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Sample records for brain stem glioma

  1. Pediatric brain stem gliomas: Comparison of evaluation by CT and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a direct comparison of the role of CT and MR imaging in the pretreatment and posttreatment evaluation of pediatric brain-stem gliomas. Thirty-four patients with presumed brain-stem gliomas were imaged by both CT and MR over the past 53 months. Twenty-two males and 12 females ranged in age from 3 to 17 years. Fifteen patients had tumor confirmed by biopsy. Thirteen children with nonneoplastic brain-stem lesions were imaged. MR proved superior to CT in both the pretreatment and posttreatment evaluation of patients with brain-stem gliomas. Pathologic correlation to the images is made in selected cases

  2. Treatment Options for Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests to check the brain, spinal cord, and nerve function. The exam checks a person’s mental status, coordination, and ability to walk normally, and how well the muscles, senses, and reflexes work. This may also be called a neuro ...

  3. Stages of Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests to check the brain, spinal cord, and nerve function. The exam checks a person’s mental status, coordination, and ability to walk normally, and how well the muscles, senses, and reflexes work. This may also be called a neuro ...

  4. Tipifarnib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, or Brain Stem Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-07

    Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  5. Isolation, cultivation and identification of brain glioma stem cells by magnetic bead sorting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuping Zhou; Chao Zheng; Qiong Shi; Xiang Li; Zhigang Shen; Rutong Yu

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a detailed process for obtaining brain glioma stem cells from freshly dissected human brain glioma samples using an immunomagnetic bead technique combined with serum-free media pressure screening. Furthermore, the proliferation, differentiation and self-renewal biological features of brain glioma stem cells were identified. Results showed that a small number of CD133 positive tumor cells isolated from brain glioma samples survived as a cell suspension in serum-free media and proliferated. Subcultured CD133 positive cells maintained a potent self-renewal and proliferative ability, and expressed the stem cell-specific markers CD133 and nestin. After incubation with fetal bovine serum, the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein and microtubule associated protein 2 positive cells increased significantly, indicating that the cultured brain glioma stem cells can differentiate into astrocytes and neurons. Western blot analysis showed that tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog was highly expressed in tumor spheres compared with the differentiated tumor cells. These experimental findings indicate that the immunomagnetic beads technique is a useful method to obtain brain glioma stem cells from human brain tumors.

  6. Paediatric brain-stem gliomas: MRI, FDG-PET and histological grading correlation

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    Kwon, Jong Won; Kim, In-One; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Moon, Sung Gyu; Kim, Tae Jung; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Chi, Je Geun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea); Wang, Kyu-Chang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea); Chung, June Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    MRI and FDG-PET may predict the histological grading of paediatric brain-stem gliomas. To assess MRI findings and metabolic imaging using FDG-PET of brain-stem gliomas based on histological grading. Included in the study were 20 paediatric patients (age 3-14 years, mean 8.2 years) with brain-stem glioma (five glioblastomas, ten anaplastic astrocytomas and five low-grade astrocytomas). MR images were assessed for the anatomical site of tumour origin, focality, pattern of tumour growth, and enhancement. All glioblastomas were located in the pons and showed diffuse pontine enlargement with focally exophytic features. Eight anaplastic astrocytomas were located in the pons and demonstrated diffuse pontine enlargement without exophytic features. Low-grade astrocytomas were located in the pons, midbrain or medulla and showed focally exophytic growth features and peripheral enhancement. In 12 patients in whom FDG-PET was undertaken, glioblastomas showed hypermetabolic or hypometabolic lesions, anaplastic astrocytomas showed no metabolic change or hypometabolic lesions and low-grade astrocytomas showed hypometabolism compared with the cerebellum. MRI findings correlated well with histological grading of brain-stem gliomas and MRI may therefore predict the histological grading. FDG-PET may be helpful in differentiating between anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastomas among high-grade tumours. (orig.)

  7. Somatostatin-receptor positive brain stem glioma visualized by octreoscan.

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    Pichler, Robert; Pichler, Josef; Mustafa, Hamdy; Nussbaumer, Karin; Zaunmüller, Thomas; Topakian, Raffi

    2007-06-01

    In diffuse brainstem gliomas often surgical biopsies cannot be obtained. The diagnosis relies upon imaging criteria, first line being MRI. Gliomas generally express somatostatin receptors (SSTR), which might enable receptor imaging. We present the case of a female adolescent with acute onset of hallucinations, dysphagia and diplopia. MRI detected a suggestive large pontine glioma. This lesion presented with marked In-111-pentreotide tracer uptake. SSTR-scan provided information about SSTR-expression, tumour viability and extension. Radiopeptide therapy for selected patients might be discussed. PMID:17627256

  8. Tomographic criteria of gliomas in the brain stem in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between Computed Tomography Imaging, histopathological and prognostic data is evaluated by reviewing 37 cases of brain stem neoplasm in infants. The results indicate a presence of a cystic lesion with solid mural nodule as the single prognostic criteria of a greater survival rate. Such finding frequently corresponds to Pilocytic Astrocytomas. No correlations between contrast enhancement and prognostic was found. The association between the prognostic value to the densitometric characteristics of the lesions was not possible. It was concluded that the evaluations of the extension of such lesion is fundamental. Therefore, Magnetic Resonance Imaging has more value than computed tomography. (M.A.C.)

  9. Evaluation of radiation therapy for pediatric brain stem glioma by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of radiation therapy on 29 brain stem gliomas in childhood were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). The patients received radiation of 2 Gy/day as a single fraction, 5 day a week with a total dose of 40 to 60 Gy. Initial CT findings of brain stem gliomas were divided into two types; diffuse and localized. Of 29 children, 5 had localized and 24 had diffuse tumor. Histological diagnoses were available for 18 patients, 4 with localized and 14 with diffuse tumor. All of the localized tumors were astrocytomas and diffuse tumors included 13 anaplastic gliomas (glioblastomas), 3 anaplastic astrocytomas, and one astrocytoma. Complete response or partial response to radiation therapy was observed on CT in 100% (5/5) of the localized tumors and 46% (11/13) of the diffuse tumors at the first evaluation. Contrary to expectation, low-grade gliomas responded much better to radiation therapy than high-grade gliomas. The response rates were 80% (4/5) in astrocytoma, 67% (2/3) in anaplastic astrocytoma, and 38% (5/13) in anaplastic glioma. In the follow-up CT after radiation therapy, a delayed effect was observed in only one of the 24 diffuse tumors. Nine of 10 children who had a re-irradiation following the recurrence experienced very little benefit. None of the patients with localized tumors have shown evidence of tumor progression or recurrence, and the quality of their life has been exellent. On the other hand, all of the patients with diffuse tumor died within 20 months after initial treatment. The results of this study suggest that radiation therapy is beneficial for localized tumors but not for diffuse tumors, and new treatments need to be developed for diffuse tumors. (author)

  10. Stem cell signatures in glioma

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xiaobing

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common tumors of the central nervous system in adults. Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form, has a median survival of 15 months regardless of the standard treatment with surgery and temozolomide-based radiochemotherapy. Therefore, it is imperative to improve treatment options for patients with glioblastoma. It has been suggested that the putative tumor stem cells in brain tumors are responsible for glioma initiation, development and resistance to ...

  11. The treatment of brain stem and thalamic gliomas with 78 Gy of hyperfractionated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To see whether increasing the dose of hyperfractionated radiation therapy from 72 to 78 Gy would increase survival time in patients with gliomas, particularly those with brain stem or thalamic tumors. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of a brain stem or thalamic glioma were enrolled in a trial to receive 78 Gy (1.0 Gy twice a day). Six patients with disease in other sites were also treated. The initial response to therapy was determined by comparing pretreatment magnetic resonance images and neurological examinations with those obtained within 2 weeks of completing therapy; subsequent responses were determined from bimonthly follow-up images. Time-to-tumor progression was measured from the date radiation therapy began until the date of documented radiographic or clinical progression. Survival time was measured from the date radiation therapy began until the date of death. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to estimate the effects of specific variables on survival. Results: Of 81 evaluable patients, 68 received ≥ 76 Gy, 10 received between 70 and 75 Gy, and 3 received between 60 and 68 Gy. The overall response or stabilization rate was 70.4%. Tumor size decreased in 30.8% of patients; 39.5% had stable disease, and 29.6% had immediate progression. The median survival time was 12.7 months (16.1 months for adults and 10.8 months for children). The median time to tumor progression was 9.0 months (11.4 months for adults and 8.4 months for children). A duration of symptoms ≤ 2 months and a diffuse lesion were each associated with shorter survival and progression times. Conclusions: For patients with brain stem or thalamic gliomas, increasing the dose of radiation therapy from 72 to 78 Gy did not significantly improve survival. Different treatment strategies are clearly needed

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests to check the brain, spinal cord, and nerve function. The exam checks a person’s mental status, coordination, and ability to walk normally, and how well the muscles, senses, and reflexes work. This may also be called a neuro ...

  13. Establishment of 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells

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    Zong-yu XIAO

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish the 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells.  Methods Rat 9L gliosarcoma stem-like cells were cultured in serum-free suspension. The expression of CD133 and nestin were tested by immunohistochemistry. A total of 48 inbredline male F344 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, and 9L tumor sphere cells and 9L monolayer cells were respectively implanted into the right caudate nucleus of F344 rats in 2 groups. Survival time was observed and determined using the method of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Fourteen days after implantation or when the rats were dying, their brains were perfused and sectioned for HE staining, and CD133 and nestin were detected by immunohistochemistry.  Results Rat 9L tumor spheres were formed with suspension culture in serum-free medium. The gliomas formed in both groups were invasive without obvious capsule. More new vessels, bleeding and necrosis could be detected in 9L tumor spheres group. The tumor cells in both groups were positive for CD133 and nestin. There was no significant difference in the expression of CD133 and nestin between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. According to the expression of nestin, the tumors formed by 9L tumor sphere cells were more invasive. The median survival time of the rats bearing 9L tumor sphere cells was 15 d (95%CI: 15.219-15.781, and the median survival time of the rats bearing 9L monolayer cells was 21 d (95%CI: 20.395-21.605. There was significant difference between 2 groups (χ2 = 12.800, P = 0.000.  Conclusions 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells is successfully established, which provides a glioma model for the future research. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.012

  14. Radiation and misonidazole in children with brain stem gliomas and supratentorial glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a series of 484 children with intracranial tumors referred to the Royal Marsden Hospital for radiotherapy, there were 47 (12%) examples of inoperable pontine and medullary tumors for which the 5-year survival rate was 17%. The limited local tumor mass in brain stem tumors, the absence of cerebro-spinal or distant metastases, and their often initial good but short-lived response to irradiation, all support the trial of a chemical radiosensitizing agent with which to try and achieve greater and more prolonged local control of the disease. Since the prognosis for cerebral hemisphere glioblastoma, which is relatively uncommon in children, is also extremely poor, such cases were included in this pilot study. The problems and possible risks associated with combined radiotherapy and a chemical radiosensitizer in children with brain tumors is discussed. So far, 8 children with brain stem tumors and 3 children with cerebral hemisphere gliomas heave been treated in this study. In addtion, data is also available on 3 children re-treated for incurrent medulloblastomas. Preliminary observations regarding experience with this small series will be reported including blood misonidazole levels, drug tolerance and the possible influence of anticonvulsants and steriods on toxicity

  15. GFAP expression is regulated by Pax3 in brain glioma stem cells.

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    Su, Xing; Liu, Xiaojiang; Ni, Lanchun; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Hui; Shi, Jinlong; Chen, Jian; Gu, Zhikai; Gao, Yilu; Lan, Qing; Huang, Qingfeng

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastomas are understood to evolve from brain glioma stem cells (BGSCs), and yet the biology underlying this model of tumorigenesis is largely unknown. Paired box 3 protein (Pax3) is a member of the paired box (Pax) family of transcription factors that is normally expressed during embryonic development, but has recently been implicated in tumorigenesis. The present study demonstrated that Pax3 is differentially expressed in U87MG human glioma cell, BGSC and normal 1800 human astrocyte lines. Herein, we identified that the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a major intermediate filament protein of mature astrocytes, is directly downregulated during the differentiation of BGSCs via the binding of Pax3 to the promoter region of GFAP. Moreover, siRNA silencing of Pax3 arrested BGSC differentiation, while overexpression of Pax3 promoted the differentiation in BGSCs. Furthermore, we studied the cell proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, differentiation and expression of Pax3 and GFAP in Pax3 siRNA-knockdown and Pax3-overexpressing BGSC models by CCK-8, Transwell migration, flow cytometry and western blot assays. The results indicate that Pax3 regulates GFAP expression, and that Pax3 may contribute to the evolution of BGSCs towards malignancy. PMID:27432276

  16. Patterns of recurrence in brain stem gliomas: evidence for craniospinal dissemination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The 3-year survival rate of pediatric patients with infiltrating brain stem gliomas (BSG) is < 10%. Treatment involves local field radiation, and local failure has been the hallmark of recurrence. With therapeutic advances and improved radiographic monitoring, perceived and actual patterns of failure may change. We report patterns of recurrence in a group of patients with close follow-up, treated on an institutional protocol incorporating hyperfractionated involved-field radiation therapy and concomitant carboplatin, who have been uniformly staged and treated and have undergone MRI surveillance. Methods and Materials: From 1990-1995, 18 pediatric patients with BSG were treated on a Phase I-II trial of concurrent carboplatin and hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Eight had surgical procedures to document histology. Nine had hydrocephalus prior to death. All had pretreatment brain and spine MRIs, with and without gadolinium, that showed no other evidence of disease. Treatment consisted of 72.00 Gy involved-field hyperfractionated radiation therapy and dose-escalating concomitant carboplatin. Results: Fifteen children have had progression of disease (median PFS = 9 months); and 13 have died (median OS = 14 months). Fourteen of the 15 children with progression had local failures, 8 of whom had evidence of noncontiguous spinal (4) or intracranial (7) disease documented by MRI or autopsy. One child with local control developed an intracranial metastasis. None had clinical manifestations of leptomeningeal disease. Conclusion: Leptomeningeal dissemination occurred within 1 month of local progression in nearly 30% of our patients and, overall, occurred in 50% prior to death. This high incidence may reflect close MRI surveillance or a changing pattern of recurrence. Because the majority of leptomeningeal disease occurs in the setting of local progression, treatment efforts must be directed primarily toward local control. However, management of leptomeningeal

  17. Glioma treatment strategies using mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the growth characteristics of malignant gliomas that are highly invasive and deeply infiltrate the surrounding brain area; the surgical resection of these gliomas with preservation of neural functions is almost always noncurative. The residual tumor cells are usually resistant to standard adjuvant radio-chemotherapy, and therefore, the tumors inevitably recur after a certain period and finally cause the death of the patients. Neural and mesenchymal stem cells have been extensively studied for the development of new strategies for treating malignant gliomas because of these cells possess the intrinsic property of homing toward tumor cells. By using neural and mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles for drug carriers, it is possible to deliver anticancer drugs to the tumor cells that infiltrate functioning normal brain tissue and are difficult to remove. Several cytokines and suicide genes have been tested, and promising results have been reported in animal brain tumor models. However, further studies involving safety issues such as secondary cancer formation are required before human trials of stem cell therapies. In the present paper, the author has reviewed the recent concepts involved in the treatment of malignant gliomas with stem cells, especially mesenchymal stem cells that are much easier to obtain from the patients themselves. (author)

  18. A detrimental effect of a combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy approach in children with diffuse intrinsic brain stem gliomas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the proportion of patients that survive at least 1 year following treatment with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HRT) to a dose of 70.2 Gy on Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) study no. 8495 with that of patients treated with similar radiotherapy plus cisplatinum given by continuous infusion on weeks 1, 3, and 5 of radiotherapy on POG no. 9239. Methods and Materials: The eligibility criteria for the two studies were identical and included age 3 to 21 years, previously untreated tumor involving the brain stem of which two-thirds was in the pons, history less than 6 months, and clinical findings typical for diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma, including cranial nerve deficits, long tract signs, and ataxia. The outcome of 57 patients who were treated at the 70.2 Gy dose level of POG no. 8495 between May 1986 and February 1988 was compared with that of 64 patients treated with identical radiotherapy plus cisplatinum on POG no. 9239 between June 1992 and March 1996. Results: The number of patients accrued to POG no. 9239 was determined to guarantee that the probability was at least 0.80 of correctly detecting that the 1-year survival rate exceeded that of patients on POG no. 8495 by 0.2. However, the z value for this test was -1.564, giving a p value of 0.9411. That is, there is almost sufficient evidence to conclude that survival for patients receiving HRT plus cisplatinum on POG no. 9239 was worse than that for patients receiving the same radiotherapy alone on POG no. 8495. Conclusion: The finding that patients who received cisplatinum given as a radiosensitizing agent concurrent with HRT fared less well than those receiving the same dose of HRT alone was unexpected and is clearly a cause for concern as many current protocols for patients with diffuse intrinsic brain stem gliomas call for use of chemotherapeutic and/or biological agents given concurrent with radiotherapy

  19. Sparing of the hippocampus, limbic circuit and neural stem cell compartment during partial brain radiotherapy for glioma: a dosimetric feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of sparing contralateral or bilateral neural stem cell (NSC) compartment, hippocampus and limbic circuit during partial brain radiotherapy (PBRT). Treatment plans were generated for five hemispheric high-grade gliomas, five hemispheric low-grade gliomas and two brainstem gliomas (12 patients). For each, standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were generated, as well as IMRT plans which spared contralateral (hemispheric cases) or bilateral (brainstem cases) limbic circuit, hippocampus, and NSC. Biologically equivalent dose for late effects (BEDlate effects) was generated for limbic circuit, hippocampus and NSC. Per cent relative reduction in mean physical dose and BED was calculated for each plan (standard vs. sparing). We were able to reduce physical dose and BEDlate effects to these critical structures by 23.5–56.8% and 23.6–66%, respectively. It is possible to spare contralateral limbic circuit, NSC and hippocampus during PBRT for both high- and low-grade gliomas using IMRT, and to spare the hippocampus bilaterally during PBRT for brainstem low-grade gliomas. This approach may reduce late cognitive sequelae of cranial radiotherapy.

  20. Functional analysis of HOXD9 in human gliomas and glioma cancer stem cells

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    Thirant Cécile

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HOX genes encode a family of homeodomain-containing transcription factors involved in the determination of cell fate and identity during embryonic development. They also behave as oncogenes in some malignancies. Results In this study, we found high expression of the HOXD9 gene transcript in glioma cell lines and human glioma tissues by quantitative real-time PCR. Using immunohistochemistry, we observed HOXD9 protein expression in human brain tumor tissues, including astrocytomas and glioblastomas. To investigate the role of HOXD9 in gliomas, we silenced its expression in the glioma cell line U87 using HOXD9-specific siRNA, and observed decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis. It was suggested that HOXD9 contributes to both cell proliferation and/or cell survival. The HOXD9 gene was highly expressed in a side population (SP of SK-MG-1 cells that was previously identified as an enriched-cell fraction of glioma cancer stem-like cells. HOXD9 siRNA treatment of SK-MG-1 SP cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation. Finally, we cultured human glioma cancer stem cells (GCSCs from patient specimens found with high expression of HOXD9 in GCSCs compared with normal astrocyte cells and neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs. Conclusions Our results suggest that HOXD9 may be a novel marker of GCSCs and cell proliferation and/or survival factor in gliomas and glioma cancer stem-like cells, and a potential therapeutic target.

  1. Irradiation of the potential cancer stem cell niches in the adult brain improves progression-free survival of patients with malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor in adults. The mechanisms leading to glioblastoma are not well understood but animal studies support that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in neural stem cells (NSC) is required and sufficient to induce glial cancers. This suggests that the NSC niches in the brain may harbor cancer stem cells (CSCs), Thus providing novel therapy targets. We hypothesize that higher radiation doses to these NSC niches improve patient survival by eradicating CSCs. 55 adult patients with Grade 3 or Grade 4 glial cancer treated with radiotherapy at UCLA between February of 2003 and May of 2009 were included in this retrospective study. Using radiation planning software and patient radiological records, the SVZ and SGL were reconstructed for each of these patients and dosimetry data for these structures was calculated. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis we show that patients whose bilateral subventricular zone (SVZ) received greater than the median SVZ dose (= 43 Gy) had a significant improvement in progression-free survival if compared to patients who received less than the median dose (15.0 vs 7.2 months PFS; P = 0.028). Furthermore, a mean dose >43 Gy to the bilateral SVZ yielded a hazard ratio of 0.73 (P = 0.019). Importantly, similarly analyzing total prescription dose failed to illustrate a statistically significant impact. Our study leads us to hypothesize that in glioma targeted radiotherapy of the stem cell niches in the adult brain could yield significant benefits over radiotherapy of the primary tumor mass alone and that damage caused by smaller fractions of radiation maybe less efficiently detected by the DNA repair mechanisms in CSCs

  2. Pediatric glioma stem cells: biologic strategies for oncolytic HSV virotherapy

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    GregoryKFriedman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common adult malignant brain tumor, GBMs in childhood represent less than 10% of pediatric malignant brain tumors and are phenotypically and molecularly distinct from adult GBMs. Similar to adult patients, outcomes for children with high-grade gliomas (HGGs remain poor. Furthermore, the significant morbidity and mortality yielded by pediatric GBM is compounded by neurotoxicity for the developing brain caused by current therapies. Poor outcomes have been attributed to a subpopulation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant cells, termed ‘glioma stem cells’ (GSCs, ‘glioma progenitor cells’, or ‘glioma-initiating cells', which have the ability to initiate and maintain the tumor and to repopulate the recurring tumor after conventional therapy. Future innovative therapies for pediatric HGGs must be able to eradicate these therapy-resistant GSCs. Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses, genetically engineered to be safe for normal cells and to express diverse foreign anti-tumor therapeutic genes, have been demonstrated in preclinical studies to infect and kill GSCs and tumor cells equally while sparing normal brain cells. In this review, we discuss the unique aspects of pediatric GSCs, including markers to identify them, the microenvironment they reside in, signaling pathways that regulate them, mechanisms of cellular resistance, and approaches to target GSCs, with a focus on the promising therapeutic, genetically engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV.

  3. Virotherapy Against Malignant Glioma Stem Cells

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    Dey, Mahua; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most common primary intracranial malignancy, is associated with very poor outcome despite advances in surgical techniques and chemo- and radiation therapy. Many novel treatment modalities are being investigated with varying amount of success. Evolution of cancer stem cell hypothesis provides a new venue for developmental therapeutics. In this review, we highlight the literature regarding the existence of glioma stem cells and their characteristics. We also discuss...

  4. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

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    Luiz Gustavo eDubois

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB. By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM, characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells, extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the blood brain barrier and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected.

  5. Glioma stem cell lines expanded in adherent culture have tumor-specific phenotypes and are suitable for chemical and genetic screens

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Steven M; YOSHIKAWA, KOICHI; Clarke, Ian D.; Danovi, Davide; Stricker, Stefan; Russell, Roslin; Bayani, Jane; Head, Renee; Lee, Marco; Bernstein, Mark; Squire, Jeremy A.; Smith, Austin; Dirks, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Human brain tumors appear to have a hierarchical cellular organization suggestive of a stem cell foundation. In vitro expansion of the putative cancer stem cells as stable cell lines would provide a powerful model system to study their biology. Here, we demonstrate routine and efficient derivation of adherent cell lines from malignant glioma that display stem cell properties and initiate high-grade gliomas following xenotransplantation. Significantly, glioma neural stem (GNS) cell lines from ...

  6. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Campanati, Loraine; Righy, Cassia; D’Andrea-Meira, Isabella; Spohr, Tania Cristina Leite de Sampaio e; Porto-Carreiro, Isabel; Pereira, Claudia Maria; Balça-Silva, Joana; Kahn, Suzana Assad; DosSantos, Marcos F.; Oliveira, Marcela de Almeida Rabello; Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Faveret, Eduardo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM), characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells), extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the BBB and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected. PMID:25565956

  7. Migration capacity of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells towards glioma in vivo*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cungang Fan; Dongliang Wang; Qingjun Zhang; Jingru Zhou

    2013-01-01

    High-grade glioma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults. The poor prognosis of glioma, combined with a resistance to currently available treatments, necessitates the ment of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem cel-based therapies are emerging as novel cel-based delivery vehicle for therapeutic agents. In the present study, we successful y isolated human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s by explant culture. The human umbilical cord senchymal stem cel s were adherent to plastic surfaces, expressed specific surface phenotypes of mesenchymal stem cel s as demonstrated by flow cytometry, and possessed multi-differentiation potentials in permissive induction media in vitro. Furthermore, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s demonstrated excel ent glioma-specific targeting capacity in established rat glioma models after intratumoral injection or contralateral ventricular administration in vivo. The excellent glioma-specific targeting ability and extensive intratumoral distribution of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s indicate that they may serve as a novel cel ular vehicle for delivering the-rapeutic molecules in glioma therapy.

  8. Autophagy involved in resveratrol increased radiosensitivity in glioma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Resveratrol combined with X-ray on radiosensitivity in glioma stem cells. Methods: The proliferation inhibition of glioma stem cells induced by X-rays and Resveratrol was assessed with MTT assay. The activation of proapoptotic effect was characterized by Hoechst 33258 stain. MDC stain and Western blot analysis were used to analyze the autophagy mechanism in X-rays-induced death of glioma stem cells. Results: MTT assay indicated that X-rays and Resveratrol decreased the viability of glioma stem cells (P<0.05); we found the proliferative inhibition of glioma stem cells was declined when we used 3-MA to inhibit autophagy(P<0.05). When the cells were treated by the Resveratrol and x-rays, their spherical shape were changed. Apoptosis was induced in glioma stem cells by combined X-rays and Resveratrol as detected by Hoechst 33258 staining. In addition, autophagy was induced in glioma stem cells in the combined treatment group as detected by MDC staining. Western blotting showed that Bcl-2 expression was decreased. in the combined treatment group (P<0.01), and the LC3-Ⅱ expression was increased in the combined treatment group (P<0.01). Conclusion: Resveratrol can increased the radiation sensitivity of glioma stem cells, the apoptosis and autophagy was induced in the glioma stem cells in the combined treatment X-rays and Resveratrol. Our results suggest that autophagy plays an essential role in the regulation of radiosensitization of glioma stem cells. (authors)

  9. The involvement of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in stem cell differentiation and in malignant glioma

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    Kundu, Soumi; Xiong, Anqi; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2016-04-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans (HSPG) are major components of the extracellular matrix. They interact with a plethora of macromolecules that are of physiological importance. The pattern of sulfation of the HS chain determines the specificity of these interactions. The enzymes that synthesize and degrade HS are thus key regulators of processes ranging from embryonic development to tissue homeostasis and tumor development. Formation of the nervous system is also critically dependent on appropriate HSPGs as shown by several studies on the role of HS in neural induction from embryonic stem cells. High-grade glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor among adults, and the prognosis is poor. Neural and glioma stem cells share several traits, including sustained proliferation and highly efficient migration in the brain. There are also similarities between the neurogenic niche where adult neural stem cells reside and the tumorigenic niche, including their interactions with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The levels of many of these components, for example HSPGs and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and modification of HS are attenuated in gliomas. In this paper, HS regulation of pathways involved in neural differentiation and how these may be of importance for brain development are discussed. The literature suggesting that modifications of HS could regulate glioma growth and invasion is reviewed. Targeting the invasiveness of glioma cells by modulating HS may improve upon present therapeutic options, which only marginally enhance the survival of glioma patients.

  10. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Guanqun; Li, Qingquan; Peng, Gang; Ma, Jun; Fan, Hongwei; Li, Yingbin

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are still unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain t...

  11. IGFBP2 promotes glioma tumor stem cell expansion and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, David, E-mail: dhs.zfs@gmail.com [College of Medicine, The University of Arizona (United States); Hsieh, Antony [The McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Stea, Baldassarre [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Arizona (United States); Ellsworth, Ron [College of Medicine, The University of Arizona (United States)

    2010-06-25

    IGFBP2 is overexpressed in the most common brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM), and its expression is inversely correlated to GBM patient survival. Previous reports have demonstrated a role for IGFBP2 in glioma cell invasion and astrocytoma development. However, the function of IGFBP2 in the restricted, self-renewing, and tumorigenic GBM cell population comprised of tumor-initiating stem cells has yet to be determined. Herein we demonstrate that IGFBP2 is overexpressed within the stem cell compartment of GBMs and is integral for the clonal expansion and proliferative properties of glioma stem cells (GSCs). In addition, IGFBP2 inhibition reduced Akt-dependent GSC genotoxic and drug resistance. These results suggest that IGFBP2 is a selective malignant factor that may contribute significantly to GBM pathogenesis by enriching for GSCs and mediating their survival. Given the current dearth of selective molecular targets against GSCs, we anticipate our results to be of high therapeutic relevance in combating the rapid and lethal course of GBM.

  12. Optic glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  13. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanqun Qiao; Qingquan Li; Gang Peng; Jun Ma; Hongwei Fan; Yingbin Li

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are stil unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cel s and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain tumor stem cells. The numbers of cytolysosomes and autophagosomes in brain tumor stem cells and induced neural stem cel s were lower and the proliferative activity was obviously stronger than that in normal neural stem cells. Normal neural stem cells could differentiate into glial fibril ary acidic protein-positive and microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells, which were also negative for nestin. However, glial fibril ary acidic protein/nestin, microtubule associated protein-2/nestin, and glial fibril ary acidic protein/microtubule associated protein-2 double-positive cells were found in induced neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cel s. Results indicate that induced neural stem cells are similar to brain tumor stem cells, and are possibly the source of brain tumor stem cells.

  14. Targeting glioma stem cells via the Hedgehog signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Gliomas are among the most devastating tumor types, and current clinical therapies are unsatisfactory. Recent reports revealed the importance of glioma-propagating cells in the malignancy of gliomas. These cells, also referred to as glioma stem cells (GSCs, share similarities with neural stem cells (NSCs. The Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway controls tissue polarity, patterning maintenance, and maintenance of NSCs during embryonic development. Aberrant activation of the Hh pathway resulting from mutation and deregulation has recently been recognized to cause tumorigenesis in a wide variety of tissues, including gliomas and GSCs. In this review, we explore the role of the Hh signaling pathway in GSCs and its potential as a therapeutic strategy.

  15. Eckol suppresses maintenance of stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell properties is responsible for tumor maintenance and progression, and may contribute to resistance to anticancer treatments. Thus, compounds that target cancer stem-like cells could be usefully applied to destroy cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of Eckol, a phlorotannin compound, on stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells. To determine whether Eckol targets glioma stem-like cells, we examined whether Eckol treatment could change the expression levels of glioma stem-like cell markers and self-renewal-related proteins as well as the sphere forming ability, and the sensitivity to anticancer treatments. Alterations in the malignant properties of sphere-derived cells by Eckol were also investigated by soft-agar colony forming assay, by xenograft assay in nude mice, and by cell invasion assay. Treatment of sphere-forming glioma cells with Eckol effectively decreased the sphere formation as well as the CD133+ cell population. Eckol treatment suppressed expression of the glioma stem-like cell markers and the self-renewal-related proteins without cell death. Moreover, treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol significantly attenuated anchorage-independent growth on soft agar and tumor formation in xenograft mice. Importantly, Eckol treatment effectively reduced the resistance of glioma stem-like cells to ionizing radiation and temozolomide. Treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol markedly blocked both phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and Ras-Raf-1-Erk signaling pathways. These results indicate that the natural phlorotannin Eckol suppresses stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells, and thereby makes glioma stem-like cells more sensitive to anticancer treatments, providing novel therapeutic strategies targeting specifically cancer stem-like cells.

  16. Topoisomerase I inhibitors, shikonin and topotecan, inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of glioma cells and glioma stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available Gliomas, the most malignant form of brain tumors, contain a small subpopulation of glioma stem cells (GSCs that are implicated in therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Topoisomerase I inhibitors, shikonin and topotecan, play a crucial role in anti-cancer therapies. After isolated and identified the GSCs from glioma cells successfully, U251, U87, GSCs-U251 and GSCs-U87 cells were administrated with various concentrations of shikonin or topotecan at different time points to seek for the optimal administration concentration and time point. The cell viability, cell cycle and apoptosis were detected using cell counting kit-8 and flow cytometer to observe the inhibitory effects on glioma cells and GSCs. We demonstrated that shikonin and topotecan obviously inhibited proliferation of not only human glioma cells but also GSCs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. According to the IC50 values at 24 h, 2 μmol/L of shikonin and 3 μmol/L of topotecan were selected as the optimal administration concentration. In addition, shikonin and topotecan induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 and S phases and promoted apoptosis. The down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression with the activation of caspase 9/3-dependent pathway was involved in the apoptosis process. Therefore, the above results showed that topoisomerase I inhibitors, shikonin and topotecan, inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of GSCs as well as glioma cells, which suggested that they might be the potential anticancer agents targeting gliomas to provide a novel therapeutic strategy.

  17. Low dose ionizing radiation responses and knockdown of ATM kinase activity in glioma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genesis of new cells in the mammalian brain has previously been regarded as a negligible event; an assumption that long limited our understanding in the development of neoplasias. The recent discovery of perpetual lineages derived from neural stem cells has resulted in a new approach to studying the cellular behaviour of potential cancer stem cells in the brain. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and lethal brain tumour is derived from a group of cancerous stem cells known as glioma stem cells. GBM cells are impervious to conventional therapies such as surgical resection and ionizing radiation because of their pluripotent and radioresistant properties. Thus in our study, we aim to investigate whether a combination of chemo- and radio- therapies is an effective treatment for glioma stem cells. The study utilizes a specific kinase inhibitor (ATMi) of the ATM (Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) protein which is an essential protein in DNA-damage responses. In the presence of both low dose radiation and ATMi, glioma stem cells have rapid onset of cell death and reduction in growth. Since DNA damage can be inherited through cell division, accumulated DNA breaks in later generations may also lead to cell death. The limitation of conventional radiation therapy is that administration of fractionated (low) doses to reduce any potential harm to the surrounding healthy cells in the brain outweighs the benefits of high radiation doses to induce actual arrest in the propagation of malignant cells. Our study demonstrates a benefit in using low dose radiation combined with chemotherapy resulting in a reduction in malignancy of glioma stem cells. (author)

  18. Targeting Glioma Stem Cells by Functional Inhibition of a Prosurvival OncomiR-138 in Malignant Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Hui Derryn Chan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most aggressive forms of brain tumors, associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Recurrence and tumorigenesis are attributed to a subpopulation of tumor-initiating glioma stem cells (GSCs that are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Initiation and progression of gliomas have been linked to alterations in microRNA expression. Here, we report the identification of microRNA-138 (miR-138 as a molecular signature of GSCs and demonstrate a vital role for miR-138 in promoting growth and survival of bona fide tumor-initiating cells with self-renewal potential. Sequence-specific functional inhibition of miR-138 prevents tumorsphere formation in vitro and impedes tumorigenesis in vivo. We delineate the components of the miR-138 regulatory network by loss-of-function analysis to identify specific regulators of apoptosis. Finally, the higher expression of miR-138 in GSCs compared to non-neoplastic tissue and association with tumor recurrence and survival highlights the clinical significance of miR-138 as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target for treatment of malignant gliomas.

  19. A computational model incorporating neural stem cell dynamics reproduces glioma incidence across the lifespan in the human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Bauer

    Full Text Available Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Demographically, the risk of occurrence increases until old age. Here we present a novel computational model to reproduce the probability of glioma incidence across the lifespan. Previous mathematical models explaining glioma incidence are framed in a rather abstract way, and do not directly relate to empirical findings. To decrease this gap between theory and experimental observations, we incorporate recent data on cellular and molecular factors underlying gliomagenesis. Since evidence implicates the adult neural stem cell as the likely cell-of-origin of glioma, we have incorporated empirically-determined estimates of neural stem cell number, cell division rate, mutation rate and oncogenic potential into our model. We demonstrate that our model yields results which match actual demographic data in the human population. In particular, this model accounts for the observed peak incidence of glioma at approximately 80 years of age, without the need to assert differential susceptibility throughout the population. Overall, our model supports the hypothesis that glioma is caused by randomly-occurring oncogenic mutations within the neural stem cell population. Based on this model, we assess the influence of the (experimentally indicated decrease in the number of neural stem cells and increase of cell division rate during aging. Our model provides multiple testable predictions, and suggests that different temporal sequences of oncogenic mutations can lead to tumorigenesis. Finally, we conclude that four or five oncogenic mutations are sufficient for the formation of glioma.

  20. Cancer Stem Cells: The Final Frontier for Glioma Virotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dey, Mahua; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Tyler, Matthew A.; Sonabend, Adam M.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are a very small subset of all cancer cells and possess characteristics very similar to normal stem cells, in particular, the capacity for self-renewal, multipotency and relative quiescence. These chemo- and radiation resistant cells are responsible for maintaining tumor volume leading to therapy failure and recurrence. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common primary intracranial malignancy, glioma stem cells have been implicated as one of the key players in ...

  1. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip G.R. Schmalz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed.

  2. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schmalz, Philip G.R.; Park, John K.; Shen, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects o...

  3. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed

  4. A Case Report of Brain Stem Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nazari

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain and spinal cord tumors are the most frequent neoplasms after leukemia in children. Brain stem glioma is responsible for 10-20% of brain tumors in this group and often found in pons presenting with cerebellar signs, cranial nerve palsies, pyramidal signs and eventually increased intracranial pressure Case Report: In this article we reported an 11 year old girl affected with brain stem tumor with signs of headache, dizziness, vomiting and ataxia. Strabismus due to palsy of sixth cranial nerve, and dysarthria was observed. Conclusion: Children complaining of vomiting, headache and dizziness for a long time must be assessed for brain tumor in posterior fossa that sometimes may lead to increased intracranial pressure. An exact neurological examination can be worth guide to diagnosis.

  5. Enhanced invasion in vitro and the distribution patterns in vivo of CD133+ glioma stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Sheng-ping; YANG Xue-jun; ZHANG Bin; MING Hao-lang; CHEN Cong; REN Bing-cheng; LIU Zhi-feng; LIU Bin

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that cancer stem cells cause tumor recurrence based on their resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.Although the highly invasive nature of glioblastoma cells is also implicated in the failure of current therapies,it is not clear whether cancer stem cells are involved in invasiveness.This study aimed to assess invasive ability of glioma stem cells (GSCs) derived from C6 glioma cell line and the distribution patterns of GSCs in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat brain tumor.Methods Serum-free medium culture and magnetic isolation were used to gain purely CD133+ GSCs.The invasive stem cell markers and luxol fast blue staining for white matter tracts were performed to show the distribution patterns of GSCs in brain tumor of rats and the relationship among GSCs,vessels,and white matter tracts.The results of matrigel invasion assay were estimated using the Student's t test and the analysis of Western blotting was performed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test.Results CD133+GSCs(number:85.3±4.1)were significantly more invasive in vitro than matched CD133- cells(number:25.9±3.1) (t=14.5,P <0.005).GSCs invaded into the brain diffusely and located in perivascular niche of tumor-brain interface or resided within perivascular niche next to white fiber tracts.The polarity of glioma cells containing GSCs was parallel to the white matter tracts.Conclusions Our data suggest that CD133+ GSCs exhibit more aggressive invasion in vitro and GSCs in vivo probably disseminate along the long axis of blood vessels and transit through the white matter tracts.The therapies targeting GSCs invasion combined with traditional glioblastoma multiforme therapeutic paradigms might be a new approach for avoiding malignant glioma recurrence.

  6. Brain tumor stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies. PMID:20370314

  7. Integral dose delivered to normal brain with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy IMRT during partial brain radiotherapy for high-grade gliomas with and without selective sparing of the hippocampus, limbic circuit and neural stem cell compartment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared integral dose with uninvolved brain (IDbrain) during partial brain radiotherapy (PBRT) for high-grade glioma patients using helical tomotherapy (HT) and seven field traditional inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with and without selective sparing (SPA) of contralateral hippocampus, neural stem cell compartment (NSC) and limbic circuit. We prepared four PBRT treatment plans for four patients with high-grade gliomas (60Gy in 30 fractions delivered to planning treatment volume (PTV60Gy)). For all plans, a structure denoted 'uninvolved brain' was created, which included all brain tissue not part of PTV or standard (STD) organs at risk (OAR). No dosimetric constraints were included for uninvolved brain. Selective SPA plans were prepared with IMRT and HT; contralateral hippocampus, NSC and limbic circuit were contoured; and dosimetric constraints were entered for these structures without compromising dose to PTV or STD OAR. We compared V100 and D95 for PTV46Gy and PTV60Gy, and IDbrain for all plans. There were no significant differences in V100 and D95 for PTV46Gy and PTV60Gy. IDbrain was lower in traditional IMRT versus HT plans for STD and SPA plans (mean IDbrain 23.64Gy vs. 28Gy and 18.7Gy vs. 24.5Gy, respectively) and in SPA versus STD plans both with IMRT and HT (18.7Gy vs. 23.64Gy and 24.5Gy vs. 28Gy, respectively). n the setting of PBRT for high-grade gliomas, IMRT reduces IDbrain compared with HT with or without selective SPA of contralateral hippocampus, limbic circuit and NSC, and the use of selective SPA reduces IDbrain compared with STD PBRT delivered with either traditional IMRT or HT.

  8. Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Low Grade Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Melanocytic Lesion; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  9. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  10. Isolation and characterization of human malignant glioma cells from histologically normal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbergeld, D L; Chicoine, M R

    1997-03-01

    Brain invasion prevents complete surgical extirpation of malignant gliomas; however, invasive cells from distant, histologically normal brain previously have not been isolated, cultured, and characterized. To evaluate invasive human malignant glioma cells, the authors established cultures from gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Three men and one woman, with a mean age of 67 years, underwent two frontal and two temporal lobectomies for tumors, which yielded specimens of both gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Each specimen was acquired a minimum of 4 cm from the gross tumor. The specimens were split: a portion was sent for neuropathological evaluation (three glioblastomas multiforme and one oligodendroglioma) and a portion was used to establish cell lines. Morphologically, the specimens of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were identical in three of the four cell culture pairs. Histochemical staining characteristics were consistent both within each pair and when compared with the specimens sent for neuropathological evaluation. Cultures demonstrated anchorage-independent growth in soft agarose and neoplastic karyotypes. Growth rates in culture were greater for histologically normal brain than for gross tumor in three of the four culture pairs. Although the observed increases in growth rates of histologically normal brain cultures do not correlate with in vivo behavior, these findings corroborate the previously reported stem cell potential of invasive glioma cells. Using the radial dish assay, no significant differences in motility between cultures of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were found. In summary, tumor cells were cultured from histologically normal brain acquired from a distance greater than 4 cm from the gross tumor, indicating the relative insensitivity of standard histopathological identification of invasive glioma cells (and hence the inadequacy of frozen-section evaluation of resection margins). Cell lines

  11. Radiosensitivity of brain cancer stem cells from malignant glicoma cell line U251 in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the radiosensitivity of brain cancer stem cells of different conditions isolated from malignant glioma cell line U251 irt vitro. Methods: The brain cancer stem cells in U251 or the brain cancer stem cells isolated from U251 were irradiated by 60Co γ-rays. TUNEL and Annexin-FITC were employed to detect the apoptosis. The brain cancer stem cells were subcutaneously transplanted to nude mouse. Flow cytometry was used to detect cell cycle. Results: The brain cancer stem cells isolated from malignant glioma cell line U251 were in active cell cycle and sensitive to 60Co γ-rays. Thed apoptotic cells were increased obviously after irradiation. After subcutaneously transplanted to unde mouse, there was no tumor appear. However; the brain cancer stem cells existed in U251 were in G0-G1 and resisted to 60Co γ-rays. They differentiated into the parent glioma type after traqnsplantation. Conclusions: The brain cancer stem cells existed in the malignant glioma cell line is resisted to irradiation, and this phenomenon may explain the glioma relapse irt situ after radiation therapy. (authors)

  12. Brain Mitochondrial Lipid Abnormalities in Mice Susceptible to Spontaneous Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Kiebish, M.A.; Han, X; Cheng, H; Chuang, J H; Seyfried, T N

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial function have long been considered a hallmark of cancer. We compared the lipidome and electron transport chain activities of non-synaptic brain mitochondria in two inbred mouse strains, the C57BL/6J (B6) and the VM/Dk (VM). The VM strain is unique in expressing a high incidence of spontaneous brain tumors (1.5%) that are mostly gliomas. The incidence of gliomas is about 210-fold greater in VM mice than in B6 mice. Using shotgun lipidomics, we found that the mitoch...

  13. Human cytomegalovirus gene expression in long-term infected glioma stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefania Fiallos

    Full Text Available The most common adult primary brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM, is characterized by fifteen months median patient survival and has no clear etiology. We and others have identified the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV gene products endogenously expressed in GBM tissue and primary cells, with a subset of viral genes being consistently expressed in most samples. Among these viral genes, several have important oncomodulatory properties, regulating tumor stemness, proliferation, immune evasion, invasion and angiogenesis. These findings lead us to hypothesize that a specific HCMV gene signature may be associated with GBM pathogenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we used glioma cell lines and primary glioma stem-like cells (GSC infected with clinical and laboratory HCMV strains and measured relative viral gene expression levels along several time points up to 15 weeks post-infection. While HCMV gene expression was detected in several infected glioma lines through week 5 post-infection, only HCMV-infected GSC expressed viral gene products 15 weeks post-infection. Efficiency of infection across time was higher in GSC compared to cell lines. Importantly, HCMV-infected GSC outlived their uninfected counterparts, and this extended survival was paralleled by increased tumorsphere frequency and upregulation of stemness regulators, such as SOX2, p-STAT3, and BMX (a novel HCMV target identified in this study. Interleukin 6 (IL-6 treatment significantly upregulated HCMV gene expression in long-term infected glioma cultures, suggesting that pro-inflammatory signaling in the tumor milieu may further augment HCMV gene expression and subsequent tumor progression driven by viral-induced cellular signaling. Together, our data support a critical role for long-term, low-level HCMV infection in promoting survival, stemness, and proliferation of GSC that could significantly contribute to GBM pathogenesis.

  14. DELETION AND 5'CPG ISLAND METHYLATION OF p15 GENE IN BRAIN GLIOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the abnormality of p15 gene in brain glioma and the correlation of it with occurrence or malignant progression of brain glioma. Methods: Deletion and 5'CPG island methylation of p15 gene were detected by the methods of PCR and PCR-based methylation in 56 cases of brain glioma. Results: Out of 43 cases of high grade glioma, 14 cases were found to have homozygous deletion of p15E1, while none of the 13 cases of low grade glioma was found to have deletion of p15E1 (P<0.05). Methylation of 5'CPG Island of p15 gene was found only in four cases of glioma. Conclusion: Abnormality of p15 gene may involved in the occurrence and malignant progression of brain glioma. Homozygous deletion of gene is the major mechanism of inactivation for p15 gene in brain glioma.

  15. Complex treatment of malignant glioma of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the results of therapy of malignant glioma of the brain using a complex of procedures (surgical removal, nidran chemotherapy and telegammatherapy ) 1991-1997. Therapy and follow-up lasted 2-64 months. Mean survival after treatment was 16 months; 63 % survived more than 24 months; post-operative mortality was 2.4 %

  16. Application of mesenchymal stem cells as a vehicle to deliver replication-competent adenovirus for treating malignant glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Nan Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although gene therapy was regarded as a promising approach for glioma treatment, its therapeutic efficacy was often disappointing because of the lack of efficient drug delivery systems. Mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs have been reported to have a tropism for brain tumors and thus could be used as delivery vehicles for glioma therapy. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to treat glioma by using MSCs as a vehicle for delivering replication-competent adenovirus. We firstly compared the infectivity of type 3, type 5, and type 35 fiber-modified adenoviruses in MSCs. We also determined suitable adenovirus titer in vitro and then used this titer to analyze the ability of MSCs to deliver replication-competent adenovirus into glioma in vivo. Our results indicated that type 35 fiber-modified adenovirus showed higher infectivity than did naked type 3 or type 5 fiber-modified adenovirus. MSCs carrying replication-competent adenovirus significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo compared with other control groups. In conclusion, MSCs are an effective vehicle that can successfully transport replication-competent adenovirus into glioma, making it a potential therapeutic strategy for treating malignant glioma.

  17. Malignant gliomas of the brain managed by radiotherapy after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article reviews the literature and gives an account of the authors' experience during a 20-year period (1960-1980) of the value of radiotherapy after surgery in the management of 76 patients suffering from brain gliomas classified into 3 grades according to the degree of anaplasia present in the histological sections, viz. grades II, III and IV. Radiotherapy was not given to grade I malignant gliomas as they are treated by surgery only. The period is divided into 2 subperiods. The first is from 1960-1972 when part-brain, high-dose irradiation following surgery was used on 33 patients in various age groups. The second period covers whole-brain, low-dose irradiation following surgery and was used on 43 patients in various age groups

  18. Bevacizumab and Irinotecan in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Ependymoma, or Low Grade Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Childhood Cerebral Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma

  19. Enhanced MGMT expression contributes to temozolomide resistance in glioma stem-like cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-Kun Qiu; Dong Shen; Yin-Sheng Chen; Qun-Ying Yang; Cheng-Cheng Guo; Bing-Hong Feng; Zhong-Ping Chen

    2014-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) can remove DNA alkylation adducts, thereby repairing damaged DNA and contributing to the drug resistance of gliomas to alkylating agents. In addition, glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) have been demonstrated to be involved in the recurrence and treatment resistance of gliomas. In this study, we aimed to investigate MGMT expression and regulatory mechanisms in GSCs and the association of MGMT with temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity. GSC...

  20. Awake anesthesia for resection of gliomas located in eloquent brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG De-xiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative awake anesthesia is a safe and reliable method performed in glioma surgery in brain eloquent areas, for the purpose of a maximum resection of the lesions and protection of brain function. Plasma target-controlled infusion (TCI is used in the course of opening cranium and closing cranium to maintain optimal sedation, which is supplemented by excellent scalp nerve block for analgesia, and a laryngeal mask is used to secure the patient's airway. During cerebral function monitoring and lesion excision, appropriately modifying the plasma concentration of propofol TCI can make the patient achieve optimal sedation.

  1. A novel bispecific immunotoxin delivered by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to target blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry of malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Yonghong Zhang,1,2 Xinlin Sun,1 Min Huang,1 Yiquan Ke,1 Jihui Wang,1 Xiao Liu1 1National Key Clinic Specialty, Neurosurgery Institute of Guangdong Province, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory on Brain Function Repair and Regeneration, Department of Neurosurgery, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 2Department of Neurosurgery, First Hospital of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: In previous years, immunotoxins have been shown to be a greatly promising therapeutic tool for brain malignancies, such as gliomas. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs exhibit tropism to tumor tissue. However, the effect of bispecific immunotoxins in malignant gliomas is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of bispecific immunotoxins in human malignant gliomas.Materials and methods: In the present study, the bispecific immunotoxin VEGF165-ephrin A1-PE38KDEL was established using deoxyribonucleic acid shuffling and cloning techniques. The VEGF165-ephrin A1-PE38KDEL was delivered by hMSCs to mouse malignant gliomas. The effects of the bispecific immunotoxins on glioma-derived blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumorigenic effects of immunotoxins were examined in vivo.Results: In vitro, transfected hMSCs significantly inhibited the cell viability of gliomas cell lines U87 and U251 in a dose-dependent manner compared with untransfected hMSCs (P<0.01. In vivo, the intratumoral injection of engineered hMSCs was effective at inhibiting tumor growth in a malignant glioma tumor model.Conclusion: The bispecific immunotoxin secreted from hMSCs acts as a novel strategy for improving treatment options for malignant gliomas in the clinic. Keywords: bispecific immunotoxin, human mesenchymal stem cells, ephrin A1, VEGF165, malignant glioma

  2. Integrated Transcriptomic and Glycomic Profiling of Glioma Stem Cell Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildburger, Norelle C; Zhou, Shiyue; Zacharias, Lauren G; Kroes, Roger A; Moskal, Joseph R; Schmidt, Mary; Mirzaei, Parvin; Gumin, Joy; Lang, Frederick F; Mechref, Yehia; Nilsson, Carol L

    2015-09-01

    Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (BM-hMSCs) have the innate ability to migrate or home toward and engraft in tumors such as glioblastoma (GBM). Because of this unique property of BM-hMSCs, we have explored their use for cell-mediated therapeutic delivery for the advancement of GBM treatment. Extravasation, the process by which blood-borne cells—such as BM-hMSCs—enter the tissue, is a highly complex process but is heavily dependent upon glycosylation for glycan-glycan and glycan-protein adhesion between the cell and endothelium. However, in a translationally significant preclinical glioma stem cell xenograft (GSCX) model of GBM, BM-hMSCs demonstrate unequal tropism toward these tumors. We hypothesized that there may be differences in the glycan compositions between the GSCXs that elicit homing ("attractors") and those that do not ("non-attractors") that facilitate or impede the engraftment of BM-hMSCs in the tumor. In this study, glycotranscriptomic analysis revealed significant heterogeneity within the attractor phenotype and the enrichment of high mannose type N-glycan biosynthesis in the non-attractor phenotype. Orthogonal validation with topical PNGase F deglycosylation on the tumor regions of xenograft tissue, followed by nLC-ESI-MS, confirmed the presence of increased high mannose type N-glycans in the non-attractors. Additional evidence provided by our glycomic study revealed the prevalence of terminal sialic acid-containing N-glycans in non-attractors and terminal galactose and N-acetyl-glucosamine N-glycans in attractors. Our results provide the first evidence for differential glycomic profiles in attractor and non-attractor GSCXs and extend the scope of molecular determinates in BM-hMSC homing to glioma. PMID:26185906

  3. Delineating the Cytogenomic and Epigenomic Landscapes of Glioma Stem Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Simona Baronchelli; Angela Bentivegna; Serena Redaelli; Gabriele Riva; Valentina Butta; Laura Paoletta; Giuseppe Isimbaldi; Monica Miozzo; Silvia Tabano; Antonio Daga; Daniela Marubbi; Monica Cattaneo; Ida Biunno; Leda Dalprà

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and malignant type of glioma, is characterized by a poor prognosis and the lack of an effective treatment, which are due to a small sub-population of cells with stem-like properties, termed glioma stem cells (GSCs). The term “multiforme” describes the histological features of this tumor, that is, the cellular and morphological heterogeneity. At the molecular level multiple layers of alterations may reflect this heterogeneity providing together th...

  4. General Information about Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  5. On the relevance of glycolysis process on brain gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounelakis, M G; Zervakis, M E; Giakos, G C; Postma, G J; Buydens, L M C; Kotsiakis, X

    2013-01-01

    The proposed analysis considers aspects of both statistical and biological validation of the glycolysis effect on brain gliomas, at both genomic and metabolic level. In particular, two independent datasets are analyzed in parallel, one engaging genomic (Microarray Expression) data and the other metabolomic (Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging) data. The aim of this study is twofold. First to show that, apart from the already studied genes (markers), other genes such as those involved in the human cell glycolysis significantly contribute in gliomas discrimination. Second, to demonstrate how the glycolysis process can open new ways towards the design of patient-specific therapeutic protocols. The results of our analysis demonstrate that the combination of genes participating in the glycolytic process (ALDOA, ALDOC, ENO2, GAPDH, HK2, LDHA, LDHB, MDH1, PDHB, PFKM, PGI, PGK1, PGM1 and PKLR) with the already known tumor suppressors (PTEN, Rb, TP53), oncogenes (CDK4, EGFR, PDGF) and HIF-1, enhance the discrimination of low versus high-grade gliomas providing high prediction ability in a cross-validated framework. Following these results and supported by the biological effect of glycolytic genes on cancer cells, we address the study of glycolysis for the development of new treatment protocols. PMID:22614725

  6. The experimental investigation of glioma-trophic capacity of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells after intraventricular administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN Cun-gang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the glioma-trophic migration capacity of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs by intraventricular administration. Methods The umbilical cord tissue were obtained during full-term pregnancy cesarean section under sterile conditions. This study was approved by Ethics Committee and got the informed consent of patient. The hUC-MSCs were isolated by trypsin and collagenase digestion, followed by adherent culture methods. The characteristics of isolated hUC-MSCs were demonstrated by cell morphylogy, phenotype analysis and multi-differentiation potentials into adipocytes, osteoblasts and neural cells. Then the hUC-MSCs were labeled with CM-DiI and injected into contralateral ventricle of glioma of the C6 glioma-bearing Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. Two weeks later, the rats were sacrificed and the brains were taken out to examine the migration and distribution of hUC-MSCs in the tumor bed, at the interface of tumor and cerebral parenchyma as well as the tumor satelites infiltrating into the normal brain. Results The hUC-MSCs demonstrated plastic-adherent characterization and homogeneous fibroblastic-like morphylogy in culture, expression of specific surface phenotypes of MSCs (CD13, CD29, CD44, CD90 but not endothelial or hematopoietic markers (CD14, CD31, CD34, CD38, CD45, CD133, and muti-differentiatiation potentials into Oil red O stained adipocytes, Alizarin red S stained osteoblasts, neuron-specific enolase (NSE-positive neurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP-positive astrocytes in permissive inducive conditions. Importantly, after labeled hUC-MSCs injection into contralateral ventricle of glioma, the hUC-MSCs migrated from initial injection site to the glioma mass and along the interface of tumor and brain, and some of them "chasing" the glioma satellites infiltrated into the normal parenchyma. Conclusion The hUC-MSCs possess prominent tumor-specific targeting capacity and extensive intratumoral

  7. ZEB1 Promotes Invasion in Human Fetal Neural Stem Cells and Hypoxic Glioma Neurospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Ulf D; Suwala, Abigail K; Raabe, Eric H; Siebzehnrubl, Florian A; Suarez, Maria J; Orr, Brent A; Bar, Eli E; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Eberhart, Charles G

    2015-11-01

    Diffuse spread through brain parenchyma and the presence of hypoxic foci rimmed by neoplastic cells are two cardinal features of glioblastoma, and low oxygen is thought to drive movement of malignant gliomas in the core of the lesions. Transcription factors associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been linked to this invasion, and we found that hypoxia increased in vitro invasion up to fourfold in glioblastoma neurosphere lines and induced the expression of ZEB1. Immunohistochemical assessment of 295 surgical specimens consisting of various types of pediatric and adult brain cancers showed that ZEB1 expression was significantly higher in infiltrative lesions than less invasive tumors such as pilocytic astrocytoma and ependymoma. ZEB1 protein was also present in human fetal periventricular stem and progenitor cells and ZEB1 inhibition impaired migration of in vitro propagated human neural stem cells. The induction of ZEB1 protein in hypoxic glioblastoma neurospheres could be partially blocked by the HIF1alpha inhibitor digoxin. Targeting ZEB1 blocked hypoxia-augmented invasion of glioblastoma cells in addition to slowing them in normoxia. These data support the role for ZEB1 in invasive and high-grade brain tumors and suggest its key role in promoting invasion in the hypoxic tumor core as well as in the periphery. PMID:25521330

  8. Gefitinib Radiosensitizes Stem-Like Glioma Cells: Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Akt-DNA-PK Signaling, Accompanied by Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Khong Bee, E-mail: dmskkb@nccs.com.sg [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Zhu Congju; Wong Yinling; Gao Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Akt-DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Results: Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Conclusions: Stem-like gliomaspheres are

  9. Gefitinib Radiosensitizes Stem-Like Glioma Cells: Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Akt-DNA-PK Signaling, Accompanied by Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–Akt-DNA–dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, γ-H2AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, γ-H2AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Results: Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G2/M arrest and increased γ-H2AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased γ-H2AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Conclusions: Stem-like gliomaspheres are resistant to irradiation-induced cytotoxicity, G2/M

  10. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL DETECTION OF P73 PRODUCT IN BRAIN GLIOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Guang; YUAN Xian-hou; PAN Hui-jin; QIU Shang-ming; ZHOU Ming-yong

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the role of p73 in the genesis or development of glioma. Methods: P73 and p53expression of 63 gliomas were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: Out of the 63 gliomas, 17 cases appeared p73 positive. The positive-rate in high grade gliomas was higher than that in low grade gliomas (x2=4.75, P<0.05). Among the 17 cases with p73-positive gliomas, 12 cases overexpressed p53 protein. Conclusion:Overexpression of wild p73 may involve in the genesis or development of glioma.

  11. Current technological progress in neurosurgery and its impact on surgical treatment of glioma brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain gliomas are characterized by infiltrative growth, with possible finding of functional brain tissue within the tumor. Intraoperatively are glioma borders often indistinguishable from surrounding brain. Eloquent areas can be damaged during surgical removal of tumors near or within these areas. Therefore, in addition to preoperative identification of cortical and subcortical eloquent areas, meticulous microsurgical technique, neuro navigation, intraoperative imaging, neuro monitoring and awake surgery are necessary. Using these methods, satisfactory and safe resection of tumors previously considered as unresectable is possible. (author)

  12. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type PTEN promoting glioma stem/progenitor cells autophagy activity

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAO Yao-dong; Zi-long WEI; Zhang, Quan-Bin; LOU Mei-qing; HUANG, QIANG

    2013-01-01

    Background PTEN is an anti-oncogene frequently inactivating in glioma. The previous study found that PTEN was closely related to cellular autophagy activity. The purpose of this paper is to study whether the inactivation of PTEN in glioma stem/progenitor cells (GSPCs) is correlative with the low autophagic activity in GSPCs. Methods Wild-type PTEN genes were transferred into GSPCs mediated by adenovirus. The autophagic activity in GSPCs before or after the introduction of wild-type PTEN was...

  13. Establishment of C6 brain glioma models through stereotactic technique for laser interstitial thermotherapy research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Shi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The rat C6 brain glioma model established in the study was a perfect model to study LITT of glioma. Infrared thermograph technique measured temperature conveniently and effectively. The technique is noninvasive, and the obtained data could be further processed using software used in LITT research. To measure deep-tissue temperature, combining thermocouple with infrared thermograph technique would present better results.

  14. N-Acetylaspartate (NAA) and N-Acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) Promote Growth and Inhibit Differentiation of Glioma Stem-like Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Patrick M.; Moffett, John R; Namboodiri, Aryan M. A.; Viapiano, Mariano S.; Lawler, Sean E.; Jaworski, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the primary source of brain acetate, and aspartoacylase (ASPA), the enzyme that catabolizes NAA, are decreased in glioma, thereby decreasing acetate bioavailability.

  15. Expression and relevant research of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in differentgrades of brain glioma and normal brain tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Fei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore and analyze expression and relevant research of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in different grades of brain glioma and normal brain tissues. Methods: 52 cases of patients with brain glioma treated in our hospital from December 2013 to December 2014, and 50 cases of normal brain-tissue patients with intracranial hypertension were selected, and proceeding test to the surgical resection of brain tissue of the above patients to determine its MGMT and XRCC1 protein content, sequentially to record the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 of both groups. Grading of tumors to brain glioma after operation was carried out, and the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in brain tissues of different patients was analyzed and compared;finally the contingency tables of X2 test was used to analyze the correlation of XRCC1and MGMT. Results:Positive rate of MGMT expression in normal brain tissue was 2%,while positive rate of MGMT expression in brain glioma was 46.2%,which was obviously higher than that in normal brain tissues (χ2=26.85, P0.05), which had no statistical significance. There were 12 cases of patients whose MGMT protein expression was positive and XRCC1 protein expression was positive; there were 18 cases of patients whose MGMT protein expression was negative and XRCC1 protein expression was negative. Contingency tables of X2 test was used to analyze the correlation of XRCC1 and MGMT, which indicated that the expression of XRCCI and MGMT in brain glioma had no correlation (r=0.9%, P=0.353), relevancy of both was r=0.9%. Conclusions: Positive rate of the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 in brain glioma was obviously higher than that in normal brain tissues, but the distribution of different grades of brain glioma had no obvious difference, and MGMT and XRCC1 expression had no obvious correlation, which needed further research.

  16. Embryonic stem cell (ESC)-mediated transgene delivery induces growth suppression, apoptosis and radiosensitization, and overcomes temozolomide resistance in malignant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, I M; Emdad, L; Qadeer, Z A; Binello, E; Uzzaman, M

    2010-09-01

    High-grade gliomas are among the most lethal of all cancers. Despite considerable advances in multimodality treatment, including surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the overall prognosis for patients with this disease remains dismal. Currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. The use of gene therapy for malignant gliomas is promising, as it allows in situ delivery and selectively targets brain tumor cells while sparing the adjacent normal brain tissue. Viral vectors that deliver proapoptotic genes to malignant glioma cells have been investigated. Although tangible results on patients' survival remain to be further documented, significant advances in therapeutic gene transfer strategies have been made. Recently, cell-based gene delivery has been sought as an alternative method. In this paper, we report the proapoptotic effects of embryonic stem cell (ESC)-mediated mda-7/IL-24 delivery to malignant glioma cell lines. Our data show that these are similar to those observed using a viral vector. In addition, acknowledging the heterogeneity of malignant glioma cells and their signaling pathways, we assessed the effects of conventional treatment for high-grade gliomas, ionizing radiation and temozolomide, when combined with ESC-mediated transgene delivery. This combination resulted in synergistic effects on tumor cell death. The mechanisms involved in this beneficial effect included activation of both apoptosis and autophagy. Our in vitro data support the concept that ESC-mediated gene delivery might offer therapeutic advantages over standard approaches to malignant gliomas. Our results corroborate the theory that combined treatments exploiting different signaling pathways are needed to succeed in the treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:20523363

  17. Brain slice invasion model reveals genes differentially regulated in glioma invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Invasion of tumor cells into adjacent brain areas is one of the major problems in treatment of glioma patients. To identify genes that might contribute to invasion, fluorescent F98 glioma cells were allowed to invade an organotypic brain slice. Gene expression analysis revealed 5 up-regulated and 14 down-regulated genes in invasive glioma cells as compared to non-invasive glioma cells. Two gene products, ferritin and cyclin B1, were verified in human gliomas by immunohistochemistry. Ferritin exhibited high mRNA levels in migratory F98 cells and also showed higher protein expression in the infiltrating edge of human gliomas. Cyclin B1 with high mRNA expression levels in stationary F98 cells showed marked protein expression in the central portions of gliomas. These findings are compatible with the concept of tumor cells either proliferating or migrating. Our study is the first to apply brain slice cultures for the identification of differentially regulated genes in glioma invasion

  18. mir-300 promotes self-renewal and inhibits the differentiation of glioma stem-like cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Daming

    2014-01-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that have been critically implicated in several human cancers. miRNAs are thought to participate in various biological processes, including proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and even the regulation of the stemness properties of cancer stem cells. In this study, we explore the potential role of miR-300 in glioma stem-like cells (GSLCs). We isolated GSLCs from glioma biopsy specimens and identified the stemness properties of the cells through neurosphere formation assays, multilineage differentiation ability analysis, and immunofluorescence analysis of glioma stem cell markers. We found that miR-300 is commonly upregulated in glioma tissues, and the expression of miR-300 was higher in GSLCs. The results of functional experiments demonstrated that miR-300 can enhance the self-renewal of GSLCs and reduce differentiation toward both astrocyte and neural fates. In addition, LZTS2 is a direct target of miR-300. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the critical role of miR-300 in GSLCs and its functions in LZTS2 inhibition and describe a new approach for the molecular regulation of tumor stem cells. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.

  19. Notch signaling pathway and glioma stem cell niche%Notch信号通路与脑胶质瘤干细胞的niche

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林才厚; 郑宗清; 邱献新; 林志雄

    2013-01-01

    A small fraction of tumor stem cells exist in glioma and play a key role in the tumorigenesis and propagation of glioma.They have a close relationship with their niche that offers structural and functional support.In glioma niche,vascular endothelial cells can provide Notch ligands for cancer stem cells to activate Notch signaling pathway and contact with other signaling pathways,maintaining the tumor stem cell self-renewal and increasing resistance of brain tumor stem cells to radiotherapy.Therefore,Notch signaling pathway is considered to be a new therapeutic target of glioma.%研究表明极少数量肿瘤干细胞存在于脑胶质瘤中,但在其发生发展中起关键作用.脑胶质瘤干细胞与为其提供结构和功能支持的血管niche关系密切.在脑胶质瘤niche中,血管内皮细胞可以提供Notch配体给肿瘤干细胞,激活Notch信号通路,并与其他信号通路构成串话,维持肿瘤干细胞的自我更新,增加脑肿瘤干细胞对放疗的抵抗性.因此,Notch信号通路被认为是脑胶质瘤新的治疗靶点.

  20. Boron neutron capture therapy induces cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis of glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioma stem cells in the quiescent state are resistant to clinical radiation therapy. An almost inevitable glioma recurrence is due to the persistence of these cells. The high linear energy transfer associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could kill quiescent and proliferative cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of BNCT on glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro. The damage induced by BNCT was assessed using cell cycle progression, apoptotic cell ratio and apoptosis-associated proteins expression. The surviving fraction and cell viability of glioma stem/progenitor cells were decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells using the same boronophenylalanine pretreatment and the same dose of neutron flux. BNCT induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, with changes in the expression of associated proteins. Glioma stem/progenitor cells, which are resistant to current clinical radiotherapy, could be effectively killed by BNCT in vitro via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis using a prolonged neutron irradiation, although radiosensitivity of glioma stem/progenitor cells was decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells when using the same dose of thermal neutron exposure and boronophenylalanine pretreatment. Thus, BNCT could offer an appreciable therapeutic advantage to prevent tumor recurrence, and may become a promising treatment in recurrent glioma

  1. CXCR4-positive subset of glioma is enriched for cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuesheng; Xie, QingSong; Li, Shiting; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2011-01-01

    CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is a cell surface molecule expressed in a distinct subset of glioma cells with enhanced tumorigenicity, and it is related to many important biological activities of the tumor. We supposed that this receptor might be a cell surface "marker" for glioma stem cells. This hypothesis was tested both in vitro and in vivo. The CXCR4+ and CXCR4- subsets were sorted from three human malignant glioma specimens. They were tested for the capability of colony formation in soft agar, generation of tumorosphere, self-renewal, and multipotent differentiation in vitro, and the capability of xenograft tumor in vivo. Drug and radiation resistance and coexpression with CD133 were studied for each subset. CXCR4+ glioma cells, but not CXCR4- cells, were capable of generating tumorospheres in serum-free medium. In addition, these spheres were able to self-renew after passage, and had multipotent differentiation after being induced in serum-containing medium. In soft agar assay, CXCR4+ cells generate much more colonies. The animal experiment revealed that CXCR4+ subpopulation had stronger tumorigenicity than the unsorted parental glioma cells, while the CXCR4- cells did not generate xenograft tumor. CXCR4-possitive cells were more resistant to temozolomide and radiation treatment. Both CXCR4+ and CXCR4- subsets contained very few CD133+ cells. The CXCR4+ subsets of glioma cells fulfill the standard of "cancer stem cell". PMID:22812188

  2. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M; Andersson, Ulrika;

    2013-01-01

    Familial cancer can be used to leverage genetic association studies. Recent genome-wide association studies have reported independent associations between seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether glioma cases with a positive...

  3. The prognostic value of clinical factors and cancer stem cell-related markers in gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard

    2014-01-01

    -renewal, proliferation, and differentiation during development of different (normal) tissues. The same characteristics were identified in cancer cells, and recently a major part of the glioma research has focused on the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, suggesting that only CSCs posses the ability of initiating new...... on experiences from clinical trials, with the risk that the results obtained are restricted to highly selected patients only. Moreover, these studies provided only little knowledge of the clinical behaviour of the tumours. For some time, it has been believed that somatic stem cells are responsible for self...... knowledge about the biological but also about the clinical presentation of gliomas and of glioma patients in an entire population was needed. Identification of patients who would benefit from standard treatment as well as identification of patients who need more aggressive treatment at the time of diagnosis...

  4. Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Oligoastrocytoma Oligodendroglioma Pineal Tumor Pituitary Tumor PNET Schwannoma Risk Factors Brain Tumor Facts Brain Tumor Dictionary ... Tumors Oligoastrocytoma Oligodendroglioma Pineal Tumor Pituitary Tumor PNET Schwannoma Risk Factors Brain Tumor Facts Brain Tumor Dictionary ...

  5. Glioma Cells in the Tumor Periphery Have a Stem Cell Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sune Munthe

    Full Text Available Gliomas are highly infiltrative tumors incurable with surgery. Although surgery removes the bulk tumor, tumor cells in the periphery are left behind resulting in tumor relapses. The aim of the present study was to characterize the phenotype of tumor cells in the periphery focusing on tumor stemness, proliferation and chemo-resistance. This was investigated in situ in patient glioma tissue as well as in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts. We identified 26 gliomas having the R132 mutation in Isocitrate DeHydrogenase 1 (mIDH1. A double immunofluorescence approach identifying mIDH1 positive tumor cells and a panel of markers was used. The panel comprised of six stem cell-related markers (CD133, Musashi-1, Bmi-1, Sox-2, Nestin and Glut-3, a proliferation marker (Ki-67 as well as a chemo-resistance marker (MGMT. Computer-based automated classifiers were designed to measure the mIDH1 positive nucleus area-fraction of the chosen markers. Moreover, orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts from five different patient-derived spheroid cultures were obtained and the tumor cells identified by human specific immunohistochemical markers. The results showed that tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas expressed stem cell markers, however for most markers at a significantly lower level than in the tumor core. The Ki-67 level was slightly reduced in the periphery, whereas the MGMT level was similar. In orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts all markers showed similar levels in the core and periphery. In conclusion tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas have a stem cell phenotype, although it is less pronounced than in the tumor core. Novel therapies aiming at preventing recurrence should therefore take tumor stemness into account. Migrating cells in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts preserve expression and stem cell markers. The orthotopic model therefore has a promising translational potential.

  6. Family history of cancer in benign brain tumor subtypes versus gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn eOstrom

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Family history is associated with gliomas, but this association has not ben established for benign brain tumors. Using information from newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients, we describe patterns of family cancer histories in patients with benign brain tumors and compare those to patients with gliomas. Methods: Newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients were identified as part of the Ohio Brain Tumor Study (OBTS. Each patient was asked to participate in a telephone interview about personal medical history, family history of cancer, and other exposures. Information was available from 33 acoustic neuroma (65%, 78 meningioma (65%, 49 pituitary adenoma (73.1% and 152 glioma patients (58.2%. The association between family history of cancer and each subtype was compared with gliomas using unconditional logistic regression models generating odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results: There was no significant difference in family history of cancer between patients with glioma and benign subtypes. Conclusions: The results suggest that benign brain tumor may have an association with family history of cancer. More studies are warranted to disentangle the potential genetic and/or environmental causes for these diseases.

  7. Abnormal expressions of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and P27 protein in brain glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both proliferating cell nuclear antigen and P27 protein are important factors to regulate cell cycle. While, the combination of them can provide exactly objective markers to evaluate prognosis of patients with brain glioma needs to be further studied based on pathological level.OBJECTIVE: To observe the expressions of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and P27 protein in both injured and normal brain glioma tissues and analyze the effect of them on onset and development of brain glioma.DESIGN: Case contrast observation.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 63 patients with brain glioma were selected from Department of Neurosurgery,the Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University from July 1996 to June 2000. There were 38 males and 25 females and their ages ranged from 23 to 71 years. Based on pathological classification and grading standards of brain glioma, patients were divided into grade Ⅰ - tⅡ (n =30) and grade Ⅲ - Ⅳ (n =33). All cases received one operation but no radiotherapy and chemiotherapy before operation. Sample tissues were collected from tumor parenchyma. Non-neoplastic brain tissues were collected from another 12 non-tumor subjects who received craniocerebral trauma infra-decompression and regarded as the control group. There were 10 males and 2 females and their ages ranged from 16 to 54 years. The experiment had got confirmed consent from local ethic committee and the collection was provided confirmed consent from patients and their relatives. All samples were restained with HE staining so as to diagnose as the brain glioma.While, all patients with brain glioma received radiotherapy after operation and their survival periods were followed up.METHODS: Primary lesion wax of brain glioma was cut into serial sections and stained with S-P immunohistochemical staining. Brown substance which was observed in tumor nucleus was regarded as the

  8. Effect of microenviroment hypoxia on glioma cells radiosensitivity through cancer stem cell pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of microenviroment hypoxia on glioma cells radiosensitivity through cancer stem pathway, and to explore the related mechanism. Methods: Glioma cell lines SHG44 and U251 were cultured in normoxia (20% O2) or continuous hypoxia (1% O2) for 12 and 24 h. The fraction of glioma cells with positive expression of CD133 was assayed by flow cytometry. The radiosensitivity of glioma cells was determined by clonogenic cell assay. Western blotting was used to investigate the expressions of HIF-1 α and its downstream gene Notch 1. Results: The fraction of glioma cells with positive expression of CD133 was higher after hypoxic culture for 12 and 24 h than that of the corresponding cells cultured in normoxia. Compared to the cells cultured in normoxia, SF2 (survival fraction at 2 Gy) were enhanced significantly in SHG44 and U251 cells cultured in hypoxia for 12 and 24 h. The OER (oxygen-enhancement ratio) of SHG44 cells in hypoxia for 12 and 24 h was 1.54 and 1.38, respectively. The OER of U251 cells was 1.44 and 1.23, respectively. The radiosensitivity of these two cell line was decreased in hypoxia. The protein expressions of HIF-1 α and Notch 1 genes were elevated more significantly for cells cultured in hypoxia for 12 and 24 h than for those in normoxia. Conclusions: Microenviroment hypoxia could increase the radioresistance of glioma cells through enrichment of cancer stem cells, and HIF-1 α-Notch 1 signal pathway may play an important role in this process. (authors)

  9. Interferon-α/β enhances temozolomide activity against MGMT-positive glioma stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dong; Guo, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Sai, Ke; Yang, Qun-Ying; Chen, Yin-Sheng; Chen, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jie; Panasci, Lawrence; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Glioma is one of the most common primary tumors of the central nervous system in adults. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal type of glioma, whose 5-year survival is 9.8% at best. Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) play an important role in recurrence and treatment resistance. MGMT is a DNA repair protein that removes DNA adducts and therefore attenuates treatment efficiency. It has been reported that interferon-α/β (IFN-α/β) downregulates the level of MGMT and sensitizes glioma cells to temozolomide. In the present study, we assessed whether IFN-α/β is able to sensitize GSCs to temozolomide by modulating MGMT expression. Upon the treatment of IFN-α/β, the efficacy of temozolomide against MGMT‑positive GSCs was markedly enhanced by combination treatment with IFN-α/β when compared with the temozolomide single agent group, and MGMT expression was markedly decreased at the same time. Further mechanistic study showed that IFN-α/β suppressed the NF-κB activity, which further mediated the sensitization of MGMT‑positive GSCs to temozolomide. Our data therefore demonstrated that the application of IFN-α/β is a promising agent with which to enhance temozolomide efficiency and reduce drug resistance, and our findings shed light on improving clinical outcomes and prolonging the survival of patients with malignant gliomas. PMID:26329778

  10. Iron labeling and pre-clinical MRI visualization of therapeutic human neural stem cells in a murine glioma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mya S Thu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment strategies for the highly invasive brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme, require that cells which have invaded into the surrounding brain be specifically targeted. The inherent tumor-tropism of neural stem cells (NSCs to primary and invasive tumor foci can be exploited to deliver therapeutics to invasive brain tumor cells in humans. Use of the strategy of converting prodrug to drug via therapeutic transgenes delivered by immortalized therapeutic NSC lines have shown efficacy in animal models. Thus therapeutic NSCs are being proposed for use in human brain tumor clinical trials. In the context of NSC-based therapies, MRI can be used both to non-invasively follow dynamic spatio-temporal patterns of the NSC tumor targeting allowing for the optimization of treatment strategies and to assess efficacy of the therapy. Iron-labeling of cells allows their presence to be visualized and tracked by MRI. Thus we aimed to iron-label therapeutic NSCs without affecting their cellular physiology using a method likely to gain United States Federal Drug Administration (FDA approval. METHODOLOGY: For human use, the characteristics of therapeutic Neural Stem Cells must be clearly defined with any pertubation to the cell including iron labeling requiring reanalysis of cellular physiology. Here, we studied the effect of iron-loading of the therapeutic NSCs, with ferumoxide-protamine sulfate complex (FE-Pro on viability, proliferation, migratory properties and transgene expression, when compared to non-labeled cells. FE-Pro labeled NSCs were imaged by MRI at tumor sites, after intracranial administration into the hemisphere contralateral to the tumor, in an orthotopic human glioma xenograft mouse model. CONCLUSION: FE-Pro labeled NSCs retain their proliferative status, tumor tropism, and maintain stem cell character, while allowing in vivo cellular MRI tracking at 7 Tesla, to monitor their real-time migration and distribution at brain tumor sites

  11. Preclinical Biosafety Evaluation of Genetically Modified Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Clinical Applications to Brainstem Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Ah; Yun, Jun-Won; Joo, Kyeung Min; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kwak, Pil Ae; Lee, Young Eun; You, Ji-Ran; Kwon, Euna; Kim, Woo Ho; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2016-06-15

    Stem-cell based gene therapy is a promising novel therapeutic approach for inoperable invasive tumors, including brainstem glioma. Previously, we demonstrated the therapeutic potential of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAT-MSC) genetically engineered to express a secreted form of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL) against brainstem glioma. However, safety concerns should be comprehensively investigated before clinical applications of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL. At first, we injected stereotactically low (1.2 × 10(5) cells/18 μL), medium (2.4 × 10(5)/18 μL), or high dose (3.6 × 10(5)/18 μL) of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL into the brainstems of immunodeficient mice reflecting the plan of the future clinical trial. Local toxicity, systemic toxicity, secondary tumor formation, and biodistribution of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL were investigated. Next, presence of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was confirmed in the brain and major organs at 4, 9, and 14 weeks in brainstem glioma-bearing mice. In the 15-week subchronic toxicity test, no serious adverse events in terms of body weight, food consumption, clinical symptom, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, organ weight, and histopathology were observed. In the 26-week tumorigenicity test, hAT-MSC.sTRAIL made no detectable tumors, whereas positive control U-87 MG cells made huge tumors in the brainstem. No remaining hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed in any organs examined, including the brainstem at 15 or 26 weeks. In brainstem glioma-bearing mice, injected hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed, but gradually decreased over time in the brain. The mRNA of human specific GAPDH and TRAIL was not detected in all major organs. These results indicate that the hAT-MSC.sTRAIL could be applicable to the future clinical trials in terms of biosafety. PMID:27151205

  12. Imaging and histological characterization of a human brain xenograft in pig: the first induced glioma model in a large animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selek, Laurent; Seigneuret, Eric; Nugue, Guillaume; Wion, Didier; Nissou, Marie France; Salon, Caroline; Seurin, Marie José; Carozzo, Claude; Ponce, Frédérique; Roger, Thierry; Berger, François

    2014-01-15

    The prognosis of glioblastoma remains poor despite significant improvement in cytoreductive surgery, external irradiation and new approach of systemic treatment as antiangiogenic therapy. One of the issues is the low concentration in the infiltrated parenchyma of therapeutic agent administered intravenously mainly due to the blood-brain barrier. An intracerebral injection is advocated to overpass this barrier, this kind of administration need a low flow and continuous injection. The development of sophisticated implanted devices for convection-enhanced delivery is a mandatory step to have a controlled released of a therapeutic agent in glioblastoma treatment. Before testing such a device in a clinical trial a serious preclinical studies are required, in order to test it in realistic conditions we have develop the first induced high grade glioma model in a non-rodent animal: the pig. 21 pigs have been implanted in the parietal lobe with human glioblastoma cell lineage under a chemical immunosuppression by ciclosporine. A MRI follow up was then realized. 15 pigs have been implanted with U87MG, 14 have presented a macroscopic significant tumor, with radiological and anatomapathological characteristics of high grade glioma. 6 pigs were implanted with G6, stem-like cells tumors of glioblastoma, 1 pig develops a macroscopic tumor. This is the first reproducible glioma model in a large animal described, it open the way to preclinical studies to test implanted devices in anatomic realistic conditions, without the ethical issues of a primate use. PMID:24126047

  13. CB-09THE CELL OF ORIGIN FOR GLIOBLASTOMA CONTRIBUTES TO THE PHENOTYPIC HETEROGENEITY OF GLIOMA STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yiwen; Marinescu, Voichita D.; Xie, Yuan; Haglund, Caroline; Jarvius, Malin; Lindberg, Nanna; Olofsson, Tommie; Hesselager, Göran; Alafuzoff, Irina; Fryknäs, Mårten; Larsson, Rolf; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent adult primary malignant brain tumor that remains incurable despite aggressive treatment. The cell of origin (COO) for GBM is unknown but assumed to be a glial stem or progenitor cell. GBM harbours hierarchical tumor cells called glioma stem cells (GSCs) that maintain tumor growth, drive tumor progression and cause tumor relapse due to their increased resistance to therapy. We have analyzed the significance of cellular origin for GBM development and GSC properties by comparing mouse GBMs and GSCs derived thereof induced in neural stem cells (NSCs), glial-restricted precursor cells (GPCs) or oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) by identical mutations. There were striking differences in GBM development and the phenotypes of GSCs and their response to drugs owing to the COO. Global gene expression analysis of mouse GSC lines displayed a clear separation due to COO and differential gene expression analysis identified a COO gene signature of 175 genes. Cross-species bioinformatics analyses were performed. First we analyzed the human cancer genome atlas (TCGA) GBM tissue samples and the mouse GSC expression data for a collection of TCGA GBM subtype signature genes. This showed that we could model both Proneural and Mesenchymal GBMs in mice by merely switching the COO. Next, we used the mouse COO gene signature to stratify a large number of newly established human glioma stem cell lines. This produced two groups of human GSCs; the NSC origin group and the progenitor cell (PC) origin group in which the mouse GPC- and OPC-derived genes were combined. Importantly, patient survival was significantly different between the NSC and PC COO groups with a better prognosis for the PC group patients. Thus, the cell of origin is essential for GBM biology and needs to be considered for more accurate patient stratification, target identification and drug discovery.

  14. Management of posterior fossa gliomas in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Sridhar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumours form the most common type of solid tumour in children and more that 50% of these are infratentorial. Cerebellar astrocytomas and brain stem gliomas are the commonest posterior fossa glial tumours in children. Cerebellar astrocytomas represent up to 10% of all primary brain tumours and up to 25% of posterior fossa tumors in children, with Low grade gliomas forming the commonest of the cerebellar gliomas. They commonly present with symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure due to obstructive hydrocephalus. Radiologically they may be solid or cystic with or without a mural nodule. Surgical excision is the mainstay of treatment and forms the most consistent factor influencing progression free and long term survival. While majority of the tumours are pilocytic astrocytomas, they may also be fibrillary astrocytomas or even high grade tumours. Tumour histology does not appear to be an independent factor in the prognosis of these children, and therefore no palliative treatment after surgery is advocated. Brain stem gliomas account for approximately 10% of all pediatric brain tumours. Cranial nerve signs, ataxia and cerebellar signs with or without symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure are classically described symptoms and signs. Radiographic findings and clinical correlates can be used to categorize brain stem tumours into four types: diffuse, focal, exophytic and cervicomedullary. Histologically most brain stem gliomas are fibrillary astrocytomas. Diffuse brain stem gliomas are the most commonly seen tumour in the brain stem. These lesions are malignant high grade fibrillary astrocytomas. Focal tumours of the brain stem are demarcated lesions generally less than 2 cms in size, without associated edema. Most commonly seen in the midbrain or medulla, they form a heterogeneous pathological group, showing indolent growth except when the lesion is a PNET. Dorsally exophytic tumours lie in the fourth ventricle, while

  15. The influence of low-grade glioma on resting state oscillatory brain activity: a magnetoencephalography study

    OpenAIRE

    Bosma, I.; Stam, C.; Douw, L.; Bartolomei, F.; Heimans, J.; van Dijk; Postma, T.; Klein, M.; Reijneveld, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In the present MEG-study, power spectral analysis of oscillatory brain activity was used to compare resting state brain activity in both low-grade glioma (LGG) patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that LGG patients show local as well as diffuse slowing of resting state brain activity compared to healthy controls and that particularly global slowing correlates with neurocognitive dysfunction. Patient and methods Resting state MEG recordings were obtained from 17 LGG patients...

  16. Predictive value of brain SPECT with 99 technetium - MIBI for differentiation of histologic grade brain gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis and treatment of primary tumors of the nervous system remain difficult and are a challenge to be addressed in a multidisciplinary way. In order to determine the usefulness of brain SPECT 99Tc MIBI to differentiate histologic grade brain gliomas - Frequently brain tumors - they were studied 68 patients with this technique. A dynamic study first step in AP and lateral view was performed, and a SPECT at 20 minutes post-administration and at 2 hours late views. the post-surgical histological study of injuries was used as control. several imaging parameters such as the absolute activity of 99mTc-MIBI were calculated both early and late phase, cortex contralateral tumor rates; pituitary tumor; choroid plexus tumor and Reason Late / Early phase tumor index / contralateral cortex tumor volume functional phase, the volume concentration of MIBI activity in the tumor and the retention rate of the radiopharmaceutical. Of the 68 patients studied, 11 were high-grade tumors and 57 low grade. The cortex contralateral tumor in late stage index showed a negative satisfactory sensitivity of 98.6% and specificity 77.1%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 48.2% and (NPV) of 99.8%. The reason late stage / early in the index tumor / contralateral cortex showed values ​​in turn 96.3%, 98.7%, 98.8% and 98.8% sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV respectively. The retention rate showed a 99% sensitivity, 89% specificity and PPV, NPV of 95% and 99% respectively. Conclusion: The combination cortex contralateral tumor rate in late stage, the reason late stage / early stage tumor index / contralateral cortex and the retention rate of the radiopharmaceutical are the most useful parameters to predict histologic grade of brain gliomas. (author)

  17. Concurrent thermochemoradiotherapy for brain high-grade glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabova, A. I.; Novikov, V. A.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Bober, E. E.; Frolova, I. G.; Baranova, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the achievements in the current strategies for treatment, the prognosis in malignant glioma patients remains unsatisfactory. Hyperthermia is currently considered to be the most effective and universal modifier of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preliminary treatment outcomes for 28 patients with newly diagnosed (23) and recurrent (5) high-grade gliomas were presented. All the patients received multimodality treatment including surgery, thermoche-moradiotherapy followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. All the patients endured thermochemoradiotherapy well. A complication, limited skin burn (II stage), was diagnosed in two cases and treated conservatively without treatment interruption. A month after thermochemoradiotherapy the results were as follows: complete regression was achieved in 4 cases, partial regression in 4 cases, stable disease in 14 cases and disease progression in 6 cases (one of them is pseudo-progression). After completing the adjuvant chemotherapy 2 more patients demonstrated complete response and 1 patient had disease progression. Introduction of local hyperthermia in multimodal therapy of malignant glioma does not impair the combined modality treatment tolerability of patients with malignant gliomas. A small number of studied patients and short follow-up time do not allow making reliable conclusions about the impact of local hyperthermia on the treatment outcomes; however, there is a tendency towards the increase in disease-free survival in the patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas.

  18. 测定脑胶质瘤患者神经肽、神经降压素的含量变化及意义%Clinical Significance and Detection of Neuro- Peptide and Neurotensin in Patients with Brain Glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹秋霞; 司永兵; 齐法莲

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the change of neuropeptide Y(NPY)and neurotensin(NT)in pqtients with brain glioma.Method The concentration of NPY and NT in and around brain glioma tissue and plasma were detected with inequilibrant radio- imunology method.Result NPY concentrqtion in brain glioma tissue was obviously higher than that in tissue around the tumor(P<0.01).The Concentration of NT in brain glioma tissue was obviously higher that in tissue around the glioma(P<0.01).Conclusion Detection of NPY and NTin brain glion aprovides basis for further study on brain glioma and explainning dlinical and imaginal symiptom of brain glioma.

  19. ALA-PDT of glioma cell micro-clusters in BD-IX rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Angell-Petersen, Even; Spetalen, Signe; Carper, Stephen W.; Ziegler, Sarah A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2006-02-01

    A significant contributory factor to the poor prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme is the inability of conventional treatments to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells. A syngeneic rat brain tumor model is used to investigate the effects of aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) on small clusters of tumor cells sequestered in normal brain. The intrinsic sensitivity of rat glioma cells to PDT was investigated by exposing ALA-incubated cells to a range of radiant exposures and irradiances using 635 nm light. Biodistribution studies were undertaken on tumor-bearing animals in order to determine the tumor selectivity of the photosensitizer following systemic administration (i.p.) of ALA. Effects of ALA-PDT on normal brain and gross tumor were evaluated using histopathology. Effects of PDT on isolated glioma cells in normal brain were investigated by treating animals 48 h after tumor cell implantation: a time when the micro-clusters of cells are protected by an intact blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Rat glioma cells in monolayer are susceptible to ALA-PDT - lower irradiances are more effective than higher ones. Fluorescence microscopy of frozen tissue sections showed that photosensitizer is produced with better than 200:1 tumor-to-normal tissue selectivity following i.p. ALA administration. ALA-PDT resulted in significant damage to both gross tumor and normal brain, however, the treatment failed to prolong survival of animals with newly implanted glioma cells compared to non-treated controls if the drug was delivered either i.p. or directly into the brain. In contrast, animals inoculated with tumor cells pre-incubated in vitro with ALA showed a significant survival advantage in response to PDT.

  20. Cancer stem cells and brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Castillo, Ana; Aguilar Morante, Diana; Morales-García, José A.; Dorado, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Besides the role of normal stem cells in organogenesis, cancer stem cells are thought to be crucial for tumorigenesis. Most current research on human tumors is focused on molecular and cellular analysis of the bulk tumor mass. However, evidence in leukemia and, more recently, in solid tumors suggests that the tumor cell population is heterogeneous. In recent years, several groups have described the existence of a cancer stem cell population in different brain tumors. These neural cancer stem ...

  1. Brain tumor stem cell dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Issues regarding cancer stem cell (CSC movement are important in neurosphere biology as cell-cell or cell-environment interactions may have significant impacts on CSC differentiation and contribute to the heterogeneity of the neurosphere. Aims. Despite the growing body of literature data on the biology of brain tumor stem cells, floating CSC-derived neurospheres have been scarcely characterized from a morphological and ultrastructural point of view. Results. Here we report a morphological and ultrastructural characterization performed by live imaging and scanning electron microscopy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM CSC-derived neurospheres are heterogeneous and are constituted by cells, morphologically different, capable of forming highly dynamic structures. These dynamic structures are regulated by not serendipitous cell-cell interactions, and they synchronously pulsate following a cyclic course made of "fast" and "slow" alternate phases. Autocrine/paracrine non canonical Wnt signalling appears to be correlated with the association status of neurospheres. Conclusions. The results obtained suggest that GBM CSCs can behave both as independents cells and as "social" cells, highly interactive with other members of its species, giving rise to a sort of "multicellular organism".

  2. UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF BRAINSTEM GLIOMA AS PROGRESSIVE BULBAR PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem gliomas/astrocytomas are slowly growing tumors affecting children and young adults. They usually present with unilateral cranial nerve palsies followed by long tract signs. Here we present a case report of a 42 year old male patient, who initially presented with thyrotoxicosis and slowly progressing dysphagia, dysarthria and dysphonia with no other long tract signs, and was later found to have brain stem glioma.

  3. Brain pharmacokinetics of ganciclovir in rats with orthotopic BT4C glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gynther, Mikko; Kääriäinen, Tiina M; Hakkarainen, Jenni J; Jalkanen, Aaro J; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Lehtonen, Marko; Peura, Lauri; Kurkipuro, Jere; Samaranayake, Haritha; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Rautio, Jarkko; Forsberg, Markus M

    2015-01-01

    Ganciclovir (GCV) is an essential part of the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene therapy of malignant gliomas. The purpose of this study was to investigate the brain pharmacokinetics and tumor uptake of GCV in the BT4C rat glioma model. GCV's brain and tumor uptakes were investigated by in vivo microdialysis in rats with orthotopic BT4C glioma. In addition, the ability of GCV to cross the blood-brain barrier and tumor vasculature was assessed with in situ rat brain perfusion. Finally, the extent to which GCV could permeate across the BT4C glioma cell membrane was assessed in vitro. The areas under the concentration curve of unbound GCV in blood, brain extracellular fluid (ECF), and tumor ECF were 6157, 1658, and 4834 μM⋅min, respectively. The apparent maximum unbound concentrations achieved within 60 minutes were 46.9, 11.8, and 25.8 μM in blood, brain, and tumor, respectively. The unbound GCV concentrations in brain and tumor after in situ rat brain perfusion were 0.41 and 1.39 nmol/g, respectively. The highly polar GCV likely crosses the fenestrated tumor vasculature by paracellular diffusion. Thus, GCV is able to reach the extracellular space around the tumor at higher concentrations than that in healthy brain. However, GCV uptake into BT4C cells at 100 μM was only 2.1 pmol/mg of protein, and no active transporter-mediated disposition of GCV could be detected in vitro. In conclusion, the limited efficacy of HSV-tk/GCV gene therapy may be due to the poor cellular uptake and rapid elimination of GCV. PMID:25349125

  4. In situ and in vitro profiling of brain tumour initiating cells of high-grade gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Leidgens, Verena Jeannine

    2016-01-01

    High-grade gliomas, especially glioblastomas, are highly complex and heterogeneous primary brain tumours. Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive cancers with poor overall survival prognosis. Fast and widespread invasion of the brain parenchyma by a subpopulation of progenitor tumour cells is a main pathophysiological feature of these tumours. Invasion renders localised therapies ineffective and is a primary cause of tumour recurrence as well as associated morbidity. Identification o...

  5. Enhanced MGMT expression contributes to temozolomide resistance in glioma stem-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Kun Qiu; Dong Shen; Yin-Sheng Chen; Qun-Ying Yang; Cheng-Cheng Guo; Bing-Hong Feng; Zhong-Ping Chen

    2014-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) can remove DNA alkylation adducts, thereby repairing damaged DNA and contributing to the drug resistance of gliomas to alkylating agents. In addition, glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) have been demonstrated to be involved in the recurrence and treatment resistance of gliomas. In this study, we aimed to investigate MGMT expression and regulatory mechanisms in GSCs and the association of MGMT with temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity. GSCs were enriched from one MGMT-positive cellline (SF-767) and 7 MGMT-negative celllines (U251, SKMG-4, SKMG-1, SF295, U87, MGR1, and MGR2) through serum-free clone culture. GSCs from the U251G, SKMG-4G, SF295G, and SKMG-1G cell lines became MGMT-positive, but those from the U87G, MGR1G, and MGR2G cell lines remained MGMT-negative. However, al the GSCs and their parental glioma celllines were positive for nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, GSCs were more resistant to TMZ than their parental glioma cell lines (P 0.05). When we treated the MGMT-positive GSCs with TMZ plus MG-132 (an NF-κB inhibitor), the antitumor activity was significantly enhanced compared to that of GSCs treated with TMZ alone (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that MGMT expression decreased through the down-regulation of NF-κB expression by MG-132. Our results show that MG-132 may inhibit NF-κB expression and further decrease MGMT expression, resulting in a synergistic effect on MGMT-positive GSCs. These results indicate that enhanced MGMT expression contributes to TMZ resistance in MGMT-positive GSCs.

  6. Enhanced MGMT expression contributes to temozolomide resistance in glioma stem-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Shen, Dong; Chen, Yin-Sheng; Yang, Qun-Ying; Guo, Cheng-Cheng; Feng, Bing-Hong; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) can remove DNA alkylation adducts, thereby repairing damaged DNA and contributing to the drug resistance of gliomas to alkylating agents. In addition, glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) have been demonstrated to be involved in the recurrence and treatment resistance of gliomas. In this study, we aimed to investigate MGMT expression and regulatory mechanisms in GSCs and the association of MGMT with temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity. GSCs were enriched from one MGMT-positive cell line (SF-767) and 7 MGMT-negative cell lines (U251, SKMG-4, SKMG-1, SF295, U87, MGR1, and MGR2) through serum-free clone culture. GSCs from the U251G, SKMG-4G, SF295G, and SKMG-1G cell lines became MGMT-positive, but those from the U87G, MGR1G, and MGR2G cell lines remained MGMT-negative. However, all the GSCs and their parental glioma cell lines were positive for nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, GSCs were more resistant to TMZ than their parental glioma cell lines (P 0.05). When we treated the MGMT-positive GSCs with TMZ plus MG-132 (an NF-κB inhibitor), the antitumor activity was significantly enhanced compared to that of GSCs treated with TMZ alone (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that MGMT expression decreased through the down-regulation of NF-κB expression by MG-132. Our results show that MG-132 may inhibit NF-κB expression and further decrease MGMT expression, resulting in a synergistic effect on MGMT-positive GSCs. These results indicate that enhanced MGMT expression contributes to TMZ resistance in MGMT-positive GSCs. PMID:23958055

  7. Detection of radiation brain injury of malignant glioma by 1H-MRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) method, to evaluate the difference of radiation brain injury between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in patients with postoperative glioma after radiation therapy. Methods: 24 patients with malignant glioma (WHOII-IV grade glioma) confirmed with clinical surgery were selected, among them 12 patients were treated with VMAT technique, and another 12 patients with 3DCRT technique, all received DT60-66GY/30-33F dose prescriptions. 1H-MRS examination was performed to analyze the change of metabolites in the brain tissues of region of interest (ROI) before and after radiotherapy,and the ratios of NAA/ Cr, Cho / Cr, NAA / Cho were computed. Results: The dose distribution of VMAT group was superior to 3DCRT group, the NAA/Cr in two groups after radiation were decreased compared with before radiation, there was a statistically difference in NAA/Cr after radiation between two groups (P<0.01). The Cho / Cr and NAA / Cho in two groups were increased compared with before radiation;after radiation, only NAA/Cho had a statistical difference between two groups (P<0.01). Conclusion: VMAT technique is superior to 3DCTR to reduce radiation brain injury in patients with postoperative glioma. (authors)

  8. MRI findings of multiple malignant gliomas. Differentiation from multiple metastatic brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple malignant gliomas are relatively uncommon, but are sometimes difficult to differentiate from multiple metastatic brain tumors. We analyzed the MR finding of four cases of multiple gliomas, comparing them with 12 cases of multiple metastatic brain tumors. All tumors were pathologically proven by surgical operation or autopsy. Gliomas were located in the deep white matter of the cerebrum, with none found in the posterior fossa. Tumors were relatively large, and irregular, thick, ring-like enhancement was noted after the administration of Gd-DTPA. Intratumoral hemorrhage was noted in only one case. High signal intensity on T2WI around the tumor suggested that edema was greater and more extensive than in metastatic tumors and was seen even in the corpus callosum. One autopsied case that showed this high intensity presented not only edema but also tumor infiltration. Metastatic tumors were located mainly in the corticomedullary junction of the brain. They were relatively small, and eight of 12 tumors showed, nodular or smooth ring-like enhancement. Intratumoral hemorrhage was noted in four cases. Edema was noted mainly around the tumor. We conclude that differential diagnosis between gliomas and metastases is possible to some extent by MRI. (author)

  9. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of normal human brain and glioma:a quantitive in vivo study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Zhi-yong; YAMAKI Toshiaki; WANG Yun-jie

    2005-01-01

    Background In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides a noninvasive method of examining a wide variety of cerebral metabolites in both healthy subjects and patients with various brain diseases.Absolute metabolite concentrations have been determined using external and internal standards with known concentrations.When an external standard is placed beside the head, variations in signal amplitudes due to B1 field inhomogeneity and static field inhomogeneity may occur.Hence an internal standard is preferable.The purpose of this study was to quantitatively analyze the metabolite concentrations in normal adult brains and gliomas by in vivo proton MRS using the fully relaxed water signal as an internal standard.Methods Between January 1998 and October 2001, 28 healthy volunteers and 16 patients with gliomas were examined by in vivo proton MRS.Single-voxel spectra were acquired using the point-resolved spectroscopic pulse sequence with a 1.5 T scanner (TR/TE/Ave=3000 ms/30 ms/64).Results The calculated concentrations of N-acetyl-asparatate (NAA), creatine (Cre), choline (Cho), and water (H2O) in the normal hemispheric white matter were (23.59±2.62) mmol/L, (13.06±1.8) mmol/L, (4.28±0.8) mmol/L, and (47 280.96±5414.85) mmol/L, respectively.The metabolite concentrations were not necessarily uniform in different parts of the brain.The concentrations of NAA and Cre decreased in all gliomas (P<0.001).The ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/H2O showed a significant difference between the normal brain and gliomas, and also between the high and low grades (P<0.001).Conclusions Quantitative analysis of in vivo proton MR spectra using the fully relaxed water signal as an internal standard is useful.The concentrations of NAA and the ratios of NAA/H2O and NAA/Cho conduce to discriminating between the glioma and normal brain, and also between the low-grade glioma and high-grade glioma.

  10. Differentiation between glioma recurrence and radiation-induced brain injuries using perfusion-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) in the differentiation of recurrent glioma and radiation-induced brain injuries. Methods: Fifteen patients with previously resected and irradiated glioma, presenting newly developed abnormal enhancement, were included in the study. The final diagnosis was determined either histologically or clinicoradiologically. PWI was obtained with a gradient echo echo-planar-imaging (GRE-EPI) sequence. The normalized rCBV ratio [CBV (abnormal enhancement)/CBV (contralateral tissue)], rCBF ratio [CBF (abnormal enhancement)/CBF (contralateral tissue)] and rMTT ratio [(MTT abnormal enhancement)/MTT (contralateral tissue)] were calculated, respectively. The regions of interest (ROIs) consisting of 20-40 mm2 were placed in the abnormal enhanced areas on postcontrast T1-weighted images. Ten to fifteen ROIs measurements were performed in each lesion and the mean value was obtained. Mann-Whitney test was used to determine whether there was a difference in the rCBV/rCBF/MTT ratios between glioma recurrence and radiated injuries. Results: Nine of the 15 patients were proved recurrent glioma, 6 were proved radiation-induced brain injuries. The mean rCBV ratio [2.87 (0.70-4.91)] in glioma recurrence was markedly higher than that [0.70 (0.12-1.62)] in radiation injuries (Z=-2.55, P<0.05). The mean rCBF ratio [1.89 (0.64-3.96)] in glioma recurrence was markedly higher than that [0.56 (0.12-2.08)] in radiation injuries (Z=-2.08, P<0.05). The areas under rCBV and rCBF ROC curve were 0.893 and 0.821. If the rCBV ratio ≤ 0.77, the diagnosis sensitivity of radiation-induced brain injuries was 100.0%; If ≥ 2.44, the diagnosis specificity of recurrent glioma was 100.0%. Conclusion: PWI was an effective technique in distinguishing glioma recurrence from radiation injuries and rCBV and rCBF ratios were of great value in the differentiation. (authors)

  11. Cerebral and brain stem Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two patients with central nervous system manifestations of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, both with brain stem involvement, are reported. The onset of symptoms was at an age when the diagnosis might not have been considered. (orig.)

  12. Alisertib and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-11

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  13. Brain stem death and organ donation.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Organs for donation are in short supply in the United Kingdom, resulting in allegations that relatives of potential donors are not being asked for consent. Legislation on "required request" has been proposed to overcome this. The incidence, causes, complications, and patterns of organ donation in brain stem dead patients in one referral centre were studied over 12 months. Data were collected on all patients fulfilling criteria for brain stem death or considered suitable for donating organs af...

  14. c(RGDyK)-decorated Pluronic micelles for enhanced doxorubicin and paclitaxel delivery to brain glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, YuKun; Liu, Wenchao; Gao, Feng; Fang, Xiaoling; Chen, Yanzuo

    2016-01-01

    Brain glioma therapy is an important challenge in oncology. Here, doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide (c(RGDyK))-decorated Pluronic micelles (cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide-decorated Pluronic micelles loaded with doxorubicin and paclitaxel [RGD-PF-DP]) were designed as a potential targeted delivery system to enhance blood–brain barrier penetration and improve drug accumulation via integrin-mediated transcytosis/endocytosis and based on integrin overexpression in blood–brain barrier and glioma cells. The physicochemical characterization of RGD-PF-DP revealed a satisfactory size of 28.5±0.12 nm with uniform distribution and core-shell structure. The transport rates across the in vitro blood–brain barrier model, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis of U87 malignant glioblastoma cells of RGD-PF-DP were significantly greater than those of non-c(RGDyK)-decorated Pluronic micelles. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrated the specificity and efficacy of intracranial tumor accumulation of RGD-PF-DP. RGD-PF-DP displayed an extended median survival time of 39 days, with no serious body weight loss during the regimen. No acute toxicity to major organs was observed in mice receiving treatment doses via intravenous administration. In conclusion, RGD-PF-DP could be a promising vehicle for enhanced doxorubicin and paclitaxel delivery in patients with brain glioma. PMID:27143884

  15. External Beam Radiotherapy of Recurrent Glioma: Radiation Tolerance of the Human Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant gliomas relapse in close proximity to the resection site, which is the postoperatively irradiated volume. Studies on re-irradiation of glioma were examined regarding radiation-induced late adverse effects (i.e., brain tissue necrosis), to obtain information on the tolerance dose and treatment volume of normal human brain tissue. The studies were analyzed using the linear-quadratic model to express the re-irradiation tolerance in cumulative equivalent total doses when applied in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2cumulative). Analysis shows that the EQD2cumulative increases from conventional re-irradiation series to fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) to LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The mean time interval between primary radiotherapy and the re-irradiation course was shortened from 30 months for conventional re-irradiation to 17 and 10 months for FSRT and SRS, respectively. Following conventional re-irradiation, radiation-induced normal brain tissue necrosis occurred beyond an EQD2cumulative around 100 Gy. With increasing conformality of therapy, the smaller the treatment volume is, the higher the radiation dose that can be tolerated. Despite the dose escalation, no increase in late normal tissue toxicity was reported. On basis of our analysis, the use of particle therapy in the treatment of recurrent gliomas, because of the optimized physical dose distribution in the tumour and surrounding healthy brain tissue, should be considered for future clinical trials

  16. Demethoxycurcumin Retards Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Brain Malignant Glioma GBM 8401 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzuu-Yuan Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Demethoxycurcumin (DMC; a curcumin-related demethoxy compound has been recently shown to display antioxidant and antitumor activities. It has also produced a potent chemopreventive action against cancer. In the present study, the antiproliferation (using the MTT assay, DMC was found to have cytotoxic activities against GBM 8401 cell with IC50 values at 22.71 μM and induced apoptosis effects of DMC have been investigated in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells. We have studied the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, and NF-κB transcriptional factor activity. By these approaches, our results indicated that DMC has produced an inhibition of cell proliferation as well as the activation of apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells. Both effects were observed to increase in proportion with the dosage of DMC treatment, and the apoptosis was induced by DMC in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells via mitochondria- and caspase-dependent pathways.

  17. Emerging role of functional brain MRI in low-grade glioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friismose, Ancuta; Traise, Peter; Markovic, Ljubo;

    Learning objectives 1. To describe the use of functional MRI (fMRI) in cranial surgery planning for patients with low-grade gliomas (LGG). 2. To show the increasing importance of fMRI in the clinical setting. Background LGG include brain tumors classified by the World Health Organization as grade I...... and II. LGG typically affect younger, otherwise healthy individuals. Whereas previously the preferred management strategy of LGG was one of watchful expectation, there is now evidence supporting radical surgery as a means of preventing malignant transformation and ensuring precise tumor grading. FMRI...... can be used to map eloquent cortex areas, thus minimizing postoperative deficits and improving surgical performance. Findings and procedure details Patients diagnosed with low-grade gliomas located in eloquent brain areas undergo fMRI prior to surgery. The exams are performed on a 3T MR system...

  18. Cancer Stem Cells in Brain Tumors and Their Lineage Hierarchy

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Doo-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the development of novel targeted chemotherapies, the prognosis of malignant glioma remains dismal. The chemo-resistance of this tumor is attributed to tumor heterogeneity. To explain this unique chemo- resistance, the concept of cancer stem cells has been evoked. Cancer stem cells, a subpopulation of whole tumor cells, are now regarded as candidate therapeutic targets. Here, the author reviews and discusses the cancer stem cell concept.

  19. The functional role of Notch signaling in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2010-01-01

    have been referred to as brain cancer stem cells (bCSC), as they share similarities to normal neural stem cells in the brain. The Notch signaling pathway is involved in cell fate decisions throughout normal development and in stem cell proliferation and maintenance. The role of Notch in cancer is now......Gliomas are among the most devastating adult tumors for which there is currently no cure. The tumors are derived from brain glial tissue and comprise several diverse tumor forms and grades. Recent reports highlight the importance of cancer-initiating cells in the malignancy of gliomas. These cells...

  20. The functional role of Notch signaling in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2010-01-01

    Gliomas are among the most devastating adult tumors for which there is currently no cure. The tumors are derived from brain glial tissue and comprise several diverse tumor forms and grades. Recent reports highlight the importance of cancer-initiating cells in the malignancy of gliomas. These cells...... have been referred to as brain cancer stem cells (bCSC), as they share similarities to normal neural stem cells in the brain. The Notch signaling pathway is involved in cell fate decisions throughout normal development and in stem cell proliferation and maintenance. The role of Notch in cancer is now...

  1. ABCG2 regulates self-renewal and stem cell marker expression but not tumorigenicity or radiation resistance of glioma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Boyoung; Pietras, Alexander; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Bazzoli, Elena; Podlaha, Ondrej; Antczak, Christophe; Westermark, Bengt; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Djaballah, Hakim; Michor, Franziska; Holland, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma cells with stem cell traits are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance and therapeutic failure. Such cells can be enriched based on their inherent drug efflux capability mediated by the ABC transporter ABCG2 using the side population assay, and their characteristics include increased self-renewal, high stem cell marker expression and high tumorigenic capacity in vivo. Here, we show that ABCG2 can actively drive expression of stem cell markers and self-renewal in glioma cells. Stem cell markers and self-renewal was enriched in cells with high ABCG2 activity, and could be specifically inhibited by pharmacological and genetic ABCG2 inhibition. Importantly, despite regulating these key characteristics of stem-like tumor cells, ABCG2 activity did not affect radiation resistance or tumorigenicity in vivo. ABCG2 effects were Notch-independent and mediated by diverse mechanisms including the transcription factor Mef. Our data demonstrate that characteristics of tumor stem cells are separable, and highlight ABCG2 as a potential driver of glioma stemness. PMID:27456282

  2. The use of MRI in radiotherapy of brain malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI was used in radiotherapy of brain tumor more and more comprehensively, especially in the prognosis, radiotherapy planning and differentiation between recurrence and necrosis of brain tumor. Due to the excellent ability in the differentiation of soft tissue, MRI extensively fusing with CT was used in drawing the outline of the tumor. Maybe in the future, it is possible to use MRI absolutely in radiotherapy planning of brain tumor. With the development of the functional MRI, MRI will be a necessary method used widely in the differetion between brain tumor reccurence and radiation injury. (authors)

  3. Human Nerual Stem Cells for Brain Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seung U.; Lee, Hong J.; In H Park; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon T.; Kim, Manho; Roh, Jae K.; Kim, Seung K.; Wang, Kyu C.

    2008-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy and gene transfer to the diseased or injured brain have provided the basis for the development of potentially powerful new therapeutic strategies for a broad spectrum of human neurological diseases including Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke, spinal cord injury and brain cancer. In recent years, neurons and glial cells have successfully been generated from neural stem cells, a...

  4. The assessment of immature microvascular density in brain gliomas with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Zhong Zheng, E-mail: jzz2397@163.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road Nantong, 226001 Jiangsu (China); Gu, Hong Mei, E-mail: guhongmei71@163.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road Nantong, 226001 Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Xue Jun, E-mail: zxj0925101@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road Nantong, 226001 Jiangsu (China); Shi, Jin Long, E-mail: shij_ns@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Li, Min Da, E-mail: 115218103@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road Nantong, 226001 Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Guo Feng, E-mail: 292768853@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road Nantong, 226001 Jiangsu (China); Wu, Xian Hua, E-mail: wuxianhua58@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road Nantong, 226001 Jiangsu (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • It is very important to evaluate glioma immature microvessel in a noninvasive manner for clinical practice. • In this work, we evaluated the immature microvascular density (MVD) in brain gliomas by comparing with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and CD105 positive MVD. • Our study provided a direct histologic microvascular that correlated with DCE-MRI, which may help to support the alternative hypothesis that DCE-MRI can assess the malignant and immature microvessels within gliomas. • Specifically, we validated the hypothesis that DCE-MRI could reflect immature MVD within gliomas. - Abstract: Purpose: This study was designed to quantitatively evaluate the immature microvascular density (MVD) of brain gliomas using the volume transfer constant (K{sup trans}) and volume of extravascular extracellular space per unit volume of tissue (V{sub e}) from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) noninvasively. Materials and methods: Fifty-seven patients (35 males, 22 females; age range, 14–70, mean age 46 ± 12 years old) with brain glioma were included in this study. The maximal values of K{sup trans} and V{sub e} of all patients with brain glioma (grade II 24, III 7 and IV 26) were obtained. The CD105-microvascular density (CD105-MVD) of each tumor was measured in surgical specimen. The differences of K{sup trans}, V{sub e} and CD105-MVD between the different grades of gliomas were analyzed using the Mann–Whitney U-test. The Pearman correlation coefficient was determined between K{sup trans}, V{sub e} and CD105-MVD. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The differences in K{sup trans}, V{sub e} and CD105-MVD were statistically significant between low-grade glioma (LGG) and high-grade glioma (HGG) (P = 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001). The K{sup trans}, V{sub e} and CD105-MVD of grade II were significantly lower than those of grade III and IV. K{sup trans} and

  5. The assessment of immature microvascular density in brain gliomas with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • It is very important to evaluate glioma immature microvessel in a noninvasive manner for clinical practice. • In this work, we evaluated the immature microvascular density (MVD) in brain gliomas by comparing with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and CD105 positive MVD. • Our study provided a direct histologic microvascular that correlated with DCE-MRI, which may help to support the alternative hypothesis that DCE-MRI can assess the malignant and immature microvessels within gliomas. • Specifically, we validated the hypothesis that DCE-MRI could reflect immature MVD within gliomas. - Abstract: Purpose: This study was designed to quantitatively evaluate the immature microvascular density (MVD) of brain gliomas using the volume transfer constant (Ktrans) and volume of extravascular extracellular space per unit volume of tissue (Ve) from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) noninvasively. Materials and methods: Fifty-seven patients (35 males, 22 females; age range, 14–70, mean age 46 ± 12 years old) with brain glioma were included in this study. The maximal values of Ktrans and Ve of all patients with brain glioma (grade II 24, III 7 and IV 26) were obtained. The CD105-microvascular density (CD105-MVD) of each tumor was measured in surgical specimen. The differences of Ktrans, Ve and CD105-MVD between the different grades of gliomas were analyzed using the Mann–Whitney U-test. The Pearman correlation coefficient was determined between Ktrans, Ve and CD105-MVD. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The differences in Ktrans, Ve and CD105-MVD were statistically significant between low-grade glioma (LGG) and high-grade glioma (HGG) (P = 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001). The Ktrans, Ve and CD105-MVD of grade II were significantly lower than those of grade III and IV. Ktrans and Ve were positively correlated with CD105-MVD in HGG (P < 0.001, P < 0

  6. Analysis of DNA damage response using by heavy ion beam in induced pluripotent stem cell. DNA damage response of glioma stem cell characterized by plagl1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plagl1 was identified as a novel glioma stem cell (GSC) marker. Previously, we reported that Plagl1 might induce homologous recombination (HR) and it might cause higher resistance to anti-cancer therapies in GSCs. In recent study, we found additional evidences that HR repair was enhanced in plagl1 positive GSCs. (author)

  7. Target volumes in radiotherapy for high-grade malignant glioma of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) in radiation treatment planning of high-grade glioma is a controversial issue. The use of computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly improved the accuracy of tumor localization in three-dimensional planning. This review aims at critically analyzing available literature data in which tumor extent of high-grade glioma has been assessed using CT and/or MRI and relating this to postmortem observations. Attention is given to the pattern of tumor spread at initial presentation and to tumor recurrence pattern after external beam irradiation. Special emphasis is given to the site of tumor regrowth after radiation treatment in relation to the boundaries of the CTV. Guidelines for delineating CTV will be inferred from this information, taking data on radiation effects on the normal brain into account. (author)

  8. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type PTEN promoting glioma stem/progenitor cells autophagy activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Yao-dong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background PTEN is an anti-oncogene frequently inactivating in glioma. The previous study found that PTEN was closely related to cellular autophagy activity. The purpose of this paper is to study whether the inactivation of PTEN in glioma stem/progenitor cells (GSPCs is correlative with the low autophagic activity in GSPCs. Methods Wild-type PTEN genes were transferred into GSPCs mediated by adenovirus. The autophagic activity in GSPCs before or after the introduction of wild-type PTEN was detected by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and Western blotting assay. Results After transfection of wild-type PTEN, a large number of microtuble-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1LC3-positive granules could be found in the cytoplasm of GSPCs under a confocal microscopy, and these granules were demonstrated to be autophagosomes under an electron microscope. Moreover, the expression of autophagy-related gene Beclin-1 significantly increased after the transfection of wild-type PTEN gene. Conclusion The inactivation of PTEN in GSPCs is one reason of the low autophagic activity of GSPCs.

  9. Serum protein fingerprinting coupled with artificial neural network distinguishes glioma from healthy population or brain benign tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian; ZHENG Shu; YU Jie-kai; ZHANG Jian-min; CHEN Zhe

    2005-01-01

    To screen and evaluate protein biomarkers for the detection of gliomas (Astrocytoma grade Ⅰ-Ⅳ) from healthy individuals and gliomas from brain benign tumors by using surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) coupled with an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm. SELDI-TOF-MS protein fingerprinting of serum from 105 brain tumor patients and healthy individuals, included 28 patients with glioma (Astrocytoma Ⅰ-Ⅳ), 37 patients with brain benign tumor, and 40 age-matched healthy individuals. Two thirds of the total samples of every compared pair as training set were used to set up discriminating patterns, and one third of total samples of every compared pair as test set were used to cross-validate; simultaneously, discriminate-cluster analysis derived SPSS 10.0 software was used to compare Astrocytoma grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ with grade Ⅲ-Ⅳ ones. An accuracy of 95.7%, sensitivity of 88.9%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 90% and negative predictive value of 100% were obtained in a blinded test set comparing gliomas patients with healthy individuals; an accuracy of 86.4%, sensitivity of 88.9%, specificity of 84.6%, positive predictive value of 90% and negative predictive value of 85.7% were obtained when patient's gliomas was compared with benign brain tumor. Total accuracy of 85.7%, accuracy of grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ Astrocytoma was 86.7%, accuracy ofⅢ-Ⅳ Astrocytoma was 84.6% were obtained when grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ Astrocytoma was compared with grade Ⅲ-Ⅳ ones (discriminant analysis). SELDI-TOF-MS combined with bioinformatics tools, could greatly facilitate the discovery of better biomarkers. The high sensitivity and specificity achieved by the use of selected biomarkers showed great potential application for the discrimination of gliomas patients from healthy individuals and glioma from brain benign tumors.

  10. Topodiagnostic investigations on the sympathoexcitatory brain stem pathway using a new method of three dimensional brain stem mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Marx, J.; IANNETTI, G.; Mika-Gruettner, A; Thoemke, F; Fitzek, S; Vucurevic, G; Urban, P.; Stoeter, P; Cruccu, G.; Hopf, H.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To study the incompletely understood sympathoexcitatory pathway through the human brain stem, using a new method of three dimensional brain stem mapping on the basis of digitally postprocessed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  11. Computed tomography of the brain stem with intrathecal metrizamide. Part 1: the normal brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed anatomy of the brain stem and cervicomedullary junction can be accurately demonstrated with metrizamide computed tomographic cisternography. Specifically surface anatomy is unusually well outlined. Nine distinct and easily recognizable levels of section are described: four levels in the medulla, three in the pons, and two in the mesencephalon. Surface features of the brain stem, fine details in the floor of the fourth ventricle, cranial nerves, and vascular structures are shown and discussed

  12. Delineating the cytogenomic and epigenomic landscapes of glioma stem cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Baronchelli

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common and malignant type of glioma, is characterized by a poor prognosis and the lack of an effective treatment, which are due to a small sub-population of cells with stem-like properties, termed glioma stem cells (GSCs. The term "multiforme" describes the histological features of this tumor, that is, the cellular and morphological heterogeneity. At the molecular level multiple layers of alterations may reflect this heterogeneity providing together the driving force for tumor initiation and development. In order to decipher the common "signature" of the ancestral GSC population, we examined six already characterized GSC lines evaluating their cytogenomic and epigenomic profiles through a multilevel approach (conventional cytogenetic, FISH, aCGH, MeDIP-Chip and functional bioinformatic analysis. We found several canonical cytogenetic alterations associated with GBM and a common minimal deleted region (MDR at 1p36.31, including CAMTA1 gene, a putative tumor suppressor gene, specific for the GSC population. Therefore, on one hand our data confirm a role of driver mutations for copy number alterations (CNAs included in the GBM genomic-signature (gain of chromosome 7- EGFR gene, loss of chromosome 13- RB1 gene, loss of chromosome 10-PTEN gene; on the other, it is not obvious that the new identified CNAs are passenger mutations, as they may be necessary for tumor progression specific for the individual patient. Through our approach, we were able to demonstrate that not only individual genes into a pathway can be perturbed through multiple mechanisms and at different levels, but also that different combinations of perturbed genes can incapacitate functional modules within a cellular networks. Therefore, beyond the differences that can create apparent heterogeneity of alterations among GSC lines, there's a sort of selective force acting on them in order to converge towards the impairment of cell development and

  13. Nrf2 is required to maintain the self-renewal of glioma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastomas are deadly cancers that display a functional cellular hierarchy maintained by self-renewing glioma stem cells (GSCs). Self-renewal is a complex biological process necessary for maintaining the glioma stem cells. Nuclear factor rythroid 2-related factor 2(Nrf2) plays a significant role in protecting cells from endogenous and exogenous stresses. Nrf2 is a key nuclear transcription factor that regulates antioxidant response element (ARE)-containing genes. Previous studies have demonstrated the significant role of Nrf2 in the proliferation of glioblastoma, and in their resistance to radioactive therapies. We examined the effect of knocking down Nrf2 in GSCs. Nrf2 expression was down-regulated by shRNA transinfected with lentivirus. Expression levels of Nestin, Nrf2, BMI-1, Sox2 and Cyclin E were assessed by western blotting, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry analysis. The capacity for self-renewal in vitro was assessed by genesis of colonies. The capacity for self-renewal in vivo was analyzed by tumor genesis of xenografts in nude mice. Knockdown of Nrf2 inhibited the proliferation of GSCs, and significantly reduced the expression of BMI-1, Sox2 and CyclinE. Knocking down of Nrf2 changed the cell cycle distribution of GSCs by causing an uncharacteristic increase in the proportion of cells in the G2 phase and a decrease in the proportion of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. Nrf2 is required to maintain the self-renewal of GSCs, and its down-regulation can attenuate the self-renewal of GSCs significantly

  14. A pilot study on 99m-Tc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy in diagnosis of brain glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 99mTc-3PRGD2 targeted SPECT/CT scanning was of significance m detecting differentiated glioma. In this work, the diagnostic value of 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy in brain glioma was evaluated by the ten clinically verified brain glioma patients after obtaining informed consent. The patients first accepted X-ray imaging to localize the detecting regions before administrating with 99mTc-3PRGD2 at a mean radioactivity of 849±115 MBq via single intravenous bolus injection 2 h prior to SPECT/CT imaging. Tumor samples for detecting αvβ3 were collected by surgical operations two weeks after the scintigraphy. The results of CT and SPECT scanning were merged and compared. The correlation between tumor occupation (T/N ratio) and αvβp3 expression level were analyzed. The T/N ratios in brain glioma were proportionally correlated to αvβ3 positive cell percentage (R2=0.9253, p<0.05). This study primarily evaluated the clinical application of 99mTc-3PRGD2 SPECT scintigraphy on brain glioma. The more pathological types and detecting strategies covering a large amount of samples would aid to clarify the potentials. (authors)

  15. The brain stem function in patients with brain bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A syndrome of detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) is occasionally found in patients with brain bladder. To evaluate the brain stem function in cases of brain bladder, urodynamic study, dynamic CT scan of the brain stem (DCT) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) were performed. The region of interest of DCT aimed at the posterolateral portion of the pons. The results were analysed in contrast with the presense of DSD in urodynamic study. DCT studies were performed in 13 cases with various brain diseases and 5 control cases without neurological diseases. Abnormal patterns of the time-density curve consisted of low peak value, prolongation of filling time and low rapid washout ratio (low clearance ratio) of the contrast medium. Four of 6 cases with DSD showed at least one of the abnormal patterns of the time-density curve bilaterally. In 7 cases without DSD none showed bilateral abnormality of the curve and in 2 of 7 cases only unilateral abnormality was found. ABR was performed in 8 patients with brain diseases. The interpeak latency of the wave I-V (I-V IPL) was considered to be prolonged in 2 cases with DSD compared to that of 4 without DSD. In 2 cases with DSD who had normal DCT findings, measurement of the I-V IPL was impossible due to abnormal pattern of the ABR wave. Above mentioned results suggests the presence of functional disturbance at the posterolateral portion of the pons in cases of brain bladder with DSD. (author)

  16. Delayed cell death associated with mitotic catastrophe in γ-irradiated stem-like glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem-like tumor cells are regarded as highly resistant to ionizing radiation (IR). Previous studies have focused on apoptosis early after irradiation, and the apoptosis resistance observed has been attributed to reduced DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair compared to non-stem tumor cells. Here, early and late radioresponse of patient-derived stem-like glioma cells (SLGCs) and differentiated cells directly derived from them were examined for cell death mode and the influence of stem cell-specific growth factors. Primary SLGCs were propagated in serum-free medium with the stem-cell mitogens epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). Differentiation was induced by serum-containing medium without EGF and FGF. Radiation sensitivity was evaluated by assessing proliferation, clonogenic survival, apoptosis, and mitotic catastrophe. DNA damage-associated γH2AX as well as p53 and p21 expression were determined by Western blots. SLGCs failed to apoptose in the first 4 days after irradiation even at high single doses up to 10 Gy, but we observed substantial cell death later than 4 days postirradiation in 3 of 6 SLGC lines treated with 5 or 10 Gy. This delayed cell death was observed in 3 of the 4 SLGC lines with nonfunctional p53, was associated with mitotic catastrophe and occurred via apoptosis. The early apoptosis resistance of the SLGCs was associated with lower γH2AX compared to differentiated cells, but we found that the stem-cell culture cytokines EGF plus FGF-2 strongly reduce γH2AX levels. Nonetheless, in two p53-deficient SLGC lines examined γIR-induced apoptosis even correlated with EGF/FGF-induced proliferation and mitotic catastrophe. In a line containing CD133-positive and -negative stem-like cells, the CD133-positive cells proliferated faster and underwent more γIR-induced mitotic catastrophe. Our results suggest the importance of delayed apoptosis, associated mitotic catastrophe, and cellular proliferation for γIR-induced death of

  17. Evaluation of normal and pathologic appearance in skull base and brain stem with metrizamide CT cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metrizamide CT cisternography was performed in accordance with prone 600 head-down method, to study the normal anatomy of the skull base and brain stem. Cases of empty sellae, Rathke's cleft cyst, mucocele trigeminal neurinoma, pons glioma, acoustic neurinoma and jugular foramen tumor were studied together. As side effects of MCTC there were headache, vomiting and appearance of slow waves on EEG, but no convulsion. Transient encephalopathy was noted when 250 mgI/ml, 12 ml, was used. Using MCTC, it is possible to identify the vertebral artery, posterior inferior cerebellar artery, basillar artery, vessels forming Willis ring as well as II, III, V, VII and VIII cranial nerves. Further, by measuring the brain stem parts on various levels, it may become possible to detect early changes of degenerative disease. (author)

  18. HIGH-THROUGHPUT SCREENING OF GLIOMA STEM CELL LINES FOR DRUG STRUCTURE- AND GENOTYPE-CORRELATED SENSITIVITY TO A PANEL OF TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, John; Thomas, C.; Piao, Y.; Nguyen, N; Drewry, D.; Zuercher, B.; Verhaak, R.; Stephan, C.; Sulman, E.P.; Lang, F.; Yung, A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial genetic heterogeneity among glioblastoma tumors from different patients. To develop an accurate depiction of the molecular determinants of response to therapy, we used a large collection of glioma stem cell lines (GSCs) to study the impact of this heterogeneity on response to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Twelve glioma stem cell (GSC) lines, which are representative of TCGA molecular subtypes, were utilized in a high-throughput compound-screening assay to identi...

  19. Presence of neural progenitors in spontaneous canine gliomas: A histopathological and immunohistochemical study of 20 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Francisco; Deviers, Alexandra; Dally, Claire; Mogicato, Giovanni; Delverdier, Maxence; Cauzinille, Laurent; Gnirs, Kirsten; Añor, Sònia; de la Fuente, Cristian; Fondevila, Dolors; Pumarola, Martí

    2016-03-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumours in humans and are associated with a poor prognosis. An accurate animal model of human glioma tumorigenesis is needed to test new treatment strategies. Dogs represent a promising model because they develop spontaneous diffusely-infiltrating gliomas. This study investigated whether spontaneous canine gliomas contain cancer stem cells previously identified in all grades of human gliomas. Twenty spontaneous cases of canine gliomas were graded according to the human WHO classification. The expression of different markers of lineage differentiation was evaluated with immunohistochemistry as follows: nestin and CD133 for neural stem cells, doublecortin for neuronal progenitor cells, Olig2 for glial progenitor cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin and S-100 for mature glial cells, and NeuN and βIII-tubulin for mature neurons. Gliomas were characterised as follows: five grade II (oligodendrogliomas); nine grade III (seven anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, one anaplastic astrocytoma, one anaplastic oligoastrocytoma); six grade IV (glioblastomas). Immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that (1) nestin and CD133 were expressed in all grades of gliomas with a higher proportion of positive cells in high-grade gliomas; (2) the expression of S-100 protein and Olig2 did not differ substantially between astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumours, and (3) all gliomas were negative for mature neuron markers. The results demonstrated the presence of undifferentiated neural progenitors in all grades of spontaneous canine gliomas, confirming the relevance of this animal model for further studies on cancer stem cells. PMID:26831167

  20. Diffuse brain calcification after radiation therapy in infantile cerebral malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reported a case of infantile cerebral malignant glioma, which showed extensive intracranial calcification following radiation therapy, and reviewed the literature. A 4-month-old female infant was admitted to our hospital because of vomiting, enlargement of the head and convulsive seizures. Computerized tomography (CT) scans demonstrated a heterogeneously contrast-enhanced mass in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region and marked obstructive hydrocephalus. Subsequent to ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, biopsy was performed. The surgical specimen revealed anaplastic glioma. She then underwent whole brain irradiation with 1800 rads before subtotal removal and 3000 rads postoperatively. Calcification was first identified in the right frontal region and left basal ganglia 2.5 months after radiation therapy. At the age of 14 months, CT scans demonstrated extensive intracranial calcification in the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglias, thalami, pons and cerebellum. A biopsy specimen of the frontal lobe revealed calcospherites of various sizes within and beside the walls of small vessels, but no tumor cells were observed. Cranial radiation therapy is a standard modality for treatment of children with neoplasm in the central nervous system. Since, however this therapy possibly causes long-term complications on the developing brain, it is important to plan radiation therapy for the brain tumor carefully. (author)

  1. A Probabilistic Atlas of Diffuse WHO Grade II Glioma Locations in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisot, Sarah; Darlix, Amélie; Baumann, Cédric; Zouaoui, Sonia; Yordanova, Yordanka; Blonski, Marie; Rigau, Valérie; Chemouny, Stéphane; Taillandier, Luc; Bauchet, Luc; Duffau, Hugues; Paragios, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse WHO grade II gliomas are diffusively infiltrative brain tumors characterized by an unavoidable anaplastic transformation. Their management is strongly dependent on their location in the brain due to interactions with functional regions and potential differences in molecular biology. In this paper, we present the construction of a probabilistic atlas mapping the preferential locations of diffuse WHO grade II gliomas in the brain. This is carried out through a sparse graph whose nodes correspond to clusters of tumors clustered together based on their spatial proximity. The interest of such an atlas is illustrated via two applications. The first one correlates tumor location with the patient's age via a statistical analysis, highlighting the interest of the atlas for studying the origins and behavior of the tumors. The second exploits the fact that the tumors have preferential locations for automatic segmentation. Through a coupled decomposed Markov Random Field model, the atlas guides the segmentation process, and characterizes which preferential location the tumor belongs to and consequently which behavior it could be associated to. Leave-one-out cross validation experiments on a large database highlight the robustness of the graph, and yield promising segmentation results. PMID:26751577

  2. A Probabilistic Atlas of Diffuse WHO Grade II Glioma Locations in the Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Parisot

    Full Text Available Diffuse WHO grade II gliomas are diffusively infiltrative brain tumors characterized by an unavoidable anaplastic transformation. Their management is strongly dependent on their location in the brain due to interactions with functional regions and potential differences in molecular biology. In this paper, we present the construction of a probabilistic atlas mapping the preferential locations of diffuse WHO grade II gliomas in the brain. This is carried out through a sparse graph whose nodes correspond to clusters of tumors clustered together based on their spatial proximity. The interest of such an atlas is illustrated via two applications. The first one correlates tumor location with the patient's age via a statistical analysis, highlighting the interest of the atlas for studying the origins and behavior of the tumors. The second exploits the fact that the tumors have preferential locations for automatic segmentation. Through a coupled decomposed Markov Random Field model, the atlas guides the segmentation process, and characterizes which preferential location the tumor belongs to and consequently which behavior it could be associated to. Leave-one-out cross validation experiments on a large database highlight the robustness of the graph, and yield promising segmentation results.

  3. The prospects of treatment for highly malignant brain gliomas. Antiangiogenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment for malignant brain tumors is an urgent issue of modern oncology. The prognosis of these patients is unfavorable, with median survival of 9-12 months. New treatment methods capable of increasing the relapse-free period and general survival of the patients are searched for. Modern strategy of treatment of the patients with malignant gliomas is based on interdisciplinary approach including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, symptomatic treatment. Variants of antiangiogenic therapy have been developed recently. The results it its application are equivocal and require further investigation.

  4. Optimized dissociation protocol for isolating human glioma stem cells from tumorspheres via fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Donglai; Ma, Qing-Hua; Duan, Jiang-Jie; Wu, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Xi-Long; Yu, Shi-Cang; Bian, Xiu-Wu

    2016-07-10

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) based on the surface marker CD133 is the most common method for isolating glioma stem cells (GSCs) from heterogeneous glioma cell populations. Optimization of this method will have profound implications for the future of GSC research. Five commonly used digestion reagents, Liberase-TL, trypsin, TrypLE, Accutase, and non-enzymatic cell dissociation solution (NECDS), were used to dissociate glioma tumorspheres derived from two primary glioma specimens (091214 and 090116) and the cell lines U87 and T98G. The dissociation time, cell viability, retention of CD133, and stemness capacity were assessed. The results showed that single cells derived from the Liberase-TL (200 µg/ml) group exhibited high viability and less damage to the antigen CD133. However, the efficiency of NECDS for dissociating the tumorspheres into single cells was fairly low. Meanwhile, the use of this digestion reagent resulted in obvious cellular and antigenic impairments. Taken together, Liberase-TL (200 µg/ml) is an ideal reagent for isolating GSCs from tumorspheres. In contrast, the use of NECDS for such a protocol should be carefully considered. PMID:27091400

  5. Kinetic characterization of hexokinase isoenzymes from glioma cells: Implications for FDG imaging of human brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzi, Mark E-mail: muzi@u.washington.edu; Freeman, Scott D.; Burrows, Robert C.; Wiseman, Robert W.; Link, Jeanne M.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Graham, Michael M.; Spence, Alexander M

    2001-02-01

    Quantitative imaging of glucose metabolism of human brain tumors with PET utilizes 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and a conversion factor called the lumped constant (LC), which relates the metabolic rate of FDG to glucose. Since tumors have greater uptake of FDG than would be predicted by the metabolism of native glucose, the characteristic of tumors that governs the uptake of FDG must be part of the LC. The LC is chiefly determined by the phosphorylation ratio (PR), which is comprised of the kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) of hexokinase (HK) for glucose as well as for FDG (LC {proportional_to} (Km{sub glc} {center_dot} Vmax{sub FDG})/(Km{sub FDG} {center_dot} Vmax{sub glc})). The value of the LC has been estimated from imaging studies, but not validated in vitro from HK kinetic parameters. In this study we measured the kinetic constants of bovine and 36B-10 rat glioma HK I (predominant in normal brain) and 36B-10 glioma HK II (increased in brain tumors) for the hexose substrates glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) and FDG. Our principal results show that the KmGlc < KmFDG << Km2DG and that PR2DG < PRFDG. The FDG LC calculated from our kinetic parameters for normal brain, possessing predominantly HK I, would be higher than the normal brain LC predicted from animal studies using 2DG or human PET studies using FDG or 2DG. These results also suggest that a shift from HK I to HK II, which has been observed to increase in brain tumors, would have little effect on the value of the tumor LC.

  6. Kinetic characterization of hexokinase isoenzymes from glioma cells: Implications for FDG imaging of human brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative imaging of glucose metabolism of human brain tumors with PET utilizes 2-[18F]-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and a conversion factor called the lumped constant (LC), which relates the metabolic rate of FDG to glucose. Since tumors have greater uptake of FDG than would be predicted by the metabolism of native glucose, the characteristic of tumors that governs the uptake of FDG must be part of the LC. The LC is chiefly determined by the phosphorylation ratio (PR), which is comprised of the kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) of hexokinase (HK) for glucose as well as for FDG (LC ∝ (Kmglc · VmaxFDG)/(KmFDG · Vmaxglc). The value of the LC has been estimated from imaging studies, but not validated in vitro from HK kinetic parameters. In this study we measured the kinetic constants of bovine and 36B-10 rat glioma HK I (predominant in normal brain) and 36B-10 glioma HK II (increased in brain tumors) for the hexose substrates glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) and FDG. Our principal results show that the KmGlc < KmFDG << Km2DG and that PR2DG < PRFDG. The FDG LC calculated from our kinetic parameters for normal brain, possessing predominantly HK I, would be higher than the normal brain LC predicted from animal studies using 2DG or human PET studies using FDG or 2DG. These results also suggest that a shift from HK I to HK II, which has been observed to increase in brain tumors, would have little effect on the value of the tumor LC

  7. MMP14 as a novel downstream target of VEGFR2 in migratory glioma-tropic neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita G. Alexiades

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cell (NSC-based carriers have been presented as promising therapeutic tools for the treatment of infiltrative brain tumors due to their intrinsic tumor homing property. They have demonstrated the ability to migrate towards distant tumor microsatellites and effectively deliver the therapeutic payload, thus significantly improving survival in experimental animal models for brain tumor. Despite such optimistic results, the efficacy of NSC-based anti-cancer therapy has been limited due to the restricted tumor homing ability of NSCs. To examine this issue, we investigated the mechanisms of tumor-tropic migration of an FDA-approved NSC line, HB1.F3.CD, by performing a gene expression analysis. We identified vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGFA and membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14 as molecules whose expression are significantly elevated in migratory NSCs. We observed increased expression of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2 in the focal adhesion complexes of migratory NSCs, with downstream activation of VEGFR2-dependent kinases such as p-PLCγ, p-FAK, and p-Akt, a signaling cascade reported to be required for cellular migration. In an in vivo orthotopic glioma xenograft model, analysis of the migratory trail showed that NSCs maintained expression of VEGFR2 and preferentially migrated within the perivascular space. Knockdown of VEGFR2 via shRNAs led to significant downregulation of MMP14 expression, which resulted in inhibited tumor-tropic migration. Overall, our results suggest, the involvement of VEGFR2-regulated MMP14 in the tumor-tropic migratory behavior of NSCs. Our data warrant investigation of MMP14 as a target for enhancing the migratory properties of NSC carriers and optimizing the delivery of therapeutic payloads to disseminated tumor burdens.

  8. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging of intra-axial brain tumours: differentiation of high-grade gliomas from primary CNS lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) allows to quantitatively assess haemodynamic characteristics of brain tissue. We investigated if different brain tumor types can be distinguished from each other using Patlak analysis of PCT data. PCT data from 43 patients with brain tumours were analysed with a commercial implementation of the Patlak method. Four patients had low-grade glioma (WHO II), 31 patients had glioblastoma (WHO IV) and eight patients had intracerebral lymphoma. Tumour regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn in a morphological image and automatically transferred to maps of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and permeability (K Trans). Mean values were calculated, group differences were tested using Wilcoxon and Mann Whitney U-tests. In comparison with normal parenchyma, low-grade gliomas showed no significant difference of perfusion parameters (p > 0.05), whereas high-grade gliomas demonstrated significantly higher values (p Trans, p Trans values compared with unaffected cerebral parenchyma (p = 0.0078) but no elevation of CBV. High-grade gliomas show significant higher CBV values than lymphomas (p = 0.0078). PCT allows to reliably classify gliomas and lymphomas based on quantitative measurements of CBV and K Trans. (orig.)

  9. Brain PDD and PDT unlocking the mystery of malignant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljamel, M Sam

    2004-12-01

    Malignant brain tumours (MBTs) have one of the worst outcomes of human cancers today and their incidence is on the increase. Current treatment failure is usually due to local recurrence of the tumour rather than distant metastasis. In the last three decades we have seen many novel and potentially effective treatment strategies rise rapidly to the rescue. Sadly, however, the majority of these approaches were not good enough to withstand the harsh reality of the sceptical gaze of the scientific eye or the stringent health economics of this millennium. PDD and PDT, however, is one of the few therapies fighting back and still standing today. The results of its randomised controlled trials are eagerly awaited. To date the literature suggests that both PDD and PDT significantly prolong the time to tumour progression, reduce local recurrence, increase radical resection and prolong overall survival of MBTs. PDD and PDT are well tolerated by patients and worthwhile pursuing. PMID:25048434

  10. Compression Stiffening of Brain and its Effect on Mechanosensing by Glioma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogoda, Katarzyna

    The stiffness of tissues, often characterized by their time-dependent elastic properties, is tightly controlled under normal condition and central nervous system tissue is among the softest tissues. Changes in tissue and organ stiffness occur in some physiological conditions and are frequently symptoms of diseases such as fibrosis, cardiovascular disease and many forms of cancer. Primary cells isolated from various tissues often respond to changes in the mechanical properties of their substrates, and the range of stiffness over which these responses occur appear to be limited to the tissue elastic modulus from which they are derived. Our goal was to test the hypotheses that the stiffness of tumors derived from CNS tissue differs from that of normal brain, and that transformed cells derived from such tumors exhibit mechanical responses that differ from those of normal glial cells. Unlike breast and some other cancers where the stroma and the tumor itself is substantially stiffer than the surrounding normal tissue, our data suggest that gliomas can arise without a gross change in the macroscopic tissue stiffness when measured at low strains without compression. However, both normal brain and glioma samples stiffen with compression, but not in elongation and increased shear strains. On the other hand, different classes of immortalized cells derived from human glioblastoma show substantially different responses to the stiffness of substrates in vitrowhen grown on soft polyacrylamide and hyaluronic acid gels. This outcome supports the hypothesis that compression stiffening, which might occur with increased vascularization and interstitial pressure gradients that are characteristic of tumors, effectively stiffens the environment of glioma cells, and that in situ, the elastic resistance these cells sense might be sufficient to trigger the same responses that are activated in vitro by increased substrate stiffness.

  11. Auditory brain-stem responses in syphilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenhall, U; Roupe, G

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of auditory brain-stem electrical responses (BSER) provides an effective means of detecting lesions in the auditory pathways. In the present study the wave patterns were analysed in 11 patients with secondary or latent syphilis with no clinical symptoms referrable to the central nervous system and in two patients with congenital syphilis and general paralysis. Decreased amplitudes and prolonged latencies occurred frequently in patients with secondary and with advanced syphilis. This ...

  12. BRAIN STEM EVOKED RESPONSE AUDIOMETRY A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem evoked response audiometry (BERA is a useful objective assessment of hearing. Major advantage of this procedure is its ability to test even infants in whom conventional audiometry may not be useful. This investigation can be used as a screening test for deafness in high risk infants. Early diagnosis and rehabilitation will reduce disability in these children. This article attempts to review the published literature on this subject.

  13. TNF-α respecifies human mesenchymal stem cells to a neural fate and promotes migration toward experimental glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Ries, Christian; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Schichor, Christian; Berninger, Benedikt; Popp, Tanja; Neth, Peter; Goldbrunner, Roland; Kienast, Yvonne; Winkler, Frank; Jochum, Marianne; Egea, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have become valuable candidates for cell-based therapeutical applications including neuroregenerative and anti-tumor strategies. Yet, the molecular mechanisms that control hMSC transdifferentiation to neural cells and hMSC tropism toward glioma remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that hMSCs incubated with 50 ng/ml TNF-? acquired astroglial cell morphology without affecting proliferation which was increased at 5 ng/m...

  14. Differentiation between high-grade glioma and metastatic brain tumor using single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the efficacy of single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in differentiating high-grade glioma from metastasis. Thirty-one high-grade gliomas (11 anaplastic gliomas and 20 glioblastomas) and 25 metastases were studied. Proton MRS was performed using point-resolved spectroscopy with echo times (TEs) of both 136 and 30 ms. The peaks for lipid were evaluated at short TE, and those for N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), and choline-containing compounds (Cho) were assessed at long TE. All the tumors exhibited a strong Cho peak at long TE. Twenty-one of 25 metastases showed no definite Cr peak. The remaining 4 metastases showed NAA and Cr peaks; however, the presence of NAA and relatively high NAA/Cr ratio (1.58±0.56) indicated normal brain contamination. All the gliomas, except for a single glioblastoma, showed a Cr peak with (n=16) or without (n=14) NAA. At short TE all metastases and glioblastomas showed definite lipid or lipid/lactate mixture, but anaplastic gliomas showed no definite lipid signal. Intratumoral Cr suggests glioma. Absence of Cr indicates metastasis. Definite lipid signal indicates cellular necrosis in glioblastoma and metastasis, and no lipid signal may exclude metastases. (orig.)

  15. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  16. Lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting brain glioma cells in magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitaka, Asahi; Arami, Hamed; Gandhi, Sonu; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new real-time imaging modality, which promises high tracer mass sensitivity and spatial resolution directly generated from iron oxide nanoparticles. In this study, monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with median core diameters ranging from 14 to 26 nm were synthesized and their surface was conjugated with lactoferrin to convert them into brain glioma targeting agents. The conjugation was confirmed with the increase of the hydrodynamic diameters, change of zeta potential, and Bradford assay. Magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS), performed to evaluate the MPI performance of these nanoparticles, showed no change in signal after lactoferrin conjugation to nanoparticles for all core diameters, suggesting that the MPI signal is dominated by Néel relaxation and thus independent of hydrodynamic size difference or presence of coating molecules before and after conjugations. For this range of core sizes (14-26 nm), both MPS signal intensity and spatial resolution improved with increasing core diameter of nanoparticles. The lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Lf-IONPs) showed specific cellular internalization into C6 cells with a 5-fold increase in MPS signal compared to IONPs without lactoferrin, both after 24 h incubation. These results suggest that Lf-IONPs can be used as tracers for targeted brain glioma imaging using MPI.

  17. "Unusual brain stone": heavily calcified primary neoplasm with some features suggestive of angiocentric glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjad, Jahangir; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Bermingham, Niamh; Marks, Charles; Keohane, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    This 40-year-old man presented with a 5-month history of progressive right-sided headache associated with visual blurring. He also had a history of epilepsy but had been seizure free with medication for the past 10 years. An initial CT scan of his brain performed 16 years previously had revealed a small area of calcification in the right parietal region. In the current presentation, he had a left-sided homonymous hemianopia but no other neurological deficits. A CT scan of his brain showed a much larger calcified, partly cystic lesion in the right parietal region. Because he was symptomatic, the lesion was excised and the cyst was drained. Histological examination of the excised tissue showed an unusual primary tumor that was difficult to classify but had some features of angiocentric glioma. The heavy calcification, mixed-density cell population, and regions with features of angiocentric glioma were most unusual. The patient remained asymptomatic 5 years after surgery, and follow-up scans did not show recurrence. PMID:26024003

  18. Pc 4 photodynamic therapy of U87 (human glioma) orthotopic tumor in nude rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, David; George, John E., III; Ahmad, Yusra; Wolfe, Michael S.; Lilge, Lothar; Morris, Rachel L.; Peterson, Allyn; Lust, W. D.; Totonchi, Ali; Varghai, Davood; Li, Xiaolin; Hoppel, Charles L.; Sun, Jiayang; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2005-04-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for Barrett"s esophagus, advanced esophageal cancer, and both early and late inoperable lung carcinoma is now FDA-approved using the first generation photosensitizer PhotofrinTM (Axcan Pharma, Birmingham, AL). Photofrin-mediated PDT of glioma is now in Phase III clinical trials. A variety of second generation photosensitizers have been developed to provide improved: (1) specificity for the target tissue, (2) tumoricidal capability, and (3) rapid clearance the vascular compartment, skin, and eyes. The phthalocyanine Pc 4 is a second generation photosensitizer that is in early phase I clinical trials for skin cancer. We have undertaken a preclinical study that seeks to determine if Pc 4-mediated PDT can be of benefit for the intra-operative localization and treatment of glioma. Methods: Using a stereotactic frame, 250,000 U87 cells were injected via Hamilton syringe through a craniotomy, and the dura, 1-2 mm below the cortical surface of nude (athymic) rat brains (N=91). The craniotomy was filled with a piece of surgical PVC and the scalp closed. After two weeks of tumor growth, the animals received 0.5 mg/kg Pc 4 via tail vein injection. One day later the scalp was re-incised, and the PVC removed. The tumor was then illuminated with either 5 or 30 Joule/cm2 of 672-nm light from a diode laser at 50 mW/cm2. The animals were sacrificed one day later and the brain was cold-perfused with formaldehyde. Two thirds of the explanted brains are now being histologically surveyed for necrosis after staining with hematoxylin and eosin and for apoptosis via immunohistochemistry (i.e., TUNEL assay). The other third were analyzed by HPLC-mass spectrometry for the presence of drug in tumor, normal brain, and plasma at sacrifice. Initial histological results show PDT-induced apoptosis and necrosis confined to the growing (live) portion of the tumor. Preliminary analysis shows an average selectivity of Pc 4 uptake in the bulk tumor to be 3

  19. Mixed Glioma (Oligoastrocytoma) in the brain of an African Hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benneter, S S; Summers, B A; Schulz-Schaeffer, W J; Härtig, W; Mollidor, J; Schöniger, S

    2014-11-01

    This report describes an oligoastrocytoma in the brain of a 3.5-year-old female pet African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) that showed progressive central nervous system signs for 6 months. Microscopical examination of the brain revealed a widely infiltrative, deep-seated glioma within the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres, basal nuclei, hippocampus, thalamus, midbrain, pons and the medulla of the cerebellum with extension of neoplastic cells into the cerebral cortex and overlying leptomeninges. Morphological features of the neoplastic cells, together with variable immunohistochemical expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, Olig-2 and Nogo-A, indicated the presence of intermingled astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumour cells with an astrocytic component of approximately 40% consistent with an oligoastrocytoma. The distribution of the tumour is consistent with gliomatosis cerebri. PMID:25172052

  20. Advances of imaging on differential diagnosis between recurrence of glioma and radiation-induced brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differentiating recurrence of glioma from radiation-induced brain injury is a central challenge in neuro-oncology. The 2 very different outcomes after brain tumor treatment often appear similar on traditional imaging studies. They may even manifest with similar clinical symptoms. Distinguishing treatment injury from tumor recurrence is crucial for diagnosis and treatment planning. In this article, we reviewed the latest developments and key findings from research studies exploring the efficacy of structural and functional imaging modalities in differentiating treatment injury from tumor recurrence with DWI, MRS, DCE-MR, DSC-MR, PET, and SPECT. And we discussed the advantages and disadvantages of each approach to provide useful information for making proper diagnosis and treatment planning. (authors)

  1. Magnetofection Based on Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Weakens Glioma Stem Cell Proliferation and Invasion by Mediating High Expression of MicroRNA-374a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhiguang; Shi, Zhifeng; Wei, Hua; Sun, Fengyan; Song, Jianping; Huang, Yongyi; Liu, Te; Mao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Glioma stem cells belong to a special subpopulation of glioma cells that are characterized by strong proliferation, invasion and drug resistance capabilities. Magnetic nanoparticles are nanoscale biological materials with magnetic properties. In this study, CD133+ primary glioma stem cells were isolated from patients and cultured. Then, magnetic nanoparticles were used to mediate the transfection and expression of a microRNA-374a overexpression plasmid in the glioma stem cells. Transmission electron microscopy detected the presence of significant magnetic nanoparticle substances within the CD133+ glioma stem cells after transfection. The qRT-PCR and Northern blot results showed that the magnetic nanoparticles could be used to achieve the transfection of the microRNA-374a overexpression plasmid into glioma stem cells and the efficient expression of mature microRNA-374a. The MTT and flow cytometry results showed that the proliferation inhibition rate was significantly higher in cells from the microRNA-374a transfection group than in cells from the microRNA-mut transfection group; additionally, the former cells presented significant cell cycle arrest. The Transwell experiments confirmed that the overexpression of microRNA-374a could significantly reduce the invasiveness of CD133+ glioma stem cells. Moreover, the high expression of microRNA-374a mediated by the magnetic nanoparticles effectively reduced the tumourigenicity of CD133+ glioma stem cells in nude mice. The luciferase assays revealed that mature microRNA-374a fragments could bind to the 3'UTR of Neuritin (NRN1), thereby interfering with Neuritin mRNA expression. The qRT-PCR and Western blotting results showed that the overexpression of microRNA-374a significantly reduced the expression of genes such as NRN1, CCND1, CDK4 and Ki67 in glioma stem cells. Thus, magnetic nanoparticles can efficiently mediate the transfection and expression of microRNA expression plasmids in mammalian cells. The overexpression of

  2. Downregulation of lncRNA-MALAT1 Affects Proliferation and the Expression of Stemness Markers in Glioma Stem Cell Line SHG139S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong; Zhou, Liang; Wu, Tingfeng; Huang, Yulun; Cheng, Zhe; Li, Xuetao; Sun, Ting; Zhou, Youxin; Du, Ziwei

    2016-10-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is among the most abundant and highly conserved lncRNAs, which has been detected in a wide variety of human tumors, including gastric cancer, gallbladder cancer, and so on. Previous research has showed that MALAT1 can activate LTBP3 gene in mesenchymal stem cells. However, the specific roles of MALAT1 in glioma stem cells (GSCs) remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to identify the effects of MALAT1 on proliferation and the expression of stemness markers on glioma stem cell line SHG139S. Our results showed that downregulation of MALAT1 suppressed the expression of Sox2 and Nestin which are related to stemness, while downregulation of MALAT1 promoted the proliferation in SHG139S. Further research on the underlying mechanism showed that the effects of MALAT1 downregulation on SHG139S were through regulating ERK/MAPk signaling activity. And we also found that downregulation of MALAT1 could activate ERK/MAPK signaling and promoted proliferation in SHG139 cells. These findings show that MALAT1 plays an important role in regulating the expression of stemness markers and proliferation of SHG139S, and provide a new research direction to target the progression of GSCs. PMID:26649728

  3. Studies on the reliability of high-field intra-operative MRI in brain glioma resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jun SONG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the reliability of high-field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging(iMRI in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.Method One hundred and thirty-one cases of brain glioma(69 males and 62 females,aged from 7 to 79 years with mean of 39.6 years hospitalized from Nov.2009 to Aug.2010 were involved in present study.All the patients were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging(MRI before the operation.The tumors were resected under conventional navigation microscope,and the high-field iMRI was used for all the patients when the operators considered the tumor was satisfactorily resected,while the residual tumor was difficult to detect under the microscope,but resected after being revealed by high-field iMRI.Histopathological examination was performed.The patients without residual tumors recieved high-field MRI scan at day 4 or 5 after operation to evaluate the accuracy of high-field iMRI during operation.Results High quality intra-operative images were obtained by using high-field iMRI.Twenty-eight cases were excluded because their residual tumors were not resected due to their location too close to functional area.Combined with the results of intra-operative histopathological examination and post-operative MRI at the early recovery stage,the sensitivity of high-field iMRI in residual tumor diagnosis was 98.0%(49/50,the specificity was 94.3%(50/53,and the accuracy was 96.1%(99/103.Conclusion High-quality intra-operative imaging could be acquired by high-field iMRI,which maybe used as a safe and reliable method in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.

  4. miRNA-21 is developmentally regulated in mouse brain and is co-expressed with SOX2 in glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and their role during tumor development have been studied in great detail during the last decade, albeit their expression pattern and regulation during normal development are however not so well established. Previous studies have shown that miRNAs are differentially expressed in solid human tumors. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling is known to be involved in normal development of the brain as well as in malignant primary brain tumors, gliomas, but the complete mechanism is still lacking. We decided to investigate the expression of the oncogenic miR-21 during normal mouse development and glioma, focusing on PDGF signaling as a potential regulator of miR-21. We generated mouse glioma using the RCAS/tv-a system for driving PDGF-BB expression in a cell-specific manner. Expression of miR-21 in mouse cell cultures and mouse brain were assessed using Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were used to investigate SOX2 expression. LNA-modified siRNA was used for irreversible depletion of miR-21. For inhibition of PDGF signaling Gleevec (imatinib mesylate), Rapamycin and U0126, as well as siRNA were used. Statistical significance was calculated using double-sided unpaired Student´s t-test. We identified miR-21 to be highly expressed during embryonic and newborn brain development followed by a gradual decrease until undetectable at postnatal day 7 (P7), this pattern correlated with SOX2 expression. Furthermore, miR-21 and SOX2 showed up-regulation and overlapping expression pattern in RCAS/tv-a generated mouse brain tumor specimens. Upon irreversible depletion of miR-21 the expression of SOX2 was strongly diminished in both mouse primary glioma cultures and human glioma cell lines. Interestingly, in normal fibroblasts the expression of miR-21 was induced by PDGF-BB, and inhibition of PDGF signaling in mouse glioma primary cultures resulted in suppression of miR-21 suggesting that mi

  5. Fractionated resection on low grade gliomas involving Broca's area and insights to brain plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chen-xing; PU Song; LIN Yi; WANG Yong-zhi; JIANG Tao; XIE Jian; WEI Miao; YI Xiao-li; WANG Xiao-yi

    2008-01-01

    Background Resent advances on functional mapping have enabled us to conduct surgery on gliomas within the eloquent area. The objective of the article is to discuss the feasibility of a planned fractionated strategy of resection on low-grade gliomas (LGGs) involving Broca's area. We report the first surgical series of planned fractionated resections on LGGs within Broca's area, focusing on language functional reshaping.Methods Four patients were treated with fractionated operations for LGGs involving Broca's area. All cases underwent conventional magnetic resonance (MR) scanning, language functional MR and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) before operation. The resections were then performed on patients under awake anesthesia using intraoperative electrical stimulation (IES) for functional mapping. Pre- and post-operative neuro-psychological examinations were evaluated. Results Total resections were achieved in all cases as confirmed by the postoperative control MR. After transient language worsening, all patients recovered to normal3-6 months later.Language functional MR scannings have shown the operation.All patients retumed to a normal socioprofessional life.Conclusions By utilizing the dynamic interaction between brain plasticity and fractionated resections,we can totally remove the tumor involving Broca'S structure without inducing permanent postoperative deficits and even improve the qualityof life.

  6. Therapeutic effect of concomitant treatment with temozolomide and radiotherapy on malignant brain glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Zhao; Yu Liao; Hai-feng Ji; Jian-jun Chu; Qing Sun; Shu-bo Chen; Qing Wang; Wei-yang Ji

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare and analyze the therapeutic effect of temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy with radiotherapy and that of MV (VM-26+Me-CCNU) chemotherapy with radiotherapy in the synchronous treatment of postoperative malignant brain glioma.Methods A total of 104 postoperative malignant brain glioma patients were randomly assigned to the treatment group (TMZ chemotherapy with radiotherapy synchronous treatment group) or the control group (MV chemotherapy with radiotherapy synchronous treatment group).There were 52 cases in the treatment group (30 cases of class Ⅲ and 22 cases of class Ⅳ) and 52 cases in the control group (32 cases of class Ⅲ and 20 cases of class Ⅳ).With the head conformal radiotherapy DT 60 Gy/30 fx/42 d,the treatment group was also administrated with TMZ 75 mg/m2 daily until the end of radiotherapy,followed by adjuvant TMZ chemotherapy 150~200 mg/m2/d × 5 d every 28 days for 6 treatment courses.The control group received 1 treatment course of MV (VM-26 70 mg/m2/d × 3 d,Me-CCNU 100~150 mg/m2 × 1 d) following 30 Gy radiotherapy,and then adjuvant MV chemotherapy every 28 days for 6 treatment courses after radiotherapy.Results The 1-year,2-year and 3-year survival rates were 86.5% (45/52),26.9 % (14/52) and 13.5% (7/52) respectively in the treatment group and 80.8% (42/52),17.3% (9/52) and 7.7% (4/52) in the control group.The median survival time was 20 months and 15 months in the treatment and control groups respectively.There were significant differences in the survival curve and median survival time between the two groups (P <0.05).The hematotoxicity and cerebral radiation injury were tolerable in both groups.Conclusion Combined treatment of TMZ chemotherapy and radiotherapy increases the survival rate in malignant brain glioma patients,which is significantly different from the survival rate in patients with MV chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  7. Non-coding RNAs as epigenetic regulator of glioma stem-like cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke eKatsushima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas show heterogeneous histological features. These distinct phenotypic states are thought to be associated with the presence of glioma stem cells (GSCs, which are highly tumorigenic and self-renewing sub-population of tumor cells that have different functional characteristics. Differentiation of GSCs may be regulated by multi-tiered epigenetic mechanisms that orchestrate the expression of thousands of genes. One such regulatory mechanism involves functional non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs; a large number of ncRNAs have been identified and shown to regulate the expression of genes associated with cell differentiation programs. Given the roles of miRNAs in cell differentiation, it is possible they are involved in the regulation of gene expression networks in GSCs that are important for the maintenance of the pluripotent state and for directing differentiation. Here, we review recent findings on ncRNAs associated with GSC differentiation and discuss how these ncRNAs contribute to the establishment of tissue heterogeneity during glioblastoma tumor formation.

  8. Sema3C Promotes the Survival and Tumorigenicity of Glioma Stem Cells through Rac1 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Man

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Different cancer cell compartments often communicate through soluble factors to facilitate tumor growth. Glioma stem cells (GSCs are a subset of tumor cells that resist standard therapy to contribute to disease progression. How GSCs employ a distinct secretory program to communicate with and nurture each other over the nonstem tumor cell (NSTC population is not well defined. Here, we show that GSCs preferentially secrete Sema3C and coordinately express PlexinA2/D1 receptors to activate Rac1/nuclear factor (NF-κB signaling in an autocrine/paracrine loop to promote their own survival. Importantly, Sema3C is not expressed in neural progenitor cells (NPCs or NSTCs. Disruption of Sema3C induced apoptosis of GSCs, but not NPCs or NSTCs, and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic models of glioblastoma. Introduction of activated Rac1 rescued the Sema3C knockdown phenotype in vivo. Our study supports the targeting of Sema3C to break this GSC-specific autocrine/paracrine loop in order to improve glioblastoma treatment, potentially with a high therapeutic index.

  9. O6-Methylguanine-Methyltransferase (MGMT Promoter Methylation Status in Glioma Stem-Like Cells is Correlated to Temozolomide Sensitivity Under Differentiation-Promoting Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Karayan-Tapon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most malignant type of primary brain tumor with a very poor prognosis. The actual standard protocol of treatment for GBM patients consists of radiotherapy and concomitant temozolomide (TMZ. However, the therapeutic efficacy of this treatment is limited due to tumor recurrence and TMZ resistance. Recently isolated, glioma stem-like cells (GSCs are thought to represent the population of tumorigenic cells responsible for GBM resistance and recurrence following surgery and chemotherapy. In addition, MGMT (O6-methylguanine-methyltransferase methylation is considered as one of the principal mechanisms contributing to TMZ sensitivity of GBM. In this study we have isolated GSCs from 10 adult GBM patients and investigated the relationship between MGMT methylation status and Temozolomide (TMZ sensitivity of these lines grown either in stem-like or differentiation promoting conditions. Sensitivity to TMZ was significantly associated with MGMT methylation status in cells committed to differentiation but not in stem-like cells. In addition, patients harboring highly methylated MGMT promoters had a longer overall survival. These results reveal the importance of the differentiation process when considering the predictive value of MGMT status in GSCs for clinical response to TMZ.

  10. The relativity of EGFR and autophagy in the regulating radiation sensitivity of brain glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is one of the most important methods in the combination therapy against glioma, but resistance of the malignant glioma to radiation limits its clinical contribution. Therefore, it makes great sense to study new mechanisms of radio-resistance. Recent studies show that there is a relationship between EGFR and autophagy in human glioma radiotherapy. More investigations will be needed to select ideal target to enhance the radio-sensitivity of glioma by use of the relationship. (authors)

  11. Resonant Raman spectra of grades of human brain glioma tumors reveal the content of tryptophan by the 1588 cm-1 mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Zhou, Lixin; Zhu, Ke; Liu, Yulong; Zhang, Lin; Boydston-White, Susie; Cheng, Gangge; Pu, Yang; Bidyut, Das; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    RR spectra of brain normal tissue, gliomas in low grade I and II, and malignant glioma tumors in grade III and IV were measured using a confocal micro Raman spectrometer. This report focus on the relative contents of tryptophan (W) in various grades of brain glioma tumors by the intrinsic molecular resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy method using the 1588cm-1 of tryptophan mode by 532 nm excitation. The RR spectra of key fingerprints of tryptophan, with a main vibrational mode at 1588cm-1 (W8b), were observed. It was found that tryptophan contribution was accumulated in grade I to IV gliomas and the mode of 1588cm-1 in grade III and IV malignant gliomas were enhanced by resonance.

  12. Evaluation of glioma with thallium-201 brain SPECT: the correlation with 1H MR spectroscopy and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thallim-201 (201TI) brain SPECT and proton (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have been used to evaluate tumor grade and viability of glioma. We assessed the correlations between 201TI brain index or spectrum of metabolites of 1H MRS and grade of glioma or histopathologic findings. We studied 17 patients (4 astrocytoma, 7 anaplastic astrocytoma and 6 glioblastoma). On 201TI Brain SPECT, 201TI index was measured as the ratio of average counts for region interest to those for the contralateral normal brain. On 1H MRS, we calculated choline (Cho)/ creatine (Cr) ratio and N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/Cr ratio in ROI defined as tumor center. Histopathologic findings were graded by Ki-67 index, cellularity, mitosis, pleomorphism, necrosis and endothelial proliferation. An unpaired t test and statistical correlations were performed to evaluate these data. TI-index showed the best correlation with Ki-67 index (p201TI brain SPECT did not correlate directly with grade of malignancy, it may still be useful in determining biological aggressiveness of tumor and prognosis of patients because it correlated well with Ki-67 index, a growth fraction of glioma, cellularity, mitosis and endothelial proliferation

  13. Discovery of Power-Law Growth in the Self-Renewal of Heterogeneous Glioma Stem Cell Populations.

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    Michiya Sugimori

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer stem cells (CSCs drive tumorigenesis. This suggests that CSCs should make ideal therapeutic targets. However, because CSC populations in tumors appear heterogeneous, it remains unclear how CSCs might be effectively targeted. To investigate the mechanisms by which CSC populations maintain heterogeneity during self-renewal, we established a glioma sphere (GS forming model, to generate a population in which glioma stem cells (GSCs become enriched. We hypothesized, based on the clonal evolution concept, that with each passage in culture, heterogeneous clonal sublines of GSs are generated that progressively show increased proliferative ability.To test this hypothesis, we determined whether, with each passage, glioma neurosphere culture generated from four different glioma cell lines become progressively proliferative (i.e., enriched in large spheres. Rather than monitoring self-renewal, we measured heterogeneity based on neurosphere clone sizes (#cells/clone. Log-log plots of distributions of clone sizes yielded a good fit (r>0.90 to a straight line (log(% total clones = k*log(#cells/clone indicating that the system follows a power-law (y = xk with a specific degree exponent (k = -1.42. Repeated passaging of the total GS population showed that the same power-law was maintained over six passages (CV = -1.01 to -1.17. Surprisingly, passage of either isolated small or large subclones generated fully heterogeneous populations that retained the original power-law-dependent heterogeneity. The anti-GSC agent Temozolomide, which is well known as a standard therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, suppressed the self-renewal of clones, but it never disrupted the power-law behavior of a GS population.Although the data above did not support the stated hypothesis, they did strongly suggest a novel mechanism that underlies CSC heterogeneity. They indicate that power-law growth governs the self-renewal of heterogeneous

  14. Brain tumour stem cells: the undercurrents of human brain cancer and their relationship to neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dirks, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    Conceptual and technical advances in neural stem cell biology are being applied to the study of human brain tumours. These studies suggest that human brain tumours are organized as a hierarchy and are maintained by a small number of tumour cells that have stem cell properties. Most of the bulk population of human brain tumours comprise cells that have lost the ability to initiate and maintain tumour growth. Although the cell of origin for human brain tumours is uncertain, recent evidence poin...

  15. De novo development of gliomas in a child with neurofibromatosis type 1, fragile X and previously normal brain magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Rabia Zafar, MD, PhD; Esther Y. Hsiao, MD; Kelly N. Botteron, MD; Robert C. McKinstry, MD, PhD; David H. Gutmann, MD, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen to 20% of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 develop low-grade glial neoplasms. However, since neuroimaging is not routinely obtained until a child is clinically symptomatic, little is known about presymptomatic radiographic characteristics of gliomas in this at-risk population. Herein, we describe a child with neurofibromatosis type 1 who initially had normal brain imaging before the development of multifocal gliomas. Comparison of these serial images demonstrated that brain tumo...

  16. Use of human embryonic stem cells to model pediatric gliomas with H3.3K27M histone mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funato, Kosuke; Major, Tamara; Lewis, Peter W.; Allis, C. David; Tabar, Viviane

    2016-01-01

    Over 70% of diffuse intrinsic pediatric gliomas, an aggressive brainstem tumor, harbor heterozygous mutations that create a K27M amino acid substitution (methionine replaces lysine 27) in the tail of histone H3.3. The role of the H3.3K27M mutation in tumorigenesis not fully understood. Here, we use a human embryonic stem cell system to model this tumor. We show that H3.3K27M expression synergizes with p53 loss and PDGFRA activation in neural progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem cells, resulting in neoplastic transformation. Genome-wide analyses indicate a resetting of the transformed precursors to a developmentally more primitive stem cell state, with evidence of major modifications of histone marks at several master regulator genes. Drug screening assays identified a compound targeting the protein menin as an inhibitor of tumor cell growth in vitro and in mice. PMID:25525250

  17. Develop a novel superparamagnetic nano-carrier for drug delivery to brain glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Anmin; Chang, Jin; Fu, Xiangping; Zhang, Zhiwen; Yan, Runmin; Wang, Hanjie; Liang, Shuli

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic drug carrier has been employed in drug delivery for over 30 years. Modern nanotechnology has improved its efficiency dramatically by decreasing its diameter into nano-scale. It may help chemotherapeutic agents penetrate BBB and raise local drug concentration in brain, which is the ideal model for glioma treatment. In our study, magnetic carrier was fabricated with octadecyl quaternized caroxymethyl chitosan (OQCMC), hydrophobic Fe₃O₄ ferrofluid and cholesterol, which showed a uniform diameter of 20 nm under transmission electronic microscopy and superparamagnetic character in vibration sample magnetical measurement system. To investigate the efficacy of drug delivery, paclitaxel was used as loaded drug and analyzed by the HPLC. Results showed that magnetic carrier released drugs for more than 20 d in vitro and maintain the drug concentration above 0.4 μg/g for 16 h in rat brain after magnetic targeting. Drug concentration increased by 1-3 folds when delivered by carrier without magnetic targeting, and by 3-15 folds after magnetic targeting. Cellular study revealed that the magnetic carrier was clearly localized in the targeted cortex neural cells and U251-MG cell lines. These results showed that this magnetic carrier is capable of maintaining high drug concentration in magnetically targeted area and carrying drugs or genes into cells, which is potentially promising for local chemotherapy to brain tumors. PMID:23701032

  18. Diagnostic Significance of Intraoperative Ultrasound Contrast in Evaluating the Resection Degree of Brain Glioma By Transmission Electron Microscopic Examination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Qing Yu; Ji-Sheng Wang; Si-Yuan Chen; Xiang-Ming Liu; Yan Li; Yi-Ming Ding; Xiao-Ya Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a dynamic and continuous modality providing real-time view of vascularization and flow distribution patterns of different organs and tumors.In order to evaluate the diagnostic significance of intraoperative contrast-enhanced ultrasound in assessing the resection degree of brain glioma by transmission electron microscopic (TEM) examination,it is important to have specific knowledge about contrast-enhanced ultrasound.Methods:Ultrasound contrast was applied in operations of 120 cases of brain glioma,to evaluate the degree of tumor resection.Biopsy tissues were obtained the suspicious residual tumors surrounding the tumor cavity.The sensitivity and specificity of the residual tumors were determined by the intraoperative ultrasound contrast according to TEM examination results.Results:There were 44 cases of low-grade gliomas and 76 cases of high-grade gliomas.Three hundred and sixty biopsy tissues were obtained.The sensitivity of intraoperative ultrasound contrast in diagnosing the residual tumor was 62.2%,while the specificity degree of it was 92.8%.The consistency coefficient of the ultrasound contrast diagnosis and TEM examination results was 0.584 (Kappa =0.584),which was between 0.4 and 0.6,therefore it was of medium consistency.Conclusions:Intraoperative ultrasound contrast was of a high sensitivity and specificity in evaluating the excision degree of tumor.The consistency of the residual tumor rate detected,respectively,by ultrasound contrast and TEM examination was of medium consistency.The application of intraoperative ultrasound contrast can improve the resection rate of brain glioma.

  19. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection. PMID:27065870

  20. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection. PMID:27065870

  1. Fluorine F 18 Fluorodopa-Labeled PET Scan in Planning Surgery and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High- or Low-Grade Malignant Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  2. 3 Tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy: cerebral gliomas vs. metastatic brain tumors. Our experience and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caivano, R; Lotumolo, A; Rabasco, P; Zandolino, A; D'Antuono, F; Villonio, A; Lancellotti, M I; Macarini, L; Cammarota, A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to report about the value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in differentiating brain metastases, primary high-grade gliomas (HGG) and low-grade gliomas (LGG). MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and MRS were performed in 60 patients with histologically verified brain tumors: 32 patients with HGG (28 glioblastomas multiforme [GBM] and 4 anaplastic astrocytomas), 14 patients with LGG (9 astrocytomas and 5 oligodendrogliomas) and 14 patients with metastatic brain tumors. The Cho/Cr (choline-containing compounds/creatine-phosphocreatine complex), Cho/NAA (N-acetyl aspartate) and NAA/Cr ratios were assessed from spectral maps in the tumoral core and peritumoral edema. The differences in the metabolite ratios between LGG, HGG and metastases were analyzed statistically. Lipids/lactate contents were also analyzed. Significant differences were noted in the tumoral and peritumoral Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA and NAA/Cr ratios between LGG, HGG and metastases. Lipids and lactate content revealed to be useful for discriminating gliomas and metastases. The results of this study demonstrate that MRS can differentiate LGG, HGG and metastases, therefore diagnosis could be allowed even in those patients who cannot undergo biopsy. PMID:23390934

  3. Quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics reveals metabolic differences in attracting and non-attracting human-in-mouse glioma stem cell xenografts and stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norelle C. Wildburger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (BM-hMSCs show promise as cell-based delivery vehicles for anti-glioma therapeutics, due to innate tropism for gliomas. However, in clinically relevant human-in-mouse glioma stem cell xenograft models, BM-hMSCs tropism is variable. We compared the proteomic profile of cancer and stromal cells in GSCXs that attract BM-hMSCs (“attractors” with those to do not (“non-attractors” to identify pathways that may modulate BM-hMSC homing, followed by targeted transcriptomics. The results provide the first link between fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, ROS, and N-glycosylation patterns in attractors. Reciprocal expression of these pathways in the stromal cells suggests microenvironmental cross-talk.

  4. Molecular and metabolic pattern classification for detection of brain glioma progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imani, Farzin, E-mail: imanif@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States); Boada, Fernando E. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States); Lieberman, Frank S. [Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States); Davis, Denise K.; Mountz, James M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Objectives: The ability to differentiate between brain tumor progression and radiation therapy induced necrosis is critical for appropriate patient management. In order to improve the differential diagnosis, we combined fluorine-18 2-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) and histological data to develop a multi-parametric machine-learning model. Methods: We enrolled twelve post-therapy patients with grade 2 and 3 gliomas that were suspicious of tumor progression. All patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET and {sup 1}H MRS. Maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the tumors and reference regions were obtained. Multiple 2D maps of choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) of the tumors were generated. A support vector machine (SVM) learning model was established to take imaging biomarkers and histological data as input vectors. A combination of clinical follow-up and multiple sequential MRI studies served as the basis for assessing the clinical outcome. All vector combinations were evaluated for diagnostic accuracy and cross validation. The optimal cutoff value of individual parameters was calculated using Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plots. Results: The SVM and ROC analyses both demonstrated that SUVmax of the lesion was the most significant single diagnostic parameter (75% accuracy) followed by Cho concentration (67% accuracy). SVM analysis of all paired parameters showed SUVmax and Cho concentration in combination could achieve 83% accuracy. SUVmax of the lesion paired with SUVmax of the white matter as well as the tumor Cho paired with the tumor Cr both showed 83% accuracy. These were the most significant paired diagnostic parameters of either modality. Combining all four parameters did not improve the results. However, addition of two more parameters, Cho and Cr of brain parenchyma contralateral to the tumor, increased the accuracy to 92

  5. Molecular and metabolic pattern classification for detection of brain glioma progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The ability to differentiate between brain tumor progression and radiation therapy induced necrosis is critical for appropriate patient management. In order to improve the differential diagnosis, we combined fluorine-18 2-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) and histological data to develop a multi-parametric machine-learning model. Methods: We enrolled twelve post-therapy patients with grade 2 and 3 gliomas that were suspicious of tumor progression. All patients underwent 18F-FDG PET and 1H MRS. Maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the tumors and reference regions were obtained. Multiple 2D maps of choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) of the tumors were generated. A support vector machine (SVM) learning model was established to take imaging biomarkers and histological data as input vectors. A combination of clinical follow-up and multiple sequential MRI studies served as the basis for assessing the clinical outcome. All vector combinations were evaluated for diagnostic accuracy and cross validation. The optimal cutoff value of individual parameters was calculated using Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plots. Results: The SVM and ROC analyses both demonstrated that SUVmax of the lesion was the most significant single diagnostic parameter (75% accuracy) followed by Cho concentration (67% accuracy). SVM analysis of all paired parameters showed SUVmax and Cho concentration in combination could achieve 83% accuracy. SUVmax of the lesion paired with SUVmax of the white matter as well as the tumor Cho paired with the tumor Cr both showed 83% accuracy. These were the most significant paired diagnostic parameters of either modality. Combining all four parameters did not improve the results. However, addition of two more parameters, Cho and Cr of brain parenchyma contralateral to the tumor, increased the accuracy to 92%. Conclusion: This study suggests

  6. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Bernier

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings.

  7. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facchino, Sabrina; Abdouh, Mohamed [Developmental Biology Laboratory, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 Boul. l' Assomption, Montreal, H1T 2M4 (Canada); Bernier, Gilbert, E-mail: gbernier.hmr@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Developmental Biology Laboratory, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 Boul. l' Assomption, Montreal, H1T 2M4 (Canada); Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2011-03-30

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings.

  8. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings

  9. Non-virally engineered human adipose mesenchymal stem cells produce BMP4, target brain tumors, and extend survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Gullotti, David; Kozielski, Kristen L; Kim, Jennifer E; Seng, Michael; Abbadi, Sara; Schiapparelli, Paula; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Vescovi, Angelo; Brem, Henry; Olivi, Alessandro; Tyler, Betty; Green, Jordan J; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for enabling non-viral nanobiotechnology to allow safe and effective gene therapy and cell therapy, which can be utilized to treat devastating diseases such as brain cancer. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) display high anti-glioma tropism and represent a promising delivery vehicle for targeted brain tumor therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that non-viral, biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) can be used to engineer hAMSCs with higher efficacy (75% of cells) than leading commercially available reagents and high cell viability. To accomplish this, we engineered a poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE) polymer structure to transfect hAMSCs with significantly higher efficacy than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We then assessed the ability of NP-engineered hAMSCs to deliver bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), which has been shown to have a novel therapeutic effect by targeting human brain tumor initiating cells (BTIC), a source of cancer recurrence, in a human primary malignant glioma model. We demonstrated that hAMSCs genetically engineered with polymeric nanoparticles containing BMP4 plasmid DNA (BMP4/NP-hAMSCs) secrete BMP4 growth factor while maintaining their multipotency and preserving their migration and invasion capacities. We also showed that this approach can overcome a central challenge for brain therapeutics, overcoming the blood brain barrier, by demonstrating that NP-engineered hAMSCs can migrate to the brain and penetrate the brain tumor after both intranasal and systemic intravenous administration. Critically, athymic rats bearing human primary BTIC-derived tumors and treated intranasally with BMP4/NP-hAMSCs showed significantly improved survival compared to those treated with control GFP/NP-hAMCSs. This study demonstrates that synthetic polymeric nanoparticles are a safe and effective approach for stem cell-based cancer-targeting therapies. PMID:27240162

  10. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  11. Ischemic and hemorrhagic brain stem lesions mimicking diabetic ophthalmoplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, T; Segawa, F; Ogawa, K; Kurihara, T; Kinoshita, M

    1995-05-01

    Two patients with diabetes mellitus, one of them with an isolated third cranial nerve palsy and the other with an isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy, are presented. MRI investigations including diffusion-weighted MRI revealed a small ischemic brain stem lesion in the former and a small hemorrhagic brain stem lesion in the latter. In the former case wallerian degeneration of the nerve fascicle within the mesencephalon was also detected. These cases indicate that vascular accidents of the brain stem may masquerade as fascicular or infranuclear disturbance of the oculomotor or abducens nerve; therefore, it is important to include brain stem lesions into the differential diagnosis of isolated ophthalmoplegia. Thorough investigation by MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI is helpful for correct diagnosis. PMID:7656493

  12. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Sang; Heo, Sung Hyuk [Dept. of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  13. Neonatal bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis caused by brain stem haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Blazer, S; Hemli, J A; Sujov, P O; Braun, J

    1989-01-01

    We describe a neonate with severe bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis caused by haemorrhage in the lower brain stem. To our knowledge this association has not been previously reported in the English medical literature.

  14. 18F FDOPA PET/CT or PET/MRI in Measuring Tumors in Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Recurrent Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Protoplasmic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma; Untreated Childhood

  15. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: brain stem involvement in a peculiar pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most common pattern in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, is in the cerebral hemisphere white matter on T2-weighted images with or without atrophy. Brain-stem lesions are rare. We report brain-stem involvement in two children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. A peculiar pattern, with involvement of the pons with extension to both middle cerebellar peduncles and substantia nigra but sparing the pontine tegmentum, is suggested. (orig.)

  16. Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengwen; Calvin; Li; Mustafa; H; Kabeer; Long; T; Vu; Vic; Keschrumrus; Hong; Zhen; Yin; Brent; A; Dethlefs; Jiang; F; Zhong; John; H; Weiss; William; G; Loudon

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of malignant brain tumors remains a challenge. Stem cell technology has been applied in the treatment of brain tumors largely because of the ability of some stem cells to infiltrate into regions within the brain where tumor cells migrate as shown in preclinical studies. However, not all of these efforts can translate in the effective treatment that improves the quality of life for pa-tients. Here, we perform a literature review to identify the problems in the field. Given the lack of efficacy of most stem cell-based agents used in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we found that stem cell distribution(i.e., only a fraction of stem cells applied capable of targeting tumors) are among the limiting factors. We provide guidelines for potential improvements in stem cell distribution. Specifically, we use an engineered tissue graft platform that replicates the in vivo microenvironment, and provide our data to validate that this culture platform is viable for producing stem cells that have better stem cell distribution than with the Petri dish culture system.

  17. Growth of G422 glioma implanted in the mouse brain was affected by the immune ability of the host

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Ying-xin; LI Fei; LU Jia-you; LI Mei; DU Peng; XU Gui-lian; FENG Hua

    2011-01-01

    Background It is generally accepted that gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors with poor prognosis. We aimed to explore the relationship of the immunity of the central nervous system and the genesis and development of glioma. Methods G422 glioma was implanted in the brain of BALB/c mice (immuno-competent mice), nude mice (T cell related immuno-deficient) and complement C3 knock-out mice (complement C3 related immunodeficient). The survival time of the host, growth and histopathology of the tumor, and concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (INF-γ) in tumor tissues were assessed.Results Tumor spheres were formed in all mice after injection, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive staining of the cells declared their glioma origin. The longest median survival time of (44.3±6.0) days was found in BALB/c mice, followed by (24.8±5.2) days in nude mice and the shortest (18.6±5.8) days in complement C3 knock-out mice. Accordingly, the growth of the tumor was fastest in complement C3 knock-out mice, followed by the nude mice and slowest in the BALB/c mice. Although the proportions of infiltrating CD68+ lymphocytes in tumor tissues showed no significant difference (P>0.05), TNF-a level in the nude and C3 knock-out mice, (28.11±4.86) μmol/L and (22.87±6.36) μmol/L respectively, were significantly lower (P<0.01) than that in the BALB/c mice, which was (230.21±39.17) μmol/L. The INF-γ level was highest in the BALB/c mice ((180.76±29.19) μmol/L), followed by the nude mice ((113.46±23.76) μmol/L) and then the C3 knock-out mice ((16.84±4.45) μmol/L).Conclusions The G422 glioma implanted in the brains of mice with different immune ability would be a useful model for studying the relationship of the immune system and tumor in the central nervous system. Furthermore, the T cells and complement C3 compartments of the immune response may affect the growth of implanted tumors and inflammatory factors such as TNF

  18. MRI of the incisural plane: assessment of normal brain stem position by age and transtentorial brain stem shift in disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standardization on MRI of an anatomic plane passing through the tectum of the midbrain based on fixed landmarks allows assessment of the position of the brain stem during development and in normal adulthood, and comparison with its position in disease states. The level of the tectum relative to this incisural plane changes during normal cranial growth as well as in the presence of masses, frank brain stem herniation correlating with altered consciousness. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging with fluorescein sodium dyeing for surgery of gliomas in brain motor functional areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jia-gang; YANG Shuai-feng; LIU Yan-hui; WANG Xiang; MAO Qing

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor surgery in brain motor functional areas remains challenging.Novel techniques are being developed to gain maximal and safe resection for brain tumor surgery.Herein,we assessed the magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) and fluorescein sodium dyeing (FLS) guiding technique for surgery of glioma located in brain motor functional areas.Methods Totally 83 patients were enrolled according to our inclusion and exclusion criteria (56 patients in experimental group,27 patients in control group).In the experimental group,the surgical approach was designed by DTI imaging,which showed the relationship between the tumor and motor tract.The range of resection in the operation was determined using the FLS-stained area,which recognized the tumor and its infiltrated tissue.The traditional routine method was used in the control group.Postoperatively,all patients underwent enhanced brain MRI within 72 hours to ascertain the extent of resection.Patients were followed in our outpatient clinic over 6-24 months.Neurological deficits and Karnofsky scoring (KPS) were evaluated.Results There were no significant differences in balance test indexes of preoperative data (sex,age,lesion location and volume,and neurological deficits before operation) and diagnosis of histopathology between the two groups.There was a trend in the experimental group for greater rates of gross total resection (80.4% vs.40.7%),and the paralysis rate caused by surgery was lower in experimental (25.0%) vs.control (66.7%) groups (P <0.05).The 6-month KPS in the low-grade and high-grade gliomas was 91±11 and 73±26,respectively,in the experimental group vs.82±9 and 43±27,respectively,in the control group (P <0.05 for both).Conclusions MR-DTI and FLS dye guiding for surgery of glioma located in brain motor functional areas can increase the gross total resection rate,decrease the paralysis rate caused by surgery,and improve patient quality of life compared with traditional

  20. Nanomedicine Approaches to Modulate Neural Stem Cells in Brain Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Tiago; Boto, Carlos; Saraiva, Cláudia M; Bernardino, Liliana; Ferreira, Lino

    2016-06-01

    We explore the concept of modulating neural stem cells and their niches for brain repair using nanotechnology-based approaches. These approaches include stimulating cell proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation to functionally recover damaged areas. Nanoscale-engineered materials potentially overcome limited crossing of the blood-brain barrier, deficient drug delivery, and cell targeting. PMID:26917252

  1. Sox2 is translationally activated by eukaryotic initiation factor 4E in human glioma-initiating cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sox2, a master transcription factor, contributes to the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells and plays significant roles in sustaining the self-renewal of neural stem cells and glioma-initiating cells. Understanding the functional differences of Sox2 between glioma-initiating cells and normal neural stem cells would contribute to therapeutic approach for treatment of brain tumors. Here, we first demonstrated that Sox2 could contribute to the self-renewal and proliferation of glioma-initiating cells. The following experiments showed that Sox2 was activated at translational level in a subset of human glioma-initiating cells compared with the normal neural stem cells. Further investigation revealed there was a positive correlation between Sox2 and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in glioma tissues. Down-regulation of eIF4E decreased Sox2 protein level without altering its mRNA level in glioma-initiating cells, indicating that Sox2 was activated by eIF4E at translational level. Furthermore, eIF4E was presumed to regulate the expression of Sox2 by its 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) sequence. Our results suggest that the eIF4E-Sox2 axis is a novel mechanism of unregulated self-renewal of glioma-initiating cells, providing a potential therapeutic target for glioma.

  2. Sox2 is translationally activated by eukaryotic initiation factor 4E in human glioma-initiating cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Yuqing; Zhou, Fengbiao; Chen, Hong; Cui, Chunhong; Liu, Dan [Key Laboratory of Glycoconjuates Research, Ministry of Public Health and Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Li, Qiuping [Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Yang, Zhiyuan; Wu, Guoqiang [Key Laboratory of Glycoconjuates Research, Ministry of Public Health and Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Sun, Shuhui [Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology, Ministry of Education and Health, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Key Laboratory of Glycoconjuates Research, Ministry of Public Health and Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Sciences of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wei, Yuanyan, E-mail: yywei@fudan.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Glycoconjuates Research, Ministry of Public Health and Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Jiang, Jianhai, E-mail: jianhaijiang@fudan.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Glycoconjuates Research, Ministry of Public Health and Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2010-07-09

    Sox2, a master transcription factor, contributes to the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells and plays significant roles in sustaining the self-renewal of neural stem cells and glioma-initiating cells. Understanding the functional differences of Sox2 between glioma-initiating cells and normal neural stem cells would contribute to therapeutic approach for treatment of brain tumors. Here, we first demonstrated that Sox2 could contribute to the self-renewal and proliferation of glioma-initiating cells. The following experiments showed that Sox2 was activated at translational level in a subset of human glioma-initiating cells compared with the normal neural stem cells. Further investigation revealed there was a positive correlation between Sox2 and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in glioma tissues. Down-regulation of eIF4E decreased Sox2 protein level without altering its mRNA level in glioma-initiating cells, indicating that Sox2 was activated by eIF4E at translational level. Furthermore, eIF4E was presumed to regulate the expression of Sox2 by its 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) sequence. Our results suggest that the eIF4E-Sox2 axis is a novel mechanism of unregulated self-renewal of glioma-initiating cells, providing a potential therapeutic target for glioma.

  3. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  4. Brain stem hypoplasia associated with Cri-du-Chat syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu [Dept. of Radiology, Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries.

  5. Brain stem hypoplasia associated with Cri-du-Chat syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries.

  6. Brain stem and thalamus antioxidative defense in experimental sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Ninković Milica; Maličević Ž.; Stojanović Dragica; Vasiljević Ivana; Jovanović Marina; Đukić Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    Although brain complications in sepsis are not rare, early pathophysiologic events had not been made clear yet. We have considered antioxidative components-glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration in two brain integrative centers, i.e the brain stem (BS) and thalamus. Sepsis was induced in adult male Wistar rats (200-250 g) by cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) with inoculation of Escherichia coli suspension (ATCC 25922) (n=40). The control group w...

  7. The role of positron emission tomography in differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis in brain glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the role of 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET PET-CT) in differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis in brain glioma patients. Methods: From June 2008 to September 2009, 30 brain glioma patients with suspected tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis after radiotherapy were evaluated by MET PET-CT. The median time between initial radiotherapy and PET examination was 13.5 months. Tumor recurrence were confirmed by histological analysis while necrosis was based on histological analysis or the subsequent clinical follow-up. Results: Eighteen out of 19 patients were histologically confirmed tumor recurrence among those tumor recurrence shown by MET PET-CT after surgery or stereotactic biopsy. 11 patients were considered to have radiation necrosis because of stable neurological symptoms and without massive enlargement of the lesion during the after follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MET PET-CT for detecting tumor recurrence were 100%, 91.7% and 96.7% respectively. Conclusion: MET PET-CT is a powerful tool in differentiating brain tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis after radiotherapy. (authors)

  8. Are there fetal stem cells in the maternal brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirhan, Osman; Cekin, Necmi; Taştemir, Deniz; Tunç, Erdal; Güzel, Ali İrfan; Meral, Demet; Demirbek, Bülent

    2013-03-01

    Fetal cells can enter maternal blood during pregnancy but whether they can also cross the blood-brain barrier to enter the maternal brain remains poorly understood. Previous results suggest that fetal cells are summoned to repair damage to the mother's brain. If this is confirmed, it would open up new and safer avenues of treatment for brain damage caused by strokes and neural diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether a baby's stem cells can enter the maternal brain during pregnancy. Deceased patients who had at least one male offspring and no history of abortion and blood transfusion were included in this study. DNA was extracted from brain tissue samples of deceased women using standard phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation methods. Genomic DNA was screened by quantitative fluorescent-polymerase chain reaction amplification together with short tandem repeat markers specific to the Y chromosome, and 13, 18, 21 and X. Any foreign DNA residues that could be used to interpret the presence of fetal stem cells in the maternal brain were monitored. Results indicated that fetal stem cells can not cross the blood-brain barrier to enter the maternal brain. PMID:25206703

  9. Are there fetal stem cells in the maternal brain?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osman Demirhan; Necmi (C)ekin; Deniz Ta(s)temir; Erdal Tun(c); Ali irfan Güzel; Demet Meral; Bülent Demirbek

    2013-01-01

    Fetal cells can enter maternal blood during pregnancy but whether they can also cross the blood-brain barrier to enter the maternal brain remains poorly understood. Previous results suggest that fetal cells are summoned to repair damage to the mother's brain. If this is confirmed, it would open up new and safer avenues of treatment for brain damage caused by strokes and neural diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether a baby's stem cells can enter the maternal brain during pregnancy. Deceased patients who had at least one male offspring and no history of abortion and blood transfusion were included in this study. DNA was extracted from brain tissue samples of deceased women using standard phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation methods. Genomic DNA was screened by quantitative fluorescent-polymerase chain reaction amplification together with short tandem repeat markers specific to the Y chromosome, and 13, 18, 21 and X. Any foreign DNA residues that could be used to interpret the presence of fetal stem cells in the maternal brain were monitored. Results indicated that fetal stem cells can not cross the blood-brain barrier to enter the maternal brain.

  10. De novo development of gliomas in a child with neurofibromatosis type 1, fragile X and previously normal brain magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Rabia; Hsiao, Esther Y.; Botteron, Kelly N.; McKinstry, Robert C.; Gutmann, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen to 20% of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 develop low-grade glial neoplasms. However, since neuroimaging is not routinely obtained until a child is clinically symptomatic, little is known about presymptomatic radiographic characteristics of gliomas in this at-risk population. Herein, we describe a child with neurofibromatosis type 1 who initially had normal brain imaging before the development of multifocal gliomas. Comparison of these serial images demonstrated that brain tumors can arise de novo in children with this cancer predisposition syndrome, further underscoring the limited prognostic value of normal baseline magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26973730

  11. Magnetofection based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-mediated low lncRNA HOTAIR expression decreases the proliferation and invasion of glioma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kan; Liu, Peifeng; Dong, Suyan; Guo, Yanjie; Cui, Xinxin; Zhu, Xiaoying; Li, Xuan; Jiang, Lianghan; Liu, Te; Wu, Yuncheng

    2016-08-01

    Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are a special subpopulation of glioma cells that are key to the sensitivity of tumors to treatments and to the possibility of tumor recurrence. Identifying new strategies that inhibit the growth of GSCs are therefore important for developing novel therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In this study, CD133+ human glioma stem cells were isolated and cultured. Magnetic nanoparticles were used to mediate the expression of siRNAs targeting the HOTAIR (si-HOTAIR) sequence in human gliomas. Effect of downregulation of HOTAIR expression on proliferation, invasion and in vivo tumorigenicity of human GSCs and underlying molecular mechanisms were further evaluated. The results of the MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis showed that downregulation of HOTAIR expression inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest. Transwell assays demonstrated that downregulation of HOTAIR expression resulted in a decrease in the invasive capability of GSCs. Moreover, magnetic nanoparticle-mediated low expression of HOTAIR effectively reduced the tumorigenic capacity of glioma stem cells in vivo. In addition, the results of qRT-PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that downregulation of HOTAIR expression significantly increased the expression of PDCD4 in GSCs, in addition to reducing the expression of CCND1 and CDK4. An in-depth mechanistic analysis showed that downregulation of HOTAIR expression reduced the recruitment of downstream molecules, EZH2 and LSD1, thereby activating the expression of PDCD4 at the transcriptional level. In conclusion, downregulation of HOTAIR expression effectively promoted the expression of PDCD4, thereby inhibiting the proliferation, invasion and in vivo tumorigenicity of human GSCs. PMID:27277755

  12. Controlling micro- and nano-environment of tumor and stem cells for novel research and therapy of brain cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher Lloyd

    The use of modern technologies in cancer research has engendered a great deal of excitement. Many of these advanced approaches involve in-depth mathematical analyses of the inner working of cells, via genomic and proteomic analyses. However these techniques may not be ideal for the study of complex cell phenotypes and behaviors. This dissertation explores cancer and potential therapies through phenotypic analysis of cell behaviors, an alternative approach. We employ this experimental framework to study brain cancer (glioma), a particularly formidable example of this diverse ailment. Through the application of micro- and nanotechnology, we carefully control the surrounding environments of cells to understand their responses to various cues and to manipulate their behaviors. Subsequently we obtain clinically relevant information that allows better understanding of glioma, and enhancement of potential therapies. We first aim to address brain tumor dispersal, through analysis of cell migration. Utilizing nanometer-scale topographic models of the extracellular matrix, we study the migratory response of glioma cells to various stimuli in vitro. Second, we implement knowledge gained from these investigations to define characteristics of tumor progression in patients, and to develop treatments inhibiting cell migration. Next we use microfluidic and nanotopographic models to study the behaviors of stem cells in vitro. Here we attempt to improve their abilities to deliver therapeutic proteins to cancer, an innovative treatment approach. We analyze the multi-step process by which adipose-derived stem cells naturally home to tumor sites, and identify numerous environmental perturbations to enhance this behavior. Finally, we attempt to demonstrate that these cell culture-based manipulations can enhance the localization of adipose stem cells to glioma in vivo using animal models. Throughout this work we utilize environmental cues to analyze and induce particular behaviors in

  13. Clinical protocols for 31P MRS of the brain and their use in evaluating optic pathway gliomas in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In vivo 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) measures phosphorus-containing metabolites that play an essential role in many disease processes. An advantage over 1H MRS is that total choline can be separated into phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine which have opposite associations with tumour grade. We demonstrate 31P MRS can provide robust metabolic information on an acceptable timescale to yield information of clinical importance. Methods: All MRI examinations were carried out on a 3T whole body scanner with all 31P MRS scans conducted using a dual-tuned 1H/31P head coil. Once optimised on phantoms, the protocol was tested in six healthy volunteers (four male and two female, mean age: 25 ± 2.7). 31P MRS was then implemented on three children with optic pathway gliomas. Results: 31P MRS on volunteers showed that a number of metabolite ratios varied significantly (p < 0.05 ANOVA) across different structures of the brain, whereas PC/GPC did not. Standard imaging showed the optic pathway gliomas were enhancing on T1-weighted imaging after contrast injection and have high tCho on 1H MRS, both of which are associated with high grade lesions. 31P MRS showed the phosphocholine/glycerophosphocholine ratio to be low (<0.6) which suggests low grade tumours in keeping with their clinical behaviour and the histology of most biopsied optic pathway gliomas. Conclusion: 31P MRS can be implemented in the brain as part of a clinical protocol to provide robust measurement of important metabolites, in particular providing a greater understanding of cases where tCho is raised on 1H MRS

  14. Development of neural stem cell in the adult brain

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Xin; Kang, Eunchai; Liu, Cindy Y.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2008-01-01

    New neurons are continuously generated in the dentate gyrus of the mammalian hippocampus and in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles throughout life. The origin of these new neurons is believed to be from multipotent adult neural stem cells. Aided by new methodologies, significant progress has been made in the characterization of neural stem cells and their development in the adult brain. Recent studies have also begun to reveal essential extrinsic and intrinsic molecular mechani...

  15. Scaffold and stem cell based modeling of brain disease

    OpenAIRE

    Karpiak, Jerome V.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular models of brain disease involve genetic modulation, geometric patterning, neurophysiologic monitoring and analyses of both primary and immortalized cell lines. Additionally, recent neurological disease models often necessitate in vitro directed differentiation and maturation of human stem cell lines. To advance human stem cell based neural disease models within this evolving field, adaptive approaches of progressive complexity are essential. First, I invented an adaptable 3D laminar ...

  16. Prognostic and predictive biomarkers in adult and paediatric gliomas: towards personalised brain tumour treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KathreenaMaryKurian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly clear that both adult and paediatric glial tumour entities represent collections of neoplastic lesions, each with individual pathological molecular events and treatment responses. In this review we discuss the current prognostic biomarkers validated for clinical use or with future clinical validity for gliomas. Accurate prognostication is crucial for managing patients as treatments may be associated with high morbidity and the benefits of high risk interventions must be judged by the treating clinicians. We also review biomarkers with predictive validity which may become clinically relevant with the development of targeted therapies for adult and paediatric gliomas.

  17. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  18. Molecular fingerprinting reflects different histotypes and brain region in low grade gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paediatric low-grade gliomas (LGGs) encompass a heterogeneous set of tumours of different histologies, site of lesion, age and gender distribution, growth potential, morphological features, tendency to progression and clinical course. Among LGGs, Pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) are the most common central nervous system (CNS) tumours in children. They are typically well-circumscribed, classified as grade I by the World Health Organization (WHO), but recurrence or progressive disease occurs in about 10-20% of cases. Despite radiological and neuropathological features deemed as classic are acknowledged, PA may present a bewildering variety of microscopic features. Indeed, tumours containing both neoplastic ganglion and astrocytic cells occur at a lower frequency. Gene expression profiling on 40 primary LGGs including PAs and mixed glial-neuronal tumours comprising gangliogliomas (GG) and desmoplastic infantile gangliogliomas (DIG) using Affymetrix array platform was performed. A biologically validated machine learning workflow for the identification of microarray-based gene signatures was devised. The method is based on a sparsity inducing regularization algorithm l1l2 that selects relevant variables and takes into account their correlation. The most significant genetic signatures emerging from gene-chip analysis were confirmed and validated by qPCR. We identified an expression signature composed by a biologically validated list of 15 genes, able to distinguish infratentorial from supratentorial LGGs. In addition, a specific molecular fingerprinting distinguishes the supratentorial PAs from those originating in the posterior fossa. Lastly, within supratentorial tumours, we also identified a gene expression pattern composed by neurogenesis, cell motility and cell growth genes which dichotomize mixed glial-neuronal tumours versus PAs. Our results reinforce previous observations about aberrant activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in LGGs, but

  19. Resecting diffuse low-grade gliomas to the boundaries of brain functions: a new concept in surgical neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffau, H

    2015-12-01

    The traditional dilemma making surgery for diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGGs) challenging is underlain by the need to optimize tumor resection in order to significantly increase survival versus the risk of permanent neurological morbidity. Development of neuroimaging led neurosurgeons to achieve tumorectomy according to the oncological limits provided by preoperative or intraoperative structural and metabolic imaging. However, this principle is not coherent, neither with the infiltrative nature of DLGGs nor with the limited resolution of current neuroimaging. Indeed, despite technical advances, MRI still underestimates the actual spatial extent of gliomas, since tumoral cells are present several millimeters to centimeters beyond the area of signal abnormalities. Furthermore, cortical and subcortical structures may be still crucial for brain functions despite their invasion by this diffuse tumoral disease. Finally, the lack of reliability of functional MRI has also been demonstrated. Therefore, to talk about "maximal safe resection" based upon neuroimaging is a non-sense, because oncological MRI does not show the tumor and functional MRI does not show critical neural pathways. This review proposes an original concept in neuro-oncological surgery, i.e. to resect DLGG to the boundaries of brain functions, thanks to intraoperative electrical mapping performed in awake patients. This paradigmatic shift from image-guided resection to functional mapping-guided resection, based upon an accurate study of brain connectomics and neuroplasticity in each patient throughout tumor removal has permitted to solve the classical dilemma, by increasing both survival and quality of life in DLGG patients. With this in mind, brain surgeons should also be neuroscientists. PMID:25907410

  20. What is the clinical value of cancer stem cell markers in gliomas?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard; Hermansen, Simon Kjær; Hansen, Steinbjørn;

    2013-01-01

    . This review summarizes current reports on putative glioma CSC markers and reviews the prognostic value of the individual immunohistochemical markers reported in the literature. Using the Pubmed database, twenty-seven CSC studies looking at membrane markers (CD133, podoplanin, CD15, and A2B5), filament...... markers (nestin), RNA-binding proteins (Musashi-1) and transcription factors (BMI1, SOX2, Id1 and Oct-4) qualified for this review. The level of CD133 and nestin increased with increasing malignancy grade, and for both markers a prognostic significance was identified in the majority of the studies...... promising. For the remaining markers CD15, A2B5, BMI1, SOX2, Id1 and Oct4, no prognostic value was found regarding overall survival in this review. In conclusion we find that CD133, nestin, CD133/nestin, podoplanin, Musashi-1 and Musashi-1/MIB1 are the most promising markers for future investigation...

  1. Methodology to assess response to stereotactic irradiation in lesions of the brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Magnetic resonance image changes were measured at various time points after patients were treated with stereotactic irradiation to brain lesions in and around the brain stem. Results were correlated with the dose of ionizing radiation given to the same anatomical region. The methodology was developed to assess its utility in predicting brain stem injury and lesion response to high-dose, single-fraction radiation treatments. Materials and Methods: We developed a computerized system for spatially correlating and analyzing changes in T1 weighted, gadolinium enhanced, 3-D magnetic resonance (MR) image sets at multiple time points after treatment with stereotactic brain irradiation. Using this system, we were able to compare post-treatment with pre-treatment images used for computerized treatment planning. The treatment planning image sets contained the dose-volume information for each treatment. The measured quantities included pixel value, size of enhanced region, and dose point value. Twelve patients, having a minimum follow-up after radiosurgery of 6 months and brain lesions of various types, were selected for review: 1 glioma, 4 juvenile pilocytic astrocytomas, 1 cavernous hemangioma, 1 ependymoma, 1 primitive neuroectodermal tumor, 1 meningioma, and 3 metastases. Patient ages ranged from 3 to 59 years at time of treatment. The prescription doses to the lesions ranged from 12 to 20 Gy. The severity and duration of complications were noted for each. Results: Image intensity changes were measured and correlated with dose on a pixel-by-pixel basis in order to plot the time course of the changes. The estimate of spatial accuracy for locating the dose and voxel of tissue was within 2 mm. The sequelae of radiologic changes to irradiation were mixed. We observed increases as well as decreases in the density of the irradiated region with time after treatment which depended on the patient. One patient had nearly complete disappearance of the enhancing

  2. Glioma stem cells are more aggressive in recurrent tumors with malignant progression than in the primary tumor, and both can be maintained long-term in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the advances made during decades of research, the mechanisms by which glioma is initiated and established remain elusive. The discovery of glioma stem cells (GSCs) may help to elucidate the processes of gliomagenesis with respect to their phenotype, differentiation and tumorigenic capacity during initiation and progression. Research on GSCs is still in its infancy, so no definitive conclusions about their role can yet be drawn. To understand the biology of GSCs fully, it is highly desirable to establish permanent and biologically stable GSC lines. In the current study, GSCs were isolated from surgical specimens of primary and recurrent glioma in a patient whose malignancy had progressed during the previous six months. The GSCs were cryopreserved and resuscitated periodically during long-term maintenance to establish glioma stem/progenitor cell (GSPC) lines, which were characterized by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and transmission electronic microscopy. The primary and recurrent GSPC lines were also compared in terms of in vivo tumorigenicity and invasiveness. Molecular genetic differences between the two lines were identified by array-based comparative genomic hybridization and further validated by real-time PCR. Two GSPC lines, SU-1 (primary) and SU-2 (recurrent), were maintained in vitro for more than 44 months and 38 months respectively. Generally, the potentials for proliferation, self-renewal and multi-differentiation remained relatively stable even after a prolonged series of alternating episodes of cryopreservation and resuscitation. Intracranial transplantation of SU-1 cells produced relatively less invasive tumor mass in athymic nude mice, while SU-2 cells led to much more diffuse and aggressive lesions strikingly recapitulated their original tumors. Neither SU-1 nor SU-2 cells reached the terminal differentiation stage under conditions that would induce terminal differentiation in neural stem cells. The differentiation of most of the tumor

  3. Drug delivery strategies to enhance the permeability of the blood–brain barrier for treatment of glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang F

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fang Zhang, Chun-Lei Xu, Chun-Mei Liu School of Pharmacy, National First-Class Key Discipline for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Gliomas are amongst the most insidious and destructive types of brain cancer and are associated with a poor prognosis, frequent recurrences, and extremely high lethality despite combination treatment of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The existence of the blood–brain barrier (BBB restricts the delivery of therapeutic molecules into the brain and offers the clinical efficacy of many pharmaceuticals that have been demonstrated to be effective for other kinds of tumors. This challenge emphasizes the need to be able to deliver drugs effectively across the BBB to reach the brain parenchyma. Enhancement of the permeability of the BBB and being able to transport drugs across it has been shown to be a promising strategy to improve drug absorption and treatment efficacy. This review highlights the innovative technologies that have been introduced to enhance the permeability of the BBB and to obtain an optimal distribution and concentration of drugs in the brain to treat gliomas, such as nanotechniques, hyperthermia techniques, receptor-mediated transport, cell-penetrating peptides, and cell-mediated delivery. Keywords: glioma, blood–brain barrier, drug delivery, nanotechnology, hyperthermia, receptor-mediated transport, cell-penetrating peptides, cell-mediated delivery

  4. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in the initially differentiating recurrent brain gliomas after radiation therapy from delayed cerebral necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in the differentiating recurrent brain gliomas after radiation therapy from delayed cerebral necrosis. Methods: Fifteen patients who had clinical and CT, MRI changes that suggested a diagnosis of delayed cerebral necrosis or recurrent brain tumor after radiation therapy and 5 patients who had a definite clinical diagnosis of delayed cerebral necrosis underwent single MR spectroscopy simultaneously both in the lesion's region and the contralateral side. Results: Of the former 15 cases who proved by surgical pathology, 14 cases were gliomas, 1 case was delayed cerebral necrosis, and their etiologic diagnoses of 1H MRS were correct. (1) 1H MRS in 14 cases with gliomas exhibited specific spectral peaks including prominent choline-containing compounds (Cho), decreased or absent acetylaspartate (NAA) and total creatine (Cr), and the metabolic ratios showed significantly increased Cho/Cr, decreased NAA/Cr. Twelve cases showed abnormal lactate (Lac). (2) Among 6 cases with delayed cerebral necrosis, 5 cases exhibited decreased or absent Cho, NAA, Cr, and abnormal Lipid, 1 case showed absent Cho, NAA, and Cr with a flat curve without Lac. Conclusion: 1H MRS was positively claimed for differentiating recurrent brain gliomas after radiation therapy from delayed cerebral necrosis

  5. Potential of anti-cancer therapy based on anti-miR-155 oligonucleotides in glioma and brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltronieri, Palmiro; D'Urso, Pietro I; Mezzolla, Valeria; D'Urso, Oscar F

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are aberrantly expressed in many cancers and can exert tumour-suppressive or oncogenic functions. As oncomirs promote growth of cancer cells and support survival during chemotherapy, thus microRNA-silencing therapies could be a valuable approach to be associated with anticancer drugs and chemotherapy treatments. miR-155 microRNA was found overexpressed in different types of cancer, such as leukaemias (PML, B-cell lymphomas), lung cancer and glioblastoma. GABA-A receptor downregulation was found correlated with glioma grading, with decreasing levels associated with higher grade of malignancies. A relationship between knock-down of miR-155 and re-expression of GABRA 1 protein in vivo was recently individuated. This finding has implication on the effectiveness of RNA-silencing approaches against miR-155 with the scope to control proliferation and signalling pathways regulated by GABA-A receptor. Applying microRNAs for treatment of brain tumours poses several problems, and fields to be solved are mainly the passage of the brain-blood barrier and the targeted delivery to specific cell types. Glioblastoma multiforme cells bud off microvesicles that deliver cytoplasmic contents to nearby cells. Thus, the exploitation of these mechanisms to deliver antagomir therapeutics targeting microvescicles in the brain could take the lead in the near future in the treatment for brain cancers in substitution of invasive surgical intervention. PMID:22834637

  6. A Synthetic Polymer Scaffold Reveals the Self-Maintenance Strategies of Rat Glioma Stem Cells by Organization of the Advantageous Niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabu, Kouichi; Muramatsu, Nozomi; Mangani, Christian; Wu, Mei; Zhang, Rong; Kimura, Taichi; Terashima, Kazuo; Bizen, Norihisa; Kimura, Ryosuke; Wang, Wenqian; Murota, Yoshitaka; Kokubu, Yasuhiro; Nobuhisa, Ikuo; Kagawa, Tetsushi; Kitabayashi, Issay; Bradley, Mark; Taga, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to be maintained within a microenvironmental niche. Here we used polymer microarrays for the rapid and efficient identification of glioma CSC (GSC) niche mimicries and identified a urethane-based synthetic polymer, upon which two groups of niche components, namely extracellular matrices (ECMs) and iron are revealed. In cultures, side population (SP) cells, defined as GSCs in the rat C6 glioma cell line, are more efficiently sustained in the presence of their differentiated progenies expressing higher levels of ECMs and transferrin, while in xenografts, ECMs are supplied by the vascular endothelial cells (VECs), including SP cell-derived ones with distinctively greater ability to retain xenobiotics than host VECs. Iron is stored in tumor infiltrating host macrophages (Mφs), whose protumoral activity is potently enhanced by SP cell-secreted soluble factor(s). Finally, coexpression of ECM-, iron-, and Mφ-related genes is found to be predictive of glioma patients' outcome. Our polymer-based approach reveals the intrinsic capacities of GSCs, to adapt the environment to organize a self-advantageous microenvironment niche, for their maintenance and expansion, which redefines the current concept of anti-CSC niche therapy and has the potential to accelerate cancer therapy development. Stem Cells 2016;34:1151-1162. PMID:26822103

  7. A systematic pipeline for the objective comparison of whole-brain spectroscopic MRI with histology in biopsy specimens from grade III glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, J. Scott; Gurbani, Saumya S.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Liang, Zhongxing; Cooper, Lee A. D.; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Neill, Stewart G.; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G.; Holder, Chad A.; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis, prognosis, and management of patients with gliomas are largely dictated by the pathological analysis of tissue biopsied from a selected region within the lesion. However, due to the heterogeneous and infiltrative nature of gliomas, identifying the optimal region for biopsy with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be quite difficult. This is especially true for low grade gliomas, which often are non-enhancing tumors. To improve the management of patients with these tumors, the field of neuro-oncology requires an imaging modality that can specifically identify a tumor’s most anaplastic/aggressive region(s) for biopsy targeting. The addition of metabolic mapping using spectroscopic MRI (sMRI) to supplement conventional MRI could improve biopsy targeting and, ultimately, diagnostic accuracy. Here, we describe a pipeline for the integration of state-of-the-art, high-resolution whole-brain 3D sMRI maps into a stereotactic neuronavigation system for guiding biopsies in gliomas with nonenhancing components. We also outline a machine-learning method for automated histology analysis that generates normalized, quantitative metrics describing tumor infiltration in immunohistochemically-stained tissue specimens. As a proof of concept, we describe the combination of these two techniques in a small cohort of grade III glioma patients. In this work, we aim to set forth a systematic pipeline to stimulate histopathology-image validation of advanced MRI techniques, such as sMRI.

  8. FasL and FADD delivery by a glioma-specific and cell cycle-dependent HSV-1 amplicon virus enhanced apoptosis in primary human brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Paula Y

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant cancer of the brain and is notoriously difficult to treat due to the highly proliferative and infiltrative nature of the cells. Herein, we explored the combination treatment of pre-established human glioma xenograft using multiple therapeutic genes whereby the gene expression is regulated by both cell-type and cell cycle-dependent transcriptional regulatory mechanism conferred by recombinant HSV-1 amplicon vectors. Results We demonstrated for the first time that Ki67-positive proliferating primary human glioma cells cultured from biopsy samples were effectively induced into cell death by the dual-specific function of the pG8-FasL amplicon vectors. These vectors were relatively stable and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity in vivo. Intracranial implantation of pre-transduced glioma cells resulted in better survival outcome when compared with viral vectors inoculated one week post-implantation of tumor cells, indicating that therapeutic efficacy is dependent on the viral spread and mode of viral vectors administration. We further showed that pG8-FasL amplicon vectors are functional in the presence of commonly used treatment regimens for human brain cancer. In fact, the combined therapies of pG8-FasL and pG8-FADD in the presence of temozolomide significantly improved the survival of mice bearing intracranial high-grade gliomas. Conclusion Taken together, our results showed that the glioma-specific and cell cycle-dependent HSV-1 amplicon vector is potentially useful as an adjuvant therapy to complement the current gene therapy strategy for gliomas.

  9. Diagnostic potential of short echo time MR spectroscopy of gliomas with single-voxel and point-resolved spatially localised proton spectroscopy of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate neuroimaging grading of gliomas is useful for management, but techniques such as MRI and CT are not sufficiently reliable. Necrosis is a consistent, decisive prognostic factor and the key diagnostic criterion for glioblastoma multiforme. MR spectroscopy (MRS) allows noninvasive measurement of metabolites in brain tumours and mobile lipids reflect necrosis. However, short echo-time (TE) spectroscopy has been required for reliable assessment of lipids, since their relaxation times are very short. Recent advances have made it possible to perform short-TE MRS. We attempted to evaluate the significance of short TE spectroscopy as part of routine imaging for diagnosis and grading of gliomas. We performed TE 30 ms MRS in 25 patients with gliomas (grade II six; grade III three; grade IV, 16) and in 19 areas of healthy white matter using proton brain examination/single voxel (PROBE/SV) and point-resolved spatially localised spectroscopy (PRESS). With short-TE spectroscopy, lipid signals were detected in all 16 tumours of grade IV, one grade II (P = 0.0002) and none of grade III (P = 0.001). TE 136 ms MRS, carried out in 20 of these cases, showed lipid signals in only four of 14 grade IV tumours and in none of the other six. N-acetylaspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) ratios were always more than 1.0 in healthy tissues and less than 1.0 in all but one of the gliomas. The mean creatine (Cr)/Cho ratio in each tumour grade was significantly lower than in the healthy tissues. The mean Cr/Cho ratio was also significantly lower in grade IV than in grade II tumours (P <.0005). Considerable overlap in Cr/Cho ratio was observed between grade II and grades III and IV gliomas at long but less so at short-TE MRS. We conclude that short-TE MRS with PROBE/SV and PRESS is of value in grading gliomas. (orig.)

  10. Role of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) in the expansion of glioma-initiating cells by fractionated radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Activation of Lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) is involved in the fractionated radiation-induced expansion of glioma stem-like cells. → Inhibition of LCK prevents acquisition of fractionated radiation-induced resistance to chemotherapeutic treatment. → LCK activity is critical for the maintenance of self-renewal in glioma stem-like cells. -- Abstract: Brain cancers frequently recur or progress as focal masses after treatment with ionizing radiation. Radiation used to target gliomas may expand the cancer stem cell population and enhance the aggressiveness of tumors; however, the mechanisms underlying the expansion of cancer stem cell population after radiation have remained unclear. In this study, we show that LCK (lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase) is involved in the fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the glioma-initiating cell population and acquisition of resistance to anticancer treatments. Fractionated radiation caused a selective increase in the activity of LCK, a Src family non-receptor tyrosine kinase. The activities of other Src family kinases Src, Fyn, and Lyn were not significantly increased. Moreover, knockdown of LCK expression with a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) effectively blocked fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the CD133+ cell population. siRNA targeting of LCK also suppressed fractionated radiation-induced expression of the glioma stem cell marker proteins CD133, Nestin, and Musashi. Expression of the known self-renewal-related proteins Notch2 and Sox2 in glioma cells treated with fractionated radiation was also downregulated by LCK inhibition. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of LCK effectively restored the sensitivity of glioma cells to cisplatin and etoposide. These results indicate that the non-receptor tyrosine kinase LCK is critically involved in fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the glioma-initiating cell population and decreased cellular

  11. Concurrent split or continuous course partial brain radiotherapy increases the hematologic toxicity from systemic chemotherapy in malignant glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To assess whether split and continuous course partial brain radiotherapy increases hematologic toxicity from concomitant systemic chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: Myelosuppression was assessed on two sequential therapeutic protocols for malignant glioma that differed only in the timing of RT. In the first protocol (37 pts), partial brain RT began one month after completion of three monthly cycles of systemic BCNU (120 mg/m2) and cisplatin (120 mg/m2). RT was 51 Gy in 17 fractions with a planned 2 week break after 30 Gy. In the second study (24 pts), RT was given concurrently with the start of the same chemotherapy regimen. Twelve of these patients were treated with the split course regimen, while twelve received conventionally fractionated continuous course radiotherapy (59.4-60 Gy in 30-33 fractions). A model was developed to describe the fractionated radiation dose received by circulating blood elements. Results: The incidence and severity of grade (3(4)) leukopenia was significantly increased with concurrent rather than sequential RT: Grade III/IV leukopenia [(19(24)) (79%) vs. (14(37)) (38%), p < .001], mean nadir (2.3 vs. 1.4, p < .001); and mean total length of grade III/IV leukopenia (15 vs. 2 days, p < .001). These differences remained highly significant when the sequentially treated patients were compared with concurrently treated patients receiving either the split course or continuous course RT regimen. Among concurrently treated patients there was no clinically or statistically significant difference between those treated with continuous course or split course RT. There was no effect of concurrent radiotherapy on incidence or severity of thrombocytopenia (73% required transfusion; median 15 units) or anemia (84% required transfusion; median 4 units). During this treatment, depending upon the volume of brain included, a maximal mean dose of up to 9 Gy was given to circulating blood elements, whereas only a negligible amount of

  12. Motor Network Plasticity and Low-Frequency Oscillations Abnormalities in Patients with Brain Gliomas: A Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chen; Zhang, Ming; Min, Zhigang; Rana, Netra; Zhang, Qiuli; Liu, Xin; Li, Min; Lin, Pan

    2014-01-01

    Brain plasticity is often associated with the process of slow-growing tumor formation, which remodels neural organization and optimizes brain network function. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether motor function plasticity would display deficits in patients with slow-growing brain tumors located in or near motor areas, but who were without motor neurological deficits. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to probe motor networks in 15 patients with histopathologically confirmed brain gliomas and 15 age-matched healthy controls. All subjects performed a motor task to help identify individual motor activity in the bilateral primary motor cortex (PMC) and supplementary motor area (SMA). Frequency-based analysis at three different frequencies was then used to investigate possible alterations in the power spectral density (PSD) of low-frequency oscillations. For each group, the average PSD was determined for each brain region and a nonparametric test was performed to determine the difference in power between the two groups. Significantly reduced inter-hemispheric functional connectivity between the left and right PMC was observed in patients compared with controls (P<0.05). We also found significantly decreased PSD in patients compared to that in controls, in all three frequency bands (low: 0.01–0.02 Hz; middle: 0.02–0.06 Hz; and high: 0.06–0.1 Hz), at three key motor regions. These findings suggest that in asymptomatic patients with brain tumors located in eloquent regions, inter-hemispheric connection may be more vulnerable. A comparison of the two approaches indicated that power spectral analysis is more sensitive than functional connectivity analysis for identifying the neurological abnormalities underlying motor function plasticity induced by slow-growing tumors. PMID:24806463

  13. Motor network plasticity and low-frequency oscillations abnormalities in patients with brain gliomas: a functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Niu

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity is often associated with the process of slow-growing tumor formation, which remodels neural organization and optimizes brain network function. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether motor function plasticity would display deficits in patients with slow-growing brain tumors located in or near motor areas, but who were without motor neurological deficits. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to probe motor networks in 15 patients with histopathologically confirmed brain gliomas and 15 age-matched healthy controls. All subjects performed a motor task to help identify individual motor activity in the bilateral primary motor cortex (PMC and supplementary motor area (SMA. Frequency-based analysis at three different frequencies was then used to investigate possible alterations in the power spectral density (PSD of low-frequency oscillations. For each group, the average PSD was determined for each brain region and a nonparametric test was performed to determine the difference in power between the two groups. Significantly reduced inter-hemispheric functional connectivity between the left and right PMC was observed in patients compared with controls (P<0.05. We also found significantly decreased PSD in patients compared to that in controls, in all three frequency bands (low: 0.01-0.02 Hz; middle: 0.02-0.06 Hz; and high: 0.06-0.1 Hz, at three key motor regions. These findings suggest that in asymptomatic patients with brain tumors located in eloquent regions, inter-hemispheric connection may be more vulnerable. A comparison of the two approaches indicated that power spectral analysis is more sensitive than functional connectivity analysis for identifying the neurological abnormalities underlying motor function plasticity induced by slow-growing tumors.

  14. Yoga Therapy in Treating Patients With Malignant Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-27

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  15. Conditioned Media from Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Efficiently Induced the Apoptosis and Differentiation in Human Glioma Cell Lines In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have an intrinsic property for homing towards tumor sites and can be used as tumor-tropic vectors for tumor therapy. But very limited studies investigated the antitumor properties of MSCs themselves. In this study we investigated the antiglioma properties of two easily accessible MSCs, namely, human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs and umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs. We found (1 MSC conditioned media can significantly inhibit the growth of human U251 glioma cell line; (2 MSC conditioned media can significantly induce apoptosis in human U251 cell line; (3 real-time PCR experiments showed significant upregulation of apoptotic genes of both caspase-3 and caspase-9 and significant downregulation of antiapoptotic genes such as survivin and XIAP after MSC conditioned media induction in U 251 cells; (4 furthermore, MSCs conditioned media culture induced rapid and complete differentiation in U251 cells. These results indicate MSCs can efficiently induce both apoptosis and differentiation in U251 human glioma cell line. Whereas UC-MSCs are more efficient for apoptosis induction than ASCs, their capability of differentiation induction is not distinguishable from each other. Our findings suggest MSCs themselves have favorable antitumor characteristics and should be further explored in future glioma therapy.

  16. Chemoresistance and chemotherapy targeting stem-like cells in malignant glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mia Dahl; Fosmark, Sigurd; Hellwege, Sofie;

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains a tumor with a dismal prognosis because of failure of current treatment. Glioblastoma cells with stem cell (GSC) properties survive chemotherapy and give rise to tumor recurrences that invariably result in the death of the patients. Here we summarize the current knowledge on ...

  17. Distribution of tumor stem cell and the relationship with p53 and MGMT in glioma%胶质瘤中肿瘤干细胞的分布及与p53、MGMT的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯金; 胡喜梅; 周水阳; 何杰; 朱海清

    2011-01-01

    Objective :To investigate the expression of tumor stem cell marker CD133 in glioma tissues and the relationship with p53 and MGMT. Methods : Expressions of CD133 , p53 and MGMT in 45 cases of glioma tissues were detected by immunohistochemcal method. Results : CD133 could be observed in glioma tissues , and there was a significant difference between the expression of CD133 in high malignant gliomas and that in low malignant gliomas ( P < 0. 05 ). The differences of p53 and MGMT expressions were statistically significant in the CD133 - positive glioma group and the CD133 - negative glioma group( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion : Tumor stem cell could be detected in glioma, and can serve as an important marker in evaluating glioma malignancy and prognoses.%目的:探讨胶质瘤中肿瘤干细胞标志物CD133的表达及其与p53、MGMT的关系.方法:采用免疫组化法检测45例不同病理级别胶质瘤标本中CD133和 p53、MGMT蛋白的表达.结果:CD133在各病理级别的胶质瘤中均有表达,高恶性度组中CD133表达高于低恶性度组(P<0.05).在CD133阳性组中p53、MGMT的表达明显高于CD133阴性组(P均<0.05).结论:不同恶性程度的胶质瘤标本中均存在肿瘤干细胞,肿瘤干细胞可作为判断胶质瘤恶性程度和预后的重要指标.

  18. Gene regulatory networks in embryonic stem cells and brain development

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Dhimankrishna; Yan, Xiaowei; Tian, Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are endowed with the ability to generate multiple cell lineages and carries great therapeutic potentials in regenerative medicines. Future application of ESCs in human health and diseases will embark on the delineation of molecular mechanisms that define the biology of ESCs. Here we discuss how the finite ESC components mediate the intriguing task of brain development and exhibits biomedical potentials to cure diverse neurological disorders.

  19. Pediatric brain stem tumors: analysis of 25 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charts of 25 pediatric patients with brain stem tumors have been reviewed. The use of computed tomography was found to have been valuable in diagnosis and follow-up, as well as in the design of radiation therapy portals. Radiotherapy and combination chemotherapy with VM-26 (4'-1 demethyl-epipodophyllo toxin B-D-thenylidene glucoside) and CCNU(1-2-chloroethyl-methyl-3-Cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea) were the treatment employed. (M.A.C.)

  20. High linear-energy-transfer radiation can overcome radioresistance of glioma stem-like cells to low linear-energy-transfer radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is applied as the standard treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, radiotherapy remains merely palliative, not curative, because of the existence of glioma stem cells (GSCs), which are regarded as highly radioresistant to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) photons. Here we analyzed whether or not high-LET particles can overcome the radioresistance of GSCs. Glioma stem-like cells (GSLCs) were induced from the GBM cell line A172 in stem cell culture medium. The phenotypes of GSLCs and wild-type cells were confirmed using stem cell markers. These cells were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays or reactor neutron beams. Under neutron-beam irradiation, high-LET proton particles can be produced through elastic scattering or nitrogen capture reaction. Radiosensitivity was assessed by a colony-forming assay, and the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were assessed by a histone gamma-H2AX focus detection assay. In stem cell culture medium, GSLCs could form neurosphere-like cells and express neural stem cell markers (Sox2 and Musashi) abundantly in comparison with their parental cells. GSLCs were significantly more radioresistant to gamma rays than their parental cells, but neutron beams overcame this resistance. There were significantly fewer gamma-H2AX foci in the A172 GSLCs 24 h after irradiation with gamma rays than in their parental cultured cells, while there was no apparent difference following neutron-beam irradiation. High-LET radiation can overcome the radioresistance of GSLCs by producing unrepairable DNA DSBs. High-LET radiation therapy might have the potential to overcome GBM's resistance to X-rays in a clinical setting. (author)

  1. A Systematic Comparison Identifies an ATP-Based Viability Assay as Most Suitable Read-Out for Drug Screening in Glioma Stem-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijn, A.; Kloezeman, J. J.; Balvers, R. K.; van der Kaaij, M.; Dirven, C. M. F.; Leenstra, S.; Lamfers, M. L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Serum-free culture methods for patient-derived primary glioma cultures, selecting for glioma stem-like cells (GSCs), are becoming the gold standard in neurooncology research. These GSCs can be implemented in drug screens to detect patient-specific responses, potentially bridging the translational gap to personalized medicine. Since numerous compounds are available, a rapid and reliable readout for drug efficacies is required. This can be done using approaches that measure viability, confluency, cytotoxicity, or apoptosis. To determine which assay is best suitable for drug screening, 10 different assays were systematically tested on established glioma cell lines and validated on a panel of GSCs. General applicability was assessed using distinct treatment modalities, being temozolomide, radiation, rapamycin, and the oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD. The apoptosis and cytotoxicity assays did not unequivocally detect responses and were excluded from further testing. The NADH- and ATP-based viability assays revealed comparable readout for all treatments; however, the latter had smaller standard deviations and direct readout. Importantly, drugs that interfere with cell metabolism require alternative techniques such as confluency monitoring to accurately measure treatment effects. Taken together, our data suggest that the combination of ATP luminescence assays with confluency monitoring provides the most specific and reproducible readout for drug screening on primary GSCs.

  2. Glioma Cells in the Tumor Periphery Have a Stem Cell Phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe, Sune; Petterson, Stine Asferg; Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard;

    2016-01-01

    panel of markers was used. The panel comprised of six stem cell-related markers (CD133, Musashi-1, Bmi-1, Sox-2, Nestin and Glut-3), a proliferation marker (Ki-67) as well as a chemo-resistance marker (MGMT). Computer-based automated classifiers were designed to measure the mIDH1 positive nucleus area...... cell markers, however for most markers at a significantly lower level than in the tumor core. The Ki-67 level was slightly reduced in the periphery, whereas the MGMT level was similar. In orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts all markers showed similar levels in the core and periphery. In conclusion tumor...

  3. Rescue of Brain Function Using Tunneling Nanotubes Between Neural Stem Cells and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Xie, Chong; Tan, Zijian; Tian, Qi; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Mingyuan; Guan, Yangtai

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that neural stem cells (NSCs) can ameliorate cerebral ischemia in animal models. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying one of the neuroprotective effects of NSCs: tunneling nanotube (TNT) formation. We addressed whether the control of cell-to-cell communication processes between NSCs and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and, particularly, the control of TNT formation could influence the rescue function of stem cells. In an attempt to mimic the cellular microenvironment in vitro, a co-culture system consisting of terminally differentiated BMECs from mice in a distressed state and NSCs was constructed. Additionally, engraftment experiments with infarcted mouse brains revealed that control of TNT formation influenced the effects of stem cell transplantation in vivo. In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that TNTs exist between NSCs and BMECs and that regulation of TNT formation alters cell function. PMID:26041660

  4. Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Is a Prognostic Marker for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Cytosine Deaminase Gene and 5-Fluorocytosine Prodrug Therapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Taemoon; Na, Juri; Kim, Young-il; Chang, Da-Young; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Hyeonjin; Moon, Ho Eun; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Paek, Sun Ha; Youn, Hyewon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated a therapeutic strategy for recurrent malignant gliomas using mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), expressing cytosine deaminase (CD), and prodrug 5-Fluorocytosine (5-FC) as a more specific and less toxic option. MSCs are emerging as a novel cell therapeutic agent with a cancer-targeting property, and CD is considered a promising enzyme in cancer gene therapy which can convert non-toxic 5-FC to toxic 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Therefore, use of prodrug 5-FC can minimize normal cell toxicity. Analyses of microarrays revealed that targeting DNA damage and its repair is a selectable option for gliomas after the standard chemo/radio-therapy. 5-FU is the most frequently used anti-cancer drug, which induces DNA breaks. Because dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) was reported to be involved in 5-FU metabolism to block DNA damage, we compared the survival rate with 5-FU treatment and the level of DPD expression in 15 different glioma cell lines. DPD-deficient cells showed higher sensitivity to 5-FU, and the regulation of DPD level by either siRNA or overexpression was directly related to the 5-FU sensitivity. For MSC/CD with 5-FC therapy, DPD-deficient cells such as U87MG, GBM28, and GBM37 showed higher sensitivity compared to DPD-high U373 cells. Effective inhibition of tumor growth was also observed in an orthotopic mouse model using DPD- deficient U87MG, indicating that DPD gene expression is indeed closely related to the efficacy of MSC/CD-mediated 5-FC therapy. Our results suggested that DPD can be used as a biomarker for selecting glioma patients who may possibly benefit from this therapy. PMID:27446484

  5. Nuclear microprobe determination of platinum quantitative distribution in rat brain tumors after cisplatin or carboplatin injection for PAT treatment of glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.; Biston, M.-C.; Devès, G.; Bohic, S.; Carmona, A.

    2005-04-01

    Conventional radiotherapy of high-grade glioma is unsuccessful since less than 50% of patients survive at 6 months, therefore glioma treatment is still challenging. A new radiotherapy procedure has been recently proposed, the photoactivation therapy (PAT), associating synchrotron radiation with a chemotherapy agent, such as cisplatin. PAT aims at using the monochromaticity and the very high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation for selective excitation of a high-Z compound introduced in tumor cell DNA to maximize the photoelectric effect probability, thus increasing local toxicity. Synchrotron irradiation of cisplatin at the platinum absorption K-edge resulted in a dramatic increase in life span relative to median survival time in the F98 glioma model in Fisher rat. In the purpose to optimize the platinum concentration into the tumor, the platinum content of irradiated target needs to be quantified. These results will enable to correlate injected dose to cellular platinum content in the tumor at the time of irradiation, and to study the spatial diffusion and distribution of the platinum into the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissues from the point of injection. Male Fisher 344 rats were inoculated with 103 F98 glioma cells. Thirteen days after stereotactic inoculation, intracerebral injection at the tumor site of 40 μg of carboplatin and 3 or 5 μg of cisplatin was performed. Platinum quantitative distribution in tumors and adjacent brain tissues was determined using μ-PIXE and μ-RBS analysis.

  6. Nuclear microprobe determination of platinum quantitative distribution in rat brain tumors after cisplatin or carboplatin injection for PAT treatment of glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, R. [Chimie Nucleaire Analytique Bioenvironnementale, UMR 5084 CNRS/Universite de Bordeaux 1, Gradignan 33175 (France)]. E-mail: ortega@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Biston, M.-C. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale ' Rayonnement Synchrotron et Recherche Medicale' and ID17 Medical Beamline, ESRF, Grenoble (France); Deves, G. [Chimie Nucleaire Analytique Bioenvironnementale, UMR 5084 CNRS/Universite de Bordeaux 1, Gradignan 33175 (France); Bohic, S. [ID22 Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Carmona, A. [Chimie Nucleaire Analytique Bioenvironnementale, UMR 5084 CNRS/Universite de Bordeaux 1, Gradignan 33175 (France); Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-04-01

    Conventional radiotherapy of high-grade glioma is unsuccessful since less than 50% of patients survive at 6 months, therefore glioma treatment is still challenging. A new radiotherapy procedure has been recently proposed, the photoactivation therapy (PAT), associating synchrotron radiation with a chemotherapy agent, such as cisplatin. PAT aims at using the monochromaticity and the very high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation for selective excitation of a high-Z compound introduced in tumor cell DNA to maximize the photoelectric effect probability, thus increasing local toxicity. Synchrotron irradiation of cisplatin at the platinum absorption K-edge resulted in a dramatic increase in life span relative to median survival time in the F98 glioma model in Fisher rat. In the purpose to optimize the platinum concentration into the tumor, the platinum content of irradiated target needs to be quantified. These results will enable to correlate injected dose to cellular platinum content in the tumor at the time of irradiation, and to study the spatial diffusion and distribution of the platinum into the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissues from the point of injection. Male Fisher 344 rats were inoculated with 10{sup 3} F98 glioma cells. Thirteen days after stereotactic inoculation, intracerebral injection at the tumor site of 40 {mu}g of carboplatin and 3 or 5 {mu}g of cisplatin was performed. Platinum quantitative distribution in tumors and adjacent brain tissues was determined using {mu}-PIXE and {mu}-RBS analysis.

  7. Cilengitide in Treating Children With Refractory Primary Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  8. NI-643D-PRINTED MRI-BASED CUSTOM BRAIN MOLDS FOR MINIMIZING TISSUE DISTORTION AND PRECISELY SLICING TISSUE FOR CO-REGISTRATION WITH CLINICALLY ACQUIRED MRI IN GLIOMA PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Pellatt, Brian; Mickevicius, Nikolai; Cochran, Elizabeth; LaViolette, Peter

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Precise co-registration of brain tissue and medical imaging is critical for validation of novel imaging biomarkers meant to detect infiltrative brain cancer. Brain tissue distortion during fixation, and brain slicing in sub-optimal orientation can complicate co-registration. METHODS: Three high-grade glioma patients undergoing brain only autopsies were included in this analysis. A clinically acquired MRI was used to render 3D computer assisted drafting (CAD) models. To generate ...

  9. The role of autophagy in sensitizing malignant glioma cells to radiation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenzhuo Zhuang; Zhenghong Qin; Zhongqin Liang

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gliomas representthe majority of primary brain tumors.The current standard treatments for malignant gliomas include surgical resection,radiation therapy,and chemotherapy.Radiotherapy,a standard adjuvant therapy,confers some survival advantages,but resistance of the glioma cells to the efficacy of radiation limits the success of the treatment.The mechanisms underlying glioma cell radioresistance have remained elusive.Autophagy is a protein degradation system characterized by a prominent formation of double-membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm.Recent studies suggest that autophagy may be important in the regulation of cancer development and progression and in determining the response of tumor cells to anticancer therapy.Also,autophagy is a novel response of glioma cells to ionizing radiation.Autophagic cell death is considered programmed cell death type Ⅱ,whereas apoptosis is programmed cell death type Ⅰ.These two types of cell death are predominantly distinctive,but many studies demonstrate a cross-talk between them.Whether autophagy in cancer cells causes death or protects cells is controversial.The regulatory pathways of autophagy share several molecules.P13K/Akt/Mtor,DNA-PK,tumor suppressor genes, mitochondrial damage,and lysosome may play important roles in radiation-induced autophagy in glioma cells.Recently,a highly tumorigenic glioma tumor subpopulation,termed cancer stem cell or tumor-initiating cell,has been shown to promote therapeutic resistance.This review summarizes the main mediators associated with radiation-induced autophagy in malignant glioma cells and discusses the implications of the cancer stem cell hypothesis for the development of future therapies for brain tumors.

  10. PET pharmacokinetic analysis to estimate boron concentration in tumor and brain as a guide to plan BNCT for malignant cerebral glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: To plan the optimal BNCT for patients with malignant cerebral glioma, estimation of the ratio of boron concentration in tumor tissue against that in the surrounding normal brain (T/N ratio of boron) is important. We report a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method to estimate T/N ratio of tissue boron concentration based on pharmacokinetic analysis of amino acid probes. Methods: Twelve patients with cerebral malignant glioma underwent 60 min dynamic PET scanning of brain after bolus injection of 18F-borono-phenyl-alanine (FBPA) with timed arterial blood sampling. Using kinetic parameter obtained by this scan, T/N ratio of boron concentration elicited by one-hour constant infusion of BPA, as performed in BNCT, was simulated on Runge-Kutta algorithm. 11C-methionine (MET) PET scan, which is commonly used in worldwide PET center as brain tumor imaging tool, was also performed on the same day to compare the image characteristics of FBPA and that of MET. Result: PET glioma images obtained with FBPA and MET are almost identical in all patients by visual inspection. Estimated T/N ratio of tissue boron concentration after one-hour constant infusion of BPA, T/N ratio of FBPA on static condition, and T/N ratio of MET on static condition showed significant linear correlation between each other. Conclusion: T/N ratio of boron concentration that is obtained by constant infusion of BPA during BNCT can be estimated by FBPA PET scan. This ratio can also be estimated by MET-PET imaging. As MET-PET study is available in many clinical PET center, selection of candidates for BNCT may be possible by MET-PET images. Accurate planning of BNCT may be performed by static images of FBPA PET. Use of PET imaging with amino acid probes may contribute very much to establish an appropriate application of BNCT for patients with malignant glioma.

  11. PET pharmacokinetic analysis to estimate boron concentration in tumor and brain as a guide to plan BNCT for malignant cerebral glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nariai, Tadashi [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: nariai.nsrg@tmd.ac.jp; Ishiwata, Kiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Nakacho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Kimura, Yuichi [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba (Japan); Inaji, Motoki; Momose, Toshiya [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Igaraki (Japan); Ishii, Kenji [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Nakacho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Ohno, Kikuo [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    Introduction: To plan the optimal BNCT for patients with malignant cerebral glioma, estimation of the ratio of boron concentration in tumor tissue against that in the surrounding normal brain (T/N ratio of boron) is important. We report a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method to estimate T/N ratio of tissue boron concentration based on pharmacokinetic analysis of amino acid probes. Methods: Twelve patients with cerebral malignant glioma underwent 60 min dynamic PET scanning of brain after bolus injection of {sup 18}F-borono-phenyl-alanine (FBPA) with timed arterial blood sampling. Using kinetic parameter obtained by this scan, T/N ratio of boron concentration elicited by one-hour constant infusion of BPA, as performed in BNCT, was simulated on Runge-Kutta algorithm. {sup 11}C-methionine (MET) PET scan, which is commonly used in worldwide PET center as brain tumor imaging tool, was also performed on the same day to compare the image characteristics of FBPA and that of MET. Result: PET glioma images obtained with FBPA and MET are almost identical in all patients by visual inspection. Estimated T/N ratio of tissue boron concentration after one-hour constant infusion of BPA, T/N ratio of FBPA on static condition, and T/N ratio of MET on static condition showed significant linear correlation between each other. Conclusion: T/N ratio of boron concentration that is obtained by constant infusion of BPA during BNCT can be estimated by FBPA PET scan. This ratio can also be estimated by MET-PET imaging. As MET-PET study is available in many clinical PET center, selection of candidates for BNCT may be possible by MET-PET images. Accurate planning of BNCT may be performed by static images of FBPA PET. Use of PET imaging with amino acid probes may contribute very much to establish an appropriate application of BNCT for patients with malignant glioma.

  12. The taxonomy of brain cancer stem cells: what's in a name?

    OpenAIRE

    Gutmann, David H.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing recognition that stem cells play vital roles in the formation, maintenance, and potential targeted treatment of brain tumors, there has been an exponential increase in basic laboratory and translational research on these cell types. However, there are several different classes of stem cells germane to brain cancer, each with distinct capabilities and functions. In this perspective, we discuss the types of stem cells relevant to brain tumor pathogenesis, and suggest a nomen...

  13. Brain tumor stem cells as research and treatment targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most malignant forms of human cancer. Despite intensive treatment, the mean survival of GBM patients remains about 1 year. Recent cancer studies revealed that cancer tissues are pathologically heterogeneous and only a small population of cells has the specific ability to reinitiate cancer. This small cell population is called cancer stem cells (CSCs); in brain tumors these are known as brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs). The identification of BTSCs yielded new insights into chemo- and radioresistance, by which BTSCs can survive selectively and initiate recurrence. Research focused on BTSCs as treatment targets may contribute to the discovery of new therapeutic strategies. Clinical and basic research studies gradually led to improved outcomes in patients with brain tumors. Stupp et al. reported a mean survival of 14.6 months in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with radiotherapy plus temozolomide and 12.1 months in those subjected to radiotherapy alone. Earlier cancer therapies primarily targeted rapidly dividing cells but not minor populations of slowly dividing cells that contain BTSCs. Accumulating evidence suggests that BTSCs may represent an excellent tool for discovering new strategies to treat GBM patients. In this review, we present evidence supporting the CSC model of tumor progression, and discuss difficulties encountered in CSC research and experimental and therapeutic implications. (author)

  14. The effects of stress on brain and adrenal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Celis, M F R; Bornstein, S R; Androutsellis-Theotokis, A; Andoniadou, C L; Licinio, J; Wong, M-L; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M

    2016-05-01

    The brain and adrenal are critical control centers that maintain body homeostasis under basal and stress conditions, and orchestrate the body's response to stress. It is noteworthy that patients with stress-related disorders exhibit increased vulnerability to mental illness, even years after the stress experience, which is able to generate long-term changes in the brain's architecture and function. High levels of glucocorticoids produced by the adrenal cortex of the stressed subject reduce neurogenesis, which contributes to the development of depression. In support of the brain-adrenal connection in stress, many (but not all) depressed patients have alterations in the components of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (LHPA) axis, with enlarged adrenal cortex and increased glucocorticoid levels. Other psychiatric disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder and depression, are also associated with abnormalities in hippocampal volume and hippocampal function. In addition, hippocampal lesions impair the regulation of the LHPA axis in stress response. Our knowledge of the functional connection between stress, brain function and adrenal has been further expanded by two recent, independent papers that elucidate the effects of stress on brain and adrenal stem cells, showing similarities in the way that the progenitor populations of these organs behave under stress, and shedding more light into the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the adaptation of tissues to stress. PMID:26809844

  15. Definition of genetic events directing the development of distinct types of brain tumors from postnatal neural stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwig, Falk; Meyer, Katharina; Braun, Sebastian; Ek, Sara; Spang, Rainer; Pfenninger, Cosima V; Artner, Isabella; Prost, Gaëlle; Chen, Xinbin; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Judkins, Alexander R; Englund, Elisabet; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2012-07-01

    Although brain tumors are classified and treated based upon their histology, the molecular factors involved in the development of various tumor types remain unknown. In this study, we show that the type and order of genetic events directs the development of gliomas, central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid-like tumors from postnatal mouse neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC/NPC). We found that the overexpression of specific genes led to the development of these three different brain tumors from NSC/NPCs, and manipulation of the order of genetic events was able to convert one established tumor type into another. In addition, loss of the nuclear chromatin-remodeling factor SMARCB1 in rhabdoid tumors led to increased phosphorylation of eIF2α, a central cytoplasmic unfolded protein response (UPR) component, suggesting a role for the UPR in these tumors. Consistent with this, application of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib led to an increase in apoptosis of human cells with reduced SMARCB1 levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that the order of genetic events determines the phenotypes of brain tumors derived from a common precursor cell pool, and suggest that the UPR may represent a therapeutic target in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors. PMID:22719073

  16. Neurological Impairment Linked with Cortico-Subcortical Infiltration of Diffuse Low-Grade Gliomas at Initial Diagnosis Supports Early Brain Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Anja; Zetterling, Maria; Lundin, Margareta; Melin, Beatrice; Fahlström, Markus; Grabowska, Anna; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGG) are slow-growing brain tumors that in spite of an indolent behavior at onset show a continuous expansion over time and inevitably transform into malignant gliomas. Extensive tumor resections may be performed with preservation of neurological function due to neuroplasticity that is induced by the slow tumor growth. However, DLGG prefer to migrate along subcortical pathways, and white matter plasticity is considerably more limited than gray matter plasticity. Whether signs of functional decompensating white matter that may be found as early as at disease presentation has not been systematically studied. Here, we examined 52 patients who presented with a DLGG at the time of radiological diagnosis. We found a significant correlation between neurological impairment and eloquent cortico-subcortical tumor localization, but not between neurological function and tumor volume. These results suggest that even small tumors invading white matter pathways may lack compensatory mechanisms for functional reorganization already at disease presentation. PMID:26113841

  17. Genetic Alterations in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor and have a dismal prognosis. Understanding the genetic alterations that drive glioma formation and progression may help improve patient prognosis by identification of novel treatment targets. Recently, two major studies have performed in-depth mutation analysis of glioblastomas (the most common and aggressive subtype of glioma). This systematic approach revealed three major pathways that are affected in glioblastomas: The receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway, the TP53 pathway and the pRB pathway. Apart from frequent mutations in the IDH1/2 gene, much less is known about the causal genetic changes of grade II and III (anaplastic) gliomas. Exceptions include TP53 mutations and fusion genes involving the BRAF gene in astrocytic and pilocytic glioma subtypes, respectively. In this review, we provide an update on all common events involved in the initiation and/or progression across the different subtypes of glioma and provide future directions for research into the genetic changes

  18. The BRAIN Initiative Provides a Unifying Context for Integrating Core STEM Competencies into a Neurobiology Course

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative introduced by the Obama Administration in 2013 presents a context for integrating many STEM competencies into undergraduate neuroscience coursework. The BRAIN Initiative core principles overlap with core STEM competencies identified by the AAAS Vision and Change report and other entities. This neurobiology course utilizes the BRAIN Initiative to serve as the unifying theme that facilitates a primary emphasis ...

  19. In vivo near-infrared imaging for the tracking of systemically delivered mesenchymal stem cells: tropism for brain tumors and biodistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Seong Muk Kim,1 Chang Hyun Jeong,2 Ji Sun Woo,2 Chung Heon Ryu,1 Jeong-Hwa Lee,3 Sin-Soo Jeun1,21Postech-Catholic Biomedical Engineering Institute, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; 3Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, KoreaAbstract: Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based gene therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of various neurological diseases, including brain tumors. However, the tracking of in vivo stem cell migration, distribution, and survival need to be defined for their clinical application. The systemic routes of stem cell delivery must be determined because direct intracerebral injection as a cure for brain tumors is an invasive method. In this study, we show for the first time that near-infrared (NIR imaging can reveal the distribution and tumor tropism of intravenously injected MSCs in an intracranial xenograft glioma model. MSCs were labeled with NIR fluorescent nanoparticles, and the effects of the NIR dye on cell proliferation and migratory capacity were evaluated in vitro. We investigated the tumor-targeting properties and tissue distribution of labeled MSCs introduced by intravenous injection and followed by in vivo imaging analysis, histological analysis, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed no cytotoxicity or change in the overall growth rate and characteristics of labeled MSCs compared with control MSCs. NIR fluorescent imaging showed the organ distribution and targeted tumor tropism of systemically injected human MSCs. A significant number of MSCs accumulated specifically at the tumor site in the mouse brain. These results suggest that NIR-based cell tracking is a potentially useful imaging technique to visualize cell survival, migration, and distribution for the application of MSC

  20. Cellular host responses to gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Najbauer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a 'network' with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a 'pair-wise' manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b high-generation xenografts (fifth passage had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with 'glomerulus-like' microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  1. Brain micro-ecologies: neural stem cell niches in the adult mammalian brain

    OpenAIRE

    Riquelme, Patricio A; Drapeau, Elodie; Doetsch, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    Neurogenesis persists in two germinal regions in the adult mammalian brain, the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone in the hippocampal formation. Within these two neurogenic niches, specialized astrocytes are neural stem cells, capable of self-renewing and generating neurons and glia. Cues within the niche, from cell–cell interactions to diffusible factors, are spatially and temporally coordinated to regulate proliferation and neurogenesis, ultimately affect...

  2. Mapping the calcitonin receptor in human brain stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Rebekah L; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard L M; Tajti, János; Edvinsson, Lars; Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S

    2016-05-01

    The calcitonin receptor (CTR) is relevant to three hormonal systems: amylin, calcitonin, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Receptors for amylin and calcitonin are targets for treating obesity, diabetes, and bone disorders. CGRP receptors represent a target for pain and migraine. Amylin receptors (AMY) are a heterodimer formed by the coexpression of CTR with receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). CTR with RAMP1 responds potently to both amylin and CGRP. The brain stem is a major site of action for circulating amylin and is a rich site of CGRP binding. This study aimed to enhance our understanding of these hormone systems by mapping CTR expression in the human brain stem, specifically the medulla oblongata. Widespread CTR-like immunoreactivity was observed throughout the medulla. Dense CTR staining was noted in several discrete nuclei, including the nucleus of the solitary tract, the hypoglossal nucleus, the cuneate nucleus, spinal trigeminal nucleus, the gracile nucleus, and the inferior olivary nucleus. CTR staining was also observed in the area postrema, the lateral reticular nucleus, and the pyramidal tract. The extensive expression of CTR in the medulla suggests that CTR may be involved in a wider range of functions than currently appreciated. PMID:26911465

  3. Cytokine Immunopathogenesis of Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Min Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is one of the most important causes of herpangina and hand, foot, and mouth disease. It can also cause severe complications of the central nervous system (CNS. Brain stem encephalitis with pulmonary edema is the severe complication that can lead to death. EV71 replicates in leukocytes, endothelial cells, and dendritic cells resulting in the production of immune and inflammatory mediators that shape innate and acquired immune responses and the complications of disease. Cytokines, as a part of innate immunity, favor the development of antiviral and Th1 immune responses. Cytokines and chemokines play an important role in the pathogenesis EV71 brain stem encephalitis. Both the CNS and the systemic inflammatory responses to infection play important, but distinctly different, roles in the pathogenesis of EV71 pulmonary edema. Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and milrinone, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has been shown to modulate inflammation, to reduce sympathetic overactivity, and to improve survival in patients with EV71 autonomic nervous system dysregulation and pulmonary edema.

  4. Location of cat brain stem neurons that drive sweating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafton, Anthony D; McAllen, Robin M

    2013-05-15

    The brain stem premotor pathways controlling most noncardiovascular sympathetic outflows are unknown. Here, we mapped the brain stem neurons that drive sweating, by microinjecting excitant amino acid (L-glutamate or D,L-homocysteate: 0.4-3 nmol) into 420 sites over the pons and medulla of eight chloralose-anesthetized cats (70 mg/kg iv). Sweating was recorded by the electrodermal potential at the ipsilateral forepaw pad. Responses were classified as immediate (10 s latency). Immediate responses were obtained from 16 sites (1-3 per animal) and were accompanied by no change in blood pressure. Those sites were clustered between the facial nucleus and the pyramidal tract in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVMM). Microinjections into 33 surrounding sites caused delayed electrodermal responses of lesser amplitude, while the remaining 371 sites evoked none. To retrogradely label bulbospinal neurons that may mediate electrodermal responses, fluorescent latex microspheres were injected into the region of the intermediolateral cell column in the fourth thoracic segment in an earlier preparatory procedure on six of the animals. A cluster of retrogradely labeled neurons was identified between the facial nucleus and the pyramidal tract. Neurons in this discrete region of the RVMM, thus, drive sweating in the cat's paw and may do so via direct spinal projections. PMID:23467325

  5. [Non-lethal brain stem hematomas in hypertensive patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel-Maroger, A; Metzger, J; Bories, J; Gardeur, D; Verger, J B; Noël, M C

    1982-01-01

    Brain stem hemorrhages (peduncular, pontine, medullary) were demonstrated by CT scan in hypertensive patients, the outcome being favorable without surgical intervention. Such lesions are considered as being usually massive and fatal. A review of the literature show that hemorrhages in the brain stem represent 5 to 9 p. cent of intraparenchymatous hemorrhages, and are usually located in the pons. A favorable course was known to occur before the use of computed tomography: the rare cases described were often related to subacute hematomas in young normotensive subjects which could be treated by surgery with or without ventricular shunting. Clinical diagnosis is based on the rapid progressive course of the disorder and the location of the lesion. Computed tomography provides an immediate correlation between anatomical and clinical findings, and allows a better evaluation of semiological and prognostic features that were previously considered well established. A major element appears to be the degree to which the hematoma is tolerated. As far as possible neurosurgical procedures should be avoided in hypertensive patients. PMID:7146726

  6. Correlation between heat shock protein 70 expression in the brain stem and sudden death after experimental traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lian-xu; XU Xiao-hu; LIU Chao; PAN Su-yue; ZHU Jia-zhen; ZHANG Cheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the patterns of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) biosynthesis following traumatic brain injury, and observe the effect of HSP70 induction on the function of the vital center in the brain stem. Methods: Rat models of sudden death resulted form traumatic brain injury were produced, and HSP70 expression in the rat brain stem was determined by immunohistochemistry, the induction of HSP70 mRNA detected by RT-PCR. Results: The level of HSP70 mRNA was prominently elevated in the brain stem as early as 1 5 min following the impact injury, while HSP70 expression was only observed 3 to 6 h after the injury. It was also observed that the levels of HSP70 mRNA but not the protein were elevated in the brain stem of sudden death rats. Conclusion: The synthesis of HSP70 was significantly enhanced in the brain stem following traumatic injury, and the expression of HSP70 is beneficial to eliminate the stress agents, and to sustain the cellular protein homeostasis. When the injury disturbs the synthesis of HSP70 to disarm the protective mechanism of heat-shock proteins, dysfunction of the vital center in the brain stem, and consequently death may occur. Breach in the synchronization of HSP70 mRNA-protein can be indicative of fatal damage to the nerve cells.

  7. RO4929097, Temozolomide, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Malignant Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic (Malignant) Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Neoplasm; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Primary Melanocytic Lesion of Meninges; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Malignant Adult Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

  8. Tumourigenicity and Immunogenicity of Induced Neural Stem Cell Grafts Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Grafts in Syngeneic Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mou; Yao, Hui; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Hongtian; Yang, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jianwei; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS) disease, the safety of stem cell grafts in the CNS, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), should be of primary concern. To provide scientific basis for evaluating the safety of these stem cells, we determined their tumourigenicity and immunogenicity in syngeneic mouse brain. Both iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were able to form tumours in the mouse brain, leading to tissue destruction along with immune cell infiltration. In contrast, no evidence of tumour formation, brain injury or immune rejection was observed with iNSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). With the help of gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, we detected significantly elevated levels of chemokines in the brain tissue and serum of mice that developed tumours after ESC or iPSC transplantation. Moreover, we also investigated the interactions between chemokines and NF-κB signalling and found that NF-κB activation was positively correlated with the constantly rising levels of chemokines, and vice versa. In short, iNSC grafts, which lacked any resulting tumourigenicity or immunogenicity, are safer than iPSC grafts. PMID:27417157

  9. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jindou Jiang; Xingyao Bu; Meng Liu; Peixun Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Results from the present study demonstrated that transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the lesion site in rat brain significantly ameliorated brain tissue pathological changes and brain edema, attenuated glial cell proliferation, and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. In addition, the number of cells double-labeled for 5-bromodeoxyuridine/glial fibrillary acidic protein and cells expressing nestin increased. Finally, blood vessels were newly generated, and the rats exhibited improved motor and cognitive functions. These results suggested that transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promoted brain remodeling and improved neurological functions following traumatic brain injury.

  10. Dexamethasone effects on [125I]albumin distribution in experimental RG-2 gliomas and adjacent brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 72 RG-2 transplanted gliomas were studied in 58 rats at three time points (1, 30, 240 min) after intravenous injection of [125I]radioiodinated serum albumin ([125I]RISA). The animals were divided into two groups: a control group that received no treatment and a second group that was treated with five doses of 1.5 mg/kg of dexamethasone over 2.5 days. Local tissue concentrations of [125I]RISA were measured with quantitative autoradiography based on morphological features of the tumors and used to calculate the tissue distribution space. Two models were used to analyze the data. A two compartment model yielded estimates of local blood-to-tissue influx constants (K1), lower limit extracellular volumes (Ve), and plasma vascular volumes (Vp) in different tumor regions. Treatment with dexamethasone consistently reduced the RISA distribution space in the RG-2 tumors; the reduction in Ve was statistically significant in almost all tumor regions: whole tumor Ve (mean +/- SE) was reduced from 0.14 +/- 0.02 ml g-1 in control animals to 0.08 +/- 0.01 ml g-1 in dexamethasone treated animals. K1 and Vp were also decreased in all tumor regions after treatment with dexamethasone (whole tumor K1 decreased from 2.36 +/- 0.89 to 0.83 +/- 0.29 microliter g-1 min-1 and Vp decreased slightly from 0.016 +/- 0.013 to 0.010 +/- 0.005 ml g-1 after dexamethasone treatment), but these changes were not statistically significant. A comparison of the tumor influx constants in control animals and the aqueous diffusion constants of two different size molecules (RISA and aminoisobutyric acid) suggests that the ''pores'' across RG-2 capillaries are large and may not restrict the free diffusion of RISA (estimated minimum pore diameter greater than 36 nm) and that the total pore area is approximately 6.2 X 10(-5) cm2 g-1 in RG-2 tumor tissue

  11. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural regeneration after traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Nabi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the supplement of lost nerve cells in rats with traumatic brain injury by intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, this study established a Wistar rat model of traumatic brain injury by weight drop impact acceleration method and administered 3 × 106 rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the lateral tail vein. At 14 days after cell transplantation, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in injured rat...

  12. 7-Tesla Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging to Assess the Effects of Radiotherapy on Normal-Appearing Brain in Patients With Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the intermediate- and long-term imaging manifestations of radiotherapy on normal-appearing brain tissue in patients with treated gliomas using 7T susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Methods and Materials: SWI was performed on 25 patients with stable gliomas on a 7 Tesla magnet. Microbleeds were identified as discrete foci of susceptibility that did not correspond to vessels. The number of microbleeds was counted within and outside of the T2-hyperintense lesion. For 3 patients, radiation dosimetry maps were reconstructed and fused with the 7T SWI data. Results: Multiple foci of susceptibility consistent with microhemorrhages were observed in patients 2 years after chemoradiation. These lesions were not present in patients who were not irradiated. The prevalence of microhemorrhages increased with the time since completion of radiotherapy, and these lesions often extended outside the boundaries of the initial high-dose volume and into the contralateral hemisphere. Conclusions: High-field SWI has potential for visualizing the appearance of microbleeds associated with long-term effects of radiotherapy on brain tissue. The ability to visualize these lesions in normal-appearing brain tissue may be important in further understanding the utility of this treatment in patients with longer survival.

  13. 3D - ASL 脑灌注成像在脑胶质瘤分级中的应用%Application of 3D - ASL Imaging in brain glioma grading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田维; 高帅

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨3D 动脉自旋标记成像( ASL)全脑灌注成像技术在脑胶质瘤分级中的应用价值。方法:对25例经手术病理证实的低级别脑胶质瘤(Ⅰ~Ⅱ级,9例),高级别脑胶质瘤(Ⅲ~Ⅳ级,16例)行3D - ASL 脑灌注成像扫描,测量各级别脑胶质瘤的脑血流量( CBF)及相对脑血流量(rCBF 白质和 rCBF 灰质),并评价它们间的差异性。结果:高级别脑胶质瘤的 CBF 及 rCBF 白质、rCBF 灰质均大于低级别胶质瘤,差异具有统计学意义(P ﹤0.001)。结论:3D - ASL 脑灌注成像技术在评价脑胶质瘤的分级中具有重要应用价值。%Objective:To explore the clinical value of three dimensional( 3D)whole brain arterial spin labeling( ASL)technique in brain glioma grad-ing. Methods:25 patients with brain glioma,were scheduled and diagnosed by pathology,including 9 Low - grade gliomas(Ⅰ ~ Ⅱgrade)and 16 High - grade gliomas(Ⅲ ~ Ⅳgrade),were underwent 3D - ASL perfusion imaging scan. The cerebral blood flow of each grade gliomas( CBF)and the relative cerebral blood flow of contralateral white matter(rCBFwhite)and the relative cerebral blood flow of contralateral grey matter(rCBFgrey)were measured. Results:Differences in High - grade gliomas and Low - grade gliomas were found,and the CBF、rCBFwhite and rCBFgrey in High - grade gliomas were higher than that in Low - grade gliomas(P ﹤ 0. 001). Conclusions:3D - ASL imaging technique is of great value in brain glioma grading.

  14. Bromelain Reversibly Inhibits Invasive Properties of Glioma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tysnes, Berit B.; H. Rainer Maurert; Torsten Porwol; Beatrice Probst; Rolf Bjerkvig; Frank Hoover

    2001-01-01

    Bromelain is an aqueous extract from pineapple stem that contains proteinases and exhibits pleiotropic therapeutic effects, i.e., antiedematous, antiinflammatory, antimetastatic, antithrombotic, and fibrinolytic activities. In this study, we tested bromelain's effects on glioma cells to assess whether bromelain could be a potential contributor to new antiinvasive strategies for gliomas. Several complementary assays demonstrated that bromelain significantly and reversibly reduced glioma cell a...

  15. Instant-mix whole brain photon with neutron boost radiotherapy for malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From July 1985 through March 1987, 44 consecutive patients with supratentorial, nonmetastatic anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were treated with whole brain photon irradiation with concomitant neutron boost at the University of Chicago. All patients had biopsy proven disease and surgery ranged from biopsy to total gross excision. Whole brain photon radiation was given at 1.5 Gy per fraction, 5 days weekly for a total dose of 45 Gy in 6 weeks. Neutron boost radiation was prescribed to a target minimum dose that included the pre-surgical CT tumor volume plus 1 cm margin. Neutrons were administered 5-20 minutes prior to photon radiation twice weekly and a total dose of 5.2 Gyn gamma was administered over 6 weeks. Median follow-up was 36 months. The median survival was 40.3 months for anaplastic astrocytoma (10 patients) and 11 months for glioblastoma multiforme (34 patients) and 12 months for the overall group. Variables that predicted longer median survival included histology (AA vs. GBM), age (less than or equal to 39 years vs. older), and extent of surgery (total gross or partial excision vs. biopsy) whereas tumor size and Karnofsky performance status did not have a significant influence. The median survival of the anaplastic astrocytoma group was better than expected compared to the RTOG 80-07 study (a dose-finding study of similar design to this study) and historical data. Reasons for this are discussed

  16. Proliferation of differentiated glial cells in the brain stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradas, P C; Cavalcante, L A

    1998-02-01

    Classical studies of macroglial proliferation in muride rodents have provided conflicting evidence concerning the proliferating capabilities of oligodendrocytes and microglia. Furthermore, little information has been obtained in other mammalian orders and very little is known about glial cell proliferation and differentiation in the subclass Metatheria although valuable knowledge may be obtained from the protracted period of central nervous system maturation in these forms. Thus, we have studied the proliferative capacity of phenotypically identified brain stem oligodendrocytes by tritiated thymidine radioautography and have compared it with known features of oligodendroglial differentiation as well as with proliferation of microglia in the opossum Didelphis marsupialis. We have detected a previously undescribed ephemeral, regionally heterogeneous proliferation of oligodendrocytes expressing the actin-binding, ensheathment-related protein 2'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase), that is not necessarily related to the known regional and temporal heterogeneity of expression of CNPase in cell bodies. On the other hand, proliferation of microglia tagged by the binding of Griffonia simplicifolia B4 isolectin, which recognizes an alpha-D-galactosyl-bearing glycoprotein of the plasma membrane of macrophages/microglia, is known to be long lasting, showing no regional heterogeneity and being found amongst both ameboid and differentiated ramified cells, although at different rates. The functional significance of the proliferative behavior of these differentiated cells is unknown but may provide a low-grade cell renewal in the normal brain and may be augmented under pathological conditions. PMID:9686148

  17. Proliferation of differentiated glial cells in the brain stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barradas P.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies of macroglial proliferation in muride rodents have provided conflicting evidence concerning the proliferating capabilities of oligodendrocytes and microglia. Furthermore, little information has been obtained in other mammalian orders and very little is known about glial cell proliferation and differentiation in the subclass Metatheria although valuable knowledge may be obtained from the protracted period of central nervous system maturation in these forms. Thus, we have studied the proliferative capacity of phenotypically identified brain stem oligodendrocytes by tritiated thymidine radioautography and have compared it with known features of oligodendroglial differentiation as well as with proliferation of microglia in the opossum Didelphis marsupialis. We have detected a previously undescribed ephemeral, regionally heterogeneous proliferation of oligodendrocytes expressing the actin-binding, ensheathment-related protein 2'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase, that is not necessarily related to the known regional and temporal heterogeneity of expression of CNPase in cell bodies. On the other hand, proliferation of microglia tagged by the binding of Griffonia simplicifolia B4 isolectin, which recognizes an alpha-D-galactosyl-bearing glycoprotein of the plasma membrane of macrophages/microglia, is known to be long lasting, showing no regional heterogeneity and being found amongst both ameboid and differentiated ramified cells, although at different rates. The functional significance of the proliferative behavior of these differentiated cells is unknown but may provide a low-grade cell renewal in the normal brain and may be augmented under pathological conditions.

  18. Identification and characterization of NBEAL1, a novel human neurobeachin-like 1 protein gene from fetal brain, which is up regulated in glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen J; Xie Y; Ying K; Lu Y; Xu J; Huang Y; Cheng H; Hu G; Luo C; Lou M; Cao G

    2005-01-01

    The Beige and Chediak-Higashi (BEACH) domain is highly conserved in a large family of eukaryotic proteins, and is crucial for their functions in vesicle trafficking, membrane dynamics and receptor signaling. From a fetal brain cDNA library, we isolated a cDNA of 3858 bp encoding a novel human BEACH protein, which was named as human neurobeachin-like 1 (NBEAL1) gene. The cDNA had an open reading frame (ORF) of 3006 bp encoding a putative 1001 amino acid protein. The NBEAL1 gene was located on human chromosome 2q33-2q34 and consisted of 25 exons spanning about 73 kb of the human genome. PSORT analysis indicated that the NBEAL1 protein contained a vacuolar-targeting motif ILPK, which suggested the protein might be located in the cell lysosome. The expression pattern was examined by reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), which showed that the transcripts were highly expressed in the human brain, kidney, prostate, and testis while lowly in the ovary, small intestine, colon and peripheral blood leukocyte. In addition, the RT-PCR result of and Northern blot showed that the novel gene was highly expressed in the biopsies of different grade glioma, especially in that of lower grade ones, which suggested it might be correlative with the glioma.

  19. A phase II trial of thymidine and carboplatin for recurrent malignant glioma: a North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Robins, H. Ian; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Hess, Kenneth; Schiff, David; Greenberg, Harry; Fink, Karen; Nicolas, Kelly; Kuhn, John G.; Cloughesy, Timothy; Junck, Larry; Mehta, Minesh

    2002-01-01

    This phase II study in recurrent high-grade glioma evaluated the response rate, toxicities, and time to treatment failure of high-dose carboplatin modulated by a 24-h infusion of thymidine (75 g/m(2)). The trial was based on preclinical data and a prior phase I study ( J. Clin. Oncol. 17, 2922-2931, 1999); a phase II recurrent high-grade glioma study was initiated in July of 1998. Thymidine was given over 24 h; carboplatin was given over 20 min at hour 20 of the thymidine infusion. The starti...

  20. An Evidence-Based Review of Alternating Electric Fields Therapy for Malignant Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Eric T; Lok, Edwin; Swanson, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Opinion statement Glioblastoma is a deadly disease and even aggressive neurosurgical resection followed by radiation and chemotherapy only extends patient survival to a median of 1.5 years. The challenge in treating this type of tumor stems from the rapid proliferation of the malignant glioma cells, the diffuse infiltrative nature of the disease, multiple activated signal transduction pathways within the tumor, development of resistant clones during treatment, the blood brain barrier that lim...

  1. Glioma-Associated Antigen HEATR1 Induces Functional Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Patients with Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Bao Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A2B5+ glioblastoma (GBM cells have glioma stem-like cell (GSC properties that are crucial to chemotherapy resistance and GBM relapse. T-cell-based antigens derived from A2B5+ GBM cells provide important information for immunotherapy. Here, we show that HEAT repeat containing 1 (HEATR1 expression in GBM tissues was significantly higher than that in control brain tissues. Furthermore, HEATR1 expression in A2B5+ U87 cells was higher than that in A2B5−U87 cells (P=0.016. Six peptides of HEATR1 presented by HLA-A*02 were selected for testing of their ability to induce T-cell responses in patients with GBM. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors (n=6 and patients with glioma (n=33 were stimulated with the peptide mixture, eight patients with malignant gliomas had positive reactivity with a significantly increased number of responding T-cells. The peptides HEATR1682–690, HEATR11126–1134, and HEATR1757–765 had high affinity for binding to HLA-A*02:01 and a strong capacity to induce CTL response. CTLs against HEATR1 peptides were capable of recognizing and lysing GBM cells and GSCs. These data are the first to demonstrate that HEATR1 could induce specific CTL responses targeting both GBM cells and GSCs, implicating that HEATR1 peptide-based immunotherapy could be a novel promising strategy for treating patients with GBM.

  2. NFL-lipid nanocapsules for brain neural stem cell targeting in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carradori, Dario; Saulnier, Patrick; Préat, Véronique; des Rieux, Anne; Eyer, Joel

    2016-09-28

    The replacement of injured neurons by the selective stimulation of neural stem cells in situ represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 showed specific interactions towards neural stem cells of the subventricular zone. The aim of our work was to produce a NFL-based drug delivery system able to target neural stem cells through the selective affinity between the peptide and these cells. NFL-TBS.40-63 (NFL) was adsorbed on lipid nanocapsules (LNC) whom targeting efficiency was evaluated on neural stem cells from the subventricular zone (brain) and from the central canal (spinal cord). NFL-LNC were incubated with primary neural stem cells in vitro or injected in vivo in adult rat brain (right lateral ventricle) or spinal cord (T10). NFL-LNC interactions with neural stem cells were different depending on the origin of the cells. NFL-LNC showed a preferential uptake by neural stem cells from the brain, while they did not interact with neural stem cells from the spinal cord. The results obtained in vivo correlate with the results observed in vitro, demonstrating that NFL-LNC represent a promising therapeutic strategy to selectively deliver bioactive molecules to brain neural stem cells. PMID:27503706

  3. MicroRNA in Human Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mengfeng, E-mail: limf@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Microbiology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Li, Jun [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Biochemistry, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Liu, Lei; Li, Wei [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Microbiology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Yang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Yuan, Jie [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Molecules from Oceanic Microorganisms (Sun Yat-sen University), Department of Education of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2013-10-23

    Glioma represents a serious health problem worldwide. Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeting therapy, the disease remains one of the most lethal malignancies in humans, and new approaches to improvement of the efficacy of anti-glioma treatments are urgently needed. Thus, new therapeutic targets and tools should be developed based on a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glioma. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, play a pivotal role in the development of the malignant phenotype of glioma cells, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, tumor angiogenesis, and stem cell generation. This review will discuss the biological functions of miRNAs in human glioma and their implications in improving clinical diagnosis, prediction of prognosis, and anti-glioma therapy.

  4. MicroRNA in Human Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioma represents a serious health problem worldwide. Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeting therapy, the disease remains one of the most lethal malignancies in humans, and new approaches to improvement of the efficacy of anti-glioma treatments are urgently needed. Thus, new therapeutic targets and tools should be developed based on a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glioma. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, play a pivotal role in the development of the malignant phenotype of glioma cells, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, tumor angiogenesis, and stem cell generation. This review will discuss the biological functions of miRNAs in human glioma and their implications in improving clinical diagnosis, prediction of prognosis, and anti-glioma therapy

  5. Potential of Neural Stem Cells for the Treatment of Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Taupin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs are self-renewing multipotent cells that generate the main phenotypes of the nervous system, neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. As such they hold the promise to treat a broad range of neurological diseases and injuries. Neural progenitor and stem cells have been isolated and characterized in vitro, from adult, fetal and post-mortem tissues, providing sources of material for cellular therapy. However, NSCs are still elusive cells and remain to be unequivocally identified and characterized, limiting their potential use for therapy. Neural progenitor and stem cells, isolated and cultured in vitro, can be genetically modified and when transplanted migrate to tumor sites in the brain. These intrinsic properties of neural progenitor and stem cells provide tremendous potential to bolster the translation of NSC research to therapy. It is proposed to combine gene therapy and cellular therapy to treat brain cancers. Hence, neural progenitor and stem cells provide new opportunities for the treatment of brain cancers.

  6. Brain volume perfusion CT performed with 128-detector row CT system in patients with cerebral gliomas: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Validation of the feasibility and efficacy of volume perfusion computed tomography (VPCT) in the preoperative assessment of cerebral gliomas by applying a 128-slice CT covering the entire tumour. Forty-six patients (25 men, 21 women; mean age 52.8 years) with cerebral gliomas were evaluated with VPCT. Two readers independently evaluated VPCT data, drawing volumes of interest (VOIs) around the tumour according to maximum intensity projection volumes, which were mapped automatically onto the cerebral blood volume (CBV), flow (CBF) and permeability (Ktrans) perfusion datasets. As control, a second VOI was placed in the contralateral healthy cortex. Correlation among perfusion parameters, tumour grade, hemisphere and VOIs was assessed. The diagnostic power of perfusion parameters was analysed by receiver operating characteristics curve analyses. VPCT was feasible in the assessment of the entire tumour extent. Mean values of Ktrans, CBV, CBF in high-grade gliomas were significantly higher compared with low-grade (p < 0.01). Ktrans demonstrated the highest diagnostic (97% sensitivity), positive (100%) and negative (94%) prognostic values. VPCT was feasible in all subjects. All areas of different perfusion characteristics are depicted and quantified in colour-coded 3D maps. The derived parameters correlate well with tumour histopathology, differentiating low- from high-grade gliomas. (orig.)

  7. Brain volume perfusion CT performed with 128-detector row CT system in patients with cerebral gliomas: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xyda, Argyro [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, Goettingen (Germany); University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology, Crete (Greece); Haberland, Ulrike; Klotz, Ernst [Computed Tomography, Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany); Bock, Hans Christoph [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Neurosurgery, Georg-August University, Goettingen (Germany); Jung, Klaus [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Medical Statistics, Georg-August University, Goettingen (Germany); Knauth, Michael; Schramm, Ramona; Psychogios, Marios Nikos; Schramm, Peter [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, Goettingen (Germany); Erb, Gunter [Bracco Imaging Deutschland GmbH, Konstanz (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Validation of the feasibility and efficacy of volume perfusion computed tomography (VPCT) in the preoperative assessment of cerebral gliomas by applying a 128-slice CT covering the entire tumour. Forty-six patients (25 men, 21 women; mean age 52.8 years) with cerebral gliomas were evaluated with VPCT. Two readers independently evaluated VPCT data, drawing volumes of interest (VOIs) around the tumour according to maximum intensity projection volumes, which were mapped automatically onto the cerebral blood volume (CBV), flow (CBF) and permeability (Ktrans) perfusion datasets. As control, a second VOI was placed in the contralateral healthy cortex. Correlation among perfusion parameters, tumour grade, hemisphere and VOIs was assessed. The diagnostic power of perfusion parameters was analysed by receiver operating characteristics curve analyses. VPCT was feasible in the assessment of the entire tumour extent. Mean values of Ktrans, CBV, CBF in high-grade gliomas were significantly higher compared with low-grade (p < 0.01). Ktrans demonstrated the highest diagnostic (97% sensitivity), positive (100%) and negative (94%) prognostic values. VPCT was feasible in all subjects. All areas of different perfusion characteristics are depicted and quantified in colour-coded 3D maps. The derived parameters correlate well with tumour histopathology, differentiating low- from high-grade gliomas. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of the brain-stem white-matter tracts with diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have reviewed the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the brain stem in 19 subjects, consisting of 15 normal volunteers and four multi-system atrophy patients. The study was performed with 1.5 T MRI scanners. DTI was correlated with an automated program allowing superposition of the structural anatomy. Axial, sagittal, and coronal images demonstrated major white-matter fibers within the brain stem, including cortico-spinal tracts, transverse pontine fibers, and medial lemniscus. Smaller fibers, such as medial longitudinal fascicles and central tegmental tracts are difficult to visualize. To identify the anatomical orientation of the brain stem, white-matter fibers will help us understand the different functional disease processes, and DTI will play an important role for the evaluation of the different white matter fibers in the brain stem. (orig.)

  9. Schwann Cells Transplantation Promoted and the Repair of Brain Stem Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG WAN; YI-HUA AN; MEI-ZHEN SUN; YA-ZHUO ZHANG; ZHONG-CHENG WANG

    2003-01-01

    To explore the possibility of Schwann cells transplantation to promote the repair of injured brain stem reticular structure in rats. Methods Schwann cells originated from sciatic nerves of 1 to 2-day-old rats were expanded and labelled by BrdU in vitro, transplanted into rat brain stem reticular structure that was pre-injured by electric needle stimulus. Immunohistochemistry and myelin-staining were used to investigate the expression of BrdU, GAP-43 and new myelination respectively. Results BrdU positive cells could be identified for up to 8 months and their number increased by about 23%, which mainly migrated toward injured ipsilateral cortex. The GAP-43expression reached its peak in 1 month after transplantation and was significantly higher than that in the control group. New myelination could be seen in destructed brain stem areas. Conclusion The transplantation of Schwann cells can promote the restoration of injured brain stem reticular structure.

  10. Improved survival in rats with glioma using MRI-guided focused ultrasound and microbubbles to disrupt the blood-brain barrier and deliver Doxil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Muna; Zhi Zhang, Yong; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Park, Juyoung; Power, Chanikarn; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-02-01

    Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) limits the transportation of most neuropeptides, proteins (enzymes, antibodies), chemotherapeutic agents, and genes that have therapeutic potential for the treatment of brain diseases. Different methods have been used to overcome this limitation, but they are invasive, non-targeted, or require the development of new drugs. We have developed a method that uses MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with circulating microbubbles to temporarily open BBB in and around brain tumors to deliver chemotherapy agents. Here, we tested whether this noninvasive technique could enhance the effectiveness of a chemotherapy agent (Doxil). Using 690 kHz FUS transducer and microbubble (Definity), we induced BBB disruption in intracranially-implanted 9L glioma tumors in rat's brain in three weekly sessions. Animals who received BBB disruption and Doxil had a median survival time of 34.5 days, which was significantly longer than that found in control animals which is 16, 18.5, 21 days who received no treatment, BBB disruption only and Doxil only respectively This work demonstrates that FUS technique has promise in overcoming barriers to drug delivery, which are particularly stark in the brain due to the BBB.

  11. Evaluation of Auditory Brain Stems Evoked Response in Newborns With Pathologic Hyperbilirubinemia in Mashhad, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Okhravi, Tooba; Tarvij Eslami, Saeedeh; Hushyar Ahmadi, Ali; Nassirian, Hossain; Najibpour, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neonatal jaundice is a common cause of sensorneural hearing loss in children. Objectives: We aimed to detect the neurotoxic effects of pathologic hyperbilirubinemia on brain stem and auditory tract by auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR) which could predict early effects of hyperbilirubinemia. Patients and Methods: This case-control study was performed on newborns with pathologic hyperbilirubinemia. The inclusion criteria were healthy term and near term (35 - 37 weeks) newbor...

  12. [Auditory hallucinations in lesions of the brain stem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, J; Decroix, J P; Masson, C

    1987-01-01

    Since the publication by Jean Lhermitte in 1922 of his paper on hallucinosis, the peduncular type has been described as a purely visual phenomenon. However, limited brain stem lesions can give rise to analogous manifestations in the auditory field. Five cases of auditory hallucinosis are reviewed, the first four resulting from a lesion of tegmentum of pons responsible for contralateral hemi-anesthesia and homolateral facial palsy with paralysis of laterality. Central type hypoacusis and a severe disorder of localization of sounds revealed a lesion of trapezoid body. The fifth case resulted from a peduncular lesion in region supplied by superior cerebellar artery, the auditory deficit being related to a lesion of inferior corpus quadrigeminum. In one patient, the auditory hallucinosis was followed by a period of visual hallucinations and oneiric delusions. Both auditory and visual hallucinosis can be related to hypnagogic hallucinations. Dream mechanisms (the geniculo-occipital spikes system) escape from normal inhibitory control exerted by the raphe nuclei. Auditory deafferentation could predispose to auditory hallucinosis. PMID:3629075

  13. Oncolytic adenoviruses: A thorny path to glioma cure

    OpenAIRE

    Ulasov, I.V.; Borovjagin, A.V.; Schroeder, B.A. (Betsy A.); Baryshnikov, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a rapidly progressing brain tumor. Despite the relatively low percentage of cancer patients with glioma diagnoses, recent statistics indicate that the number of glioma patients may have increased over the past decade. Current therapeutic options for glioma patients include tumor resection, chemotherapy, and concomitant radiation therapy with an average survival of approximately 16 months. The rapid progression of gliomas has spurred the development of novel tr...

  14. Epigenetic targeting of glioma stem cells: Short-term and long-term treatments with valproic acid modulate DNA methylation and differentiation behavior, but not temozolomide sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Gabriele; Butta, Valentina; Cilibrasi, Chiara; Baronchelli, Simona; Redaelli, Serena; Dalprà, Leda; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Bentivegna, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive tumor of the central nervous system. GBM is a fatal tumor, incurable by conventional therapies. One of the factors underlying tumor recurrence and poor long-term survival is the presence of a cancer stem-like cell population, termed glioma stem cells (GSCs), which is particularly resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and supports tumor self-renewal. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact and difference in effects of short-term and long‑term treatments with valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on seven GSC lines. We investigated for the first time the changes in the genome-wide DNA methylation profile and the differentiation behavior of GSCs induced by short-term and long-term VPA treatments. Moreover, we verified VPA sensitivity after long-term VPA pretreatment and, notably, the results provide evidence of a subpopulation more resistant to further VPA treatments. Finally, since short-term VPA treatment induced a reversal of the MGMT methylation status, we aimed to sensitize GSCs to temozolomide, the drug commonly used for this tumor, using this regimen. The overall data highlighted the heterogeneous behavior of GSC lines that is representative of tumor heterogeneity in GBM. The VPA effects were variable among these cell lines in terms of pro‑differentiating ability and DNA methylation switch. Here, we attempted to identify a suitable therapy for the eradication of the stem cell subpopulation, which is mandatory to achieve an effective treatment for this tumor. Differentiation-inducing and epigenetic therapies are the most promising approaches to affect the multiple properties of GSCs and, finally, defeat GBM. PMID:26986767

  15. MiR-508-5p Inhibits the Progression of Glioma by Targeting Glycoprotein Non-metastatic Melanoma B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Gang; Wang, Ning; Li, Ruichun; Xu, Gaofeng; Liu, Peijun; He, Baixiang

    2016-07-01

    Glioma is a severe and highly lethal brain cancer, a malignancy largely stemming from growing in a relatively restrained area of the brain. Hence, the understanding of the molecular regulation of the growth of glioma is critical for improving its treatment. MicroRNA has become a hotspot in research on diseases, especially in the initiation and progression of different types of cancer. However, the molecular function and mechanisms of miR-508-5p in gliomagenesis are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate miR-508-5p expression in glioma and determine its effects on proliferation. miR-508-5p expression levels, both in glioma cell lines and in tissue, were significantly lower than in a normal human astrocyte cell line or adjacent tissues. Cell growth was analyzed using a MTT assay and over-expression of miR-508-5p was found to decrease glioma cell growth. Moreover, a bioinformatic analysis was performed, showing that glycoprotein non-metastatic melanoma B (GPNMB) was a direct target for miR-508-5p in glioma cells. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with miR-508-5p reduced GPNMB protein levels in the tumor. Additionally, overexpression of GPNMB without 3'-UTR partially reversed the cell growth arrest induced by miR-508-5p over-expression in glioma cells. In conclusion, these results indicate that increased expression of miR-508-5p might be related to glioma progression, indicating a potential role of miR-508-5p for clinical therapy. PMID:27003587

  16. Reproducibility of O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine uptake kinetics in brain tumors and influence of corticoid therapy: an experimental study in rat gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegmayr, Carina; Schoeneck, Michael; Oliveira, Dennis; Willuweit, Antje [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Filss, Christian; Coenen, Heinz H.; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FET) is a well-established method for the diagnostics of brain tumors. This study investigates reproducibility of {sup 18}F-FET uptake kinetics in rat gliomas and the influence of the frequently used dexamethasone (Dex) therapy. F98 glioma or 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted into the striatum of 31 Fischer rats. After 10-11 days of tumor growth, the animals underwent dynamic PET after injection of {sup 18}F-FET (baseline). Thereafter, animals were divided into a control group and a group receiving Dex injections, and all animals were reinvestigated 2 days later. Tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR) of {sup 18}F-FET uptake (18-61 min p.i.) and the slope of the time-activity-curves (TAC) (18-61 min p.i.) were evaluated using a Volume-of-Interest (VOI) analysis. Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and reproducibility by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The slope of the tumor TACs showed high reproducibility with an ICC of 0.93. A systematic increase of the TBR in the repeated scans was noted (3.7 ± 2.8 %; p < 0.01), and appeared to be related to tumor growth as indicated by a significant correlation of TBR and tumor volume (r = 0.77; p < 0.0001). After correction for tumor growth TBR showed high longitudinal stability with an ICC of 0.84. Dex treatment induced a significant decrease of the TBR (-8.2 ± 6.1 %; p < 0.03), but did not influence the slope of the tumor TAC. TBR of {sup 18}F-FET uptake and tracer kinetics in brain tumors showed high longitudinal stability. Dex therapy may induce a minor decrease of the TBR; this needs further investigation. (orig.)

  17. Reproducibility of O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine uptake kinetics in brain tumors and influence of corticoid therapy: an experimental study in rat gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (18F-FET) is a well-established method for the diagnostics of brain tumors. This study investigates reproducibility of 18F-FET uptake kinetics in rat gliomas and the influence of the frequently used dexamethasone (Dex) therapy. F98 glioma or 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted into the striatum of 31 Fischer rats. After 10-11 days of tumor growth, the animals underwent dynamic PET after injection of 18F-FET (baseline). Thereafter, animals were divided into a control group and a group receiving Dex injections, and all animals were reinvestigated 2 days later. Tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR) of 18F-FET uptake (18-61 min p.i.) and the slope of the time-activity-curves (TAC) (18-61 min p.i.) were evaluated using a Volume-of-Interest (VOI) analysis. Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and reproducibility by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The slope of the tumor TACs showed high reproducibility with an ICC of 0.93. A systematic increase of the TBR in the repeated scans was noted (3.7 ± 2.8 %; p < 0.01), and appeared to be related to tumor growth as indicated by a significant correlation of TBR and tumor volume (r = 0.77; p < 0.0001). After correction for tumor growth TBR showed high longitudinal stability with an ICC of 0.84. Dex treatment induced a significant decrease of the TBR (-8.2 ± 6.1 %; p < 0.03), but did not influence the slope of the tumor TAC. TBR of 18F-FET uptake and tracer kinetics in brain tumors showed high longitudinal stability. Dex therapy may induce a minor decrease of the TBR; this needs further investigation. (orig.)

  18. Radioimmunotherapy of malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite all technical advances (intraoperative resection control, fluorescence guided resection, advances in external beam radiation techniques) and new consolidated findings on systemic chemotherapy treatment of malignant gliomas with conventional therapeutic modalities (surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy) is still highly unfavourable. Total tumor erradication is impossible due to tumor infiltrations into the normal brain and the limitations given by the limited tolerance of surrounding brain tissue. New treatment strategies, therefore, aim for a more selective destruction of tumor cells. Malignant glioma cells selectively express several antigens or receptors which are not or only to a minor extent present in normal brain tissue. Administration of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies, especially when given locoregionally, targeting these tumor-specific antigens offers an innovative therapeutic strategy that has recently demonstrated encouraging antitumor effects and acceptable toxicity in many phase I/II clinical trials. This review offers a comprehensive summary of own experiences and results of clinical trials reported in the literature dealing with radioimmunotherapy of malignant glioma and highlights future plans to further develop this therapeutic strategy. (orig.)

  19. A study of ICAM expression in brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Hong, Seok Il [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the possibility of using sICAM-1 as a marker for follow-up of treatment. The micro-ELISA method was adopted. The brain stem gliomas showed positive results in 67%. Overall, 23% of brain tumors showed positive results. It is possible that we can use sICAM-1 as a marker for metastatic brain tumors, and measurement after radiation therapy is not reliable. 6 refs. (Author) (Author).

  20. Are human dental papilla-derived stem cell and human brain-derived neural stem cell transplantations suitable for treatment of Parkinson's disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyung Ho Yoon; Joongkee Min; Nari Shin; Yong Hwan Kim; Jin-Mo Kim; Yu-Shik Hwang; Jun-Kyo Francis Suh; Onyou Hwang; Sang Ryong Jeon

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of neural stem cells has been reported as a possible approach for replacing impaired dopaminergic neurons. In this study, we tested the efficacy of early-stage human dental papilla-derived stem cells and human brain-derived neural stem cells in rat models of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease. Rats received a unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into right medial forebrain bundle, followed 3 weeks later by injections of PBS, early-stage human dental papilla-derived stem cells, or human brain-derived neural stem cells into the ipsilateral striatum. All of the rats in the human dental papilla-derived stem cell group died from tumor formation at around 2 weeks following cell transplantation. Postmortem examinations revealed homogeneous malignant tumors in the striatum of the human dental papilla-derived stem cell group. Stepping tests revealed that human brain-derived neural stem cell transplantation did not improve motor dysfunction. In apomorphine-induced rotation tests, neither the human brain-derived neural stem cell group nor the control groups (PBS injection) demonstrated significant changes. Glucose metabolism in the lesioned side of striatum was reduced by human brain-derived neural stem cell transplantation. [18 F]-FP-CIT PET scans in the striatum did not demonstrate a significant increase in the human brain-derived neural stem cell group. Tyrosine hydroxylase (dopaminergic neuronal marker) staining and G protein-activated inward rectifier potassium channel 2 (A9 dopaminergic neuronal marker) were positive in the lesioned side of striatum in the human brain-derived neural stem cell group. The use of early-stage human dental papilla-derived stem cells confirmed its tendency to form tumors. Human brain-derived neural stem cells could be partially differentiated into dopaminergic neurons, but they did not secrete dopamine.

  1. Mechanism of tropism of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells to glioma stem cells%脐带间充质干细胞向胶质瘤干细胞趋向性机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱瑾; 苏小营; 董桂娟; 李罡; 刘振林

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the tropism of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) to glioma stem cells and their mechanism.Methods The isolated humanized UCMSCs were cultured and identified.The glioma stem cells were induced to remain at the resting, proliferation or differentiation states by soft or hard agar combined with stemness maintenance factors (epidermal growth factor [EGF] and basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF]): soft agar+EGF+bFGF group, hard agar+EGF+bFGF group, and hard agar group;clone spheres of the stem cells were cultured for 7 d, and then, the growth curve of clone spheres diameters was drawn;flow cytometry was used to detect the cell cycle of the stem cells 72 h after culture;CD133, Ki67 and GFAP expressions in the clone spheres of stem cells in the three groups were observed by immunofluorescent staining;the tropism aptitude of UCMSCs to glioma stem cells at different states was detected by Transwell dual chamber culture system;the protein expression levels of stem cell factor (SCF), stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in glioma stem cells were monitored by enzyme immunoassay (ELISA);Western blotting was used to measure the protein expression levels of c-Kit, C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR-4) and VEGF receptor in UCMSCs.Results The diameters of clone spheres in the hard agar+EGF+bFGF group and hard agar group were significantly larger than those in the soft agar+EGF+bFGF group on the second and 7th d of culture (P<0.05);cell cycle analysis indicated that glioma stem cells in the soft agar+EGF+bFGF group, hard agar+EGF+bFGF group, and hard agar group were successfully remained at the resting, proliferation or differentiation states;high CD133 expression ([95.79±5.31] %) was noted in the cells of soft agar+EGF+bFGF group, high Ki67 and GFAP expressions ([89.39±7.45 and 63.49±16.54] %) were noted in the cells of hard agar+EGF+bFGF group, and high GFAP expression ([97.36±3.48] %) was

  2. Sublethal dose of irradiation enhances invasion of malignant glioma cells through p53-MMP 2 pathway in U87MG mouse brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma is a highly lethal neoplasm that frequently recurs locally after radiotherapy, and most of these recurrences originate from near the irradiated target field. In the present study, we identified the effects of radiation on glioma invasion and p53, TIMP-2, and MMP-2 expression through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The U87MG (wt p53) and U251 (mt p53) human malignant glioma cell lines were prepared, and the U2OS (wt 53) and Saos2 (del p53) osteosarcoma cell lines were used as p53 positive and negative controls. The four cell lines and p53 knock-downed U87MG cells received radiation (2–6 Gy) and were analyzed for expression of p53 and TIMP-2 by Western blot, and MMP-2 activity was detected by zymography. In addition, the effects of irradiation on directional invasion of malignant glioma were evaluated by implanting nude mice with bioluminescent u87-Fluc in vivo followed by MMP-2, p53, and TIMP-2 immunohisto-chemistry and in situ zymography. MMP-2 activity and p53 expression increased in proportional to the radiation dose in cell lines with wt p53, but not in the cell lines with del or mt p53. TIMP-2 expression did not increase in U87MG cells. MMP-2 activity decreased in p53 knock-downed U87MG cells but increased in the control group. Furthermore, radiation enhanced MMP-2 activity and increased tumor margin invasiveness in vivo. Tumor cells invaded by radiation overexpressed MMP-2 and p53 and revealed high gelatinolytic activity compared with those of non-radiated tumor cells. Radiation-induced upregulation of p53 modulated MMP-2 activity, and the imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 may have an important role in glioblastoma invasion by degrading the extracellular matrix. Bioluminescent “U87-Fluc”was useful for observing tumor formation without sacrifice after implanting tumor cells in the mouse brain. These findings suggest that the radiotherapy involved field for malignant glioma needs to be reconsidered, and that future trials should investigate

  3. Neural stem cells harvested from live brains by antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, C N P; Tsui, Y P; Ho, A S L; Shum, D K Y; Chan, Y S; Wu, C T; Li, H W; Tsang, S C Edman; Yung, K K L

    2013-11-18

    It stems from the magnetism: The extraction of stem/progenitor cells from the brain of live animals is possible using antibodies conjugated to magnetic nanoparticles (Ab-MNPs). The Ab-MNPs are introduced to a rat's brain with a superfine micro-syringe. The stem cells attach to the Ab-MNPs and are magnetically isolated and removed. They can develop into neurospheres and differentiate into different types of cells outside the subject body. The rat remains alive and healthy. PMID:24108547

  4. TLR9 expression in glioma tissues correlated to glioma progression and the prognosis of GBM patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our study aims to evaluate the expression of TLR9 in glioma tissues, examine the association between TLR9 expression, clinicopathological variables, and glioma patient outcome, we further characterized the direct effects of TLR9 agonist CpG ODN upon the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells in vitro. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence were used to determine the expression of TLR9 in glioma cell lines and clinical glioma samples. Tissue microarry and immunohistochemistry were applied to evaluated TLR9 expression in 292 newly diagnosed glioma and 13 non-neoplastic brain tissues. We further investigated the effect of CpG ODN on the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells in vitro with MTT assays and matrigel transwell assay respectively. RT-PCR showed that TLR9 expressed in all the glioma samples and glioma cell lines we examined. The tissue array analysis indicated that TLR9 expression is correlated with malignancy of glioma (p < 0.01). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that TLR9 expression is an independent prognostic factor for PFS of GBM patients(P = 0.026). TLR9 agonist CpG ODN has no significant effect on glioma proliferation, but matrigel transwell analysis showed that TLR9 agonist CpG ODN can significantly enhance glioma invasion in vitro. Our data indicated that TLR9 expression increases according to the histopathological grade of glioma, and the TLR9 expression level is related to the PFS of GBM patients. In addition, our findings warrant caution in the directly injection of TLR9 agonist CpG ODN into glioma tissues for the glioma immunotherapy

  5. Amplification of neural stem cell proliferation by intermediate progenitor cells in Drosophila brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello Bruno C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mammalian brain, neural stem cells divide asymmetrically and often amplify the number of progeny they generate via symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Here we investigate whether specific neural stem cell-like neuroblasts in the brain of Drosophila might also amplify neuronal proliferation by generating symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Results Cell lineage-tracing and genetic marker analysis show that remarkably large neuroblast lineages exist in the dorsomedial larval brain of Drosophila. These lineages are generated by brain neuroblasts that divide asymmetrically to self renew but, unlike other brain neuroblasts, do not segregate the differentiating cell fate determinant Prospero to their smaller daughter cells. These daughter cells continue to express neuroblast-specific molecular markers and divide repeatedly to produce neural progeny, demonstrating that they are proliferating intermediate progenitors. The proliferative divisions of these intermediate progenitors have novel cellular and molecular features; they are morphologically symmetrical, but molecularly asymmetrical in that key differentiating cell fate determinants are segregated into only one of the two daughter cells. Conclusion Our findings provide cellular and molecular evidence for a new mode of neurogenesis in the larval brain of Drosophila that involves the amplification of neuroblast proliferation through intermediate progenitors. This type of neurogenesis bears remarkable similarities to neurogenesis in the mammalian brain, where neural stem cells as primary progenitors amplify the number of progeny they generate through generation of secondary progenitors. This suggests that key aspects of neural stem cell biology might be conserved in brain development of insects and mammals.

  6. Stem cells modified by brain-derived neurotrophic fac-tor to promote stem cells differentiation into neurons and enhance neuromotor function after brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Sai; LIU Xiao-zhi; LIU Zhen-lin; WANG Yan-min; HU Qun-liang; MA Tie-zhu; SUN Shi-zhong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To promote stem cells differentiation into neurons and enhance neuromotor function after brain in-jury through brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) induction.Methods: Recombinant adenovirus vector was ap-plied to the transfection of BDNF into human-derived um-bilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to deter-mine the secretion phase of BDNF. The brain injury model of athymic mice induced by hydraulic pressure percussion was established for transplantation of stem cells into the edge of injury site. Nerve function scores were obtained, and the expression level of transfected and non-transfected BDNF, proportion of neuron specific enolase (NSE) andglial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the number of apoptosis cells were compared respectively. Results: The BDNF expression achieved its stabiliza-tion at a high level 72 hours after gene transfection. The mouse obtained a better score of nerve function, and the proportion of the NSE-positive cells increased significantly (P<0.05), but GFAP-positive cells decreased in BDNF-UCMSCs group compared with the other two groups (P<0.05). At the site of high expression of BDNF, the number of apoptosis cells decreased markedly.Conclusion: BDNF gene can promote the differentia-tion of the stem cells into neurons rather than gliai cells, and enhance neuromotor function after brain injury.

  7. Stem cell-based therapies for tumors in the brain: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Khalid

    2016-08-01

    Advances in understanding adult stem cell biology have facilitated the development of novel cell-based therapies for cancer. Recent developments in conventional therapies (eg, tumor resection techniques, chemotherapy strategies, and radiation therapy) for treating both metastatic and primary tumors in the brain, particularly glioblastoma have not resulted in a marked increase in patient survival. Preclinical studies have shown that multiple stem cell types exhibit inherent tropism and migrate to the sites of malignancy. Recent studies have validated the feasibility potential of using engineered stem cells as therapeutic agents to target and eliminate malignant tumor cells in the brain. This review will discuss the recent progress in the therapeutic potential of stem cells for tumors in the brain and also provide perspectives for future preclinical studies and clinical translation. PMID:27282399

  8. Characterization of TLX Expression in Neural Stem Cells and Progenitor Cells in Adult Brains

    OpenAIRE

    Shengxiu Li; Guoqiang Sun; Kiyohito Murai; Peng Ye; Yanhong Shi

    2012-01-01

    TLX has been shown to play an important role in regulating the self-renewal and proliferation of neural stem cells in adult brains. However, the cellular distribution of endogenous TLX protein in adult brains remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used immunostaining with a TLX-specific antibody to show that TLX is expressed in both neural stem cells and transit-amplifying neural progenitor cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult mouse brains. Then, using a double thymidine analo...

  9. Are there fetal stem cells in the maternal brain?☆

    OpenAIRE

    DEMIRHAN, OSMAN; Çekin, Necmi; Taştemir, Deniz; Tunç, Erdal; Güzel, Ali İrfan; Meral, Demet; Demirbek, Bülent

    2013-01-01

    Fetal cells can enter maternal blood during pregnancy but whether they can also cross the blood-brain barrier to enter the maternal brain remains poorly understood. Previous results suggest that fetal cells are summoned to repair damage to the mother's brain. If this is confirmed, it would open up new and safer avenues of treatment for brain damage caused by strokes and neural diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether a baby's stem cells can enter the maternal brain during preg...

  10. Expression of c-jun in brain stem following moderate lateral fluid percussion brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of c-jun in brain stem following moderate lateral fluid percussion brain injury in rats, and to observe the temporal patterns of its expressions following percussion.METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into normal control, sham operation control and injury groups. The rats of injury group subjected to moderate lateral fluid percussion injury (0.2 mPa), and then were subdivided into 5 min, 15 min, 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h and 12 h groups according to the time elapsed after injury. The expression of c-jun was studied by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. RESULTS: After percussion for 15 min, Jun positive neurons increased in brain stem progressively, and peaked at 12h. At 5min after percussion, the induction of c-jun mRNA was increased, and remained elevated up to 1h-2h after brain injury. CONCLUSION: The induction and expression of the c-jun in brain stem after fluid percussion brain injury were increased rapidly and lasted for a long time.

  11. MicroRNA-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and regulates glioma cell migration by targeting connective tissue growth factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Kyung Lee

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBM, the most common and aggressive type of malignant glioma, are characterized by increased invasion into the surrounding brain tissues. Despite intensive therapeutic strategies, the median survival of GBM patients has remained dismal over the last decades. In this study we examined the expression of miR-145 in glial tumors and its function in glioma cells. Using TCGA analysis and real-time PCR we found that the expression of miR-145/143 cluster was downregulated in astrocytic tumors compared to normal brain specimens and in glioma cells and glioma stem cells (GSCs compared to normal astrocytes and neural stem cells. Moreover, the low expression of both miR-145 and miR-143 in GBM was correlated with poor patient prognosis. Transfection of glioma cells with miR-145 mimic or transduction with a lentivirus vector expressing pre-miR 145 significantly decreased the migration and invasion of glioma cells. We identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF as a novel target of miR-145 in glioma cells; transfection of the cells with this miRNA decreased the expression of CTGF as determined by Western blot analysis and the expression of its 3'-UTR fused to luciferase. Overexpression of a CTGF plasmid lacking the 3'-UTR and administration of recombinant CTGF protein abrogated the inhibitory effect of miR-145 on glioma cell migration. Similarly, we found that silencing of CTGF decreased the migration of glioma cells. CTGF silencing also decreased the expression of SPARC, phospho-FAK and FAK and overexpression of SPARC abrogated the inhibitory effect of CTGF silencing on cell migration. These results demonstrate that miR-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and its low expression in GBM predicts poor patient prognosis. In addition miR-145 regulates glioma cell migration by targeting CTGF which downregulates SPARC expression. Therefore, miR-145 is an attractive therapeutic target for anti-invasive treatment of astrocytic tumors.

  12. The preventive effects of neural stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells intra-ventricular injection on brain stroke in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mojtaba Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is one of the most important causes of disability in developed countries and, unfortunately, there is no effective treatment for this major problem of central nervous system (CNS; cell therapy may be helpful to recover this disease. In some conditions such as cardiac surgeries and neurosurgeries, there are some possibilities of happening brain stroke. Inflammation of CNS plays an important role in stroke pathogenesis, in addition, apoptosis and neural death could be the other reasons of poor neurological out come after stroke. In this study, we examined the preventive effects of the neural stem cells (NSCs and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs intra-ventricular injected on stroke in rats. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of neural and MSCs for stroke in rats. Materials and Methods: The MSCs were isolated by flashing the femurs and tibias of the male rats with appropriate media. The NSCs were isolated from rat embryo ganglion eminence and they cultured NSCs media till the neurospheres formed. Both NSCs and MSCs were labeled with PKH26-GL. One day before stroke, the cells were injected into lateral ventricle stereotactically. Results: During following for 28 days, the neurological scores indicated that there are better recoveries in the groups received stem cells and they had less lesion volume in their brain measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Furthermore, the activities of caspase-3 were lower in the stem cell received groups than control group and the florescent microscopy images showed that the stem cells migrated to various zones of the brains. Conclusion: Both NSCs and MSCs are capable of protecting the CNS against ischemia and they may be good ways to prevent brain stroke consequences situations.

  13. Comparative evaluation of gadoteridol versus gadopentetate dimeglumine for contrast-enhanced MRI in a rat brain glioma model at 1.5 and 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare gadoteridol and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) with respect to lesion enhancement in a rat brain glioma model at 1. 5 and 3.0 T. Methods: Glioma cells were injected into the brains of 42 male CDF (Fisher 344) rats through implanted cannula to create Glioma animal model. One week after implantation, all rats were randomly divided in to four groups which included 12, 10, 10, 10 rats. The comparisons included the contrast effect of gadoteridol versus gadopentetate dimeglumine at both 1.5 and 3.0 T. In addition, gadoteridol alone was evaluated by comparing the standard dose at both two field strengths and half dose at 3.0 T to a standard full dose at 1.5 T. Two MRI scans for different contrast agent injections were performed in each animal model with an interval of 24 hours. T1-weighted images were analyzed pre-contrast and at five time points (1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 min) post-contrast with respect to lesion signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and contrast enhancement (CE). Student t test was used for statistics. Results: The mean SNR, CNR, and CE were respectively 54.4±3.2, 17.0±3.3 and 20.8±3.4 with gadopentetate dimeglumine versus 53.2±3.2, 17.2±3.1 and 20.8±3.2 with gadoteridol at 1.5 T at every postconuast time point (t=2.247, 0.403, 0.076, P>0.05). The mean SNR, CNR, and CE were respectively 94.8±7.1, 38.0±6.0 and 45.0±6.3 with gadopentetate dimeglumine versus 95.5±2.9, 37.2±2.7 and 45.6±2.8 with gadoteridol at 3.0 T (t= 0.303, 0.573, 0.357, P>0.05). No statistically significant differences were found in these parameters between the two agents at any time point at either field strength. Standard dose gadoteridol demonstrated significant improvements in SNR (51.9±3.0 at 1.5 T vs 86.1±4.9 at 3.0 T), CNR (15.6±3.0 at 1.5 T vs 27.4±5.0 at 3.0 T) and CE (18.6±3.0 at 1.5 T vs 37.3±5.3 at 3.0 T) at 3.0 T as compared to 1.5 T at every time post-contrast (t=36.227, 11.977, 17.106, P0.05). Conclusions

  14. Conjugation Magnetic PAEEP-PLLA Nanoparticles with Lactoferrin as a Specific Targeting MRI Contrast Agent for Detection of Brain Glioma in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Binhua; Wang, Siqi; Rao, Rong; Liu, Xuhan; Xu, Haibo; Wu, Yun; Yang, Xiangliang; Liu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis of malignant brain gliomas is largely based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast agents. In recent years, nano-sized contrast agents have been developed for improved MRI diagnosis. In this study, oleylamine-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (OAM-MNPs) were synthesized with thermal decomposition method and encapsulated in novel amphiphilic poly(aminoethyl ethylene phosphate)/poly(L-lactide) (PAEEP-PLLA) copolymer nanoparticles. The OAM-MNP-loaded PAEEP-PLLA nanoparticles (M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were further conjugated with lactoferrin (Lf) for glioma tumor targeting. The Lf-conjugated M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs (Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The average size of OAM-MNPs, M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs, and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were 8.6 ± 0.3, 165.7 ± 0.6, and 218.2 ± 0.4 nm, with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.185 ± 0.023, 0.192 ± 0.021, and 0.224 ± 0.036, respectively. TEM imaging showed that OAM-MNPs were monodisperse and encapsulated in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. TGA analysis showed that the content of iron oxide nanoparticles was 92.8 % in OAM-MNPs and 45.2 % in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. VSM results indicated that both OAM-MNPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were superparamagnetic, and the saturated magnetic intensity were 77.1 and 74.8 emu/g Fe. Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs exhibited good biocompatibility in cytotoxicity assay. The high cellular uptake of Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs in C6 cells indicated that Lf provided effective targeting for the brain tumor cells. The T 2 relaxation rate (r 2) of M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were calculated to be 167.2 and 151.3 mM(-1) s(-1). In MRI on Wistar rat-bearing glioma tumor, significant contrast enhancement could clearly appear at 4 h after injection and last 48 h. Prussian

  15. Conjugation Magnetic PAEEP-PLLA Nanoparticles with Lactoferrin as a Specific Targeting MRI Contrast Agent for Detection of Brain Glioma in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Binhua; Wang, Siqi; Rao, Rong; Liu, Xuhan; Xu, Haibo; Wu, Yun; Yang, Xiangliang; Liu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    The diagnosis of malignant brain gliomas is largely based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast agents. In recent years, nano-sized contrast agents have been developed for improved MRI diagnosis. In this study, oleylamine-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (OAM-MNPs) were synthesized with thermal decomposition method and encapsulated in novel amphiphilic poly(aminoethyl ethylene phosphate)/poly(L-lactide) (PAEEP-PLLA) copolymer nanoparticles. The OAM-MNP-loaded PAEEP-PLLA nanoparticles (M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were further conjugated with lactoferrin (Lf) for glioma tumor targeting. The Lf-conjugated M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs (Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The average size of OAM-MNPs, M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs, and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were 8.6 ± 0.3, 165.7 ± 0.6, and 218.2 ± 0.4 nm, with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.185 ± 0.023, 0.192 ± 0.021, and 0.224 ± 0.036, respectively. TEM imaging showed that OAM-MNPs were monodisperse and encapsulated in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. TGA analysis showed that the content of iron oxide nanoparticles was 92.8 % in OAM-MNPs and 45.2 % in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. VSM results indicated that both OAM-MNPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were superparamagnetic, and the saturated magnetic intensity were 77.1 and 74.8 emu/g Fe. Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs exhibited good biocompatibility in cytotoxicity assay. The high cellular uptake of Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs in C6 cells indicated that Lf provided effective targeting for the brain tumor cells. The T 2 relaxation rate ( r 2) of M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were calculated to be 167.2 and 151.3 mM-1 s-1. In MRI on Wistar rat-bearing glioma tumor, significant contrast enhancement could clearly appear at 4 h after injection and last 48 h. Prussian blue staining of the section clearly

  16. Monocyte galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptor stimulant immunotherapy of an experimental glioma. Part 1: stimulatory effects on blood monocytes and monocyte-derived cells of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunotherapy with immunostimulants is an attractive therapy against gliomas. C-type lectin receptors specific for galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (GCLR) regulate cellular differentiation, recognition, and trafficking of monocyte-derived cells. A peptide mimetic of GCLR ligands (GCLRP) was used to activate blood monocytes and populations of myeloid-derived cells against a murine glioblastoma. The ability of GCLRP to stimulate phagocytosis by human microglia and monocyte-derived cells of the brain (MDCB) isolated from a human glioblastoma was initially assessed in vitro. Induction of activation markers on blood monocytes was assayed by flow cytometry after administration of GCLRP to naive mice. C57BL/6 mice underwent stereotactic intracranial implantation of GL261 glioma cells and were randomized for tumor size by magnetic resonance imaging, which was also used to assess increase in tumor size. Brain tumor tissues were analyzed using flow cytometry, histology, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with respect to tumor, peritumoral area, and contralateral hemisphere regions. GCLRP exhibited strong stimulatory effect on MDCBs and blood monocytes in vitro and in vivo. GCLRP was associated with an increased percentage of precursors of dendritic cells in the blood (P = 0.003), which differentiated into patrolling macrophages in tumoral (P = 0.001) and peritumoral areas (P = 0.04), rather than into dendritic cells, as in control animals. Treatment with GCLRP did not result in a significant change in survival of mice bearing a tumor. In vitro and in vivo activation of monocytes was achieved by administration of GCLR to mice. GCLRP-activated blood monocytes were recruited to the brain and exhibited specific phenotypes corresponding with tumor region (glioma, peritumoral zone, and contralateral glioma-free hemisphere). GCLRP treatment alone was associated with increased glioma mass as the result of the infiltration of phagocytic cells. Regional specificity for MDCB may have

  17. Delayed radiation injury of brain stem after radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the clinical characteristics, MRI findings, diagnosis, treatment and prognostic factors of patients with radiation induced brain stem injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: From January 1991 to January 2001, 24 patients with radiation injury of brain stem were treated, 14 males and 10 females. The latency ranged from 6 to 38 months, with a median of 18 months. The lesions were located in the pons in 10 patients, mesencephalon + pons in 4, pons + medulla oblongata in 5, medulla oblongata in 2 and mesencephalon + pons + medulla oblongata in 3. MRI findings showed that the injury was chiefly presented as hypointensity foci on T1WI and hyperintensity foci on T2WI. Results: Eighteen patients were treated with dexamethasone in the early phase, with symptoms relieved in 12 patients but unimproved in 6 patients. Eight 44% patients died within the 8-38 months, leaving 16 patients surviving for 0.5 to 6.0 years. Conclusions: Radiation injury of brain stem has a short latency with severe symptoms, signifying poor prognosis. It is suggested that adequate reduction of irradiation volume and dose at the brain stem should be able to lower the incidence of brain stem injury

  18. Rehabilitation of patients with glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, Mary; Henriksson, Roger; Salander, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Disabling sequelae occur in a majority of patients diagnosed with brain tumor, including glioma, such as cognitive deficits, weakness, and visual perceptual changes. Often, multiple impairments are present concurrently. Healthcare staff must be aware of the "biographic disruption" the patient with glioma has experienced. While prognostic considerations factor into rehabilitation goals and expectations, regardless of prognosis the treatment team must offer cohesive support, facilitating hope, function, and quality of life. Awareness of family and caregiver concerns plays an important role in the overall care. Inpatient rehabilitation, especially after surgical resection, has been shown to result in functional improvement and homegoing rates on a par with individuals with other neurologic conditions, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury. Community integration comprises a significant element of life satisfaction, as has been shown in childhood glioma survivors. Employment is often affected by the glioma diagnosis, but may be ameliorated, when appropriate, by addressing modifiable factors such as depression, fatigue, or sleep disturbance, or by workplace accommodations. Further research is needed into many facets of rehabilitation in the setting of glioma, including establishing better care models for consistently identifying and addressing functional limitations in this population, measuring outcomes of various levels of rehabilitation care, identifying optimal physical activity strategies, delineating the long-term effects of rehabilitation interventions, and exploring impact of rehabilitation interventions on caregiver burden. The effective elements of cognitive rehabilitation, including transition of cognitive strategies to everyday living, need to be better defined. PMID:26948361

  19. More Complete Removal of Malignant Brain Tumors by Fluorescence-Guided Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    Benign Neoplasms, Brain; Brain Cancer; Brain Neoplasms, Benign; Brain Neoplasms, Malignant; Brain Tumor, Primary; Brain Tumor, Recurrent; Brain Tumors; Intracranial Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Brain; Neoplasms, Intracranial; Primary Brain Neoplasms; Primary Malignant Brain Neoplasms; Primary Malignant Brain Tumors; Gliomas; Glioblastoma

  20. A North American brain tumor consortium phase II study of poly-ICLC for adult patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Lee, Bee L; Prados, Michael D; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Abrey, Lauren; Fink, Karen; Lieberman, Frank; Mehta, Minesh; Ian Robins, H; Junck, Larry; Salazar, Andres M; Chang, Susan M

    2009-01-01

    This phase II study was designed to determine the objective response rate and 6-month progression free survival of adult patients with recurrent supratentorial anaplastic glioma when treated with the immune modulator, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized with polylysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC). This was an open-labeled, single arm phase II study. Patients were treated with poly-ICLC alone. Patients may have had treatment for no more than two prior relapses. Treatment with poly-ICLC continued until tumor progression. Fifty five patients were enrolled in the study. Ten were ineligible after central review of pathology. Eleven percent of patients (5 of 45) had a radiographic response. Time to progression was known for 39 patients and 6 remain on treatment. The estimated 6-month progression free survival was 24%. The median survival time was 43 weeks. Poly-ICLC was well tolerated, but there was no improvement in 6-month progression free survival compared to historical database nor was there an encouraging objective radiographic response rate. Based on this study, poly-ICLC does not improve 6moPFS in patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas but may be worth further study in combination with agents such as temozolomide. PMID:18850068

  1. Anatomy of brain-stem white-matter tracts shown by diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We acquired high-resolution MRI and anisotropically diffusion-weighted images (DWI) with direction-selective gradients of the brain stem in 20 healthy volunteers, to identify brain-stem structures such as white-matter tracts and nuclei which show diffusion anisotropy. After averaging and superposition of individual cuts, the images were projected onto appropriate plates of the Schaltenbrand and Wahren anatomical atlas. We identified 20 structures - white-matter tracts and some nuclei - with high contrast. The direction of fibres could be determined as areas of increased (parallel to) or decreased diffusion (perpendicular to the gradient). This study may contribute to understanding of the functional anatomy of the brain stem. (orig.)

  2. Patient-derived stem cells: pathways to drug discovery for brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Mackay-Sim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of drug discovery through stem cell biology is based on technological developments whose genesis is now coincident. The first is automated cell microscopy with concurrent advances in image acquisition and analysis, known as high content screening (HCS. The second is patient-derived stem cells for modelling the cell biology of brain diseases. HCS has developed from the requirements of the pharmaceutical industry for high throughput assays to screen thousands of chemical compounds in the search for new drugs. HCS combines new fluorescent probes with automated microscopy and computational power to quantify the effects of compounds on cell functions. Stem cell biology has advanced greatly since the discovery of genetic reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. There is now a rush of papers describing their generation from patients with various diseases of the nervous system. Although the majority of these have been genetic diseases, iPSCs have been generated from patients with complex diseases (schizophrenia and sporadic Parkinson’s disease. Some genetic diseases are also modelled in embryonic stem cells generated from blastocysts rejected during in vitro fertilisation. Neural stem cells have been isolated from post-mortem brain of Alzheimer’s patients and neural stem cells generated from biopsies of the olfactory organ of patients is another approach. These “olfactory neurosphere-derived” cells demonstrate robust disease-specific phenotypes in patients with schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. High content screening is already in use to find small molecules for the generation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenges for using stem cells for drug discovery are to develop robust stem cell culture methods that meet the rigorous requirements for repeatable, consistent quantities of defined cell types at the industrial scale necessary for high

  3. Risk factors for astrocytic glioma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the brain in young children: a report from the Children's Cancer Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunin, G R; Buckley, J D; Boesel, C P; Rorke, L B; Meadows, A T

    1994-01-01

    We conducted a matched case-control study to investigate risk factors for the two most common types of brain tumors in children, astrocytic glioma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). Since the study focused on gestational exposures, we restricted it to young children because these exposures would be expected to act early in life. Parents of 155 astrocytic glioma cases, 166 PNET cases, and controls identified by random digit dialing completed telephone interviews. Few associations occurred with the hypothesized risk factors, which were gestational exposure to alcohol, hair coloring products, farms, and substances containing N-nitroso compounds (passive smoking, makeup, incense, new cars, pacifiers, baby bottles, beer). Of the products studied that contain N-nitroso compounds, only beer was associated with a significantly increased risk of either tumor type [odds ratio (OR) for PNET = 4.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-22.1; P = 0.04]. Elevated ORs for PNET were observed for farm residence of the mother during the pregnancy (OR = 3.7; 95% CI, 0.8-23.9; P = 0.06) and of the child for at least a year (OR = 5.0; 95% CI, 1.1-46.8; P = 0.04). Significant associations with astrocytoma were observed for mother's use of kerosene (OR = 8.9; 95% CI, 1.1-71.1; P = 0.04) and birth by Caesarean section (OR = 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-3.2; P = 0.03). History of miscarriage was associated with a lower risk of PNET (OR = 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9; P = 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8019366

  4. Brain Cancer Stem Cells Display Preferential Sensitivity to Akt Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Eyler, Christine E.; Foo, Wen-Chi; LaFiura, Katherine M.; McLendon, Roger E.; Hjelmeland, Anita B.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2008-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are among the most lethal cancers, and conventional therapies are largely limited to palliation. Novel therapies targeted against specific molecular pathways may offer improved efficacy and reduced toxicity compared to conventional therapies, but initial clinical trials of molecular targeted agents in brain cancer therapy have been frequently disappointing. In brain tumors and other cancers, subpopulations of tumor cells have recently been characterized by their ability...

  5. Development of functional human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons in mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Muotri, Alysson R.; Nakashima, Kinichi; Toni, Nicolas; Sandler, Vladislav M.; Gage, Fred H

    2005-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent entities, theoretically capable of generating a whole-body spectrum of distinct cell types. However, differentiation of these cells has been observed only in culture or during teratoma formation. Our results show that human embryonic stem cells implanted in the brain ventricles of embryonic mice can differentiate into functional neural lineages and generate mature, active human neurons that successfully integrate into the adult mouse forebrain. Moreo...

  6. Positron Emission Tomography Using Fluorine F 18 EF5 to Find Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Meningeal Melanocytoma

  7. Correlation of auditory brain stem response and the MRI measurements in neuro-degenerative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Hidekazu (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate correlations of several MRI measurements of the cranium and brain, functioning as a volume conductor, to the auditory brain stem response (ABR) in neuro-degenerative disorders. The subjects included forty-seven patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and sixteen of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between I-V and III-V interpeak latencies (IPLs) and the area of cranium and brain in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between I-III and III-V IPLs and the area in the longitudinal section of those with ALS. And, also there were statistically significant correlations between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of brain stem as well as that of the cranium in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of the cerebrum in the longitudinal section of ALS. In conclusion, in the ABR, the IPLs were prolonged and the amplitude of the V wave was decreased while the MRI size of the cranium and brain increased. When the ABR is applied to neuro-degenerative disorders, it might be important to consider not only the conduction of the auditory tracts in the brain stem, but also the correlations of the size of the cranium and brain which act as a volume conductor. (author).

  8. Correlation of auditory brain stem response and the MRI measurements in neuro-degenerative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate correlations of several MRI measurements of the cranium and brain, functioning as a volume conductor, to the auditory brain stem response (ABR) in neuro-degenerative disorders. The subjects included forty-seven patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and sixteen of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between I-V and III-V interpeak latencies (IPLs) and the area of cranium and brain in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between I-III and III-V IPLs and the area in the longitudinal section of those with ALS. And, also there were statistically significant correlations between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of brain stem as well as that of the cranium in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of the cerebrum in the longitudinal section of ALS. In conclusion, in the ABR, the IPLs were prolonged and the amplitude of the V wave was decreased while the MRI size of the cranium and brain increased. When the ABR is applied to neuro-degenerative disorders, it might be important to consider not only the conduction of the auditory tracts in the brain stem, but also the correlations of the size of the cranium and brain which act as a volume conductor. (author)

  9. Dosimetric comparison of the related parameters between simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy and sequential boost conformal radiotherapy for postoperative malignant glioma of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric of different parameter of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) with sequential boost conformal radiotherapy (SB-CRT) for postoperative malignant glioma of the brain. Methods: Ten patients with malignant glioma of brain were selected to study. Each patient was simulated all by CT and MRI, and the imagings of CT and MRI were all sent to Pinnacle3 planning system. The fusion technology with MR-CT imaging was used on Pinnacle3 planning system. The target volume was delineated and defined based on MRI. The postoperative residual lesion and resection cavity were defined as gross tumor volume (GTV) and expanded GTV some scope was defined as clinical target volume (CTV). The margins of GTV expanded 10 mm and 25 mm were defined as CTV1 and CTV2 respectively. CTV1 and CTV2 all enlarged 5 mm were defined as PTV1 and PTV2 respectively. The plans of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy and sequential boost conformal radiotherapy were respectively designed for each patient using Pinnacle3 planning system and the dosimetric of different parameter was compared. The prescribe dose of SIB-IMRT was PTV1: 62.5 Gy/25 f, PTV2: 50.0 Gy/25 f; and SB-CRT was PTV1: 66.0 Gy/33 f, PTV2: 50.0 Gy/25 f. The dosimetries of different parameters of SIB-IMRT and SB-CRT were compared by using Paired-Samples T Test. Results: The maximum and mean dose of PTV1, PTV2, and brainstem were of significant difference (P0.05). Conclusion: The SIB-IMRT plan is better than the SB-CRT plan. The CI and HI of SIB-IMRT are superior to SB-CRT. At the same time, it can preserve the important organs such as brainstem and reduce the mean dose of whole brain. On the other hand it can shorten the total period of therapy time. (authors)

  10. P61CATHEPSIN K IN AN IN VITRO MODEL OF GLIOMA ANGIOGENESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, S.; Stevenson, K.; Verbovšek, U.; Yin, L.H.; Pilkington, G.; Lah, T.; Fillmore, H.L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cathepsin K, a cysteine protease expressed in osteoclasts, involved in bone resorption is expressed in other cells including brain cells. Reports suggest that cathepsin K may be involved in cancers associated with bone metastasis. Little is known about its expression in brain tumours. There is evidence of a potential interaction of cathepsin K with stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1) in haemapoietic stem cell motility. Because of the importance of SDF-1 in brain tumour angiogenesis and recruitment of glioma like stem cells to vascular niches, we investigated cathepsin K in an in vitro model of angiogenesis. METHOD: Brain endothelial cells (hCMEC) and glioma cell lines (SNB-19 and UP-007) cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions were analysed using flow cytometry and western blotting. Angiogenesis was assessed using an in vitro model of brain endothelial cell tube formation. Brain endothelial tube length, number of tube projections and number of branch points were measured. RESULTS: Under hypoxic conditions, there is a significant decrease in cathepsin K expression in brain endothelial cells when compared to normoxic conditions (P ≤ 0.05). Addition of Odanacatib, a cathepsin K inhibitor, to the angiogenesis assay revealed that inhibition of cathepsin K resulted in a significant increase in endothelial tube length in normoxic conditions (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The decrease in cathepsin K expression in endothelial cells under hypoxia, coupled with the increase in tube length following inhibition of cathepsin K, suggests an involvement of cathepsin K with angiogenesis. These data provide rationale and basis for further study into the function of cathepsin K and its relationship with SDF-1 in gliomas.

  11. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Mouse Brain Stem and Cervical Spinal Cord

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Joong Hee; Haldar, Justin; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2008-01-01

    In vivo diffusion tensor imaging measurements of the mouse brain stem and cervical spinal cord are presented. Utilizing actively decoupled transmit/receive coils, high resolution diffusion images (117 × 59 × 500 μm3) were acquired at 4.7 T within an hour. Both brain stem and cervical spine displayed clear gray-white matter contrast. The cervical spinal cord white matter showed similar tissue characteristics as seen in the thoracic cord. The coherent fiber orientation in the white matter was o...

  12. Characterization of highly proliferative secondary tumor clusters along host blood vessels in malignant glioma

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, TING-CHUNG; Cheng, Chun-Yu; YANG, WEI-HSUN; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the extensive invasion of tumor cells into normal brain tissue, a life-threatening feature of malignant gliomas. How invasive tumor cells migrate into normal brain tissue and form a secondary tumor structure remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the morphological and phenotypic changes of glioma cells during invasion in a C6 glioma model were investigated. C6 glioma cells were stereotactically injected into the right putamen region of ...

  13. Aberrant brain stem morphometry associated with sleep disturbance in drug-naïve subjects with Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Han; Jung, Won Sang; Choi, Woo Hee; Lim, Hyun Kook

    2016-01-01

    Objective Among patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), sleep disturbances are common and serious noncognitive symptoms. Previous studies of AD patients have identified deformations in the brain stem, which may play an important role in the regulation of sleep. The aim of this study was to further investigate the relationship between sleep disturbances and alterations in brain stem morphology in AD. Materials and methods In 44 patients with AD and 40 healthy elderly controls, sleep disturbances were measured using the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep subscale. We employed magnetic resonance imaging-based automated segmentation tools to examine the relationship between sleep disturbances and changes in brain stem morphology. Results Analyses of the data from AD subjects revealed significant correlations between the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep-subscale scores and structural alterations in the left posterior lateral region of the brain stem, as well as normalized brain stem volumes. In addition, significant group differences in posterior brain stem morphology were observed between the AD group and the control group. Conclusion This study is the first to analyze an association between sleep disturbances and brain stem morphology in AD. In line with previous findings, this study lends support to the possibility that brain stem structural abnormalities might be important neurobiological mechanisms underlying sleep disturbances associated with AD. Further longitudinal research is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27601903

  14. Sonic hedgehog controls stem cell behavior in the postnatal and adult brain

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Veronica; Lim, D A; Dahmane, Nadia; Sanchez, Pilar; Brionne, T. C.; Herzberg, C. D.; Gitton, Yorick; Carleton, Alan; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Ruiz Altaba, Ariel

    2005-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling controls many aspects of ontogeny, orchestrating congruent growth and patterning. During brain development, Shh regulates early ventral patterning while later on it is critical for the regulation of precursor proliferation in the dorsal brain, namely in the neocortex, tectum and cerebellum. We have recently shown that Shh also controls the behavior of cells with stem cell properties in the mouse embryonic neocortex, and additional studies have implicated it in t...

  15. Physics strategies for sparing neural stem cells during whole-brain radiation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Neil; Chuang, Cynthia; Pouliot, Jean; Hwang, Andrew; Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Currently, there are no successful long-term treatments or preventive strategies for radiation-induced cognitive impairments, and only a few possibilities have been suggested. One such approach involves reducing the dose to neural stem cell compartments (within and outside of the hippocampus) during whole-brain radiation treatments for brain metastases. This study investigates the fundamental physics issues associated with the sparing of neural stem cells during photon radiotherapy for brain metastases. Methods: Several factors influence the stem cell dose: intracranial scattering, collimator leakage, beam energy, and total number of beams. The relative importance of these factors is investigated through a set of radiation therapy plans, which are all variations of an initial 6 MV intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan designed to simultaneously deliver a whole-brain dose of 30 Gy and maximally reduce stem cell compartment dose. Additionally, an in-house leaf segmentation algorithm was developed that utilizes jaw motion to minimize the collimator leakage. Results: The plans are all normalized such that 50% of the PTV receives 30 Gy. For the initial 6 MV IMRT plan, 50% of the stem cells receive a dose greater than 6.3 Gy. Calculations indicate that 3.6 Gy of this dose originates from intracranial scattering. The jaw-tracking segmentation algorithm, used in conjunction with direct machine parameter optimization, reduces the 50% stem cell dose to 4.3 and 3.7 Gy for 6 and 10 MV treatment beams, respectively. Conclusions: Intracranial scattering alone is responsible for a large dose contribution to the stem cell compartment. It is, therefore, important to minimize other contributing factors, particularly the collimator leakage, to maximally reduce dose to these critical structures. The use of collimator jaw tracking in conjunction with modern collimators can minimize this leakage.

  16. Immunohistochemical expression of stem cell, endothelial cell, and chemosensitivity markers in primary glioma spheroids cultured in serum-containing and serum-free medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karina; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Andersen, Claus;

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the influence of serum-free medium (SFM) supplemented with epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor compared with conventional serum-containing medium (SCM) on the phenotype of organotypic primary spheroids from seven gliomas....

  17. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoto, Masafumi, E-mail: mkanoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki, E-mail: thosoya@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Toyoguchi, Yuuki, E-mail: c-elegans_0201g@mail.goo.ne.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Oda, Atsuko, E-mail: a.oda@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis.

  18. Syrinx of the Spinal Cord and Brain Stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... imaging (MRI) of the entire spinal cord and brain is done after paramagnetic contrast agent, such as ... neurosurgeon may make a hole in a syrinx to drain it and prevent it from expanding, but surgery ...

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor ameliorates brain stem cardiovascular dysregulation during experimental temporal lobe status epilepticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yi Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Status epilepticus (SE is an acute, prolonged epileptic crisis with a mortality rate of 20-30%; the underlying mechanism is not completely understood. We assessed the hypothesis that brain stem cardiovascular dysregulation occurs during SE because of oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, a key nucleus of the baroreflex loop; to be ameliorated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF via an antioxidant action. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a clinically relevant experimental model of temporal lobe SE (TLSE using Sprague-Dawley rats, sustained hippocampal seizure activity was accompanied by progressive hypotension that was preceded by a reduction in baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone; heart rate and baroreflex-mediated cardiac responses remained unaltered. Biochemical experiments further showed concurrent augmentation of superoxide anion, phosphorylated p47(phox subunit of NADPH oxidase and mRNA or protein levels of BDNF, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB, angiotensin AT1 receptor subtype (AT1R, nitric oxide synthase II (NOS II or peroxynitrite in RVLM. Whereas pretreatment by microinjection bilaterally into RVLM of a superoxide dismutase mimetic (tempol, a specific antagonist of NADPH oxidase (apocynin or an AT1R antagonist (losartan blunted significantly the augmented superoxide anion or phosphorylated p47(phox subunit in RVLM, hypotension and the reduced baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone during experimental TLSE, pretreatment with a recombinant human TrkB-Fc fusion protein or an antisense bdnf oligonucleotide significantly potentiated all those events, alongside peroxynitrite. However, none of the pretreatments affected the insignificant changes in heart rate and baroreflex-mediated cardiac responses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that formation of peroxynitrite by a reaction between superoxide anion generated by NADPH oxidase in RVLM on activation by AT1R and NOS II

  20. Defunct brain stem cardiovascular regulation underlies cardiovascular collapse associated with methamphetamine intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Faith CH

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intoxication from the psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH because of cardiovascular collapse is a common cause of death within the abuse population. For obvious reasons, the heart has been taken as the primary target for this METH-induced toxicity. The demonstration that failure of brain stem cardiovascular regulation, rather than the heart, holds the key to cardiovascular collapse induced by the pesticide mevinphos implicates another potential underlying mechanism. The present study evaluated the hypothesis that METH effects acute cardiovascular depression by dampening the functional integrity of baroreflex via an action on brain stem nuclei that are associated with this homeostatic mechanism. Methods The distribution of METH in brain and heart on intravenous administration in male Sprague-Dawley rats, and the resultant changes in arterial pressure (AP, heart rate (HR and indices for baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone and cardiac responses were evaluated, alongside survival rate and time. Results Intravenous administration of METH (12 or 24 mg/kg resulted in a time-dependent and dose-dependent distribution of the psychostimulant in brain and heart. The distribution of METH to neural substrates associated with brain stem cardiovascular regulation was significantly larger than brain targets for its neurological and psychological effects; the concentration of METH in cardiac tissues was the lowest among all tissues studied. In animals that succumbed to METH, the baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone and cardiac response were defunct, concomitant with cessation of AP and HR. On the other hand, although depressed, those two indices in animals that survived were maintained, alongside sustainable AP and HR. Linear regression analysis further revealed that the degree of dampening of brain stem cardiovascular regulation was positively and significantly correlated with the concentration of METH in key neural

  1. Role of adrenal catecholamines in cerebrovasodilation evoked from brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied whether adrenal medullary catecholamines (CAs) contribute to the metabolically linked increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal medullary reticular formation (DMRF). Rats were anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated. The DMRF was electrically stimulated with intermittent trains of pulses through microelectrodes stereotaxically implanted. Blood gases were controlled and, during stimulation, arterial pressure was maintained within the autoregulated range for rCBF. rCBF and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability were determined in homogenates of brain regions by using [14C]iodoantipyrine and α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), respectively, as tracers. Plasma CAs (epinephrine and norepinephrine) were measured radioenzymatically. DMRF stimulation increased rCBF throughout the brain and elevated plasma CAs substantially. Acute bilateral adrenalectomy abolished the increase in plasma epinephrine, reduced the increases in flow in cerebral cortex, and abolished them elsewhere in brain. They conclude that the increases in rCBF elicited from the DMRF has two components, one dependent on, and the other independent of CAs. Since the BBB is impermeable to CAs and DMRF stimulation fails to open the BBB, the results suggest that DMRF stimulations allows, through a mechanism not yet determined, circulating CAs to act on brain and affect brain function

  2. Stem cells and treatment of brain and spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Suppl.1 (2009), s. 40-40. ISSN 1742-464X. [Congress of the Federation-of-European-Biochemical-Societies /34./. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  3. Motor Network Plasticity and Low-Frequency Oscillations Abnormalities in Patients with Brain Gliomas: A Functional MRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Chen; Zhang, Ming; Min, Zhigang; Rana, Netra; Zhang, Qiuli; Liu, Xin; Li, Min; Lin, Pan

    2014-01-01

    Brain plasticity is often associated with the process of slow-growing tumor formation, which remodels neural organization and optimizes brain network function. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether motor function plasticity would display deficits in patients with slow-growing brain tumors located in or near motor areas, but who were without motor neurological deficits. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to probe motor networks in 15 patients with histopatholo...

  4. EZH2 Protects Glioma Stem Cells from Radiation-Induced Cell Death in a MELK/FOXM1-Dependent Manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Sung-Hak; Joshi, Kaushal; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker;

    2015-01-01

    repressive complex 2, EZH2, is targeted by the MELK-FOXM1 complex, which in turn promotes resistance to radiation in GSCs. Clinically, EZH2 and MELK are coexpressed in GBM and significantly induced in postirradiation recurrent tumors whose expression is inversely correlated with patient prognosis. Through a......Glioblastoma (GBM)-derived tumorigenic stem-like cells (GSCs) may play a key role in therapy resistance. Previously, we reported that the mitotic kinase MELK binds and phosphorylates the oncogenic transcription factor FOXM1 in GSCs. Here, we demonstrate that the catalytic subunit of Polycomb...... essential for GSC radioresistance and therefore raise the possibility that MELK-FOXM1-driven EZH2 signaling can serve as a therapeutic target in irradiation-resistant GBM tumors....

  5. Brainstem gliomas - A clinicopathological study of 45 cases with p53 immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badhe Prerna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brainstem tumors represent 10% of central nervous system tumors, accounting for 30% of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. AIMS: The aim of this study was to clinicopathologically correlate 45 cases of brain stem gliomas and determine the occurrence and prognostic significance of p53 expression. MATERIALS AND METHOD: 45 cases of brain stem gliomas encountered during a 19-year period. 30 were diagnosed by surgical biopsy and 15 at autopsy. In 25 cases p53 immunohistochemistry (Avidin Biotinylated technique was performed. The WHO brain tumor classification and Stroink's CT classification were applied. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Chi square test. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: 51 % of gliomas were observed in the first decade of life. The female to male ratio was 1.04: 1. The commonest presenting features were cranial nerve palsies (33% and cerebellar signs (29.8%. 55.55% of cases were located in the pons, 31.01% in the medulla and 13.33% in the midbrain. Diffuse astrocytomas were seen in 40 cases (5% were Grade I, 47.5%Grade II, 32.5% Grade III and 15% Grade IV and pilocytic astrocytomas in 5 cases. Grade IV patients had 2- 3 mitoses /10 high power fields and had a poorer survival rate. Grade II astrocytomas were treated with excision and radiotherapy, while grade III and IV tumors were treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy (CCNU. Improvement was noted in 20% of patients postoperatively. The outcome was better in patients who were treated surgically. p53 is a frequently mutated gene in brain stem astrocytomas. It was found in 50 % of glioblastoma multiforme, 28.57% of grade III astrocytoma and 12.5% of grade II astrocytoma, while grade 1 astrocytomas failed to express p53 protein. p53 positivity was more in high grade lesions, decreasing significantly in lower grade lesions.

  6. Are human dental papilla-derived stem cell and human brain-derived neural stem cell transplantations suitable for treatment of Parkinson's disease?★

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Hyung Ho; Min, Joongkee; Shin, Nari; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Jin-Mo; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Hwang, Onyou; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of neural stem cells has been reported as a possible approach for replacing impaired dopaminergic neurons. In this study, we tested the efficacy of early-stage human dental papilla-derived stem cells and human brain-derived neural stem cells in rat models of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease. Rats received a unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into right medial forebrain bundle, followed 3 weeks later by injections of PBS, early-stage human dental papilla-der...

  7. Stem cells and therapy of brain and spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla; Glogarová, Kateřina; Urdzíková, Lucia; Lesný, Petr; Hampl, Aleš; Dvořák, Petr

    Hradec Králové, 2003, s. 65. ISBN 80-239-1413-8. [Symposium of the Czech Society of Histo- and Cytochemistry with International Participation /40./. Hradec Králové (CZ), 16.09.2003-19.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  8. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Tayama, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Masahito; Murakawa, Kazuyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-01-01

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author).

  9. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author)

  10. EZH2 Protects Glioma Stem Cells from Radiation-Induced Cell Death in a MELK/FOXM1-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hak Kim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM-derived tumorigenic stem-like cells (GSCs may play a key role in therapy resistance. Previously, we reported that the mitotic kinase MELK binds and phosphorylates the oncogenic transcription factor FOXM1 in GSCs. Here, we demonstrate that the catalytic subunit of Polycomb repressive complex 2, EZH2, is targeted by the MELK-FOXM1 complex, which in turn promotes resistance to radiation in GSCs. Clinically, EZH2 and MELK are coexpressed in GBM and significantly induced in postirradiation recurrent tumors whose expression is inversely correlated with patient prognosis. Through a gain-and loss-of-function study, we show that MELK or FOXM1 contributes to GSC radioresistance by regulation of EZH2. We further demonstrate that the MELK-EZH2 axis is evolutionarily conserved in Caenorhabditis elegans. Collectively, these data suggest that the MELK-FOXM1-EZH2 signaling axis is essential for GSC radioresistance and therefore raise the possibility that MELK-FOXM1-driven EZH2 signaling can serve as a therapeutic target in irradiation-resistant GBM tumors.

  11. 经侧脑室注射人脐带间充质干细胞向胶质瘤趋化能力的实验研究%The experimental investigation of glioma-trophic capacity of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells after intraventricular administration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范存刚; 王栋梁; 张庆俊; 周景儒

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the glioma-trophic migration capacity of human umbilical cordderived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) by intraventricular administration.Methods The umbilical cord tissue were obtained during full-term pregnancy cesarean section under sterile conditions.This study was approved by Ethics Committee and got the informed consent of patient.The hUC-MSCs were isolated by trypsin and collagenase digestion,followed by adherent culture methods.The characteristics of isolated hUC-MSCs were demonstrated by cell morphylogy,phenotype analysis and multi-differentiation potentials into adipocytes,osteoblasts and neural ceils.Then the hUC-MSCs were labeled with CM-DiI and injected into contralateral ventricle of glioma of the C6 glioma-bearing Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats.Two weeks later,the rats were sacrificed and the brains were taken out to examine the migration and distribution of hUCMSCs in the tumor bed,at the interface of tumor and cerebral parenchyma as well as the tumor satelites infiltrating into the normal brain.Results The hUC-MSCs demonstrated plastic-adherent characterization and homogeneous fibroblastic-like morphylogy in culture,expression of specific surface phenotypes of MSCs (CD13,CD29,CD44,CD90) but not endothelial or hematopoietic markers (CD14,CD31,CD34,CD38,CD45,CD133),and muti-differentiatiation potentials into Oil red O stained adipocytes,Alizarin red S stained osteoblasts,neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-positive neurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)positive astrocytes in permissive inducive conditions.Importantly,after labeled hUC-MSCs injection into contralateral ventricle of glioma,the hUC-MSCs migrated from initial injection site to the glioma mass and along the interface of tumor and brain,and some of them "chasing" the glioma satellites infiltrated into the normal parenchyma.Conclusion The hUC-MSCs possess prominent tumor-specific targeting capacity and extensive intratumoral distribution in glioma models.Thus,they may

  12. Monocyte galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptor stimulant immunotherapy of an experimental glioma. Part 1: stimulatory effects on blood monocytes and monocyte-derived cells of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushchayev SV

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sergiy V Kushchayev,1 Tejas Sankar,1 Laura L Eggink,4,5 Yevgeniya S Kushchayeva,5 Philip C Wiener,1,5 J Kenneth Hoober,5,6 Jennifer Eschbacher,3 Ruolan Liu,2 Fu-Dong Shi,2 Mohammed G Abdelwahab,4 Adrienne C Scheck,4 Mark C Preul11Neurosurgery Research Laboratory, 2Neuroimmunology Laboratory, 3Department of Pathology, 4Neurooncology Research, Barrow Neurological Institute, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, 5School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, 6Susavion Biosciences, Inc, Tempe, AZ, USAObjectives: Immunotherapy with immunostimulants is an attractive therapy against gliomas. C-type lectin receptors specific for galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (GCLR regulate cellular differentiation, recognition, and trafficking of monocyte-derived cells. A peptide mimetic of GCLR ligands (GCLRP was used to activate blood monocytes and populations of myeloid-derived cells against a murine glioblastoma.Methods: The ability of GCLRP to stimulate phagocytosis by human microglia and monocyte-derived cells of the brain (MDCB isolated from a human glioblastoma was initially assessed in vitro. Induction of activation markers on blood monocytes was assayed by flow cytometry after administration of GCLRP to naive mice. C57BL/6 mice underwent stereotactic intracranial implantation of GL261 glioma cells and were randomized for tumor size by magnetic resonance imaging, which was also used to assess increase in tumor size. Brain tumor tissues were analyzed using flow cytometry, histology, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with respect to tumor, peritumoral area, and contralateral hemisphere regions.Results: GCLRP exhibited strong stimulatory effect on MDCBs and blood monocytes in vitro and in vivo. GCLRP was associated with an increased percentage of precursors of dendritic cells in the blood (P = 0.003, which differentiated into patrolling macrophages in tumoral (P = 0.001 and peritumoral areas (P = 0.04, rather than into dendritic cells

  13. Stem Cells Expand Insights into Human Brain Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Substantial expansion in the number of cerebral cortex neurons is thought to underlie cognitive differences between humans and other primates, although the mechanisms underlying this expansion are unclear. Otani et al. (2016) utilize PSC-derived brain organoids to study how species-specific differences in cortical progenitor proliferation may underlie cortical evolution. PMID:27058930

  14. Does State Merit-Based Aid Stem Brain Drain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Ness, Erik C.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors use college enrollment and migration data to test the brain drain hypothesis. Their results suggest that state merit scholarship programs do indeed stanch the migration of "best and brightest" students to other states. In the aggregate and on average, the implementation of state merit aid programs increases the total…

  15. Prediction of malignancy degree in brain glioma using selective neural networks ensemble%基于聚类算法的选择性神经网络集成在大脑胶质瘤诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘天羽; 李国正; 吴耿锋

    2006-01-01

    A clustering algorithm based selective neural networks ensemble (CLUSEN) is proposed to predict the degree of malignancy in brain glioma.Since the degree prediction of malignancy is critical before brain surgery, many learning methods are used like rule induction algorithm, single neural networks, support vector machines, etc.Ensemble learning methods can improve the generalization of single learning machine, and are becoming popular in the machine learning and medical data processing communities.The procedure of CLUSEN can efficiently remove redundancy learning individuals and help improve the diversity of ensemble methods.CLUSEN is used to predict the degree of malignancy in brain glioma.Experimental results on a set of brain glioma data show that, compared to support vector machines, rule induction and single neural networks, the classification accuracy of CLUSEN is higher.

  16. Aberrant brain-stem morphometry associated with sleep disturbance in drug-naïve subjects with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JH

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ji Han Lee,1 Won Sang Jung,2 Woo Hee Choi,3 Hyun Kook Lim4 1Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA; 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Nuclear Medicine, 4Department of Psychiatry, Saint Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, South Korea Objective: Among patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, sleep disturbances are common and serious noncognitive symptoms. Previous studies of AD patients have identified deformations in the brain stem, which may play an important role in the regulation of sleep. The aim of this study was to further investigate the relationship between sleep disturbances and alterations in brain stem morphology in AD.Materials and methods: In 44 patients with AD and 40 healthy elderly controls, sleep disturbances were measured using the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep subscale. We employed magnetic resonance imaging-based automated segmentation tools to examine the relationship between sleep disturbances and changes in brain stem morphology.Results: Analyses of the data from AD subjects revealed significant correlations between the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep-subscale scores and structural alterations in the left posterior lateral region of the brain stem, as well as normalized brain stem volumes. In addition, significant group differences in posterior brain stem morphology were observed between the AD group and the control group.Conclusion: This study is the first to analyze an association between sleep disturbances and brain stem morphology in AD. In line with previous findings, this study lends support to the possibility that brain stem structural abnormalities might be important neurobiological mechanisms underlying sleep disturbances associated with AD. Further longitudinal research is needed to confirm these findings. Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, sleep, brain stem, MRI, shape analysis

  17. 低级别胶质瘤患者脑功能区的可塑性%Brain Functional Areas Plasticity of Patients with Low Grade Glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑刚

    2013-01-01

    Low grade glioma( LGG ) is a common disease in neurosurgery, it often invades brain functional regions with infiltrative growth. Patients with LGG always have no neurological deficits when they are discovered. Nowadays operation is still the first-line treatment, how to resect the tumor in maximum extent while preserving neurological function is still an challenge to neurosurgeons. In recent years,it's found much plasticity of brain functional areas exists in patients with LGG, and the reorganization of functional regions have different models. According to this LGG's feature,the operative strategy can be adjusted based on different reorganization models of functional regions in different patients, to increase the extent of resection and decrease the morbidity.%低级别胶质瘤是神经外科的常见疾病,其呈浸润性生长,多累及脑功能区,发病时多无神经功能障碍.目前手术切除仍是首选的治疗方案,如何在最大程度地切除肿瘤的同时保留神经功能,对神经外科医师来说仍是一项挑战.近年来发现,在低级别胶质瘤患者中,脑功能区存在较大的可塑性,并且存在着不同的功能区重构模式.对低级别胶质瘤的这种特性的研究和利用,可针对不同患者脑功能重构的不同模式调整相应的手术策略,从而提高手术切除率,降低病残率.

  18. Classic and novel stem cell niches in brain homeostasis and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruihe; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2015-12-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) critical for the continued production of new neurons and glia are sequestered in distinct areas of the brain called stem cell niches. Until recently, only two forebrain sites, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus, have been recognized adult stem cell niches (Alvarez-Buylla and Lim, 2004; Doetsch et al., 1999a, 1999b; Doetsch, 2003a, 2003b; Lie et al., 2004; Ming and Song, 2005). Nonetheless, the last decade has been witness to a growing literature suggesting that in fact the adult brain contains stem cell niches along the entire extent of the ventricular system. These niches are capable of widespread neurogenesis and gliogenesis, particularly after injury (Barnabé-Heider et al., 2010; Carlén et al., 2009; Decimo et al., 2012; Lin et al., 2015; Lindvall and Kokaia, 2008; Robins et al., 2013) or other inductive stimuli (Bennett et al., 2009; Cunningham et al., 2012; Decimo et al., 2011; Kokoeva et al., 2007, 2005; Lee et al., 2012a, 2012b; Migaud et al., 2010; Pencea et al., 2001b; Sanin et al., 2013; Suh et al., 2007; Sundholm-Peters et al., 2004; Xu et al., 2005; Zhang et al., 2007). This review focuses on the role of these novel and classic brain niches in maintaining adult neurogenesis and gliogenesis in response to normal physiological and injury-related pathological cues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:25931262

  19. In vivo evaluation of the uptake of [(123)I]FIAU, [(123)I]IVFRU and [(123)I]IVFAU by normal mouse brain: potential for noninvasive assessment of HSV-1 thymidine kinase gene expression in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H-F; Winkeler, A; Moharram, S; Knaus, E E; Dittmar, K; Stöckle, M; Heiss, W D; Wiebe, L I; Jacobs, A H; Jacob, A J

    2008-01-01

    Radioiodinated 5-iodo-1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl)uracil (F *IAU) is most commonly used for noninvasive assessment of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) gene expression. However, it does not permeate the intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) because of its moderate lipophilicity. In this work, three iodo-nucleosides, FIAU, IVFRU, and IVFAU, were radiolabeled with iodine-123 and tested for permeation of the BBB in mice and for potential measurement of HSV-1-tk gene expression in gliomas. The results demonstrate that brain uptake and retention of these nucleosides is not directly related to their lipophilicity. The low brain uptake of IVFAU, in conjunction with its higher and constant brain/blood ratio, may reflect greater stability against hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond. In vivo PET evaluations of [(124)I]IVFRU and [(124)I]IVFAU in tumor-bearing mice are warranted. PMID:18188770

  20. STEM CELL-PAVED BIOBRIDGE FACILITATES NEURAL REPAIR IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Yankee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modified mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs display a unique mechanism of action during the repair phase of traumatic brain injury by exhibiting the ability to build a biobridge between the neurogenic niche and the site of injury. Immunohistochemistry and laser capture assay have visualized this biobridge in the area between the neurogenic subventricular zone and the injured cortex. This biobridge expresses high levels of extracellular matrixmetalloproteinases (MMPs, which are initially co-localized with a stream of transplanted MSCs, but later this region contains only few to non-detectable grafts and becomes overgrown by newly recruited host cells. We have reported that long-distance migration of host cells from the neurogenic niche to the injured brain site can be attained via these transplanted stem cell-paved biobridges, which serve as a key regenerative process for the initiation of endogenous repair mechanisms. Thus far the two major schools of discipline in stem cell repair mechanisms support the idea of “cell replacement” and the bystander effects of “trophic factor secretion.” Our novel observation of stem cell-paved biobridges as pathways for directed migration of host cells from neurogenic niche towards the injured brain site adds another mode of action underlying stem cell therapy. More in-depth investigations on graft-host interaction will likely aid translational research focused on advancing this stem cell-paved biobridge from its current place, as an equally potent repair mechanism as cell replacement and trophic factor secretion, into a new treatment strategy for traumatic brain injury and other neurological disorders.

  1. Treatment planning using CT/MRI fusion in patients with low-grade gliomas and benign brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: The use of the CT image without and with contrast in MRI in treatment planning of the clinical target volumes, and critical organs, lead to increased accuracy in radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: From September 2007 to December 2009 in the Department of Radiotherapy CT with and without contrast was applied in 53 patients. After that two dosimetric plans have been developed, which showed minimal advantage in low-grade gliomas because their poor blood supply. This gave us a reason to move to the use of images from MRI without contrast. Next step in the treatment planning was merging images from MRI without contrast with the basic imaging technique in radiotherapy - CT. From January 2010 to March 2013 were prepared individual dosimetric plan 51 ± MRI and the data from the dose- volume histograms and investigated advantages of the method are compared. Results: There was a notable advantage at the confluence of MRI and CT images in the determination of the large tumor volume (LTV) due to better visualization of residual formation compared with CT images. There is an advantage in tumors located in the cerebellum, celery, suprasellar area and the base of the skull, which are an essential part of the studied patients. Depending on the type of the histology the method shows an advantage in low-grade glial tumor excision by R1 and benign tumor. The process has the significant advantage in the medical treatment plan to determine and outline of the tumor volume to that with application of contrast in CT. Conclusion: As a result form the performed studies on the problem, a protocol was developed for treatment planning of patients through simultaneous use of CT and MRI images in low-grade glial and benign tumors as well as tumors located in the rear cranial fossa

  2. Neurogenesis in the brain stem of the rabbit: an autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aid of (3H)-thymidine autoradiography, neurogenesis was documented in the nuclear groups of the medulla oblongata, pons, and mid-brain, as well as in the brain stem reticular formation of the rabbit. Following single injections of (3H)-thymidine, counts were taken of intensely labeled neurons within the nuclei of the functional columns related to the cranial nerves, nuclei of several other functional classifications, and nuclei that did not fit into a functional category. In the brain stem as a whole, neurogenesis was found to occur between days 10.0 and 18.5 of gestation: however, the majority of nuclei studied contained intensely neurons only between days 12.0 and 15.0. Only in the pontine nucleus and the tectum were intensely labeled cells observed as late as day 18.5. Directional gradients of histogenesis were often observed within, as well as between, various nuclei. Within the nuclear columns related to the cranial nerves, a clear mediolateral spread of neurogenesis was observable such that nuclei of the motor columns reached a peak in neurogenesis before those in the sensory columns. Likewise, a mediolateral proliferation pattern was seen in the brain stem reticular formation. Other individual directional gradients were discernible; however, in the brain stem as a whole, distinct overall gradients were not observable. In many individual nuclei, gradients in neuron size were observed such that large neurons preferentially arose prior to smaller neurons. Information pertaining to gradients in neurogenesis, as well as to relationships among functionally related nuclei, are discussed

  3. cGMP modulates stem cells differentiation to neurons in brain in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pinedo, U; Rodrigo, R; Cauli, O; Herraiz, S; Garcia-Verdugo, J-M; Pellicer, B; Pellicer, A; Felipo, V

    2010-02-17

    During brain development neural stem cells may differentiate to neurons or to other cell types. The aim of this work was to assess the role of cGMP (cyclic GMP) in the modulation of differentiation of neural stem cells to neurons or non-neuronal cells. cGMP in brain of fetuses was reduced to 46% of controls by treating pregnant rats with nitroarginine-methylester (L-NAME) and was restored by co-treatment with sildenafil.Reducing cGMP during brain development leads to reduced differentiation of stem cells to neurons and increased differentiation to non-neuronal cells. The number of neurons in the prefrontal cortex originated from stem cells proliferating on gestational day 14 was 715+/-14/mm(2) in control rats and was reduced to 440+/-29/mm(2) (61% of control) in rats treated with L-NAME. In rats exposed to L-NAME plus sildenafil, differentiation to neurons was completely normalized, reaching 683+/-11 neurons/mm(2). In rats exposed to sildenafil alone the number of cells labelled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and NeuN was 841+/-16/mm(2). In prefrontal cortex of control rats 48% of the neural stem cells proliferating in gestational day 14 differentiate to neurons, but only 24% in rats exposed to L-NAME. This was corrected by sildenafil, 40% of cells differentiate to neurons. Similar results were obtained for neurons proliferating during all developmental period. Treatment with L-NAME did not reduce the total number of cells labelled with BrdU, further supporting that L-NAME reduces selectively the differentiation of stem cells to neurons. Similar results were obtained in hippocampus. Treatment with L-NAME reduced the differentiation of neural stem cells to neurons, although the effect was milder than in prefrontal cortex. These results support that cGMP modulates the fate of neural stem cells in brain in vivo and suggest that high cGMP levels promote its differentiation to neurons while reduced cGMP levels promote differentiation to non-neuronal cells. PMID:19958812

  4. RNAi沉默AQP-4技术治疗胶质瘤性脑水肿的实验研究%An experimental study of the treatment of glioma brain edema by RNAi silencing AQP-4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁冰; 刘晓智; 张赛; 苏治国; 陈镭; 姜忠敏; 于士柱; 刘振林

    2012-01-01

    目的 应用RNA干扰(RNAi)技术靶向沉默胶质瘤内水通道蛋白4(AQP -4)的表达,观察其对胶质瘤源性脑水肿的治疗效果.方法 构建靶向AQP-4的siRNA质粒,免疫荧光化学方法检测其对C6细胞AQP-4的沉默效果;建立SD大鼠颅内C6胶质瘤模型,分对照组、空载组、无义序列组和siRNA组;聚合酶链式反应和蛋白印迹方法分别检测第3、6、9、12天AQP-4的mRNA和蛋白水平;干/湿比重法和Evans蓝测定法检测不同时相脑组织含水量和血脑屏障通透性改变;比较动物生存期.结果 siRNA可沉默AQP-4表达;siRNA组脑组织水含量和血脑屏障通透性均明显低于对照组、空载组和无义序列组,动物生存期最长.结论 靶向AQP-4的RNAi技术可在一定程度上减轻胶质瘤性脑水肿的发生和发展,为胶质瘤脑水肿提供了一种新的治疗策略选择.%Objective To observe the treatment effect on glioma cerebral edema by RNA interference ( RNAi ) technology silencing aquaporin 4 ( AQP-4 ) expression.Methods The siRNA plasmid targeting AQP-4 was constructed,and transfected into C6 glioma cells by liposome.Immunofluorescence assay was used to verify the silencing effect of AQP-4.The intracal C6 glioma model was established in SD rats,and four sub-groups,control group,empty vector transfected group,nonsense group and AQP-4 siRNA treated group,were divided.The AQP-4 mRNA and protein levels,in rats model brain tissue on 3,6,9,and 12 day,were detected by RT-PCR and Western Blot.Moreover,dry/wet weight method and evans blue assay were used to detect the brain water content and blood-brain barrier permeability changes.Then the animal survival was compared.Results siRNA can effectively reduce AQP -4 expression in C6 glioma cells.Compared with the control and empty vector transfected group in vivo,AQP-4 siRNA treatment group can effectively reduce AQP-4 mRNA and protein level,decrease brain water content,and reduce blood-brain barrier

  5. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Yu; Liu, Pin; Zhao, Weiguo

    2016-08-01

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients' poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. PMID:27251576

  6. Effect of Acupuncture on the Auditory Evoked Brain Stem Potential in Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玲玲; 何崇; 刘跃光; 朱莉莉

    2002-01-01

    @@ Under the auditory evoked brain stem potential (ABP) examination, the latent period of V wave and the intermittent periods of III-V peak and I-V peak were significantly shortened in Parkinson's disease patients of the treatment group (N=29) after acupuncture treatment. The difference of cumulative scores in Webster's scale was also decreased in correlation analysis. The increase of dopamine in the brain and the excitability of the dopamine neurons may contribute to the therapeutic effects, in TCM terms, of subduing the pathogenic wind and tranquilizing the mind.

  7. Long-term meditation is associated with increased gray matter density in the brain stem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Beek, Martijn van; Skewes, Joshua;

    2009-01-01

    Extensive practice involving sustained attention can lead to changes in brain structure. Here, we report evidence of structural differences in the lower brainstem of participants engaged in the long-term practice of meditation. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we observed higher gray matter...... density in lower brain stem regions of experienced meditators compared with age-matched nonmeditators. Our findings show that long-term practitioners of meditation have structural differences in brainstem regions concerned with cardiorespiratory control. This could account for some of the...... cardiorespiratory parasympathetic effects and traits, as well as the cognitive, emotional, and immunoreactive impact reported in several studies of different meditation practices....

  8. Measuring glioma volumes: A comparison of linear measurement based formulae with the manual image segmentation technique

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev A Sreenivasan; Madhugiri, Venkatesh S; Gopalakrishnan M Sasidharan; Roopesh V. R. Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Gliomas are irregular in shape unlike benign brain tumors like meningiomas or schwannomas. Simplifying assumptions about glioma geometry are therefore more likely to lead to wrong calculations of glioma volumes than for other tumors. Aims: We compared simple linear measurement.based techniques of measuring glioma volume with manual region of interest.based image segmentation and to assess concordance. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective radiology archive-based s...

  9. Adult-Onset Leukoencephalopathy with Brain Stem and Spinal Cord Involvement and Normal Lactate: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özdem Ertürk

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and high lactate (LBSL is a recently described leukoencephalopathy with a genetically proven underlying defect. Clinical features are slowly progressive pyramidal, cerebellar and dorsal column dysfunction with childhood or rarely adult onset. The genetic basis of the disease was recently identified, which concerned mutations in the DARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial aspartly-tRNA synthetase. The disease has distinct magnetic resonance imaging findings including inhomogeneous cerebral white matter abnormalities and selective brain stem and spinal cord tract involvement. Additionally, there are usually increased lactate levels on magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS of the abnormal white matter. In this case report, we describe the clinical and radiological features of a patient with genetically proven adult-onset LBSL and normal lactate levels on MRS.

  10. Endovascular treatment of brain-stem arteriovenous malformations: safety and efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endovascular treatment of brain-stem arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), reviewing six cases managed in the last 5 years. There were four patients who presented with bleeding, one with a progressive neurological deficit and one with obstructive hydrocephalus. Of the six patients, one showed 100%, one 90%, two 75% and two about 50% angiographic obliteration of the AVM after embolisation; the volume decreased about 75% on average. Five patients had a good outcome and one an acceptable outcome, with a mild postprocedure neurological deficit; none had further bleeding during midterm follow-up. Endovascular management of a brain-stem AVM may be an alternative to treatment such as radiosurgery and microsurgery in selected cases. It may be not as risky as previously thought. Embolisation can reduce the size of the AVM and possibly make it more treatable by radiosurgery and decrease the possibility of radiation injury. (orig.)

  11. Early changes of auditory brain stem evoked response after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma - a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, S.K.; Wei, W.I.; Sham, J.S.T.; Choy, D.T.K.; Hui, Y. (Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong))

    1992-10-01

    A prospective study of the effect of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma on hearing was carried out on 49 patients who had pure tone, impedance audiometry and auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR) recordings before, immediately, three, six and 12 months after radiotherapy. Fourteen patients complained of intermittent tinnitus after radiotherapy. We found that 11 initially normal ears of nine patients developed a middle ear effusion, three to six months after radiotherapy. There was mixed sensorineural and conductive hearing impairment after radiotherapy. Persistent impairment of ABR was detected immediately after completion of radiotherapy. The waves I-III and I-V interpeak latency intervals were significantly prolonged one year after radiotherapy. The study shows that radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma impairs hearing by acting on the middle ear, the cochlea and the brain stem auditory pathway. (Author).

  12. Auditory Brain Stem Processing in Reptiles and Amphibians: Roles of Coupled Ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Katie L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Carr, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Comparative approaches to the auditory system have yielded great insight into the evolution of sound localization circuits, particularly within the nonmammalian tetrapods. The fossil record demonstrates multiple appearances of tympanic hearing, and examination of the auditory brain stem of various...... groups can reveal the organizing effects of the ear across taxa. If the peripheral structures have a strongly organizing influence on the neural structures, then homologous neural structures should be observed only in groups with a homologous tympanic ear. Therefore, the central auditory systems of...... anurans (frogs), reptiles (including birds), and mammals should all be more similar within each group than among the groups. Although there is large variation in the peripheral auditory system, there is evidence that auditory brain stem nuclei in tetrapods are homologous and have similar functions among...

  13. Is cerebral cavernous malformation a pre-glioma lesion?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-yang; MING Zong-yi; WU An-hua

    2012-01-01

    Glioma is the most malignant tumor in the brain,the origin of glioma is still unknown.Recently some papers indicated that glioma may be developed from cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM).We describe a man with a right temporal lobe CCM,after gamma-knife radiotherapy,the patient developed a low-grade astrocytoma in the area of the preexistent CCM.This case,together with other reports,may indicated an oncogenetic properties of CCM,and we proposed that CCM may be a pre-glioma lesion.

  14. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells: Rational for Use as a Neuroprotectant in Ischemic Brain Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadar Arien-Zakay

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cells for reparative medicine was first proposed more than three decades ago. Hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow, peripheral blood and human umbilical cord blood (CB have gained major use for treatment of hematological indications. CB, however, is also a source of cells capable of differentiating into various non-hematopoietic cell types, including neural cells. Several animal model reports have shown that CB cells may be used for treatment of neurological injuries. This review summarizes the information available on the origin of CB-derived neuronal cells and the mechanisms proposed to explain their action. The potential use of stem/progenitor cells for treatment of ischemic brain injuries is discussed. Issues that remain to be resolved at the present stage of preclinical trials are addressed.

  15. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glioblastoma multiforme - children; Ependymoma - children; Glioma - children; Astrocytoma - children; Medulloblastoma - children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children)

  16. Mutations in DARS Cause Hypomyelination with Brain Stem and Spinal Cord Involvement and Leg Spasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Taft, Ryan J.; Vanderver, Adeline; Leventer, Richard J.; Damiani, Stephen A.; Simons, Cas; Grimmond, Sean M.; Miller, David; Schmidt, Johanna; Lockhart, Paul J.; Pope, Kate; Ru, Kelin; Crawford, Joanna; Rosser, Tena; de Coo, Irenaeus F.M.; Juneja, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Inherited white-matter disorders are a broad class of diseases for which treatment and classification are both challenging. Indeed, nearly half of the children presenting with a leukoencephalopathy remain without a specific diagnosis. Here, we report on the application of high-throughput genome and exome sequencing to a cohort of ten individuals with a leukoencephalopathy of unknown etiology and clinically characterized by hypomyelination with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and leg sp...

  17. Stemming the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa: a systemic review of policy options

    OpenAIRE

    Edward Zimbudzi

    2013-01-01

    Africa has been losing professionally trained health workers who are the core of the health system of this continent for many years. Faced with an increased burden of disease and coupled by a massive exodus of the health workforce, the health systems of many African nations are risking complete paralysis. Several studies have suggested policy options to reduce brain drain from Africa. The purpose of this paper is to review possible policies, which can stem the impact of health professional br...

  18. Role of the brain stem in tibial inhibition of the micturition reflex in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Matthew C; Slater, Rick C; Shen, Bing; Xiao, Zhiying; Wang, Jicheng; Lee, Andy; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the role of the brain stem in inhibition of bladder reflexes induced by tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) in α-chloralose-anesthetized decerebrate cats. Repeated cystometrograms (CMGs) were performed by infusing saline or 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to elicit normal or overactive bladder reflexes, respectively. TNS (5 or 30 Hz) at three times the threshold (3T) intensity for inducing toe movement was applied for 30 min between CMGs to induce post-TNS inhibition or applied during the CMGs to induce acute TNS inhibition. Inhibition was evident as an increase in bladder capacity without a change in amplitude of bladder contractions. TNS applied for 30 min between saline CMGs elicited prolonged (>2 h) poststimulation inhibition that significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity to 30-60% above control; however, TNS did not produce this effect during AA irritation. TNS applied during CMGs at 5 Hz but not 30 Hz significantly (P < 0.01) increased bladder capacity to 127.3 ± 6.1% of saline control or 187.6 ± 5.0% of AA control. During AA irritation, naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) administered intravenously (1 mg/kg) or directly to the surface of the rostral brain stem (300-900 μg) eliminated acute TNS inhibition and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced bladder capacity to 62.8 ± 22.6% (intravenously) or 47.6 ± 25.5% (brain stem application). Results of this and previous studies indicate 1) forebrain circuitry rostral to the pons is not essential for TNS inhibition; and 2) opioid receptors in the brain stem have a critical role in TNS inhibition of overactive bladder reflexes but are not involved in inhibition of normal bladder reflexes. PMID:26017973

  19. The contribution of drug resistant cancer stem cells to paediatric brain tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Punjaruk, Wiyada

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies have revealed that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in malignant disease. Additionally, it is proposed that these cells may survive following chemotherapy, and hence contribute to tumour relapse. A significant mechanism of drug resistance in CSCs is believed to be the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that efflux cytotoxic agents out of cells. The objective of this study was to study the existence of CSCs in a panel of primary paediatric brain tu...

  20. Availability of transplantable organs from brain stem dead donors in intensive care units.

    OpenAIRE

    Gore, S M; Taylor, R. M.; Wallwork, J

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--By audit from January to June 1989 to quantify, separately for hearts, kidneys, liver, lungs and corneas, the possible increases in transplantable organs from brain stem dead potential donors in intensive care units and to compare them with the increases achieved in October-November 1989, during intense, national publicity about transplantation. DESIGN--Prospective audit of all deaths in intensive care units in England from 1 January to 30 June 1989 and subsequent case study of the...

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate Blood Brain Barrier Integrity in Traumatic Brain Injury Through Production of the Soluble Factor TIMP3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menge, Tyler; Zhao, Yuhai; Zhao, Jing; Wataha, Kathryn; Geber, Michael; Zhang, Jianhu; Letourneau, Phillip; Redell, John; Shen, Li; Wang, Jing; Peng, Zhalong; Xue, Hasen; Kozar, Rosemary; Cox, Charles S.; Khakoo, Aarif Y.; Holcomb, John B.; Dash, Pramod K.; Pati, Shibani

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MCSs) have been shown to have therapeutic potential in multiple disease states associated with vascular instability including traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the present study, Tissue Inhibitor of Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3) is identified as the soluble factor produced by MSCs that can recapitulate the beneficial effects of MSCs on endothelial function and blood brain barrier (BBB) compromise in TBI. Attenuation of TIMP3 expression in MSCs completely abrogates the effect of MSCs on BBB permeability and stability, while intravenous administration of rTIMP3 alone can inhibit BBB permeability in TBI. Our results demonstrate that MSCs increase circulating levels of soluble TIMP3, which inhibits VEGF-A induced breakdown of endothelial AJs in vitro and in vivo. These findings elucidate a clear molecular mechanism for the effects of MSCs on the BBB in TBI, and directly demonstrate a role for TIMP3 in regulation of BBB integrity. PMID:23175708

  2. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis stimulates neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the premature brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the effects of angiogenesis on the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the premature brain. We observed the changes in neurogenesis that followed the stimulation and inhibition of angiogenesis by altering vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in a 3-day-old rat model. VEGF expression was overexpressed by adenovirus transfection and down-regulated by siRNA interference. Using immunofluorescence assays, Western blot analysis, and real-time PCR methods, we observed angiogenesis and the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Immunofluorescence assays showed that the number of vWF-positive areas peaked at day 7, and they were highest in the VEGF up-regulation group and lowest in the VEGF down-regulation group at every time point. The number of neural stem cells, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes in the subventricular zone gradually increased over time in the VEGF up-regulation group. Among the three groups, the number of these cells was highest in the VEGF up-regulation group and lowest in the VEGF down-regulation group at the same time point. Western blot analysis and real-time PCR confirmed these results. These data suggest that angiogenesis may stimulate the proliferation of neural stem cells and differentiation into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes in the premature brain.

  3. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis stimulates neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the premature brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jinqiao, E-mail: jinqiao1977@163.com [Institute of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital of Fudan University (China); Sha, Bin [Department of Neonatology, Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, 399 Wanyuan Road, Shanghai 201102 (China); Zhou, Wenhao, E-mail: zhou_wenhao@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Neonatology, Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, 399 Wanyuan Road, Shanghai 201102 (China); Yang, Yi [Institute of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital of Fudan University (China)

    2010-03-26

    This study investigated the effects of angiogenesis on the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the premature brain. We observed the changes in neurogenesis that followed the stimulation and inhibition of angiogenesis by altering vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in a 3-day-old rat model. VEGF expression was overexpressed by adenovirus transfection and down-regulated by siRNA interference. Using immunofluorescence assays, Western blot analysis, and real-time PCR methods, we observed angiogenesis and the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Immunofluorescence assays showed that the number of vWF-positive areas peaked at day 7, and they were highest in the VEGF up-regulation group and lowest in the VEGF down-regulation group at every time point. The number of neural stem cells, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes in the subventricular zone gradually increased over time in the VEGF up-regulation group. Among the three groups, the number of these cells was highest in the VEGF up-regulation group and lowest in the VEGF down-regulation group at the same time point. Western blot analysis and real-time PCR confirmed these results. These data suggest that angiogenesis may stimulate the proliferation of neural stem cells and differentiation into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes in the premature brain.

  4. Brain stem global gene expression profiles in human spina bifida embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhao; Xiang Li; Wan-I Lie; Quanren He; Ting Zhang; Xiaoying Zheng; Ran Zhou; Jun Xie

    2011-01-01

    Environmental and genetic factors influence the occurrence of neural tube defects, such as spina bifida.Specific disease expression patterns will help to elucidate the pathogenesis of disease.However, results obtained from animal models, which often exhibit organism specificity, do not fully explain the mechanisms of human spina bifida onset.In the present study, three embryos with a gestational age of approximately 17 weeks and a confirmed diagnosis of spina bifida, as well as 3 age-matched normal embryos, were obtained from abortions.Fetal brain stem tissues were dissected for RNA isolation, and microarray analyses were conducted to examine profiles of gene expression in brain stems of spina bifida and normal embryos using Affymetrix HG-U1 33A 2.0 GeneChip arrays.Of the 14 500 gene transcripts examined, a total of 182 genes exhibited at least 2.5-fold change in expression, including 140 upregulated and 42 downregulated genes.These genes were placed into 19 main functional categories according to the Gene Ontology Consortium database for biological functions.Of the 182 altered genes, approximately 50% were involved in cellular apoptosis, growth, adhesion, cell cycle, stress, DNA replication and repair, signal transduction, nervous system development, oxidoreduction, immune responses, and regulation of gene transcription.Gene expression in multiple biological pathways was altered in the brain stem of human spina bifida embryos.

  5. MRI findings of radiation encephalopathy of brain stem after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study MRI findings and clinical manifestation of radiation encephalopathy (RE) of brain stem. Methods: MRI findings and clinical symptoms in 51 patients with RE of brain stem after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer were reviewed. Results: Clinical symptoms included number weakness or paralysis in the limbs and symptoms of damaged cranial nerves. All lesions appeared hypo- or iso-intense on spin echo(SE) T1-weighted images and inhomogeneous and mixed hyper- and iso-intense on Turbo spin echo (TSE) T2-weighted images. The lesions were located in mesencephalon, pons, medulla, basilar part of pons, basilar part of pons and medulla oblongata in 2,7,3,9 and 30 patients respectively. The enhancement patterns included irregular rings in 39 patients, spotty in 3 and no enhancement in 9 patients. Mass effect was minimal in all patients. On follow-up MRI, the lesions disappeared in 4 patients, did not change in size and shape in 8 patients and enlarged in 2 patients. Conclusion: MRI could demonstrate the characteristic findings of RE of brain stem. MRI findings sometimes are not consistent with the clinical symptoms

  6. ARPP-19 promotes proliferation and metastasis of human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhao, Bing; Li, Xiaocan; Wan, Jinghai

    2016-09-01

    Glioma is the most common and aggressive type of human primary brain tumor with a poor outcome. The molecular mechanisms underlying glioma development and progression are still poorly understood. Recent studies have reported a novel role of ARPP-19 in the regulation of cell mitosis and cancer progression. However, no study has been carried out to determine the role of ARPP-19 in human glioma cells and assess the expression and clinical significance of ARPP-19 in human glioma. In this study, we systematically examined the role of ARPP-19 in glioma A172 cells and examined the expression of ARPP-19 and CD147 in 81 cases of human glioma tissue specimens and correlated them to clinicopathological parameters and patient survival. We found that ARPP-19 promoted both proliferation and metastasis of human glioma cells and the expression of ARPP-19 and CD147 in high-grade glioma was significantly higher than that in the low-grade glioma. Patients whose tumors were positive for expression of ARPP-19 or CD147 showed lower relapse-free survival and overall survival than patients whose tumors were negative for ARPP-19 or CD147, respectively. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that there was a statistically significant correlation between ARPP-19 and CD147. Expressions of ARPP-19 and CD147 may serve as biomarkers for high-grade glioma and poor patient survival. PMID:27380244

  7. Long Non-Coding RNAs: The Key Players in Glioma Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiang, Karrie Mei-Yee; Zhang, Xiao-Qin; Leung, Gilberto Ka-Kit, E-mail: gilberto@hku.hk [Department of Surgery, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-07-29

    Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) represent a novel class of RNAs with no functional protein-coding ability, yet it has become increasingly clear that interactions between lncRNAs with other molecules are responsible for important gene regulatory functions in various contexts. Given their relatively high expressions in the brain, lncRNAs are now thought to play important roles in normal brain development as well as diverse disease processes including gliomagenesis. Intriguingly, certain lncRNAs are closely associated with the initiation, differentiation, progression, recurrence and stem-like characteristics in glioma, and may therefore be exploited for the purposes of sub-classification, diagnosis and prognosis. LncRNAs may also serve as potential therapeutic targets as well as a novel biomarkers in the treatment of glioma. In this article, the functional aspects of lncRNAs, particularly within the central nervous system (CNS), will be briefly discussed, followed by highlights of the important roles of lncRNAs in mediating critical steps during glioma development. In addition, the key lncRNA players and their possible mechanistic pathways associated with gliomagenesis will be addressed.

  8. Long Non-Coding RNAs: The Key Players in Glioma Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karrie Mei-Yee Kiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs represent a novel class of RNAs with no functional protein-coding ability, yet it has become increasingly clear that interactions between lncRNAs with other molecules are responsible for important gene regulatory functions in various contexts. Given their relatively high expressions in the brain, lncRNAs are now thought to play important roles in normal brain development as well as diverse disease processes including gliomagenesis. Intriguingly, certain lncRNAs are closely associated with the initiation, differentiation, progression, recurrence and stem-like characteristics in glioma, and may therefore be exploited for the purposes of sub-classification, diagnosis and prognosis. LncRNAs may also serve as potential therapeutic targets as well as a novel biomarkers in the treatment of glioma. In this article, the functional aspects of lncRNAs, particularly within the central nervous system (CNS, will be briefly discussed, followed by highlights of the important roles of lncRNAs in mediating critical steps during glioma development. In addition, the key lncRNA players and their possible mechanistic pathways associated with gliomagenesis will be addressed.

  9. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter M Suryadevara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas (MG are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM, the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12-15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM.

  10. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Bin [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Hu, Zhiqiang, E-mail: zhiqhutg@126.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  11. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management

  12. Therapeutic Potential of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells on Brain Damage of a Model of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Nikravesh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human cord blood-derived stem cells are a rich source of stem cells as well as precursors. With regard to the researchers have focused on the therapeutic potential of stem cell in the neurological disease such as stroke, the aim of this study was the investiga-tion of the therapeutic effects of human cord blood-derived stem cells in cerebral ischemia on rat. Methods: This study was carried out on young rats. Firstly, to create a laboratory model of ischemic stroke, carotid artery of animals was occluded for 30 minutes. Then, umbilical cord blood cells were isolated and labeled using bromodeoxyuridine and 2×105 cells were injected into the experimental group via the tail vein. Rats with hypoxic condi-tions were used as a sham group. A group of animals did not receive any injection or sur-geries were used as a control. Results: Obtained results were evaluated based on behavior-al responses and immunohistochemistry, with emphasis on areas of putamen and caudate nucleus in the control, sham and experimental groups. Our results indicated that behavioral recovery was observed in the experimental group compared to the either the sham or the control group. However, histological studies demonstrated a low percent of tissue injury in the experimental group in comparison with the sham group. Conclusion: Stem cell trans-plantation is beneficial for the brain tissue reparation after hypoxic ischemic cell death.

  13. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  14. In Vivo Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Endogenous Neural Stem Cells in the Adult Rodent Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Mei Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain have a significant level of neurogenesis plasticity. In vivo monitoring of adult endogenous NSCs would be of great benefit to the understanding of the neurogenesis plasticity under normal and pathological conditions. Here we show the feasibility of in vivo targeted MR imaging of endogenous NSCs in adult mouse brain by intraventricular delivery of monoclonal anti-CD15 antibody conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. After intraventricular administration of these nanoparticles, the subpopulation of NSCs in the anterior subventricular zone and the beginning of the rostral migratory stream could be in situ labeled and were in vivo visualized with 7.0-T MR imaging during a period from 1 day to 7 days after the injection. Histology confirmed that the injected targeted nanoparticles were specifically bound to CD15 positive cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix. Our results suggest that in vivo targeted MR imaging of endogenous neural stem cells in adult rodent brain could be achieved by using anti-CD15-SPIONs as the molecular probe; and this targeting imaging strategy has the advantage of a rapid in vivo monitoring of the subpopulation of endogenous NSCs in adult brains.

  15. SC-27CD13 REPRESENTS A NOVEL BRAIN TUMOR STEM CELL MARKER FOR GLIOBLASTOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Reeve, Nathaniel; Markert, Tara; Oliva, Claudia; Griguer, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a very deadly and highly vascularized tumor, but targeting glioma angiogenesis by vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition has been minimally successful. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that control glioma angiogenesis and progression could lead to significant new therapies. We previously described that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induces increased tumor angiogenesis, decreased mouse survival, increased resistance to chemotherapy, and...

  16. Differentiation and characterization of human pluripotent stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Matthew J; Wilson, Hannah K; Canfield, Scott G; Qian, Tongcheng; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-05-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical component of the central nervous system (CNS) that regulates the flux of material between the blood and the brain. Because of its barrier properties, the BBB creates a bottleneck to CNS drug delivery. Human in vitro BBB models offer a potential tool to screen pharmaceutical libraries for CNS penetration as well as for BBB modulators in development and disease, yet primary and immortalized models respectively lack scalability and robust phenotypes. Recently, in vitro BBB models derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have helped overcome these challenges by providing a scalable and renewable source of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). We have demonstrated that hPSC-derived BMECs exhibit robust structural and functional characteristics reminiscent of the in vivo BBB. Here, we provide a detailed description of the methods required to differentiate and functionally characterize hPSC-derived BMECs to facilitate their widespread use in downstream applications. PMID:26518252

  17. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Baker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM, and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients.

  18. Induction of neuro-protective/regenerative genes in stem cells infiltrating post-ischemic brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz Gokhan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Although the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells (BMSC has been demonstrated in different experimental models of ischemic stroke, it remains unclear how stem cells (SC induce neuroprotection following stroke. In this study, we describe a novel method for isolating BMSC that infiltrate postischemic brain tissue and use this method to identify the genes that are persistently activated or depressed in BMSC that infiltrate brain tissue following ischemic stroke. Methods- Ischemic strokes were induced in C57BL/6 mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 1 h, followed by reperfusion. BMSC were isolated from H-2 Kb-tsA58 (immortomouse™ mice, and were administered (i.v. 24 h after reperfusion. At the peak of therapeutic improvement (14 days after the ischemic insult, infarcted brain tissue was isolated, and the BMSC were isolated by culturing at 33°C. Microarray analysis and RT-PCR were performed to compare differential gene expression between naïve and infiltrating BMSC populations. Results- Z-scoring revealed dramatic differences in the expression of extracellular genes between naïve and infiltrating BMSC. Pair-wise analysis detected 80 extracellular factor genes that were up-regulated (≥ 2 fold, P Conclusions- BMSC infiltrating the post-ischemic brain exhibit persistent epigenetic changes in gene expression for numerous extracellular genes, compared to their naïve counterparts. These genes are relevant to the neuroprotection, regeneration and angiogenesis previously described following stem cell therapy in animal models of ischemic stroke.

  19. Erlotinib and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  20. Nanoparticle-mediated transcriptional modification enhances neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells following transplantation in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Liu, Xiaoyan; Tammia, Markus; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Rolfe, Andrew; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Ning; Green, Jordan J; Wen, Xuejun; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2016-04-01

    Strategies to enhance survival and direct the differentiation of stem cells in vivo following transplantation in tissue repair site are critical to realizing the potential of stem cell-based therapies. Here we demonstrated an effective approach to promote neuronal differentiation and maturation of human fetal tissue-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs) in a brain lesion site of a rat traumatic brain injury model using biodegradable nanoparticle-mediated transfection method to deliver key transcriptional factor neurogenin-2 to hNSCs when transplanted with a tailored hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel, generating larger number of more mature neurons engrafted to the host brain tissue than non-transfected cells. The nanoparticle-mediated transcription activation method together with an HA hydrogel delivery matrix provides a translatable approach for stem cell-based regenerative therapy. PMID:26828681

  1. Cell migration in paediatric glioma; characterisation and potential therapeutic targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Cockle, J V; Picton, S; Levesley, J.; Ilett, E; Carcaboso, A M; Short, S.(Queen Mary University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London, United Kingdom); Steel, L P; Melcher, A.; Lawler, S. E.; Brüning-Richardson, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric high grade glioma (pHGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are highly aggressive brain tumours. Their invasive phenotype contributes to their limited therapeutic response, and novel treatments that block brain tumour invasion are needed. Methods: Here, we examine the migratory characteristics and treatment effect of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and the indirubin derivative 6-bromoindirubin-oxime (BIO), previousl...

  2. Prognostic value of Musashi-1 in gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlrot, Rikke H; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Herrstedt, Jørn;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of the RNA-binding protein Musashi-1 in adult patients with primary gliomas. Musashi-1 has been suggested to be a cancer stem cell-related marker in gliomas, and high levels of Musashi-1 have been associated with high tumor grades...... 0.65, p = 0.038). In addition patients with high levels of Musashi-1 benefitted most from post-surgical treatment, indicating that Musashi-1 may be a predictive marker in GBMs. In conclusion, our results suggest that high levels of Musashi-1 are associated with poor survival in patients with WHO...

  3. Brain stem and cerebellum volumetric analysis of Machado Joseph disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S T Camargos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3(MJD/SCA3, is the most frequent late onset spinocerebellar ataxia and results from a CAG repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 gene. Previous studies have found correlation between atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem with age and CAG repeats, although no such correlation has been found with disease duration and clinical manifestations. In this study we test the hypothesis that atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem in MJD/SCA3 is related to clinical severity, disease duration and CAG repeat length as well as to other variables such as age and ICARS (International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Whole brain high resolution MRI and volumetric measurement with cranial volume normalization were obtained from 15 MJD/SCA3 patients and 15 normal, age and sex-matchedcontrols. We applied ICARS and compared the score with volumes and CAG number, disease duration and age. We found significant correlation of both brain stem and cerebellar atrophy with CAG repeat length, age, disease duration and degree of disability. The Spearman rank correlation was stronger with volumetric reduction of the cerebellum than with brain stem. Our data allow us to conclude that volumetric analysis might reveal progressive degeneration after disease onset, which in turn is linked to both age and number of CAG repeat expansions in SCA 3.

  4. Adaptor protein LNK is a negative regulator of brain neural stem cell proliferation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlenius, Henrik; Devaraju, Karthikeyan; Monni, Emanuela; Oki, Koichi; Wattananit, Somsak; Darsalia, Vladimer; Iosif, Robert E; Torper, Olof; Wood, James C; Braun, Sebastian; Jagemann, Lucas; Nuber, Ulrike A; Englund, Elisabet; Jacobsen, Sten-Eirik W; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2012-04-11

    Ischemic stroke causes transient increase of neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), and migration of newly formed neuroblasts toward the damaged area where they mature to striatal neurons. The molecular mechanisms regulating this plastic response, probably involved in structural reorganization and functional recovery, are poorly understood. The adaptor protein LNK suppresses hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal, but its presence and role in the brain are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that LNK is expressed in NSPCs in the adult mouse and human SVZ. Lnk(-/-) mice exhibited increased NSPC proliferation after stroke, but not in intact brain or following status epilepticus. Deletion of Lnk caused increased NSPC proliferation while overexpression decreased mitotic activity of these cells in vitro. We found that Lnk expression after stroke increased in SVZ through the transcription factors STAT1/3. LNK attenuated insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling by inhibition of AKT phosphorylation, resulting in reduced NSPC proliferation. Our findings identify LNK as a stroke-specific, endogenous negative regulator of NSPC proliferation, and suggest that LNK signaling is a novel mechanism influencing plastic responses in postischemic brain. PMID:22496561

  5. EXPRESSION AND SWITCHING OF TH 1/TH2 TYPE CYTOKINES GENE IN HUMAN GLIOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-sheng Hu; Xin-gang Li; Qing-lin Zhang; Dong-hai Wang; Song-feng Gong

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the expression and switching of Th1/Th2 cytokines gene in hman gliomas and its effects on occurring and developing of human gliomas.Methods Interleukin(IL)-2 and intefferon-γ represent Th1 type cytokines. IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-13 represent Th2 type cytokines. The gene expressions of Th1/Th2 cytokines in human glioma cells, glioma infiltrating lymphocytes,and glioma cell lines were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The biological activity of cytokines in the supematant of glioma cell lines was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)method.Results The total positive rates of Th1 and Th2 type cytokines gene in human glioma cells were 14.77% and 75%. The total positive rates of Thl and Th2 type cytokines gene in glioma infiltrating lymphocytes were 22.73% and 68.17%. There was obviously predominant expression of Th2 type cytokines in human glioma tissues, glioma infiltrating lymphocytes, and glioma cell lines. There was no unbalanced expression of Th1/Th2 cytokines in normal brain tissues.Conclusion There is a predominant expression of Th2 type cytokines in human glioma cells. The switching of Th1/Th2 cytokines gene may play an important role in the occurring and developing of human gliomas.

  6. Stemming the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa: a systemic review of policy options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Zimbudzi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Africa has been losing professionally trained health workers who are the core of the health system of this continent for many years. Faced with an increased burden of disease and coupled by a massive exodus of the health workforce, the health systems of many African nations are risking complete paralysis. Several studies have suggested policy options to reduce brain drain from Africa. The purpose of this paper is to review possible policies, which can stem the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa. A systemic literature review was conducted. Cinahl, Science Direct and PubMed databases were searched with the following terms: health professional brain drain from Africa and policies for reducing impact of brain drain from Africa. References were also browsed for relevant articles. A total of 425 articles were available for the study but only 23 articles met the inclusion criteria. The review identified nine policy options, which were being implemented in Africa, but the most common was task shifting which had success in several African countries. This review has demonstrated that there is considerable consensus on task shifting as the most appropriate and sustainable policy option for reducing the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa.

  7. Transplantation of human glioma stem cells in nude mice with green fluorescent protein expression%人脑胶质瘤干细胞移植于表达绿色荧光蛋白裸小鼠的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴自成; 黄强; 邵义祥; 薛智谋; 董军; 刁艺; 王爱东; 兰青

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the possibility of transplantation of human glioma stem cells (HGSCs) in nude mice stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) so as to clearly identify the incubated HGSCs from the host tissues. Methods Transgenic C57BL/6J mice expressing GFP was crossed with nude mice of the line NC, then hairless male nude mice expressing GFP were crossed with hairy female pubescent mice to obtain nude mice with GFP expression the expression of GFP in the skin and organs of these nude mice were evaluated by naked eyes, and immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence assays. HGSCs were transplanted orthotopically into the caudate nuclei of nude mice expressing GFP. Immunohistochemistry was used to observe the transplanted tumor. Results The structures rich in adipose tissue of the 8th generation nude mice were dark green and the other organs were light green. However, green fluorescence was emitted from all tissues under fluorescence microscopy. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the tumor cells were stained red, distinguished from the host ceils distinctly in the brains bearing tumor transplanted orthotopically. Conclusion Nude mice expressing GFP can be obtained by crossing the trangenic mice bearing naive immunity with nude mice. Orthotopic transplantation of HGSCs may be used in the investigation of tumor tissue reconstitution because of the easy identification between the transplantation tumor and host tissue.%目的 培育表达绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)的裸小鼠,并探讨将其用于人胶质瘤干细胞(HGSC)移植实验研究.方法 将C57BL/6J-GFP转基因小鼠与NC系裸小鼠进行交配,在继代时严格挑选都表达GFP的无毛雄鼠与有毛母鼠交配,通过肉眼、免疫组织化学和荧光显微镜等方法观察GFP在裸小鼠皮肤和脏器中的表达情况,继将HGSC原位移植于表达GFP的裸小鼠,以观察移植瘤的生长情况.结果 传至8代的裸小鼠,包括脑在内的全身主要器官和细胞

  8. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical infiltrative

  9. Busulfan, Melphalan, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and a Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed Solid Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-04

    Solid Tumor; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Ewing Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  10. Comparitive Study Between Cnventional and Hyperfractionaltion Radiation Therapy for The Treatment of Brain Stem Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Fares * (MD, Mamdouh Salama** (MD Manal Moawad

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem tumors are special challenge because primarily of their location and the neurologic effect caused by these groups of tumors (Paul 1997. Radiation therapy improves survival for brain stem tumors and stabilizes or reverses neurologic dysfunction in 75-90% of patients. The main domain of applicability of hyperfractionation would be in tumor sites where the dose limiting tissue is late reacting and whose effective control requires the delivery of doses beyond tolerance (Awwad, 1990, hence the rationale for the use of hyperfractionation in brain stem lesions. The purpose of this work is to find out the best radiation protocol in this group of patients comparing conventional fractionation and hyperafractionation. This study included 46 patients which brainstem tumors treated in Radiation Oncology and Neurosurgery Departments Ain Shams University between February 1998 and May 2000. These patients had been randomly distributed in 2 groups A and B. The first group treated by conventional radiotherapy protocol and the second group treated by hyperfractionation radiation protocol. By the end of the study, the median over all survival and median time for disease progression were calculated for each group. Age, neurologic status at presentation and anatomical location were significant prognostic factors. By the end of this study clicinal evalualion had no significant difference between both groups but the median over all survival for the two groups was 10.5 months, the median survival for group A was 9.4 months and that for group B was 11.5 months which was statistically significant P < 0.02. On the other hand the percentage of patient with one year survival for group A & B (22%, 32% respectively. The rate of acute (early reaction of radiation is slightly higher in hyperfracticmaticm than conventional fractionation but the late reactions occur with same frequency with both regimens.

  11. Dosimetric analysis of trigeminal nerve, brain stem doses in CyberKnife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CyberKnife radiosurgery treatment of Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is performed as a non-invasive image guided procedure. The prescription dose for TN is very high. The brainstem is the adjacent critical organ at risk (OAR) which is prone to receive the very high target dose of TN. The present study is to analyze the dose distribution inside the tiny trigeminal nerve target and also to analyze the dose fall off in the brain stem. Seven TN cases treated between November 2010 and January 2012 were taken for this study retrospectively. The treatment plans were analyzed for target dose conformity, homogeneity and dose coverage. In the brainstem the volume doses D1% and D2% were taken for analyzing the higher doses in the brain stem. The dose fall off was analyzed in terms of D5% and D10%. The mean value of maximum dose within the trigeminal nerve target was 73.5±2.1 Gy (P=0.0007) and the minimum dose was 50.0±4.1Gy (P=0.1315). The mean conformity index was 2.19 and the probable reason could be the smallest CyberKnife collimator of 5mm used in the treatment plan. The mean D1%, of the brainstem was 10.5±2.1Gy(P=0.5316) and the mean value of the maximum point dose within the brainstem was 35.6±3.8Gy. This shows the degree of dose fall off within the brainstem. Though the results of the present study are showing superior sparing of brain stem and reasonable of target coverage, it is necessary to execute the treatment plan with greater accuracy in CyberKnife as the immobilization is noninvasive and frameless. (author)

  12. ELTD1, A Potential New Biomarker for Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A.; Jensen, Randy L.; Colman, Howard; Vaillant, Brian; Smith, Nataliya; Casteel, Rebba; Saunders, Debra; Gillespie, David L.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea; Giles, Cory B.; Wren, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), high-grade glioma, is characterized by being diffuse, invasive, and highly angiogenic, and has a very poor prognosis. Identification of new biomarkers could help in the further diagnosis of GBM. Objective To identify ELTD1 ([epidermal growth factor (EGF), latrophilin and seven transmembrane domain-containing 1] on chromosome 1) as a putative glioma-associated marker via a bioinformatic method. Methods We used advanced data mining and a novel bioinformatics method to predict ELTD1 as a potential novel biomarker that is associated with gliomas. Validation was done with immunohistochemistry (IHC), which was used to detect levels of ELTD1 in human high-grade gliomas, and rat F98 glioma tumors. In vivo levels of ELTD1 in rat F98 gliomas were assessed using molecular MRI (mMRI). Results ELTD1 was found to be significantly higher (P=.03) in high-grade gliomas (50 patients) compared to low-grade gliomas (21 patients), and compared well to traditional IHC markers including VEGF, GLUT-1,CAIX, and HIF-1α. ELTD1 gene expression indicates an association with grade, survival across grade, and an increase in the mesenchymal subtype. Significantly high (P<0.001) in vivo levels of ELTD1 were additionally found in F98 tumors, compared to normal brain tissue. Conclusion This study strongly suggests that associative analysis was able to accurately identify ELTD1 as a putative glioma-associated biomarker. The detection of ELTD1 was also validated in both rodent and human gliomas, and may serve as an additional biomarker for gliomas in pre-clinical and clinical diagnosis of gliomas. PMID:23096411

  13. 660 nm red light-enhanced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianchao Li; Wensheng Hou; Xiaoying Wu; Wei Jiang; Haiyan Chen; Nong Xiao; Ping Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for neonatal hy-poxic-ischemic brain damage. However, the in vivo transplantation effects are poor and their survival, colonization and differentiation efifciencies are relatively low. Red or near-infrared light from 600-1,000 nm promotes cellular migration and prevents apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of red light with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be effective for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. In this study, the migra-tion and colonization of cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on primary neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation were detected using Transwell assay. The results showed that, after a 40-hour irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm2, an increasing number of green lfuorescence-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrated towards hypoxic-ischemic damaged primary neurons. Meanwhile, neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 × 106 bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, followed by irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm2 for 7 successive days. Shuttle box test results showed that, after phototherapy and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the active avoidance response rate of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rats was significantly increased, which was higher than that after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation alone. Experimental ifndings indicate that 660 nm red light emitting diode irradiation promotes the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, thereby enhancing the contribution of cell transplantation in the treatment of hypox-ic-ischemic brain damage.

  14. Science Letters: Brain natriuretic peptide: A potential indicator of cardiomyogenesis after autologous mesenchymal stem cell transplantation?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Nan; WANG Jian-an

    2006-01-01

    We observed in a pilot study that there was a transient elevation of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level shortly after the transplantation in the patient with ischemic heart failure, which is unexplainable by the simultaneous increase of the cardiac output and six-minute walk distance. Similar findings were observed in the phase I trial. We postulated on the basis of the finding of Fukuda in vitro that this transient elevation of BNP level against the improvement of cardiac function and exercise capacity might indicate cardiomyogenesis in patients after mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Further study is warranted to verify the hypothesis.

  15. Apples to origins: Identifying brain tumor stem cell genes by comparing transcriptomes of normal and cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wortham, Matthew; Yan, Hai

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms whereby medulloblastoma stem cells coordinate tumor propagation are poorly understood. Utilizing microarray analysis, Corno and colleagues draw parallels and distinctions between medulloblastoma stem cells from the Ptch+/− mouse and normal neural stem cells, identifying Ebf3 as a cancer stem cell-specific transcript critical for tumor growth.

  16. Neuromyelitis Optica Lesion Mimicking Brainstem Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old girl who presented with weakness of the left extremities and right sided sixth cranial nerve palsy had neuromyelitis optica (NMO mistaken for brainstem glioma on MRI, in a report from Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine,Seoul, Republic of KoreaNeuromyelitis Optica, Optic-Spinal Syndrome, Spectroscopy.

  17. Glioma cells on the run – the migratory transcriptome of 10 human glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holz David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary intracranial tumor and despite recent advances in treatment regimens, prognosis for affected patients remains poor. Active cell migration and invasion of GBM cells ultimately lead to ubiquitous tumor recurrence and patient death. To further understand the genetic mechanisms underlying the ability of glioma cells to migrate, we compared the matched transcriptional profiles of migratory and stationary populations of human glioma cells. Using a monolayer radial migration assay, motile and stationary cell populations from seven human long term glioma cell lines and three primary GBM cultures were isolated and prepared for expression analysis. Results Gene expression signatures of stationary and migratory populations across all cell lines were identified using a pattern recognition approach that integrates a priori knowledge with expression data. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed two discriminating patterns between migrating and stationary glioma cells: i global down-regulation and ii global up-regulation profiles that were used in a proband-based rule function implemented in GABRIEL to find subsets of genes having similar expression patterns. Genes with up-regulation pattern in migrating glioma cells were found to be overexpressed in 75% of human GBM biopsy specimens compared to normal brain. A 22 gene signature capable of classifying glioma cultures based on their migration rate was developed. Fidelity of this discovery algorithm was assessed by validation of the invasion candidate gene, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF. siRNA mediated knockdown yielded reduced in vitro migration and ex vivo invasion; immunohistochemistry on glioma invasion tissue microarray confirmed up-regulation of CTGF in invasive glioma cells. Conclusion Gene expression profiling of migratory glioma cells induced to disperse in vitro affords discovery of genomic signatures; selected

  18. Compartment- and malignance-dependent up-regulation of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and dipetidylpeptidase-IV activity in human brain gliomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Vladislav; Stremeňová, J.; Lisá, Věra; Kozáková, Hana; Marek, J.; Syrůček, M.; Šoula, O.; Šedo, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 7 (2012), s. 931-940. ISSN 0213-3911 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase * dipeptidylpeptidase IV-like activity * CD26 * FAP-1 alpha * human gliomas Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 2.281, year: 2012

  19. Maternal Inflammation Contributes to Brain Overgrowth and Autism-Associated Behaviors through Altered Redox Signaling in Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janel E. Le Belle

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A period of mild brain overgrowth with an unknown etiology has been identified as one of the most common phenotypes in autism. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal inflammation during critical periods of embryonic development can cause brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors as a result of altered neural stem cell function. Pregnant mice treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide at embryonic day 9 had offspring with brain overgrowth, with a more pronounced effect in PTEN heterozygotes. Exposure to maternal inflammation also enhanced NADPH oxidase (NOX-PI3K pathway signaling, stimulated the hyperproliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells, increased forebrain microglia, and produced abnormal autism-associated behaviors in affected pups. Our evidence supports the idea that a prenatal neuroinflammatory dysregulation in neural stem cell redox signaling can act in concert with underlying genetic susceptibilities to affect cellular responses to environmentally altered cellular levels of reactive oxygen species.

  20. Vasculogenic mimicry: a novel target for glioma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Sheng Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Anti-angiogenic therapy has shown promising but insufficient efficacy on gliomas. Recent studies suggest that vasculogenic mimicry (VM, or the formation of non-endothelial, tumor-cell-lined microvascular channels, occurs in aggressive tumors, including gliomas. There is also evidence of a physiological connection between the endothelial-lined vasculature and VM channels. Tumor cells, by virtue of their high plasticity, can form vessel-like structures themselves, which may function as blood supply networks. Our previous study on gliomas showed that microvessel density was comparably less in VM-positive tumors than in VM-negative tumors. Thus, VM may act as a complement to ensure tumor blood supply, especially in regions with less microvessel density. Patients with VM-positive gliomas survived a shorter period of time than did patients with VM-negative gliomas. Although the detailed molecular mechanisms for VM are not fully understood, glioma stem cells might play a key role, since they are involved in tumor tissue remodeling and contribute to neovascularization via transdifferentiation. In the future, successful treatment of gliomas should involve targeting both VM and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize the progress and challenges of VM in gliomas.

  1. Application of SPET using technetium-99m sestamibi in brain tumours and comparison with expression of the MDR-1 gene: is it possible to predict the response to chemotherapy in patients with gliomas by means of 99mTc-sestamibi SPET?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, MIBI SPET was compared with thallium-201 (Tl) SPET using magnetic resonance imaging as a guide in 16 patients with untreated brain tumours (ten glioblastomas (GBs)), two anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs), two low-grade gliomas (LGASs) and two metastatic brain tumours and in four patients who had received treatment for with brain tumours (two GBs, two AAs). In addition, we investigated the expression of the MDR-1 gene and its product Pgp inn the same patients, and compared the results with MIBI SPET findings. MIBI, as well as Tl, was highly accumulated and retained in the enhanced region of malignant gliomas. In addition, MIBI SPET yielded sharp and well-contrasted images, and the margin of the tumour was more clearly defined than with Tl SPET due to a good signal-to-noise ratio. Follow-up MIBI SPET in patients who had received therapy showed marked uptake in a patient with malignant transformation, who deteriorated clinically. Patients with no uptake on MIBI SPET showed no sign of recurrence. Semiquantitative analysis of untreated patients showed a relationship between the early uptake index and the degree of malignancy. The retention index (RI, ratio of delayed to early UI) of MIBI was significantly lower than that of Tl in metastatic brain tumours (P<0.05), but not in malignant gliomas. Histological and biological investigation of gliomas showed that the MDR-1 gene and its product Pgp were expressed only in normal endothelial cells and not in tumour cells or proliferating enen550601l cells; Pgp tended to decrease as the degree of malignancy rose. Hence, the presence of Pgp and the grade of malignancy were inversely related in gliomas. By contrast, immunohistochemical study showed strong accumulation of Pgp in metastatic brain tumour cells. (orig./MG) (orig.)

  2. Neurogenic plasticity of mesenchymal stem cell, an alluring cellular replacement for traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Soumya; Muthuraju, Sangu; Hadi, Raisah Ab; Huat, Tee Jong; Singh, Shailja; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Jaafar, Hasnan

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) imposes horrendous neurophysiological alterations leading to most devastating forms of neuro-disability. Which includes impaired cognition, distorted locomotors activity and psychosomatic disability in both youths and adults. Emerging evidence from recent studies has identified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as one of the promising category of stem cells having excellent neuroregenerative capability in TBI victims. Some of the clinical and animal studies reported that MSCs transplantation could cure neuronal damage as well as improve cognitive and locomotors behaviors in TBI. However, mechanism behind their broad spectrum neuroregenerative potential in TBI has not been reviewed yet. Therefore, in the present article, we present a comprehensive data on the important attributes of MSCs, such as neurotransdifferentiation, neuroprotection, axonal repair and plasticity, maintenance of blood-brain integrity, reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and immunomodulation. We have reviewed in detail the crucial neurogenic capabilities of MSCs in vivo and provided consolidated knowledge regarding their cellular remodeling in TBI for future therapeutic implications. PMID:26763886

  3. Mutations in DARS Cause Hypomyelination with Brain Stem and Spinal Cord Involvement and Leg Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Ryan J.; Vanderver, Adeline; Leventer, Richard J.; Damiani, Stephen A.; Simons, Cas; Grimmond, Sean M.; Miller, David; Schmidt, Johanna; Lockhart, Paul J.; Pope, Kate; Ru, Kelin; Crawford, Joanna; Rosser, Tena; de Coo, Irenaeus F.M.; Juneja, Monica; Verma, Ishwar C.; Prabhakar, Prab; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian; Pouwels, Petra J.W.; Bevova, Marianna R.; Abbink, Truus E.M.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Wolf, Nicole I.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited white-matter disorders are a broad class of diseases for which treatment and classification are both challenging. Indeed, nearly half of the children presenting with a leukoencephalopathy remain without a specific diagnosis. Here, we report on the application of high-throughput genome and exome sequencing to a cohort of ten individuals with a leukoencephalopathy of unknown etiology and clinically characterized by hypomyelination with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and leg spasticity (HBSL), as well as the identification of compound-heterozygous and homozygous mutations in cytoplasmic aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (DARS). These mutations cause nonsynonymous changes to seven highly conserved amino acids, five of which are unchanged between yeast and man, in the DARS C-terminal lobe adjacent to, or within, the active-site pocket. Intriguingly, HBSL bears a striking resemblance to leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and elevated lactate (LBSL), which is caused by mutations in the mitochondria-specific DARS2, suggesting that these two diseases might share a common underlying molecular pathology. These findings add to the growing body of evidence that mutations in tRNA synthetases can cause a broad range of neurologic disorders. PMID:23643384

  4. 660 nm red light-enhanced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xianchao; Hou, Wensheng; Wu, Xiaoying; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. However, the in vivo transplantation effects are poor and their survival, colonization and differentiation efficiencies are relatively low. Red or near-infrared light from 600–1,000 nm promotes cellular migration and prevents apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of red light with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be effective for the tr...

  5. PET、MRI和PET/MRI多模式分子显像在脑胶质瘤中的应用%Application of PET, MRI and PET/MRI multi-mode imaging in brain gliomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙娜; 赵晋华; 乔文礼

    2012-01-01

    神经影像学在颅内肿瘤尤其是脑胶质瘤的诊断、分级、疗效及预后评估等方面有重要的临床价值.不同模式的PET显像可用于评估肿瘤的位置、范围及其生物活性.MRI不仅可提供高对比度和分辨率的软组织信息,还可提供肿瘤功能代谢方面的一些信息.PET/MRI综合了二者的优势,实现了对大脑形态、功能、代谢和分子信息的同时评估.本文主要综述PET、MRI和PET/MRI在脑胶质瘤显像中的应用.%Neuroimaging plays an important role in diagnosis, classification, assessment of efficacy and prognosis of intracranial tumors, especially brain gliomas. Multi-mode positron emission tomography (PET) imaging can be used to assess the location, extent and biological activity of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can delineate tissue with high contrast and resolution, and provide some metabolic information of the tumor. The newly developed imaging equipment, PET/MRI, combining the advantages of both, can simultaneously assess the morphologic, functional and metabolic and molecular information on the brain. This review focuses on the application of PET, MRI and PET/MRI in brain gliomas.

  6. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulla, Rishi R; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  7. Strain differences in pH-sensitive K+ channel-expressing cells in chemosensory and nonchemosensory brain stem nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Martino, Paul F.; Olesiak, S.; Batuuka, D.; Riley, D; Neumueller, S.; Forster, H. V.; Hodges, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    The ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex is inherently low in inbred Brown Norway (BN) rats compared with other strains, including inbred Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Since the brain stem expression of various pH-sensitive ion channels may be determinants of the CO2 chemoreflex, we tested the hypothesis that there would be fewer pH-sensitive K+ channel-expressing cells in BN relative to SS rats within brain stem sites associated with respiratory chemoreception, such as the nucleus tractus solitarius...

  8. Interleukin-2 expression and glioma cell proliferation following Vaceinia vector gene transfection in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaogang Wang; Xuezhong Wei; Jiangqiu Liu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of gene therapy is closely related to the efficiency of vector transfection and expression.OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to transfect a human brain glioma cell line with recombinant Vaccinia virus expressing the interleukin-2 (rVV-IL-2) gene, and to observe IL-2 expression and glioma cell proliferation potential after transfection. DESIGN: Experimental observation. SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, Shenyang Military Area Command of Chinese PLA. MATERIALS: The rVV-IL-2 vectors were obtained through homologous recombination and screening in the Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. The human brain glioma cell line and IL-2-dependent cells were produced by the Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. Human IL-2 was produced by Genzyme Corporation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: IL-2 expression at different time points after transfection of human brain glioma cells with varying MOI of Vaccinia viral vectors; in vitro proliferation capacity of human brain glioma cells among the 4 groups. RESULTS: IL-2 expression was detectable 4 hours after Vaccinia viral vector transfection and reached 300 kU/L by 8 hours. There was no significant difference in the proliferating rate of human brain glioma cells among the 4 groups (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: Vaccinia viral vectors can transfect human brain glioma cells in vitro and express high levels of IL-2. Vaccinia virus and high IL-2 expression do not influence the proliferation rate of human brain glioma cells in vitro.

  9. Physical weight loading induces expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 in the brain stem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon W Shim

    Full Text Available Sustaining brain serotonin is essential in mental health. Physical activities can attenuate mental problems by enhancing serotonin signaling. However, such activity is not always possible in disabled individuals or patients with dementia. Knee loading, a form of physical activity, has been found to mimic effects of voluntary exercise. Focusing on serotonergic signaling, we addressed a question: Does local mechanical loading to the skeleton elevate expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (tph2 that is a rate-limiting enzyme for brain serotonin? A 5 min knee loading was applied to mice using 1 N force at 5 Hz for 1,500 cycles. A 5-min treadmill running was used as an exercise (positive control, and a 90-min tail suspension was used as a stress (negative control. Expression of tph2 was determined 30 min - 2 h in three brain regions --frontal cortex (FC, ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH, and brain stem (BS. We demonstrated for the first time that knee loading and treadmill exercise upregulated the mRNA level of tph2 in the BS, while tail suspension downregulated it. The protein level of tph2 in the BS was also upregulated by knee loading and downregulated by tail suspension. Furthermore, the downregulation of tph2 mRNA by tail suspension can be partially suppressed by pre-application of knee loading. The expression of tph2 in the FC and VMH was not significantly altered with knee loading. In this study we provided evidence that peripheral mechanical loading can activate central tph2 expression, suggesting that physical cues may mediate tph2-cathalyzed serotonergic signaling in the brain.

  10. Interaction between nonviral reprogrammed fibroblast stem cells and trophic factors for brain repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Anisman, H; Bobyn, J; Hayley, S

    2014-10-01

    There are currently no known treatment options that actually halt or permanently reverse the pathology evident in any neurodegenerative condition. Arguably, one of the most promising avenues for creating viable neuronal treatments could involve the combined use of cell replacement and gene therapy. Given the complexity of the neurodegenerative process, it stands to reason that adequate therapy should involve not only the replacement of loss neurons/synapses but also the interruption of multiple pro-death pathways. Thus, we propose the use of stem cells that are tailored to express specific trophic factors, thereby potentially encouraging synergistic effects between the stem cell properties and those of the trophic factors. The trophic factors, brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), glial cell-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1, in particular, have demonstrated neuroprotective actions in a number of animal models. Importantly, we use a nonviral approach, thereby minimizing the potential risk for DNA integration and tumor formation. The present study involved the development of a nonviral reprogramming system to transform adult mature mouse fibroblasts into progressive stages of cell development. We also tailored these stem cells to individually express each of the trophic factors, including BDNF, GDNF, FGF2, and IGF1. Significantly, central infusion of BDNF-expressing stem cells prevented the in vivo loss of neurons associated with infusion of the endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This is particularly important in light of the role of inflammatory processes that are posited to play in virtually all neurodegenerative states. Hence, the present results support the utility of using combined gene and cell-targeting approaches for neuronal pathology. PMID:24677069

  11. Spatial and Functional Architecture of the Mammalian Brain Stem Respiratory Network: A Hierarchy of Three Oscillatory Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, J C; Abdala, A. P. L.; Koizumi, H.; Rybak, I. A.; Paton, J. F. R.

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian central pattern generators (CPGs) producing rhythmic movements exhibit extremely robust and flexible behavior. Network architectures that enable these features are not well understood. Here we studied organization of the brain stem respiratory CPG. By sequential rostral to caudal transections through the pontine-medullary respiratory network within an in situ perfused rat brain stem–spinal cord preparation, we showed that network dynamics reorganized and new rhythmogenic mechanisms ...

  12. Molecular Therapeutic Targets for Glioma Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Takano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prominent angiogenesis that occurs in malignant glioma, antiangiogenic therapy has been attempted. There have been several molecular targets that are specific to malignant gliomas, as well as more broadly in systemic cancers. In this review, I will focus on some topics related to molecular therapeutic targets for glioma angiogenesis. First, important angiogenic factors that could be considered molecular targets are VEGF, VEGF-induced proteins on endothelial cells, tissue factor, osteopontin, v3 integrin, and thymidine phosphorylase as well as endogenous inhibitors, soluble Flt1, and thrombospondin 1. Second, hypoxic areas are also decreased by metronomic CPT11 treatment as well as temozolomide. Third, glioma-derived endothelial cells that are genetically and functionally distinct from normal endothelial cells should be targeted, for example, with SDF-1 and CXCR7 chemokine. Fourth, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs likely contribute towards glioma angiogenesis in the brain and could be useful as a drug delivery tool. Finally, blockade of delta-like 4 (Dll4 results in a nonfunctioning vasculature and could be another important target distinct from VEGF.

  13. Expression of FOXG1 is associated with the malignancy of human glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiwei Shao; Beibei Cong; Aihua Sui; Kai Meng; Yihe Dou

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Recent evidence indicates that the increased expression of FOXG1 is associated with tumor genesis. This study was designed to explore the expression and role which FOXG1 plays in human glioma. Methods: We detected the expression of FOXG1 by immunohistochemistry in glioma tissue samples. Fol owing the down-regulation of FOXG1 in glioma cel lines by a specific short hairpin RNA, the function of FOXG1 in proliferation and apoptosis was assessed. Results:Glioma tissues exhibited notably higher expression of FOXG1 compared with control brain tissues and was positively corre-lated with histological malignancy. The down-regulation of FOXG1 in glioma cel s led to a cel apoptosis in vitro. Conclusion:The overexpression of FOXG1 is a novel glioma malignancy marker, and FOXG1 may be used as a new target in therapeutic strategies for human glioma.

  14. Effects of Photodynamic Therapy on the Ultrastructure of Glioma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the change in ultrastructure of C6 glioma cells after photodynamic therapy (PDT), to compare morphological differences in necrosis and apoptosis before and after PDT treatment, and to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy on the blood brain tumor barrier (BTB) of C6 glioma. Methods The model was produced by transplanting C6 glioma cells cultured in vitro using Peterson method into the caudate nuclei of Wister rats. The experiment group received PDT for two weeks after the operation. The sub-cellular structure, blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and BTB in both groups were observed under electron microscope. Results Apoptosis in different phases and necrosis could be observed in some C6 glioma cells.Swelling occurred on the ultrastructure of cellular organs such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum in most of the cells.Damage to the BTB, reduction of the number of cellular organs in endothelial cells of the capillary blood vessels, stretch of the tight junction, and enlargement of the gaps between endothelial cells were also seen in the experiment group. Meanwhile,limited impact on the normal sub-cellular structures and BBB was observed. Conclusion PDT could induce apoptosis and necrosis of C6 glioma cells due to the damage to the ultrastructure of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. The weakened function of C6 glioma BTB initiated by PDT makes it possible to perform a combined therapy of PDT and chemotherapy for glioma.

  15. Nop2 is expressed during proliferation of neural stem cells and in adult mouse and human brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kosi, N.; Alic, I.; Kolacevic, M.; Vrsaljko, N.; Milosevic, N.J.; Sobol, Margaryta; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozák, Pavel; Gajovic, S.; Pochet, R.; Mitrecic, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1597, FEB 9 (2015), s. 65-76. ISSN 1872-6240 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MPO FR-TI3/588 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Nop2 * Brain * Stem cells * Stroke * Nucleolus * Cell cycle Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology

  16. Nop2 is expressed during proliferation of neural stem cells and in adult mouse and human brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kosi, N.; Alic, I.; Kolačevic, M.; Vrsaljko, N.; Miloševic, N.J.; Sobol, Margaryta; Filimonenko, Anatolij; Hozák, Pavel; Gajovic, S.; Pochet, R.; Mitrečic, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1597, February (2015), s. 65-76. ISSN 1872-6240 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MPO FR-TI3/588 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Nop2 * Brain * Stem cells * Stroke Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology

  17. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury: a biomechanical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-jun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 10 6 human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, maximum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, improve biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury.

  18. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury:a biomechanical evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-jun Zhang; Ya-jun Li; Xiao-guang Liu; Feng-xiao Huang; Tie-jun Liu; Dong-mei Jiang; Xue-man Lv; Min Luo

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, max-imum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neu-rotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These ifndings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, im-prove biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury.

  19. Cognitive improvement following transvenous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongfei Li; Chun Yang; Rongmei Qu; Huiying Yang; Meichun Yu; Hui Tao; Jingxing Dai; Lin Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The effects of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADMSC) transplantation for the repair of traumatic brain injury remain poorly understood. The present study observed neurological functional changes in a rat model of traumatic brain injury following ADMSC transplantation via the tail vein.Cell transplants were observed in injured cerebral cortex, and expression of brain-derived nerve growth factor was significantly increased in the injured hippocampus following transplantation. Results demonstrated that transvenous ADMSC transplants migrated to the injured cerebral cortex and significantly improved cognitive function.

  20. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Zhang; Wenliang Chen; Xin Zhang; Bin Huang; Aanjing Chen; Ying He; Jian Wang; Xingang Li

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic ...

  1. Modeling learning in brain stem and cerebellar sites responsible for VOR plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, K. J.; Didier, A. J.; Baker, J. F.; Peterson, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    A simple model of vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) function was used to analyze several hypotheses currently held concerning the characteristics of VOR plasticity. The network included a direct vestibular pathway and an indirect path via the cerebellum. An optimization analysis of this model suggests that regulation of brain stem sites is critical for the proper modification of VOR gain. A more physiologically plausible learning rule was also applied to this network. Analysis of these simulation results suggests that the preferred error correction signal controlling gain modification of the VOR is the direct output of the accessory optic system (AOS) to the vestibular nuclei vs. a signal relayed through the cerebellum via floccular Purkinje cells. The potential anatomical and physiological basis for this conclusion is discussed, in relation to our current understanding of the latency of the adapted VOR response.

  2. Dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells mediated by co-cultured rat striatal brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Mohammad Raffaqat; Andreasen, Christian Maaløv; Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa;

    2008-01-01

    differentiation, we co-cultured cells from a human neural forebrain-derived stem cell line (hNS1) with rat striatal brain slices. In brief, coronal slices of neonatal rat striatum were cultured on semiporous membrane inserts placed in six-well trays overlying monolayers of hNS1 cells. After 12 days of co......-induced areas. The presence of dopamine in the conditioned culture medium was confirmed by HPLC analysis. Interestingly, not all striatal slice cultures induced TH-expression in underlying hNS1 cells. Common to TH-inductive cultures was, however, the presence of degenerating, necrotic areas, suggesting that...... factors released during striatal degeneration were responsible for the dopaminergic induction of the hNS1 cells. Ongoing experiments aim to identify such factors by comparing protein profiles of media conditioned by degenerating (necrotic) versus healthy striatal slice cultures....

  3. Brain stem death as the vital determinant for resumption of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Y W Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous circulation returns to less than half of adult cardiac arrest victims who received in-hospital resuscitation. One clue for this disheartening outcome arises from the prognosis that asystole invariably takes place, after a time lag, on diagnosis of brain stem death. The designation of brain stem death as the point of no return further suggests that permanent impairment of the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery precedes death. It follows that a crucial determinant for successful revival of an arrested heart is that spontaneous circulation must resume before brain stem death commences. Here, we evaluated the hypothesis that maintained functional integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, a neural substrate that is intimately related to brain stem death and central circulatory regulation, holds the key to the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An animal model of brain stem death employing the pesticide mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rats was used. Intravenous administration of lethal doses of mevinphos elicited an abrupt cardiac arrest, accompanied by elevated systemic arterial pressure and anoxia, augmented neuronal excitability and enhanced microvascular perfusion in RVLM. This period represents the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation in our experimental model. Animals with restored spontaneous circulation exhibited maintained neuronal functionality in RVLM beyond this critical time-window, alongside resumption of baseline tissue oxygen and enhancement of local blood flow. Intriguingly, animals that subsequently died manifested sustained anoxia, diminished local blood flow, depressed mitochondrial electron transport activities and reduced ATP production, leading to necrotic cell death in RVLM. That amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction and

  4. Activated vascular endothelia regulate invasion of glioma cells through expression of fibronectin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhi-xiong; YANG Li-juan; HUANG Qiang; FU Jin

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous researches have indicated that glioma invasion may occur within a tumor-host microecology, and that fibronectin may be involved in glioma invasion as an important component of the extracellular matrix. However, how the interaction between tumor cells and vascular endothelial cells affects glioma invasion is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the interaction between tumor cells and vascular endothelial cells on glioma invasion, and the relationship of this interaction to fibronectin.Methods The localization of fibronectin in different brain astrocytoma tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry. Then, vascular endothelial cells and glioma cells were co-cultured in a Transwell co-culturing system. Fibronectin expression was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunocytochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, the influence of the interaction between tumor cells and vascular endothelial cells on glioma cell invasion was determined by an in vitro rapid invasion test.Results In brain astrocytoma tissues, fibronectin was present on the endothelial cells, in the extracellular matrix. Fibronectin expression was greater in higher grade tumors than in lower grade tumors. The interaction of glioma cells and vascular endothelial cells in vitro induced fibronectin release from vascular endothelial cells, which in turn stimulated glioma cell migration. This effect was inhibited by fibronectin blocking antibody.Conclusion Glioma cells may induce vascular epithelial cells to express fibronectin, and in turn fibronectin could promote glioma cell invasion.

  5. Preventive sparing of spinal cord and brain stem in the initial irradiation of locally advanced head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Piras, Sara; Porru, Sergio; Massazza, Federica; Fadda, Giuseppina; Solla, Ignazio; Piras, Denise; Deidda, Maria Assunta; Amichetti, Maurizio; Possanzini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Since reirradiation in recurrent head and neck patients is limited by previous treatment, a marked reduction of maximum doses to spinal cord and brain stem was investigated in the initial irradiation of stage III/IV head and neck cancers. Eighteen patients were planned by simultaneous integrated boost, prescribing 69.3 Gy to PTV1 and 56.1 Gy to PTV2. Nine 6 MV coplanar photon beams at equispaced gantry angles were chosen for each patient. Step-and-shoot IMRT was calculated by direct machine parameter optimization, with the maximum number of segments limited to 80. In the standard plan, optimization considered organs at risk (OAR), dose conformity, maximum dose < 45 Gy to spinal cord and < 50 Gy to brain stem. In the sparing plans, a marked reduction to spinal cord and brain stem were investigated, with/without changes in dose conformity. In the sparing plans, the maximum doses to spinal cord and brain stem were reduced from the initial values (43.5 ± 2.2 Gy and 36.7 ± 14.0 Gy), without significant changes on the other OARs. A marked difference (-15.9 ± 1.9 Gy and -10.1 ± 5.7 Gy) was obtained at the expense of a small difference (-1.3% ± 0.9%) from initial PTV195% coverage (96.6% ± 0.9%). Similar difference (-15.7 ± 2.2 Gy and -10.2 ± 6.1 Gy) was obtained compromising dose conformity, but unaffecting PTV195% and with negligible decrease in PTV295% (-0.3% ± 0.3% from the initial 98.3% ± 0.8%). A marked spinal cord and brain stem preventive sparing was feasible at the expense of a decrease in dose conformity or slightly compromising target coverage. A sparing should be recommended in highly recurrent tumors, to make potential reirradiation safer. PMID:24423836

  6. Therapeutics with SPION-labeled stem cells for the main diseases related to brain aging: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarim LT

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Larissa T Alvarim,1,3,* Leopoldo P Nucci,2,* Javier B Mamani,1 Luciana C Marti,1 Marina F Aguiar,1,2 Helio R Silva,1,3 Gisele S Silva,1 Mariana P Nucci-da-Silva,4 Elaine A DelBel,5,6 Lionel F Gamarra1–31Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Universidade Federal de São Paulo, UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 4Departamento de Radiologia, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil; 5Universidade de São Paulo-Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil; 6NAPNA- Núcleo de Apoio a Pesquisa em Neurociências Aplicadas, São Paulo, Brazil*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The increase in clinical trials assessing the efficacy of cell therapy for structural and functional regeneration of the nervous system in diseases related to the aging brain is well known. However, the results are inconclusive as to the best cell type to be used or the best methodology for the homing of these stem cells. This systematic review analyzed published data on SPION (superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled stem cells as a therapy for brain diseases, such as ischemic stroke, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and dementia. This review highlights the therapeutic role of stem cells in reversing the aging process and the pathophysiology of brain aging, as well as emphasizing nanotechnology as an important tool to monitor stem cell migration in affected regions of the brain.Keywords: iron oxide, dementia, stem cell, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, sclerosis disease, brain aging

  7. BEHAB/brevican requires ADAMTS-mediated proteolytic cleavage to promote glioma invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Viapiano, Mariano Sebastian; Hockfield, Susan; Matthews, Russell Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and deadly primary brain tumors, due to their infiltrative invasion of the normal neural tissue that makes them virtually impossible to completely eliminate. We have previously identified and characterized the proteoglycan BEHAB/brevican in gliomas and have demonstrated that upregulation and cleavage of this CNS-specific molecule promote glioma invasion. Here, we have further investigated if the proteolytic processing of BEHAB/brevican by metalloproteases...

  8. Identifying novel glioma associated pathways based on systems biology level meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yangfan; Li, Jinquan; Yan, Wenying; Chen, Jiajia; Li, Yin; Hu, Guang; Shen, Bairong

    2013-01-01

    Background With recent advances in microarray technology, including genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, it brings a great challenge for integrating this "-omics" data to analysis complex disease. Glioma is an extremely aggressive and lethal form of brain tumor, and thus the study of the molecule mechanism underlying glioma remains very important. To date, most studies focus on detecting the differentially expressed genes in glioma. However, the meta-analysis for pathway analysis based on ...

  9. Voxel-based clustered imaging by multiparameter diffusion tensor images for glioma grading

    OpenAIRE

    Rika Inano; Naoya Oishi; Takeharu Kunieda; Yoshiki Arakawa; Yukihiro Yamao; Sumiya Shibata; Takayuki Kikuchi; Hidenao Fukuyama; Susumu Miyamoto

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common intra-axial primary brain tumour; therefore, predicting glioma grade would influence therapeutic strategies. Although several methods based on single or multiple parameters from diagnostic images exist, a definitive method for pre-operatively determining glioma grade remains unknown. We aimed to develop an unsupervised method using multiple parameters from pre-operative diffusion tensor images for obtaining a clustered image that could enable visual grading of glio...

  10. In vitro delineation of human brain-stem anatomy using a small resonator: correlation with macroscopic and histological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was to investigate the potential of an experimental animal coil using a commercial MRI unit to delineate the anatomical structure of the human brain stem. Three formaldehyde-fixed brain-stem specimens were examined by MRI and sectioned perpendicular to their longitudinal axis. The images were compared with gross anatomy and myelin-stained histological sections. Fibre tracts and nuclei which were not evident on examination of the unstained specimen were readily identified by MRI. Due to its inherent grey/white matter contrast, MRI with a high-resolution coil delineates anatomical structures in a way comparable to the myelin-stained histological sections. However, pigmented structures, readily visible on examination of the unstained specimen were discernible on neither MRI nor on myelin-stained sections. The excellent anatomical detail and grey/white matter contrast provided by these images could make MRI a useful adjunct to the pathologist investigating brain disease. (orig.)

  11. Glioma Association and Balancing Selection of ZFPM2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui-Ying Tsang

    Full Text Available ZFPM2, encoding a zinc finger protein and abundantly expressed in the brain, uterus and smooth muscles, plays important roles in cardiac and gonadal development. Abnormal expression of ZFPM2 in ovarian tumors and neuroblastoma has been reported but hitherto its genetic association with cancer and effects on gliomas have not been studied. In the present study, the hexamer insertion-deletion polymorphism rs71305152, located within a large haplotype block spanning intron 1 to intron 3 of ZFPM2, was genotyped in Chinese cohorts of glioma (n = 350, non-glioma cancer (n = 354 and healthy control (n = 463 by direct sequencing and length polymorphism in gel electrophoresis, and ZFPM2 expression in glioma tissues (n = 69 of different grades was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, potential natural selection pressure acting on the gene was investigated. Disease-association analysis showed that the overall genotype of rs71305152 was significantly associated with gliomas (P = 0.016, and the heterozygous genotype compared to the combined homozygous genotypes was less frequent in gliomas than in controls (P = 0.005 or non-glioma cancers (P = 0.020. ZFPM2 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the grades of gliomas (P = 0.002, with higher expression levels in the low-grade gliomas. In the astrocytoma subtype, higher ZFPM2 expression was also correlated with the rs71305152 heterozygous genotype (P = 0.028. In addition, summary statistics tests gave highly positive values, demonstrating that the gene is under the influence of balancing selection. These findings suggest that ZFPM2 is a glioma susceptibility gene, its genotype and expression showing associations with incidence and severity, respectively. Moreover, the balancing selection acting on ZFPM2 may be related to the important roles it has to play in multiple organ development or associated disease etiology.

  12. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, Elke R. [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Maderwald, Stefan [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Linn, Jennifer; Bochmann, Katja [LMU Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Dassinger, Benjamin [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Giessen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  13. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  14. Neural stem cells secrete factors facilitating brain regeneration upon constitutive Raf-Erk activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Yong-Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Jo, A-Young; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel; Choi, Young-Jin; Sun, Woong; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular Raf-Erk signaling pathway is activated during neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, and neuronal and astrocytic differentiation. A key question is how this signal can evoke multiple and even opposing NSC behaviors. We show here, using a constitutively active Raf (ca-Raf), that Raf-Erk activation in NSCs induces neuronal differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. By contrast, it causes NSC proliferation and the formation of astrocytes in an extrinsic autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, treatment of NSCs with medium (CM) conditioned in ca-Raf-transduced NSCs (Raf-CM; RCM) became activated to form proliferating astrocytes resembling radial glial cells (RGCs) or adult-type NSCs. Infusion of Raf-CM into injured mouse brains caused expansion of the NSC population in the subventricular zone, followed by the formation of new neurons that migrated to the damaged site. Our study shows an example how molecular mechanisms dissecting NSC behaviors can be utilized to develop regenerative therapies in brain disorders. PMID:27554447

  15. Current and future strategies in radiotherapy of childhood low-grade glioma of the brain. Part I. Treatment modalities of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Treatment of childhood low-grade gliomas is a challenging issue owing to their low incidence and the lack of consensus about ''optimal'' treatment approach. Material and Methods: Reports in the literature spanning 60 years of radiation therapy, including orthovoltage, megavoltage and recently modern high-precision treatments, were reviewed with respect to visual function, survival, prognostic factors, dose prescriptions, target volumes, and treatment techniques. Based on these experiences, future strategies in the management of childhood low-grade glioma are presented. Results: Evaluation of published reports is difficult because of inconsistencies in data presentation, relatively short follow-up in some series and failure to present findings and results in a comparable way. Even with the shortcomings of the reports available in the literature, primarily concerning indications, age at treatment, dose response, timing and use of ''optimal'' treatment fields, radiation therapy continues to play an important role in the management of these tumors achieving long-term survival rates up to 80% or more. Particularly in gliomas of the visual pathway, high local tumor control and improved or stable function is achieved in approximately 90% of cases. Data on dose-response relationships recommend dose prescriptions between 45 and 54 Gy with standard fractionation. There is consensus now to employ radiation therapy in older children in case of progressive disease only, regardless of tumor location and histologic subtype. In younger children, the role of radiotherapy is unclear. Recent advances in treatment techniques, such as 3-D treatment planning and various ''high-precision'' treatments achieved promising initial outcome, however with limited patient numbers and short follow-ups. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is an effective treatment modality in children with low-grade glioma regarding tumor control and improvement and/or preservation of neurologic function or

  16. Current and future strategies in radiotherapy of childhood low-grade glioma of the brain. Part I. Treatment modalities of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortmann, R.D.; Timmermann, B.; Plasswilm, L.; Paulsen, F.; Jeremic, B.; Kay, S.; Bamberg, M. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Taylor, R.E. [Radiotherapy Dept., Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Scarzello, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Padua General Hospital (Italy); Gnekow, A.K. [Children' s Hospital, Augsburg (Germany); Dieckmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, General Hospital Vienna (Austria)

    2003-08-01

    Background: Treatment of childhood low-grade gliomas is a challenging issue owing to their low incidence and the lack of consensus about ''optimal'' treatment approach. Material and Methods: Reports in the literature spanning 60 years of radiation therapy, including orthovoltage, megavoltage and recently modern high-precision treatments, were reviewed with respect to visual function, survival, prognostic factors, dose prescriptions, target volumes, and treatment techniques. Based on these experiences, future strategies in the management of childhood low-grade glioma are presented. Results: Evaluation of published reports is difficult because of inconsistencies in data presentation, relatively short follow-up in some series and failure to present findings and results in a comparable way. Even with the shortcomings of the reports available in the literature, primarily concerning indications, age at treatment, dose response, timing and use of ''optimal'' treatment fields, radiation therapy continues to play an important role in the management of these tumors achieving long-term survival rates up to 80% or more. Particularly in gliomas of the visual pathway, high local tumor control and improved or stable function is achieved in approximately 90% of cases. Data on dose-response relationships recommend dose prescriptions between 45 and 54 Gy with standard fractionation. There is consensus now to employ radiation therapy in older children in case of progressive disease only, regardless of tumor location and histologic subtype. In younger children, the role of radiotherapy is unclear. Recent advances in treatment techniques, such as 3-D treatment planning and various ''high-precision'' treatments achieved promising initial outcome, however with limited patient numbers and short follow-ups. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is an effective treatment modality in children with low-grade glioma regarding tumor control

  17. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation. PMID:26948349

  18. Efficacy of 68Ga-DOTATOC Positron Emission Tomography (PET) CT in Children and Young Adults With Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-17

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Meningeal Melanocytoma; Newly Diagnosed Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood

  19. Recent advances in the involvement of long non-coding RNAs in neural stem cell biology and brain pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PanagiotisKPolitis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of non-coding genome has recently uncovered a growing list of formerly unknown regulatory long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs with important functions in stem cell pluripotency, development and homeostasis of several tissues. Although thousands of lncRNAs are expressed in mammalian brain in a highly patterned manner, their roles in brain development have just begun to emerge. Recent data suggest key roles for these molecules in gene regulatory networks controlling neuronal and glial cell differentiation. Analysis of the genomic distribution of genes encoding for lncRNAs indicates a physical association of these regulatory RNAs with transcription factors (TFs with well-established roles in neural differentiation, suggesting that lncRNAs and TFs may form coherent regulatory networks with important functions in neural stem cells (NSCs. Additionally, many studies show that lncRNAs are involved in the pathophysiology of brain-related diseases/disorders. Here we discuss these observations and investigate the links between lncRNAs, brain development and brain-related diseases. Understanding the functions of lncRNAs in NSCs and brain organogenesis could revolutionize the basic principles of developmental biology and neuroscience.

  20. A phase I/II trial of the histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin for adults with recurrent malignant glioma: North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study 03-03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Fabio M; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Kuhn, John G; Wen, Patrick Y; Yung, W K Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R; Chang, Susan M; Lieberman, Frank S; Prados, Michael D; Fine, Howard A

    2011-05-01

    Romidepsin, a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor, has shown activity in preclinical glioma models. The primary objectives of this trial were to determine the pharmacokinetics of romidepsin in patients with recurrent glioma on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of romidepsin in patients with recurrent glioblastoma who were not receiving EIAEDs. Two dose cohorts were studied in the phase I component of the trial (13.3 and 17.7 mg/m(2)/d). Patients in the phase II component were treated with intravenous romidepsin at a dosage of 13.3 mg/m(2)/day on days 1, 8, and 15 of each 28-day cycle. Eight patients were treated on the phase I component. A similar romidepsin pharmacokinetic profile was demonstrated between patients receiving EIAEDs to those not receving EIAEDs. Thirty-five patients with glioblastoma were accrued to the phase II component. There was no objective radiographic response. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 weeks and only 1 patient had a PFS time ≥6 months (PFS6 = 3%). To date, 34 patients (97%) have died, with a median survival duration of 34 weeks. Despite in vitro studies showing that romidepsin is primarily metabolized by CYP3A4, no decrease in exposure to romidepsin was seen in patients receiving potent CYP3A4 inducers. Romidepsin, at its standard dose and schedule, was ineffective for patients with recurrent glioblastomas. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00085540. PMID:21377994

  1. Brain injury expands the numbers of neural stem cells and progenitors in the SVZ by enhancing their responsiveness to EGF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Lazzarino

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There is an increase in the numbers of neural precursors in the SVZ (subventricular zone after moderate ischaemic injuries, but the extent of stem cell expansion and the resultant cell regeneration is modest. Therefore our studies have focused on understanding the signals that regulate these processes towards achieving a more robust amplification of the stem/progenitor cell pool. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of the EGFR [EGF (epidermal growth factor receptor] in the regenerative response of the neonatal SVZ to hypoxic/ischaemic injury. We show that injury recruits quiescent cells in the SVZ to proliferate, that they divide more rapidly and that there is increased EGFR expression on both putative stem cells and progenitors. With the amplification of the precursors in the SVZ after injury there is enhanced sensitivity to EGF, but not to FGF (fibroblast growth factor-2. EGF-dependent SVZ precursor expansion, as measured using the neurosphere assay, is lost when the EGFR is pharmacologically inhibited, and forced expression of a constitutively active EGFR is sufficient to recapitulate the exaggerated proliferation of the neural stem/progenitors that is induced by hypoxic/ischaemic brain injury. Cumulatively, our results reveal that increased EGFR signalling precedes that increase in the abundance of the putative neural stem cells and our studies implicate the EGFR as a key regulator of the expansion of SVZ precursors in response to brain injury. Thus modulating EGFR signalling represents a potential target for therapies to enhance brain repair from endogenous neural precursors following hypoxic/ischaemic and other brain injuries.

  2. Adenovirus-mediated human brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene-modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changsheng Wang; Jianhua Lin; Chaoyang Wu; Rongsheng Chen

    2011-01-01

    Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor were successfully obtained using a gene transfection method, then intravenously transplanted into rats with spinal cord injury. At 1, 3, and 5 weeks after transplantation, the expression of ??brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurofilament-200 was upregulated in the injured spinal cord, spinal cord injury was alleviated, and Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scores of hindlimb motor function were significantly increased. This evidence suggested that intravenous transplantation of adenovirus- mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene-modified rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells could play a dual role, simultaneously providing neural stem cells and neurotrophic factors.

  3. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper; Ravn, Pernille; Gaist, David

    2013-01-01

    nationwide setting. Methods: Using population-based registries we conducted a case-control study nested in the Danish female population. We identified all women aged 55-84 years with a first diagnosis of histologically verified brain glioma during 2000-2009. Using risk-set sampling, each case was matched on......Aim: Several studies indicate that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increased risk of intracranial meningioma, while associations between HRT use and risk of other brain tumors have been less explored. We investigated the influence of HRT use on the risk of glioma in a...... birth year to eight population controls. Ever use of HRT was defined as ≥2 HRT prescriptions and categorized according to type (oestrogens only, combined oestrogen-progestagen and progestagen only) and duration of use (...

  4. Bright Solitary Waves in Malignant Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-García, Víctor M.; Calvo, Gabriel F.; Belmonte-Beitia, Juan; Diego, D.; Pérez-Romasanta, Luis

    2011-01-01

    We put forward a nonlinear wave model describing the fundamental physio-pathologic features of an aggressive type of brain tumors: glioblastomas. Our model accounts for the invasion of normal tissue by a proliferating and propagating rim of active glioma cancer cells in the tumor boundary and the subsequent formation of a necrotic core. By resorting to numerical simulations, phase space analysis and exact solutions, we prove that bright solitary tumor waves develop in such systems.

  5. Perspectives in Intraoperative Diagnostics of Human Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Tyurikova, O.; Y. Dembitskaya; Yashin, K.; M. Mishchenko; Vedunova, M.; I. Medyanik; V. Kazantsev

    2015-01-01

    Amongst large a variety of oncological diseases, malignant gliomas represent one of the most severe types of tumors. They are also the most common type of the brain tumors and account for over half of the astrocytic tumors. According to different sources, the average life expectancy of patients with various glioblastomas varies between 10 and 12 months and that of patients with anaplastic astrocytic tumors between 20 and 24 months. Therefore, studies of the physiology of transformed glial cel...

  6. Autocrine IL-8 promotes F-actin polymerization and mediate mesenchymal transition via ELMO1-NF-κB-Snail signaling in glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Baogang; Shi, Lihong; Lu, Shijun; Sun, Xiuning; Liu, Yuqing; Li, Hongli; Wang, Xuejian; Zhao, Chunzhen; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most common form of primary malignant brain cancers. Tumor cell invasiveness is a critical challenge in the clinical management of glioma patients. The invasive biological feature of glioma cell is stimulated by both autocrine and paracrine factors including chemokine IL-8. In this study, we report that the production of IL-8 is higher in glioma tissues and cells than adjacent nontumor tissues (ANT) and normal glial cells. Autocrine IL-8 can increase the invasive ability of glio...

  7. Thymosin β 4 gene silencing decreases stemness and invasiveness in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsching, Hans-Georg; Krishnan, Shanmugarajan; Florea, Ana-Maria; Frei, Karl; Krayenbühl, Niklaus; Hasenbach, Kathy; Reifenberger, Guido; Weller, Michael; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh

    2014-02-01

    Thymosin beta 4 is a pleiotropic actin-sequestering polypeptide that is involved in wound healing and developmental processes. Thymosin beta 4 gene silencing promotes differentiation of neural stem cells whereas thymosin beta 4 overexpression initiates cortical folding of developing brain hemispheres. A role of thymosin beta 4 in malignant gliomas has not yet been investigated. We analysed thymosin beta 4 staining on tissue microarrays and performed interrogations of the REMBRANDT and the Cancer Genome Atlas databases. We investigated thymosin beta 4 expression in seven established glioma cell lines and seven glioma-initiating cell lines and induced or silenced thymosin beta 4 expression by lentiviral transduction in LNT-229, U87MG and GS-2 cells to study the effects of altered thymosin beta 4 expression on gene expression, growth, clonogenicity, migration, invasion, self-renewal and differentiation capacity in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo. Thymosin beta 4 expression increased with grade of malignancy in gliomas. Thymosin beta 4 gene silencing in LNT-229 and U87MG glioma cells inhibited migration and invasion, promoted starvation-induced cell death in vitro and enhanced survival of glioma-bearing mice. Thymosin beta 4 gene silencing in GS-2 cells inhibited self-renewal and promoted differentiation in vitro and decreased tumorigenicity in vivo. Gene expression analysis suggested a thymosin beta 4-dependent regulation of mesenchymal signature genes and modulation of TGFβ and p53 signalling networks. We conclude that thymosin beta 4 should be explored as a novel molecular target for anti-glioma therapy. PMID:24355709

  8. Efficient and Rapid Derivation of Primitive Neural Stem Cells and Generation of Brain Subtype Neurons From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Yiping; Shin, Soojung; Jha, Balendu Shekhar; Liu, Qiuyue; Sheng, Jianting; Li, Fuhai; Zhan, Ming; Davis, Janine; Bharti, Kapil; Zeng, Xianmin; Rao, Mahendra; Malik, Nasir; Mohan C. Vemuri

    2013-01-01

    This study developed a highly efficient serum-free pluripotent stem cell (PSC) neural induction medium that can induce human PSCs into primitive neural stem cells (NSCs) in 7 days, obviating the need for time-consuming, laborious embryoid body generation or rosette picking. This method of primitive NSC derivation sets the stage for the scalable production of clinically relevant neural cells for cell therapy applications in good manufacturing practice conditions.

  9. Severe Radiation Necrosis Successfully Treated With Bevacizumab in an Infant with Low-Grade Glioma and Tumor-Associated Intractable Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay Smiley, Natasha; Alden, Tord; Hartsell, William; Fangusaro, Jason

    2016-09-01

    We present a unique case of radiation necrosis in a child with brain stem low-grade glioma (LGG) presenting with trigeminal neuralgia. Despite extensive therapies, severe pain persisted. She received proton beam radiation with significant improvement. However, she developed radiation necrosis and hydrocephalus. Despite surgical correction of hydrocephalus, the patient remained critically ill. She was treated with dexamethasone and bevacizumab with rapid clinical improvement. Subsequent MRIs revealed almost complete resolution of the necrosis. This case illustrates the successful treatment of trigeminal neuralgia with radiation and a rare case of radiation necrosis in an LGG successfully treated with bevacizumab and dexamethasone. PMID:27187113

  10. Utility of multiparametric 3-T MRI for glioma characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Bhaswati; Gupta, Rakesh K. [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Department of Radiology and Imaging, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Maudsley, Andrew A.; Sheriff, Sulaiman [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami (United States); Awasthi, Rishi; Mohakud, Sudipta [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Lucknow (India); Gu, Meng; Spielman, Daniel M. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Standford (United States); Husain, Nuzhat [Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Pathology, Lucknow (India); Behari, Sanjay [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Neurosurgery, Lucknow (India); Pandey, Chandra M. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Biostatistics and Health Informatics, Lucknow (India); Rathore, Ram K.S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Kanpur (India); Alger, Jeffry R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Accurate grading of cerebral glioma using conventional structural imaging techniques remains challenging due to the relatively poor sensitivity and specificity of these methods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative sensitivity and specificity of structural magnetic resonance imaging and MR measurements of perfusion, diffusion, and whole-brain spectroscopic parameters for glioma grading. Fifty-six patients with radiologically suspected untreated glioma were studied with T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and volumetric whole-brain MR spectroscopic imaging. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was performed using the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), apparent diffusion coefficient, fractional anisotropy, and multiple spectroscopic parameters to determine optimum thresholds for tumor grading and to obtain the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for identifying high-grade gliomas. Logistic regression was performed to analyze all the parameters together. The rCBV individually classified glioma as low and high grade with a sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 88 %, respectively, based on a threshold value of 3.34. On combining all parameters under consideration, the classification was achieved with 2 % error and sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 96 %, respectively. Individually, CBV measurement provides the greatest diagnostic performance for predicting glioma grade; however, the most accurate classification can be achieved by combining all of the imaging parameters. (orig.)

  11. Utility of multiparametric 3-T MRI for glioma characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate grading of cerebral glioma using conventional structural imaging techniques remains challenging due to the relatively poor sensitivity and specificity of these methods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative sensitivity and specificity of structural magnetic resonance imaging and MR measurements of perfusion, diffusion, and whole-brain spectroscopic parameters for glioma grading. Fifty-six patients with radiologically suspected untreated glioma were studied with T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and volumetric whole-brain MR spectroscopic imaging. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was performed using the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), apparent diffusion coefficient, fractional anisotropy, and multiple spectroscopic parameters to determine optimum thresholds for tumor grading and to obtain the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for identifying high-grade gliomas. Logistic regression was performed to analyze all the parameters together. The rCBV individually classified glioma as low and high grade with a sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 88 %, respectively, based on a threshold value of 3.34. On combining all parameters under consideration, the classification was achieved with 2 % error and sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 96 %, respectively. Individually, CBV measurement provides the greatest diagnostic performance for predicting glioma grade; however, the most accurate classification can be achieved by combining all of the imaging parameters. (orig.)

  12. Liposome size and charge optimization for intraarterial delivery to gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shailendra; Cooke, Johann R N; Chan, Darren K W; Ellis, Jason A; Hossain, Shaolie S; Singh-Moon, Rajinder P; Wang, Mei; Bigio, Irving J; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Straubinger, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticles such as liposomes may be used as drug delivery vehicles for brain tumor therapy. Particle geometry and electrostatic properties have been hypothesized to be important determinants of effective tumor targeting after intraarterial injection. In this study, we investigate the combined roles of liposome size and surface charge on the effectiveness of delivery to gliomas after intraarterial injection. Intracarotid injection of liposomes was performed in separate cohorts of both healthy and C6 glioma-bearing Sprague Dawley rats after induction of transient cerebral hypoperfusion. Large (200 nm) and small (60-80 nm) fluorescent dye-loaded liposomes that were either cationic or neutral in surface charge were utilized. Delivery effectiveness was quantitatively measured both with real-time, in vivo and postmortem diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Semi-quantitative multispectral fluorescence imaging was also utilized to assess the pattern and extent of liposome targeting within tumors. Large cationic liposomes demonstrated the most effective hemispheric and glioma targeting of all the liposomes tested. Selective large cationic liposome retention at the site of glioma growth was observed. The liposome deposition pattern within tumors after intraarterial injection was variable with both core penetration and peripheral deposition observed in specific tumors. This study provides evidence that liposome size and charge are important determinants of effective brain and glioma targeting after intraarterial injection. Our results support the future development of 200-nm cationic liposomal formulations of candidate intraarterial anti-glioma agents for further pre-clinical testing. PMID:27091339

  13. Depression in glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Rooney, Alasdair Grant

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few high-quality observational studies have been conducted to examine clinically relevant features of emotional distress and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in adults with primary cerebral glioma. Our knowledge of these important complications of glioma is currently poor. AIMS This thesis aims to answer a series of relevant clinical questions. I have studied: [1] the frequency, independent clinical associations and course of general emotional distress measured usi...

  14. Identification and culture of neural stem cells isolated from adult rat subventricular zone following fluid percussion brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To analyze proliferation and differentiation of glial fibrillary acid protein(GFAP)-and nestin-positive(GFAP+/nestin+)cells isolated from the subventricular zone following fluid percussion brain injury to determine whether GFAP+/nestin+ cells exhibit characteristics of neural stem cells.Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats,aged 12 weeks and weighing 200-250 g,were randomly and evenly assigned to normal control group and model group.In the model group,a rat model of fluid percussion brain injury was es...

  15. A case of radiation-induced glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of malignant cerebellar glioma developing 25 years after radiotherapy for pineal tumor is described. The patient is a 40-year-old male, who was admitted to our department with complaints of dizziness and gait disturbance. neurological examinations revealed symptoms involving the left cerebellar hemisphere and cerebellar vermis. CT scan and MRI demonstrated a circularly enhanced tumor which was located in the left cerebellar hemisphere extending to the vermis. The tumor was diagnosed as malignant glioma. In view of the former radiotherapy, this glioma was suspected to have been induced by radiation. The situation conformed to Walker's criteria for radiation-induced tumor. With the patient under general anesthesia, the tumor was subtotally removed by means of suboccipitel craniectomy. Histopathologically, the tumor was diagnosed as astrocytoma, grade 3. Most radiation-induced gliomas are malignant. There seems to be no significant correlation between the radiation dose; the latent period widely varies, ranging from several years to more than 20 years. Even if the radiation dose is small, there still exists the risk that radiation might induce a tumor. It was concluded that the possibility of radiation-induced tumor should be kept in mind whenever radiation therapy is carried out for brain tumors. (author)

  16. Combined chemotherapy of malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A controlled study of 226 age-matched patients with histologically proven grade 3 and 4 supratentorial gliomas with maximum feasible tumour resection, postoperative Karnofsky performance over 50 and minimum survival of 8 weeks compares the results of supportive care (45 cases), high-dose irradiation of 40 to 66 Gy (59 cases), COMP protocol (CCNU, procarbazine, vincristine, methotrexate, prednisone in 15 day cycles-42 cases) and simultaneous irradiation and COMP chemotherapy (80 cases including 30 survivors). Median recurrent-free intervals in the treatment groups (7 to 11.7 months) were significantly longer than after supportive care (4.4 months). Median survival with supportive care (6.7 months) was significantly shorter than after radiation or COMP treatment (11.7 and 12.3 months) and 14.9 to over 19.9 months with combined treatment, where the two-year survival rates were 33 and 67% (for survivors), and the 3-year survival rates 13 to 30%. Toxic side effects of multimodality treatment were more frequent than after chemotherapy. In addition to space-occupying intracranial cysts often simulating tumour recurrence (12%) and rare radiation necrosis, about 15% of long-term survivors developed progressive intellectual dysfunction with brain atrophy, in the absence of tumour regrowth. Despite some promising results of multimodality approaches towards the management of malignant supratentorial gliomas, the overall results are unsatisfactory and need further optimization. (Author)

  17. The Brain Microenvironment Preferentially Enhances the Radioresistance of CD133+ Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jamal

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumor xenografts initiated from glioblastoma (GBM CD133+ tumor stem-like cells (TSCs are composed of TSC and non-TSC subpopulations, simulating the phenotypic heterogeneity of GBMs in situ. Given that the discrepancies between the radiosensitivity of GBM cells in vitro and the treatment response of patients suggest a role for the microenvironment in GBM radioresistance, we compared the response of TSCs and non-TSCs irradiated under in vitro and orthotopic conditions. As a measure of radioresponse determined at the individual cell level, γH2AX and 53BP1 foci were quantified in CD133+ cells and their differentiated (CD133- progeny. Under in vitro conditions, no difference was detected between CD133+ and CD133- cells in foci induction or dispersal after irradiation. However, irradiation of orthotopic xenografts initiated from TSCs resulted in the induction of fewer γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in CD133+ cells compared to their CD133- counterparts within the same tumor. Xenograft irradiation resulted in a tumor growth delay of approximately 7 days with a corresponding increase in the percentage of CD133+ cells at 7 days after radiation, which persisted to the onset of neurologic symptoms. These results suggest that, although the radioresponse of TSCs and non-TSCs does not differ under in vitro growth conditions, CD133+ cells are relatively radioresistant under intracerebral growth conditions. Whereas these findings are consistent with the suspected role for TSCs as a determinant of GBM radioresistance, these data also illustrate the dependence of the cellular radioresistance on the brain microenvironment.

  18. Therapy of brain stem tumors - palliative conception with prospect of curative success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1969 to 1981, 23 patients with tumors in the pons region were irradiated at the Department of Radiotherapy of the West German Tumor Center in Essen. The age of the patients ranged from 18 months to 50 years. Fifteen patients (65%) were younger than 18 years, one was 25 years old, and seven were between 40 and 50 years old. In two cases the histologic diagnosis of an astrocytoma I and astrocytoma II could be confirmed by exploratory excision and cyst punction, respectively. Nineteen patients received a shunt system (ventriculoatrial shunt) prior to radiotherapy in order to achieve a pressure reduction. After a follow-up period of 1.5 to 12 years, eleven patients are alive, and twelve patients died from a local recurrence or from progressive tumor growth. The five-year survival rate is 47%. Five of the surviving patients show no or only slight adverse effects on their general condition and are able to attend school or carry out their profession (in Karnofsky: 90 to 100%). Four other patients suffering from marked remaining neurologic symptoms are able to take care of themselves (Karnofsky: 70 to 80%). Two patients need permanent nursing (Karnofsky: 50 to 60%). Because of the local propagation tendency of pons tumors, radiotherapy should be locally restricted to the brain stem and the adjacent brain structures, e.g. cerebellum and proximal neck marrow. The authors recommend target volumes of 55 to 60 Gy, which must be applied within 6 to 8 weeks, taking into account the age of patients. This palliative therapy conception should be applied routinely in the hope of bringing about a curative treatment to this group of patients. (orig.)

  19. Presenilins are required for maintenance of neural stem cells in the developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Woo-Young

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The early embryonic lethality of mutant mice bearing germ-line deletions of both presenilin genes precluded the study of their functions in neural development. We therefore employed the Cre-loxP technology to generate presenilin conditional double knockout (PS cDKO mice, in which expression of both presenilins is inactivated in neural progenitor cells (NPC or neural stem cells and their derivative neurons and glia beginning at embryonic day 11 (E11. In PS cDKO mice, dividing NPCs labeled by BrdU are decreased in number beginning at E13.5. By E15.5, fewer than 20% of NPCs remain in PS cDKO mice. The depletion of NPCs is accompanied by severe morphological defects and hemorrhages in the PS cDKO embryonic brain. Interkinetic nuclear migration of NPCs is also disrupted in PS cDKO embryos, as evidenced by displacement of S-phase and M-phase nuclei in the ventricular zone of the telencephalon. Furthermore, the depletion of neural progenitor cells in PS cDKO embryos is due to NPCs exiting cell cycle and differentiating into neurons rather than reentering cell cycle between E13.5 and E14.5 following PS inactivation in most NPCs. The length of cell cycle, however, is unchanged in PS cDKO embryos. Expression of Notch target genes, Hes1 and Hes5, is significantly decreased in PS cDKO brains, whereas Dll1 expression is up-regulated, indicating that Notch signaling is effectively blocked by PS inactivation. These findings demonstrate that presenilins are essential for neural progenitor cells to re-enter cell cycle and thus ensure proper expansion of neural progenitor pool during embryonic neural development.

  20. Expression and Prognostic Significance of p53 in Glioma Patients: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yueling; Xiao, Weizhong; Song, Tingting; Feng, Guangjia; Dai, Zhensheng

    2016-07-01

    Glioma is a brain tumor deriving from the neoplastic glial cells or neuroglia. Due to its resistance to anticancer drugs and different disease progress of individuals, patients with high-grade glioma are difficult to completely cure, leading to a poor prognosis and low overall survival. Therefore, there is an urgent need to look for prognostic and diagnostic indicators that can predict glioma grades. P53 is one of the widely studied biomarkers in human glioma. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the significance of p53 expression in glioma grades and overall survival. We searched commonly used electronic databases to retrieve related articles of p53 expression in glioma. Overall, a total of 21 studies including 1322 glioma patients were finally screened out. We observed that the frequency of p53 immuno-positivity was higher in high-grade patients than that in low-grade category (63.8 vs. 41.6 %), and our statistic analysis indicated that p53 expression was associated with pathological grade of glioma (OR 2.93, 95 % CI 1.87-4.60, P < 0.00001). This significant correction was also found in 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival. However, no positive relationship was found between age, sex, tumor size and p53 expression in patients with glioma. In conclusion, our results suggested that p53 immunohistochemical expression might have an effective usefulness in predicting the prognosis in patients with glioma. PMID:27038932

  1. A phase 2 trial of irinotecan (CPT-11) in patients with recurrent malignant glioma: a North American Brain Tumor Consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, Michael D; Lamborn, Kathleen; Yung, W K A; Jaeckle, Kurt; Robins, H Ian; Mehta, Minesh; Fine, Howard A; Wen, Patrick Y; Cloughesy, Timothy; Chang, Susan; Nicholas, M Kelly; Schiff, David; Greenberg, Harry; Junck, Larry; Fink, Karen; Hess, Ken; Kuhn, John

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the response to CPT-11 administered every three weeks to adults with progressive malignant glioma, treated with or without enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug (EIAED) therapy, at the recommended phase 2 dose determined from a previous phase 1 study. Adult patients age 18 or older with a KPS of 60 or higher who had measurable recurrent grade III anaplastic glioma (AG) or grade IV glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were eligible. No more than one prior chemotherapy was allowed, either as adjuvant therapy or for recurrent disease. The CPT-11 dose was 350 mg/m(2) i.v. every three weeks in patients not on EIAED and 750 mg/m(2) in patients on EIAED therapy. Patients with stable or responding disease could be treated until tumor progression or a total of 12 months of therapy. The primary end point of the study was to determine whether CPT-11 could significantly delay tumor progression, using the rate of six-month progression-free survival (PFS-6). The trial was sized to be able to discriminate between a 15% and 35% rate for the GBM group alone and between a 20% and 40% rate for the entire cohort. There were 51 eligible patients, including 38 GBM and 13 AG patients, enrolled. The median age was 52 and 42 years, respectively. PFS-6 for the entire cohort was 17.6%. PFS-6 was 15.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07-0.31) for the GBM patients and 23% (95% CI, 0.07-0.52) for AG patients. Toxicity for the group included diarrhea and myelosuppression. We conclude that the recommended phase 2 dose of CPT-11 for patients with or without EIAED was ineffective on this schedule, in this patient population. PMID:16533878

  2. A phase 2 trial of irinotecan (CPT-11) in patients with recurrent malignant glioma: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium study1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, Michael D.; Lamborn, Kathleen; Yung, W.K.A.; Jaeckle, Kurt; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh; Fine, Howard A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Cloughesy, Timothy; Chang, Susan; Nicholas, M. Kelly; Schiff, David; Greenberg, Harry; Junck, Larry; Fink, Karen; Hess, Ken; Kuhn, John

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the response to CPT-11 administered every three weeks to adults with progressive malignant glioma, treated with or without enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug (EIAED) therapy, at the recommended phase 2 dose determined from a previous phase 1 study. Adult patients age 18 or older with a KPS of 60 or higher who had measurable recurrent grade III anaplastic glioma (AG) or grade IV glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were eligible. No more than one prior chemotherapy was allowed, either as adjuvant therapy or for recurrent disease. The CPT-11 dose was 350 mg/m2 i.v. every three weeks in patients not on EIAED and 750 mg/m2 in patients on EIAED therapy. Patients with stable or responding disease could be treated until tumor progression or a total of 12 months of therapy. The primary end point of the study was to determine whether CPT-11 could significantly delay tumor progression, using the rate of six-month progression-free survival (PFS-6). The trial was sized to be able to discriminate between a 15% and 35% rate for the GBM group alone and between a 20% and 40% rate for the entire cohort. There were 51 eligible patients, including 38 GBM and 13 AG patients, enrolled. The median age was 52 and 42 years, respectively. PFS-6 for the entire cohort was 17.6%. PFS-6 was 15.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07–0.31) for the GBM patients and 23% (95% CI, 0.07–0.52) for AG patients. Toxicity for the group included diarrhea and myelosuppression. We conclude that the recommended phase 2 dose of CPT-11 for patients with or without EIAED was ineffective on this schedule, in this patient population. PMID:16533878

  3. Vorinostat and Temozolomide in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Primary Brain Tumors or Spinal Cord Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Choriocarcinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Germinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Teratoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Extra-adrenal Paraganglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  4. Critical appraisal of cerebral blood flow measured from brain stem and cerebellar regions after 133 Xe inhalation in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Validity of regional blood flow (rCBF) measurements recorded over the human posterior fossa after 133Xe inhalation was tested. Recording of counts from both brain stem and cerebellum (BSC) was reproducible and contamination by counts derived from surrounding anatomical structures was low and no greater than that found over hemispheres. BSC flow values showed significant correlation with the state of awareness as judged by clinical and EEG evaluation

  5. Testing the hypothesis of neurodegeneracy in respiratory network function with a priori transected arterially perfused brain stem preparation of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sarah E; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    Degeneracy of respiratory network function would imply that anatomically discrete aspects of the brain stem are capable of producing respiratory rhythm. To test this theory we a priori transected brain stem preparations before reperfusion and reoxygenation at 4 rostrocaudal levels: 1.5 mm caudal to obex (n = 5), at obex (n = 5), and 1.5 (n = 7) and 3 mm (n = 6) rostral to obex. The respiratory activity of these preparations was assessed via recordings of phrenic and vagal nerves and lumbar spinal expiratory motor output. Preparations with a priori transection at level of the caudal brain stem did not produce stable rhythmic respiratory bursting, even when the arterial chemoreceptors were stimulated with sodium cyanide (NaCN). Reperfusion of brain stems that preserved the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) showed spontaneous and sustained rhythmic respiratory bursting at low phrenic nerve activity (PNA) amplitude that occurred simultaneously in all respiratory motor outputs. We refer to this rhythm as the pre-BötC burstlet-type rhythm. Conserving circuitry up to the pontomedullary junction consistently produced robust high-amplitude PNA at lower burst rates, whereas sequential motor patterning across the respiratory motor outputs remained absent. Some of the rostrally transected preparations expressed both burstlet-type and regular PNA amplitude rhythms. Further analysis showed that the burstlet-type rhythm and high-amplitude PNA had 1:2 quantal relation, with burstlets appearing to trigger high-amplitude bursts. We conclude that no degenerate rhythmogenic circuits are located in the caudal medulla oblongata and confirm the pre-BötC as the primary rhythmogenic kernel. The absence of sequential motor patterning in a priori transected preparations suggests that pontine circuits govern respiratory pattern formation. PMID:26888109

  6. Transplantation of human neural stem cells restores cognition in an immunodeficient rodent model of traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Haus, DL; Lopez-Velazquez, L; Gold, EM; Cunningham, KM; Perez, H; Anderson, AJ; Cummings, BJ

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans can result in permanent tissue damage and has been linked to cognitive impairment that lasts years beyond the initial insult. Clinically effective treatment strategies have yet to be developed. Transplantation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) has the potential to restore cognition lost due to injury, however, the vast majority of rodent TBI/hNSC studies to date have evaluated cognition only at early time points, typically

  7. A meta-analysis of efficacy in pre-clinical human stem cell therapies for traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, J.; Phelan, M; Cummings, BJ

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objectives: Evaluate the preclinical evidence for human cell therapies for the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI), determine behavioral effect sizes for modified and non-modified cells, and identify variables that correlate with greater effect sizes. Methods: A literature search identified 58 animal studies of TBI using human stem cells. Each study received a Quality Index (QI) score based on existing guidelines. Effect sizes for cell therapies were determined for ...

  8. Gene expression analysis of neuronal precursors from adult mouse brain and differential screen for neural stem cell markers

    OpenAIRE

    Pennartz, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    In the adult mouse brain, neuronal precursor cells continuously emanate from neural stem cells (NSC) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and migrate into the olfactory bulb (OB) where they differentiate to serve as replenishment for GABAergic interneurons. During the migration process, PSA-NCAM (Polysialic acid-Neural cell adhesion molecule) specifically marks the neuronal precursors (PSA+ cells). This phenomenon was exploited in the framework of this doctoral thesis to isolate a homogeneous cel...

  9. Depletion of neural stem cells from the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain using cytosine b‐Arabinofuranoside

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanbari, Amir; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Bahmanpour, Soghra; Golmohammadi, Mohammad Ghasem; Sharififar, Sharareh; Azari, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside along the ventricular axis of the mammalian brain. They divide infrequently to maintain themselves and the down‐stream progenitors. Due to the quiescent property of NSCs, attempts to deplete these cells using antimitotic agents such as cytosine b‐Aarabinofuranoside (Ara‐C) have not been successful. We hypothesized that implementing infusion gaps in Ara‐C kill paradigms would recruit the quiescent NSCs and subsequently eliminate them from t...

  10. C1–C2 arthrodesis after transoral odontoidectomy and suboccipital craniectomy for ventral brain stem compression in Chiari I patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Steven W.; Heilman, Carl B.; Riesenburger, Ron I.; Kryzanski, James

    2008-01-01

    Chiari I malformations are often associated with congenital craniocervical anomalies such as platybasia, basilar invagination, and retroflexion of the odontoid process. Management of ventral brain stem compression associated with Chiari I malformations remains controversial, but several authors report a significant rate of failure with suboccipital decompression alone in the presence of pronounced ventral brain stem compression (VBSC). Treatment options described in the literature for these p...

  11. Combining acellular nerve allografts with brain-derived neurotrophic factor transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells restores sciatic nerve injury better than either intervention alone

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Gechen; Ka, Ka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts from bilateral sciatic nerves, and repaired 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats using these grafts and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Experiments were performed in three groups: the acellular nerve allograft bridging group, acellular nerve allograft + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and the acellular nerve allograft + brain-derived neurotrophic factor transfected bone...

  12. Susceptibility-weighted imaging of the venous networks around the brain stem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Ming; Lin, Zhong-Xiao; Zhang, Nu [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China); Zhang, Xiao-Fen; Qiao, Hui-Huang; Chen, Cheng-Chun [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Human Anatomy, Wenzhou (China); Ren, Chuan-Gen; Li, Jian-Ce [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Radiology, The 1nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China)

    2014-10-18

    The venous network of the brainstem is complex and significant. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a practical technique which is sensitive to veins, especially tiny veins. Our purpose of this study was to evaluate the visualization of the venous network of brainstem by using SWI at 3.0 T. The occurrence rate of each superficial veins of brainstem was evaluated by using SWI on a 3 T MR imaging system in 60 volunteers. The diameter of the lateral mesencephalic vein and peduncular vein were measured by SWI using the reconstructed mIP images in the sagittal view. And the outflow of the veins of brainstem were studied and described according to the reconstructed images. The median anterior pontomesencephalic vein, median anterior medullary vein, peduncular vein, right vein of the pontomesencephalic sulcus, and right lateral anterior pontomesencephalic vein were detected in all the subjects (100 %). The outer diameter of peduncular vein was 1.38 ± 0.26 mm (range 0.8-1.8 mm). The lateral mesencephalic vein was found in 75 % of the subjects and the mean outer diameter was 0.81 ± 0.2 mm (range 0.5-1.2 mm). The inner veins of mesencephalon were found by using SWI. The venous networks around the brain stem can be visualized by SWI clearly. This result can not only provide data for anatomical study, but also may be available for the surgical planning in the infratentorial region. (orig.)

  13. Molecular control of brain size: Regulators of neural stem cell life, death and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proper development of the brain and other organs depends on multiple parameters, including strictly controlled expansion of specific progenitor pools. The regulation of such expansion events includes enzymatic activities that govern the correct number of specific cells to be generated via an orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, differentiation, cell death etc. Certain proteins in turn exert direct control of these enzymatic activities and thus progenitor pool expansion and organ size. The members of the Cip/Kip family (p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2) are well-known regulators of cell cycle exit that interact with and inhibit the activity of cyclin-CDK complexes, whereas members of the p53/p63/p73 family are traditionally associated with regulation of cell death. It has however become clear that the roles for these proteins are not as clear-cut as initially thought. In this review, we discuss the roles for proteins of the Cip/Kip and p53/p63/p73 families in the regulation of cell cycle control, differentiation, and death of neural stem cells. We suggest that these proteins act as molecular interfaces, or 'pilots', to assure the correct assembly of protein complexes with enzymatic activities at the right place at the right time, thereby regulating essential decisions in multiple cellular events.

  14. Brain stem adenosine receptors modulate centrally mediated hypotensive responses in conscious rats: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha N. Nassar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is implicated in the modulation of cardiovascular responses either at the peripheral or at central level in experimental animals. However, there are no dedicated reviews on the involvement of adenosine in mediating the hypotensive response of centrally administered clonidine in general and specifically in aortically barodenervated rats (ABD. The conscious ABD rat model exhibits surgically induced baroreflex dysfunction and exaggerated hypotensive response, compared with conscious sham-operated (SO rats. The current review focuses on, the role of adenosine receptors in blood pressure (BP regulation and their possible crosstalk with other receptors e.g. imidazoline (I1 and alpha (α2A adrenergic receptor (AR. The former receptor is a molecular target for clonidine, whose hypotensive effect is enhanced approx. 3-fold in conscious ABD rats. We also discussed how the balance between the brain stem adenosine A1 and A2A receptors is regulated by baroreceptors and how such balance influences the centrally mediated hypotensive responses. The use of the ABD rat model yielded insight into the downstream signaling cascades following clonidine-evoked hypotension in a surgical model of baroreflex dysfunction.

  15. Wnt3a, a Protein Secreted by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Is Neuroprotective and Promotes Neurocognitive Recovery Following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuhai; Gibb, Stuart L; Zhao, Jing; Moore, Anthony N; Hylin, Michael J; Menge, Tyler; Xue, Hasen; Baimukanova, Gyulnar; Potter, Daniel; Johnson, Evan M; Holcomb, John B; Cox, Charles S; Dash, Pramod K; Pati, Shibani

    2016-05-01

    Intravenous administration of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to reduce blood brain barrier compromise and improve neurocognition following traumatic brain injury (TBI). These effects occur in the absence of engraftment and differentiation of these cells in the injured brain. Recent studies have shown that soluble factors produced by MSCs mediate a number of the therapeutic effects. In this study, we sought to determine if intravenous administration of MSCs (IV-MSCs) could enhance hippocampal neurogenesis following TBI. Our results demonstrate that IV-MSC treatment attenuates loss of neural stem cells and promotes hippocampal neurogenesis in TBI injured mice. As Wnt signaling has been implicated in neurogenesis, we measured circulating Wnt3a levels in serum following IV-MSC administration and found a significant increase in Wnt3a. Concurrent with this increase, we detected increased activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, IV recombinant Wnt3a treatment provided neuroprotection, promoted neurogenesis, and improved neurocognitive function in TBI injured mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for Wnt3a in the therapeutic potential of MSCs and identify Wnt3a as a potential stand-alone therapy or as part of a combination therapeutic strategy for the treatment of TBI. Stem Cells 2016;34:1263-1272. PMID:26840479

  16. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xue-Man; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fei; Yuan, Yi; Luo, Min

    2016-04-01

    The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 μg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 10(6) human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery. PMID:27212930

  17. Human umbilical cord blo