive hypotension and a decrease in baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone. There was progressive augmentation in PTEN activity as reflected by a decrease in the oxidized form of PTEN in the RVLM during mevinhpos intoxication, without significant changes in the mRNA or protein level of PTEN. Loss-of-function manipulations of PTEN in the RVLM by immunoneutralization, pharmacological blockade or siRNA pretreatment significantly potentiated the increase in Akt activity or NOS II/peroxynitrite cascade in the RVLM, enhanced the elicited hypotension and exacerbated the already reduced baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone. We conclude that augmented PTEN activity via a decrease of its oxidized form in the RVLM sustains brain stem cardiovascular regulation during mevinphos intoxication via downregulation of the NOS II/peroxynitrite cascade as a negative regulator of PI3K/Akt signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress in brain by dietary inclusion of red dye extracts from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboh, Ganiya; Akomolafe, Toyin L; Adetuyi, Abayomi O

    2010-10-01

    The stem of sorghum is used as color additives in cooking meals and taken as beverages when steeped or boiled in water as folklore for the management of anemia and some other diseases. This study sought to assess the antioxidant and neuroprotective potentials of red dye extract from sorghum stem on cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress in rat brain. Wistar strain albino rats were fed diet supplemented with the red dye (0.5% and 1.0% inclusion) for 14 days. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in average feed intake and weight gain of rats fed the basal diet and the red dye-supplemented diet. However, intraperitoneal administration of cyclophosphamide (75 mg/kg of body weight) 24 hours prior the termination of the experiment caused a significant (P brain malondialdehyde (MDA) content and serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase in those rats fed diet without the dye supplement, whereas there was a significant decrease (P brain MDA content and serum enzyme activities in rats fed diet with the dye in a concentration-dependent manner. The protective effect of the red dye against cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress could be attributed to the high phenolic content (56.2%) and antioxidant activities of the red dye as typified by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging ability, reducing properties, and Fe(2+) chelating ability. Therefore, dietary inclusion of the red dye from sorghum stem could be harnessed in the management of neurodegenerative diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  14. Preservation of memory with conformal avoidance of the hippocampal neural stem-cell compartment during whole-brain radiotherapy for brain metastases (RTOG 0933): a phase II multi-institutional trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondi, Vinai; Pugh, Stephanie L; Tome, Wolfgang A; Caine, Chip; Corn, Ben; Kanner, Andrew; Rowley, Howard; Kundapur, Vijayananda; DeNittis, Albert; Greenspoon, Jeffrey N; Konski, Andre A; Bauman, Glenn S; Shah, Sunjay; Shi, Wenyin; Wendland, Merideth; Kachnic, Lisa; Mehta, Minesh P

    2014-12-01

    Hippocampal neural stem-cell injury during whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) may play a role in memory decline. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy can be used to avoid conformally the hippocampal neural stem-cell compartment during WBRT (HA-WBRT). RTOG 0933 was a single-arm phase II study of HA-WBRT for brain metastases with prespecified comparison with a historical control of patients treated with WBRT without hippocampal avoidance. Eligible adult patients with brain metastases received HA-WBRT to 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Standardized cognitive function and quality-of-life (QOL) assessments were performed at baseline and 2, 4, and 6 months. The primary end point was the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Delayed Recall (HVLT-R DR) at 4 months. The historical control demonstrated a 30% mean relative decline in HVLT-R DR from baseline to 4 months. To detect a mean relative decline ≤ 15% in HVLT-R DR after HA-WBRT, 51 analyzable patients were required to ensure 80% statistical power with α = 0.05. Of 113 patients accrued from March 2011 through November 2012, 42 patients were analyzable at 4 months. Mean relative decline in HVLT-R DR from baseline to 4 months was 7.0% (95% CI, -4.7% to 18.7%), significantly lower in comparison with the historical control (P memory and QOL as compared with historical series. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Myelination is Decreased in the Brain Stem of Small Piglets Compared to Larger Littermates During Late Gestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preweaning mortality is associated with low birth weights. Reduced myelination in the brain of low birth weight piglets has been reported, however, these studies measured brain cholesterol, which is not myelin. Thus, we compared myelination in brain regions associated with coordinated movement and r...

  16. Feasibility, safety, and potential demand of emergent brain magnetic resonance imaging of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Ono

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Our study found the potential demand of brain MRI of patients with CIEDs in emergency situations compared with scheduled scanning, which was shown to be feasible and safe for the diagnosis and treatment of an acute stroke.

  17. A novel test method for evaluation of the abrasive wear behaviour of total hip stems at the interface between implant surface and bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, R; Steinhauser, E; Holzwarth, U; Schmitt, M; Mittelmeier, W

    2004-01-01

    After total hip replacement, some cemented titanium stems show above-average early loosening rates. Increased release of wear particles and resulting reaction of the peri-prosthetic tissue were considered responsible. The objective was to develop a test method for analysing the abrasive wear behaviour of cemented stems and for generating wear particles at the interface with the bone cement. By means of the novel test device, cemented hip stems with different designs, surface topographies and material compositions using various bone cements could be investigated. Before testing, the cemented stems were disconnected from the cement mantle to simulate the situation of stem loosening (debonding). Subsequently, constant radial contact pressures were applied on to the stem surface by a force-controlled hydraulic cylinder. Oscillating micromotions of the stem (+/- 250 microm; 3 x 10(6)cycles; 5 Hz) were carried out at the cement interface initiating the wear process. The usability of the method was demonstrated by testing geometrically identical Ti-6A1-7Nb and Co-28Cr-6Mo hip stems (n= 12) with definite rough and smooth surfaces, combined with commercially available bone cement containing zirconium oxide particles. Under identical frictional conditions with the rough shot-blasted stems, clearly more wear particles were generated than with the smooth stems, whereas the material composition of the hip stems had less impact on the wear behaviour.

  18. Demonstration of ipsilateral brain activation by noise in patients profoundly deaf with cochlear implant, or unilaterally deaf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, H.; Wieler, H.; Morgenstern, C.; Lipman, J.; Langen, K.-J.; Schmid, A.; Rota, E.; Patton, D.; Feinendegen, L.F.

    1986-01-01

    Two groups of patients with hearing handicaps have been investigated with PET and F-18-2-FDG. Since these patients were unilaterally deaf or profoundly deaf with a cochlear implant installed, monaural stimulation was possible excluding any effects of bone conduction to the contralateral ear. White noise was used as acoustic stimulus in unilaterally deaf patients. The peripheral auditory nerve of cochlear implant patients was stimulated by electrical impulses which were encoded from music or a 4-tone mixture by an electronic speech processor. The non-music stimuli were chosen to avoid associative cortical reactions. In both groups response to the stimuli by increase of glucose consumption (LCMRglc) was found not only in the contralateral primary auditory cortex as expected from neuroanatomical knowledge, but also in the ipsilateral auditory cortex. Furthermore there was no correlation between the hemisphere showing increased LCMRglc and the side of stimulation or the type of stimulus. The similarity of results obtained in both groups by acoustical and electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve suggests that this kind of measurement might be a tool to predict or check the performance of a cochlear implant in a profoundly deaf patient. The finding of increased LCMRglc in the area of the normal auditory cortex in patients profoundly deaf since birth contradicts the hypothesis of degeneration of this cortical center in such patients. (Author)

  19. dp53 Restrains ectopic neural stem cell formation in the Drosophila brain in a non-apoptotic mechanism involving Archipelago and cyclin E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingshi Ouyang

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that tumor-initiating stem cells or cancer stem cells (CSCs possibly originating from normal stem cells may be the root cause of certain malignancies. How stem cell homeostasis is impaired in tumor tissues is not well understood, although certain tumor suppressors have been implicated. In this study, we use the Drosophila neural stem cells (NSCs called neuroblasts as a model to study this process. Loss-of-function of Numb, a key cell fate determinant with well-conserved mammalian counterparts, leads to the formation of ectopic neuroblasts and a tumor phenotype in the larval brain. Overexpression of the Drosophila tumor suppressor p53 (dp53 was able to suppress ectopic neuroblast formation caused by numb loss-of-function. This occurred in a non-apoptotic manner and was independent of Dacapo, the fly counterpart of the well-characterized mammalian p53 target p21 involved in cellular senescence. The observation that dp53 affected Edu incorporation into neuroblasts led us to test the hypothesis that dp53 acts through regulation of factors involved in cell cycle progression. Our results show that the inhibitory effect of dp53 on ectopic neuroblast formation was mediated largely through its regulation of Cyclin E (Cyc E. Overexpression of Cyc E was able to abrogate dp53's ability to rescue numb loss-of-function phenotypes. Increasing Cyc E levels by attenuating Archipelago (Ago, a recently identified transcriptional target of dp53 and a negative regulator of Cyc E, had similar effects. Conversely, reducing Cyc E activity by overexpressing Ago blocked ectopic neuroblast formation in numb mutant. Our results reveal an intimate connection between cell cycle progression and NSC self-renewal vs. differentiation control, and indicate that p53-mediated regulation of ectopic NSC self-renewal through the Ago/Cyc E axis becomes particularly important when NSC homeostasis is perturbed as in numb loss-of-function condition. This has

  20. Initial Attempts of Development and Characterization of an In Vitro Blood Brain Barrier Model Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldeman, Charlotte; Saaby, Lasse; Hall, Vanessa Jane

    observed for several days after seeding by measuring the trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Initial pilot studies have shown a significant difference between stem cells grown as a mono culture and stem cells grown in co-culture with rat astrocytes. The stem cell line WTSli024-A had...... configurations (mono culture, non-contact co-culture and contact co-culture) with primary rat astrocytes to induce barrier-like properties. Endothelial cell media supplemented with retinoic acid were then applied to the cells to ensure selective expansion of BECs. The different culture configurations were...

  1. Human Cytomegalovirus IE2 Protein Disturbs Brain Development by the Dysregulation of Neural Stem Cell Maintenance and the Polarization of Migrating Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Juwan; Kwon, Mookwang; Pleasure, Samuel J; Ahn, Jin-Hyun; Yoon, Keejung

    2017-09-01

    Despite the high incidence of severe defects in the central nervous system caused by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) congenital infection, the mechanism of HCMV neuropathogenesis and the roles of individual viral genes have not yet been fully determined. In this study, we show that the immediate-early 2 (IE2) protein may play a key role in HCMV-caused neurodevelopmental disorders. IE2-transduced neural progenitor cells gave rise to neurospheres with a lower frequency and produced smaller neurospheres than control cells in vitro , indicating reduction of self-renewal and expansion of neural progenitors by IE2. At 2 days after in utero electroporation into the ventricle of the developing brain, a dramatically lower percentage of IE2-expressing cells was detected in the ventricular zone (VZ) and cortical plate (CP) compared to control cells, suggesting that IE2 concurrently dysregulates neural stem cell maintenance in the VZ and neuronal migration to the CP. In addition, most IE2 + cells in the lower intermediate zone either showed multipolar morphology with short neurites or possessed nonradially oriented processes, whereas control cells had long, radially oriented monopolar or bipolar neurites. IE2 + callosal axons also failed to cross the midline to form the corpus callosum. Furthermore, we provide molecular evidence that the cell cycle arrest and DNA binding activities of IE2 appear to be responsible for the increased neural stem cell exit from the VZ and cortical migrational defects, respectively. Collectively, our results demonstrate that IE2 disrupts the orderly process of brain development in a stepwise manner to further our understanding of neurodevelopmental HCMV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE HCMV brain pathogenesis has been studied in limited experimental settings, such as in vitro HCMV infection of neural progenitor cells or in vivo murine CMV infection of the mouse brain. Here, we show that IE2 is a pivotal factor that contributes to HCMV-induced abnormalities in

  2. 5-Fluorouracil and 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) followed by hydroxyurea, misonidazole, and irradiation for brain stem gliomas: a pilot study of the Brain Tumor Research Center and the Childrens Cancer Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, V.A.; Edwards, M.S.; Wara, W.M.; Allen, J.; Ortega, J.; Vestnys, P.

    1984-01-01

    T