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Sample records for brain slice recordings

  1. A novel carbon fiber bundle microelectrode and modified brain slice chamber for recording long-term multiunit activity from brain slices.

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    Tcheng, T K; Gillette, M U

    1996-11-01

    The fabrication and characteristics of a novel multiunit recording electrode and modified brain slice chamber suitable for long-term recording from brain slices are described. The electrode consisted of an electrolyte-filled glass micropipette with a 20-50 microns thick wax-coated bundle of 5-micron diameter carbon fibers extending 2.5 cm from the tapered end and an AgCl-coated silver wire inserted into the open end and connected to a preamplifier. Both ends of the electrode were sealed with wax to prevent evaporation of the electrolyte. The brain slice was maintained over this extended period in an interface-type brain slice chamber modified to completely surround the slice with medium. Using this electrode, regular 24-h oscillations of spontaneous multiunit activity were recorded for 3 days from a single location in a 500 microns thick rat suprachiasmatic nucleus brain slice. Preliminary data suggest that this novel carbon fiber bundle electrode will be a favorable alternative to traditional metal electrodes for long-term recording of multiunit activity from brain slices.

  2. Dose-response testing of peptides by hippocampal brain slice recording.

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    Phillips, M I; Palovcik, R A

    1989-01-01

    The brain slice chamber described offers a method of studying, with intracellular electrodes, the relationship of response to dose of peptides. By raising the level of the slices 1 mm above the level of flowing perfusion medium, we can test substances in known concentrations, free from artifacts, during long duration, stable intracellular recordings. Manipulation of Ca2+/Mg2+ ratios in the medium can help to define synaptic and second messenger mediation of the responses. The addition of substances to the perfusion medium in this system could be combined with iontophoresis and/or micropressure techniques. Pathways in the slices may also be stimulated electrically and analyzed for the involvement of various synaptic transmitters. The results with the method so far show distinct differences among the peptides studied. Thus, there are several advantages to this method in establishing the physiological role of peptides in the brain.

  3. A combined long-term recording system for single-unit activity and neurotransmitter efflux of a brain slice

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    Sheu, Y. H.; Young, M. S.

    1998-04-01

    A combined long-term measurement and recording system for neurotransmission research of brain slices is presented in this study. This system, based on the IBM PC or compatible computer, is capable of simultaneously measuring and recording both single-unit neural electropotential signals and the electrochemical signals of neurotransmitter efflux from the same neuron in a brain slice for long periods of time (time limited largely by hard disk capacity, 100 h or more not being unreasonable with contemporary hardware) using a single carbon microelectrode for both measurements. The combined long-term recording system uses a simple switching circuit to switch periodically the single microelectrode between two data acquisition subsystems, one for electrochemical data and one for electrophysiological data. The simple switching circuit separates the electrophysiological signals and electrochemical signals, overcoming the traditional interference problem caused by the two different measuring techniques. Software designed for the proposed system allows easy reconstruction of the full time course of the compressed measured data and easy, simultaneous display of both types of signals on the same time scale. On-line and recorded displays are available. Test results of a practical implementation of the proposed system verify that the combined long-term recording system meets actual requirements for electrophysiological and neurochemical research.

  4. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation

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    Tamar ePashut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Here we tested these theoretical predictions by combining in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices with magnetic stimulation and compartmental modeling. In agreement with the modeling, our recordings demonstrate the dependence of magnetic stimulation-triggered action potentials on the type and state of the neuron and its orientation within the magnetic field. Our results suggest that the observed effects of TMS are deeply rooted in the biophysical properties of single neurons in the central nervous system and provide a framework both for interpreting existing TMS data and developing new simulation-based tools and therapies.

  5. Microcutting of living brain slices by a pulsed ultrafine water jet which allows simultaneous electrophysiological recordings (micromingotome).

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    Speckmann, E J; Köhling, R; Lücke, A; Straub, H; Wittkowski, W; Elger, C E; Wiemann, M; Bingmann, D

    1998-07-01

    Up to now microsurgical dissections in living nervous tissue (e.g. in slices or cell cultures) are performed either by micro-scalpels or by laser beams. As an alternative technique, a device for cutting with an ultrafine pulsed water jet was developed to allow precise, visually controled dissections in neuronal circuits even during electrophysiological recordings. Water is ejected by pressure (20-30 bar) from patch pipettes with tip diameters of 10-12 microm. By means of a piezo-element the pipette and the water jet are forced to oscillate vertically with a frequency of 200-400 Hz with an adjustable amplitude. These oscillations facilitate the transsection of neuronal connections even in thick slice preparations. Best results were obtained when the tip of the pipette was about 500 microm above the surface of the submerged slice tissue. This micromingotome offers the following advantages: (i) histological studies show that the water jet cleans the cutting surface, thus avoiding debris and its uncontrolable effects on cells underneath; (ii) the arrangement enables ongoing electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices during the cutting procedure and thus facilitates studies of the functions of neuronal connections; (iii) the device allows even disconnection in cultured nervous tissue overgrowing polyamid grids with 50 microm wide meshes.

  6. Voltage-sensitive dye recording from axons, dendrites and dendritic spines of individual neurons in brain slices.

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    Popovic, Marko; Gao, Xin; Zecevic, Dejan

    2012-11-29

    Understanding the biophysical properties and functional organization of single neurons and how they process information is fundamental for understanding how the brain works. The primary function of any nerve cell is to process electrical signals, usually from multiple sources. Electrical properties of neuronal processes are extraordinarily complex, dynamic, and, in the general case, impossible to predict in the absence of detailed measurements. To obtain such a measurement one would, ideally, like to be able to monitor, at multiple sites, subthreshold events as they travel from the sites of origin on neuronal processes and summate at particular locations to influence action potential initiation. This goal has not been achieved in any neuron due to technical limitations of measurements that employ electrodes. To overcome this drawback, it is highly desirable to complement the patch-electrode approach with imaging techniques that permit extensive parallel recordings from all parts of a neuron. Here, we describe such a technique - optical recording of membrane potential transients with organic voltage-sensitive dyes (V(m)-imaging) - characterized by sub-millisecond and sub-micrometer resolution. Our method is based on pioneering work on voltage-sensitive molecular probes (2). Many aspects of the initial technology have been continuously improved over several decades (3, 5, 11). Additionally, previous work documented two essential characteristics of V(m)-imaging. Firstly, fluorescence signals are linearly proportional to membrane potential over the entire physiological range (-100 mV to +100 mV; (10, 14, 16)). Secondly, loading neurons with the voltage-sensitive dye used here (JPW 3028) does not have detectable pharmacological effects. The recorded broadening of the spike during dye loading is completely reversible (4, 7). Additionally, experimental evidence shows that it is possible to obtain a significant number (up to hundreds) of recordings prior to any detectable

  7. Organotypic slice culture of embryonic brain tissue.

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    Daza, Ray A M; Englund, Chris; Hevner, Robert F

    2007-12-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes how to dissect, assemble, and cultivate mouse embryonic (E) brain tissue from age E11.5 to E18.5 (days) for organotypic slice culture. These preparations can be used for a variety of assays and studies including coculture of different brain regions, cell migration assays, axon guidance assays, and DNA electroporation experiments. During electroporation, an electric current is applied to the surface of a specific target area of the brain slice in order to open holes in the plasma membrane and introduce a plasmid of coding DNA. The floating slice-on-membrane construct helps to preserve the structural integrity of the brain slices, while maintaining easy experimental access and optimal viability. Experiments can be monitored in living slices (e.g., with confocal imaging), and further studies can be completed using slices that have been fixed and cryosectioned at the end of the experiment. Any region of embryonic brain or spinal tissue can be used in this protocol.

  8. Image reconstruction for brain CT slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建明; 施鹏飞

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities in biomedical images, like CT, MRI and PET scanners, provide detailed cross-sectional views of human anatomy. This paper introduces three-dimensional brain reconstruction based on CT slices. It contains filtering, fuzzy segmentation, matching method of contours, cell array structure and image animation. Experimental results have shown its validity. The innovation is matching method of contours and fuzzy segmentation algorithm of CT slices.

  9. Coupling of organotypic brain slice cultures to silicon-based arrays of electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Henrik; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Thiébaud, P

    1999-01-01

    such hippocampal rat brain slice cultures on biocompatible silicon-based chips with arrays of electrodes with a histological organization comparable to that of conventional brain slice cultures grown by the roller drum technique and on semiporous membranes. Intracellular and extracellular recordings from neurons......Fetal or early postnatal brain tissue can be cultured in viable and healthy condition for several weeks with development and preservation of the basic cellular and connective organization as so-called organotypic brain slice cultures. Here we demonstrate and describe how it is possible to establish...

  10. Long-term brain slice culturing in a microfluidic platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Avaliani, N.; Tønnesen, J.;

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we present the development of a transparent poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based microfluidic culture system for handling long-term brain slice cultures independent of an incubator. The different stages of system development have been validated by culturing GFP producing brain...... brain slice culturing for 16 days....

  11. Monitoring axonal and somatodendritic dopamine release using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices.

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    Patel, Jyoti C; Rice, Margaret E

    2013-01-01

    Brain dopamine pathways serve wide-ranging functions including the control of movement, reward, cognition, learning, and mood. Consequently, dysfunction of dopamine transmission has been implicated in clinical conditions such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Establishing factors that regulate dopamine release can provide novel insights into dopaminergic communication under normal conditions, as well as in animal models of disease in the brain. Here we describe methods for the study of somatodendritic and axonal dopamine release in brain slice preparations. Topics covered include preparation and calibration of carbon-fiber microelectrodes for use with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, preparation of midbrain and forebrain slices, and procedures of eliciting and recording electrically evoked dopamine release from in vitro brain slices.

  12. Whole brain CT perfusion on a 320-slice CT scanner

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    Jai Jai Shiva Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography perfusion (CTP has been criticized for limited brain coverage. This may result in inadequate coverage of the lesion, inadequate arterial input function, or omission of the lesion within the target perfusion volume. The availability of 320-slice CT scanners offers whole brain coverage. This minimizes the chances of misregistration of lesions regardless of location, and makes the selection of the arterial input function easy. We present different clinical scenarios in which whole brain CTP is especially useful.

  13. GnRH neuron firing and response to GABA in vitro depend on acute brain slice thickness and orientation.

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    Constantin, Stephanie; Piet, Richard; Iremonger, Karl; Hwa Yeo, Shel; Clarkson, Jenny; Porteous, Robert; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-08-01

    The GnRH neurons exhibit long dendrites and project to the median eminence. The aim of the present study was to generate an acute brain slice preparation that enabled recordings to be undertaken from GnRH neurons maintaining the full extent of their dendrites or axons. A thick, horizontal brain slice was developed, in which it was possible to record from the horizontally oriented GnRH neurons located in the anterior hypothalamic area (AHA). In vivo studies showed that the majority of AHA GnRH neurons projected outside the blood-brain barrier and expressed c-Fos at the time of the GnRH surge. On-cell recordings compared AHA GnRH neurons in the horizontal slice (AHAh) with AHA and preoptic area (POA) GnRH neurons in coronal slices [POA coronal (POAc) and AHA coronal (AHAc), respectively]. AHAh GnRH neurons exhibited tighter burst firing compared with other slice orientations. Although α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) excited GnRH neurons in all preparations, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was excitatory in AHAc and POAc but inhibitory in AHAh slices. GABA(A) receptor postsynaptic currents were the same in AHAh and AHAc slices. Intriguingly, direct activation of GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptors respectively stimulated and inhibited GnRH neurons regardless of slice orientation. Subsequent experiments indicated that net GABA effects were determined by differences in the ratio of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor-mediated effects in "long" and "short" dendrites of GnRH neurons in the different slice orientations. These studies document a new brain slice preparation for recording from GnRH neurons with their extensive dendrites/axons and highlight the importance of GnRH neuron orientation relative to the angle of brain slicing in studying these neurons in vitro.

  14. Novel culturing platform for brain slices and neuronal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Bakmand, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a novel culturing system for brain slices and neuronal cells, which can control the concentration of nutrients and the waste removal from the culture by adjusting the fluid flow within the device. The entire system can be placed in an incubator. The system has been...... tested successfully with brain slices and PC12 cells. The culture substrate can be modified using metal electrodes and/or nanostructures for conducting electrical measurements while culturing and for better mimicking the in vivo conditions....

  15. 3D Data Mapping and Real-Time Experiment Control and Visualization in Brain Slices.

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    Navarro, Marco A; Hibbard, Jaime V K; Miller, Michael E; Nivin, Tyler W; Milescu, Lorin S

    2015-10-20

    Here, we propose two basic concepts that can streamline electrophysiology and imaging experiments in brain slices and enhance data collection and analysis. The first idea is to interface the experiment with a software environment that provides a 3D scene viewer in which the experimental rig, the brain slice, and the recorded data are represented to scale. Within the 3D scene viewer, the user can visualize a live image of the sample and 3D renderings of the recording electrodes with real-time position feedback. Furthermore, the user can control the instruments and visualize their status in real time. The second idea is to integrate multiple types of experimental data into a spatial and temporal map of the brain slice. These data may include low-magnification maps of the entire brain slice, for spatial context, or any other type of high-resolution structural and functional image, together with time-resolved electrical and optical signals. The entire data collection can be visualized within the 3D scene viewer. These concepts can be applied to any other type of experiment in which high-resolution data are recorded within a larger sample at different spatial and temporal coordinates.

  16. Human brain slices for epilepsy research: Pitfalls, solutions and future challenges.

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    Jones, Roland S G; da Silva, Anderson Brito; Whittaker, Roger G; Woodhall, Gavin L; Cunningham, Mark O

    2016-02-15

    Increasingly, neuroscientists are taking the opportunity to use live human tissue obtained from elective neurosurgical procedures for electrophysiological studies in vitro. Access to this valuable resource permits unique studies into the network dynamics that contribute to the generation of pathological electrical activity in the human epileptic brain. Whilst this approach has provided insights into the mechanistic features of electrophysiological patterns associated with human epilepsy, it is not without technical and methodological challenges. This review outlines the main difficulties associated with working with epileptic human brain slices from the point of collection, through the stages of preparation, storage and recording. Moreover, it outlines the limitations, in terms of the nature of epileptic activity that can be observed in such tissue, in particular, the rarity of spontaneous ictal discharges, we discuss manipulations that can be utilised to induce such activity. In addition to discussing conventional electrophysiological techniques that are routinely employed in epileptic human brain slices, we review how imaging and multielectrode array recordings could provide novel insights into the network dynamics of human epileptogenesis. Acute studies in human brain slices are ultimately limited by the lifetime of the tissue so overcoming this issue provides increased opportunity for information gain. We review the literature with respect to organotypic culture techniques that may hold the key to prolonging the viability of this material. A combination of long-term culture techniques, viral transduction approaches and electrophysiology in human brain slices promotes the possibility of large scale monitoring and manipulation of neuronal activity in epileptic microcircuits.

  17. The energy demand of fast neuronal network oscillations: insights from brain slice preparations

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    Oliver eKann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast neuronal network oscillations in the gamma range (30-100 Hz in the cerebral cortex have been implicated in higher cognitive functions such as sensual perception, working memory, and, perhaps, consciousness. However, little is known about the energy demand of gamma oscillations. This is mainly caused by technical limitations that are associated with simultaneous recordings of neuronal activity and energy metabolism in small neuronal networks and at the level of mitochondria in vivo. Thus recent studies have focused on brain slice preparations to address the energy demand of gamma oscillations in vitro. Here, reports will be summarized and discussed that combined electrophysiological recordings, oxygen sensor microelectrodes and live-cell fluorescence imaging in acutely prepared slices and organotypic slice cultures of the hippocampus from both, mouse and rat. These reports consistently show that gamma oscillations can be reliably induced in hippocampal slice preparations by different pharmacological tools. They suggest that gamma oscillations are associated with high energy demand, requiring both rapid adaptation of oxidative energy metabolism and sufficient supply with oxygen and nutrients. These findings might help to explain the exceptional vulnerability of higher cognitive functions during pathological processes of the brain, such as circulatory disturbances, genetic mitochondrial diseases, and neurodegeneration.

  18. Differential Conditioning of Associative Synaptic Enhancement in Hippocampal Brain Slices

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    Kelso, Stephen R.; Brown, Thomas H.

    1986-04-01

    An electrophysiological stimulation paradigm similar to one that produces Pavlovian conditioning was applied to synaptic inputs to pyramidal neurons of hippocampal brain slices. Persistent synaptic enhancement was induced in one of two weak synaptic inputs by pairing high-frequency electrical stimulation of the weak input with stimulation of a third, stronger input to the same region. Forward (temporally overlapping) but not backward (temporally separate) pairings caused this enhancement. Thus hippocampal synapses in vitro can undergo the conditional and selective type of associative modification that could provide the substrate for some of the mnemonic functions in which the hippocampus is thought to participate.

  19. Fluidic system for long-term in vitro culturing and monitoring of organotypic brain slices

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    Bakmand, Tanya; Troels-Smith, Ane R.; Dimaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Brain slice preparations cultured in vitro have long been used as a simplified model for studying brain development, electrophysiology, neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. In this paper an open fluidic system developed for improved long term culturing of organotypic brain slices is presented. ...

  20. Profile analysis of hepatic porcine and murine brain tissue slices obtained with a vibratome.

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    Mattei, G; Cristiani, I; Magliaro, C; Ahluwalia, A

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing soft tissue slices using a vibratome. In particular, the effect of two sectioning parameters (i.e., step size and sectioning speed) on resultant slice thickness was investigated for fresh porcine liver as well as for paraformaldehyde-fixed (PFA-fixed) and fresh murine brain. A simple framework for embedding, sectioning and imaging the slices was established to derive their thickness, which was evaluated through a purposely developed graphical user interface. Sectioning speed and step size had little effect on the thickness of fresh liver slices. Conversely, the thickness of PFA-fixed murine brain slices was found to be dependent on the step size, but not on the sectioning speed. In view of these results, fresh brain tissue was sliced varying the step size only, which was found to have a significant effect on resultant slice thickness. Although precision-cut slices (i.e., with regular thickness) were obtained for all the tissues, slice accuracy (defined as the match between the nominal step size chosen and the actual slice thickness obtained) was found to increase with tissue stiffness from fresh liver to PFA-fixed brain. This quantitative investigation can be very helpful for establishing the most suitable slicing setup for a given tissue.

  1. Fast whole-brain optical tomography capable of automated slice-collection (Conference Presentation)

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    Yuan, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Lei; Long, Beng; Peng, Jie; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Acquiring brain-wide composite information of neuroanatomical and molecular phenotyping is crucial to understand brain functions. However, current whole-brain imaging methods based on mechnical sectioning haven't achieved brain-wide acquisition of both neuroanatomical and molecular phenotyping due to the lack of appropriate whole-brain immunostaining of embedded samples. Here, we present a novel strategy of acquiring brain-wide structural and molecular maps in the same brain, combining whole-brain imaging and subsequent immunostaining of automated-collected slices. We developed a whole-brain imaging system capable of automatically imaging and then collecting imaged tissue slices in order. The system contains three parts: structured illumination microscopy for high-throughput optical sectioning, vibratome for high-precision sectioning and slice-collection device for automated collecting of tissue slices. Through our system, we could acquire a whole-brain dataset of agarose-embedded mouse brain at lateral resolution of 0.33 µm with z-interval sampling of 100 µm in 9 h, and automatically collect the imaged slices in sequence. Subsequently, we performed immunohistochemistry of the collected slices in the routine way. We acquired mouse whole-brain imaging datasets of multiple specific types of neurons, proteins and gene expression profiles. We believe our method could accelerate systematic analysis of brain anatomical structure with specific proteins or genes expression information and understanding how the brain processes information and generates behavior.

  2. Slices

    KAUST Repository

    McCrae, James

    2011-01-01

    Minimalist object representations or shape-proxies that spark and inspire human perception of shape remain an incompletely understood, yet powerful aspect of visual communication. We explore the use of planar sections, i.e., the contours of intersection of planes with a 3D object, for creating shape abstractions, motivated by their popularity in art and engineering. We first perform a user study to show that humans do define consistent and similar planar section proxies for common objects. Interestingly, we observe a strong correlation between user-defined planes and geometric features of objects. Further we show that the problem of finding the minimum set of planes that capture a set of 3D geometric shape features is both NP-hard and not always the proxy a user would pick. Guided by the principles inferred from our user study, we present an algorithm that progressively selects planes to maximize feature coverage, which in turn influence the selection of subsequent planes. The algorithmic framework easily incorporates various shape features, while their relative importance values are computed and validated from the user study data. We use our algorithm to compute planar slices for various objects, validate their utility towards object abstraction using a second user study, and conclude showing the potential applications of the extracted planar slice shape proxies. © 2011 ACM.

  3. Label-free dopamine imaging in live rat brain slices.

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    Sarkar, Bidyut; Banerjee, Arkarup; Das, Anand Kant; Nag, Suman; Kaushalya, Sanjeev Kumar; Tripathy, Umakanta; Shameem, Mohammad; Shukla, Shubha; Maiti, Sudipta

    2014-05-21

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission has been investigated extensively, yet direct optical probing of dopamine has not been possible in live cells. Here we image intracellular dopamine with sub-micrometer three-dimensional resolution by harnessing its intrinsic mid-ultraviolet (UV) autofluorescence. Two-photon excitation with visible light (540 nm) in conjunction with a non-epifluorescent detection scheme is used to circumvent the UV toxicity and the UV transmission problems. The method is established by imaging dopamine in a dopaminergic cell line and in control cells (glia), and is validated by mass spectrometry. We further show that individual dopamine vesicles/vesicular clusters can be imaged in cultured rat brain slices, thereby providing a direct visualization of the intracellular events preceding dopamine release induced by depolarization or amphetamine exposure. Our technique opens up a previously inaccessible mid-ultraviolet spectral regime (excitation ~270 nm, emission free imaging of native molecules in live tissue.

  4. Influence of Thin Slice Reconstruction on CT Brain Perfusion Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, Edwin; Oosterbroek, Jaap; Horsch, Alexander D.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Velthuis, BK; Viergever, Max A.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although CT scanners generally allow dynamic acquisition of thin slices (1 mm), thick slice (>= 5 mm) reconstruction is commonly used for stroke imaging to reduce data, processing time, and noise level. Thin slice CT perfusion (CTP) reconstruction may suffer less from partial volume effec

  5. Ex Vivo Optogenetic Dissection of Fear Circuits in Brain Slices.

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    Bosch, Daniel; Asede, Douglas; Ehrlich, Ingrid

    2016-04-05

    Optogenetic approaches are now widely used to study the function of neural populations and circuits by combining targeted expression of light-activated proteins and subsequent manipulation of neural activity by light. Channelrhodopsins (ChRs) are light-gated cation-channels and when fused to a fluorescent protein their expression allows for visualization and concurrent activation of specific cell types and their axonal projections in defined areas of the brain. Via stereotactic injection of viral vectors, ChR fusion proteins can be constitutively or conditionally expressed in specific cells of a defined brain region, and their axonal projections can subsequently be studied anatomically and functionally via ex vivo optogenetic activation in brain slices. This is of particular importance when aiming to understand synaptic properties of connections that could not be addressed with conventional electrical stimulation approaches, or in identifying novel afferent and efferent connectivity that was previously poorly understood. Here, a few examples illustrate how this technique can be applied to investigate these questions to elucidating fear-related circuits in the amygdala. The amygdala is a key region for acquisition and expression of fear, and storage of fear and emotional memories. Many lines of evidence suggest that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) participates in different aspects of fear acquisition and extinction, but its precise connectivity with the amygdala is just starting to be understood. First, it is shown how ex vivo optogenetic activation can be used to study aspects of synaptic communication between mPFC afferents and target cells in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Furthermore, it is illustrated how this ex vivo optogenetic approach can be applied to assess novel connectivity patterns using a group of GABAergic neurons in the amygdala, the paracapsular intercalated cell cluster (mpITC), as an example.

  6. Influence of Thin Slice Reconstruction on CT Brain Perfusion Analysis.

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    Edwin Bennink

    Full Text Available Although CT scanners generally allow dynamic acquisition of thin slices (1 mm, thick slice (≥5 mm reconstruction is commonly used for stroke imaging to reduce data, processing time, and noise level. Thin slice CT perfusion (CTP reconstruction may suffer less from partial volume effects, and thus yield more accurate quantitative results with increased resolution. Before thin slice protocols are to be introduced clinically, it needs to be ensured that this does not affect overall CTP constancy. We studied the influence of thin slice reconstruction on average perfusion values by comparing it with standard thick slice reconstruction.From 50 patient studies, absolute and relative hemisphere averaged estimates of cerebral blood volume (CBV, cerebral blood flow (CBF, mean transit time (MTT, and permeability-surface area product (PS were analyzed using 0.8, 2.4, 4.8, and 9.6 mm slice reconstructions. Specifically, the influence of Gaussian and bilateral filtering, the arterial input function (AIF, and motion correction on the perfusion values was investigated.Bilateral filtering gave noise levels comparable to isotropic Gaussian filtering, with less partial volume effects. Absolute CBF, CBV and PS were 22%, 14% and 46% lower with 0.8 mm than with 4.8 mm slices. If the AIF and motion correction were based on thin slices prior to reconstruction of thicker slices, these differences reduced to 3%, 4% and 3%. The effect of slice thickness on relative values was very small.This study shows that thin slice reconstruction for CTP with unaltered acquisition protocol gives relative perfusion values without clinically relevant bias. It does however affect absolute perfusion values, of which CBF and CBV are most sensitive. Partial volume effects in large arteries and veins lead to overestimation of these values. The effects of reconstruction slice thickness should be taken into account when absolute perfusion values are used for clinical decision making.

  7. Metabolic therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy in a dish: investigating mechanisms of ketogenic diet using electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices

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    Masahito Kawamura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is prone to epileptic seizures and is a key brain region and experimental platform for investigating mechanisms associated with the abnormal neuronal excitability that characterizes a seizure. Accordingly, the hippocampal slice is a common in vitro model to study treatments that may prevent or reduce seizure activity. The ketogenic diet is a metabolic therapy used to treat epilepsy in adults and children for nearly 100 years; it can reduce or eliminate even severe or refractory seizures. New insights into its underlying mechanisms have been revealed by diverse types of electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices. Here we review these reports and their relevant mechanistic findings. We acknowledge that a major difficulty in using hippocampal slices is the inability to reproduce precisely the in vivo condition of ketogenic diet feeding in any in vitro preparation, and progress has been made in this in vivo/in vitro transition. Thus far at least three different approaches are reported to reproduce relevant diet effects in the hippocampal slices: (1 direct application of ketone bodies, (2 mimicking the ketogenic diet condition during a whole-cell patch-clamp technique, and (3 reduced glucose incubation of hippocampal slices from ketogenic diet–fed animals. Significant results have been found with each of these methods and provide options for further study into short- and long-term mechanisms including ATP-sensitive potassium channels, vesicular glutamate transporter, pannexin channels and adenosine receptors underlying ketogenic diet and other forms of metabolic therapy.

  8. Inhibitory effect of morphine on excitatory synaptic transmission via presynaptic mechanism in rat SON neurons in brain slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-bin; HU San-jue; JU Gong

    2001-01-01

    To observe the effects of morphine on the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) in rat supraoptic nucleus (SON) neurons and to explore its synaptic mechanism. Methods: Using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording technique in the brain slices, the EPSCS and mEPSCs of rat SON neurons were recorded, respectively. Results: Morphine (20 μmol/L) decreased the frequency of EPSCs and mEPSCs (by 65% for EPSCS and by 45% for mEPSCs), and reduced the amplitude of EPSCs by 44% in all SON neurons, but the amplitude distribution ofmEPSCs was not affected. Conclusion: Morphine inhibits the excitatory transmissions via presynaptic mechanisms in SON neurons from rat brain slices.

  9. Optimized Protocol of Methanol Treatment for Immunofluorescent Staining in Fixed Brain Slices

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    Yuan, Feng; Cohen, Noam A.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2017-01-01

    We optimized methanol treatment in paraformaldehyde-fixed slices for immunofluorescent staining of ependymal basal bodies in brain ventricles. As 100% methanol induced severe deformations to the slices (including rolling and folding over), we tried to decrease methanol concentration. We found that 33.3% to 75% methanol could result in ideal immunostaining of basal bodies without inducing obvious deformations. Instead of treating slices at −20°C (without proper cryoprotection measurements) as suggested in previous studies, we carried out methanol treatment at room temperature. Our modified protocol can not only raise immunostaining efficiency in tissue slices, it may also prevent potential freezing damages to the samples. PMID:26509907

  10. Preliminary Study of Realistic Blast Impact on Cultured Brain Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    integral membrane protein belonging to the glutamate-gated ion channel family, whereas a triple blast insult caused a significant reduction in the...24 I.U. per mg), 5-units/ml penicillin , and 5-mg/l streptomycin. The prepared slice cultures were supplied with fresh HSM 24 h later (culture day 1... penicillin , and 5-mg/L streptomycin. Just prior to submerging the blast plate, a control plate of slices was flooded with warmed SFM to provide tissue

  11. How to record a million synaptic weights in a hippocampal slice.

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    Upinder S Bhalla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A key step toward understanding the function of a brain circuit is to find its wiring diagram. New methods for optical stimulation and optical recording of neurons make it possible to map circuit connectivity on a very large scale. However, single synapses produce small responses that are difficult to measure on a large scale. Here I analyze how single synaptic responses may be detectable using relatively coarse readouts such as optical recording of somatic calcium. I model a network consisting of 10,000 input axons and 100 CA1 pyramidal neurons, each represented using 19 compartments with voltage-gated channels and calcium dynamics. As single synaptic inputs cannot produce a measurable somatic calcium response, I stimulate many inputs as a baseline to elicit somatic action potentials leading to a strong calcium signal. I compare statistics of responses with or without a single axonal input riding on this baseline. Through simulations I show that a single additional input shifts the distribution of the number of output action potentials. Stochastic resonance due to probabilistic synaptic release makes this shift easier to detect. With approximately 80 stimulus repetitions this approach can resolve up to 35% of individual activated synapses even in the presence of 20% recording noise. While the technique is applicable using conventional electrical stimulation and extracellular recording, optical methods promise much greater scaling, since the number of synapses scales as the product of the number of inputs and outputs. I extrapolate from current high-speed optical stimulation and recording methods, and show that this approach may scale up to the order of a million synapses in a single two-hour slice-recording experiment.

  12. How to record a million synaptic weights in a hippocampal slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Upinder S

    2008-06-20

    A key step toward understanding the function of a brain circuit is to find its wiring diagram. New methods for optical stimulation and optical recording of neurons make it possible to map circuit connectivity on a very large scale. However, single synapses produce small responses that are difficult to measure on a large scale. Here I analyze how single synaptic responses may be detectable using relatively coarse readouts such as optical recording of somatic calcium. I model a network consisting of 10,000 input axons and 100 CA1 pyramidal neurons, each represented using 19 compartments with voltage-gated channels and calcium dynamics. As single synaptic inputs cannot produce a measurable somatic calcium response, I stimulate many inputs as a baseline to elicit somatic action potentials leading to a strong calcium signal. I compare statistics of responses with or without a single axonal input riding on this baseline. Through simulations I show that a single additional input shifts the distribution of the number of output action potentials. Stochastic resonance due to probabilistic synaptic release makes this shift easier to detect. With approximately 80 stimulus repetitions this approach can resolve up to 35% of individual activated synapses even in the presence of 20% recording noise. While the technique is applicable using conventional electrical stimulation and extracellular recording, optical methods promise much greater scaling, since the number of synapses scales as the product of the number of inputs and outputs. I extrapolate from current high-speed optical stimulation and recording methods, and show that this approach may scale up to the order of a million synapses in a single two-hour slice-recording experiment.

  13. Altered regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in hippocampus following slice preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzer, S C; Pan, E; Nef, S; Parada, L F; McNamara, J O

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) play important roles in regulating survival, structure, and function of CNS neurons. One method of studying the functions of these molecules has utilized in vitro hippocampal slice preparations. An important caveat to using slices, however, is that slice preparation itself might alter the expression of BDNF, thereby confounding experimental results. To address this concern, BDNF immunoreactivity was examined in rodent slices using two different methods of slice preparation. Rapid and anatomically selective regulation of BDNF content followed slice preparation using both methodologies; however, different patterns of altered BDNF immunoreactivity were observed. First, in cultured slices, BDNF content decreased in the dentate molecular layer and increased in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer and the mossy fiber pathway of the hippocampus after 30 min. Furthermore, an initially "punctate" pattern of BDNF labeling observed in the mossy fiber pathway of control sections changed to homogenous labeling of the pathway in vitro. In contrast to these findings, slices prepared as for acute slice physiology exhibited no change in BDNF content in the molecular layer and mossy fiber pathway 30 min after slicing, but exhibited significant increases in the dentate granule and CA3 pyramidal cell layers. These findings demonstrate that BDNF protein content is altered following slice preparation, that different methods of slice preparation produce different patterns of BDNF regulation, and raise the possibility that BDNF release and TrkB activation may also be regulated. These consequences of hippocampal slice preparation may confound analyses of exogenous or endogenous BDNF on hippocampal neuronal structure or function.

  14. Using laser confocal scanning microscope to study ischemia-hypoxia injury in rat brain slice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The level of lipid peroxidation and cellular necrosis in rat living brain slices during brain ischemia-hypoxia injury have been observed using a laser confocal scanning microscope (LCSM) with double labeling of fluorescent probes D-399 (2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate) and propidium iodide (PI).The hypoxia and/or reoxygenation injury in rat brain slices is markedly decreased by pretreatment with L-NG-nitro-arginine (L-NNA) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC),showing that the nitric oxide (NO) and other free radicals play an important role in brain ischemia-hypoxia injury.

  15. Precise spatial and temporal control of oxygen within in vitro brain slices via microfluidic gas channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Mauleon

    Full Text Available The acute brain slice preparation is an excellent model for studying the details of how neurons and neuronal tissue respond to a variety of different physiological conditions. But open slice chambers ideal for electrophysiological and imaging access have not allowed the precise spatiotemporal control of oxygen in a way that might realistically model stroke conditions. To address this problem, we have developed a microfluidic add-on to a commercially available perfusion chamber that diffuses oxygen throughout a thin membrane and directly to the brain slice. A microchannel enables rapid and efficient control of oxygen and can be modified to allow different regions of the slice to experience different oxygen conditions. Using this novel device, we show that we can obtain a stable and homogeneous oxygen environment throughout the brain slice and rapidly alter the oxygen tension in a hippocampal slice. We also show that we can impose different oxygen tensions on different regions of the slice preparation and measure two independent responses, which is not easily obtainable with current techniques.

  16. Comparison of bNOS and chat immunohistochemistry in the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) and the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) of the mouse from brain slices prepared for electrophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veleanu, Maxime; Axen, Tina E; Kristensen, Morten P

    2016-01-01

    maintains that antibody staining for enzymes involved in synthesis or transport, of acetylcholine would be a more definitive marker and hence, preferable. NEW METHOD: Colocalization of bNOS and CHAT in the LDT/PPT, and presence of parvalbumin (PV), was examined in non-ideally prepared mouse brain slices......BACKGROUND: Identification of cell phenotype from brain slices upon which in vitro electrophysiological recordings have been performed often relies on conducting post hoc immunohistochemistry on tissue that necessarily has not been ideally prepared for immunohistochemical procedures....../PPT. CONCLUSION: CHAT and bNOS are equally useful target proteins for immunofluorescent identification of cholinergic LDT/PPT cells in mouse brain slices prepared for in vitro recordings, however, antibody targeting of bNOS allows for a superior appreciation of structural detail....

  17. Epileptiform synchronization and high-frequency oscillations in brain slices comprising piriform and entorhinal cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, S; Lévesque, M; Avoli, M

    2014-12-05

    We employed field potential recordings in extended in vitro brain slices form Sprague-Dawley rats containing the piriform and entorhinal cortices (PC and EC, respectively) to identify the characteristics of epileptiform discharges and concomitant high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, ripples: 80-200Hz, fast ripples: 250-500Hz) during bath application of 4-aminopyridine (4AP, 50μM). Ictal-like discharges occurred in PC and EC either synchronously or independently of each other; synchronous ictal discharges always emerged from a synchronous "fast" interictal background whereas asynchronous ictal discharges were preceded by a "slow" interictal event. In addition, asynchronous ictal discharges had longer duration and interval of occurrence than synchronous ictal discharges, and contained a higher proportion of ripples and fast ripples. Cutting the connections between PC and EC made synchronicity disappear and increased ictal discharges duration in the EC but failed in changing HFO occurrence in both areas. Finally, antagonizing ionotropic glutamatergic receptors abolished ictal activity in all experiments, increased the duration and rate of occurrence of interictal discharges occurring in PC-EC interconnected slices while it did not influence the slow asynchronous interictal discharges in both areas. Our results identify some novel in vitro interactions between olfactory (PC) and limbic (EC) structures that presumably contribute to in vivo ictogenesis as well.

  18. Three-dimensional electrode array for brain slice culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez Rodriguez, Patricia

    Multielektroder arrays (MEA) er rækker af elektroder mest i mikrometer størrelse, som er blevet brugt i stor omfang til at stimulere og måle elektrisk aktivitet fra neuronale netværker. Brug af disse for at analysere hjerne slices (hjerneskiver) kan give indsigt i interaktioner mellem neuroner...

  19. Binding of mescaline with subcellular fractions upon incubation of brain cortex slices with [14C] mescaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R K; Antopol, W; Ghosh, J J

    1977-01-01

    Incubation of brain cortex slices in the presence of glucose resulted in the permeation of about 65% of [14C] mescaline into slices. Of this, about one-third radioactivity was bound with nuclei, mitochondria, microsomes, and ribosomes. Dialysis of subcellular fractions did not markedly reduce the amounts of radioactivity bound to the fractions. The permeation into slices and the binding of mescaline to subcellular fractions were fairly time-dependent, but were inhibited by the presence of potassium cyanide, or by the absence of glucose and by heating to 80 degrees C for 1 min.

  20. Effects of ketamine, midazolam, thiopental, and propofol on brain ischemia injury in rat cerebral cortical slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-shengXUE; Bu-weiYU; Ze-jianWANG; Hong-zhuanCHEN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effects of ketamine, midazolam, thiopental, and propofol on brain ischemia by the model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in rat cerebral cortical slices. METHODS: Cerebral cortical slices were incu-bated in 2 % 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) solution after OGD, the damages and effects of ketamine,midazolam, thiopental, and propofol were quantitativlye evaluated by ELISA reader of absorbance (A) at 490 nm,which indicated the red formazan extracted from slices, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) releases in the incubated supernate were also measured. RESULTS: Progressive prolongation of OGD resulted in decreases of TTC staining.The percentage of tissue injury had a positive correlation with LDH releases, r=0.9609, P<0.01. Two hours of reincubation aggravated the decrease of TTC staining compared with those slices stained immediately after OGD(P<0.01). These four anesthetics had no effects on the TTC staining of slices. Ketamine completely inhibited thedecrease of A value induced by 10 min of OGD injury. High concentrations of midazolam (10 μmol/L) and thiopental (400μmol/L) partly attenuated this decrease. Propofol at high concentration (100 μmol/L) enhanced the decrease of A value induced by 10 min of OGD injury (P<0.01). CONCLUSION; Ketamine, high concentration of midazolam and thiopental have neuroprotective effects against OGD injury in rat cerebral cortical slices, while high concentration of propofol augments OGD injury in rat cerebral cortical slices.

  1. Brain slices as models for neurodegenerative disease and screening platforms to identify novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seongeun; Wood, Andrew; Bowlby, Mark R

    2007-03-01

    Recent improvements in brain slice technology have made this biological preparation increasingly useful for examining pathophysiology of brain diseases in a tissue context. Brain slices maintain many aspects of in vivo biology, including functional local synaptic circuitry with preserved brain architecture, while allowing good experimental access and precise control of the extracellular environment, making them ideal platforms for dissection of molecular pathways underlying neuronal dysfunction. Importantly, these ex vivo systems permit direct treatment with pharmacological agents modulating these responses and thus provide surrogate therapeutic screening systems without recourse to whole animal studies. Virus or particle mediated transgenic expression can also be accomplished relatively easily to study the function of novel genes in a normal or injured brain tissue context.In this review we will discuss acute brain injury models in organotypic hippocampal and co-culture systems and the effects of pharmacological modulation on neurodegeneration. The review will also cover the evidence of developmental plasticity in these ex vivo models, demonstrating emergence of injury-stimulated neuronal progenitor cells, and neurite sprouting and axonal regeneration following pathway lesioning. Neuro-and axo-genesis are emerging as significant factors contributing to brain repair following many acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore brain slice models may provide a critical contextual experimental system to explore regenerative mechanisms in vitro.

  2. A visual thalamocortical slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Jason N; Fenstermaker, Vivian; Watson, Brendon O; Yuste, Rafael

    2006-02-01

    We describe a thalamocortical slice preparation in which connectivity between the mouse lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1) is preserved. Through DiI injections in fixed brains we traced and created a three-dimensional model of the mouse visual pathways. From this computer model we designed a slice preparation that contains a projection from LGN to V1. We prepared brain slices with these predicted coordinates and demonstrated anatomical LGN-V1 connectivity in these slices after LGN tracer injections. We also revealed functional LGN-V1 connectivity by stimulating LGN electrically and detecting responses in layer 4 of V1 using calcium imaging, field potential recordings and whole-cell recordings. We also identified layer-4 neurons that receive direct thalamocortical input. Finally, we compared cortical activity after LGN stimulation with spontaneous cortical activity and found significant overlap of the spatiotemporal dynamics generated by both types of events.

  3. Targeting neurotransmitter receptors with nanoparticles in vivo allows single-molecule tracking in acute brain slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Juan A.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Etchepare, Laetitia; Espana, Agnès; Cognet, Laurent; Groc, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule imaging has changed the way we understand many biological mechanisms, particularly in neurobiology, by shedding light on intricate molecular events down to the nanoscale. However, current single-molecule studies in neuroscience have been limited to cultured neurons or organotypic slices, leaving as an open question the existence of fast receptor diffusion in intact brain tissue. Here, for the first time, we targeted dopamine receptors in vivo with functionalized quantum dots and were able to perform single-molecule tracking in acute rat brain slices. We propose a novel delocalized and non-inflammatory way of delivering nanoparticles (NPs) in vivo to the brain, which allowed us to label and track genetically engineered surface dopamine receptors in neocortical neurons, revealing inherent behaviour and receptor activity regulations. We thus propose a NP-based platform for single-molecule studies in the living brain, opening new avenues of research in physiological and pathological animal models.

  4. Biocompatibility of silicon-based arrays of electrodes coupled to organotypic hippocampal brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Noraberg, J; Thiébaud, P

    2001-01-01

    ) rats were grown for 4-8 weeks on the perforated silicon chips with silicon nitride surfaces and 40 microm sized holes and compared with corresponding tissue slices grown on conventional semiporous membranes. In terms of preservation of the basic cellular and connective organization, as visualized...... around the upper recording part of the 47-microm-high platinum-tip electrodes. Slice cultures grown on a separate set of chips with platinum instead of silicon nitride surfaces also displayed normal MAP2 and GFAP immunostaining. The width of the GFAP-rich zone (glia limitans) at the bottom surface...... of the slice cultures was the same ( approximately 20 microm) in cultures grown on chips with silicon nitride and platinum surfaces and on conventional insert membranes. The slice cultures grown on chips maintained a normal, subfield differentiated susceptibility to the glutamate receptor agonist N...

  5. Cavitation Induced Structural and Neural Damage in Live Brain Tissue Slices: Relevance to TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-29

    the value of this experimental platform to investigate the single bubble cavitation- induced damage in a biological tissue is illustrated with an...Lei Wu, Malisa Sarntinoranont, Huikai Xie1. Refractive index measurement of acute rat brain tissue slices using optical coherence tomography, Optics...b-TBI, i.e. what is “broken”, in the brain during exposure to shock loading is currently unknown. While blast waves are well known to have negative

  6. Functional imaging of single synapses in brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertner, Thomas G

    2002-11-01

    The strength of synaptic connections in the brain is not fixed, but can be modulated by numerous mechanisms. Traditionally, electrophysiology has been used to characterize connections between neurons. Electrophysiology typically reports the activity of populations of synapses, while most mechanisms of plasticity are thought to operate at the level of single synapses. Recently, two-photon laser scanning microscopy has enabled us to perform optical quantal analysis of individual synapses in intact brain tissue. Here we introduce the basic principle of the two-photon microscope and discuss its main differences compared to the confocal microscope. Using calcium imaging in dendritic spines as an example, we explain the advantages of simultaneous dual-dye imaging for quantitative calcium measurements and address two common problems, dye saturation and background fluorescence subtraction.

  7. Organotypic brain slice cultures of adult transgenic P301S mice--a model for tauopathy studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Mewes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organotypic brain slice cultures represent an excellent compromise between single cell cultures and complete animal studies, in this way replacing and reducing the number of animal experiments. Organotypic brain slices are widely applied to model neuronal development and regeneration as well as neuronal pathology concerning stroke, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease (AD. AD is characterized by two protein alterations, namely tau hyperphosphorylation and excessive amyloid β deposition, both causing microglia and astrocyte activation. Deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau, called neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, surrounded by activated glia are modeled in transgenic mice, e.g. the tauopathy model P301S. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we explore the benefits and limitations of organotypic brain slice cultures made of mature adult transgenic mice as a potential model system for the multifactorial phenotype of AD. First, neonatal (P1 and adult organotypic brain slice cultures from 7- to 10-month-old transgenic P301S mice have been compared with regard to vitality, which was monitored with the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH- and the MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays over 15 days. Neonatal slices displayed a constant high vitality level, while the vitality of adult slice cultures decreased significantly upon cultivation. Various preparation and cultivation conditions were tested to augment the vitality of adult slices and improvements were achieved with a reduced slice thickness, a mild hypothermic cultivation temperature and a cultivation CO(2 concentration of 5%. Furthermore, we present a substantial immunohistochemical characterization analyzing the morphology of neurons, astrocytes and microglia in comparison to neonatal tissue. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Until now only adolescent animals with a maximum age of two months have been used to prepare organotypic brain slices. The current study

  8. Intersection-based registration of slice stacks to form 3D images of the human fetal brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Kio; Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Habas, Piotr;

    2008-01-01

    Clinical fetal MR imaging of the brain commonly makes use of fast 2D acquisitions of multiple sets of approximately orthogonal 2D slices. We and others have previously proposed an iterative slice-to-volume registration process to recover a geometrically consistent 3D image. However, these approac...

  9. Excitatory amino acid neurotoxicity and modulation of glutamate receptor expression in organotypic brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, J; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Jakobsen, B

    2000-01-01

    -induced excitotoxicity and KA-glutamate receptor subunit mRNA expression after long-term exposure to low, non-toxic doses of KA and NBQX. We conclude that organotypic brain slice cultures, combined with standardized procedures for quantitation of cell damage and receptor subunit changes is of great potential use...... for studies of excitotoxic, glutamate receptor-induced neuronal cell death, receptor modulation and related neuroprotection....

  10. Automatic brain cropping and atlas slice matching using a PCNN and a generalized invariant Hough transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathanthira Kumar, M. M.; Sullivan, John M., Jr.

    2007-03-01

    Medical research is dominated by animal models, especially rats and mice. Within a species most laboratory subjects exhibit little variation in brain anatomy. This uniformity of features is used to crop regions of interest based upon a known, cropped brain atlas. For any study involving N subjects, image registration or alignment to an atlas is required to construct a composite result. A highly resolved stack of T2 weighted MRI anatomy images of a Sprague-Dawley rat was registered and cropped to a known segmented atlas. This registered MRI volume was used as the reference atlas. A Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN) was used to separate brain tissue from surrounding structures, such as cranium and muscle. Each iteration of the PCNN produces binary images of increasing area as the intensity spectrum is increased. A rapid filtering algorithm is applied that breaks narrow passages connecting larger segmented areas. A Generalized Invariant Hough Transform is applied subsequently to each PCNN segmented area to identify which segmented reference slice it matches. This process is repeated for multiple slices within each subject. Since we have apriori knowledge of the image ordering and fields of view this information provides initial estimates for subsequent registration codes. This process of subject slice extraction to PCNN mask creations and GIHT matching with known atlas locations is fully automatic.

  11. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin, on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Theophilidis, G

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the action of deltamethrin on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice. Deltamethrin depolarized the hypoglossal motoneurons, increased the background synaptic noise and reduced the frequency and amplitude of current elicited action...

  12. A Unified Approach to Diffusion Direction Sensitive Slice Registration and 3-D DTI Reconstruction From Moving Fetal Brain Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect...... to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction...... (AUDiSSAR) that explicitly formulates a process for diffusion direction sensitive DW-slice-to-DTI-volume alignment. This also incorporates image resolution modeling to iteratively deconvolve the effects of the imaging point spread function using the multiple views provided by thick slices acquired...

  13. Parkia biglobosa Improves Mitochondrial Functioning and Protects against Neurotoxic Agents in Rat Brain Hippocampal Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode Komolafe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Methanolic leaf extracts of Parkia biglobosa, PBE, and one of its major polyphenolic constituents, catechin, were investigated for their protective effects against neurotoxicity induced by different agents on rat brain hippocampal slices and isolated mitochondria. Methods. Hippocampal slices were preincubated with PBE (25, 50, 100, or 200 µg/mL or catechin (1, 5, or 10 µg/mL for 30 min followed by further incubation with 300 µM H2O2, 300 µM SNP, or 200 µM PbCl2 for 1 h. Effects of PBE and catechin on SNP- or CaCl2-induced brain mitochondrial ROS formation and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm were also determined. Results. PBE and catechin decreased basal ROS generation in slices and blunted the prooxidant effects of neurotoxicants on membrane lipid peroxidation and nonprotein thiol contents. PBE rescued hippocampal cellular viability from SNP damage and caused a significant boost in hippocampus Na+, K+-ATPase activity but with no effect on the acetylcholinesterase activity. Both PBE and catechin also mitigated SNP- or CaCl2-dependent mitochondrial ROS generation. Measurement by safranine fluorescence however showed that the mild depolarization of the ΔΨm by PBE was independent of catechin. Conclusion. The results suggest that the neuroprotective effect of PBE is dependent on its constituent antioxidants and mild mitochondrial depolarization propensity.

  14. Minimum conditions for the induction of cortical spreading depression in brain slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yujie T.; Mendez, Jorge M.; Theriot, Jeremy J.; Sawant, Punam M.; López-Valdés, Héctor E.; Ju, Y. Sungtaek

    2014-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) occurs during various forms of brain injury such as stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and brain trauma, but it is also thought to be the mechanism of the migraine aura. It is therefore expected to occur over a range of conditions including the awake behaving state. Yet it is unclear how such a massive depolarization could occur under relatively benign conditions. Using a microfluidic device with focal stimulation capability in a mouse brain slice model, we varied extracellular potassium concentration as well as the area exposed to increased extracellular potassium to determine the minimum conditions necessary to elicit CSD. Importantly, we focused on potassium levels that are physiologically plausible (≤145 mM; the intracellular potassium concentration). We found a strong correlation between the threshold concentration and the slice area exposed to increased extracellular potassium: minimum area of exposure was needed with the highest potassium concentration, while larger areas were needed at lower concentrations. We also found that moderate elevations of extracellular potassium were able to elicit CSD in relatively small estimated tissue volumes that might be activated under noninjury conditions. Our results thus show that CSD may be inducible under the conditions that expected in migraine aura as well as those related to brain trauma. PMID:25122714

  15. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures for studies of brain damage, neuroprotection and neurorepair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noraberg, Jens; Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Blaabjerg, Morten

    2005-01-01

    ), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and epilepsia. Studies of non-excitotoxic neurotoxic compounds and the experimental use of slice cultures in studies of HIV neurotoxicity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and neurogenesis are included. For cerebral ischemia, experimental models with oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD......) and exposure to glutamate receptor agonists (excitotoxins) are reviewed. For epilepsia, focus is on induction of seizures with effects on neuronal loss, axonal sprouting and neurogenesis. For Alzheimer's disease, the review centers on the use of beta-amyloid (Abeta) in different models, while the section...... on repair is focused on neurogenesis and cell migration. The culturing techniques, set-up of models, and analytical tools, including markers for neurodegeneration, like the fluorescent dye propidium iodide (PI), are reviewed and discussed. Comparisons are made between hippocampal slice cultures and other...

  16. Oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1 mRNA and protein expression in organotypic rat brain slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Cui; Lijun Yang; Dezhuang Huang; Wandong Zhang; Weijuan Han; Yanqing Yao; Wenxing Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have confirmed that oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1 (Olig-1) is vital for myelin repair. However, the effects of hypoxia and ischemia on Olig-1 expression remain unknown.In this study, Olig-1 mRNA and protein expressions were analyzed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, to determine the expression profile of Olig-1 in rat brain slices exposed to hypoxia and ischemia. Brains were obtained from 2-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats, and sections were randomly assigned to control and hypoxia/ischemia groups. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed karyorrhexis and karyopyknosis in cells from the hypoxia/ischemia group. Under electron microscopy, mitochondria swelling and neuropil edema were observed in the hypoxia/ischemia group. Olig-1 mRNA and protein expressions were increased at 1 day after hypoxia and ischemia treatment. These results suggest that in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry could be used simultaneously to detect mRNA and protein expression in brain slices.

  17. Microelectrode array recordings of excitability of low Mg2+-induced acute hippocampal slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yang; Xinwei Gong; Haiqing Gong; Puming Zhang; Peiji Liang; Qinchi LU

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal connections can be detected by neuronal network discharges in hippocampal neurons cultured on multi-electrodes.However,the multi-electrode-array(MEA)has not been widely used in hippocampal slice culture studies focused on epilepsy.The present study induced spontaneous synchronous epileptiform activity using low Mg2+artificial cerebrospinal fluid on acute hippocampal slices to record hippocampal discharges with MEA.Results showed that burst duration and average number of spikes in a burst were significantly greater in the CA3 compared with dentate gyrus and CA1 areas.In Schaffer cut-off group,CA1 area discharges disappeared,but synchronous discharges remained in the CA3 area.Moreover,synchronous discharge frequency in the Schaffer cut-off group was similar to control.However,burst duration and average number of spikes in a burst were significantly decreased compared with control(P < 0.05).Results demonstrated that highest neuronal excitability occurred in the CA3 area,and synchronous discharges induced by low Mg2+originated from the CA3 region.

  18. Culturing of PC12 Cells, Neuronal Cells, Astrocytes Cultures and Brain Slices in an Open Microfluidic System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Bakmand, Tanya; Rømer Sørensen, Ane

    cells, neuronal cells, astrocytes cultures and brain slices. The microfluidic system provides efficient nutrient delivery, waste removal, access to oxygen, fine control over the neurochemical environment and access to modern microscopy. Additionally, the setup consists of an in vitro culturing......The brain is the center of the nervous system, where serious neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s are products of functional loss in the neural cells (1). Typical techniques used to investigate these diseases lack precise control of the cellular surroundings...... and electrochemical sensor system that enables real time detection of metabolites, e.g. dopamine from cell cultures and brain slices. In summary we present results on culturing of brain slices and cells in the microfluidic system as well as on the incorporation of an electrochemical sensor system for characterization...

  19. Inhibitory effects of matrine on electrical signals and amino acid neurotransmitters in hippocampal brain slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuping Wang; Jiping Chen; Guizhi Zhao; Dan Shou; Xuezhi Hong; Jianmin Zhang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on electrical signals of hippocampal brain slices in vivo have shown that matrine inhibits benzylpenicillin sodium-induced activation of neuronal signal transduction.OBJECTIVE: To verify the inhibition effect of matrine on activation of electrical signals in rat brain slices and the role matrine plays in hippocampal amino acid transmitter release.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The in vitro, neurophysiological, controlled experiment was performed in the Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Cardio-cerebrovascular Disease and Nerve System Drugs Appraisement and Chinese Traditional Medicine Screening and Research between July 2003 and May 2004. The in vivo, neuronal, biochemical experiment was performed in the Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Chinese Traditional Medicine Quality Standardization from July 2005 to December 2006.MATERIALS: Forty healthy, Sprague Dawley rats, 7-8 weeks old, and 120 healthy, ICR mice, 5-6weeks old, were included in this study, irrespective of gender. Matrine powder was provided by the National Institute for the Control of Pharmaceutical and Biological Products, China. Matrine injection was purchased from Zhuhai Biochemical Pharmaceutical Factory, China. Penicillin was bought from Shijiazhuang Pharmaceutical Group Co., Ltd., China.METHODS: (1) Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: control, penicillin model, and matrine high-dose and low-dose, with 10 rats in each group. The control group was perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, in the remaining three groups, hippocampal brain slices were perfused with normal artificial cerebrospinal fluid containing 1x106 U/L penicillin for the first 10 minutes. The penicillin model group received artificial cerebrospinal fluid for an additional 30 minutes, while the matrine high-dose and low-dose groups received 0.1 g/L and 0.05 g/L matdne, respectively, for an additional 30 minutes. (2) Mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n=30). The matrine high-,medium-, and low

  20. Preserving GABAergic interneurons in acute brain slices of mice using the N-methyl-D-glucamine-based artificial cerebrospinal fluid method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Geng; Li, Yue; Geng, Hong-Yan; Yang, Jian-Ming; Li, Ke-Xin; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Defects in the function and development of GABAergic interneurons have been linked to psychiatric disorders, so preservation of these interneurons in brain slices is important for successful electrophysiological recording in various ex vivo methods. However, it is difficult to maintain the activity and morphology of neurons in slices from mice of >30 days old. Here we evaluated the N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG)-based artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) method for the preservation of interneurons in slices from mice of up to ∼6 months old and discussed the steps that may affect their quality during slicing. We found that the NMDG-aCSF method rescued more cells than sucrose-aCSF and successfully preserved different types of interneurons including parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons. In addition, both the chemical and electrical synaptic signaling of interneurons were maintained. These results demonstrate that the NMDG-aCSF method is suitable for the preservation of interneurons, especially in studies of gap junctions.

  1. Examining the complex regulation and drug-induced plasticity of dopamine release and uptake using voltammetry in brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Mark J; Calipari, Erin S; Yorgason, Jordan T; Jones, Sara R

    2013-05-15

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices (slice voltammetry) has been used over the last several decades to increase substantially our understanding of the complex local regulation of dopamine release and uptake in the striatum. This technique is routinely used for the study of changes that occur in the dopamine system associated with various disease states and pharmacological treatments, and to study mechanisms of local circuitry regulation of dopamine terminal function. In the context of this Review, we compare the relative advantages of voltammetry using striatal slice preparations versus in vivo preparations, and highlight recent advances in our understanding of dopamine release and uptake in the striatum specifically from studies that use slice voltammetry in drug-naïve animals and animals with a history of psychostimulant self-administration.

  2. Analysis of acute brain slices by electron microscopy: a correlative light-electron microscopy workflow based on Tokuyasu cryo-sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loussert Fonta, Celine; Leis, Andrew; Mathisen, Cliff; Bouvier, David S; Blanchard, Willy; Volterra, Andrea; Lich, Ben; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-01-01

    Acute brain slices are slices of brain tissue that are kept vital in vitro for further recordings and analyses. This tool is of major importance in neurobiology and allows the study of brain cells such as microglia, astrocytes, neurons and their inter/intracellular communications via ion channels or transporters. In combination with light/fluorescence microscopies, acute brain slices enable the ex vivo analysis of specific cells or groups of cells inside the slice, e.g. astrocytes. To bridge ex vivo knowledge of a cell with its ultrastructure, we developed a correlative microscopy approach for acute brain slices. The workflow begins with sampling of the tissue and precise trimming of a region of interest, which contains GFP-tagged astrocytes that can be visualised by fluorescence microscopy of ultrathin sections. The astrocytes and their surroundings are then analysed by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). An important aspect of this workflow is the modification of a commercial cryo-ultramicrotome to observe the fluorescent GFP signal during the trimming process. It ensured that sections contained at least one GFP astrocyte. After cryo-sectioning, a map of the GFP-expressing astrocytes is established and transferred to correlation software installed on a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope equipped with a STEM detector. Next, the areas displaying fluorescence are selected for high resolution STEM imaging. An overview area (e.g. a whole mesh of the grid) is imaged with an automated tiling and stitching process. In the final stitched image, the local organisation of the brain tissue can be surveyed or areas of interest can be magnified to observe fine details, e.g. vesicles or gold labels on specific proteins. The robustness of this workflow is contingent on the quality of sample preparation, based on Tokuyasu's protocol. This method results in a reasonable compromise between preservation of morphology and maintenance of

  3. Histamine H1 and endothelin ETB receptors mediate phospholipase D stimulation in rat brain hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarri, E; Picatoste, F; Claro, E

    1995-08-01

    Different neurotransmitter receptor agonists [carbachol, serotonin, noradrenaline, histamine, endothelin-1, and trans-(1S,3R)-aminocyclopentyl-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (trans-ACPD)], known as stimuli of phospholipase C in brain tissue, were tested for phospholipase D stimulation in [32P]Pi-prelabeled rat brain cortical and hippocampal slices. The accumulation of [32P]phosphatidylethanol was measured as an index of phospholipase D-catalyzed transphosphatidylation in the presence of ethanol. Among the six neurotransmitter receptor agonists tested, only noradrenaline, histamine, endothelin-1, and trans-ACPD stimulated phospholipase D in hippocampus and cortex, an effect that was strictly dependent of the presence of millimolar extracellular calcium concentrations. The effect of histamine (EC50 18 microM) was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist mepyramine with a Ki constant of 0.7 nM and was resistant to H2 and H3 receptor antagonists (ranitidine and tioperamide, respectively). Endothelin-1-stimulated phospholipase D (EC50 44 nM) was not blocked by BQ-123, a specific antagonist of the ETA receptor. Endothelin-3 and the specific ETB receptor agonist safarotoxin 6c were also able to stimulate phospholipase D with efficacies similar to that of endothelin-1, and EC50 values of 16 and 3 nM, respectively. These results show that histamine and endothelin-1 stimulate phospholipase D in rat brain through H1 and ETB receptors, respectively.

  4. Presynaptically mediated effects of cholecystokinin-8 on the excitability of area postrema neurons in rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeta, Shingo; Hirai, Yoshiyuki; Maezawa, Hitoshi; Inoue, Nobuo; Yamazaki, Yutaka; Funahashi, Makoto

    2015-08-27

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a well-known gut hormone that shows anorexigenic effects via action at peripheral and central receptors. CCK is also widely distributed throughout the mammalian brain and appears to function as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. The area postrema is one of the circumventricular organs, located on the dorsal surface of the medulla oblongata at the caudal end of the fourth ventricle. Blood vessels in the area postrema lack a blood brain barrier, offering specific central neural elements unique access to circulating substances. Immunohistochemical studies show CCK-A receptors in the area postrema, and we reported CCK-sensitive area postrema neurons. However, the receptive mechanism of CCK in area postrema neurons still remains unexplained. We investigated the responses of area postrema neurons to agonists and antagonists of CCK receptors using whole cell and perforated patch-clamp recordings in rat brain slices. The application of CCK-8 elicited excitatory responses, such as increases in the frequency of mEPSCs (miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents), a shift toward larger amplitude mEPSCs, and increases in the frequency of action potentials. These changes were found mostly in cells not displaying the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih), except for small excitatory changes in a minority of Ih-positive neurons. Tonic inward currents or an inhibitory response to CCK-8 were never seen. Analysis of the amplitude of mEPSCs before and after the administration of CCK-8 indicated the responses mediated via the presynaptic receptors. The effect of CCK-8 was abolished in the presence of CNQX (AMPA type glutamate receptor antagonist). In the presence of lorglumide (a selective CCK-A receptor antagonist), CCK-8-induced excitatory responses were inhibited. No cells responded to the administration of non-sulfated CCK-8 (CCK-8NS, a selective CCK-B receptor agonist). We conclude that CCK-8 exerts its action via presynaptic CCK-A receptors

  5. Erratum to "Noise-induced changes of neuronal spontaneous activity in mice inferior colliculus brain slices".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, Dietmar; Ernst, Arne

    2005-02-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) in vivo is reportedly subject to a noise-induced decrease of GABA-related inhibitory synaptic transmission accompanied by an amplitude increase of auditory evoked responses, a widening of tuning curves and a higher neuronal discharge rate at suprathreshold levels. However, other in vivo experiments which demonstrated constant neuronal auditory thresholds or unchanged spontaneous activity in the IC after noise exposure did not confirm those findings. Perhaps this can be the result of complex noise-induced interactions between different central auditory structures. It was, therefore, the aim of the present study to investigate the effects of noise exposure on the spontaneous electrical activity of single neurons in a slice preparation of the isolated mouse IC. Normal hearing mice were exposed to noise (10 kHz center frequency at 115 dB SPL for 3 h) at the age of 21 days under anesthesia (Ketamin/Rompun 10:1). After one week, auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings and extracellular single-unit recordings from spontaneously active neurons within the IC slice were performed in noise-exposed and in normal hearing control mice. Noise-exposed animals showed a significant ABR threshold shift in the whole tested frequency range and a significant lower neuronal spontaneous activity in all investigated isofrequency laminae compared to controls. In both groups, the firing rate of 80% of IC neurons (approximately) increased significantly during the application of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist Bicucullin (10 microM). The present findings demonstrate a noise-related modulation of spontaneous activity in the IC, which possibly contribute to the generation of noise-induced tinnitus and hearing loss.

  6. Noise-induced changes of neuronal spontaneous activity in mice inferior colliculus brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, Dietmar; Ernest, Arne

    2004-09-30

    The inferior colliculus (IC) in vivo is reportedly subject to a noise-induced decrease of GABA-related inhibitory synaptic transmission accompanied by an amplitude increase of auditory evoked responses, a widening of tuning curves and a higher neuronal discharge rate at suprathreshold levels. However, other in vivo experiments which demonstrated constant neuronal auditory thresholds or unchanged spontaneous activity in the IC after noise exposure did not confirm those findings. Perhaps this can be the result of complex noise-induced interactions between different central auditory structures. It was, therefore, the aim of the present study to investigate the effects of noise exposure on the spontaneous electrical activity of single neurons in a slice preparation of the isolated mouse IC. Normal hearing mice were exposed to noise (10 kHz center frequency at 115 dB SPL for 3 h) at the age of 21 days under anesthesia (Ketamin/Rompun 10:1). After one week, auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings and extracellular single-unit recordings from spontaneously active neurons within the IC slice were performed in noise-exposed and in normal hearing control mice. Noise-exposed animals showed a significant ABR threshold shift in the whole tested frequency range and a significant lower neuronal spontaneous activity in all investigated isofrequency laminae compared to controls. In both groups, the firing rate of 80% of IC neurons (approximately) increased significantly during the application of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist Bicucullin (10 microM). The present findings demonstrate a noise-related modulation of spontaneous activity in the IC, which possibly contribute to the generation of noise-induced tinnitus and hearing loss.

  7. Acute and long-term effects of noise exposure on the neuronal spontaneous activity in cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröschel, Moritz; Ryll, Jana; Götze, Romy; Ernst, Arne; Basta, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Noise exposure leads to an immediate hearing loss and is followed by a long-lasting permanent threshold shift, accompanied by changes of cellular properties within the central auditory pathway. Electrophysiological recordings have demonstrated an upregulation of spontaneous neuronal activity. It is still discussed if the observed effects are related to changes of peripheral input or evoked within the central auditory system. The present study should describe the intrinsic temporal patterns of single-unit activity upon noise-induced hearing loss of the dorsal and ventral cochlear nucleus (DCN and VCN) and the inferior colliculus (IC) in adult mouse brain slices. Recordings showed a slight, but significant, elevation in spontaneous firing rates in DCN and VCN immediately after noise trauma, whereas no differences were found in IC. One week postexposure, neuronal responses remained unchanged compared to controls. At 14 days after noise trauma, intrinsic long-term hyperactivity in brain slices of the DCN and the IC was detected for the first time. Therefore, increase in spontaneous activity seems to develop within the period of two weeks, but not before day 7. The results give insight into the complex temporal neurophysiological alterations after noise trauma, leading to a better understanding of central mechanisms in noise-induced hearing loss.

  8. Properties of gamma-frequency oscillations initiated by propagating population bursts in retrohippocampal regions of rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, M; Stewart, M

    1998-07-01

    1. In the hippocampal formation in vivo, brief periods of gamma-frequency activity follow population bursts called sharp waves. The approximately 200 Hz activity of the sharp wave itself may serve to enhance synaptic connections and the approximately 40 Hz gamma activity has been offered as a mechanism for solving the 'binding' problem. We describe epochs of gamma-frequency activity which follow population spikes evoked by low frequency repetitive extracellular stimuli in retrohippocampal neurons of horizontal rat brain slices. 2. gamma-Frequency activity recorded intracellularly from deep layer neurons of entorhinal cortex, presubiculum and parasubiculum consisted of one action potential correlated with each of the three to five gamma cycles recorded with a proximate field potential electrode. A minority of cells exhibited only sub-threshold gamma-frequency membrane potential oscillations (ranging from 5 to 10 mV). No cells fired more than one spike per gamma cycle under any conditions. 3. The range of synchrony varied from individual cells which showed gamma-frequency firing without corresponding oscillations in close field recordings to field potential recordings of oscillations which were well correlated across regions. The lead or lag between any two retrohippocampal regions was in the direction of the conduction delay for the primary population spike, but typically was less, and approached zero milliseconds for some cycles in most cells. The level of synchrony was stable for particular stimulating conditions (intensity, stimulation rate, stimulus location). 4. The duration of the period of gamma activity had the duration of a slow depolarizing potential which was mediated by NMDA receptor activation. NMDA receptor antagonists or low concentrations of AMPA receptor antagonists reduced the duration of, or completely abolished the slow potential, thereby eliminating the gamma portion of the evoked response. 5. gamma-Frequency firing was eliminated by the GABAA

  9. Organotypic slice cultures from rat brain tissue: a new approach for Naegleria fowleri CNS infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianinazzi, C; Schild, M; Müller, N; Leib, S L; Simon, F; Nuñez, S; Joss, P; Gottstein, B

    2005-12-01

    The free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the aetiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a disease leading to death in the vast majority of cases. In patients suffering from PAM, and in corresponding animal models, the brain undergoes a massive inflammatory response, followed by haemorrhage and severe tissue necrosis. Both, in vivo and in vitro models are currently being used to study PAM infection. However, animal models may pose ethical issues, are dependent upon availability of specific infrastructural facilities, and are time-consuming and costly. Conversely, cell cultures lack the complex organ-specific morphology found in vivo, and thus, findings obtained in vitro do not necessarily reflect the situation in vivo. The present study reports infection of organotypic slice cultures from rat brain with N. fowleri and compares the findings in this culture system with in vivo infection in a rat model of PAM, that proved complementary to that of mice. We found that brain morphology, as present in vivo, is well retained in organotypic slice cultures, and that infection time-course including tissue damage parallels the observations in vivo in the rat. Therefore, organotypic slice cultures from rat brain offer a new in vitro approach to study N. fowleri infection in the context of PAM.

  10. Quantitation of dopamine, serotonin and adenosine content in a tissue punch from a brain slice using capillary electrophoresis with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huaifang; Pajski, Megan L; Ross, Ashley E; Venton, B Jill

    2013-01-01

    Methods to determine neurochemical concentrations in small samples of tissue are needed to map interactions among neurotransmitters. In particular, correlating physiological measurements of neurotransmitter release and the tissue content in a small region would be valuable. HPLC is the standard method for tissue content analysis but it requires microliter samples and the detector often varies by the class of compound being quantified; thus detecting molecules from different classes can be difficult. In this paper, we develop capillary electrophoresis with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry detection (CE-FSCV) for analysis of dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine content in tissue punches from rat brain slices. Using field-amplified sample stacking, the limit of detection was 5 nM for dopamine, 10 nM for serotonin, and 50 nM for adenosine. Neurotransmitters could be measured from a tissue punch as small as 7 µg (7 nL) of tissue, three orders of magnitude smaller than a typical HPLC sample. Tissue content analysis of punches in successive slices through the striatum revealed higher dopamine but lower adenosine content in the anterior striatum. Stimulated dopamine release was measured in a brain slice, then a tissue punch collected from the recording region. Dopamine content and release had a correlation coefficient of 0.71, which indicates much of the variance in stimulated release is due to variance in tissue content. CE-FSCV should facilitate measurements of tissue content in nanoliter samples, leading to a better understanding of how diseases or drugs affect dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine content.

  11. Brain perfusion CT for acute stroke using a 256-slice CT: improvement of diagnostic information by large volume coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, F. [Technical University, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Institut fuer Radiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Muenzel, D.; Meier, R.; Rummeny, E.J.; Huber, A. [Technical University, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Poppert, H. [Technical University, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    To compare a 256-slice CT with a simulated standard CT for brain CT perfusion (CTP). CTP was obtained in 51 patients using a 256-slice CT (128 detector rows, flying z-focus, 8-cm detector width, 80 kV, 120mAs, 20 measurements, 1 CT image/2.5 s). Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) were compared in grey and white matter. Perfusion maps were evaluated for cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in hypoperfused areas and corresponding contralateral regions. Two reconstructed 10-mm slices for simulation of a standard CT (SDCT) were compared with the complete data sets (large-volume CT, LVCT). Adequate image quality was achieved in 50/51 cases. SNR were significantly different in grey and white matter. A perfusion deficit was present in 27 data sets. Differences between the hypoperfusions and the control regions were significant for MTT and CBF, but not for CBV. Three lesions were missed by SDCT but detected by LVCT; 24 lesions were covered incompletely by SDCT, and 6 by LVCT. 21 lesions were detected completely by LVCT, but none by SDCT. CTP imaging of the brain using an increased detector width can detect additional ischaemic lesions and cover most ischaemic lesions completely. (orig.)

  12. Effect of pre-ischaemic conditioning on hypoxic depolarization of dopamine efflux in the rat caudate brain slice measured in real-time with fast cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Colin; Coomber, Ben; Gibson, Claire L; Young, Andrew M J

    2011-10-01

    Fast cyclic voltammetry can be used to measure dopamine release after oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) induced anoxic depolarization in vitro. Here we measure dopamine efflux with 1s time resolution, which is appropriate to measure OGD-evoked dopamine efflux accurately. In the present study, we examined whether OGD-evoked dopamine efflux could be used to show pre-ischaemic conditioning in the rat caudate brain slice. Caudate slices were exposed to 0, 2, or 10 min OGD pre-ischaemic conditioning, then 60 min later exposed to a second OGD event of 15 min duration. We measured the OGD-evoked dopamine efflux using fast cyclic voltammetry and in some experiments caudate dopamine and DOPAC tissue levels were measured using HPLC and 20 μm cryostat sections were Nissl stained to indicate neuronal loss. We found that 10 but not 2 min OGD pre-ischaemic conditioning resulted in a longer time to onset of OGD-evoked dopamine efflux on the main OGD event (475 ± 31 and 287 ± 30 s for 10 Vs 0 min pre-ischaemic conditioning respectively). Further, 10 min OGD pre-ischaemic conditioning resulted in less dopamine efflux on the second OGD event (4.23 ± 1.12 and 8.14 ± 0.82 μM for 10 Vs 0 min pre-ischaemic conditioning respectively), despite these slices having similar tissue dopamine content and DOPAC/DA ratio, and the rate of dopamine release was slower in the main OGD event (21 ± 5 and 74 ± 8 nM/s for 10 Vs 0 min pre-ischaemic conditioning respectively). These data suggest that 10 min OGD pre-ischaemic conditioning can evoke tolerance to a second OGD event and that voltammetric recording of OGD-evoked dopamine efflux is a useful model of pre-ischaemic conditioning in neuronal tissue.

  13. Protective effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on dopaminergic neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lirong Jin; Zhen Hong; Chunjiu Zhong; Yang Wang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date, the use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease have solely focused on in vivo animal models. Because of the number of influencing factors, it has been difficult to determine a consistent outcome. OBJECTIVE: To establish an injury model in brain slices of substantia nigra and striatum using 1-methyl-4-phenylpytidinium ion (MPP+), and to investigate the effect of MSCs on dopaminergic neurons following MPP+ induced damage.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An in vitro, randomized, controlled, animal experiment using immunohistochemistry was performed at the Laboratory of the Department of Anatomy, Fudan University between January 2004 and December 2006.MATERIALS: Primary MSC cultures were obtained from femurs and tibias of adult Sprague Dawley rats. Organotypic brain slices were isolated from substantia nigra and striatum of 1-day-old Sprague Dawley rat pups. Monoclonal antibodies for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, 1:5 000) were from Santa Cruz (USA); goat anti-rabbit IgG antibodies labeled with FITC were from Boster Company (China).METHODS: Organotypic brain slices were cultured for 5 days in whole culture medium supplemented with 50% DMEM, 25% equine serum, and 25% Tyrode's balanced salt solution. The medium was supplemented with 5 μg/mL Ara-C, and the culture was continued for an additional 5 days. The undergrowth of brain slices was discarded at day 10. Eugonic brain slices were cultured with basal media for an additional 7 days. The brain slices were divided into three groups: control, MPP+ exposure, and co-culture. For the MPP+ group, MPP+ (30 μmol/L) was added to the media at day 17 and brain slices were cultured for 4 days, followed by control media. For the co-culture group, the MPP+ injured brain slices were placed over MSCs in the well and were further cultured for 7 days.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: After 28 days in culture, neurite outgrowth was examined in the brain slices under phase

  14. Does brain slices from pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice provide a more predictive screening model for antiepileptic drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Suzanne L; Sterjev, Zoran; Werngreen, Marie; Simonsen, Bodil J; Knudsen, Katrine E; Nielsen, Ane H; Pedersen, Mikael E; Badolo, Lassiana; Kristiansen, Uffe; Vestergaard, Henrik T

    2012-05-05

    The cortical wedge is a commonly applied model for in vitro screening of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and has been extensively used in characterization of well-known AEDs. However, the predictive validity of this model as a screening model has been questioned as, e.g., carbamazepine has been reported to lack effect in this model. The neuroplastic changes induced in acute and chronic animal models of epilepsy are known to affect the pharmacological profile of AEDs in vivo. Hence, we investigated whether brain slices from pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled animals could provide a more predictive screening model for AEDs. To this end, we compared the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profile of several selected AEDs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, tiagabine, fosphenytoin, valproate, and carbamazepine) along with citalopram using the PTZ-kindled model and brain slices from naïve, saline-injected and PTZ-kindled mice. Our data suggest that the use of slices from PTZ-kindled mice in the cortical wedge does not increase the predictive validity of the model as an in vitro screening model for AEDs. Traditionally, the incidence of certain seizure types is widely used as a measure to characterize drug action in animal models of epilepsy. In our study, the anticonvulsant effect of the AEDs was investigated in vivo using several observational parameters (i.e., incidence and duration of convulsions, latency to clonic convulsions, and severity of convulsions). We found that including the observational parameter "severity" offered important additional information about the drug profile that would otherwise be lost if only a single parameter as "incidence" was used.

  15. Long-term GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion in a novel hypothalamo-pituitary slice culture from tilapia brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Corinne L; Kedar, Noa; Golan, Matan; Gutnick, Michael J; Fleidervish, Ilya A; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2014-10-01

    Organotypic cultures, prepared from hypothalamo-pituitary slices of tilapia, were developed to enable long-term study of secretory cells in the pituitary of a teleost. Values of membrane potential at rest were similar to those recorded from acute slices, and cells presented similar spontaneous spikes and spikelets. Some cells also exhibited slow spontaneous oscillations in membrane potential, which may be network-driven. Long-term (6days) continuous exposure to GnRH induced increases in LH and FSH secretion. FSH levels reached the highest levels after 24h of exposure to GnRH, and the highest secretion of LH was observed in days 4 and 5 of the experiment. Since slices were viable for several weeks in culture, maintaining the original cytoarchitecture, electrical membrane properties and the ability to secrete hormones in response to exogenous GnRH, this technique is ideal for studying the mechanisms regulating cell-to-cell communication under conditions resembling the in vivo tissue organization.

  16. Normobaric hyperoxia stimulates superoxide and nitric oxide production in the caudal solitary complex of rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Dean, Jay B

    2016-12-01

    Central CO2-chemosensitive neurons in the caudal solitary complex (cSC) are stimulated not only by hypercapnic acidosis, but by hyperoxia as well. While a cellular mechanism for the CO2 response has yet to be isolated, previous data show that a redox-sensitive mechanism underlies neuronal excitability to hyperoxia. However, it remains unknown how changes in Po2 affect the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the cSC that can lead to increased cellular excitability and, with larger doses, to cellular dysfunction and death. To this end, we used fluorescence microscopy in real time to determine how normobaric hyperoxia increases the production of key RONS in the cSC. Because neurons in the region are CO2 sensitive, we also examined the potential effects of CO2 narcosis, used during euthanasia before brain slice harvesting, on RONS production. Our findings show that normobaric hyperoxia (0.4 → 0.95 atmospheres absolute O2) increases the fluorescence rates of fluorogenic dyes specific to both superoxide and nitric oxide. Interestingly, different results were seen for superoxide fluorescence when CO2 narcosis was used during euthanasia, suggesting long-lasting changes in superoxide production and/or antioxidant activity subsequent to CO2 narcosis before brain slicing. Further research needs to distinguish whether the increased levels of RONS reported here are merely increases in oxidative and nitrosative signaling or, alternatively, evidence of redox and nitrosative stress.

  17. Conductor compounds of phenylpentane in Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii mycelium enhance the release of dopamine from rat brain striatum slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Satoshi; Sawasaki, Emi; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2004-04-01

    Monoterpene compound is a major component of essential oils in various aromatic species. Previous reports about the monoterpene compound linalool and its effect on the brain neurotransmitters glutamic acid, GABA and acetylcholine, but not catecholamines, have been reported. In this study, we investigated the effect of linalool or conductor compounds of phenylpentane, including 1-phenyl-3-pentanol and 1-phenyl-3-pentanone, on dopamine release using rat striatal slices. The edible mushroom Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii belongs to the Climacodontaceae family, and its cultivate medium or mycelium contains derivatives of the fragrant conductor compound, phenylpentane. Compared to basal levels, 2.5 microg linalool increased dopamine from striatal slices 3-fold. A 4-fold increase in dopamine release resulted from 2.5 microg 1-phenyl-3-pentanol administration, while a half dose of this compound induced a 2.5-fold increase. A greater than 2-fold increase resulted with 2.5 microg 1-phenyl-3-pentanone. These data indicate that striatum has sensitivity for these fragrant compounds and different releasing effects result with differ structures. These actions may affect other neurotransmitters and influence brain function.

  18. Hyperexcitability in combined entorhinal/hippocampal slices of adult rat after exposure to brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, H E

    1997-08-01

    Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in area CA3, the dentate gyrus, and medial entorhinal cortex were examined electrophysiologically by bath application of BDNF in slices containing the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Bath application of 25-100 ng/ml BDNF for 30-90 min increased responses to single afferent stimuli in selective pathways in the majority of slices. In area CA3, responses to mossy fiber stimulation increased in 73% of slices and entorhinal cortex responses to white matter stimulation increased in 64% of slices. After exposure to BDNF, these areas also demonstrated evidence of hyperexcitability, because responses to repetitive stimulation (1-Hz paired pulses for several s) produced multiple population spikes in response to mossy fiber stimulation in CA3 or multiple field potentials in response to white matter stimulation in the entorhinal cortex. Repetitive field potentials persisted after repetitive stimulation ended and usually were followed by spreading depression. Enhancement of responses to single stimuli and hyperexcitability were never evoked in untreated slices or after bath application of boiled BDNF or cytochrome C. The tyrosine kinase antagonist K252a (2 microM) blocked the effects of BDNF. In area CA3, both the potentiation of responses to single stimuli and hyperexcitability showed afferent specificity, because responses to mossy fiber stimulation were affected but responses to fimbria or Schaffer collateral stimulation were not. In addition, regional specificity was demonstrated in that the dentate gyrus was much less affected. The effects of BDNF in area CA3 were similar to those produced by bath application of low doses of kainic acid, which is thought to modulate glutamate release from mossy fiber terminals by a presynaptic action. These results suggest that BDNF has acute effects on excitability in different areas of the hippocampal-entorhinal circuit. These effects appear to be greatest in areas that are highly

  19. Neuroprotection afforded by diazepam against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced injury in rat cortical brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Lorenzo; Valoti, Massimo; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Frosini, Maria

    2007-04-30

    The aim of the present investigation was to assess neuroprotection exerted by diazepam (0.1-25 microM) in rat cortical brain slices subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation. Neuronal injury and neuroprotection were assessed by measuring the release of glutamate and lactate dehydrogenase and tissue water content. Results demonstrate that diazepam exerted neuroprotective effects according to a "U-shaped", hormetic-like, concentration-response curve, with an efficacy window of 0.5-5 microM concentration. Flumazenil (20 microM) fully antagonised neuroprotection afforded by 5 microM diazepam. In conclusion, the hormetic response of diazepam should be taken into consideration when designing experiments aimed at assessing diazepam neuroprotection against ischemia/reoxygenation injury.

  20. S100b Counteracts Neurodegeneration of Rat Cholinergic Neurons in Brain Slices after Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Serbinek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a severe chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by beta-amyloid plaques, tau pathology, cerebrovascular damage, inflammation, reactive gliosis, and cell death of cholinergic neurons. The aim of the present study is to test whether the glia-derived molecule S100b can counteract neurodegeneration of cholinergic neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in organotypic brain slices of basal nucleus of Meynert. Our data showed that 3 days of OGD induced a marked decrease of cholinergic neurons (60% of control, which could be counteracted by 50 μg/mL recombinant S100b. The effect was dose and time dependent. Application of nerve growth factor or fibroblast growth factor-2 was less protective. C-fos-like immunoreactivity was enhanced 3 hours after OGD indicating metabolic stress. We conclude that S100b is a potent neuroprotective factor for cholinergic neurons during ischemic events.

  1. Effects of normobaric versus hyperbaric oxygen on cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in acute brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazalviel, Laurent; Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Vallée, Nicolas; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Besnard, Stéphane; Abraini, Jacques H

    2016-01-01

    Normobaric oxygen (NBO) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) are emerging as a possible co-treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Both have been shown to reduce infarct volume, to improve neurologic outcome, to promote endogenous tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis and cerebral blood flow, and to improve tissue oxygenation through oxygen diffusion in the ischemic areas, thereby questioning the interest of HBO compared to NBO. In the present study, in order to investigate and compare the oxygen diffusion effects of NBO and HBO on acute ischemic stroke independently of their effects at the vascular level, we used acute brain slices exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an ex vivo model of brain ischemia that allows investigating the acute effects of NBO (partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) = 1 atmospheres absolute (ATA) = 0.1 MPa) and HBO (pO2 = 2.5 ATA = 0.25 MPa) through tissue oxygenation on ischemia-induced cell injury as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. We found that HBO, but not NBO, reduced oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury, indicating that passive tissue oxygenation (i.e. without vascular support) of the brain parenchyma requires oxygen partial pressure higher than 1 ATA.

  2. Depolarizing and calcium-mobilizing stimuli fail to enhance synthesis and release of endocannabinoids from rat brain cerebral cortex slices.

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    Sarmad, Sarir; Alexander, Stephen P H; Barrett, David A; Marsden, Charles A; Kendall, David A

    2011-05-01

    The concentrations of the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonylethanolamine (anandamide) were examined in rat brain cerebral cortex slices and surrounding medium. Basal concentrations of endocannabinoids were similar to those identified previously in rat brain, with anandamide content being much lower (19 pmol/g) than that of 2-AG (7300 pmol/g). In contrast, basal concentrations in the surrounding medium were proportionally much lower for 2-arachidonoylglycerol (16 pmol/mL) compared to anandamide (0.6 pmol/mL). Incubation of slices with glutamate receptor agonists, depolarizing concentrations of KCl, or ionomycin failed to alter tissue concentrations of endocannabinoids, while endocannabinoids in the medium were unaltered by elevated KCl. Cyclohexyl carbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-biphenyl-3-yl ester, an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase, significantly enhanced tissue concentrations of anandamide (and related N-acylethanolamines), without altering 2-AG, while evoking proportional elevations of anandamide in the medium. Removal of extracellular calcium ions failed to alter tissue concentrations of anandamide, but significantly reduced 2-AG in the tissue by 90% and levels in the medium to below the detection limit. Supplementation of the medium with 50 μM N-oleoylethanolamine only raised tissue concentrations of N-oleoylethanolamine in the presence of cyclohexyl carbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-biphenyl-3-yl ester and failed to alter either tissue or medium anandamide or 2-AG concentrations. These results highlight the ongoing turnover of endocannabinoids, and the importance of calcium ions in maintaining 2-AG concentrations in this tissue.

  3. A LED-based method for monitoring NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence in cell cultures and brain slices.

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    Rösner, Jörg; Liotta, Agustin; Schmitz, Dietmar; Heinemann, Uwe; Kovács, Richard

    2013-01-30

    Nicotinamide- and flavine-adenine-dinucleotides (NAD(P)H and FADH₂) are electron carriers involved in cellular energy metabolism and in a multitude of enzymatic processes. As reduced NAD(P)H and oxidised FAD molecules are fluorescent, changes in tissue auto-fluorescence provide valuable information on the cellular redox state and energy metabolism. Since fluorescence excitation, by mercury arc lamps (HBO) is inherently coupled to photo-bleaching and photo-toxicity, microfluorimetric monitoring of energy metabolism might benefit from the replacement of HBO lamps by light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here we describe a LED-based custom-built setup for monitoring NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence at the level of single cells (HEK293) and of brain slices. We compared NAD(P)H bleaching characteristics with two light sources (HBO lamp and LED) as well as sensitivity and signal to noise ratio of three different detector types (multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC), photomultiplier tube (PMT) and photodiode). LED excitation resulted in reduced photo-bleaching at the same fluorescence output in comparison to excitation with the HBO lamp. Transiently increasing LED power resulted in reversible bleaching of NAD(P)H fluorescence. Recovery kinetics were dependent on metabolic substrates indicating coupling of NAD(P)H fluorescence to metabolism. Electrical stimulation of brain slices induced biphasic redox changes, as indicated by NAD(P)H/FAD fluorescence transients. Increasing the gain of PMT and decreasing the LED power resulted in similar sensitivity as obtained with the MPPC and the photodiode, without worsening the signal to noise ratio. In conclusion, replacement of HBO lamp with LED might improve conventional PMT based microfluorimetry of tissue auto-fluorescence.

  4. Cytoprotective effect of hydroxytyrosyl alkyl ether derivatives after oral administration to rats in a model of glucose-oxygen deprivation in brain slices.

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    Muñoz-Marín, Javier; De La Cruz, José Pedro; Guerrero, Ana; López-Leiva, Inmaculada; López-Villodres, Juan Antonio; Reyes, José Julio; Espartero, José Luis; Madrona, Andrés; Labajos, María Teresa; González-Correa, José Antonio

    2012-08-08

    This study was designed to determine whether the oral administration of hydroxytyrosol (HT) alkyl ether derivatives has a neuroprotective effect in rats. The animals were treated for 7 days with HT or ethyl, butyl, hexyl, octyl, and dodecyl HT ether. A method of in vitro hypoxia-reoxygenation in brain slices was used. Hexyl, octyl, and dodecyl HT derivatives reduced brain cell death (LDH efflux). Lipid peroxidation and nitrite concentrations were inhibited most by hexyl, octyl, and dodecyl derivatives. Concentrations of 3-nitrotyrosine were reduced by HT butyl, hexyl, octyl, and dodecyl ether derivatives. Interleukin-1β was significantly reduced in brain slices from rats treated with all HT ether derivatives. LDH efflux showed a linear correlation with brain concentrations of lipid peroxides, nitrites plus nitrates, and interleukin 1β. The reduction in oxidative and nitrosative stress and decreased production of pro-inflammatory interleukins may be the basis for the observed neuroprotective effects.

  5. Development of a lung slice preparation for recording ion channel activity in alveolar epithelial type I cells

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    Crandall Edward D

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung fluid balance in the healthy lung is dependent upon finely regulated vectorial transport of ions across the alveolar epithelium. Classically, the cellular locus of the major ion transport processes has been widely accepted to be the alveolar type II cell. Although evidence is now emerging to suggest that the alveolar type I cell might significantly contribute to the overall ion and fluid homeostasis of the lung, direct assessment of functional ion channels in type I cells has remained elusive. Methods Here we describe a development of a lung slice preparation that has allowed positive identification of alveolar type I cells within an intact and viable alveolar epithelium using living cell immunohistochemistry. Results This technique has allowed, for the first time, single ion channels of identified alveolar type I cells to be recorded using the cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Conclusion This exciting new development should facilitate the ascription of function to alveolar type I cells and allow us to integrate this cell type into the general model of alveolar ion and fluid balance in health and disease.

  6. Eye-position recording during brain MRI examination to identify and characterize steps of glioma diagnosis

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    Cavaro-Ménard, Christine; Tanguy, Jean-Yves; Le Callet, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    MRI is an essential tool for brain glioma diagnosis thanks to its ability to produce images in any layout plan and to its numerous sequences adapted to both anatomic and functional imaging. In this paper, we investigate the use of an eyetracking system to explore relationships between visual scanning patterns and the glioma diagnostic process during brain MRI analysis. We divide the analyzed screen into Areas of Interest (AOIs), each AOI corresponding to one sequence. Analyzing temporal organization of fixation location intra AOI and inter AOI splits the diagnostic process into different steps. The analysis of saccadic amplitudes reveals clear delineation of three sequential steps. During the first step (characterized by large saccades), a radiologist performs a short review on all sequences and on the patient report. In the second step (characterized by short saccades), a radiologist sequentially and systematically scans all the slices of each sequence. The fixation duration in one AOI depends on the number of slices, on the lesion subtlety and on the lesion contrast in the sequence to be analyzed. In order to improve the detection, localization and characterization of the glioma, the radiologist compares sequences during the third step (characterized by large saccades). Eye-position recording enables one to identify each elementary task implemented during diagnostic process of glioma detection and characterization on brain MRI. Total dwell time associated with one MRI sequence (one AOI) and contrast in primary lesion area enable one to estimate the amount and subtleties of diagnosis criteria provided by the sequence. From this information, one could establish some rules to optimize brain MRI compression (depending on the sequence to be compressed).

  7. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS)

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    Fernandes, Anna Maria A. P.; Vendramini, Pedro H.; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels.

  8. Investigation of inter-slice magnetization transfer effects as a new method for MTR imaging of the human brain.

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    Jeffrey W Barker

    Full Text Available We present a new method for magnetization transfer (MT ratio imaging in the brain that requires no separate saturation pulse. Interslice MT effects that are inherent to multi-slice balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP imaging were controlled via an interslice delay time to generate MT-weighted (0 s delay and reference images (5-8 s delay for MT ratio (MTR imaging of the brain. The effects of varying flip angle and phase encoding (PE order were investigated experimentally in normal, healthy subjects. Values of up to ∼50% and ∼40% were observed for white and gray matter MTR. Centric PE showed larger MTR, higher SNR, and better contrast between white and gray matter than linear PE. Simulations of a two-pool model of MT agreed well with in vivo MTR values. Simulations were also used to investigate the effects of varying acquisition parameters, and the effects of varying flip angle, PE steps, and interslice delay are discussed. Lastly, we demonstrated reduced banding with a non-balanced SSFP-FID sequence and showed preliminary results of interslice MTR imaging of meningioma.

  9. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A. P.; Vendramini, Pedro H.; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2016-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels.

  10. Cytosolic NADH-NAD+ Redox Visualized in Brain Slices by Two-Photon Fluorescence Lifetime Biosensor Imaging

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    Mongeon, Rebecca; Venkatachalam, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Cytosolic NADH-NAD+ redox state is central to cellular metabolism and a valuable indicator of glucose and lactate metabolism in living cells. Here we sought to quantitatively determine NADH-NAD+ redox in live cells and brain tissue using a fluorescence lifetime imaging of the genetically-encoded single-fluorophore biosensor Peredox. Results: We show that Peredox exhibits a substantial change in its fluorescence lifetime over its sensing range of NADH-NAD+ ratio. This allows changes in cytosolic NADH redox to be visualized in living cells using a two-photon scanning microscope with fluorescence lifetime imaging capabilities (2p-FLIM), using time-correlated single photon counting. Innovation: Because the lifetime readout is absolutely calibrated (in nanoseconds) and is independent of sensor concentration, we demonstrate that quantitative assessment of NADH redox is possible using a single fluorophore biosensor. Conclusion: Imaging of the sensor in mouse hippocampal brain slices reveals that astrocytes are typically much more reduced (with higher NADH:NAD+ ratio) than neurons under basal conditions, consistent with the hypothesis that astrocytes are more glycolytic than neurons. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 553–563. PMID:26857245

  11. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 in cultured brain slices after oxygen-glucose deprivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Cui; Weijuan Han; Lijun Yang; Yanzhong Chang

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expressed in oligodendrocytes may trigger the repair of neuronal myelin impairment, and play a crucial role in myelin repair. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor, is of great significance in premature infants with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. There is little evidence of direct regulatory effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α on oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1. In this study, brain slices of Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured and subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation. Then, slices were transfected with hypoxia-inducible factor 1α or oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1. The expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 were significantly up-regulated in rat brains prior to transfection, as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Eight hours after transfection of slices with hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expression was upregulated, and reached a peak 24 hours after transfection. Oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 transfection induced no significant differences in hypoxia-inducible factor 1α levels in rat brain tissues with oxygen-glucose deprivation. These experimental findings indicate that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α can regulate oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expression in hypoxic brain tissue, thus repairing the neural impairment.

  12. Microglial Kv1.3 Channels and P2Y12 Receptors Differentially Regulate Cytokine and Chemokine Release from Brain Slices of Young Adult and Aged Mice.

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    Nicoletta Charolidi

    Full Text Available Brain tissue damage following stroke or traumatic brain injury is accompanied by neuroinflammatory processes, while microglia play a central role in causing and regulating neuroinflammation via production of proinflammatory substances, including cytokines and chemokines. Here, we used brain slices, an established in situ brain injury model, from young adult and aged mice to investigate cytokine and chemokine production with particular focus on the role of microglia. Twenty four hours after slice preparation, higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. TNF-α and IL-6, and chemokines, i.e. CCL2 and CXCL1, were released from brain slices of aged mice than from slices of young adult mice. However, maximal microglial stimulation with LPS for 24 h did not reveal age-dependent differences in the amounts of released cytokines and chemokines. Mechanisms underlying microglial cytokine and chemokine production appear to be similar in young adult and aged mice. Inhibition of microglial Kv1.3 channels with margatoxin reduced release of IL-6, but not release of CCL2 and CXCL1. In contrast, blockade of microglial P2Y12 receptors with PSB0739 inhibited release of CCL2 and CXCL1, whereas release of IL-6 remained unaffected. Cytokine and chemokine production was not reduced by inhibitors of Kir2.1 K+ channels or adenosine receptors. In summary, our data suggest that brain tissue damage-induced production of cytokines and chemokines is age-dependent, and differentially regulated by microglial Kv1.3 channels and P2Y12 receptors.

  13. Ethyl-eicosapentaenoate modulates changes in neurochemistry and brain lipids induced by parkinsonian neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium in mouse brain slices.

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    Meng, QingJia; Luchtman, Dirk W; El Bahh, Bouchaib; Zidichouski, Jeffrey A; Yang, Jun; Song, Cai

    2010-12-15

    Evidence suggests a link between Parkinson's disease and the dietary intake of omega (n)-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Presently, we investigated whether an acute dose of parkinsonian neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) affects brain n-3 and n-6 PUFA content and expression of fatty acid metabolic enzymes cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in brain slices from C57Bl/6 mice. Furthermore, we investigated whether feeding a diet of n-3 PUFA ethyl-eicosapentaenoate (E-EPA) to these mice can attenuate the MPP(+) induced changes in brain PUFA content and expression of cPLA2 and COX-2, and attenuate MPP(+) induced changes in neurotransmitters and metabolites and apoptotic markers, bax, bcl-2 and caspase-3. MPP(+) increased brain content of n-6 PUFAs linoleic acid and arachidonic acid, and increased the mRNA expression of cPLA2. MPP(+) also depleted striatal dopamine levels and increased dopamine turnover, and depleted noradrenaline levels in the frontal cortex. The neurotoxin induced increases in bax, bcl-2 and caspase-3 mRNA expression that approached significance. E-EPA by itself increased brain n-3 content, including EPA and docosapentaenoic acid (C22:5, n-3), and increased cortical dopamine. More importantly, E-EPA attenuated the MPP(+) induced increase in n-6 fatty acids content, partially attenuated the striatal dopaminergic turnover, and prevented the increases of pro-apoptotic bax and caspase-3 mRNAs. In conclusion, increases in n-6 PUFAs in the acute stage of exposure to parkinsonian neurotoxins may promote pro-inflammatory conditions. EPA may provide modest beneficial effects in Parkinson's disease, but further investigation is warranted.

  14. Stimulant mechanisms of cathinones - effects of mephedrone and other cathinones on basal and electrically evoked dopamine efflux in rat accumbens brain slices.

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    Opacka-Juffry, Jolanta; Pinnell, Thomas; Patel, Nisha; Bevan, Melissa; Meintel, Meghan; Davidson, Colin

    2014-10-01

    Mephedrone, an erstwhile "legal high", and some non-abused cathinones (ethcathinone, diethylpropion and bupropion) were tested for stimulant effects in vitro, through assessing their abilities to increase basal and electrically evoked dopamine efflux in rat accumbens brain slices, and compared with cocaine and amphetamine. We also tested mephedrone against cocaine in a dopamine transporter binding study. Dopamine efflux was electrically evoked and recorded using voltammetry in the rat accumbens core. We constructed concentration response curves for these cathinones for effects on basal dopamine levels; peak efflux after local electrical stimulation and the time-constant of the dopamine decay phase, an index of dopamine reuptake. We also examined competition between mephedrone or cocaine and [(125)I]RTI121 at the dopamine transporter. Mephedrone was less potent than cocaine at displacing [(125)I]RTI121. Mephedrone and amphetamine increased basal levels of dopamine in the absence of electrical stimulation. Cocaine, bupropion, diethylpropion and ethcathinone all increased the peak dopamine efflux after electrical stimulation and slowed dopamine reuptake. Cocaine was more potent than bupropion and ethcathinone, while diethylpropion was least potent. Notably, cocaine had the fastest onset of action. These data suggest that, with respect to dopamine efflux, mephedrone is more similar to amphetamine than cocaine. These findings also show that cocaine was more potent than bupropion and ethcathinone while diethylpropion was least potent. Mephedrone's binding to the dopamine transporter is consistent with stimulant effects but its potency was lower than that of cocaine. These findings confirm and further characterize stimulant properties of mephedrone and other cathinones in adolescent rat brain.

  15. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke.

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    Van Kanegan, Michael J; Dunn, Denise E; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Shah, Bijal; He, Dong Ning; McCoy, Daniel D; Yang, Peiying; Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Li; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Newman, Robert A; Lo, Donald C

    2016-05-12

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-05204 in the brain slice oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model is considerably broader than that for oleandrin as a single agent. We thus surmised that PBI-05204 contains an additional neuroprotective component(s), distinct from oleandrin. We report here that neuroprotective activity is also provided by the triterpenoid constituents of PBI-05204, notably oleanolic acid. We demonstrate that a sub-fraction of PBI-05204 (Fraction 0-4) containing oleanolic and other triterpenoids, but without cardiac glycosides, induces the expression of cellular antioxidant gene transcription programs regulated through antioxidant transcriptional response elements (AREs). Finally, we show that Fraction 0-4 provides broad neuroprotection in organotypic brain slice models for neurodegeneration driven by amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau implicated in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementias, respectively, in addition to ischemic injury modeled by OGD.

  16. Interfacing with the brain using organic electronics (Presentation Recording)

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    Malliaras, George G.

    2015-10-01

    Implantable electrodes are being used for diagnostic purposes, for brain-machine interfaces, and for delivering electrical stimulation to alleviate the symptoms of diseases such as Parkinson's. The field of organic electronics made available devices with a unique combination of attractive properties, including mixed ionic/electronic conduction, mechanical flexibility, enhanced biocompatibility, and capability for drug delivery. I will present examples of organic electrodes, transistors and other devices for recording and stimulation of brain activity and discuss how they can improve our understanding of brain physiology and pathology, and how they can be used to deliver new therapies.

  17. Mathematical Identification of a Neuronal Network Consisting of GABA and DA in Striatal Slices of the Rat Brain

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    L. Ramrath

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency stimulation (HFS has been used to treat various neurological and psychiatric diseases. Although further disorders are under investigation to extend the clinical application of HFS, the complex effect of HFS within a neuronal network is still unknown. Thus, it would be desirable to find a theoretical model that allows an estimation of the expected effect of applied HFS. Based on the neurochemical analysis of effects of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline, the D2-like receptor antagonist sulpiride and the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390 on HFS evoked GABA and dopamine (DA release from striatal slices of the rat brain, a mathematical network model is proposed including the neurotransmitters GABA, DA and glutamate (GLU. The model reflects inhibitory and excitatory interactions of the neurotransmitters outflow in the presence of HFS. Under the assumption of linear interactions and static measurements, the model is expressed analytically. Numerical identification of inhibition and excitation is performed on a basis of real outflow levels of GABA and DA in the rat striatum. Results validate the nature of the proposed model. Therefore, this leads to an analytical model of the interactions within distinct neural network components of the rat striatum.

  18. Effective range of electrical stimulation in brain silica preparation; No slice hyohon ni okeru denki shigeki koka han`i no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takimori, T.; Ogawa, T.; Nishida, M. [Akita University, Akita (Japan)

    1997-08-20

    In order to examine the confines of electrical stimulation in layer 2/3 of visual cortex in the brain slice preparation, we estimated the effective range of the stimulation based on the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) evoked in layer V neuron which receives input from layer 2/3. For this purpose, we recorded and compared EPSPs amplitudes evoked by stimulations at directly over site of recording electrode and lateral site in layer 2/3. Since the EPSP increased linearly with stimulus intensity before the saturation, it was considered that the EPSP correlates with the number of projecting neurons in area directly excited with the stimulation. Then we formed the region model by which we can get the ratios between the neuron numbers in areas excited by different sites stimulations against the stimulus effective ranges. And in the stimulus intensity for action potential threshold of layer 5 neuron, we evaluated the effective range for the relative values of EPSPs to be produced with the stimulations of 250{mu}m lateral site and directory over site. In the model, the ratio increased monotonically with the effective range and in the case of 250{mu}m for the effective range, the ratio between those EPSPs was less than the value in the model. These results led the conclusion that the effective range of the intensity for layer 5 neuron to generate the output is confined within 250{mu}m from directly over site, that is, within layer 2/3. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Effect of. cap alpha. -,. beta. -adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists of the efflux of /sup 22/Na and uptake of /sup 42/K by rat brain cortical slices

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    Phillis, J.W.; Wu, P.H.; Thierry, D.L.

    1982-03-18

    The effects of norepinephrine on ion fluxes in rat brain cortical slices have now been ascertained. /sup 22/Na efflux and /sup 42/K influx are enhanced by norepinephrine. The increase in ion fluxes can be blocked by ouabain, phentolamine and propranolol, suggesting that the catecholamine activates a membrane sodium pump by a receptor-mediated step. The facilitation of /sup 22/Na efflux is stereospecific as demonstrated by the very weak action of D-norepinephrine at 10/sup -5/ M concentration. Various ..cap alpha..-adrenergic and ..beta..-adrenergic receptor agonists, including oxymetazoline, naphazoline, clonidine, tramazoline, methoxamine, phenylephrine, L-isoproterenol and methoxyphenamine are potent stimulants of the sodium pump as demonstrated by their enhancement of ion fluxes in rat brain cortical slices. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that norepinephrine hyperpolarizes central neurons by activating an ouabain-sensitive, receptor-mediated sodium pump.

  20. Microfluidics and multielectrode array-compatible organotypic slice culture method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Sabolek, Helen; Levine, John B; Staley, Kevin J; Yarmush, Martin L

    2009-03-30

    Organotypic brain slice cultures are used for a variety of molecular, electrophysiological, and imaging studies. However, the existing culture methods are difficult or expensive to apply in studies requiring long-term recordings with multielectrode arrays (MEAs). In this work, a novel method to maintain organotypic cultures of rodent hippocampus for several weeks on standard MEAs in an unmodified tissue culture incubator is described. Polydimethylsiloxane (Sylgard) mini-wells were used to stabilize organotypic cultures on glass and MEA surfaces. Hippocampus slices were successfully maintained within PDMS mini-wells for multiple weeks, with preserved pyramidal layer organization, connectivity, and activity. MEAs were used to record the development of spontaneous activity in an organotypic cultures for 4 weeks. This method is compatible with integration of microchannels into the culture substrate. Microchannels were incorporated into the mini-wells and applied to the guidance of axons originating within the slice, paving the way for studies of axonal sprouting using organotypic slices.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, but not neurotrophin-3, prevents ischaemia-induced neuronal cell death in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, A K; Sundstrom, L E; Wilde, G J; Williams, L R; Iannotti, F

    1996-06-28

    We have investigated the neuroprotective actions of neurotrophins in a model of ischaemia using slice cultures. Ischaemia was induced in organotypic hippocampal cultures by simultaneous oxygen and glucose deprivation. Cell death was assessed 24 h later by propidium iodide fluorescence. Pre- but not post-ischaemic addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a concentration-dependent reduction in neuronal damage. Neurotrophin-3 was not neuroprotective. These data suggest that BDNF may form part of an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism.

  2. Whole-brain CT perfusion and CT angiography assessment of Moyamoya disease before and after surgical revascularization: preliminary study with 256-slice CT.

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    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: The 256-slice CT enables the entire brain to be scanned in a single examination. We evaluated the application of 256-slice whole-brain CT perfusion (CTP in determining graft patency as well as investigating cerebral hemodynamic changes in Moyamoya disease before and after surgical revascularization. METHODS: Thirty-nine cases of Moyamoya disease were evaluated before and after surgical revascularization with 256-slice CT. Whole-brain perfusion images and dynamic 3D CT angiographic images generated from perfusion source data were obtained in all patients. Cerebral blood flow (CBF, cerebral blood volume (CBV, time to peak (TTP and mean transit time (MTT of one hemisphere in the region of middle cerebral artery (MCA distribution and contralateral mirroring areas were measured. Relative CTP values (rCBF, rCBV, rTTP, rMTT were also obtained. Differences in pre- and post- operation perfusion CT values were assessed with paired t test or matched-pairs signed-ranks test. RESULTS: Preoperative CBF, MTT and TTP of potential surgical side were significantly different from those of contralateral side (P<0.01 for all. All graft patencies were displayed using the 3D-CTA images. Postoperative CBF, rCBF and rCBV values of surgical side in the region of MCA were significantly higher than those before operation (P<0.01 for all. Postoperative MTT, TTP, rMTT and rTTP values of the surgical side in the region of MCA were significantly lower than those before operation (P<0.05 for all. CONCLUSION: The 256-slice whole-brain CTP can be used to evaluate cerebral hemodynamic changes in Moyamoya disease before and after surgery and the 3D-CTA is useful for assessing the abnormalities of intracranial arteries and graft patencies.

  3. Cranial CT with 64-, 16-, 4- and single-slice CT systems-comparison of image quality and posterior fossa artifacts in routine brain imaging with standard protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Eftimov, Lara; Becker, Christoph; Reiser, Maximilian [University of Munich, Grosshadern (Germany). Institute of Clinical Radiology; Blume, Jeffrey; Cormack, Jean [Brown University, Center for Statistical Sciences, Providence, RI (United States); Bruening, Roland; Brueckmann, Hartmut [University of Munich, Grosshadern (Germany). Department of Neuroradiology

    2008-08-15

    Posterior fossa artifacts constitute a characteristic limitation of cranial CT. To identify practical benefits and drawbacks of newer CT systems with reduced collimation in routine cranial imaging, we aimed to investigate image quality, posterior fossa artifacts and parenchymal delineation in non-enhanced CT (NECT) with 1-, 4-, 16- and 64-slice scanners using standard scan protocols. We prospectively enrolled 25 consecutive patients undergoing NECT on a 64-slice CT. Three groups with 25 patients having undergone NECT on 1-, 4- and 16-slice CT machines were matched regarding age and sex. Standard routine CT parameters were used on each CT system with helical acquisition in the posterior fossa; the parameters varied regarding collimation and radiation dose. Three blinded readers independently assessed the cases regarding image quality, infra- and supratentorial artifacts and delineation of brain parenchymal structures on a five-point ordinal scale. Reading orders were randomized. A proportional odds model that accounted for the correlated nature of the data was fit using generalized estimating equations. Posterior fossa artifacts were significantly reduced, and the delineation of infratentorial brain structures was significantly improved with the thinner collimation used for the newer CT systems (p<0.001). No significant differences were observed for midbrain structures (p>0.5). The thinner collimation available on modern CT systems leads to reduced posterior fossa artifacts and to a better delineation of brain parenchyma in the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  4. β-Adrenoceptor activation depresses brain inflammation and is neuroprotective in lipopolysaccharide-induced sensitization to oxygen-glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cilio Corrado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation acting in synergy with brain ischemia aggravates perinatal ischemic brain damage. The sensitizing effect of pro-inflammatory exposure prior to hypoxia is dependent on signaling by TNF-α through TNF receptor (TNFR 1. Adrenoceptor (AR activation is known to modulate the immune response and synaptic transmission. The possible protective effect of α˜ and β˜AR activation against neuronal damage caused by tissue ischemia and inflammation, acting in concert, was evaluated in murine hippocampal organotypic slices treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and subsequently subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. Method Hippocampal slices from mice were obtained at P6, and were grown in vitro for 9 days on nitrocellulose membranes. Slices were treated with β1(dobutamine-, β2(terbutaline-, α1(phenylephrine- and α2(clonidine-AR agonists (5 and 50 μM, respectively during LPS (1 μg/mL, 24 h -exposure followed by exposure to OGD (15 min in a hypoxic chamber. Cell death in the slice CA1 region was assessed by propidium iodide staining of dead cells. Results Exposure to LPS + OGD caused extensive cell death from 4 up to 48 h after reoxygenation. Co-incubation with β1-agonist (50 μM during LPS exposure before OGD conferred complete protection from cell death (P -/- and TNFR2-/- slices exposed to LPS followed by OGD. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that activation of both β1- and β2-receptors is neuroprotective and may offer mechanistic insights valuable for development of neuro-protective strategies in neonates.

  5. The Appetite-Inducing Peptide, Ghrelin, Induces Intracellular Store-Mediated Rises in Calcium in Addiction and Arousal-Related Laterodorsal Tegmental Neurons in Mouse Brain Slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Katrine; Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, a gut and brain peptide, has recently been shown to be involved in motivated behavior and regulation of the sleep and wakefulness cycle. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) is involved in appetitive behavior and control of the arousal state of an organism, and accordingly, behavioral...... this peptide has been shown in other cell types to lead to rises in calcium via release of calcium from intracellular stores. To determine whether ghrelin induced intracellular calcium rises in mouse LDT neurons, we conducted calcium imaging studies in LDT brain slices loaded with the calcium binding dye, Fura...

  6. Comparison of iterative model, hybrid iterative, and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques in low-dose brain CT: impact of thin-slice imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaura, Takeshi; Iyama, Yuji; Kidoh, Masafumi; Yokoyama, Koichi [Amakusa Medical Center, Diagnostic Radiology, Amakusa, Kumamoto (Japan); Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Oda, Seitaro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Tokuyasu, Shinichi [Philips Electronics, Kumamoto (Japan); Harada, Kazunori [Amakusa Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of iterative model reconstruction (IMR) in brain CT especially with thin-slice images. This prospective study received institutional review board approval, and prior informed consent to participate was obtained from all patients. We enrolled 34 patients who underwent brain CT and reconstructed axial images with filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) and IMR with 1 and 5 mm slice thicknesses. The CT number, image noise, contrast, and contrast noise ratio (CNR) between the thalamus and internal capsule, and the rate of increase of image noise in 1 and 5 mm thickness images between the reconstruction methods, were assessed. Two independent radiologists assessed image contrast, image noise, image sharpness, and overall image quality on a 4-point scale. The CNRs in 1 and 5 mm slice thickness were significantly higher with IMR (1.2 ± 0.6 and 2.2 ± 0.8, respectively) than with FBP (0.4 ± 0.3 and 1.0 ± 0.4, respectively) and HIR (0.5 ± 0.3 and 1.2 ± 0.4, respectively) (p < 0.01). The mean rate of increasing noise from 5 to 1 mm thickness images was significantly lower with IMR (1.7 ± 0.3) than with FBP (2.3 ± 0.3) and HIR (2.3 ± 0.4) (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in qualitative analysis of unfamiliar image texture between the reconstruction techniques. IMR offers significant noise reduction and higher contrast and CNR in brain CT, especially for thin-slice images, when compared to FBP and HIR. (orig.)

  7. GLP-1R Signaling Directly Activates Arcuate Nucleus Kisspeptin Action in Brain Slices but Does not Rescue Luteinizing Hormone Inhibition in Ovariectomized Mice During Negative Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, Kristy M.; Baquero, Arian F.; True, Cadence; Grove, Kevin L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) are key components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, as they regulate the basal pulsatile release of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). ARC Kiss1 action is dependent on energy status, and unmasking metabolic factors responsible for modulating ARC Kiss1 neurons is of great importance. One possible factor is glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an anorexigenic neuropeptide produced by brainstem preproglucagon neurons. Because GLP fiber projections and the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) are abundant in the ARC, we hypothesized that GLP-1R signaling could modulate ARC Kiss1 action. Using ovariectomized mice, we found that GLP-producing fibers come in close apposition with ARC Kiss1 neurons; these neurons also contain Glp1r mRNA. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that liraglutide (a long-acting GLP-1R agonist) increased action potential firing and caused a direct membrane depolarization of ARC Kiss1 cells in brain slices. We determined that brainstem preproglucagon mRNA is decreased after a 48-h fast in mice, a negative energy state in which ARC Kiss1 expression and downstream GnRH/luteinizing hormone (LH) release are potently suppressed. However, activation of GLP-1R signaling in fasted mice with liraglutide was not sufficient to prevent LH inhibition. Furthermore, chronic central infusions of the GLP-1R antagonist, exendin(9–39), in ad libitum–fed mice did not alter ARC Kiss1 mRNA or plasma LH. As a whole, these data identify a novel interaction of the GLP-1 system with ARC Kiss1 neurons but indicate that CNS GLP-1R signaling alone is not critical for the maintenance of LH during fasting or normal feeding. PMID:28144621

  8. Actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in slices from rats with spontaneous seizures and mossy fiber sprouting in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, H E; Goodman, J H; Sollas, A L

    1999-07-01

    This study examined the acute actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the rat dentate gyrus after seizures, because previous studies have shown that BDNF has acute effects on dentate granule cell synaptic transmission, and other studies have demonstrated that BDNF expression increases in granule cells after seizures. Pilocarpine-treated rats were studied because they not only have seizures and increased BDNF expression in granule cells, but they also have reorganization of granule cell "mossy fiber" axons. This reorganization, referred to as "sprouting," involves collaterals that grow into novel areas, i.e., the inner molecular layer, where granule cell and interneuron dendrites are located. Thus, this animal model allowed us to address the effects of BDNF in the dentate gyrus after seizures, as well as the actions of BDNF on mossy fiber transmission after reorganization. In slices with sprouting, BDNF bath application enhanced responses recorded in the inner molecular layer to mossy fiber stimulation. Spontaneous bursts of granule cells occurred, and these were apparently generated at the site of the sprouted axon plexus. These effects were not accompanied by major changes in perforant path-evoked responses or paired-pulse inhibition, occurred only after prolonged (30-60 min) exposure to BDNF, and were blocked by K252a. The results suggest a preferential action of BDNF at mossy fiber synapses, even after substantial changes in the dentate gyrus network. Moreover, the results suggest that activation of trkB receptors could contribute to the hyperexcitability observed in animals with sprouting. Because human granule cells also express increased BDNF mRNA after seizures, and sprouting can occur in temporal lobe epileptics, the results may have implications for understanding temporal lobe epilepsy.

  9. GLP-1R Signaling Directly Activates Arcuate Nucleus Kisspeptin Action in Brain Slices but Does not Rescue Luteinizing Hormone Inhibition in Ovariectomized Mice During Negative Energy Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, Kristy M; Baquero, Arian F; Bennett, Camdin M; Lindsley, Sarah R; Kirigiti, Melissa A; Bennett, Baylin; Bosch, Martha A; Mercer, Aaron J; Rønnekleiv, Oline K; True, Cadence; Grove, Kevin L; Smith, M Susan

    2017-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) are key components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, as they regulate the basal pulsatile release of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). ARC Kiss1 action is dependent on energy status, and unmasking metabolic factors responsible for modulating ARC Kiss1 neurons is of great importance. One possible factor is glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an anorexigenic neuropeptide produced by brainstem preproglucagon neurons. Because GLP fiber projections and the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) are abundant in the ARC, we hypothesized that GLP-1R signaling could modulate ARC Kiss1 action. Using ovariectomized mice, we found that GLP-producing fibers come in close apposition with ARC Kiss1 neurons; these neurons also contain Glp1r mRNA. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that liraglutide (a long-acting GLP-1R agonist) increased action potential firing and caused a direct membrane depolarization of ARC Kiss1 cells in brain slices. We determined that brainstem preproglucagon mRNA is decreased after a 48-h fast in mice, a negative energy state in which ARC Kiss1 expression and downstream GnRH/luteinizing hormone (LH) release are potently suppressed. However, activation of GLP-1R signaling in fasted mice with liraglutide was not sufficient to prevent LH inhibition. Furthermore, chronic central infusions of the GLP-1R antagonist, exendin(9-39), in ad libitum-fed mice did not alter ARC Kiss1 mRNA or plasma LH. As a whole, these data identify a novel interaction of the GLP-1 system with ARC Kiss1 neurons but indicate that CNS GLP-1R signaling alone is not critical for the maintenance of LH during fasting or normal feeding.

  10. Slice Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Neal, R M

    2000-01-01

    Markov chain sampling methods that automatically adapt to characteristics of the distribution being sampled can be constructed by exploiting the principle that one can sample from a distribution by sampling uniformly from the region under the plot of its density function. A Markov chain that converges to this uniform distribution can be constructed by alternating uniform sampling in the vertical direction with uniform sampling from the horizontal `slice' defined by the current vertical position, or more generally, with some update that leaves the uniform distribution over this slice invariant. Variations on such `slice sampling' methods are easily implemented for univariate distributions, and can be used to sample from a multivariate distribution by updating each variable in turn. This approach is often easier to implement than Gibbs sampling, and more efficient than simple Metropolis updates, due to the ability of slice sampling to adaptively choose the magnitude of changes made. It is therefore attractive f...

  11. Architectural slicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2013-01-01

    a system and a slicing criterion, architectural slicing produces an architectural prototype that contain the elements in the architecture that are dependent on the ele- ments in the slicing criterion. Furthermore, we present an initial design and implementation of an architectural slicer for Java.......Architectural prototyping is a widely used practice, con- cerned with taking architectural decisions through experiments with light- weight implementations. However, many architectural decisions are only taken when systems are already (partially) implemented. This is prob- lematic in the context...... of architectural prototyping since experiments with full systems are complex and expensive and thus architectural learn- ing is hindered. In this paper, we propose a novel technique for harvest- ing architectural prototypes from existing systems, \\architectural slic- ing", based on dynamic program slicing. Given...

  12. Initial experience of whole-brain perfusion imaging performed with 256-slice CT%256层螺旋CT全脑灌注成像的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐健; 姜建威; 常军; 侯海燕; 姜旭栋; 堵红群

    2011-01-01

    目的:初步评价256层螺旋CT全脑灌注成像对正常脑血流动力学测定的可行性和价值.方法:从拟诊缺血性脑病行头颅平扫、头颅灌注成像及头颈部血管成像的114例患者中选取检查结果正常者35例,记录头颅灌注成像的辐射剂量,由两名高年资神经放射科医生分别对灌注图像进行分析,选择基底节层面和侧脑室体部层面的两侧大脑中动脉供血区的颞叶皮质进行测定,通过手动勾画选定层面的感兴趣区,CT灌注软件自动生成感兴趣区的脑血流量(CBF)、脑血容量(CBV)、平均通过时间(MTr)、达峰时间(TTP)值,测得的灌注参数均值进行单因素方差分析.结果:35例正常人的辐射剂量为(2.307±0.008)mSv.2名分析者所测得侧脑室体部层面和基底节层面的颞叶灰质的CBF、CBV、MTr、TTP值之间无明显统计学差异(P>0.05).2名分析者测得的两个层面的颞叶灰质的CBV、CBF值之间均有统计学差异(P<0.05).结论:256层螺旋CT全脑灌注成像辐射剂量低,脑灌注参数稳定,能够更真实的反应全脑血流动力学改变.%Objective;To preliminarily evaluate the feasibility and potential values of whole-brain perfusion imaging performed with 256-slice CT to assess normal adult cerebral hemodynamics. Methods; Thirty-five normal results were selected from one hundred and fourteen patients who underwent brain CT unenhanced scan.CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography in head and neck for suspicion of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. The radiation dosage of CT perfusion imaging was recorded. Two senior neuroradiologic doctors independently analyzed the CT perfusion maps. Region of interest (ROI) was placed on bilateral temporal gray matter of two slices (the basal ganglia slice and body of lateral cerebral ventricle slice) supplied by middle cerebral artery,and the cerebral blood flow(CBF),cerebral blood volume(CBV),mean transiting time(MTT), and time to peak(TTP) values of ROI

  13. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry as a novel method for detection of real-time gonadotropin-releasing hormone release in mouse brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanowska, Katarzyna M; Venton, B Jill; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2012-10-17

    Pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release is critical for the central regulation of fertility. There is no method allowing real-time GnRH detection in brain slices. We developed fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFME) to detect GnRH release and validated it using a biologically relevant system. FSCV parameters (holding potential, switching potential, and scan rate) were determined for stable GnRH detection in vitro, then optimized for GnRH detection in mouse brain slices. Placement of CFMEs in the median eminence (ME) near GnRH terminals allowed detection of both KCl-evoked and spontaneous GnRH release. GnRH release was also detected from GnRH fibers passing near GnRH soma and near fiber-fiber appositions in the preoptic area. No GnRH signal was detected from CFMEs in the ME of hpg mice, which lack GnRH, or in regions not containing GnRH neurons in wild-type mice; application of exogenous GnRH produced a signal similar to that observed for spontaneous/evoked endogenous GnRH release. Using an established mouse model that produces diurnal variations in GnRH neuron activity, we demonstrated corresponding changes in spontaneous GnRH release in the median eminence. These results validate FSCV to detect GnRH in brain slices and provide new information on the sites and amounts of GnRH release, providing insight into its neuromodulatory functions.

  14. Effects of the blood components on the AMPA and NMDA synaptic responses in brain slices in the onset of hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrushin, Anatoly A; Pavlinova, Larisa I

    2013-12-01

    Blood-borne events play a major role in post bleeding disturbances of the neuronal network. However, very little is known about the early effects of blood plasma, leucocytes, and the red blood cells on the AMPA and NMDA-mediated synaptic responses in the onset of experimental intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). In this study, we used the technique of on-line monitoring of electrophysiological parameters referred to synaptic activity in piriform cortex of SHR rat slice. We exposed the olfactory cortex slices to diluted autologous blood or its components and compared with effects of ferric chloride. Whole blood exerted a total inhibition of synaptic activity in piriform cortex within first 5 min. Dilution of blood induced prolonged epileptic synaptic activation of NMDA receptors. Blood plasma and fraction of leucocytes induced hyperactivation of neurons transforming to epileptiform discharges. Fraction of red blood cells acted biphasic, an initial sharp activity of AMPA- and NMDA-mediated receptors replaced by a following total depression. Our slice-based models of experimental stroke revealed the mechanism of the earliest pathophysiologic events occur in brain tissue during bleeding that may be relevant to the human ICH.

  15. Noise-free magnetoencephalography recordings of brain function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volegov, P.; Matlachov, A.; Mosher, J.; Espy, M. A.; Kraus, R. H., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    Perhaps the greatest impediment to acquiring high-quality magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings is the ubiquitous ambient magnetic field noise. We have designed and built a whole-head MEG system using a helmet-like superconducting imaging surface (SIS) surrounding the array of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers used to measure the MEG signal. We previously demonstrated that the SIS passively shields the SQUID array from ambient magnetic field noise, independent of frequency, by 25-60 dB depending on sensor location. SQUID 'reference sensors' located on the outside of the SIS helmet measure ambient magnetic fields in very close proximity to the MEG magnetometers while being nearly perfectly shielded from all sources in the brain. The fact that the reference sensors measure no brain signal yet are located in close proximity to the MEG sensors enables very accurate estimation and subtraction of the ambient field noise contribution to the MEG sensors using an adaptive algorithm. We have demonstrated total ambient noise reduction factors in excess of 106 (>120 dB). The residual noise for most MEG SQUID channels is at or near the intrinsic SQUID noise floor, typically 2-3 f T Hz-1/2. We are recording MEG signals with greater signal-to-noise than equivalent EEG measurements.

  16. Noise-free magnetoencephalography recordings of brain function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volegov, P; Matlachov, A; Mosher, J; Espy, M A; Kraus, R H Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2004-05-21

    Perhaps the greatest impediment to acquiring high-quality magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings is the ubiquitous ambient magnetic field noise. We have designed and built a whole-head MEG system using a helmet-like superconducting imaging surface (SIS) surrounding the array of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers used to measure the MEG signal. We previously demonstrated that the SIS passively shields the SQUID array from ambient magnetic field noise, independent of frequency, by 25-60 dB depending on sensor location. SQUID 'reference sensors' located on the outside of the SIS helmet measure ambient magnetic fields in very close proximity to the MEG magnetometers while being nearly perfectly shielded from all sources in the brain. The fact that the reference sensors measure no brain signal yet are located in close proximity to the MEG sensors enables very accurate estimation and subtraction of the ambient field noise contribution to the MEG sensors using an adaptive algorithm. We have demonstrated total ambient noise reduction factors in excess of 10{sup 6} (>120 dB). The residual noise for most MEG SQUID channels is at or near the intrinsic SQUID noise floor, typically 2-3 f T Hz{sup -1/2}. We are recording MEG signals with greater signal-to-noise than equivalent EEG measurements.

  17. Low-threshold Ca2+ currents in dendritic recordings from Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouginot, D; Bossu, J L; Gähwiler, B H

    1997-01-01

    Voltage-dependent Ca2+ conductances were investigated in Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures using the whole-cell and cell-attached configurations of the patch-clamp technique. In the presence of 0.5 mM Ca2+ in the extracellular solution, the inward current activated with a threshold of -55 +/- 1.5 mV and reached a maximal amplitude of 2.3 +/- 0.4 nA at -31 +/- 2 mV. Decay kinetics revealed three distinct components: a fast (24.6 +/- 2 msec time constant), a slow (304 +/- 46 msec time constant), and a nondecaying component. Rundown of the slow and sustained components of the current, or application of antagonists for the P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, allowed isolation of the fast-inactivating Ca2+ current, which had a threshold for activation of -60 mV and reached a maximal amplitude of 0.7 nA at a membrane potential of -33 mV. Both activation and steady-state inactivation of this fast-inactivating Ca2+ current were described with Boltzmann equations, with half-activation and inactivation at -51 mV and -86 mV, respectively. This Ca2+ current was nifedipine-insensitive, but its amplitude was reduced reversibly by bath-application of NiCl2 and amiloride, thus allowing its identification as a T-type Ca2+ current. Channels with a conductance of 7 pS giving rise to a fast T-type ensemble current (insensitive to omega-Aga-IVA) were localized with a high density on the dendritic membrane. Channel activity responsible for the ensemble current sensitive to omega-Aga-IVA was detected with 10 mM Ba2+ as the charge carrier. These channels were distributed with a high density on dendritic membranes and in rare cases were also seen in somatic membrane patches.

  18. Reproducibility of perfusion CT derived CBV and rCBV measurements with different slice thickness in patients with brain neoplasms%脑瘤灌注CT不同层厚CBV与rCBV测量的可重复性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess inter-and intraobserver reproducibility for measuring perfusion CT derived cerebral blood volume(CBV)and relative cerebral blood volume(rCBV)with different slice thickness in patients with brain neoplasms.Methods: Three independent observers who were blinded to the histopathologic diagnosis performed perfusion derived CBV and rCBV measurements with 5 mm and 10 mm slice thickness in 52 patients with various cerebral neoplasms.The results of the measurements with different slice thickness were compared.Calculation of coefficient of variation(CV), and relative paired difference of the measurements were used to determine the levels of inter-and intraobserver reproducibility.Results: The differences of CBV and rCBV measurements between different slice thickness groups were statistically significant(P<0.05)respectively in observer 2, and were not significant in the other two observers(P>0.05).For the same slice thickness, both the difference of CBV and rCBV measurements among the three observers were not statistically significant.Interobserver CV and relative paired difference of the measurements with 10 mm slice thickness group were slightly lower than those of 5 mm slice thickness group.Interobserver CV and relative paired difference of CBV group were slightly lower than those of rCBV group.The intraobserver differences of CBV and rCBV in 10 mm slice thickness group were statistically significant for observer 2 respectively.No other intraobserver differences of measurements were statistically significant.CV and relative paired difference of intraobserver CBV and rCBV measurements for observer 2 were significantly higher than for the other two observers.Conclusion: High reproducibility of CBV and rCBV measurements was acquired with the two different slice thickness.Suitable training may be helpful to maintain a high level of consistency for measurements.

  19. Acute hypercapnic hyperoxia stimulates reactive species production in the caudal solitary complex of rat brain slices but does not induce oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Dean, Jay B

    2016-12-01

    Central CO2 chemoreceptive neurons in the caudal solitary complex (cSC) are stimulated by hyperoxia via a free radical mechanism. Hyperoxia has been shown to increase superoxide and nitric oxide in the cSC, but it remains unknown how changes in Pco2 during hyperoxia affect the production of O2-dependent reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) downstream that can lead to increased levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress, cellular excitability, and, potentially, dysfunction. We used real-time fluorescence microscopy in rat brain slices to determine how hyperoxia and hypercapnic acidosis (HA) modulate one another in the production of key RONS, as well as colorimetric assays to measure levels of oxidized and nitrated lipids and proteins. We also examined the effects of CO2 narcosis and hypoxia before euthanasia and brain slice harvesting, as these neurons are CO2 sensitive and hypothesized to employ CO2/H(+) mechanisms that exacerbate RONS production and potentially oxidative stress. Our findings show that hyperoxia ± HA increases the production of peroxynitrite and its derivatives, whereas increases in Fenton chemistry are most prominent during hyperoxia + HA. Using CO2 narcosis before euthanasia modulates cellular sensitivity to HA postmortem and enhances the magnitude of the peroxynitrite pathway, but blunts the activity of Fenton chemistry. Overall, hyperoxia and HA do not result in increased production of markers of oxidative and nitrosative stress as expected. We postulate this is due to antioxidant and proteosomal removal of damaged lipids and proteins to maintain cell viability and avoid death during protracted hyperoxia.

  20. Influence of location of a fluorescent zinc probe in brain slices on its response to synaptic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Alan R; Tóth, Katalin

    2006-03-01

    The precise role of the high concentration of ionic zinc found in the synaptic vesicles of certain glutamatergic terminals is unknown. Fluorescent probes with their ability to detect ions at low concentrations provide a powerful approach to monitoring cellular Zn2+ levels. In the last few years, a number of fluorescent probes (indicators) have been synthesized that can be used to visualize Zn2+ in live cells. The interpretation of data gathered using such probes depends crucially on the location of the probe. Using acutely prepared hippocampal slices, we provide evidence that the Zn2+ probes, ZnAF-2 and ZP4, are membrane permeant and are able to pass into synaptic vesicles. In addition, we show that changes in fluorescence of the Zn2+ probes can be used to monitor presynaptic activity; however, these changes are inconsistent with Zn2+ release.

  1. Effects of aspirin plus alpha-tocopherol on brain slices damage after hypoxia-reoxygenation in rats with type 1-like diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Correa, J A; Arrebola, M M; Cansino, A L; Muñoz-Marín, J; Guerrero, A; Sánchez de la Cuesta, F; De la Cruz, J P

    2006-06-12

    Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for cerebrovascular ischemic disease. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is the most widely used drug for the secondary prevention of thrombotic phenomena. It has been also recently demonstrated that alpha-tocopherol influenced in vitro the antiplatelet effect of aspirin. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effects aspirin plus alpha-tocopherol on cerebral oxidative stress, prostaglandin production and the nitric oxide pathway in a model of hypoxia-reoxygenation in rat brain slices. Our results show an imbalance in brain oxidative status (reflected mainly as the increase in lipid peroxides) as a result of diabetes itself rather than a failure of the glutathione-based antioxidant system. Moreover, our results also show a higher concentration of prostaglandins in the brain of diabetic animals and a higher nitric oxide concentration, mainly through a high iNOS activity. After 180 min of post-hypoxia reoxygenation, LDH activity was 40.6% higher in animals with diabetes, in comparison to non-diabetic animals. The increase of the LDH efflux observed in non-treated rats was reduced by 31.2% with aspirin, by 34.7% with alpha-tocopherol and by 69.8% with the association aspirin-alpha-tocopherol. The accumulation of prostaglandin E2 observed in diabetic non-treated rats was reduced statistically after the treatment with aspirin (34.2% inhibition), alpha-tocopherol (19.3% inhibition) or the association aspirin-alpha-tocopherol (54.4% inhibition). Nitric oxide production after 180 min reoxygenation was significantly reduced in aspirin (36.4%), alpha-tocopherol (22.7%) and aspirin-alpha-tocopherol (77.8%) treated rats with respect to diabetic non-treated animals; this was related mainly with a reduction in iNOS activity. The association between aspirin and alpha tocopherol could protects against brain ischemic-reperfusion damage with a better profile than aspirin alone.

  2. Effects of deprivation of oxygen or glucose on the neural activity in the guinea pig hippocampal slice--intracellular recording study of pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, T; Okada, Y

    1995-06-12

    The block of synaptic transmission and neural activity during deprivation of oxygen or glucose has been simply attributed to the lack of energy due to the disorder of energy production. To clarify the interrelation between neural activity and energy metabolism during hypoxia or glucose deprivation, we studied the changes in ATP levels and electrical events of pyramidal neurons in the CA3 region and [Ca2+]i mobilization of the dendritic and cellular region of CA3 area, using guinea pig hippocampal slices. The studies of field potentials and intracellular recording from the pyramidal cell of CA3 area during hypoxia or glucose deprivation revealed that the cessation of synaptic activity and the depolarization of resting potential occurred earlier than during glucose deprivation while the increase of [Ca2+]i was slow during hypoxia but rapid during glucose deprivation although the ATP level of CA3 area was maintained at its original level for 20 min during both conditions. When glucose was replaced by lactate, ATP concentration was not reduced but the electrical activity decayed and [Ca2+]i increased with the similar time course as observed during lack of glucose, only. These results suggest that different mechanisms underlie the block of synaptic transmission in the CA3 pyramidal neurons during hypoxia and glucose deprivation and that lactate cannot substitute for glucose in the maintenance of neural activity.

  3. The inflammatory molecules IL-1β and HMGB1 can rapidly enhance focal seizure generation in a brain slice model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eChiavegato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by a hyperexcitable brain tissue and unpredictable seizures, i.e., aberrant firing discharges in large neuronal populations. It is well established that proinflammatory cytokines, in addition to their canonical involvement in the immune response, have a crucial role in the mechanism of seizure generation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of interleukin-1β (IL-1β and high mobility group B1 (HMGB1 in the generation of seizure-like discharges using two models of focal epilepsy in a rat entorhinal cortex slice preparation. Seizure like-discharges were evoked by either slice perfusion with low Mg2+ and picrotoxin or with a double NMDA local stimulation in the presence of the proconvulsant 4-amino-pyridine. The effects of IL-1β or HMGB1 were evaluated by monitoring seizure discharge generation through laser scanning microscope imaging of Ca2+ signals from neurons and astrocytes. In the picrotoxin model, we revealed that both cytokines increased the mean frequency of spontaneous ictal-like discharges, whereas only IL-1β reduced the latency and prolonged the duration of the first ictal-like event. In the second model, a single NMDA pulse, per se ineffective, became successful when it was performed after IL-β or HMGB1 local applications. These findings demonstrate that both IL-1β and HMGB1 can rapidly lower focal ictal event threshold and strengthen the possibility that targeting these inflammatory pathways may represent an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent seizures.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of stearic acid against toxicity of oxygen/glucose deprivation or glutamate on rat cortical or hippocampal slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-jian WANG; Guang-mei LI; Wen-lu TANG; Ming YIN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To observe the effects of stearic acid, a long-chain saturated fatty acid consisting of 18 carbon atoms, on brain (cortical or hippocampal) slices insulted by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), glutamate or sodium azide (NaN3) in vitro.Methods: The activities of hippocampal slices were monitored by population spikes recorded in the CA1 region. In vitro injury models of brain slice were induced by 10 min of OGD, 1 mmol/L glutamate or 10 mmol/L NaN3. After 30 min of preincubation with stearic acid (3-30 μmol/L), brain slices (cortical or hippocampal)were subjected to OGD, glutamate or NaN3, and the tissue activities were evaluated by using the 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride method. MK886 [5 mmol/L;a noncompetitive inhibitor of proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-α)] or BADGE (bisphenol A diglycidyl ether; 100 μmol/L; an antagonist of PPAR-γ) were tested for their effects on the neuroprotection afforded by stearic acid. Results: Viability of brain slices was not changed significantly after direct incubation with stearic acid. OGD, glutamate and NaN3 injury significantly decreased the viability of brain slices. Stearic acid (3-30 μmol/L) dose-dependently protected brain slices from OGD and glutamate injury but not from NaN3 injury, and its neuroprotective effect was completely abolished by BADGE. Conclusion: Stearic acid can protect brain slices (cortical or hippocampal) against injury induced by OGD or glutamate.Its neuroprotective effect may be mainly mediated by the activation of PPAR-γ.

  5. Evaluation of 2D multiband EPI imaging for high-resolution, whole-brain, task-based fMRI studies at 3T: Sensitivity and slice leakage artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nick; Moeller, Steen; Auerbach, Edward J; Yacoub, Essa; Flandin, Guillaume; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that require high-resolution whole-brain coverage have long scan times that are primarily driven by the large number of thin slices acquired. Two-dimensional multiband echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences accelerate the data acquisition along the slice direction and therefore represent an attractive approach to such studies by improving the temporal resolution without sacrificing spatial resolution. In this work, a 2D multiband EPI sequence was optimized for 1.5mm isotropic whole-brain acquisitions at 3T with 10 healthy volunteers imaged while performing simultaneous visual and motor tasks. The performance of the sequence was evaluated in terms of BOLD sensitivity and false-positive activation at multiband (MB) factors of 1, 2, 4, and 6, combined with in-plane GRAPPA acceleration of 2× (GRAPPA 2), and the two reconstruction approaches of Slice-GRAPPA and Split Slice-GRAPPA. Sensitivity results demonstrate significant gains in temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR) and t-score statistics for MB 2, 4, and 6 compared to MB 1. The MB factor for optimal sensitivity varied depending on anatomical location and reconstruction method. When using Slice-GRAPPA reconstruction, evidence of false-positive activation due to signal leakage between simultaneously excited slices was seen in one instance, 35 instances, and 70 instances over the ten volunteers for the respective accelerations of MB 2×GRAPPA 2, MB 4×GRAPPA 2, and MB 6×GRAPPA 2. The use of Split Slice-GRAPPA reconstruction suppressed the prevalence of false positives significantly, to 1 instance, 5 instances, and 5 instances for the same respective acceleration factors. Imaging protocols using an acceleration factor of MB 2×GRAPPA 2 can be confidently used for high-resolution whole-brain imaging to improve BOLD sensitivity with very low probability for false-positive activation due to slice leakage. Imaging protocols using higher acceleration factors (MB 3 or MB 4

  6. Quantitative evaluation of benign meningioma and hemangiopericytoma with peritumoral brain edema by 64-slice CT perfusion imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Guang; CHEN Shuang; WANG Yin; ZHU Rui-jiang; GENG Dao-ying; FENG Xiao-yuan

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) have a relentless tendency for local recurrence and metastases,differentiating between benign meningiomas and HPCs before surgery is important for both treatment planning and the prognosis appraisal.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlations between CT perfusion parameters and microvessel density (MVD) in extra-axial tumors and the possible role of CT perfusion imaging in preoperatively differentiating benign meningiomas and HPCs.Methods Seventeen patients with benign meningiomas and peritumoral edema, 12 patients with HPCs and peritumoral edema underwent 64-slice CT perfusion imaging pre-operation.Perfusion was calculated using the Patlak method.The quantitative parameters, include cerebral blood volume (CBV), permeability surface (PS) of parenchyma, peritumoral edema among benign meningiomas and HPCs were compared respectively.CBV and PS in parenchyma, peritumoral edema of benign meningiomas and HPCs were also compared to that of the contrallateral normal white matter respectively.The correlations between CBV, PS of tumoral parenchyma and MVD were examined.Results The value of CBV and PS in parenchyma of HPCs were significantly higher than that of benign meningiomas (P<0.05), while the values of CBV and PS in peritumoral edema of benign meningiomas and HPCs were not significantly different (P >0.05).MVD in parenchyma of HPCs were significantly higher than that of benign meningiomas (P<0.05).There were positive correlations between CBV and MVD (r=0.648, P<0.05), PS and MVD (r=0.541, P<0.05) respectively.Furthermore, the value of CBV and PS in parenchyma of benign meningiomas and HPCs were significantly higher than that of contrallateral normal white matter (P<0.05), the value of CBV in peritumoral edema of benign meningiomas and HPCs were significantly lower than that of contrallateral normal white matter (P<0.05), while the value of PS in peritumoral edema of benign meningiomas and HPCs were not

  7. A setup for administering TMS to medial and lateral cortical areas during whole-brain FMRI recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, A.D. de; Sommer, I.E.C.; Bakker, E.J.; Bloemendaal, M.; Bakker, C.J.; Klomp, D.W.J.; Bestmann, S.; Neggers, S.F.W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Stimulating brain areas with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while concurrently and noninvasively recording brain activity changes through functional MRI enables a new range of investigations about causal interregional interactions in the human brain. However, standard head-coil arr

  8. N-Methyl-d-aspartate Modulation of Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine Release by Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Fast Cyclic Voltammetry Studies in Rat Brain Slices in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavas, Ersin; Young, Andrew M J

    2017-02-15

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, phencyclidine, induces behavioral changes in rodents mimicking symptoms of schizophrenia, possibly mediated through dysregulation of glutamatergic control of mesolimbic dopamine release. We tested the hypothesis that NMDA receptor activation modulates accumbens dopamine release, and that phencyclidine pretreatment altered this modulation. NMDA caused a receptor-specific, dose-dependent decrease in electrically stimulated dopamine release in nucleus accumbens brain slices. This decrease was unaffected by picrotoxin, making it unlikely to be mediated through GABAergic neurones, but was decreased by the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, (RS)-α-methyl-4-sulfonophenylglycine, indicating that NMDA activates mechanisms controlled by these receptors to decrease stimulated dopamine release. The effect of NMDA was unchanged by in vivo pretreatment with phencyclidine (twice daily for 5 days), with a washout period of at least 7 days before experimentation, which supports the hypothesis that there is no enduring direct effect of PCP at NMDA receptors after this pretreatment procedure. We propose that NMDA depression of accumbal dopamine release is mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors located pre- or perisynaptically, and suggest that NMDA evoked increased extrasynaptic spillover of glutamate is sufficient to activate these receptors that, in turn, inhibit dopamine release. Furthermore, we suggest that enduring functional changes brought about by subchronic phencyclidine pretreatment, modeling deficits in schizophrenia, are downstream effects consequent on chronic blockade of NMDA receptors, rather than direct effects on NMDA receptors themselves.

  9. Involvement of striatal lipid peroxidation and inhibition of calcium influx into brain slices in neurobehavioral alterations in a rat model of short-term oral exposure to manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Daiana Silva; Gubert, Priscila; Fachinetto, Roselei; Wagner, Caroline; Aschner, Michael; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes

    2008-11-01

    Manganese is an essential element for biological systems, nevertheless occupational exposure to high levels of Mn can lead to neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by excessive Mn accumulation, especially in astrocytes of basal ganglia and symptoms closely resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate behavioral and biochemical alterations in adult rats exposed for 30 days to 10 and 25mg/mL of MnCl(2) in their drinking water. MnCl(2) intoxicated rats showed impaired locomotor activity in comparison to control animals. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation were increased, delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (delta-ALA-D, an enzyme sensitive to pro-oxidant situations) activity was inhibited and (45)Ca(2+) influx into striatal slices was decreased in rats exposed to 25mg/mL of Mn, indicating that this brain region was markedly affected by short-term Mn exposure. In contrast, Mn exposure was not associated with characteristic extrapyramidal effects and did not modify protein oxidation, suggesting that the striatal damage represents early stages of Mn-induced damage. In addition, treatment with Mn was associated with reduced body weight gain, but there were no discernible alterations in liver and kidney function. In conclusion, Mn caused increased oxidative stress and decreased (45)Ca(2+) influx into the striatum, which are likely linked to impaired locomotor activity, but not with the occurrence of orofacial dyskinesia.

  10. Recording brain waves at the supermarket: what can we learn from a shopper's brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Stephen F; Sands, J Andrew

    2012-01-01

    cognitive and emotional activity and are complimentary. EEG is more sensitive to time-locked events (i.e., story lines), whereas fMRI is more sensitive to the brain regions involved. The application of neuroscience in BTL campaigns is significantly more difficult to achieve. Participants move unconstrained in a shopping environment while EEG and eye movements are monitored. In this scenario, fMRI is not possible. fMRI can be used with virtual store mock-ups, but it is expensive and seldom used. We have developed a technology that allows for the measurement of EEG in an unobtrusive manner. The intent is to record the brain waves of participants during their day-to-day shopping experience. A miniaturized video recorder, EEG amplifiers, and eye-tracking systems are used. Digital signal processing is employed to remove the substantial artifact generated by eye movements and motion. Eye fixations identify specific viewings of products and displays, and they are used for synchronizing the behavior with EEG response. The location of EEG sources is determined by the use of a source reconstruction software.

  11. 31P-saturation-transfer nuclear-magnetic-resonance measurements of phosphocreatine turnover in guinea-pig brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, P G; Feeney, J; Cox, D W; Bachelard, H S

    1985-05-01

    The technique of 31P saturation-transfer n.m.r. was used to determine the forward and the reverse rate constants of creatine phosphotransferase in superfused guinea-pig cerebral tissues in vitro. The calculated forward rate constant of 0.22 +/- 0.03s-1 compared well with a previously reported value for rat brain in vivo [Shoubridge, Briggs & Radda (1982) FEBS Lett. 140, 288-292]. The reverse rate constant was found to be 0.55 +/- 0.10s-1. 3. By using concentrations of ATP and phosphocreatine estimated previously for this superfused preparation [Cox, Morris, Feeney & Bachelard (1983) Biochem. J. 212, 365-370], forward and reverse flux rates were calculated to be 0.68 and 0.72 mumol X s-1 X g-1 respectively. The concordance of forward and reverse fluxes contrasts with the situation observed in vitro in other tissues, and suggests that the creatine phosphotransferase reaction is at equilibrium under the conditions used here. 4. Lowering the concentration of glucose in the superfusing medium from 10mM to 0.5mM had no significant effect on phosphocreatine concentration or on the forward (ATP-generating) flux through creatine phosphotransferase. The results indicate that a normal phosphocreatine content in the presence of lowered glucose availability is reflected by an unchanged turnover rate.

  12. Review: Human Intracortical recording and neural decoding for brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandman, David M; Cash, Sydney S; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2017-03-02

    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) use neural information recorded from the brain for voluntary control of external devices. The development of BCI systems has largely focused on improving functional independence for individuals with severe motor impairments, including providing tools for communication and mobility. In this review, we describe recent advances in intracortical BCI technology and provide potential directions for further research.

  13. Central Administration of Lipopolysaccharide Induces Depressive-like Behavior in Vivo and Activates Brain Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase In Murine Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavelaars Annemieke

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient stimulation of the innate immune system by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS activates peripheral and central expression of the tryptophan degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO which mediates depressive-like behavior. It is unknown whether direct activation of the brain with LPS is sufficient to activate IDO and induce depressive-like behavior. Methods Sickness and depressive-like behavior in C57BL/6J mice were assessed by social exploration and the forced swim test, respectively. Expression of cytokines and IDO mRNA was measured by real-time RT-PCR and cytokine protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs. Enzymatic activity of IDO was estimated as the amount of kynurenine produced from tryptophan as determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC with electrochemical detection. Results Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. administration of LPS (100 ng increased steady-state transcripts of TNFα, IL-6 and the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in the hippocampus in the absence of any change in IFNγ mRNA. LPS also increased IDO expression and induced depressive-like behavior, as measured by increased duration of immobility in the forced swim test. The regulation of IDO expression was investigated using in situ organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs derived from brains of newborn C57BL/6J mice. In accordance with the in vivo data, addition of LPS (10 ng/ml to the medium of OHSCs induced steady-state expression of mRNA transcripts for IDO that peaked at 6 h and translated into increased IDO enzymatic activity within 8 h post-LPS. This activation of IDO by direct application of LPS was preceded by synthesis and secretion of TNFα and IL-6 protein and activation of iNOS while IFNγ expression was undetectable. Conclusion These data establish that activation of the innate immune system in the brain is sufficient to activate IDO and induce

  14. Electrophysiological recording of the brain, visualization, prediction, and interconnectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talakoub, Omid

    The human brain is a complex network of interconnected neurons. The aim of neuroscience and neuroengineering is to decode the neural activity, visualize it and try to better understand how neurons communicate with each other. This dissertation comprises four contributions to the area. These four topics are discussing how functional relationship between brain activity and movement can be found and whether common features found in different regions are correlated (phase-locked). First, the method of chirplet decomposition offers a new way to visualize the time-frequency content of non-stationary signals with higher resolution than previously possible. The use of Wigner-Ville distribution together with chirplet decomposition allows a clearer visualization in terms of both the temporal and frequency details with detail higher than previously achieved using other methods including Choi-Williams and spectrogram. Second, an improved method of averaging of neural signals over repeated trials is introduced whereby slight variations in the alignment of the neural signal over time is corrected through the use of nonlinear shifts. In earlier studies, time alignment has been performed using linear shift (e.g. alignment with movement onset), but this process alone is not sufficient when the signal timing changes differently over time. To overcome this issue, nonlinear transformations were found to remove any temporal variabilities in the way the task was performed. Third, a multilinear model is demonstrated showing how limb velocity in a reach task can be predicted from neuroelectrical activity. The model, after fitting, suggested that high frequency oscillations have sufficient information for both detection of movement onset and reconstruction of its movement. The use of a linear model reduces the overall computational requirements and simplifies the reconstruction of movement kinematics. Finally, a fourth method involving the measurement of coherence over time reveals how

  15. Thick Slice and Thin Slice Teaching Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, Gail; Tong, Stephanie Tom; Hesse, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Student-based teaching evaluations are an integral component to institutions of higher education. Previous work on student-based teaching evaluations suggest that evaluations of instructors based upon "thin slice" 30-s video clips of them in the classroom correlate strongly with their end of the term "thick slice" student evaluations. This study's…

  16. A novel role for PHT1 in the disposition of l-histidine in brain: In vitro slice and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in wildtype and Pht1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Xing; Hu, Yongjun; Keep, Richard F; Toyama-Sorimachi, Noriko; Smith, David E

    2017-01-15

    PHT1 (SLC15A4) is responsible for translocating l-histidine (l-His), di/tripeptides and peptide-like drugs across biological membranes. Previous studies have indicated that PHT1 is located in brain parenchyma, however, its role and significance in brain along with effect on the biodistribution of substrates is unknown. In this study, adult gender-matched Pht1-competent (wildtype) and Pht1-deficient (null) mice were used to investigate the effect of PHT1 on l-His brain disposition via in vitro slice and in vivo pharmacokinetic approaches. We also evaluated the serum clinical chemistry and expression levels of select transporters and enzymes in the two genotypes. No significant differences were observed between genotypes in serum chemistry, body weight, viability and fertility. PCR analyses indicated that Pept2 had a compensatory up-regulation in Pht1 null mice (about 2-fold) as compared to wildtype animals, which was consistent in different brain regions and confirmed by immunoblots. The uptake of l-His was reduced in brain slices by 50% during PHT1 ablation. The l-amino acid transporters accounted for 30% of the uptake, and passive (other) pathways for 20% of the uptake. During the in vivo pharmacokinetic studies, plasma concentration-time profiles of l-His were comparable between the two genotypes after intravenous administration. Still, biodistribution studies revealed that, when sampled 5min after dosing, l-His values were 28-48% lower in Pht1 null mice, as compared to wildtype animals, in brain parenchyma but not cerebrospinal fluid. These findings suggest that PHT1 may play an important role in histidine transport in brain, and resultant effects on histidine/histamine homeostasis and neuropeptide regulation.

  17. Protective Effects of Chlorogenic Acid and its Metabolites on Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Alterations in Rat Brain Slices: A Comparative Study with Resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Zulfiye; Demircan, Celaleddin; Bagdas, Deniz; Buyukuysal, Rifat Levent

    2016-08-01

    The effectiveness of chlorogenic acid and its main metabolites, caffeic and quinic acids, against oxidative stress was investigated. Resveratrol, another natural phenolic compound, was also tested for comparison. Rat cortical slices were incubated with 200 μM H2O2 for 1 h, and alterations in oxidative stress parameters, such as 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and the production of both malondialdehyde (MDA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), were assayed in the absence or presence of phenolic compounds. Additionally, the effectiveness of chlorogenic acid and other compounds on H2O2-induced increases in fluorescence intensities were also compared in slice-free incubation medium. Although quinic acid failed, chlorogenic and caffeic acids significantly ameliorated the H2O2-induced decline in TTC staining intensities. Although resveratrol also caused an increase in staining intensity, its effect was not dose-dependent; the high concentrations of resveratrol tested in the present study (10 and 100 μM) further lessened the staining of the slices. Additionally, all phenolic compounds significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced increases in MDA and ROS levels in cortical slices. When the IC50 values were compared to H2O2-induced alterations, chlorogenic acid was more potent than either its metabolites or resveratrol for all parameters studied under these experimental conditions. In slice-free experimental conditions, on the other hand, chlorogenic and caffeic acids significantly attenuated the fluorescence emission enhanced by H2O2 with a similar order of potency to that obtained in slice-containing physiological medium. These results indicate that chlorogenic acid is a more potent phenolic compound than resveratrol and its main metabolites caffeic and quinic acids against H2O2-induced alterations in oxidative stress parameters in rat cortical slices.

  18. Three-dimensional Brain Current Source Reconstruction from Intra-cranial ECoG Recordings

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yingchun; van Drongelen, Wim; Kohrman, Michael; He, Bin

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated 3-dimensional brain current density reconstruction (CDR) from intracranial electrocorticogram (ECoG) recordings by means of finite element method (FEM). The brain electrical sources are modeled by a current density distribution and estimated from the ECoG signals with the aid of a weighted minimum norm estimation algorithm. A series of computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of ECoG-CDR by comparing with the scalp EEG based CDR results. The present...

  19. Simultaneous EMG-Functional MRI Recordings Can Directly Relate Hyperkinetic Movements to Brain Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Maurits, Natasha M.; Renken, Remco; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Hoogduin, Johannes M.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To apply and validate the use of electromyogram (EMG) recorded during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with movement disorders, to directly relate involuntary movements to brain activity. Methods: Eight "familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy" (FCMTE) pat

  20. Recording the brain at work: the visible, the readable, and the invisible in electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borck, Cornelius

    2008-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG), the graphic recording of the electric activity of the human brain, kindled far-reaching speculations about the imminent deciphering of mind and brain in the 1930s. Regardless of the thousands of neurons in the human cortex, recording from a person at rest produced a surprisingly regular line oscillating at 10 per second that disappeared at the moment of mental activity. With ever more groups specializing in electroencephalography, however, the deciphering of mind and brain did not materialize but moved further away in the information produced. In the various approaches employed in EEG research, such as the analysis of the graphic code, the search for pathognomic patterns or the imaging of cognitive processing, visualization guided research as well as theorizing, its productivity continued to keep the epistemological question open.

  1. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain.

  2. High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device recordings of spontaneous brain activity: Towards high-Tc magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öisjöen, F.; Schneiderman, J. F.; Figueras, G. A.; Chukharkin, M. L.; Kalabukhov, A.; Hedström, A.; Elam, M.; Winkler, D.

    2012-03-01

    We have performed single- and two-channel high transition temperature (high-Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of spontaneous brain activity in two healthy human subjects. We demonstrate modulation of two well-known brain rhythms: the occipital alpha rhythm and the mu rhythm found in the motor cortex. We further show that despite higher noise-levels compared to their low-Tc counterparts, high-Tc SQUIDs can be used to detect and record physiologically relevant brain rhythms with comparable signal-to-noise ratios. These results indicate the utility of high-Tc technology in MEG recordings of a broader range of brain activity.

  3. Tamoxifen mediated estrogen receptor activation protects against early impairment of hippocampal neuron excitability in an oxygen/glucose deprivation brain slice ischemia model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Huaqiu; Xie, Minjie; Gary P. Schools; Feustel, Paul F.; Wang, Wei; Lei, Ting; Kimelberg, Harold K.; Zhou, Min

    2008-01-01

    Pretreatment of ovarectomized rats with estrogen shows long-term protection via activation of the estrogen receptor (ER). However, it remains unknown whether activation of the ER can provide protection against early neuronal damage when given acutely, we simulated ischemic conditions by applying oxygen and glucose deprived (OGD) solution to acute male rat hippocampal slices and examined the neuronal electrophysiological changes. Pyramidal neurons and interneurons showed a time-dependent membr...

  4. Neuronal activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulate the density of inhibitory synapses in organotypic slice cultures of postnatal hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, S; Wehrlé, R; Sotelo, C

    2000-11-01

    Hippocampal interneurons inhibit pyramidal neurons through the release of the neurotransmitter GABA. Given the importance of this inhibition for the proper functioning of the hippocampus, the development of inhibitory synapses must be tightly regulated. In this study, the possibility that neuronal activity and neurotrophins regulate the density of GABAergic inhibitory synapses was investigated in organotypic slice cultures taken from postnatal day 7 rats. In hippocampal slices cultured for 13 d in the presence of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline, the density of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65-immunoreactive terminals was increased in the CA1 area when compared with control slices. Treatment with the glutamate receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione decreased the density of GAD65-immunoreactive terminals in the stratum oriens of CA1. These treatments had parallel effects on the density of GABA-immunoreactive processes. Electron microscopic analysis after postembedding immunogold labeling with antibodies against GABA indicated that bicuculline treatment increased the density of inhibitory but not excitatory synapses. Application of exogenous BDNF partly mimicked the stimulatory effect of bicuculline on GAD65-immunoreactive terminals. Finally, antibodies against BDNF, but not antibodies against nerve growth factor, decrease the density of GAD65-immunoreactive terminals in bicuculline-treated slices. Thus, neuronal activity regulates the density of inhibitory synapses made by postnatal hippocampal interneurons, and BDNF could mediate part of this regulation. This regulation of the density of inhibitory synapses could represent a feedback mechanism aimed at maintaining an appropriate level of activity in the developing hippocampal networks.

  5. Cutting of living hippocampal slices by a highly pressurised water jet (macromingotome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingmann, D; Wiemann, M; Speckmann, E J; Köhling, R; Straub, H; Dunze, K; Wittkowski, W

    2000-10-15

    Living brain slices are usually cut with razor blades, which compress a ca. 50-microm-thick layer of tissue. This results in cell debris and lesioned cells which, e.g. form diffusion barriers between the bath and living neurons underneath, thereby prolonging response times of neurons to drugs in the bath saline and impeding the experimental access to intact neurons. To avoid such drawbacks, a macromingotome was developed which cuts nervous tissue with water jets. Physiological saline under pressures of 100-1800 bar was ejected through nozzles of 35-100 microm to cut 300-500-microm-thick hippocampal slices. Systematic variations of pressure and nozzle diameter revealed best results at 400-600 bar and with nozzle diameters of 60-80 microm. Under these conditions, intact CA1- and CA3-neurons as well as granule cells were detected with infrared microscopy at less than 10 microm underneath the surface of the slice. Superficial neurons with intact fine structures were also seen when the slices were studied by light-microscopy. Intra- and extracellular recordings from superficial neurons showed normal membrane- and full action potentials and the development of stable epileptiform discharges in 0 Mg(2+)-saline. These results indicate that the macromingotome offers an alternative way of cutting slices which may facilitate electrophysiological/neuropharmacological or fluorometric studies on superficial neurons.

  6. Circadian rhythm modulates long-term potentiation induced at CA1 in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Hiroki; Natsume, Kiyohisa

    2014-03-01

    Circadian rhythm affects neuronal plasticity. Consistent with this, some forms of synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) are modulated by the light/dark cycle (LD cycle). For example, this type of modulation is observed in hippocampal slices. In rodents, which are nocturnal, LTP is usually facilitated in the dark phase, but the rat hippocampal CA1 is an exception. The reason why LTP in the dark phase is suppressed in CA1 remains unknown. Previously, LTP was induced with high-frequency stimulation. In this study, we found that in the dark phase, theta-burst stimulation-induced LTP is indeed facilitated in CA1, similar to other regions in the rodent brain. Population excitatory postsynaptic potentials (pEPSP)-LTP and population spikes (PS)-LTP were recorded at CA1. The magnitude of PS-LTP in dark-phase slices was significantly larger than in light-phase slices, while that of pEPSP-LTP was unchanged. Using antidromic-orthodromic stimulation, we found that recurrent inhibition is suppressed in the dark phase. Local gabazine-application to stratum pyramidale in light-phase slices mimicked this disinhibition and facilitated LTP in dark-phase slices. These results suggest that the disinhibition of a GABAA recurrent inhibitory network can be induced in the dark phase, thereby facilitating LTP.

  7. Effects of ketamine,midazolam,thiopental,and propofol on brain ischemia injury in rat cerebral cortical slices%氯胺酮,咪唑安定,硫喷妥钠和异丙酚对大鼠皮层脑片缺血性损伤的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛庆生; 于布为; 王泽剑; 陈红专

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effects of ketamine, midazolam, thiopental, and propofol on brain ischemia by the model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in rat cerebral cortical slices. METHODS: Cerebral cortical slices were incubated in 2 % 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) solution after OGD, the damages and effects of ketamine,midazolam, thiopental, and propofol were quantitativlye evaluated by ELISA reader of absorbance (A) at 490 nm,which indicated the red formazan extracted from slices, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) releases in the incubated supernate were also measured. RESULTS: Progressive prolongation of OGD resulted in decreases of TTC staining.The percentage of tissue injury had a positive correlation with LDH releases, r=0.9609, P<0.01. Two hours of reincubation aggravated the decrease of TTC staining compared with those slices stained immediately after OGD (P<0.01). These four anesthetics had no effects on the TTC staining of slices. Ketamine completely inhibited the decrease of A value induced by 10 min of OGD injury. High concentrations of midazolam (10 μmol/L) and thiopental (400 μmol/L)partly attenuated this decrease. Propofol at high concentration (100 μmol/L) enhanced the decrease of A value induced by 10 min of OGD injury (P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Ketamine, high concentration of midazolam and thiopental have neuroprotective effects against OGD injury in rat cerebral cortical slices, while high concentration of propofol augments OGD injury in rat cerebral cortical slices.

  8. Three-dimensional brain current source reconstruction from intra-cranial ECoG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingchun; van Drongelen, Wim; Kohrman, Michael; He, Bin

    2008-08-15

    We have investigated 3-dimensional brain current density reconstruction (CDR) from intracranial electrocorticogram (ECoG) recordings by means of finite element method (FEM). The brain electrical sources are modeled by a current density distribution and estimated from the ECoG signals with the aid of a weighted minimum norm estimation algorithm. A series of computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of ECoG-CDR by comparing with the scalp EEG based CDR results. The present computer simulation results indicate that the ECoG-CDR provides enhanced performance in localizing single dipole sources which are located in regions underneath the implanted subdural ECoG grids, and in distinguishing and imaging multiple separate dipole sources, in comparison to the CDR results as obtained from the scalp EEG under the same conditions. We have also demonstrated the applicability of the present ECoG-CDR method to estimate 3-dimensional current density distribution from the subdural ECoG recordings in a human epilepsy patient. Eleven interictal epileptiform spikes (seven from the frontal region and four from parietal region) in an epilepsy patient undergoing surgical evaluation were analyzed. The present promising results indicate the feasibility and applicability of the developed ECoG-CDR method of estimating brain sources from intracranial electrical recordings, with detailed forward modeling using FEM.

  9. Effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane postconditioning and changes in JNK1/2 pathway activity on rat brain slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Wang; Zhigang Dai; Xiwei Dong; Suxiang Guo; Yang Liu; Shan Jiang; Zhiping Wang

    2011-01-01

    Recent research shows that the JNK1/2 signaling pathway plays a neuroprotective role against ischemia-reperfusion injury by cross-talk with other pathways. The present study investigated the effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane postconditioning on JNK1/2 pathway activity and neuronal cell viability after oxygen and glucose deprivation injury in hippocampal slices in vitro. Techniques used included population spike analysis, propidium iodide fluorescent staining, western blot assay, and the use of JNK1/2-specific pharmacological tools such as anisomycin (agonist) and SP600125 (inhibitor). We found that both isoflurane and sevoflurane inhibited JNK pathway activity and had neuroprotective effects against oxygen and glucose deprivation injury in slices of rat hippocampus in vitro. Postconditioning with volatile anesthetics exerted neuroprotective effects on nerve cells and preserved the function of the CA1 region by inhibiting JNK1/2 phosphorylation. This suppression of JNK1/2 activity could underlie the observed synergistic neuroprotective effect produced by volatile anesthetic postconditioning.

  10. The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece); Medical Diagnostic Center ' Ayios Therissos,' P.O. Box 28405, Nicosia 2033, Cyprus and Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Panepistimioupolis, Dragana 68100, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Heraklion, P.O. Box 1352, Heraklion 71110, Crete (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of

  11. Performance of dry electrode with bristle in recording EEG rhythms across brain state changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitoko, Vangu; Nguyen, Tuan N; Nguyen, Jordan S; Tran, Yvonne; Nguyen, Hung T

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the physiological performance of a silver-silver chloride dry electrode with bristle (B-Electrode) in recording EEG data. For this purpose, we compare the performance of the bristle electrode in recording EEG data with the standard wet gold-plated cup electrode (G-Electrode) using two different brain state change tasks including resting condition with eyes-closed and performing mathematical task with eyes-open. Using a 2 channel recording device, eyes-closed command data were collected from each of 6 participants for a period of 20 sec and the same procedure was applied for the mathematical calculation task. These data were used for statistical and classification analyse. Although, B-electrode has shown a slightly higher performance compared with G-electrode in both tasks, but analyse did not reveal any significant differences between both electrodes in all six subjects tested.

  12. Slice hyperholomorphic Schur analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Alpay, Daniel; Sabadini, Irene

    2016-01-01

    This book defines and examines the counterpart of Schur functions and Schur analysis in the slice hyperholomorphic setting. It is organized into three parts: the first introduces readers to classical Schur analysis, while the second offers background material on quaternions, slice hyperholomorphic functions, and quaternionic functional analysis. The third part represents the core of the book and explores quaternionic Schur analysis and its various applications. The book includes previously unpublished results and provides the basis for new directions of research.

  13. BRAIN DYSFUNCTION OF PATIENTS WITH QIGONG INDUCED MENTAL DISORDER REVEALED BY EVOKED POTENTIALS RECORDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yingzhi; ZONG Wenbin; CHEN Xingshi

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In order to investigate the brain function of patients with Qigong induced mental disorder (QIMD), this study was carried out. Methods: Four kinds of evoked potentials, including contingent negative variation (CNV), auditory evoked potentials (AEP), visual evoked potentials (VEP), and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP), were recorded from 12 patients with Qigong induced mental disorder.Comparison of their evoked potentials with the data from some normal controls was made. Results: The results revealed that there were 3 kinds of abnormal changes in evoked potentials of patients with QIMD that is latency prolongation, amplitude increase and amplitude decrease, as compared with normal controls. Conclusion: Brain dysfunction of patients with QIMD was confirmed. Its biological mechanism needs further studying.

  14. A HYBRID DYNAMIC PROGRAM SLICING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Tong; Wu Fangjun

    2005-01-01

    This letter proposes a hybrid method for computing dynamic program slicing. The key element is to construct a Coverage-Testing-based Dynamic Dependence Graph (CTDDG),which makes use of both dynamic and static information to get execution status. The approach overcomes the limitations of previous dynamic slicing methods, which have to redo slicing if slice criterion changes.

  15. A glass capillary microelectrode based on capillarity and its application to the detection of L-glutamate release from mouse brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kumiko; Yamagiwa, Takashi; Hirano, Ayumi; Sugawara, Masao

    2003-01-01

    A new glass capillary microelectrode for L-glutamate is described using pulled glass capillaries (tip size, approximately 12.5 microm) with a very small volume (approximately 2 microl) of inner solution containing glutamate oxidase (GluOx) and ascorbate oxidase. The operation of the electrode is based on capillary action that samples L-glutamate into the inner solution. The enzyme reaction by GluOx generates hydrogen peroxide that is detected at an Os-gel-HRP polymer modified Pt electrode in a three-electrode configuration. The amperometric response behavior of the electrode was characterized in terms of the capillarity, response time, sensitivity and selectivity for measurements of L-glutamate. The currents at 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl increased linearly with the L-glutamate concentration from 10 to 150 microM for in vitro and in situ calibrations. The response was highly selective to L-glutamate over ascorbate, dopamine, serotonin and other amino acids. The detection of L-glutamate in the extracellular fluids of different regions of mouse hippocampal slices under stimulation of KCl was demonstrated.

  16. 肌肽对大鼠脑片缺氧缺糖/再灌损伤的保护作用%Neuroprotective of carnosine on oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion induced injury in rat brain slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方超; 李晴; 鲁美丽; 黄国兴; 杨菁

    2015-01-01

    目的:在离体脑片缺氧缺糖/再灌损伤模型上,评价肌肽对脑组织的保护作用。方法肌肽预处理后,用缺氧缺糖/再灌(oxygen glucose deprivation/reperfusion,OGD/RP)来制备大鼠离体脑片损伤模型。以2,3,5-三苯基氯化四氮唑(2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride,TTC)染色法检测脑片活性;HPLC法检测海马脑片中ATP、ADP、AMP含量;荧光法检测脑组织活性氧( reactive oxygen species,ROS)。结果与对照组相比,缺氧缺糖/再灌损伤可以明显损伤大鼠海马脑片,TTC染色颜色变浅,A490 nm明显下降, ATP和ADP含量明显降低,而AMP含量明显升高,ROS明显升高,差异均具有统计学意义(P<0.01)。与模型组相比,缺氧缺糖/再灌损伤前预先加入1000、200、40μg/mL肌肽预处理15 min可显著抑制缺氧缺糖/再灌引起的损伤,TTC染色颜色加深,A490 nm明显升高,ATP、ADP、AMP含量升高,ROS含量降低,差异均具有统计学意义( P<0.01)。结论肌肽可减轻缺氧缺糖/再灌导致的损伤,其机制可能与其改善脑组织能量代谢,增强抗氧化能力有关。%Objective To investigate effect of carnosine on oxygen glucose deprivation/reperfusion ( OGD/RP) induced injury in rat brain slices. Methods Injury of brain slices was determined by TTC methods.The contents of ATP, ADP and AMP were determined by high performance liquid chromatography.Reactive Oxygen species ( ROS) were determined by fluorescence methods.Results Compared with control group, rat hippocampal slices were significantly damaged by OGD/RP, indicated by light color and decreased A490 nm value of TTC staining.Meanwhile the contents of ATP and ADP were significantly decreased, and the content of AMP and ROS were significantly increased, the difference between two group was significant ( P<0.01).Pre-incubation with Carnosine (1000, 200, 40 μg/mL) significantly inhibited the

  17. Tamoxifen mediated estrogen receptor activation protects against early impairment of hippocampal neuron excitability in an oxygen/glucose deprivation brain slice ischemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaqiu; Xie, Minjie; Schools, Gary P; Feustel, Paul F; Wang, Wei; Lei, Ting; Kimelberg, Harold K; Zhou, Min

    2009-01-09

    Pretreatment of ovarectomized rats with estrogen shows long-term protection via activation of the estrogen receptor (ER). However, it remains unknown whether activation of the ER can provide protection against early neuronal damage when given acutely. We simulated ischemic conditions by applying oxygen and glucose deprived (OGD) solution to acute male rat hippocampal slices and examined the neuronal electrophysiological changes. Pyramidal neurons and interneurons showed a time-dependent membrane potential depolarization and reduction in evoked action potential frequency and amplitude over a 10 to 15 min OGD exposure. These changes were largely suppressed by 10 microM TAM. The TAM effect was neuron-specific as the OGD-induced astrocytic membrane potential depolarization was not altered. The TAM effect was mediated through ER activation because it could be simulated by 17beta-estradiol and was completely inhibited by the ER inhibitor ICI 182, 780, and is therefore an example of TAM's selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) action. We further show that TAM's effects on OGD-induced impairment of neuronal excitability was largely due to activation of neuroprotective BK channels, as the TAM effect was markedly attenuated by the BK channel inhibitor paxilline at 10 microM. TAM also significantly reduced the frequency and amplitude of AMPA receptor mediated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in pyramidal neurons which is an early consequence of OGD. Altogether, this study demonstrates that both 17beta-estradiol and TAM attenuate neuronal excitability impairment early on in a simulated ischemia model via ER activation mediated potentiation of BK K(+) channels and reduction in enhanced neuronal AMPA/NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity.

  18. Simultaneous multi-slice Turbo-FLASH imaging with CAIPIRINHA for whole brain distortion-free pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling at 3 and 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Moeller, Steen; Li, Xiufeng; Vu, An T; Krasileva, Kate; Ugurbil, Kamil; Yacoub, Essa; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-06-01

    Simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) or multiband (MB) imaging has recently been attempted for arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI in conjunction with echo-planar imaging (EPI) readout. It was found that SMS-EPI can reduce the T1 relaxation effect of the label and improve image coverage and resolution with little penalty in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, EPI still suffers from geometric distortion and signal dropout from field inhomogeneity effects especially at high and ultrahigh magnetic fields. Here we present a novel scheme for achieving high fidelity distortion-free quantitative perfusion imaging by combining pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with SMS Turbo-FLASH (TFL) readout at both 3 and 7 T. Bloch equation simulation was performed to characterize and optimize the TFL-based pCASL perfusion signal. Two MB factors (3 and 5) were implemented in SMS-TFL pCASL and compared with standard 2D TFL and EPI pCASL sequences. The temporal SNR of SMS-TFL pCASL relative to that of standard TFL pCASL was 0.76 ± 0.10 and 0.74 ± 0.11 at 7 T and 0.70 ± 0.05 and 0.65 ± 0.05 at 3T for MB factor of 3 and 5, respectively. By implementing background suppression in conjunction with SMS-TFL at 3T, the relative temporal SNR improved to 0.84 ± 0.09 and 0.79 ± 0.10 for MB factor of 3 and 5, respectively. Compared to EPI pCASL, significantly increased temporal SNR (pbrain distortion-free quantitative mapping of cerebral blood flow at high and ultrahigh magnetic fields.

  19. Scale-Free Brain-Wave Music from Simultaneously EEG and fMRI Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wu, Dan; Yang, Hua; Luo, Cheng; Li, Chaoyi; Yao, Dezhong

    2012-01-01

    In the past years, a few methods have been developed to translate human EEG to music. In 2009, PloS One 4 e5915, we developed a method to generate scale-free brainwave music where the amplitude of EEG was translated to music pitch according to the power law followed by both of them, the period of an EEG waveform is translated directly to the duration of a note, and the logarithm of the average power change of EEG is translated to music intensity according to the Fechner's law. In this work, we proposed to adopt simultaneously-recorded fMRI signal to control the intensity of the EEG music, thus an EEG-fMRI music is generated by combining two different and simultaneous brain signals. And most importantly, this approach further realized power law for music intensity as fMRI signal follows it. Thus the EEG-fMRI music makes a step ahead in reflecting the physiological process of the scale-free brain. PMID:23166768

  20. Scale-free brain-wave music from simultaneously EEG and fMRI recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wu, Dan; Yang, Hua; Luo, Cheng; Li, Chaoyi; Yao, Dezhong

    2012-01-01

    In the past years, a few methods have been developed to translate human EEG to music. In 2009, PloS One 4 e5915, we developed a method to generate scale-free brainwave music where the amplitude of EEG was translated to music pitch according to the power law followed by both of them, the period of an EEG waveform is translated directly to the duration of a note, and the logarithm of the average power change of EEG is translated to music intensity according to the Fechner's law. In this work, we proposed to adopt simultaneously-recorded fMRI signal to control the intensity of the EEG music, thus an EEG-fMRI music is generated by combining two different and simultaneous brain signals. And most importantly, this approach further realized power law for music intensity as fMRI signal follows it. Thus the EEG-fMRI music makes a step ahead in reflecting the physiological process of the scale-free brain.

  1. Inhibition of spontaneous network activity in neonatal hippocampal slices by energy substrates is not correlated with intracellular acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtarov, Marat; Ivanov, Anton; Zilberter, Yuri; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Several energy substrates complementary to glucose, including lactate, pyruvate and β-hydroxybutyrate, serve as a fuel for neurons. It was reported recently that these substrates can substantially modulate cortical excitability in neonatal slices. However, complementary energy substrates (CES) can also induce an intracellular acidification when added exogenously. Therefore, action of CES on the neuronal properties governing excitability in neonatal brain slices may be underlain by a change in the cell energy status or by intracellular acidification, or both. Here, we attempt to elucidate these possibilities in neonatal hippocampus by recording neuronal population activity and monitoring intracellular pH. We show that a spontaneous network activity pattern, giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs), characteristic for the neonatal hippocampal slices exposed to artificial cerebrospinal fluid, is strongly inhibited by CES and this effect is unlikely to be caused by a subtle intracellular acidification induced by these compounds. Indeed, a much stronger intracellular acidification in the HCO(3) -free solution inhibited neither the GDP frequency nor the GDP amplitude. Therefore, modulation of neuronal energy homeostasis is the most likely factor underlying the effect of lactate, pyruvate and β-hydroxybutyrate on network excitability in neonatal brain slices.

  2. 64排CT用于创伤性颅脑损伤诊断中的价值%Value of Applying 64-slice CT to Diagnosis of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘光祖

    2016-01-01

    Objective To research and analyze the value of applying 64-slice CT to diagnosis of traumatic brain injury. Methods 100 patients with traumatic brain injury were selected as main survey samples randomly. All patients received CT examination when they were admitted to the hospital. The patients with negative examination result received CT reexamination in 1 day. If the examination results were negative, the patients needed to receive CT examination for the third day. CT image features of 100 patients were analyzed carefully, and were divided into three types according to the actual characteristics of CT image. The condition of different injury classiifcations was analyzed. Results The sensitivity of the patients for the admission to hospital (30~180 minute), in one day and in 2~3 day was 69.00%, 73.00%and 100.00%. The light, medium and severe brain injury had different prognostic effect. The severer the injury, the higher disability rate and fatality rate, which had evident statistical signiifcance, P<0.05. Conclusion 64-slice CT achieves evident effect for diagnosing brain injury.%目的:研究分析64排CT用于创伤性颅脑损伤诊断中的价值。方法随机选取创伤性颅脑损伤患者100例作为主要的调查样本,在患者入院时均接受CT检查,对于检查结果为阴性的患者,在1天之内完成CT复查;若其检查结果还是阴性的患者,则需要在第2-3天之内第三天接受CT检查。对100例患者的CT影像特点进行缜密分析,严格按照CT影像的实际特点完成轻、中、重三型划分,对不同损伤分型影响预后的情况进行针对分析。结果刚刚入院时候(30~180分钟)、1天之内、2~3天内患者的灵敏度分别为69.00%、73.00%、100.00%。轻型、中型以及重型颅脑损伤存在不同的预后效果,即损伤越严重就会有越高的致残率以及致死率,具有明显的统计学意义,P<0.05。结论64排CT在诊断颅脑损伤优势的过程中可以取得非常明显的效果。

  3. Ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra and prefrontal cortex rodent organotypic brain slices as an integrated model to study the cellular changes induced by oxygen/glucose deprivation and reperfusion: effect of neuroprotective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Laura; Parravicini, Chiara; Lecca, Davide; Dossi, Elena; Heine, Claudia; Cimino, Mauro; Wanke, Enzo; Illes, Peter; Franke, Heike; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2014-01-01

    Unveiling the roles of distinct cell types in brain response to insults is a partially unsolved challenge and a key issue for new neuroreparative approaches. In vivo models are not able to dissect the contribution of residential microglia and infiltrating blood-borne monocytes/macrophages, which are fundamentally undistinguishable; conversely, cultured cells lack original tissue anatomical and functional complexity, which profoundly alters reactivity. Here, we tested whether rodent organotypic co-cultures from mesencephalic ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra and prefrontal cortex (VTA/SN-PFC) represent a suitable model to study changes induced by oxygen/glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R). OGD/R induced cytotoxicity to both VTA/SN and PFC slices, with higher VTA/SN susceptibility. Neurons were highly affected, with astrocytes and oligodendrocytes undergoing very mild damage. Marked reactive astrogliosis was also evident. Notably, OGD/R triggered the activation of CD68-expressing microglia and increased expression of Ym1 and Arg1, two markers of "alternatively" activated beneficial microglia. Treatment with two well-known neuroprotective drugs, the anticonvulsant agent valproic acid and the purinergic P2-antagonist PPADS, prevented neuronal damage. Thus, VTA/SN-PFC cultures are an integrated model to investigate OGD/R-induced effects on distinct cells and easily screen neuroprotective agents. The model is particularly adequate to dissect the microglia phenotypic shift in the lack of a functional vascular compartment.

  4. Semi-automatic microdrive system for positioning electrodes during electrophysiological recordings from rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Piotr; Kublik, Ewa; Mozaryn, Jakub

    2015-09-01

    Electrophysiological recording of neuronal action potentials from behaving animals requires portable, precise and reliable devices for positioning of multiple microelectrodes in the brain. We propose a semi-automatic microdrive system for independent positioning of up to 8 electrodes (or tetrodes) in a rat (or larger animals). Device is intended to be used in chronic, long term recording applications in freely moving animals. Our design is based on independent stepper motors with lead screws which will offer single steps of ~ μm semi-automatically controlled from the computer. Microdrive system prototype for one electrode was developed and tested. Because of the lack of the systematic test procedures dedicated to such applications, we propose the evaluation of the prototype similar to ISO norm for industrial robots. To this end we designed and implemented magnetic linear and rotary encoders that provided information about electrode displacement and motor shaft movement. On the basis of these measurements we estimated repeatability, accuracy and backlash of the drive. According to the given assumptions and preliminary tests, the device should provide greater accuracy than hand-controlled manipulators available on the market. Automatic positioning will also shorten the course of the experiment and improve the acquisition of signals from multiple neuronal populations.

  5. Evaluation of 128-slice spiral CT whole brain perfusion imaging in grading infiltrating astrocytomas%128层螺旋CT全脑灌注对浸润性星形细胞瘤的分级评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾文兵; 王毅; 汪明全; 吴炅; 刘兴华; 罗江平; 温云

    2011-01-01

    目的:评价128层螺旋CT全脑灌注(CTP)对浸润性星形细胞瘤分级定性诊断的价值.方法:选择我院90例脑肿瘤患者进行CTP检查,经手术和病理学证实为浸润性星形细胞瘤(Ⅱ~Ⅳ级)者46例纳入本研究对象.CTP采用SOMATOM Definition AS型128层螺旋CT机进行灌注扫描,应用后处理工作站对原始数据进行后处理.获得时间-密度曲线(TDC).测定肿瘤区和对侧正常组织的脑血流量(CBF)、脑血容量(CBV)、毛细血管表面通透性(PS)及对比剂达峰值时间(TTP),并对灌注参数进行统计学分析.结果:在所有病例中,全脑灌注图像平均视觉评价分数明显高于传统灌注图(P<0 01).且对病变定位更为精确.星形细胞肿瘤高级别组的CBF、CBV和PS值均显著高于低级别组(P<0.01).而TTP值的差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).ROC曲线分析表明,CBF、CBV和PS值对鉴别高、低级别星形细胞肿瘤的ROC曲线下面积分别为0.925、0.897和0.954.采用CBF≥72.052ml/min/100g,CBV≥4.293ml/100g和PS≥6.337ml/min/100g作为分界点对鉴别高低级别星形细胞肿瘤的敏感性均为87.2%,特异性分别是83.5%、83.5%和93.0%.结论:128层螺旋CT全脑灌注有利于脑肿瘤的术前整体评估和精确定位;CTP参数CBF、CBV及PS值及TDC曲线对鉴别高、低级别星形细胞肿瘤具有较高的敏感性和特异性.%Objective:To evaluate the value of 128-slicc spiral CT whole brain perfusion (CTP) imaging in grading infil-traiing astrocytomas. Methods: Ninety patients with brain rumors underwent CTP examination and forty-six of them with astrocytic tumors (Ⅱ -Ⅳ) confirmed by operation and pathology were selected as the object of this study. 128-slice helical CT whole brain perfusion imaging was performed in the 46 patients, and the data were analyzed by the software. Cerebral blood flow (CBF). Cerebral blood volume (CBV). Time to peak (TTP) and permeability surface (PS> on the maximum perfusion area

  6. Silhouette-Slice Theorems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-20

    with standard expressions of spherical trigonometry is sinr)0 = cos0 sini//0 (4.37) which is consistent with the results obtained previously with...theorems for discrete transforms. However, sampling questions inlroduce difficult obstacles in the develop- ment of a discrete theory. First, sampling...additional obstacle to discrete represen- tations of the CT. An example of qualitative predication of the shape of silhouettes with the Silhouette-Slice

  7. Altered network timing in the CA3-CA1 circuit of hippocampal slices from aged mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kanak

    Full Text Available Network patterns are believed to provide unique temporal contexts for coordinating neuronal activity within and across different regions of the brain. Some of the characteristics of network patterns modeled in vitro are altered in the CA3 or CA1 subregions of hippocampal slices from aged mice. CA3-CA1 network interactions have not been examined previously. We used slices from aged and adult mice to model spontaneous sharp wave ripples and carbachol-induced gamma oscillations, and compared measures of CA3-CA1 network timing between age groups. Coherent sharp wave ripples and gamma oscillations were evident in the CA3-CA1 circuit in both age groups, but the relative timing of activity in CA1 stratum pyramidale was delayed in the aged. In another sample of aged slices, evoked Schaffer collateral responses were attenuated in CA3 (antidromic spike amplitude and CA1 (orthodromic field EPSP slope. However, the amplitude and timing of spontaneous sharp waves recorded in CA1 stratum radiatum were similar to adults. In both age groups unit activity recorded juxtacellularly from unidentified neurons in CA1 stratum pyramidale and stratum oriens was temporally modulated by CA3 ripples. However, aged neurons exhibited reduced spike probability during the early cycles of the CA3 ripple oscillation. These findings suggest that aging disrupts the coordination of patterned activity in the CA3-CA1 circuit.

  8. 5-HT4-receptors modulate induction of long-term depression but not potentiation at hippocampal output synapses in acute rat brain slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wawra

    Full Text Available The subiculum is the principal target of CA1 pyramidal cells and mediates hippocampal output to various cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. The majority of subicular pyramidal cells are burst-spiking neurons. Previous studies indicated that high frequency stimulation in subicular burst-spiking cells causes presynaptic NMDA-receptor dependent long-term potentiation (LTP whereas low frequency stimulation induces postsynaptic NMDA-receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD. In the present study, we investigate the effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 4 (5-HT4 receptor activation and blockade on both forms of synaptic plasticity in burst-spiking cells. We demonstrate that neither activation nor block of 5-HT4 receptors modulate the induction or expression of LTP. In contrast, activation of 5-HT4 receptors facilitates expression of LTD, and block of the 5-HT4 receptor prevents induction of short-term depression and LTD. As 5-HT4 receptors are positively coupled to adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1, 5-HT4 receptors might modulate PKA activity through AC1. Since LTD is blocked in the presence of 5-HT4 receptor antagonists, our data are consistent with 5-HT4 receptor activation by ambient serotonin or intrinsically active 5-HT4 receptors. Our findings provide new insight into aminergic modulation of hippocampal output.

  9. Electrophysiological characteristics of medium spiny neurons in neocortex-striatum-substantia nigra brain slices of rats%大鼠皮质-纹状体-黑质脑片中等多棘神经元的电生理特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐嵩; 孔岩; 董万利; 张正春; 曹碧茵

    2011-01-01

    目的 通过制备大鼠皮质-纹状体-黑质脑片,在可视条件下观察纹状体中等多棘神经元(MSN)的电活动,探讨其电生理特性.方法 选用出牛7~10 d的健康SD大鼠,制备皮质-纹状体-黑质旁矢状位脑片,通过红外微分干涉相差(IR-DIC)显微镜直视下定位纹状体MSN,并采用膜片钳放大器全细胞记录,电流钳模式下记录MSN的自发性电活动,采用步阶电流注入,观察膜电位变化.结果 成功记录的92个MSN表现为三种状态:14个细胞为持续的极化状态,无动作电位发放;61个细胞表现为持续的极化状态间隔短阵的去极化至阈电位水平伴发动作电位;17个细胞为持续的极化状态间隔突然出现的去极化状态.三种表现形式细胞的静息电位、阈电位均数差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).注入电流时,膜电位变化表现为一定程度的延迟,电位变化随注入电流增强有减少趋势.结论 旁矢状位脑片中的纹状体MSN保留了在体的电生理特性,为深入研究黑质-纹状体通路电信号的发生和传递在帕金森病发病机制中的作用奠定了基础.%Objective To establish the neocortex-striatum-substantia nigra brain slices of rats and observe the medium spiny neurons of striatum under a visible condition so as to explore their electrophysiological characteristics. Methods The brain slices containing the neocortex-striatum-substantia nigra were prepared from SD rats of postnatal 7 - 10 days. With infrared differential interference contrast (IR-DIC) microscope and patch clamp amplifier whole-cell recording technique, the medium spiny neurons were located in striatum and their spontaneous electrical activity was recorded in the current clamp mode. By infusing the step current, we observed the variation of membrane potentials. Results There were three types of conditions in the 92 medium spiny neurons successfully recorded. Among them, 14 were in persistent down state without action potential

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of 3D Micro- and Nanoelectrodes for Neuron Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria; Vazquez, Patricia; Olsen, Mark Holm

    2010-01-01

    between cells and ultimately for brain slice recordings and small nanoelectrodes for highly localized measurements and ultimately for intracellular studies. Electrical and electrochemical characterization of these electrodes as well as the results of PC12 cell differentiation on chip will be presented...

  11. Intrinsic control of electroresponsive properties of transplanted mammalian brain neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, J; Yarom, Y

    1985-01-01

    The present study presents the first analysis of neurons in mammalian brain transplants based on intracellular recording. The results, obtained in brain slices including both donor and host tissue, showed that neuronal precursor cells in embryonic transplants retained their ability to complete...... their normal differentiation of cell-type-specific electroresponsive properties. Distortions in cell aggregation and synaptic connectivity did not affect this aspect of neuronal differentiation....

  12. Long-term neural recordings using MEMS based moveable microelectrodes in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Jackson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the critical requirements of the emerging class of neural prosthetic devices is to maintain good quality neural recordings over long time periods. We report here a novel (Micro-ElectroMechanical Systems based technology that can move microelectrodes in the event of deterioration in neural signal to sample a new set of neurons. Microscale electro-thermal actuators are used to controllably move microelectrodes post-implantation in steps of approximately 9 µm. In this study, a total of 12 moveable microelectrode chips were individually implanted in adult rats. Two of the 12 moveable microelectrode chips were not moved over a period of 3 weeks and were treated as control experiments. During the first three weeks of implantation, moving the microelectrodes led to an improvement in the average SNR from 14.61 ± 5.21 dB before movement to 18.13 ± 4.99 dB after movement across all microelectrodes and all days. However, the average RMS values of noise amplitudes were similar at 2.98 ± 1.22 µV and 3.01 ± 1.16 µV before and after microelectrode movement. Beyond three weeks, the primary observed failure mode was biological rejection of the PMMA (dental cement based skull mount resulting in the device loosening and eventually falling from the skull. Additionally, the average SNR for functioning devices beyond three weeks was 11.88 ± 2.02 dB before microelectrode movement and was significantly different (p<0.01 from the average SNR of 13.34 ± 0.919 dB after movement. The results of this study demonstrate that MEMS based technologies can move microelectrodes in rodent brains in long-term experiments resulting in improvements in signal quality. Further improvements in packaging and surgical techniques will potentially enable movable microelectrodes to record cortical neuronal activity in chronic experiments.

  13. Localization of brain activity during auditory verbal short-term memory derived from magnetic recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, A; Kristeva, R; Cheyne, D; Lindinger, G; Deecke, L

    1991-09-01

    We have studied magnetic and electrical fields of the brain in normal subjects during the performance of an auditory verbal short-term memory task. On each trial 3 digits, selected from the numbers 'one' through 'nine', were presented for memorization followed by a probe number which could or could not be a member of the preceding memory set. The subject pressed an appropriate response button and accuracy and reaction time were measured. Magnetic fields recorded from up to 63 sites over both hemispheres revealed a transient field at 110 ms to both the memory item and the probe consistent with a dipole source in Heschl's gyrus; a sustained magnetic field between 300 and 800 ms to just the memory items localized to the temporal lobe slightly deeper and posterior to Heschl's gyri; and a sustained magnetic field between 300 and 800 ms to just the probes localized bilaterally to the medio-basal temporal lobes. These results are related to clinical disorders of short-term memory in man.

  14. Is there a tape recorder in your head? How the brain stores and retrieves musical melodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef P Rauschecker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Music consists of strings of sound that vary over time. Technical devices, such as tape recorders, store musical melodies by transcribing event times of temporal sequences into consecutive locations on the storage medium. Playback occurs by reading out the stored information in the same sequence. However, it is unclear how the brain stores and retrieves auditory sequences. Neurons in the anterior lateral belt of auditory cortex are sensitive to the combination of sound features in time, but the integration time of these neurons is not sufficient to store longer sequences that stretch over several seconds, minutes or more. Functional imaging studies in humans provide evidence that music is stored instead within the auditory dorsal stream, including premotor and prefrontal areas. In monkeys, these areas are the substrate for learning of motor sequences. It appears, therefore, that the auditory dorsal stream transforms musical into motor sequence information and vice versa, realizing what are known as forward and inverse models. The basal ganglia and the cerebellum are involved in setting up the sensorimotor associations, translating timing information into spatial codes and back again.

  15. Trimethyltin (TMT) neurotoxicity in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noraberg, J; Gramsbergen, J B; Fonnum, F;

    1998-01-01

    The neurotoxic effects of trimethyltin (TMT) on the hippocampus have been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, we examined whether the toxicity of TMT to hippocampal neurons could be reproduced in organotypic brain slice cultures in order to test the potential of this model for neurotoxico......The neurotoxic effects of trimethyltin (TMT) on the hippocampus have been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, we examined whether the toxicity of TMT to hippocampal neurons could be reproduced in organotypic brain slice cultures in order to test the potential of this model...

  16. Alterations in the properties of neonatal thalamocortical synapses with time in in vitro slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Liliana L; Currie, Stephen P; Daw, Michael I

    2017-01-01

    New synapses are constantly being generated and lost in the living brain with only a subset of these being stabilized to form an enduring component of neuronal circuitry. The properties of synaptic transmission have primarily been established in a variety of in vitro neuronal preparations. It is not clear, however, if newly-formed and persistent synapses contribute to the results of these studies consistently throughout the lifespan of these preparations. In neonatal somatosensory, barrel, cortex we have previously hypothesized that a population of thalamocortical synapses displaying unusually slow kinetics represent newly-formed, default-transient synapses. This clear phenotype would provide an ideal tool to investigate if such newly formed synapses consistently contribute to synaptic transmission throughout a normal experimental protocol. We show that the proportion of synapses recorded in vitro displaying slow kinetics decreases with time after brain slice preparation. However, slow synapses persist in vitro in the presence of either minocycline, an inhibitor of microglia-mediated synapse elimination, or the TrkB agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone a promoter of synapse formation. These findings show that the observed properties of synaptic transmission may systematically change with time in vitro in a standard brain slice preparation.

  17. Multi-slice Spiral Computed Tomography Manifestations of Brain and Cerebral Hemodynamics in Chronic Mountain Sickness%慢性高原病脑部MSCT表现与血流动力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王铎尧; 鲍海华; 赵希鹏; 李文方

    2011-01-01

    significantly highcr in CMS group than that in normal group (t=4. 551, P<0. 01 and t= 2. 898,P<0. 01 , respectively) . In CMS group , the CT value of superior sagittal sinus and bilateral middle cerebral artery with hemoglobin level (r=0. 758 and r=0. 740 , both P<0. 01). (2) The changes of CBF were obviously in grey matter than in white matter. In grey matter,CBF reduced more in CMS group than in normal group(P<0. 01). TTP in grey matter prolonged obviously in CMS group (P<0. 05 ). MTT in grey matter and white matter both prolonged obviously in CMS group (P<0. 01 ). Conclusion Multi-slice spiral CT is a valuable tool to study the state of the whole brain and the cercbral hemodvnamics in CMS patients.

  18. RESULTS OF SLICE MEASUREMENTS

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, J

    2011-01-01

    The linear accelerator ELBE delivers high-brightness electron bunches to multiple user stations, including two IR-FEL oscillators [1], [2]. In the framework of an upgrade program the current thermionic injector is being replaced by a SRF-photoinjector [3], [4]. The SRF injector promises higher beam quality, especially required for future experiments with high power laser radiation. During the commissioning phase, the SRF-injector was running in parallel to the thermionic gun. After installation of a injection beamline (dogleg), beam from the SRF-injector can now be injected into the ELBE linac. Detailed characterization of the electron beam quality delivered by the new electron injector includes vertical slice emittance measurements in addition to measurements of projected emittance values. This report gives an overview of the status of the project and summarizes first measurement results as well as results of simulations performed with measurement settings.

  19. Brain activity underlying auditory perceptual learning during short period training: simultaneous fMRI and EEG recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Ana Cláudia Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an accumulating body of evidence indicating that neuronal functional specificity to basic sensory stimulation is mutable and subject to experience. Although fMRI experiments have investigated changes in brain activity after relative to before perceptual learning, brain activity during perceptual learning has not been explored. This work investigated brain activity related to auditory frequency discrimination learning using a variational Bayesian approach for source localization, during simultaneous EEG and fMRI recording. We investigated whether the practice effects are determined solely by activity in stimulus-driven mechanisms or whether high-level attentional mechanisms, which are linked to the perceptual task, control the learning process. Results The results of fMRI analyses revealed significant attention and learning related activity in left and right superior temporal gyrus STG as well as the left inferior frontal gyrus IFG. Current source localization of simultaneously recorded EEG data was estimated using a variational Bayesian method. Analysis of current localized to the left inferior frontal gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus revealed gamma band activity correlated with behavioral performance. Conclusions Rapid improvement in task performance is accompanied by plastic changes in the sensory cortex as well as superior areas gated by selective attention. Together the fMRI and EEG results suggest that gamma band activity in the right STG and left IFG plays an important role during perceptual learning.

  20. A novel formal approach to program slicing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Program slicing is a well-known program analysis technique that extracts the elements of a program related to a particular computation. The current slicing methods, however, are singular (mainly based on a program or system dependence graph), and lack good reusability and flexibility. In this paper, we present a novel formal method for program slicing, modular monadic program slicing, which abstracts the computation of program slicing as a slice monad transformer, and applies it to semantic descriptions of the program analyzed in a modular way, forming the corresponding monadic slicing algorithms. The modular abstraction mechanism allows our slicing method to possess excellent modularity and language-flexibility properties. We also give the related axioms of our slice monad transformer, the proof of the correctness and the implementation of monadic slicing algorithms. We reveal the relations of our algorithms and graph-reachable slicing algorithms.

  1. [Brain changes in patients on chronic hemodialysis recorded by computed axial tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, V; Penkova, S; Boneva, R; Kiuchukov, G

    1988-01-01

    The brain changes in patients with chronic renal failure treated by chronic hemodialysis were studied with the help of computed tomography. The results showed the development of internal hydrocephalus in the patients in whose treatment "hard" water was used. In some of these patients the hydrocephalus was accompanied by clinical manifestations of the "disequilibrium" syndrome and the "hard water" syndrome. The patients dialyzed with "soft" water showed no brain changes and clinical signs. Hydrocephalus is probably the main pathogenetic factor for the development of the "hard water" syndrome which later develops in dialysis encephalopathy.

  2. Metabolic Characterization of Acutely Isolated Hippocampal and Cerebral Cortical Slices Using [U-(13)C]Glucose and [1,2-(13)C]Acetate as Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNair, Laura F; Kornfelt, Rasmus; Walls, Anne B;

    2016-01-01

    Brain slice preparations from rats, mice and guinea pigs have served as important tools for studies of neurotransmission and metabolism. While hippocampal slices routinely have been used for electrophysiology studies, metabolic processes have mostly been studied in cerebral cortical slices. Few c...

  3. A Model for Slicing JAVA Programs Hierarchically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bi-Xin Li; Xiao-Cong Fan; Jun Pang; Jian-Jun Zhao

    2004-01-01

    Program slicing can be effectively used to debug, test, analyze, understand and maintain objectoriented software. In this paper, a new slicing model is proposed to slice Java programs based on their inherent hierarchical feature. The main idea of hierarchical slicing is to slice programs in a stepwise way, from package level, to class level, method level, and finally up to statement level. The stepwise slicing algorithm and the related graph reachability algorithms are presented, the architecture of the Java program Analyzing Tool (JATO) based on hierarchical slicing model is provided, the applications and a small case study are also discussed.

  4. Revealing pathologies in the liquid crystalline structures of the brain by polarimetric studies (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshetyan, Karen; Melkonyan, Gurgen G.; Galstian, Tigran V.; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2015-10-01

    Natural or "self" alignment of molecular complexes in living tissue represents many similarities with liquid crystals (LC), which are anisotropic liquids. The orientational characteristics of those complexes may be related to many important functional parameters and their study may reveal important pathologies. The know-how, accumulated thanks to the study of LC materials, may thus be used to this end. One of the traditionally used methods, to characterize those materials, is the polarized light imaging (PLI) that allows for label-free analysis of anisotropic structures in the brain tissue and can be used, for example, for the analysis of myelinated fiber bundles. In the current work, we first attempted to apply the PLI on the mouse histological brain sections to create a map of anisotropic structures using cross-polarizer transmission light. Then we implemented the PLI for comparative study of histological sections of human postmortem brain samples under normal and pathological conditions, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Imaging the coronal, sagittal and horizontal sections of mouse brain allowed us to create a false color-coded fiber orientation map under polarized light. In human brain datasets for both control and PD groups we measured the pixel intensities in myelin-rich subregions of internal capsule and normalized these to non-myelinated background signal from putamen and caudate nucleus. Quantification of intensities revealed a statistically significant reduction of fiber intensity of PD compared to control subjects (2.801 +/- 0.303 and 3.724 +/- 0.07 respectively; *p < 0.05). Our study confirms the validity of PLI method for visualizing myelinated axonal fibers. This relatively simple technique can become a promising tool for study of neurodegenerative diseases where labeling-free imaging is an important benefit.

  5. pHEMA encapsulated PEDOT-PSS-CNT microsphere microelectrodes for recording single unit activity in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eCastagnola

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The long-term reliability of neural interfaces and stability of high-quality recordings are still unsolved issues in neuroscience research. High surface area PEDOT-PSS-CNT composites are able to greatly improve the performance of recording and stimulation for traditional intracortical metal microelectrodes by decreasing their impedance and increasing their charge transfer capability. This enhancement significantly reduces the size of the implantable device though preserving excellent electrical performances. On the other hand, the presence of nanomaterials often rises concerns regarding possible health hazards, especially when considering a clinical application of the devices. For this reason, we decided to explore the problem from a new perspective by designing and testing an innovative device based on nanostructured microspheres grown on a thin tether, integrating PEDOT-PSS-CNT nanocomposites with a soft synthetic permanent biocompatible hydrogel. The pHEMA hydrogel preserves the electrochemical performance and high quality recording ability of PEDOT-PSS-CNT coated devices, reduces the mechanical mismatch between soft brain tissue and stiff devices and also avoids direct contact between the neural tissue and the nanocomposite, by acting as a biocompatible protective barrier against potential nanomaterial detachment. Moreover, the spherical shape of the electrode together with the surface area increase provided by the nanocomposite deposited on it, maximize the electrical contact and may improve recording stability over time. These results have a good potential to contribute to fulfill the grand challenge of obtaining stable neural interfaces for long-term applications.

  6. When the brain simulates stopping: Neural activity recorded during real and imagined stop-signal tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Villar, Alberto J; Bonilla, F Mauricio; Carrillo-de-la-Peña, María T

    2016-10-01

    It has been suggested that mental rehearsal activates brain areas similar to those activated by real performance. Although inhibition is a key function of human behavior, there are no previous reports of brain activity during imagined response cancellation. We analyzed event-related potentials (ERPs) and time-frequency data associated with motor execution and inhibition during real and imagined performance of a stop-signal task. The ERPs characteristic of stop trials-that is, the stop-N2 and stop-P3-were also observed during covert performance of the task. Imagined stop (IS) trials yielded smaller stop-N2 amplitudes than did successful stop (SS) and unsuccessful stop (US) trials, but midfrontal theta power similar to that in SS trials. The stop-P3 amplitude for IS was intermediate between those observed for SS and US. The results may be explained by the absence of error-processing and correction processes during imagined performance. For go trials, real execution was associated with higher mu and beta desynchronization over motor areas, which confirms previous reports of lower motor activation during imagined execution and also with larger P3b amplitudes, probably indicating increased top-down attention to the real task. The similar patterns of activity observed for imagined and real performance suggest that imagination tasks may be useful for training inhibitory processes. Nevertheless, brain activation was generally weaker during mental rehearsal, probably as a result of the reduced engagement of top-down mechanisms and limited error processing.

  7. Development of an implantable wireless ECoG 128ch recording device for clinical brain machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kojiro; Hirata, Masayuki; Suzuki, Takafumi; Ando, Hiroshi; Ota, Yuki; Sato, Fumihiro; Morris, Shyne; Yoshida, Takeshi; Matsuki, Hidetoshi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2013-01-01

    Brain Machine Interface (BMI) is a system that assumes user's intention by analyzing user's brain activities and control devices with the assumed intention. It is considered as one of prospective tools to enhance paralyzed patients' quality of life. In our group, we especially focus on ECoG (electro-corti-gram)-BMI, which requires surgery to place electrodes on the cortex. We try to implant all the devices within the patient's head and abdomen and to transmit the data and power wirelessly. Our device consists of 5 parts: (1) High-density multi-electrodes with a 3D shaped sheet fitting to the individual brain surface to effectively record the ECoG signals; (2) A small circuit board with two integrated circuit chips functioning 128 [ch] analogue amplifiers and A/D converters for ECoG signals; (3) A Wifi data communication & control circuit with the target PC; (4) A non-contact power supply transmitting electrical power minimum 400[mW] to the device 20[mm] away. We developed those devices, integrated them, and, investigated the performance.

  8. Distributed Slicing in Dynamic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez, Antonio; Jimenez, Ernesto; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Raynal, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Peer to peer (P2P) systems are moving from application specific architectures to a generic service oriented design philosophy. This raises interesting problems in connection with providing useful P2P middleware services capable of dealing with resource assignment and management in a large-scale, heterogeneous and unreliable environment. The slicing service, has been proposed to allow for an automatic partitioning of P2P networks into groups (slices) that represent a controllable amount of some resource and that are also relatively homogeneous with respect to that resource. In this paper we propose two gossip-based algorithms to solve the distributed slicing problem. The first algorithm speeds up an existing algorithm sorting a set of uniform random numbers. The second algorithm statistically approximates the rank of nodes in the ordering. The scalability, efficiency and resilience to dynamics of both algorithms rely on their gossip-based models. These algorithms are proved viable theoretically and experimenta...

  9. Optical Recording of Neuronal Circuit Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the optical recording of cerebellar circuit dynamics from acute brain slices of the cerebellar surface. This preparation preserves the functional connectivity of the cerebellar cortex. It was used to investigate the function of Kv3 potassium channels in the cerebellar granule cell axon. Double knockout mice lacking both Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 potassium channels display severe motor deficits, while mice lacking only Kv3.1 or Kv3.3 do not. Since granule cells express both Kv3.1 an...

  10. A testbed to explore the optimal electrical stimulation parameters for suppressing inter-ictal spikes in human hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Chi Hsiao; Pen-Ning Yu; Dong Song; Liu, Charles Y; Heck, Christi N; Millett, David; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-01-01

    New interventions using neuromodulatory devices such as vagus nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation and responsive neurostimulation are available or under study for the treatment of refractory epilepsy. Since the actual mechanisms of the onset and termination of the seizure are still unclear, most researchers or clinicians determine the optimal stimulation parameters through trial-and-error procedures. It is necessary to further explore what types of electrical stimulation parameters (these may include stimulation frequency, amplitude, duration, interval pattern, and location) constitute a set of optimal stimulation paradigms to suppress seizures. In a previous study, we developed an in vitro epilepsy model using hippocampal slices from patients suffering from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Using a planar multi-electrode array system, inter-ictal activity from human hippocampal slices was consistently recorded. In this study, we have further transferred this in vitro seizure model to a testbed for exploring the possible neurostimulation paradigms to inhibit inter-ictal spikes. The methodology used to collect the electrophysiological data, the approach to apply different electrical stimulation parameters to the slices are provided in this paper. The results show that this experimental testbed will provide a platform for testing the optimal stimulation parameters of seizure cessation. We expect this testbed will expedite the process for identifying the most effective parameters, and may ultimately be used to guide programming of new stimulating paradigms for neuromodulatory devices.

  11. A Device for Long-Term Perfusion, Imaging, and Electrical Interfacing of Brain Tissue In vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Nathaniel J.; Vernekar, Varadraj N.; Potter, Steve M.; Vukasinovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Distributed microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from consistent, viable, ≥500 μm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3-D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step toward the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long) brain slice preparations. PMID:27065793

  12. Rate of entrance of benzodiazepines into the brain determined by eye movement recording.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    1 Peak saccadic velocity of horizontal eye movements, saccade duration at 30 degrees of amplitude and saccade reaction time were measured in six drug free male subjects. 2 In two separate experiments, intravenous doses of diazepam (5 mg), lorazepam (2 mg), chlordiazepoxide (25 mg) and placebo were given, and eye movement recordings were made before and at frequent intervals after drug administration. 3 All the benzodiazepines produced a significant impairment of peak saccadic velocity and sac...

  13. Unstable periodic orbits in human epileptic hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen-Ning Yu; Min-Chi Hsiao; Dong Song; Liu, Charles Y; Heck, Christi N; Millett, David; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-01-01

    Inter-ictal activity is studied in hippocampal slices resected from patients with epilepsy using local field potential recording. Inter-ictal activity in the dentate gyrus (DG) is induced by high-potassium (8 mM), low-magnesium (0.25 mM) aCSF with additional 100 μM 4-aminopyridine(4-AP). The dynamics of the inter-ictal activity is investigated by developing the first return map with inter-pulse intervals. Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) are detected in the hippocampal slice at the DG area according to both the topological recurrence method and the periodic orbit transform method. Surrogate analysis suggests the presence of UPOs in hippocampal slices from patients with epilepsy. This finding also suggests that inter-ictal activity is a chaotic system and will allow us to apply chaos control techniques to manipulate inter-ictal activity.

  14. Analysis of Direct Recordings from the Surface of the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towle, Vernon L.

    2006-03-01

    Recording electrophysiologic signals directly from the cortex of patients with chronically implanted subdural electrodes provides an opportunity to map the functional organization of human cortex. In addition to using direct cortical stimulation, sensory evoked potentials, and electrocorticography (ECoG) can also be used. The analysis of ECoG power spectrums and inter-electrode lateral coherence patterns may be helpful in identifying important eloquent cortical areas and epileptogenic regions in cortical multifocal epilepsy. Analysis of interictal ECoG coherence can reveal pathological cortical areas that are functionally distinct from patent cortex. Subdural ECoGs have been analyzed from 50 medically refractive pediatric epileptic patients as part of their routine surgical work-up. Recording arrays were implanted over the frontal, parietal, occipital or temporal lobes for 4-10 days, depending on the patient's seizure semiology and imaging studies. Segments of interictal ECoG ranging in duration from 5 sec to 45 min were examined to identify areas of increased local coherence. Ictal records were examined to identify the stages and spread of the seizures. Immediately before a seizure began, lateral coherence values decreased, reorganized, and then increased during the late ictal and post-ictal periods. When computed over relatively long interictal periods (45 min) coherence patterns were found to be highly stable (r = 0.97, p < .001), and only changed gradually over days. On the other hand, when calculated over short periods of time (5 sec) coherence patterns were highly dynamic. Coherence patterns revealed a rich topography, with reduced coherence across sulci and major fissures. Areas that participate in receptive and expressive speech can be mapped through event-related potentials and analysis of task-specific changes in power spectrums. Information processing is associated with local increases in high frequency activity, with concomitant changes in coherence

  15. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) depolarizes a subset of inspiratory neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Champagnat, J; Denavit-Saubié, M

    1996-01-01

    1. To extend the classification of respiratory neurons based on active membrane properties and discharge patterns to include responses to respiratory modulators, we have studied the effect of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, 1-5 microM) on the spontaneous respiratory-related neural activity...... in a thick brain stem slice preparation from the newborn mouse. The action of TRH on the respiratory output from the slice was investigated by recordings from the XII nerve. Cellular responses to TRH were investigated using whole cell recordings from hypoglossal motoneurons and three types of inspiratory...... neurons located in the rostral ventrolateral part of the slice. 2. Bath-applied TRH (1 microM) decreased the time between inspiratory discharges recorded on the XII nerve from 12.3 +/- 3.3 s to 4.9 +/- 1.1 s (n = 28; means +/- SD), i.e., caused an approximate threefold increase in the respiratory...

  16. Incorporating 3D-printing technology in the design of head-caps and electrode drives for recording neurons in multiple brain regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucca, Michael V.; Haufler, Darrell; Paré, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in recording and computing hardware have enabled laboratories to record the electrical activity of multiple brain regions simultaneously. Lagging behind these technical advances, however, are the methods needed to rapidly produce microdrives and head-caps that can flexibly accommodate different recording configurations. Indeed, most available designs target single or adjacent brain regions, and, if multiple sites are targeted, specially constructed head-caps are used. Here, we present a novel design style, for both microdrives and head-caps, which takes advantage of three-dimensional printing technology. This design facilitates targeting of multiple brain regions in various configurations. Moreover, the parts are easily fabricated in large quantities, with only minor hand-tooling and finishing required. PMID:25652930

  17. The contrasting effects of dendrotoxins and other potassium channel blockers in the CA1 and dentate gyrus regions of rat hippocampal slices

    OpenAIRE

    Southan, A P; Owen, D G

    1997-01-01

    The effects of potassium channel blocking compounds on synaptic transmission in the CA1 and dentate gyrus regions of the rat hippocampus were examined by means of simultaneous field potential recording techniques in brain slices.4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) enhanced the excitatory postsynaptic potential (e.p.s.p.) and induced multiple population spike responses in both regions. EC50 values were 6.7 μM in the CA1 (n=5) and 161.7 μM (n=5) in the dentate gyrus.Tetraethylammonium (TEA) increased the am...

  18. Time Slice Analysis Method Based on OTCA Used in fMRI Weak Signal Function Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Sen-lin; LI Li; ZHANG Xin-li; ZHANG Tie-mei

    2007-01-01

    The original temporal clustering analysis (OTCA) is an effective technique for obtaining brain activation maps when the timing and location of the activation are completely unknown, but its deficiency of sensitivity is exposed in processing brain activation signal which is relatively weak. The time slice analysis method based on OTCA is proposed considering the weakness of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal of the rat model. By dividing the stimulation period into several time slices and analyzing each slice to detect the activated pixels respectively after the background removal, the sensitivity is significantly improved. The inhibitory response in the hypothalamus after glucose loading is detected successfully with this method in the experiment on rat. Combined with the OTCA method, the time slice analysis method based on OTCA is effective on detecting when, where and which type of response will happen after stimulation, even if the fMRI signal is weak.

  19. Constrained reverse diffusion for thick slice interpolation of 3D volumetric MRI images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Aleš; Salvado, Olivier; Acosta, Oscar; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen

    2012-03-01

    Due to physical limitations inherent in magnetic resonance imaging scanners, three dimensional volumetric scans are often acquired with anisotropic voxel resolution. We investigate several interpolation approaches to reduce the anisotropy and present a novel approach - constrained reverse diffusion for thick slice interpolation. This technique was compared to common methods: linear and cubic B-Spline interpolation and a technique based on non-rigid registration of neighboring slices. The methods were evaluated on artificial MR phantoms and real MR scans of human brain. The constrained reverse diffusion approach delivered promising results and provides an alternative for thick slice interpolation, especially for higher anisotropy factors.

  20. Propofol enhances the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials in CA1 hippocampal slices of young and aged mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Yiqing; William J Middleton; Carlos M.Florez; Peter L.Carlen; Hossam EI-Beheiry

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing age was shown to decrease the requirements for propfol.However,the mechanisms of ageing-induced potentiation of anesthetic actions have not been clearly explored.The aim of this study is to compare the effects of propofol on the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in hippocampal slices of young and aging mice.Methods Brain slices were prepared from C57BL6 male young (2 months) and aging (>12 months) mice.The dendritic field excitatory postsynaptic potential was recorded from the CA1 stratum radiatum using patch clamp electrophysiological methods.A bipolar concentric stimulating electrode was placed along the Schaffer collateral for othodromic stimulation.The effects of clinically-relevant concentrations of propofol were studied in the young and ageing mouse tissues.Results Propofol application increased the orthodromically evoked fEPSP produced in slices taken from young and older animals.A striking feature in the I/O relationship was the decreased enhancement of the fEPSPs by propofol in slices from older mice.A clinically relevant concentration of propofol,10 μmol/L,showed more significant enhancement in amplitude and area under the curve (AUC) of fEPSP in young compared to tissues from older mice (amplitude:young (24.9±3.4)%,old (4.6±1.6)%; AUC young (30.6±5.4)%,old (2.1±1.7)%).There was no statistically significant difference between the paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) ratios calculated for the responses obtained in tissues from young mice.In slices from older mice,in the presence of 10 μmol/L propofol,PPF was decreased and returned to baseline after washout (baseline 1.21±0.01,propofol:1.16±0.01).Bicuculline (15 μmol/L) blocked the enhancement of propofol on fEPSP in tissues from young and old mice.Conclusion The fEPSP of slices from aging mice demonstrates diminished sensitivity to the enhancing actions of propofol.

  1. SLIMMER: SLIce MRI motion estimation and reconstruction tool for studies of fetal anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-03-01

    We describe a free software tool which combines a set of algorithms that provide a framework for building 3D volumetric images of regions of moving anatomy using multiple fast multi-slice MRI studies. It is specifically motivated by the clinical application of unsedated fetal brain imaging, which has emerged as an important area for image analysis. The tool reads multiple DICOM image stacks acquired in any angulation into a consistent patient coordinate frame and allows the user to select regions to be locally motion corrected. It combines algorithms for slice motion estimation, bias field inconsistency correction and 3D volume reconstruction from multiple scattered slice stacks. The tool is built onto the RView (http://rview.colin-studholme.net) medical image display software and allows the user to inspect slice stacks, and apply both stack and slice level motion estimation that incorporates temporal constraints based on slice timing and interleave information read from the DICOM data. Following motion estimation an algorithm for bias field inconsistency correction provides the user with the ability to remove artifacts arising from the motion of the local anatomy relative to the imaging coils. Full 3D visualization of the slice stacks and individual slice orientations is provided to assist in evaluating the quality of the motion correction and final image reconstruction. The tool has been evaluated on a range of clinical data acquired on GE, Siemens and Philips MRI scanners.

  2. Drying Characteristics and Product Quality of Lemon Slices Dried with Hot Air Circulation Oven and Hybrid Heatpump Dryers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hong Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, drying characteristics and product quality of Coulomb-force-assisted heatpump and oven dried lemon slices were studied. Lemon slices with 3 mm thickness each, were dried using oven and Coulomb-force-assisted-heatpump dryer with and without auxiliary heater at different drying conditions. It was found that the drying rate of the lemon slices dried by all drying methods showed only falling rate states, which indicates the drying kinetics were controlled by internal moisture diffusion. Oven drying of lemon slices at 60°C showed the highest drying rate among all, followed by oven dried slices at 50°C, Coulomb-force-heater-assisted-heatpump (CF-HT-HP dried slices at 31°C, Coulomb-force-assisted-heatpump (CF-HP dried slices at 22°C, oven dried slices at 40°C and heatpump dried slices at 22°C. The average effective moisture diffusivity value for the slices dried with these drying methods was found in the range of 16.2 to 63.8´10-4 mm2min-1. In terms of quality assessment, CF-HP dried lemon slices retained the highest amount of Vitamin C as compared to the lemon slices dried by other drying methods. However, it retained relatively lower amount of total phenolic content (TPC as compared to oven dried products. Among of all, CF-HP drying method produced dried lemon slices with the highest Vitamin C (6.74 mg AA / g dry weight whereas oven dried lemon slices at 50°C preserved most of the TPC in the dried slices, which recorded as 13.76 mg GA / g dry weight.

  3. Slice stretching effects for maximal slicing of a Schwarzschild black hole

    OpenAIRE

    Reimann, B.

    2005-01-01

    Slice stretching effects such as slice sucking and slice wrapping arise when foliating the extended Schwarzschild spacetime with maximal slices. For arbitrary spatial coordinates these effects are quantified here in the context of boundary conditions where the lapse arises as a linear combination of odd and even lapse. Favourable boundary conditions are then derived which make the overall slice stretching occur late in numerical simulations. Allowing the lapse to become negative, this require...

  4. Viscous fingering of miscible slices

    CERN Document Server

    De Wit, A; Martin, M; Wit, Anne De; Bertho, Yann; Martin, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Viscous fingering of a miscible high viscosity slice of fluid displaced by a lower viscosity fluid is studied in porous media by direct numerical simulations of Darcy's law coupled to the evolution equation for the concentration of a solute controlling the viscosity of miscible solutions. In contrast with fingering between two semi-infinite regions, fingering of finite slices is a transient phenomenon due to the decrease in time of the viscosity ratio across the interface induced by fingering and dispersion processes. We show that fingering contributes transiently to the broadening of the peak in time by increasing its variance. A quantitative analysis of the asymptotic contribution of fingering to this variance is conducted as a function of the four relevant parameters of the problem i.e. the log-mobility ratio R, the length of the slice l, the Peclet number Pe and the ratio between transverse and axial dispersion coefficients $\\epsilon$. Relevance of the results is discussed in relation with transport of vi...

  5. Automatic basal slice detection for cardiac analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknezhad, Mahsa; Marchesseau, Stephanie; Brown, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Identification of the basal slice in cardiac imaging is a key step to measuring the ejection fraction (EF) of the left ventricle (LV). Despite research on cardiac segmentation, basal slice identification is routinely performed manually. Manual identification, however, has been shown to have high inter-observer variability, with a variation of the EF by up to 8%. Therefore, an automatic way of identifying the basal slice is still required. Prior published methods operate by automatically tracking the mitral valve points from the long-axis view of the LV. These approaches assumed that the basal slice is the first short-axis slice below the mitral valve. However, guidelines published in 2013 by the society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance indicate that the basal slice is the uppermost short-axis slice with more than 50% myocardium surrounding the blood cavity. Consequently, these existing methods are at times identifying the incorrect short-axis slice. Correct identification of the basal slice under these guidelines is challenging due to the poor image quality and blood movement during image acquisition. This paper proposes an automatic tool that focuses on the two-chamber slice to find the basal slice. To this end, an active shape model is trained to automatically segment the two-chamber view for 51 samples using the leave-one-out strategy. The basal slice was detected using temporal binary profiles created for each short-axis slice from the segmented two-chamber slice. From the 51 successfully tested samples, 92% and 84% of detection results were accurate at the end-systolic and the end-diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle, respectively.

  6. Effects of fractionated doses of fast neutrons or photons on the canine brain: evaluation by computerized tomography and evoked response recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E.W.; Davis, D.O.; Gaskill, J.W.; Deye, J.A.; Fisher, M.P.; Sloan, G.E.; Rogers, C.C.

    1980-12-01

    The use of fast neutrons in the treatment of cancer necessitates a knowledge of the normal tissue responses. This study was designed to compare the late effects of fractionated doses of fast neutrons with fractionated doses of photons on canine brains by evoked response recording and viewing computerized tomograms (CT). A relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 4 was obtained for normal brain tissue assessed by mortality and onset of neurologic symptoms. Every three months post-irradiation, visual and sensory evoked responses were recorded. Changes over time appeared to be minimal; however, computerized tomographs showed marked brain shrinkage. A method of quantitating cerebrospinal fluid and parenchymal volumes from scans is described and future use of these CT ratios to generate dose response curves and RBE values is postulated.

  7. Electroresponsive properties and membrane potential trajectories of three types of inspiratory neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Champagnat, J; Denavit-Saubié, M

    1996-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological properties of inspiratory neurons were studied in a rhythmically active thick-slice preparation of the newborn mouse brain stem maintained in vitro. Whole cell patch recordings were performed from 60 inspiratory neurons within the rostral ventrolateral part of the slice...... with the aim of extending the classification of inspiratory neurons to include analysis of active membrane properties. 2. The slice generated a regular rhythmic motor output recorded as burst of action potentials on a XII nerve root with a peak to peak time of 11.5 +/- 3.4 s and a duration of 483 +/- 54 ms...... (means +/- SD, n = 50). Based on the electroresponsive properties and membrane potential trajectories throughout the respiratory cycle, three types of inspiratory neurons could be distinguished. 3. Type-1 neurons were spiking in the interval between the inspiratory potentials (n = 9) or silent...

  8. Modelling and Analysis of Electrical Potentials Recorded in Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Torbjørn V; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Potworowski, Jan; Łęski, Szymon; Głąbska, Helena; Wójcik, Daniel K; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2015-10-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs), substrate-integrated planar arrays of up to thousands of closely spaced metal electrode contacts, have long been used to record neuronal activity in in vitro brain slices with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, the analysis of the MEA potentials has generally been mainly qualitative. Here we use a biophysical forward-modelling formalism based on the finite element method (FEM) to establish quantitatively accurate links between neural activity in the slice and potentials recorded in the MEA set-up. Then we develop a simpler approach based on the method of images (MoI) from electrostatics, which allows for computation of MEA potentials by simple formulas similar to what is used for homogeneous volume conductors. As we find MoI to give accurate results in most situations of practical interest, including anisotropic slices covered with highly conductive saline and MEA-electrode contacts of sizable physical extensions, a Python software package (ViMEAPy) has been developed to facilitate forward-modelling of MEA potentials generated by biophysically detailed multicompartmental neurons. We apply our scheme to investigate the influence of the MEA set-up on single-neuron spikes as well as on potentials generated by a cortical network comprising more than 3000 model neurons. The generated MEA potentials are substantially affected by both the saline bath covering the brain slice and a (putative) inadvertent saline layer at the interface between the MEA chip and the brain slice. We further explore methods for estimation of current-source density (CSD) from MEA potentials, and find the results to be much less sensitive to the experimental set-up.

  9. A novel bioelectronic nose based on brain-machine interface using implanted electrode recording in vivo in olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qi; Du, Liping; Zhuang, Liujing; Li, Rong; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Ping

    2013-11-15

    The mammalian olfactory system has merits of higher sensitivity, selectivity and faster response than current electronic nose system based on chemical sensor array. It is advanced and feasible to detect and discriminate odors by mammalian olfactory system. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel bioelectronic nose based on the brain-machine interface (BMI) technology for odor detection by in vivo electrophysiological measurements of olfactory bulb. In this work, extracellular potentials of mitral/tufted (M/T) cells in olfactory bulb (OB) were recorded by implanted 16-channel microwire electrode arrays. The odor-evoked response signals were analyzed. We found that neural activities of different neurons showed visible different firing patterns both in temporal features and rate features when stimulated by different small molecular odorants. The detection low limit is below 1 ppm for some specific odors. Odors were classified by an algorithm based on population vector similarity and support vector machine (SVM). The results suggested that the novel bioelectonic nose was sensitive to odorant stimuli. The best classifying accuracy was up to 95%. With the development of the BMI and olfactory decoding methods, we believe that this system will represent emerging and promising platforms for wide applications in medical diagnosis and security fields.

  10. Ethanol induces MAP2 changes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noraberg, J; Zimmer, J

    1998-01-01

    loss of CA3 pyramidal cells and moderate loss of dentate granule cells, as seen in vivo. The results indicate that brain slice cultures combined with immunostaining for cytoskeleton and neuronal markers can be used for studies of ethanol and organic solvent neurotoxicity.......Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and neuron-specific protein (NeuN) immunostains were used to demonstrate neurotoxic effects in mature hippocampal slice cultures exposed to ethanol (50, 100, 200 mM) for 4 weeks. At the low dose the density of MAP2 immunostaining in the dentate molecular...... layer was 118% of the control cultures, with no detectable changes in CA1 and CA3. At 100 mM no changes were detected, while 200 mM ethanol significantly reduced the MAP2 density in both dentate (19%) and hippocampal dendritic fields (CA3, 52%; CA1, 55%). At this dose NeuN staining showed considerable...

  11. Impedance recordings to determine change in extracellular volume in the brain following cardiac arrest in broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis-Heutinck, LFM; Savenije, B; Postema, F; Van Voorst, A; Lambooij, E; Korf, J

    1998-01-01

    The present study describes a method to determine the onset and development of brain damage in broiler chickens. Exsanguination disrupts the brain metabolism and causes the brain to become ischemic. Energy-requiring systems in the cell membrane fail, which results in an ionic shift over the membrane

  12. A split microdrive for simultaneous multi-electrode recordings from two brain areas in awake small animals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.S. Lansink; M. Bakker; W. Buster; J. Lankelma; R. van der Blom; R. Westdorp; R.N.J.M.A. Joosten; B.L. Mc.Naughton; C.M.A. Pennartz

    2007-01-01

    Complex cognitive operations such as memory formation and decision-making are thought to be mediated not by single, isolated brain structures but by multiple, connected brain areas. To facilitate studies on the neural communication between connected brain structures, we developed a multi-electrode m

  13. A novel method for recording neuronal depolarization with recording at 125-825 Hz: implications for imaging fast neural activity in the brain with electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, T; Gilad, O; Ghosh, A; Schuettler, M; Holder, D S

    2011-05-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a recently developed medical imaging method which has the potential to produce images of fast neuronal depolarization in the brain. Previous modelling suggested that applied current needed to be below 100 Hz but the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) recorded with scalp electrodes during evoked responses was too low to permit imaging. A novel method in which contemporaneous evoked potentials are subtracted is presented with current applied at 225 Hz to cerebral cortex during evoked activity; although the signal is smaller than at DC by about 10×, the principal noise from the EEG is reduced by about 1000×, resulting in an improved SNR. It was validated with recording of compound action potentials in crab walking leg nerve where peak changes of -0.2% at 125 and 175 Hz tallied with biophysical modelling. In recording from rat cerebral cortex during somatosensory evoked responses, peak impedance decreases of -0.07 ± 0.006% (mean ± SE) with a SNR of >50 could be recorded at 225 Hz. This method provides a reproducible and artefact free means for recording resistance changes during neuronal activity which could form the basis for imaging fast neural activity in the brain.

  14. PROGRAM SLICING BASED ON INTERESTING INDEX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Fangjun; Yi Tong

    2004-01-01

    With the scale of programs becoming increasingly bigger, and the complexity degree higher, how to select program fragments for slicing has become an important research topic. A new type of criterion called interesting index is proposed for selecting parts of procedures or procedure fragments to do program slicing. This new criterion considers not only the subjective aspects in users, namely users' emphasis on the time efficiency, storage capacity or readability,but also the objective aspect in large procedures. It also represents the benefit of the users, while displaying the many-faceted roles that program slicing plays. In this way users can proceed with program slicing to large systems or unfinished systems.

  15. Brain activity underlying auditory perceptual learning during short period training: simultaneous fMRI and EEG recording

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background There is an accumulating body of evidence indicating that neuronal functional specificity to basic sensory stimulation is mutable and subject to experience. Although fMRI experiments have investigated changes in brain activity after relative to before perceptual learning, brain activity during perceptual learning has not been explored. This work investigated brain activity related to auditory frequency discrimination learning using a variational Bayesian approach for sourc...

  16. Electrohydrodynamic drying of carrot slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Ding

    Full Text Available Carrots have one of the highest levels of carotene, and they are rich in vitamins, fiber and minerals. However, since fresh carrots wilt rapidly after harvest under inappropriate storage conditions, drying has been used to improve their shelf life and retain nutritional quality. Therefore, to further investigate the potential of this method, carrot slices were dried in an EHD system in order to study the effect of different voltages on drying rate. As measures of quality, carotene content and rehydration ratio were, respectively, compared against the conventional oven drying regime. Carotene, the main component of the dried carrot, and rehydration characteristics of the dried product can both indicate quality by physical and chemical changes during the drying process. Mathematical modeling and simulation of drying curves were also performed, using root mean square error, reduced mean square of the deviation and modeling efficiency as the primary criteria to select the equation that best accounts for the variation in the drying curves of the dried samples. Theoretically, the Page model was best suited for describing the drying rate curve of carrot slices at 10kV to 30kV. Experimentally, the drying rate of carrots was notably greater in the EHD system when compared to control, and quality, as determined by carotene content and rehydration ratio, was also improved when compared to oven drying. Therefore, this work presents a facile and effective strategy for experimentally and theoretically determining the drying properties of carrots, and, as a result, it provides deeper insight into the industrial potential of the EHD drying technique.

  17. Color changes and acrylamide formation in fried potato slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedreschi, Franco; Moyano, Pedro; Kaack, Karl;

    2005-01-01

    at 85degreesC for 3.5 min. Unblanched slices were used as the control. Control and blanched potato slices (Panda variety, diameter: 37 mm, width: 2.2 mm) were fried at 120, 150 and 180degreesC until reaching moisture contents of similar to1.8% (total basis) and their acrylamide content and final color...... were measured. Color changes were recorded at different sampling times during frying at the three mentioned temperatures using the chromatic redness parameter a(*). Experimental data of surface temperature, moisture content and color change in potato chips during frying were fit to empirical...... relationship with correlation coefficients greater than 90%. A first-order rate equation was used to model the kinetics of color change. In all case the Arrhenius activation energy decreases alongside with decreasing chip moisture content. Blanching reduced acrylamide formation in potato chips in similar to64...

  18. Setting up alcohol-associated dementia models in vitro with primary-cultured hippocampal neuron and brain slice%采用海马原代神经元和离体脑片建立乙醇性痴呆体外模型的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勇; 曾玉娥; 杨海玉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To set up the different alcohol-associated dementia (AAD) models in vitro and provide methods for researching the mechanism of AAD.Methods Hippocampal neurons got from fetal rats were primary cultured for 6 days and identified.Then,the cells were treated with different doses of ethanol (25-100 mol/L) for 24 h.The cell viability was analyzed with MTT assay.The staining with Hoechst33342 was used to observe the cell apoptosis.In addition,hippocampi of newbom rats 7-10 days after birth were taken out and cut to 300 μm thickness of slices; the morphological changes of the brain slices were observed with HE staining at different time points after ethanol administration.Results Primary-cultured hippocampal neurons highly expressed neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and lowly expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP).And the cell viability was significantly decreased by ethanol administration (50-100 mol/L,24 h) in a dose-dependent manner.Increased apoptosis cells were detected when cells were treated with 50 mol/L concentration of ethanol for 24 h.For hippocampal slices,acute ethanol administration (50 mol/L,30 min) induced significant cell apoptosis and chronic ethanol administration (50 mol/L,24 h) resulted in the serious damage of hippocampal morphology.Conclusions The models that primary-cultured hippocampal neuron apoptosis induced by chronic ethanol administration is suitable for researching the mechanism of AAD.Hippocampal slices are more sensitive for ethanol toxic effects and may be used for the research of acute alcohol toxicity.%目的 建立和比较不同的乙醇性痴呆(AAD)体外研究模型,为进一步探讨其发病机制提供方法学参考. 方法 取胎鼠海马进行原代神经元培养及鉴定,给予不同浓度的乙醇作用24 h,采用四甲基偶氮唑蓝(MTT)比色法检测细胞存活率以及Hoechst33342染色观察细胞凋亡状况.另外,取新生大鼠海马切取脑片进行离体培养,采用HE染色观察不同时间

  19. Brain injury impairs working memory and prefrontal circuit function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin James Smith

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available More than 2.5 million Americans suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI each year. Even mild to moderate traumatic brain injury causes long-lasting neurological effects. Despite its prevalence, no therapy currently exists to treat the underlying cause of cognitive impairment suffered by TBI patients. Following lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI, the most widely used experimental model of TBI, we investigated alterations in working memory and excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance in the prefrontal cortex. LFPI impaired working memory as assessed with a T-maze behavioral task. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials recorded in the prefrontal cortex were reduced in slices derived from brain-injured mice. Spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents onto layer 2/3 neurons were more frequent in slices derived from LFPI mice while inhibitory currents onto layer 2/3 neurons were smaller after LFPI. Additionally, an increase in action potential threshold and concomitant decrease in firing rate was observed in layer 2/3 neurons in slices from injured animals. Conversely, no differences in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic transmission onto layer 5 neurons were observed; however, layer 5 neurons demonstrated a decrease in input resistance and action potential duration after LFPI. These results demonstrate synaptic and intrinsic alterations in prefrontal circuitry that may underlie working memory impairment caused by TBI.

  20. Integrating interface slicing into software engineering processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Interface slicing is a tool which was developed to facilitate software engineering. As previously presented, it was described in terms of its techniques and mechanisms. The integration of interface slicing into specific software engineering activities is considered by discussing a number of potential applications of interface slicing. The applications discussed specifically address the problems, issues, or concerns raised in a previous project. Because a complete interface slicer is still under development, these applications must be phrased in future tenses. Nonetheless, the interface slicing techniques which were presented can be implemented using current compiler and static analysis technology. Whether implemented as a standalone tool or as a module in an integrated development or reverse engineering environment, they require analysis no more complex than that required for current system development environments. By contrast, conventional slicing is a methodology which, while showing much promise and intuitive appeal, has yet to be fully implemented in a production language environment despite 12 years of development.

  1. Simultaneous electrophysiological recording and calcium imaging of suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Robert P; Allen, Charles N

    2013-12-08

    Simultaneous electrophysiological and fluorescent imaging recording methods were used to study the role of changes of membrane potential or current in regulating the intracellular calcium concentration. Changing environmental conditions, such as the light-dark cycle, can modify neuronal and neural network activity and the expression of a family of circadian clock genes within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the location of the master circadian clock in the mammalian brain. Excitatory synaptic transmission leads to an increase in the postsynaptic Ca(2+) concentration that is believed to activate the signaling pathways that shifts the rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes. Hypothalamic slices containing the SCN were patch clamped using microelectrodes filled with an internal solution containing the calcium indicator bis-fura-2. After a seal was formed between the microelectrode and the SCN neuronal membrane, the membrane was ruptured using gentle suction and the calcium probe diffused into the neuron filling both the soma and dendrites. Quantitative ratiometric measurements of the intracellular calcium concentration were recorded simultaneously with membrane potential or current. Using these methods it is possible to study the role of changes of the intracellular calcium concentration produced by synaptic activity and action potential firing of individual neurons. In this presentation we demonstrate the methods to simultaneously record electrophysiological activity along with intracellular calcium from individual SCN neurons maintained in brain slices.

  2. Physiological Effects of Enriched Environment Exposure and LTP Induction in the Hippocampus In Vivo Do Not Transfer Faithfully to In Vitro Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Michael J.; Abraham, Wickliffe C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of experimental paradigms use in vitro brain slices to test for changes in synaptic transmission and plasticity following a behavioral manipulation. For example, a number of previous studies have reported a variety of effects of environmental enrichment (EE) exposure on field potential responses in hippocampal slices, but in no study was…

  3. Neuroprotective effects of anticonvulsants in rat hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen/glucose deprivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, Jens C

    2003-01-01

    Some anticonvulsants show neuroprotective effects, and may be of use in reducing neuronal death resulting from stroke or traumatic brain injury. Here I report that a broad range of anticonvulsants protect cells in hippocampal slice cultures from death induced by oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD...

  4. Chronic neural probe for simultaneous recording of single-unit, multi-unit, and local field potential activity from multiple brain sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothof, F.; Bonini, L.; Lanzilotto, M.; Livi, A.; Fogassi, L.; Orban, G. A.; Paul, O.; Ruther, P.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Drug resistant focal epilepsy can be treated by resecting the epileptic focus requiring a precise focus localisation using stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) probes. As commercial SEEG probes offer only a limited spatial resolution, probes of higher channel count and design freedom enabling the incorporation of macro and microelectrodes would help increasing spatial resolution and thus open new perspectives for investigating mechanisms underlying focal epilepsy and its treatment. This work describes a new fabrication process for SEEG probes with materials and dimensions similar to clinical probes enabling recording single neuron activity at high spatial resolution. Approach. Polyimide is used as a biocompatible flexible substrate into which platinum electrodes and leads are integrated with a minimal feature size of 5 μm. The polyimide foils are rolled into the cylindrical probe shape at a diameter of 0.8 mm. The resulting probe features match those of clinically approved devices. Tests in saline solution confirmed the probe stability and functionality. Probes were implanted into the brain of one monkey (Macaca mulatta), trained to perform different motor tasks. Suitable configurations including up to 128 electrode sites allow the recording of task-related neuronal signals. Main results. Probes with 32 and 64 electrode sites were implanted in the posterior parietal cortex. Local field potentials and multi-unit activity were recorded as early as one hour after implantation. Stable single-unit activity was achieved for up to 26 days after implantation of a 64-channel probe. All recorded signals showed modulation during task execution. Significance. With the novel probes it is possible to record stable biologically relevant data over a time span exceeding the usual time needed for epileptic focus localisation in human patients. This is the first time that single units are recorded along cylindrical polyimide probes chronically implanted 22 mm deep into the

  5. CENTRAL ASSESSMENT OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY BRAIN SCANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Ann Cala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of multislice CT (MSCT scanners since 1998 has resulted in submillimetre thick slices being able to be acquired, without increasing the radiation dose to the patient. Although the incident x-ray beam is widened in the slice thickness direction (Z-direction, the emergent x-rays fall upon multiple rows of small detectors. This means data can be collected simultaneously for more than one slice per rotation of the x-ray tube. For example, the dose received by the patient will be the same for four thin slices of 2.5 mm, as for one slice of 10 mm thickness. A 64-slice MSCT can create 0.625 mm thick slices. This leads to high diagnostic value in the detection of small abnormalities in stroke patients and in the reconstruction of data from CT angiography (CTA of the brain.

  6. How Slice Stretching arises when Maximally Slicing the Schwarzschild Spacetime with Vanishing Shift

    CERN Document Server

    Reimann, B

    2004-01-01

    When foliating the extended Schwarzschild spacetime with maximal slices while using zero shift, slice stretching effects such as slice sucking and slice wrapping arise. These effects are due to the differential infall of Eulerian observers and can be quantified for arbitrary spatial coordinates in the context of even boundary conditions. As examples logarithmic and isotropic grid coordinates are discussed. For boundary conditions where the lapse arises as a linear combination of odd and even lapse, two integrals are introduced which characterize the overall slice stretching. Favorable boundary conditions are then derived which make slice stretching occur late in numerical simulations. Allowing the lapse to become negative, this requirement leads to lapse functions which approach at late times the odd lapse corresponding to the static Schwarzschild metric. Demanding in addition that a numerically favorable lapse remains non-negative, as result the average of odd and even lapse is obtained. At late times the la...

  7. The ATLAS Trigger Muon "Vertical Slice"

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; Biglietti, M; Carlino, G; Cataldi, G; Conventi, F; Del Prete, T; Di Mattia, A; Falciano, S; Gorini, S; Kanaya, N; Kohno, T; Krasznahorkay, A; Lagouri, T; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Marzano, F; Nagano, K; Nisati, A; Panikashvili, N; Pasqualucci, E; Primavera, M; Scannicchio, D A; Spagnolo, S; Tarem, S; Tarem, Z; Tokushuku, K; Usai, G; Ventura, A; Vercesi, V; Yamazaki, Y; 10th Pisa Meeting on Advanced Detectors : Frontier Detectors For Frontier Physics

    2007-01-01

    The muon trigger system is a fundamental component of the ATLAS detector at the LHC collider. In this paper we describe the ATLAS multi-level trigger selecting events with muons: the Muon Trigger Slice.

  8. Augmented inhibition from cannabinoid sensitive interneurons diminishes CA1 output after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Neal Johnson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The neurological impairments associated with traumatic brain injury include learning and memory deficits and increased risk of seizures. The hippocampus is critically involved in both of these phenomena and highly susceptible to damage by traumatic brain injury. To examine network activity in the hippocampal CA1 region after lateral fluid percussion injury, we used a combination of voltage sensitive dye, field potential and patch clamp recording in mouse hippocampal brain slices. When the stratum radiatum was stimulated in slices from injured mice we found decreased depolarization in stratum radiatum and increased hyperpolarization in stratum oriens, together with a decrease in the percentage of pyramidal neurons firing stimulus-evoked action potentials. Increased hyperpolarization in stratum oriens persisted when glutamatergic transmission was blocked. However, we found no changes in stratum oriens responses when the alveus was stimulated to directly activate stratum oriens. These results suggest that the increased stratum oriens hyperpolarization evoked by stratum radiatum stimulation was mediated by interneurons that have cell bodies and/or axons in stratum radiatum, and form synapses in stratum pyramidale and stratum oriens. A low concentration (100 nM of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2,restored CA1 output in slices from injured animals. These findings support the hypothesis that increased GABAergic signaling by cannabinoid sensitive interneurons contributes to the reduced CA1 output following traumatic brain injury.

  9. Slicing Strategy for Selective Laser Melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xin; LIU Ji-quan; FAN Shu-qian

    2014-01-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is one of the most popular additive manufacturing (AM) technologies for metal parts. Slicing result, especially for the different dimensional slicing geometry and its topology, plays an important role because of the thermodynamic behavior of metal powders. To get correct geometry and reliable topology, a slicing strategy for SLM is proposed. The unavoidable numerical error caused by sampling and geometric transformation is suppressed firstly, according to shifting the z-coordinate of a vertex with a small value such the shifted vertex is on a slicing plane. The result of vertex-shifting makes it possible to identify different geometric features such as skin surfaces, overhang surfaces, extreme edges and volumetric solid. Second, from geometric primitives a hierarchy of axis-aligned bounding boxes (AABBs) is constructed and used to speed up intersection of slicing planes against sets of triangles. All intersecting segments are given different signs to depict their geometric or topological information. Based the different signs, the different dimensional geometry that is eventually represented by simple and anticlockwise oriented polygons, are identified. Finally, the polygons are classified and nested in a multi-tree data structure set to produce correct topological relations. The result of digital and physical experiments shows the proposed slicing strategy is feasible and robust.

  10. GDNF and neublastin protect against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity in hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, C; Kristensen, B W; Blaabjerg, M;

    2000-01-01

    The potential neuroprotective effects of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and neublastin (NBN) against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity were examined in hippocampal brain slice cultures. Recombinant human GDNF (25-100 ng/ ml) or NBN, in medium conditioned by growth of transfected, NBN......-producing HiB5 cells, were added to slice cultures I h before exposure to 10 microM NMDA for 48h. Neuronal cell death was monitored, before and during the NMDA exposure, by densitometric measurements of propidium iodide (PI) uptake and loss of Nissl staining. Both the addition of rhGDNF and NBN...

  11. Microelectronics, bioinformatics and neurocomputation for massive neuronal recordings in brain circuits with large scale multielectrode array probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccione, Alessandro; Gandolfo, Mauro; Zordan, Stefano; Amin, Hayder; Di Marco, Stefano; Nieus, Thierry; Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Berdondini, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Deciphering neural network function in health and disease requires recording from many active neurons simultaneously. Developing approaches to increase their numbers is a major neurotechnological challenge. Parallel to recent advances in optical Ca(2+) imaging, an emerging approach consists in adopting complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology to realize MultiElectrode Array (MEA) devices. By implementing signal conditioning and multiplexing circuits, these devices allow nowadays to record from several thousands of single neurons at sub-millisecond temporal resolution. At the same time, these recordings generate very large data streams which become challenging to analyze. Here, at first we shortly review the major approaches developed for data management and analysis for conventional, low-resolution MEAs. We highlight how conventional computational tools cannot be easily up-scaled to very large electrode array recordings, and custom bioinformatics tools are an emerging need in this field. We then introduce a novel approach adapted for the acquisition, compression and analysis of extracellular signals acquired simultaneously from 4096 electrodes with CMOS MEAs. Finally, as a case study, we describe how this novel large scale recording platform was used to record and analyze extracellular spikes from the ganglion cell layer in the wholemount retina at pan-retinal scale following patterned light stimulation.

  12. Reliability and validity of nonverbal thin slices in social interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nora A; Hall, Judith A; Schmid Mast, Marianne; Ruben, Mollie A; Frauendorfer, Denise; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Roter, Debra L; Nguyen, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    Four studies investigated the reliability and validity of thin slices of nonverbal behavior from social interactions including (a) how well individual slices of a given behavior predict other slices in the same interaction; (b) how well a slice of a given behavior represents the entirety of that behavior within an interaction; (c) how long a slice is necessary to sufficiently represent the entirety of a behavior within an interaction; (d) which slices best capture the entirety of behavior, across different behaviors; and (e) which behaviors (of six measured behaviors) are best captured by slices. Notable findings included strong reliability and validity for thin slices of gaze and nods, and that a 1.5-min slice from the start of an interaction may adequately represent some behaviors. Results provide useful information to researchers making decisions about slice measurement of behavior.

  13. Thin layer drying of tomato slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Purkayastha, Manashi; Nath, Amit; Deka, Bidyut Chandra; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2013-08-01

    The hot air convective drying characteristics of blanched tomato (Lycopersicon esculantum L.) slices have been investigated. Drying experiments were carried out at four different temperatures (50, 60, 65 and 70 °C). The effect of drying temperatures on the drying behavior of the tomato slices was evaluated. All drying experiments had only falling rate period. The average effective diffusivity values varied from 0.5453 × 10(-9) to 2.3871 × 10(-9) m(2)/s over the temperature range studied and the activation energy was estimated to be 61.004 kJ/mol. In order to select a suitable form of the drying curve, six different thin layer drying models (Henderson-Pabis, Page, Diamante et al., Wang and Singh, Logarithmic and Newton models) were fitted to the experimental data. The goodness of fit tests indicated that the Logarithmic model gave the best fit to experimental results, which was closely followed by the Henderson-Pabis model. The influence of varied drying temperatures on quality attributes of the tomato slices viz. Hunter color parameters, ascorbic acid, lycopene, titratable acidity, total sugars, reducing sugars and sugar/acid ratio of dried slices was also studied. Slices dried at 50 and 60 °C had high amount of total sugars, lycopene, sugar/acid ratio, Hunter L- and a-values. Drying of slices at 50 °C revealed optimum retention of ascorbic acid, sugar/acid ratio and red hue, whereas, drying at higher temperature (65 and 70 °C) resulted in a considerable decrease in nutrients and colour quality of the slices.

  14. Dynamics of regional brain activity in epilepsy: a cross-disciplinary study on both intracranial and scalp-recorded epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minadakis, George; Ventouras, Errikos; Gatzonis, Stylianos D.; Siatouni, Anna; Tsekou, Hara; Kalatzis, Ioannis; Sakas, Damianos E.; Stonham, John

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Recent cross-disciplinary literature suggests a dynamical analogy between earthquakes and epileptic seizures. This study extends the focus of inquiry for the applicability of models for earthquake dynamics to examine both scalp-recorded and intracranial electroencephalogram recordings related to epileptic seizures. Approach. First, we provide an updated definition of the electric event in terms of magnitude and we focus on the applicability of (i) a model for earthquake dynamics, rooted in a nonextensive Tsallis framework, (ii) the traditional Gutenberg and Richter law and (iii) an alternative method for the magnitude-frequency relation for earthquakes. Second, we apply spatiotemporal analysis in terms of nonextensive statistical physics and we further examine the behavior of the parameters included in the nonextensive formula for both types of electroencephalogram recordings under study. Main results. We confirm the previously observed power-law distribution, showing that the nonextensive formula can adequately describe the sequences of electric events included in both types of electroencephalogram recordings. We also show the intermittent behavior of the epileptic seizure cycle which is analogous to the earthquake cycles and we provide evidence of self-affinity of the regional electroencephalogram epileptic seizure activity. Significance. This study may provide a framework for the analysis and interpretation of epileptic brain activity and other biological phenomena with similar underlying dynamical mechanisms.

  15. A three-dimensional digital atlas of the starling brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groof, Geert; George, Isabelle; Touj, Sara; Stacho, Martin; Jonckers, Elisabeth; Cousillas, Hugo; Hausberger, Martine; Güntürkün, Onur; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2016-05-01

    Because of their sophisticated vocal behaviour, their social nature, their high plasticity and their robustness, starlings have become an important model species that is widely used in studies of neuroethology of song production and perception. Since magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents an increasingly relevant tool for comparative neuroscience, a 3D MRI-based atlas of the starling brain becomes essential. Using multiple imaging protocols we delineated several sensory systems as well as the song control system. This starling brain atlas can easily be used to determine the stereotactic location of identified neural structures at any angle of the head. Additionally, the atlas is useful to find the optimal angle of sectioning for slice experiments, stereotactic injections and electrophysiological recordings. The starling brain atlas is freely available for the scientific community.

  16. Absence of synaptic regulation by phosducin in retinal slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H Long

    Full Text Available Phosducin is an abundant photoreceptor protein that binds G-protein βγ subunits and plays a role in modulating synaptic transmission at photoreceptor synapses under both dark-adapted and light-adapted conditions in vivo. To examine the role of phosducin at the rod-to-rod bipolar cell (RBC synapse, we used whole-cell voltage clamp recordings to measure the light-evoked currents from both wild-type (WT and phosducin knockout (Pd(-/- RBCs, in dark- and light-adapted retinal slices. Pd(-/- RBCs showed smaller dim flash responses and steeper intensity-response relationships than WT RBCs, consistent with the smaller rod responses being selectively filtered out by the non-linear threshold at the rod-to-rod bipolar synapse. In addition, Pd(-/- RBCs showed a marked delay in the onset of the light-evoked currents, similar to that of a WT response to an effectively dimmer flash. Comparison of the changes in flash sensitivity in the presence of steady adapting light revealed that Pd(-/- RBCs desensitized less than WT RBCs to the same intensity. These results are quantitatively consistent with the smaller single photon responses of Pd(-/- rods, owing to the known reduction in rod G-protein expression levels in this line. The absence of an additional synaptic phenotype in these experiments suggests that the function of phosducin at the photoreceptor synapse is abolished by the conditions of retinal slice recordings.

  17. Complement C1q expression induced by Abeta in rat hippocampal organotypic slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong; Tenner, Andrea J

    2004-02-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) is a major component of senile plaques, one of the principle pathological features in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Fibrillar Abeta has been shown to bind C1 via C1q, the recognition component of the classical complement pathway, resulting in the activation of the complement pathway, thereby initiating an inflammatory cascade in the brain. C1q has also been shown to enhance phagocytic activities of microglia, which could benefit in clearance of apoptotic cells or cellular debris. To begin to define the role of C1q in tissue injury mediated by Abeta, we assessed the appearance of C1q in hippocampal slice cultures treated with freshly solubilized or fibrillar Abeta 1-42. Here we demonstrate a dose- and time-dependent uptake of exogenously applied Abeta by pyramidal neurons in organotypic slice cultures from rat hippocampus. Importantly, when slices were immunostained with antibody against rat C1q, a distinct reactivity for C1q in cells within the neuronal cell layer of cornu ammonis (CA) of hippocampus, primarily the CA1/CA2, was observed in the Abeta-treated slices. No such immunoreactivity was detected in untreated cultures or upon addition of control peptides. ELISA assays also showed an increase in C1q in tissue extracts from slices of the treated group. Similarly, the mRNA level of C1q in slices was increased within 24 h after Abeta treatment. These data demonstrate that upon exposure to Abeta, C1q is expressed in neurons in this organotypic system. The induction of C1q may be an early, perhaps beneficial, tissue or cellular response to injury triggered by particular pathogenic stimuli.

  18. Whole-body diffusion imaging applying simultaneous multi-slice excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenkel, David; Wurning, M.C.; Filli, L.; Ulbrich, E.J.; Boss, A. [Universitaetsspital Zuerich (Switzerland). Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Runge, V.M. [Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Beck, T. [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of a fast protocol for whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-DWI) using a slice-accelerated echo-planar sequence, which, when using comparable image acquisition parameters, noticeably reduces measurement time compared to a conventional WB-DWI protocol. A single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence capable of simultaneous slice excitation and acquisition was optimized for WB-DWI on a 3 T MR scanner, with a comparable conventional WB-DWI protocol serving as the reference standard. Eight healthy individuals and one oncologic patient underwent WB-DWI. Quantitative analysis was carried out by measuring the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and its coefficient of variation (CV) in different organs. Image quality was assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists using a 4-point Likert scale. Using our proposed protocol, the scan time of the WB-DWI measurement was reduced by up to 25.9 %. Both protocols, the slice-accelerated protocol and the conventional protocol, showed comparable image quality without statistically significant differences in the reader scores. Similarly, no significant differences of the ADC values of parenchymal organs were found, whereas ADC values of brain tissue were slightly higher in the slice-accelerated protocol. It was demonstrated that slice-accelerated DWI can be applied to WB-DWI protocols with the potential to greatly reduce the required measurement time, thereby substantially increasing clinical applicability.

  19. Staining protocol for organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolla, Nadine; Galimberti, Ivan; DePaola, Vincenzo; Caroni, Pico

    2006-01-01

    This protocol details a method to immunostain organotypic slice cultures from mouse hippocampus. The cultures are based on the interface method, which does not require special equipment, is easy to execute and yields slice cultures that can be imaged repeatedly, from the time of isolation at postnatal day 6-9 up to 6 months in vitro. The preserved tissue architecture facilitates the analysis of defined hippocampal synapses, cells and entire projections. Time-lapse imaging is based on transgenes expressed in the mice or on constructs introduced through transfection or viral vectors; it can reveal processes that develop over periods ranging from seconds to months. Subsequent to imaging, the slices can be processed for immunocytochemistry to collect further information about the imaged structures. This protocol can be completed in 3 d.

  20. Dynamic Slicing of Object-Oriented Programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Program slice has many applications such as program debugging,testing, maintena n ce, and complexity measurement. A static slice consists of all statements in pro gram P that may effect the value of variable v at some point p, and a dynamic s lice consists only of statements that influence the value of variable occurrence for specific program inputs. In this paper, we concern the problem of dynamic s licing of object-oriented programs which, to our knowledge, has not been addres s ed in the literatures. To solve this problem, we present the dynamic object-ori e nted dependence graph (DODG)which is an arc-classified digraph to explicitly re p resent various dynamic dependence between statement instances for a particular e xecution of an object-oriented program. Based on the DODG, we present a two-ph as e backward algorithm for computing a dynamic slice of an object-oriented program.

  1. Interactive Slice of the CMS detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Davis, Siona Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This slice shows a colorful cross-section of the CMS detector with all parts of the detector labelled. Viewers are invited to click on buttons associated with five types of particles to see what happens when each type interacts with the sections of the detector. The five types of particles users can select to send through the slice are muons, electrons, neutral hadrons, charged hadrons and photons. Supplementary information on each type of particles is given. Useful for inclusion into general talks on CMS etc. *Animated CMS "slice" for Powerpoint (Mac & PC) Original version - 2004 Updated version - July 2010 *Six slides required - first is a set of buttons; others are for each particle type (muon, electron, charged/neutral hadron, photon) Recommend putting slide 1 anywhere in your presentation and the rest at the end

  2. Additional value of two-channel amplitude integrated EEG recording in full-term infants with unilateral brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, Linda G. M.; de Vries, Linda S.; van Huffelen, Alexander C.; Toet, Mona C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Amplitude integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) is a valuable tool for evaluating neonatal encephalopathy and identifying electrographic seizures. Objective To compare seizure activity and background pattern (BGP) between one-channel and two-channel aEEG recordings in full-term neonate

  3. In Vitro Manganese Exposure Disrupts MAPK Signaling Pathways in Striatal and Hippocampal Slices from Immature Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Tanara Vieira; Pedro, Daniela Zótico; de Cordova, Fabiano Mendes; Lopes, Mark William; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Mendes-de-Aguiar, Cláudia Beatriz Nedel; Walz, Roger; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms mediating manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity, particularly in the immature central nervous system, have yet to be completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) could represent potential targets of Mn in striatal and hippocampal slices obtained from immature rats (14 days old). The aim of this study was to evaluate if the MAPK pathways are modulated after subtoxic Mn exposure, which do not significantly affect cell viability. The concentrations of manganese chloride (MnCl2; 10–1,000 μM) caused no change in cell viability in slices exposed for 3 or 6 hours. However, Mn exposure significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, as well as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2/3 phosphorylation at both 3 and 6 hours incubations, in both brain structures. Furthermore, Mn exposure did not change the total content or phosphorylation of TH at the serine 40 site in striatal slices. Thus, Mn at concentrations that do not disrupt cell viability causes activation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3) in immature hippocampal and striatal slices. These findings suggest that altered intracellular MAPKs signaling pathways may represent an early event concerning the effects of Mn in the immature brain. PMID:24324973

  4. In Vitro Manganese Exposure Disrupts MAPK Signaling Pathways in Striatal and Hippocampal Slices from Immature Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanara Vieira Peres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms mediating manganese (Mn-induced neurotoxicity, particularly in the immature central nervous system, have yet to be completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH could represent potential targets of Mn in striatal and hippocampal slices obtained from immature rats (14 days old. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the MAPK pathways are modulated after subtoxic Mn exposure, which do not significantly affect cell viability. The concentrations of manganese chloride (MnCl2; 10–1,000 μM caused no change in cell viability in slices exposed for 3 or 6 hours. However, Mn exposure significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, as well as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK 1/2/3 phosphorylation at both 3 and 6 hours incubations, in both brain structures. Furthermore, Mn exposure did not change the total content or phosphorylation of TH at the serine 40 site in striatal slices. Thus, Mn at concentrations that do not disrupt cell viability causes activation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3 in immature hippocampal and striatal slices. These findings suggest that altered intracellular MAPKs signaling pathways may represent an early event concerning the effects of Mn in the immature brain.

  5. Ultrashort pulse laser slicing of semiconductor crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunho; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Miura, Kiyotaka

    2016-07-01

    Meanwhile, by the convention wire-saw technique, it is difficult to slice off a thin wafer from bulk SiC crystal without the reserving space for cutting. In this study, we have achieved exfoliation of 4H-SiC single crystal by femtosecond laser induced slicing method. By using this, the exfoliated surface with the root-mean-square roughness of 3 μm and the cutting-loss thickness smaller than 30 μm was successfully demonstrated. We have also observed the nanostructure on the exfoliated surface in SiC crystal.

  6. Synaptic potentials in locus coeruleus neurons in brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J T; Bobker, D H; Harris, G C

    1991-01-01

    Neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC) fire action potentials spontaneously in vitro in the absence of any stimulation. This spontaneous activity is thought to arise from intrinsic membrane properties that include a balance between at least two ion conductances. One is a persistent inward sodium current that is active near the threshold for action potential generation. The second is a calcium-dependent potassium current that is activated following the entry of calcium during the action potential, is responsible for the after-hyperpolarization following the action potential, and decays over a period of 1-2 sec following the action potential. The spontaneous activity of LC neurons can be altered by both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. One excitatory input has been described that is mediated by glutamate receptors of both the non-NMDA and NMDA subtypes. Inhibitory synaptic potentials include those mediated by GABA (acting on GABAA-receptors), glycine (acting on a strychnine-sensitive receptor) and noradrenaline (acting on alpha 2-adrenoceptors). The presence of synaptic potentials mediated by these transmitters, studied in vitro, correlate with studies made in vivo and with histochemical identification of synaptic inputs to the locus coeruleus.

  7. 小鼠海马脑片和海马-内嗅皮层联合脑片癫痫样放电特性的比较研究%Comparative study of the characteristics of epileptiform discharges in the hippocampal slices and combined entorhinal cortex-hippocampal slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石叶军; 陆钦池; 宫新伟; 龚海庆; 张溥明; 梁培基

    2013-01-01

    Objective In order to explore the Mg 2+-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid ( ACSF ) induced different epileptiform discharge patterns in adult mouse hippocampal slices and combined entorhinal cortex -hippocampal slices in vitro.Methods Two brain slice models were prepared , and Mg2+-free-ACSF was used to induce epileptiform discharges , which were recorded by micro-electrode array ( MEA ) .The spatiotemporal characteristics of the discharge patterns were studied following successful induction of epileptiform discharges in the two slice models .Results Mg2+-free-ACSF induced interictal discharges in the hippocampal slice ,with frequency of (11.6 ±2.4)times/min,and lasted 149.0-202.6 ms.While in the combined entorhinal cortex-hippocampal slice,the discharge pattern was alternated between interictal and ictal discharges .The frequency of interictal discharges was (12.9 ±3.3) times/min,with duration of 181.3-223.7 ms.The frequency of ictal discharges was (0.26 ±0.07 ) times/min,with duration of 14.3-14.5 s.Conclusion Interictal as well as ictal discharges could be recorded in the combined entorhinal cortex-hippocampal slice network level .So the combined entorhinal cortex-hippocampal slice is an ideal model for epilepsy research .%目的探索离体条件下无镁人工脑脊液( ACSF )诱导的成年小鼠海马脑片和海马-内嗅皮层联合脑片的不同癫痫样放电模式。方法分别制备两种脑片模型,使用无镁ACSF诱导脑片产生癫痫样放电,并用多电极阵列记录脑片不同区域神经元的放电情况。在两种脑片模型上诱导出稳定的癫痫样放电后,分析不同类型癫痫样放电模式的时空特性。结果无镁ACSF诱导海马脑片产生间期放电,间期放电频率为(11.6±2.4)次/min,平均放电持续时间为149.0~202.6 ms。无镁ACSF诱导海马-内嗅皮层联合脑片产生间期和发作期放电交替出现的模式,间期放电的频率为(12.9±3.3)次/min,

  8. Localized gene transfer into organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and acute hippocampal slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Benedikz, Eirikur; Shen, H;

    1993-01-01

    Viral vectors derived from herpes simplex virus, type-1 (HSV), can transfer and express genes into fully differentiated, post-mitotic neurons. These vectors also transduce cells effectively in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Nanoliter quantities of a virus stock of HSVlac, an HSV vector...... or hippocampal slices. The rapid expression of beta-gal by HSVlac allowed efficient transduction of acute hippocampal slices. Many genes have been transduced and expressed using HSV vectors; therefore, this microapplication method can be applied to many neurobiological questions....

  9. Sautéed Fish Slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Ingredients: A fresh fish, cooking oil, scallion, ginger, egg white, salt, MSG, cooking wine, cornstarch. Directions: 1. Clean and scale the fish and take out the internal organs. 2. Fillet the fish. Slice the fish into thin pieces. Coat the fish

  10. Neuroprotection against diisopropylfluorophosphate in acute hippocampal slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferchmin, P. A.; Pérez, Dinely; Cuadrado, Brenda L.; Carrasco, Marimée; Martins, Antonio H.; Eterović, Vesna A.

    2015-01-01

    Diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and a surrogate of the organophosphorus (OP) nerve agent sarin. The neurotoxicity of DFP was assessed as a reduction of population spike (PS) area elicited by synaptic stimulation in acute hippocampal slices. Two classical antidotes, atropine, and pralidoxime, and two novel antidotes, 4R-cembranotriene-diol (4R) and a caspase 9 inhibitor, were tested. Atropine, pralidoxime, and 4R significantly protected when applied 30 min after DFP. The caspase inhibitor was neuroprotective when applied 5–10 min before or after DFP, suggesting that early synaptic apoptosis is responsible for the loss of PSs. It is likely that apoptosis starts at the synapses and, if antidotes are not applied, descends to the cell bodies, causing death. The acute slice is a reliable tool for mechanistic studies, and the assessment of neurotoxicity and neuroprotection with PS areas is, in general, pharmacologically congruent with in vivo results and predicts the effect of drugs in vivo. 4R was first found to be neuroprotective in slices and later we demonstrated that 4R is neuroprotective in vivo. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of OPs is not well understood, and there is a need for novel antidotes that could be discovered using acute slices. PMID:26438150

  11. Detecting Psychopathy from Thin Slices of Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Katherine A.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Patrick, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    This study is the first to demonstrate that features of psychopathy can be reliably and validly detected by lay raters from "thin slices" (i.e., small samples) of behavior. Brief excerpts (5 s, 10 s, and 20 s) from interviews with 96 maximum-security inmates were presented in video or audio form or in both modalities combined. Forty raters used…

  12. [Human brain resource--experience at the Brain Research Institute,University of Niigata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2010-10-01

    Through 40 years of neuropathological practice,the Brain Research Institute, University of Niigata (BRI-Niigata), Japan has accumulated extensive human brain resource,including fresh-frozen brain slices,for scientific research. Over 30,000 slices obtained from consecutive autopsies have been systematically stored in 25 deep freezers. Establishment of effective networks between brain banks and institutional collections in Japan is essential for promoting scientific activities that require human brain resource. We at the BRI-Niigata are eager to contribute to the establishment of such networks.

  13. A method for recording resistance changes non-invasively during neuronal depolarization with a view to imaging brain activity with electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, Ori; Ghosh, Anthony; Oh, Dongin; Holder, David S

    2009-05-30

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a recently developed medical imaging method which has the potential to produce images of fast neuronal depolarization in the brain. The principle is that current remains in the extracellular space at rest but passes into the intracellular space during depolarization through open ion channels. As current passes into the intracellular space across the capacitance of cell membranes at higher frequencies, applied current needs to be below 100 Hz. A method is presented for its measurement with subtraction of the contemporaneous evoked potentials which occur in the same frequency band. Neuronal activity is evoked by stimulation and resistance is recorded from the potentials resulting from injection of a constant current square wave at 1 Hz with amplitude less than 25% of the threshold for stimulating neuronal activity. Potentials due to the evoked activity and the injected square wave are removed by subtraction. The method was validated with compound action potentials in crab walking leg nerve. Resistance changes of -0.85+/-0.4% (mean+/-SD) occurred which decreased from -0.97+/-0.43% to -0.46+/-0.16% with spacing of impedance current application electrodes from 2 to 8 mm but did not vary significantly with applied currents of 1-10 microA. These tallied with biophysical modelling, and so were consistent with a genuine physiological origin. This method appears to provide a reproducible and artefact free means for recording resistance changes during neuronal activity which could lead to the long-term goal of imaging of fast neural activity in the brain.

  14. High-Resolution, Non-Invasive Imaging of Upper Vocal Tract Articulators Compatible with Human Brain Recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer E Bouchard

    Full Text Available A complete neurobiological understanding of speech motor control requires determination of the relationship between simultaneously recorded neural activity and the kinematics of the lips, jaw, tongue, and larynx. Many speech articulators are internal to the vocal tract, and therefore simultaneously tracking the kinematics of all articulators is nontrivial--especially in the context of human electrophysiology recordings. Here, we describe a noninvasive, multi-modal imaging system to monitor vocal tract kinematics, demonstrate this system in six speakers during production of nine American English vowels, and provide new analysis of such data. Classification and regression analysis revealed considerable variability in the articulator-to-acoustic relationship across speakers. Non-negative matrix factorization extracted basis sets capturing vocal tract shapes allowing for higher vowel classification accuracy than traditional methods. Statistical speech synthesis generated speech from vocal tract measurements, and we demonstrate perceptual identification. We demonstrate the capacity to predict lip kinematics from ventral sensorimotor cortical activity. These results demonstrate a multi-modal system to non-invasively monitor articulator kinematics during speech production, describe novel analytic methods for relating kinematic data to speech acoustics, and provide the first decoding of speech kinematics from electrocorticography. These advances will be critical for understanding the cortical basis of speech production and the creation of vocal prosthetics.

  15. High-Resolution, Non-Invasive Imaging of Upper Vocal Tract Articulators Compatible with Human Brain Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumanchipalli, Gopala K.; Dichter, Benjamin; Chaisanguanthum, Kris S.; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    A complete neurobiological understanding of speech motor control requires determination of the relationship between simultaneously recorded neural activity and the kinematics of the lips, jaw, tongue, and larynx. Many speech articulators are internal to the vocal tract, and therefore simultaneously tracking the kinematics of all articulators is nontrivial—especially in the context of human electrophysiology recordings. Here, we describe a noninvasive, multi-modal imaging system to monitor vocal tract kinematics, demonstrate this system in six speakers during production of nine American English vowels, and provide new analysis of such data. Classification and regression analysis revealed considerable variability in the articulator-to-acoustic relationship across speakers. Non-negative matrix factorization extracted basis sets capturing vocal tract shapes allowing for higher vowel classification accuracy than traditional methods. Statistical speech synthesis generated speech from vocal tract measurements, and we demonstrate perceptual identification. We demonstrate the capacity to predict lip kinematics from ventral sensorimotor cortical activity. These results demonstrate a multi-modal system to non-invasively monitor articulator kinematics during speech production, describe novel analytic methods for relating kinematic data to speech acoustics, and provide the first decoding of speech kinematics from electrocorticography. These advances will be critical for understanding the cortical basis of speech production and the creation of vocal prosthetics. PMID:27019106

  16. Slice stretching effects for maximal slicing of a Schwarzschild black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Bernd

    2005-11-01

    Slice stretching effects such as slice sucking and slice wrapping arise when foliating the extended Schwarzschild spacetime with maximal slices. For arbitrary spatial coordinates these effects are quantified here in the context of boundary conditions where the lapse arises as a linear combination of odd and even lapse. Favourable boundary conditions are then derived which make the overall slice stretching occur late in numerical simulations. Allowing the lapse to become negative, this requirement leads to lapse functions which approach at late times the odd lapse corresponding to the static Schwarzschild metric. Demanding, however, that a numerically favourable lapse remains non-negative, as a result the average of odd and even lapse is obtained. At late times the lapse with zero gradient at the puncture arising for the puncture evolution is precisely of this form. Finally, analytic arguments are given on how slice stretching effects can be avoided. Here the excision technique and the working mechanism of the shift function are studied in detail.

  17. Feasibility of slice width reduction for spiral cranial computed tomography using iterative image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubenreisser, Holger; Fink, Christian; Nance, John W. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Sedlmair, Martin; Schmidt, Bernhard [Siemens Healthcare, Division CT, Forchheim (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Henzler, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.henzler@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To prospectively compare image quality of cranial computed tomography (CCT) examinations with varying slice widths using traditional filtered back projection (FBP) versus sinogram-affirmed iterative image reconstruction (SAFIRE). Materials and methods: 29 consecutive patients (14 men, mean age: 72 ± 17 years) referred for a total of 40 CCT studies were prospectively included. Each CCT raw data set was reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE at 5 slice widths (1–5 mm; 1 mm increments). Objective image quality was assessed in three predefined regions of the brain (white matter, thalamus, cerebellum) using identical regions of interest (ROIs). Subjective image quality was assessed by 2 experienced radiologists. Objective and subjective image quality parameters were statistically compared between FBP and SAFIRE reconstructions. Results: SAFIRE reconstructions resulted in mean noise reductions of 43.8% in the white matter, 45.6% in the thalamus and 42.0% in the cerebellum (p < 0.01) compared to FBP on non contrast-enhanced 1 mm slice width images. Corresponding mean noise reductions on 1 mm contrast-enhanced studies were 45.7%, 47.3%, and 45.0% in the white matter, thalamus, and cerebellum, respectively (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference in mean attenuation of any region or slice width between the two reconstruction methods (all p > 0.05). Subjective image quality of IR images was mostly rated higher than that of the FBP images. Conclusion: Compared to FBP, SAFIRE provides significant reductions in image noise while increasing subjective image in CCT, particularly when thinner slices are used. Therefore, SAFIRE may allow utilization of thinner slices in CCT, potentially reducing partial volume effects and improving diagnostic accuracy.

  18. THE EFFECT OF ETHYLENE IN MAINTAINING QUALITY OF TOMATO SLICES

    OpenAIRE

    Darwin H. Pangaribuan1)

    2009-01-01

    Processes such as slicing tomato fruits disrupt the plant tissue so the products become more perishable compared with the intact fruit. Ethylene production is stimulated during the slicing of fresh cut tomato slices. Experiments were conducted to investigate if ethylene absorbent and exogenous ethylene influences the quality of tomato slices cv. ‘Revolution’ during storage at 5C. In the experiment of ethylene absorbent, experiment was laid out in a completely randomised design. The treat...

  19. Functional brain network organisation of children between 2 and 5 years derived from reconstructed activity of cortical sources of high-density EEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathelt, Joe; O'Reilly, Helen; Clayden, Jonathan D; Cross, J Helen; de Haan, Michelle

    2013-11-15

    There is increasing interest in applying connectivity analysis to brain measures (Rubinov and Sporns, 2010), but most studies have relied on fMRI, which substantially limits the participant groups and numbers that can be studied. High-density EEG recordings offer a comparatively inexpensive easy-to-use alternative, but require channel-level connectivity analysis which currently lacks a common analytic framework and is very limited in spatial resolution. To address this problem, we have developed a new technique for studies of network development that overcomes the spatial constraint and obtains functional networks of cortical areas by using EEG source reconstruction with age-matched average MRI templates (He et al., 1999). In contrast to previously reported channel-level analysis, this approach provides information about the cortical areas most likely to be involved in the network as well as their functional relationship (Babiloni et al., 2005; De Vico Fallani et al., 2007). In this study, we applied source reconstruction with age-matched templates to task-free high-density EEG recordings in typically-developing children between 2 and 6 years of age (O'Reilly, 2012). Graph theory was then applied to the association strengths of 68 cortical regions of interest based on the Desikan-Killiany atlas. We found linear increases of mean node degree, mean clustering coefficient and maximum betweenness centrality between 2 years and 6 years of age. Characteristic path length was negatively correlated with age. The correlation of the network measures with age indicates network development towards more closely integrated networks similar to reports from other imaging modalities (Fair et al., 2008; Power et al., 2010). We also applied eigenvalue decomposition to obtain functional modules (Clayden et al., 2013). Connection strength within these modules did not change with age, and the modules resembled hub networks previously described for MRI (Hagmann et al., 2010; Power et al

  20. Highly Stable Glassy Carbon Interfaces for Long-Term Neural Stimulation and Low-Noise Recording of Brain Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomero, Maria; Castagnola, Elisa; Ciarpella, Francesca; Maggiolini, Emma; Goshi, Noah; Zucchini, Elena; Carli, Stefano; Fadiga, Luciano; Kassegne, Sam; Ricci, Davide

    2017-01-01

    We report on the superior electrochemical properties, in-vivo performance and long term stability under electrical stimulation of a new electrode material fabricated from lithographically patterned glassy carbon. For a direct comparison with conventional metal electrodes, similar ultra-flexible, micro-electrocorticography (μ-ECoG) arrays with platinum (Pt) or glassy carbon (GC) electrodes were manufactured. The GC microelectrodes have more than 70% wider electrochemical window and 70% higher CTC (charge transfer capacity) than Pt microelectrodes of similar geometry. Moreover, we demonstrate that the GC microelectrodes can withstand at least 5 million pulses at 0.45 mC/cm2 charge density with less than 7.5% impedance change, while the Pt microelectrodes delaminated after 1 million pulses. Additionally, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) was selectively electrodeposited on both sets of devices to specifically reduce their impedances for smaller diameters (<60 μm). We observed that PEDOT-PSS adhered significantly better to GC than Pt, and allowed drastic reduction of electrode size while maintaining same amount of delivered current. The electrode arrays biocompatibility was demonstrated through in-vitro cell viability experiments, while acute in vivo characterization was performed in rats and showed that GC microelectrode arrays recorded somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) with an almost twice SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) when compared to the Pt ones.

  1. Optogenetic Evocation of Field Inhibitory Postsynaptic Potentials in Hippocampal Slices: A Simple and Reliable Approach for Studying Pharmacological Effects on GABAA and GABAB Receptor-Mediated Neurotransmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien eDine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The GABAergic system is the main source of inhibition in the mammalian brain. Consequently, much effort is still made to develop new modulators of GABAergic synaptic transmission. In contrast to glutamatergic postsynaptic potentials (PSPs, accurate monitoring of GABA receptor-mediated PSPs (GABAR-PSPs and their pharmacological modulation in brain tissue invariably requires the use of intracellular recording techniques. However, these techniques are expensive, time- and labor-consuming, and, in case of the frequently employed whole-cell patch-clamp configuration, impact on intracellular ion concentrations, signaling cascades, and pH buffering systems. Here, we describe a novel approach to circumvent these drawbacks. In particular, we demonstrate in mouse hippocampal slices that selective optogenetic activation of interneurons leads to prominent field inhibitory GABAAR- and GABABR-PSPs in area CA1 which are easily and reliably detectable by a single extracellular recording electrode. The field PSPs exhibit typical temporal and pharmacological characteristics, display pronounced paired-pulse depression, and remain stable over many consecutive evocations. Additionally validating the methodological value of this approach, we further show that the neuroactive steroid 5-THDOC (5 µM shifts the inhibitory GABAAR-PSPs towards excitatory ones.

  2. Separable geodesic action slicing in stationary spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato; Jantzen, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    A simple observation about the action for geodesics in a stationary spacetime with separable geodesic equations leads to a natural class of slicings of that spacetime whose orthogonal geodesic trajectories represent freely falling observers. The time coordinate function can then be taken to be the observer proper time, leading to a unit lapse function. This explains some of the properties of the original Painlev\\'e-Gullstrand coordinates on the Schwarzschild spacetime and their generalization to the Kerr-Newman family of spacetimes, reproducible also locally for the G\\"odel spacetime. For the static spherically symmetric case the slicing can be chosen to be intrinsically flat with spherically symmetric geodesic observers, leaving all the gravitational field information in the shift vector field.

  3. Role of adenosine in the antiepileptic effects of deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Maisa F.; Hamani, Clement; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G.; Amorim, Beatriz O.; Macedo, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Maria José S.; Nobrega, José N.; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Andersen, Monica L.; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of epilepsy, mechanisms responsible for the antiepileptic effects of this therapy remain elusive. As adenosine modulates neuronal excitability and seizure activity in animal models, we hypothesized that this nucleoside could be one of the substrates involved in the effects of AN DBS. We applied 5 days of stimulation to rats rendered chronically epileptic by pilocarpine injections and recorded epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. We found that slices from animals given DBS had reduced hippocampal excitability and were less susceptible to develop ictal activity. In live animals, AN DBS significantly increased adenosine levels in the hippocampus as measured by microdialysis. The reduced excitability of DBS in vitro was completely abolished in animals pre-treated with A1 receptor antagonists and was strongly potentiated by A1 receptor agonists. We conclude that some of the antiepileptic effects of DBS may be mediated by adenosine. PMID:25324724

  4. slice of a LEP bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a slice of a LEP dipole bending magnet, made as a concrete and iron sandwich The bending field needed in LEP is small (about 1000 Gauss), equivalent to two of the magnets people stick on fridge doors. Because it is very difficult to keep a low field steady, a high field was used in iron plates embedded in concrete. A CERN breakthrough in magnet design, LEP dipoles can be tuned easily and are cheaper than conventional magnets.

  5. Slice of a LEP bending magnet

    CERN Document Server

    This is a slice of a LEP dipole bending magnet, made as a concrete and iron sandwich. The bending field needed in LEP is small (about 1000 Gauss), equivalent to two of the magnets people stick on fridge doors. Because it is very difficult to keep a low field steady, a high field was used in iron plates embedded in concrete. A CERN breakthrough in magnet design, LEP dipoles can be tuned easily and are cheaper than conventional magnets.

  6. Three-dimensions Volume Reconstruction of Grayscale Serial Slice Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jianming(吴建明); Shi Pengfei; Zhang Luoming

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on basic geometric and topological access methods, and computational operations implemented by various data objects. It covers such methods as inter-slices point matching, stream slices, sorting of octree blocks, cell operations and experimental results. At first, this paper discusses in detail the feature points matching of inter-slices. Then it introduces stream slices eigenfields and octree data structures theories. Next, it discusses cell operations and its data structure. Finally, it shows an experimental result. The innovations in the paper is the data structure of slices feature and cell feature, and the feature matching methods owns the properties both quickly and exactly.

  7. Application of Dynamic Slicing in Test Data Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUO Suwei; ZHAO Ruilian; LI Lijian

    2007-01-01

    The program slicing technique is employed to calculate the current values of the variables at some interest points in software test data generation. This paper introduces the concept of statement domination to represent the multiple nests, and presents a dynamic program slice algorithm based on forward analysis to generate dynamic slices. In the approach, more attention is given to the statement itself or its domination node, so computing program slices is more easy and accurate, especially for those programs with multiple nests. In addition, a case study is discussed to illustrate our algorithm. Experimental results show that the slicing technique can be used in software test data generation to enhance the effectiveness.

  8. CT quality assurance: computer assisted slice thickness determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, N J; Bushong, S C

    1980-01-01

    The precise slice geometry of a CT scanner is an important, albeit tedious to determine, characteristic. A series of computer programs have been developed to analyze the slice thickness insert of the AAPM phantom. Without operator assistance they generate the beam profiles and slice thicknesses at three points in the scan field. A representative analysis is done on an AS&E scanner with slice thickness settings of 2 to 10 mm. The resulting discrepent measured thicknesses, ranging from 3 to 8 mm, indicate the need to perform such slice thickness measurements as part of a regular quality assurance program.

  9. Increased BOLD sensitivity in the orbitofrontal cortex using slice-dependent echo times at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domsch, Sebastian; Linke, Julia; Heiler, Patrick M; Kroll, Alexander; Flor, Herta; Wessa, Michèle; Schad, Lothar R

    2013-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) exploits the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect to detect neuronal activation related to various experimental paradigms. Some of these, such as reversal learning, involve the orbitofrontal cortex and its interaction with other brain regions like the amygdala, striatum or dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These paradigms are commonly investigated with event-related methods and gradient echo-planar imaging (EPI) with short echo time of 27 ms. However, susceptibility-induced signal losses and image distortions in the orbitofrontal cortex are still a problem for this optimized sequence as this brain region consists of several slices with different optimal echo times. An EPI sequence with slice-dependent echo times is suitable to maximize BOLD sensitivity in all slices and might thus improve signal detection in the orbitofrontal cortex. To test this hypothesis, we first optimized echo times via BOLD sensitivity simulation. Second, we measured 12 healthy volunteers using a standard EPI sequence with an echo time of 27 ms and a modified EPI sequence with echo times ranging from 22 ms to 47 ms. In the orbitofrontal cortex, the number of activated voxels increased from 87 ± 44 to 549 ± 83 and the maximal t-value increased from 4.4 ± 0.3 to 5.4 ± 0.3 when the modified EPI was used. We conclude that an EPI with slice-dependent echo times may be a valuable tool to mitigate susceptibility artifacts in event-related whole-brain fMRI studies with a focus on the orbitofrontal cortex.

  10. A Review of Variable Slicing in Fused Deposition Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiyapara, Hitesh Hirjibhai; Pande, Sarang

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a literature survey in the field of fused deposition of plastic wires especially in the field of slicing and deposition using extrusion of thermoplastic wires. Various researchers working in the field of computation of deposition path have used their algorithms for variable slicing. In the study, a flowchart has also been proposed for the slicing and deposition process. The algorithm already been developed by previous researcher will be used to be implemented on the fused deposition modelling machine. To demonstrate the capabilities of the fused deposition modeling machine a case study has been taken. It uses a manipulated G-code to be fed to the fused deposition modeling machine. Two types of slicing strategies, namely uniform slicing and variable slicing have been evaluated. In the uniform slicing, the slice thickness has been used for deposition is varying from 0.1 to 0.4 mm. In the variable slicing, thickness has been varied from 0.1 in the polar region to 0.4 in the equatorial region Time required and the number of slices required to deposit a hemisphere of 20 mm diameter have been compared with that using the variable slicing.

  11. Significant glial alterations in response to iron loading in a novel organotypic hippocampal slice culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Sinead; McMahon, Jill; Owens, Peter; FitzGerald, Una

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant iron deposition in the brain is associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. To study the collective response to iron loading, we have used hippocampal organotypic slices as a platform to develop a novel ex vivo model of iron accumulation. We demonstrated differential uptake and toxicity of iron after 12 h exposure to 10 μM ferrous ammonium sulphate, ferric citrate or ferrocene. Having established the supremacy of ferrocene in this model, the cultures were then loaded with 0.1–100 μM ferrocene for 12 h. One μM ferrocene exposure produced the maximal 1.6-fold increase in iron compared with vehicle. This was accompanied by a 1.4-fold increase in ferritin transcripts and mild toxicity. Using dual-immunohistochemistry, we detected ferritin in oligodendrocytes, microglia, but rarely in astrocytes and never in neurons in iron-loaded slice cultures. Moreover, iron loading led to a 15% loss of olig2-positive cells and a 16% increase in number and greater activation of microglia compared with vehicle. However, there was no appreciable effect of iron loading on astrocytes. In what we believe is a significant advance on traditional mono- or dual-cultures, our novel ex vivo slice-culture model allows characterization of the collective response of brain cells to iron-loading. PMID:27808258

  12. Characterization of Optically and Electrically Evoked Dopamine Release in Striatal Slices from Digenic Knock-in Mice with DAT-Driven Expression of Channelrhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FCV) is an established method to monitor increases in extracellular dopamine (DA) concentration ([DA]o) in the striatum, which is densely innervated by DA axons. Ex vivo brain slice preparations provide an opportunity to identify endogenous modulators of DA release. For these experiments, local electrical stimulation is often used to elicit release of DA, as well as other transmitters, in the striatal microcircuitry; changes in evoked increases in [DA]o after application of a pharmacological agent (e.g., a receptor antagonist) indicate a regulatory role for the transmitter system interrogated. Optogenetic methods that allow specific stimulation of DA axons provide a complementary, bottom-up approach for elucidating factors that regulate DA release. To this end, we have characterized DA release evoked by local electrical and optical stimulation in striatal slices from mice that genetically express a variant of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). Evoked increases in [DA]o in the dorsal and ventral striatum (dStr and vStr) were examined in a cross of a Cre-dependent ChR2 line (“Ai32” mice) with a DAT::Cre mouse line. In dStr, repeated optical pulse-train stimulation at the same recording site resulted in rundown of evoked [DA]o using heterozygous mice, which contrasted with the stability seen with electrical stimulation. Similar rundown was seen in the presence of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist, implicating the absence of concurrent nAChR activation in DA release instability in slices. Rundown with optical stimulation in dStr could be circumvented by recording from a population of sites, each stimulated only once. Same-site rundown was less pronounced with single-pulse stimulation, and a stable baseline could be attained. In vStr, stable optically evoked increases in [DA]o at single sites could be achieved using heterozygous mice, although with relatively low peak [DA]o. Low release could be overcome by using mice with a

  13. Optimizing full-brain coverage in human brain MRI through population distributions of brain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennes, Maarten; Jenkinson, Mark; Valabregue, Romain; Buitelaar, Jan K; Beckmann, Christian; Smith, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    When defining an MRI protocol, brain researchers need to set multiple interdependent parameters that define repetition time (TR), voxel size, field-of-view (FOV), etc. Typically, researchers aim to image the full brain, making the expected FOV an important parameter to consider. Especially in 2D-EPI sequences, non-wasteful FOV settings are important to achieve the best temporal and spatial resolution. In practice, however, imperfect FOV size estimation often results in partial brain coverage for a significant number of participants per study, or, alternatively, an unnecessarily large voxel-size or number of slices to guarantee full brain coverage. To provide normative FOV guidelines we estimated population distributions of brain size in the x-, y-, and z-direction using data from 14,781 individuals. Our results indicated that 11mm in the z-direction differentiate between obtaining full brain coverage for 90% vs. 99.9% of participants. Importantly, we observed that rotating the FOV to optimally cover the brain, and thus minimize the number of slices needed, effectively reduces the required inferior-superior FOV size by ~5%. For a typical adult imaging study, 99.9% of the population can be imaged with full brain coverage when using an inferior-superior FOV of 142mm, assuming optimal slice orientation and minimal within-scan head motion. By providing population distributions for brain size in the x-, y-, and z-direction we improve the potential for obtaining full brain coverage, especially in 2D-EPI sequences used in most functional and diffusion MRI studies. We further enable optimization of related imaging parameters including the number of slices, TR and total acquisition time.

  14. Temperature- and concentration-dependence of kainate-induced y oscillation in rat hippocampal slices under submerged condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-biao LU; Zhi-hua WANG; Yan-hong ZHOU; Martin VREUGDENHIL

    2012-01-01

    Aim:Fast neuronal network oscillation at the y frequency band (y oscillation:30-80 Hz) has been studied extensively in hippocampal slices under interface recording condition.The aim of this study is to establish a method for recording Y oscillation in submerged hippocampal slices that allows simultaneously monitoring Y oscillation and the oscillation-related intracellular events,such as intracellular Ca2+ concentration or mitochondrial membrane potentials.Methods:Horizontal hippocampal slices (thickness:300 pm) of adult rats were prepared and placed in a submerged or an interface chamber.Extracellular field recordings Were made in the CA3c pyramidal layer of the slices.Kainate,an AMPA/kainate receptor agonist,was applied via perfusion.Data analysis was performed off-line.Results:Addition of kainate (25-1000 nmol/L) induced Y oscillation in both the submerged and interface slices.Kainate increased the Y power in a concentration-dependent manner,but the duration of steady state oscillation was reduced at higher concentrations of kainate.Long-lasting Y oscillation was maintained at the concentrations of 100-300 nmol/L.Under submerged condition,Y oscillation was temperature-dependent,with the maximum power achieved at 29℃.The induction of Y oscillation under submerged condition also required a fast rate of perfusion (5-7 mL/min) and showed a fast dynamic during development and after the washout.Conclusion:The kainite-induced Y oscillation recorded in submerged rat hippocampal slices is useful for studying the intracellular events related to neuronal network activities and may represent a model to reveal the mechanisms underlying the normal neuronal synchronizations and diseased conditions.

  15. Mechanical characteristics of native tendon slices for tissue engineering scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ting-Wu; Chen, Qingshan; Sun, Yu-Long; Steinmann, Scott P; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the mechanical behavior of tendon slices with different thicknesses. Tendon slices of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 μm thickness were mechanically tested. The 300 μm slices were further tested for strength and modulus after 21,000-cycle fatigue testing under different applied strain levels (0, 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 12%). The tendon slice structure, morphology, and viability of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) seeded onto the slices were also examined with histology, scanning electron microscopy, and vital cell labeling, respectively. Tendon slices 300 μm or more in thickness had similar ultimate tensile strength and Young's modulus to the intact tendon bundle. A strain of 5% or less did not cause any structural damage, nor did it change the mechanical properties of a 300 μm-thick tendon slice after 21,000-cycle fatigue testing. BMSCs were viable between and on the tendon slices after 2 weeks in tissue culture. This study demonstrated that, if tendon slices are used as a scaffold for tendon tissue engineering, slices 300 μm or more in thickness would be preferable from a mechanical strength point of view. If mechanical stimulation is performed for seeded-cell preparations, 5% strain or less would be appropriate.

  16. Mechanical characteristics of native tendon slices for tissue engineering scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ting-Wu; Chen, Qingshan; Sun, Yu-Long; Steinmann, Scott P.; Amadio, Peter C.; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the mechanical behavior of tendon slices with different thicknesses. Tendon slices of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 μm thickness were mechanically tested. The 300 μm slices were further tested for strength and modulus after 21,000-cycle fatigue testing under different applied strain levels (0, 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 12%). The tendon slice structure, morphology, and viability of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) seeded onto the slices were also examined with histology, scanning electron microscopy, and vital cell labeling, respectively. Tendon slices 300 μm or more in thickness had similar ultimate tensile strength and Young's modulus to the intact tendon bundle. A strain of 5% or less did not cause any structural damage, nor did it change the mechanical properties of a 300 μm-thick tendon slice after 21,000-cycle fatigue testing. BMSCs were viable between and on the tendon slices after 2 weeks in tissue culture. This study demonstrated that, if tendon slices are used as a scaffold for tendon tissue engineering, slices 300 μm or more in thickness would be preferable from a mechanical strength point of view. If mechanical stimulation is performed for seeded-cell preparations, 5% strain or less would be appropriate. PMID:22323314

  17. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Effect of mescaline on the hydrogen-bonded structure of ribonucleic acid of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R K; Ghosh, J J

    1970-05-01

    1. The action of mescaline sulphate on the hydrogen-bonded structure of the RNA constituent of ribosomes of goat brain-cortex slices was studied by using the hyperchromic effect of heating and formaldehyde reaction. 2. The ribosomal total RNA species of the mescaline-treated brain-cortex slices have a smaller proportion of hydrogen-bonded structure than the ribosomal RNA species of the untreated brain-cortex slices. 3. Mescaline also appears to have affected this lowering of hydrogen-bonded structure of the ribosomal 28S RNA of brain-cortex tissue.

  18. TEST COVERAGE ANALYSIS BASED ON PROGRAM SLICING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhenqiang; Xu Baowen; Guanjie

    2003-01-01

    Coverage analysis is a structural testing technique that helps to eliminate gaps in atest suite and determines when to stop testing. To compute test coverage, this letter proposes anew concept coverage about variables, based on program slicing. By adding powers accordingto their importance, the users can focus on the important variables to obtain higher test coverage.The letter presents methods to compute basic coverage based on program structure graphs. Inmost cases, the coverage obtained in the letter is bigger than that obtained by a traditionalmeasure, because the coverage about a variable takes only the related codes into account.

  19. Stark effect on a geometry defined by a cake' slice

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Esqueda, J A; Castillo-Mussot, M; Vazquez, G J; Reyes-Esqueda, Jorge-Alejandro; Mendoza, Carlos I.; Castillo-Mussot, Marcelo del; Vazquez, Gerardo J.

    2005-01-01

    By using a variational calculation, we study the effect of an external applied electric field on the ground state of electrons confined in a quantum box with a geometry defined by a slice of a cake. This geometry is a first approximation for a tip of a cantilever of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). By modeling the tip with the slice, we calculate the electronic ground state energy as function of the slice's diameter, its angular aperture, its thickness and the intensity of the external electric field applied along the slice. For the applied field pointing to the wider part of the slice, a confining electronic effect in the opposite side is clearly observed. This effect is sharper as the angular slice's aperture is smaller and there is more radial space to manifest itself.

  20. Dependence Analysis Based on Dynamic Slicing for Debugging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Dynamic program slicing is an effective technique for narrowingthe errors to t h e relevant parts of a program when debugging. Given a slicing criterion, the dyn amic slice contains only those statements that actually affect the variables in the slicing criterion. This paper proposes a dynamic slicing method based on sta tic dependence analysis. It uses the program dependence graph and other static i nformation to reduce the information needed to be traced during program executio n. Thus, the efficiency is dramatically improved while the precision is not depr e ssed. The slicing criterion is modified to fit for debugging. It consists of fil e-name and the line number at which the statement is.

  1. An improved method for determining CT image slice thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, N J; Bushong, S C

    1981-01-01

    One of the important characteristics of a computed tomography scanner is the image slice thickness. Most phantoms designed to measure this parameter do so with a ramp or tilted wire. Such a phantom must be precisely aligned to avoid possible significant inaccuracy. We present here a procedure for measuring the image slice thickness using a phantom containing two crossed ramps. The procedure produced consistent and accurate measurements of slice thickness without having to carry out a time consuming alignment procedure.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 is essential for LPS-induced sensitization and tolerance to oxygen-glucose deprivation in murine neonatal organotypic hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Tina; Cronberg, Tobias; Cilio, Corrado; Pronk, Cornelis; Wieloch, Tadeusz; Ley, David

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation and ischemia have a synergistic damaging effect in the immature brain. The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors 1 and 2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sensitization and tolerance to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) was evaluated in neonatal murine hippocampal organotypic slices. Hippocampal slices from balb/c, C57BL/6 TNFR1(-/-), TNFR2(-/-), and wild-type (WT) mice obtained at P6 were grown in vitro for 9 days. Preexposure to LPS immediately before OGD increased propidium iodide-determined cell death in regions CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus from 4 up to 48 h after OGD (P<0.001). Extending the time interval between LPS exposure and OGD to 72 h resulted in tolerance, that is reduced neuronal cell death after OGD (P<0.05). Slices from TNFR1(-/-) mice showed neither LPS-induced sensitization nor LPS-induced tolerance to OGD, whereas both effects were present in slices from TNFR2(-/-) and WT mice. Cytokine secretion (TNFalpha and interleukin-6) during LPS exposure was decreased in TNFR1(-/-) slices and increased in TNFR2(-/-) as compared with WT slices. We conclude that LPS induces sensitization or tolerance to OGD depending on the time interval between exposure to LPS and OGD in murine hippocampal slice cultures. Both paradigms are dependent on signaling through TNFR1.

  3. [Design and accuracy analysis of upper slicing system of MSCT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongjian

    2013-05-01

    The upper slicing system is the main components of the optical system in MSCT. This paper focuses on the design of upper slicing system and its accuracy analysis to improve the accuracy of imaging. The error of slice thickness and ray center by bearings, screw and control system were analyzed and tested. In fact, the accumulated error measured is less than 1 microm, absolute error measured is less than 10 microm. Improving the accuracy of the upper slicing system contributes to the appropriate treatment methods and success rate of treatment.

  4. THE EFFECT OF ETHYLENE IN MAINTAINING QUALITY OF TOMATO SLICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwin H. Pangaribuan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Processes such as slicing tomato fruits disrupt the plant tissue so the products become more perishable compared with the intact fruit. Ethylene production is stimulated during the slicing of fresh cut tomato slices. Experiments were conducted to investigate if ethylene absorbent and exogenous ethylene influences the quality of tomato slices cv. ‘Revolution’ during storage at 5C. In the experiment of ethylene absorbent, experiment was laid out in a completely randomised design. The treatments were plus 10 g and minus ethylene absorbent (KMnO4; Purafil; 5C for 12 d. In the experiment of ethylene concentrations, experiment was laid out in a completely randomised design. The treatments were exogenous ethylene concentrations of 0 (control, 0.1, 1 or 10 L L–1 respectively (5C for 6 h. In both experiments, the treatments were replicated 5 fold. Results showed that ethylene absorbent resulted in reduced ethylene accumulation, and CO2 accumulation in enclosed containers, and firmer slices. Ethylene applied 2 days after slicing stimulated the rate of ethylene production, CO2 production, and produced softer slices during storage. Changes in soluble solids concentration and titratable acidity development were independent of ethylene effects. These experiments showed that ethylene produced by slicing or introduced exogenously had an undesirable effect of accelerating softening of tomato slices.

  5. Thin slices of child personality: Perceptual, situational, and behavioral contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Herzhoff, Kathrin; Kushner, Shauna C; Rule, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined whether thin-slice ratings of child personality serve as a resource-efficient and theoretically valid measurement of child personality traits. We extended theoretical work on the observability, perceptual accuracy, and situational consistency of childhood personality traits by examining intersource and interjudge agreement, cross-situational consistency, and convergent, divergent, and predictive validity of thin-slice ratings. Forty-five unacquainted independent coders rated 326 children's (ages 8-12) personality in 1 of 15 thin-slice behavioral scenarios (i.e., 3 raters per slice, for over 14,000 independent thin-slice ratings). Mothers, fathers, and children rated children's personality, psychopathology, and competence. We found robust evidence for correlations between thin-slice and mother/father ratings of child personality, within- and across-task consistency of thin-slice ratings, and convergent and divergent validity with psychopathology and competence. Surprisingly, thin-slice ratings were more consistent across situations in this child sample than previously found for adults. Taken together, these results suggest that thin slices are a valid and reliable measure to assess child personality, offering a useful method of measurement beyond questionnaires, helping to address novel questions of personality perception and consistency in childhood.

  6. Particle swarm optimization and its application in MEG source localization using single time sliced data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Juan; Liu, Chenglian; Guo, Yongning

    2014-10-01

    The estimation of neural active sources from the magnetoencephalography (MEG) data is a very critical issue for both clinical neurology and brain functions research. A widely accepted source-modeling technique for MEG involves calculating a set of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs). Depth in the brain is one of difficulties in MEG source localization. Particle swarm optimization(PSO) is widely used to solve various optimization problems. In this paper we discuss its ability and robustness to find the global optimum in different depths of the brain when using single equivalent current dipole (sECD) model and single time sliced data. The results show that PSO is an effective global optimization to MEG source localization when given one dipole in different depths.

  7. The Journal of Biological Chemistry, Volume 203, 1953: Enzyme secretion and the incorporation of P32 into phospholipides of pancreas slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokin, M R; Hokin, L E

    1989-06-01

    1. When enzyme secretion was stimulated by carbamylcholine or acetylcholine (with eserine) in slices of pigeon pancreas, the incorporation of P32 into the phospholipide fraction of the stimulated slices was, after 2 hours, 4.8 to 8.7 (average, 7.0) times greater than the incorporation of P32 into the phospholipides of control slices. Neither respiration nor the incorporation of P32 into acid-soluble phosphate esters was increased. 2. Pilocarpine, which on a weight for weight basis was much less effective than carbamylcholine or acetylcholine in stimulating enzyme secretion in pancreas slices, was also much less effective in stimulating the uptake of P32 into phospholipides. 3. The stimulatory effects of carbamylcholine on both enzyme secretion and the incorporation of P32 into phospholipides were abolished by atropine. 4. The specific activity of the phospholipides from slices incubated anaerobically was less than 5 per cent of that observed aerobically. Anaerobically, carbamylcholine did not stimulate the incorporation of P32 into phospholipides to any significant extent. The specific activity of the acid-soluble phosphate esters after anaerobic incubation was 34 per cent of that found aerobically. 5. Cholinergic drugs had little or no effect on the incorporation of P32 into the phospholipides of the following tissue slices: pigeon and guinea pig liver, guinea pig heart ventricle, pigeon gizzard (smooth muscle), and guinea pig kidney cortex. A relatively slight stimulation of P32 uptake into phospholipides was observed in slices of pigeon brain (65 per cent) and guinea pig brain cortex (40 per cent). 6. Stimulation of amylase synthesis in slices of pigeon pancreas by the addition of a mixture of amino acids had no effect on the incorporation of P32 into phospholipides.

  8. Effects of Anterior Thalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Chronic Epileptic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Beatriz; Cavarsan, Clarissa; Miranda, Maisa Ferreira; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Nobrega, José N.; Mello, Luiz E.; Hamani, Clement

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been investigated for the treatment of epilepsy. In rodents, an increase in the latency for the development of seizures and status epilepticus (SE) has been reported in different animal models but the consequences of delivering stimulation to chronic epileptic animals have not been extensively addressed. We study the effects of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) stimulation at different current intensities in rats rendered epileptic following pilocarpine (Pilo) administration. Four months after Pilo-induced SE, chronic epileptic rats were bilaterally implanted with AN electrodes or had sham-surgery. Stimulation was delivered for 6 h/day, 5 days/week at 130 Hz, 90 µsec. and either 100 µA or 500 µA. The frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures in animals receiving stimulation was compared to that recorded in the preoperative period and in rats given sham treatment. To investigate the effects of DBS on hippocampal excitability, brain slices from animals receiving AN DBS or sham surgery were studied with electrophysiology. We found that rats treated with AN DBS at 100 µA had a 52% non-significant reduction in the frequency of seizures as compared to sham-treated controls and 61% less seizures than at baseline. Animals given DBS at 500 µA had 5.1 times more seizures than controls and a 2.8 fold increase in seizure rate as compared to preoperative values. In non-stimulated controls, the average frequency of seizures before and after surgery remained unaltered. In vitro recordings have shown that slices from animals previously given DBS at 100 µA had a longer latency for the development of epileptiform activity, shorter and smaller DC shifts, and a smaller spike amplitude compared to non-stimulated controls. In contrast, a higher spike amplitude was recorded in slices from animals given AN DBS at 500 µA. PMID:24892420

  9. Reality, No Matter How You Slice It

    CERN Document Server

    Wharton, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In order to reject the notion that information is always about something, the "It from Bit" idea relies on the nonexistence of a realistic framework that might underly quantum theory. This essay develops the case that there is a plausible underlying reality: one actual spacetime-based history, although with behavior that appears strange when analyzed dynamically (one time-slice at a time). By using a simple model with no dynamical laws, it becomes evident that this behavior is actually quite natural when analyzed "all-at-once" (as in classical statistical mechanics). The "It from Bit" argument against a spacetime-based reality must then somehow defend the importance of dynamical laws, even as it denies a reality on which such fundamental laws could operate.

  10. Originator usage control with business process slicing

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Ziyi

    2012-01-01

    Originator Control allows information providers to define the information re-dissemination condition. Combined with usage control policy, fine-grained 'downstream usage control' can be achieved, which specifies what attributes the downstream consumers should have and how data is used. This paper discusses originator usage control, paying particular attention to enterprise-level dynamic business federations. Rather than 'pre-defining' the information re-dissemination paths, our business process slicing method 'capture' the asset derivation pattern, allowing to maintain originators' policies during the full lifecycle of assets in a collaborative context. First, we propose Service Call Graph (SCG), based on extending the System Dependency Graph, to describe dependencies among partners. When SCG (and corresponding 'service call tuple' list) is built for a business process, it is analyzed to group partners into sub-contexts, according to their dependency relations. Originator usage control can be achieved focusing...

  11. Eigenvalues of collective emission in multi-slice slab configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedberg, Richard [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Manassah, Jamal T. [HMS Consultants, Inc., PO Box 592, New York, NY 10028 (United States)], E-mail: jmanassah@gmail.com

    2008-06-02

    We compute the eigenmodes of collective emission from multi-slice slab configurations, using the transfer matrix formalism. We elucidate within this formalism the phenomena of 'Invisible Gaps' in multiple-slice configuration and of 'Precocious Superradiance' in periodic structures previously observed in numerical solutions of Maxwell-Bloch equations.

  12. Microfabricated solid-state ion-selective electrode probe for measuring potassium in the living rodent brain: Compatibility with DC-EEG recordings to study spreading depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odijk, M.; Wouden, van der E.J.; Olthuis, W.; Ferrari, M.D.; Tolner, E.A.; Maagdenberg, van den A.M.J.M.; Berg, van den A.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable need in neuroscience research to reliably measure concentrations of extracellular ions in the living brain as the dynamics of ion levels increasingly is considered to play a key role in the pathophysiology of many brain disorders. Unfortunately, most probes currently used for d

  13. A survey of program slicing for software engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jon

    1993-01-01

    This research concerns program slicing which is used as a tool for program maintainence of software systems. Program slicing decreases the level of effort required to understand and maintain complex software systems. It was first designed as a debugging aid, but it has since been generalized into various tools and extended to include program comprehension, module cohesion estimation, requirements verification, dead code elimination, and maintainence of several software systems, including reverse engineering, parallelization, portability, and reuse component generation. This paper seeks to address and define terminology, theoretical concepts, program representation, different program graphs, developments in static slicing, dynamic slicing, and semantics and mathematical models. Applications for conventional slicing are presented, along with a prognosis of future work in this field.

  14. Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract (SLiCE) cloning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) is a novel cloning method that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (15-52 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost-effective and demonstrates the versatility as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. We established a DH10B-derived E. coli strain expressing an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system, termed PPY, which facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies.

  15. A 3-dimensional digital atlas of the ascending sensory and the descending motor systems in the pigeon brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güntürkün, Onur; Verhoye, Marleen; De Groof, Geert; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2013-01-01

    Pigeons are classic animal models for learning, memory, and cognition. The majority of the current understanding about avian neurobiology outside of the domain of the song system has been established using pigeons. Since MRI represents an increasingly relevant tool for comparative neuroscience, a 3-dimensional MRI-based atlas of the pigeon brain becomes essential. Using multiple imaging protocols, we delineated diverse ascending sensory and descending motor systems as well as the hippocampal formation. This pigeon brain atlas can easily be used to determine the stereotactic location of identified neural structures at any angle of the head. In addition, the atlas is useful to find the optimal angle of sectioning for slice experiments, stereotactic injections and electrophysiological recordings. This pigeon brain atlas is freely available for the scientific community.

  16. Regional and directional anisotropy of apparent diffusion coefficient in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn-Berlage, M; Eis, M; Schmitz, B

    1999-02-01

    Quantitative diffusion maps were recorded in normal rat brain. In multi-slice sections covering the whole brain, strong variation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was observed depending on slice position at constant gradient direction. Furthermore, a varying difference between apparent diffusion coefficients depending on gradient direction was found, reaching 32% in the cortex of the ventral-most horizontal sections while showing equal ADC on the dorsal cortex side. The regional variation and directional anisotropy of the ADC was not restricted to white matter but was described for both cortical and subcortical brain tissue. From diffusion coefficients along the three major field gradient directions (ADCx, ADCy, ADCz), the average ADC (ADCaverage) was determined from the trace of the diffusion tensor (D) as 653+/-28 microm2/s for parietal cortex and 671+/-32 microm2/s for lateral cortex, independent of position along the sagittal direction. From these observations about the regional diffusion anisotropy, a more stringent protocol for the description of ischemic ADC changes is proposed.

  17. Use of multi-electrode array recordings in studies of network synaptic plasticity in both time and space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Gang Liu; Xue-Feng Chen; Ting He; Zhen Li; Jun Chen

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous multisite recording using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) in cultured and acutely-dissociated brain slices and other tissues is an emerging technique in the field of network electrophysiology.Over the past 40 years,great efforts have been made by both scientists and commercial concerns,to advance this technique.The MEA technique has been widely applied to many regions of the brain,retina,heart and smooth muscle in various studies at the network level.The present review starts from the development of MEA techniques and their uses in brain preparations,and then specifically concentrates on the use of MEA recordings in studies of synaptic plasticity at the network level in both the temporal and spatial domains.Because the MEA technique helps bridge the gap between single-cell recordings and behavioral assays,its wide application will undoubtedly shed light on the mechanisms underlying brain functions and dysfunctions at the network level that remained largely unknown due to the technical difficulties before it matured.

  18. The developmental expression of fluorescent proteins in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from transgenic mice and its use in the determination of excitotoxic neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noraberg, Jens; Jensen, Carsten V; Bonde, Christian

    2007-01-01

    in organotypic brain slice cultures, such as cellular uptake of propidium iodide (PI), loss of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), Fluoro-Jade (FJ) cell staining, and the release of cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). An important supplement to these markers would be data on corresponding morphological...

  19. A Hierarchical Slicing Tool Model%一个分层切片工具模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭毅; 朱平; 李必信; 郑国梁

    2001-01-01

    Most of the traditional methods of slicing are based on dependence graph. But constructing dependence graph for object oriented programs directly is very complicated. The design and implementation of a hierarchical slicing tool model are described. By constructing the package level dependence graph, class level dependence graph, method level dependence graph and statement level dependence graph, package level slice, class level slice, method level slice and program slice are obtained step by step.

  20. Attack diagnosis on binary executables using dynamic program slicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shan; Zheng, Yudi; Zhang, Ruoyu

    2011-12-01

    Nowadays, the level of the practically used programs is often complex and of such a large scale so that it is not as easy to analyze and debug them as one might expect. And it is quite difficult to diagnose attacks and find vulnerabilities in such large-scale programs. Thus, dynamic program slicing becomes a popular and effective method for program comprehension and debugging since it can reduce the analysis scope greatly and drop useless data that do not influence the final result. Besides, most of existing dynamic slicing tools perform dynamic slicing in the source code level, but the source code is not easy to obtain in practice. We believe that we do need some kinds of systems to help the users understand binary programs. In this paper, we present an approach of diagnosing attacks using dynamic backward program slicing based on binary executables, and provide a dynamic binary slicing tool named DBS to analyze binary executables precisely and efficiently. It computes the set of instructions that may have affected or been affected by slicing criterion set in certain location of the binary execution stream. This tool also can organize the slicing results by function call graphs and control flow graphs clearly and hierarchically.

  1. Spacetime Slices and Surfaces of Revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Giblin, J T; Jr, John T. Giblin; Hwang, Andrew D.

    2004-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a $(1+1)$-dimensional slice $\\hat{g}$ of a spherically symmetric black hole spacetime can be equivariantly embedded in $(2+1)$-dimensional Minkowski space. The embedding depends on a real parameter that corresponds physically to the surface gravity $\\kappa$ of the black hole horizon. Under conditions that turn out to be closely related, a real surface that possesses rotational symmetry can be equivariantly embedded in 3-dimensional Euclidean space. The embedding does not obviously depend on a parameter. However, the Gaussian curvature is given by a simple formula: If the metric is written $g = \\phi(r)^{-1} dr^2 + \\phi(r) d\\theta^2$, then $\\K_g=-{1/2}\\phi''(r)$. This note shows that metrics $g$ and $\\hat{g}$ occur in dual pairs, and that the embeddings described above are orthogonal facets of a single phenomenon. In particular, the metrics and their respective embeddings differ by a Wick rotation that preserves the ambient symmetry. Consequently, the embedding of $g$ depends on a real...

  2. Blanching, salting and sun drying of different pumpkin fruit slices

    OpenAIRE

    Workneh, T. S.; Zinash, A.; Woldetsadik, K.

    2012-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the quality of pumpkin (Cucuribita Spp.) slices that were subjected to pre-drying treatments and drying using two drying methods (uncontrolled sun and oven) fruit accessions. Pre-drying had significant (P ≤ 0.05) effect on the quality of dried pumpkin slices. 10 % salt solution dipped pumpkin fruit slices had good chemical quality. The two-way interaction between drying methods and pre-drying treatments had significant (P ≤ 0.05) effect on chemical qualities. ...

  3. Automatic Registration and Error Detection of Multiple Slices Using Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Frimmel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. When analysing the 3D structure of tissue, serial sectioning and staining of the resulting slices is sometimes the preferred option. This leads to severe registration problems. In this paper, a method for automatic registration and error detection of slices using landmark needles has been developed. A cost function takes some parameters from the current state of the problem to be solved as input and gives a quality of the current solution as output. The cost function used in this paper, is based on a model of the slices and the landmark needles. The method has been used to register slices of prostates in order to create 3D computer models. Manual registration of the same prostates has been undertaken and compared with the results from the algorithm. Methods. Prostates from sixteen men who underwent radical prostatectomy were formalin fixed with landmark needles, sliced and the slices were computer reconstructed. The cost function takes rotation and translation for each prostate slice, as well as slope and offset for each landmark needle as input. The current quality of fit of the model, using the input parameters given, is returned. The function takes the built‐in instability of the model into account. The method uses a standard algorithm to optimize the prostate slice positions. To verify the result, s standard method in statistics was used. Results. The methods were evaluated for 16 prostates. When testing blindly, a physician could not determine whether the registration shown to him were created by the automated method described in this paper, or manually by an expert, except in one out of 16 cases. Visual inspection and analysis of the outlier confirmed that the input data had been deformed. The automatic detection of erroneous slices marked a few slices, including the outlier, as suspicious. Conclusions. The model based registration performs better than traditional simple slice‐wise registration. In the case of prostate

  4. Peripheral pulmonary arteries: identification at multi-slice spiral CT with 3D reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coche, Emmanuel; Pawlak, Sebastien; Dechambre, Stephane; Maldague, Baudouin [Department of Radiology, St. Luc Hospital, UCL, Avenue Hippocrate, 10, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2003-04-01

    Our objective was to analyze the peripheral pulmonary arteries using thin-collimation multi-slice spiral CT. Twenty consecutive patients underwent enhanced-spiral multi-slice CT using 1-mm collimation. Two observers analyzed the pulmonary arteries by consensus on a workstation. Each artery was identified on axial and 3D shaded-surface display reconstruction images. Each subsegmental artery was measured at a mediastinal window setting and compared with anatomical classifications. The location and branching of every subsegmental artery was recorded. The number of well-visualized sub-subsegmental arteries at a mediastinal window setting was compared with those visualized at a lung window setting. Of 800 subsegmental arteries, 769 (96%) were correctly visualized and 123 accessory subsegmental arteries were identified using the mediastinal window setting. One thousand ninety-two of 2019 sub-subsegmental arteries (54%) identified using the lung window setting were correctly visualized using the mediastinal window setting. Enhanced multi-slice spiral CT with thin collimation can be used to analyze precisely the subsegmental pulmonary arteries and may identify even more distal pulmonary arteries. (orig.)

  5. Peripheral pulmonary arteries: identification at multi-slice spiral CT with 3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, Emmanuel; Pawlak, Sebastien; Dechambre, Stéphane; Maldague, Baudouin

    2003-04-01

    Our objective was to analyze the peripheral pulmonary arteries using thin-collimation multi-slice spiral CT. Twenty consecutive patients underwent enhanced-spiral multi-slice CT using 1-mm collimation. Two observers analyzed the pulmonary arteries by consensus on a workstation. Each artery was identified on axial and 3D shaded-surface display reconstruction images. Each subsegmental artery was measured at a mediastinal window setting and compared with anatomical classifications. The location and branching of every subsegmental artery was recorded. The number of well-visualized sub-subsegmental arteries at a mediastinal window setting was compared with those visualized at a lung window setting. Of 800 subsegmental arteries, 769 (96%) were correctly visualized and 123 accessory subsegmental arteries were identified using the mediastinal window setting. One thousand ninety-two of 2019 sub-subsegmental arteries (54%) identified using the lung window setting were correctly visualized using the mediastinal window setting. Enhanced multi-slice spiral CT with thin collimation can be used to analyze precisely the subsegmental pulmonary arteries and may identify even more distal pulmonary arteries.

  6. Drug resistance in cortical and hippocampal slices from resected tissue of epilepsy patients: no significant impact of P-glycoprotein and Multidrug resistance associated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora eSandow

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistant patients undergoing epilepsy surgery have a good chance to become sensitive to anticonvulsant medication, suggesting that the resected brain tissue is responsible for drug resistance. Here, we address the question whether P-glycoprotein (Pgp and multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRPs expressed in the resected tissue contribute to drug resistance in vitro. Effects of anti-epileptic drugs (carbamazepine, sodium valproate, phenytoin and two unspecific inhibitors of Pgp and MRPs (verapamil and probenecid on seizure-like events induced in slices from 35 hippocampal and 35 temporal cortex specimens of altogether 51 patients (161 slices were studied. Although in slice preparations the blood brain barrier is not functional, we found that seizure-like events predominantly persisted in the presence of anticonvulsant drugs (90% and also in the presence of verapamil and probenecid (86%. Following subsequent co-administration of antiepileptic drugs and drug transport inhibitors, seizure-like events continued in 63% of 143 slices. Drug sensitivity in slices was recognized either as transition to recurrent epileptiform transients (30% or as suppression (7%, particularly by perfusion with carbamazepine in probenecid containing solutions (43%, 9%. Summarizing responses to co-administration from more than one slice per patient revealed that suppression of seizure-like activity in all slices was only observed in 7 % of patients. Patients whose tissue was completely or partially sensitive (65 % presented with higher seizure frequencies than those with resistant tissue (35 %. However, corresponding subgroups of patients don’t differ with respect to expression rates of drug transporters. Our results imply that parenchymal MRPs and Pgp are not responsible for drug resistance in resected tissue.

  7. Listening to Brain Microcircuits for Interfacing With External World-Progress in Wireless Implantable Microelectronic Neuroengineering Devices: Experimental systems are described for electrical recording in the brain using multiple microelectrodes and short range implantable or wearable broadcasting units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmikko, Arto V; Donoghue, John P; Hochberg, Leigh R; Patterson, William R; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Bull, Christopher W; Borton, David A; Laiwalla, Farah; Park, Sunmee; Ming, Yin; Aceros, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Acquiring neural signals at high spatial and temporal resolution directly from brain microcircuits and decoding their activity to interpret commands and/or prior planning activity, such as motion of an arm or a leg, is a prime goal of modern neurotechnology. Its practical aims include assistive devices for subjects whose normal neural information pathways are not functioning due to physical damage or disease. On the fundamental side, researchers are striving to decipher the code of multiple neural microcircuits which collectively make up nature's amazing computing machine, the brain. By implanting biocompatible neural sensor probes directly into the brain, in the form of microelectrode arrays, it is now possible to extract information from interacting populations of neural cells with spatial and temporal resolution at the single cell level. With parallel advances in application of statistical and mathematical techniques tools for deciphering the neural code, extracted populations or correlated neurons, significant understanding has been achieved of those brain commands that control, e.g., the motion of an arm in a primate (monkey or a human subject). These developments are accelerating the work on neural prosthetics where brain derived signals may be employed to bypass, e.g., an injured spinal cord. One key element in achieving the goals for practical and versatile neural prostheses is the development of fully implantable wireless microelectronic "brain-interfaces" within the body, a point of special emphasis of this paper.

  8. Graph-based retrospective 4D image construction from free-breathing MRI slice acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Mong, Andrew; Campbell, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    4D or dynamic imaging of the thorax has many potential applications [1, 2]. CT and MRI offer sufficient speed to acquire motion information via 4D imaging. However they have different constraints and requirements. For both modalities both prospective and retrospective respiratory gating and tracking techniques have been developed [3, 4]. For pediatric imaging, x-ray radiation becomes a primary concern and MRI remains as the de facto choice. The pediatric subjects we deal with often suffer from extreme malformations of their chest wall, diaphragm, and/or spine, as such patient cooperation needed by some of the gating and tracking techniques are difficult to realize without causing patient discomfort. Moreover, we are interested in the mechanical function of their thorax in its natural form in tidal breathing. Therefore free-breathing MRI acquisition is the ideal modality of imaging for these patients. In our set up, for each coronal (or sagittal) slice position, slice images are acquired at a rate of about 200-300 ms/slice over several natural breathing cycles. This produces typically several thousands of slices which contain both the anatomic and dynamic information. However, it is not trivial to form a consistent and well defined 4D volume from these data. In this paper, we present a novel graph-based combinatorial optimization solution for constructing the best possible 4D scene from such data entirely in the digital domain. Our proposed method is purely image-based and does not need breath holding or any external surrogates or instruments to record respiratory motion or tidal volume. Both adult and children patients' data are used to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the reconstructed 4D scenes are smooth and consistent spatially and temporally, agreeing with known shape and motion of the lungs.

  9. Study of Energy Consumption of Potato Slices During Drying Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafezi Negar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the new methods of food drying using infrared heating under vacuum is to increase the drying rate and maintain the quality of dried product. In this study, potato slices were dried using vacuum-infrared drying. Experiments were performed with the infrared lamp power levels 100, 150 and 200 W, absolute pressure levels 20, 80, 140 and 760 mmHg, and with three thicknesses of slices 1, 2 and 3 mm, in three repetitions. The results showed that the infrared lamp power, absolute pressure and slice thickness have important effects on the drying of potato. With increasing the radiation power, reducing the absolute pressure (acts of vacuum in the dryer chamber and also reducing the thickness of potato slices, drying time and the amount of energy consumed is reduced. In relation to thermal utilization efficiency, results indicated that with increasing the infrared radiation power and decreasing the absolute pressure, thermal efficiency increased.

  10. Water Hammer Model of Shock Absorber Throttle Slice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yi-jie; GU Liang; LEI Sheng-guang; GUAN Ji-fu

    2008-01-01

    In allusion to easy invalidation of damping valve in vehicle shock absorber caused by the impact from the road surface, the importance of the study of damping valve water hammer pressure is presented. The physical model of damping valve with the circle throttle slice is established. The time for the throttle slice deformation is studied by using the finite software, and the laws that how the structure parameters affect the deformation time are obtained. Combining the theory of water hammer, the water hammer initial and boundary condition of the damping valve is deduced, and the water hammer model of throttle slice is established. The analysis of simulation results indicates that the water hammer pressure amplitude and the amount of water hammer oscillation period can be reduced and the dependability of the valve can be enhanced by modifying the structure parameters and aperture width between slice and valve body.

  11. Skin Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy The sometimes deadly conditions cost $75 billion in ... a major impact on Americans and the U.S. economy, a new report finds. "The impact of skin ...

  12. Dynamic Frequency Allocation in SLICE Considering both BER and Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proposed in this paper is a dynamic resource-aware routing and frequency slots allocation scheme with consideration of both BER requirement and distance adaptive modulation (RA-BERR-DA for spectrum-sliced elastic optical path networks (SLICE.Numerical simulations are conducted to analysis network performance such as blocking rate and the number of used frequency slots. The results demonstrate that this scheme is able to decrease traffic blocking and improve resource utilization in dynamic spectrum assignment.

  13. Combined infrared-vacuum drying of pumpkin slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaboos, Seyyed Hossein Hosseini; Ardabili, Seyed Mahdi Seyedain; Kashaninejad, Mahdi; Asadi, Gholamhassan; Aalami, Mehran

    2016-05-01

    Infrared-vacuum dehydration characteristics of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) were evaluated in a combined dryer system. The effects of drying parameters, infrared radiation power (204-272 W), system pressure (5-15 kPa), slice thickness (5 and 7 mm) and time (0-220 min) on the drying kinetics and characteristics of pumpkin slices were investigated. The vacuum pressure, lamp power and slice had significant effect on the drying kinetics and various qualities of the dried pumpkin. Moisture ratios were fitted to 10 different mathematical equations using nonlinear regression analysis. The quadratic equation satisfactorily described the drying behavior of pumpkin slices with the highest r value and the lowest SE values. The effective moisture diffusivity increased with power and ranged between 0.71 and 2.86 × 10(-9) m(2)/s. With increasing in infrared radiation power from 204 to 272 W, β-carotene content of dried pumpkins decreased from 30.04 to 24.55 mg/100 g. The rise in infrared power has a negative effect on the color changes (ΔE). The optimum condition was determined as power, 238W, pressure, 5 kPa and slice thickness, 5mm. These conditions resulted into dried pumpkin slices with maximum B-carotene retention.

  14. Generalized Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Jiang, Dazong; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    The cone-beam reconstruction theory has been proposed by Kirillov in 1961, Tuy in 1983, Feldkamp in 1984, Smith in 1985, Pierre Grangeat in 1990. The Fourier slice theorem is proposed by Bracewell 1956, which leads to the Fourier image reconstruction method for parallel-beam geometry. The Fourier slice theorem is extended to fan-beam geometry by Zhao in 1993 and 1995. By combining the above mentioned cone-beam image reconstruction theory and the above mentioned Fourier slice theory of fan-beam geometry, the Fourier slice theorem in cone-beam geometry is proposed by Zhao 1995 in short conference publication. This article offers the details of the derivation and implementation of this Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam geometry. Especially the problem of the reconstruction from Fourier domain has been overcome, which is that the value of in the origin of Fourier space is 0/0. The 0/0 type of limit is proper handled. As examples, the implementation results for the single circle and two perpendicular circle source orbits are shown. In the cone-beam reconstruction if a interpolation process is considered, the number of the calculations for the generalized Fourier slice theorem algorithm is O(N^4), which is close to the filtered back-projection method, here N is the image size of 1-dimension. However the interpolation process can be avoid, in that case the number of the calculations is O(N5).

  15. Brain-specific modulation of kynurenic acid synthesis in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, J B; Hodgkins, P S; Rassoulpour, A;

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate modulatory mechanisms that control the synthesis of the neuroprotective endogenous excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist kynurenate. De novo kynurenate formation was examined in vitro using tissue slices from rat brain, liver, and kidney. In slices from ...

  16. A sliced inverse regression (SIR decoding the forelimb movement from neuronal spikes in the rat motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hung Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Several neural decoding algorithms have successfully converted brain signals into commands to control a computer cursor and prosthetic devices. A majority of decoding methods, such as population vector algorithms (PVA, optimal linear estimators (OLE, and neural networks (NN, are effective in predicting movement kinematics, including movement direction, speed and trajectory but usually require a large number of neurons to achieve desirable performance. This study proposed a novel decoding algorithm even with signals obtained from a smaller numbers of neurons. We adopted sliced inverse regression (SIR to predict forelimb movement from single-unit activities recorded in the rat primary motor (M1 cortex in a water-reward lever-pressing task. SIR performed weighted principal component analysis (PCA to achieve effective dimension reduction for nonlinear regression. To demonstrate the decoding performance, SIR was compared to PVA, OLE, and NN. Furthermore, PCA and sequential feature selection (SFS which are popular feature selection techniques were implemented for comparison of feature selection effectiveness. Among SIR, PVA, OLE, PCA, SFS, and NN decoding methods, the trajectories predicted by SIR (with a root mean square error, RMSE, of 8.47 ± 1.32 mm was closer to the actual trajectories compared with those predicted by PVA (30.41 ± 11.73 mm, OLE (20.17 ± 6.43 mm, PCA (19.13 ± 0.75 mm, SFS (22.75 ± 2.01 mm, and NN (16.75 ± 2.02 mm. The superiority of SIR was most obvious when the sample size of neurons was small. We concluded that SIR sorted the input data to obtain the effective transform matrices for movement prediction, making it a robust decoding method for conditions with sparse neuronal information.

  17. The effects of drugs, other foreign compounds, and cigarette smoke on the synthesis of protein by lung slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstern, K.; Curtis, C.G.; Powell, G.M. (University College, Cardiff (England)); Upshall, D.G. (Chemical Defence Establishment, Wiltshire (England))

    1990-04-01

    The incorporation of {sup 14}C-leucine into rabbit lung slices was monitored in the absence and presence of selected drugs and chemicals relevant to the perturbation of lung function and the development of lung disease. Known inhibitors of protein synthesis (cycloheximide and ricin) inhibited the incorporation of {sup 14}C-leucine. Marked inhibition was also recorded with the lung toxins paraquat and 4-ipomeanol. By contrast, orciprenaline, salbutamol, and terbutaline were without effect although some response was recorded with isoprenaline. The filtered gas phase of cigarette smoke and acrolein, one of its components, were inhibitory but protection was afforded by N-acetylcysteine. It is suggested that the inhibitory effects of cigarette smoke may be due to its acrolein content. It is further suggested that the use of lung slices and measurements of {sup 14}C-leucine incorporation provide valuable means for monitoring potential pulmonary toxins.

  18. Impact of 64-slice coronary CT on the management of patients presenting with acute chest pain: results of a prospective two-centre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiaens, Luc [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); CHU de Poitiers, Departement de Cardiologie, Poitiers (France); Duchat, Florent; Boudiaf, Mourad; Fargeaudou, Yann; Ledref, Olivier; Soyer, Philippe [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Tasu, Jean-Pierre [CHU de Poitiers, Departement de Radiologie, Poitiers (France); Sirol, Marc [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); INSERM UFR U942, Insuffisance Cardiaque et Biomarqueurs, Universite Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Universite Paris VII - Denis Diderot, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie Vasculaire, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France)

    2012-05-15

    Our two-centre prospective study evaluates the usefulness of 64-slice coronary computed tomography (CCT) to rule out significant coronary artery stenosis in patients admitted in emergency departments (ED) for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with low-to-intermediate risk score. Patients (175) admitted for acute chest pain (ACP), unmodified electrocardiogram and first troponin measurement within normal ranges were included. A second troponin measurement and a 64-slice CCT within 24 h were performed. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were recorded during follow-up (6 months {+-} 2). 64-slice CCT was either normal or showed non-significant coronary stenosis in the majority of patients (78%). 64-slice CCT depicted significant stenosis (>50% diameter) in 22% of patient whereas initial clinical and biological evaluation was reassuring. For negative CCTs, elevated troponin at second measurement did not modify the strategy or treatment of patients. No MACEs were noted during follow up. In 12% of patients CCT identified unsuspected non-coronary abnormalities. Our study confirms 64-slice CCT utility to rule out significant coronary artery stenosis in 8/10 patients admitted in ED with ACP or ACS with low-to-intermediate risk score. Early discharge with a negative 64-slice CCT is associated with very low risk of cardiac events at 6 months. (orig.)

  19. Axonal bleb recording

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqin Hu; Yousheng Shu

    2012-01-01

    Patch-clamp recording requires direct accessibility of the cell membrane to patch pipettes and allows the investigation of ion channel properties and functions in specific cellular compartments.The cell body and relatively thick dendrites are the most accessible compartments of a neuron,due to their large diameters and therefore great membrane surface areas.However,axons are normally inaccessible to patch pipettes because of their thin structure; thus studies of axon physiology have long been hampered by the lack of axon recording methods.Recently,a new method of patchclamp recording has been developed,enabling direct and tight-seal recording from cortical axons.These recordings are performed at the enlarged structure (axonal bleb) formed at the cut end of an axon after slicing procedures.This method has facilitated studies of the mechanisms underlying the generation and propagation of the main output signal,the action potential,and led to the finding that cortical neurons communicate not only in action potential-mediated digital mode but also in membrane potential-dependent analog mode.

  20. Cellular responses to stress: comparison of a family of 71--73-kilodalton proteins rapidly synthesized in rat tissue slices and canavanine-treated cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, L E; White, F P

    1981-08-01

    Cultured rat embryo cells exposed to the L-arginine analogue L-canavanine rapidly accumulated a major 71 kilodalton polypeptide and several minor ones (110, 95, 88, and 78 kilodaltons). Canavanine-treated cultures contained elevated levels of translatable mRNA encoding P71, and the stimulated synthesis of this protein was blocked by actinomycin D, suggesting that P71 is inducible. Rat embryo cells maintained under routine culture conditions synthesized only trace amounts of P71; however, they accumulated an abundant 73 kilodalton protein that was closely related to P71. No kinetic evidence of a precursor-product relationship between P73 and P71 was found. The peptide map of P71 from cultured cells was identical to the map of proteins with the same electrophoretic mobility isolated from incubated slices of rat telencephalon. Previous studies (White, '80a, b, c) have shown that the latter proteins are rapidly synthesized by cells associated with cerebral microvessels in incubated brain slices, but are not detectable in vivo. Herein we present evidence that the synthesis of P71 is not unique to brain slices. Incubated slices of heart, lung, thymus, kidney, spleen, and liver all accumulated an abundant 71 kilodalton size class. The peptide maps of P71 obtained from brain, heart, lung and thymus tissue were similar. The stimulated synthesis of P71 in brain, heart, and lung slices was inhibited strongly by the addition of actinomycin D at the start of incubation. The 71-73 kilodalton proteins of canavanine-treated rat embryo cells and incubated slices from seven different organs were compared in detail on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. Eight charge variants were detected in extracts of lung, spleen, and thymus tissue, four in liver and heart, three in kidney, and two different pairs of variants in extracts of brain tissue and cultured cells. The possible significance of the rapid synthesis of a similar small set of proteins in tissue slices and cultured cells in

  1. Non-signalling energy use in the developing rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engl, Elisabeth; Jolivet, Renaud; Hall, Catherine N; Attwell, David

    2017-03-01

    Energy use in the brain constrains its information processing power, but only about half the brain's energy consumption is directly related to information processing. Evidence for which non-signalling processes consume the rest of the brain's energy has been scarce. For the first time, we investigated the energy use of the brain's main non-signalling tasks with a single method. After blocking each non-signalling process, we measured oxygen level changes in juvenile rat brain slices with an oxygen-sensing microelectrode and calculated changes in oxygen consumption throughout the slice using a modified diffusion equation. We found that the turnover of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, followed by lipid synthesis, are significant energy drains, contributing 25%, 22% and 18%, respectively, to the rate of oxygen consumption. In contrast, protein synthesis is energetically inexpensive. We assess how these estimates of energy expenditure relate to brain energy use in vivo, and how they might differ in the mature brain.

  2. Development of DARPP-32-positive parts of fetal pig ganglionic eminence and ventral mesencephalon in organotypic slice co-cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Annette Møller; Rasmussen, Jens Zimmer

    2006-01-01

    Neurons from the fetal pig dopaminergic ventral mesencephalon (VM) and basal ganglia anlage (the ganglionic eminence) were co-cultured as organotypic slice cultures to study the development of the two interconnected brain areas. During a short developmental period (E35-E42), a groove separates th...... esterase (AChE) and were the preferred target areas for TH-positive fibers from the co-cultured VM....... (TH)-positive, dopaminergic fibers from co-cultured slices of the ventral mesencephalon. DARPP-32 expression was more extensive and dense in cultures of the lateral part of the striatal anlage than the medial part. The DARPP-32-positive areas moreover overlapped with areas rich in acetylcholine...

  3. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Role of sperimidine in counteracting the destabilizing effect of mescaline of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R K; Antopol, W; Ghosh, J J

    1971-11-01

    1. The effect of spermidine on the mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes was studied by adding spermidine during the treatment of goat brain-cortex slices with mescaline. 2. Mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices removed a portion of the endogenous spermidine from ribosomes and this removal was significantly prevented when spermidine was present during mescaline treatment. 3. Spermidine present during mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices counteracted, to some extent, the destabilizing effect of mescaline on ribosomes with respect to heat denaturation. 4. Mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices made ribosomes more susceptible to breakdown, releasing protein and RNA, and resulting in loss of ribosomal enzymic activities. However, spermidine present during mescaline treatment counteracted moderately the mescaline-induced ribosomal susceptibility to breakdown and ribosomal loss of enzymic activities. 5. Ribosomes of mescaline-treated cortex slices were rapidly degraded by ribonuclease and trypsin. However, if spermidine was present during mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices the rates of degradation diminished.

  4. VALUE OF SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS LOCAL FIELD POTENTIALS RECORDINGS IN PREDICITING STIMULATION PARAMETERS FOR DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION IN PARKINSON´S DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Fumiaki Y; Martinez-Torres, Irene; Pogosyan, Alek; Holl, Etienne; Petersen, Erika; Chen, Chiung Chu; Foltynie, Tomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic U.; Hariz, Marwan I; Brown, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can be a highly effective treatment for Parkinsona ?s disease. However, therapeutic efficacy can be limited by inconsistent targeting of this nucleus. We previously showed that an increase in local field potential (LFP) power over the beta frequency band may provide intra-operative confirmation of STN targeting. Here we test whether the depth of this focal increase also helps predict the depth and v...

  5. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Werthwein, S; Zentner, J

    1999-01-01

    Stimulation-evoked 3H-noradrenaline release in human cerebrocortical slices was inhibited by histamine (in a manner sensitive to clobenpropit) and by imetit, suggesting H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in human brain.

  6. Rapid and quantitative discrimination of tumour cells on tissue slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Wei, Wen-Chun; Hsiao, Pei-Yi; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er

    2016-06-01

    After a needle biopsy, immunohistochemistry is generally used to stain tissue slices for clinically confirming tumours. Currently, tissue slices are immersed in a bioprobe-linked fluorescent reagent for several minutes, washed to remove the unbound reagent, and then observed using a fluorescence microscope. However, the observation must be performed by experienced pathologists, and producing a qualitative analysis is time consuming. Therefore, this study proposes a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference device biosusceptometry (SSB) method for avoiding these drawbacks. First, stain reagents were synthesised for the dual modalities of fluorescent and magnetic imaging by combining iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles and the currently used fluorescent reagent. The reagent for the proposed approach was stained using the same procedure as that for the current fluorescent reagent, and tissue slices were rapidly imaged using the developed SSB for obtaining coregistered optical and magnetic images. Analysing the total intensity of magnetic spots in SSB images enables quantitatively determining the tumour cells of tissue slices. To confirm the magnetic imaging results, a traditional observation methodology entailing the use of a fluorescence microscope was also performed as the gold standard. This study determined high consistency between the fluorescent and magnetic spots in different regions of the tissue slices, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed approach, which will benefit future clinical pathology.

  7. Short pulse generation by laser slicing at NSLSII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.; Blednykh, A.; Guo, W.; Krinsky, S.; Li, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Tchoubar, O.; Wang, G.; Willeke, F.; Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    We discuss an upgrade R&D project for NSLSII to generate sub-pico-second short x-ray pulses using laser slicing. We discuss its basic parameters and present a specific example for a viable design and its performance. Since the installation of the laser slicing system into the storage ring will break the symmetry of the lattice, we demonstrate it is possible to recover the dynamical aperture to the original design goal of the ring. There is a rapid growth of ultrafast user community interested in science using sub-pico-second x-ray pulses. In BNL's Short Pulse Workshop, the discussion from users shows clearly the need for a sub-pico-second pulse source using laser slicing method. In the proposal submitted following this workshop, NSLS team proposed both hard x-ray and soft x-ray beamlines using laser slicing pulses. Hence there is clearly a need to consider the R&D efforts of laser slicing short pulse generation at NSLSII to meet these goals.

  8. Estrogen receptor beta and 2-arachydonoylglycerol mediate the suppressive effects of estradiol on frequency of postsynaptic currents in gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons of metestrous mice: an acute slice electrophysiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flóra eBálint

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons are controlled by 17β-estradiol (E2 contributing to the steroid feedback regulation of the reproductive axis. In rodents, E2 exerts a negative feedback effect upon GnRH neurons throughout the estrus-diestrus phase of the ovarian cycle. The present study was undertaken to reveal the role of estrogen receptor subtypes in the mediation of the E2 signal and elucidate the downstream molecular machinery of suppression. The effect of E2 administration at low physiological concentration (10 pM on GnRH neurons in acute brain slices obtained from metestrous GnRH-GFP mice was studied under paradigms of blocking or activating estrogen receptor subtypes and interfering with retrograde 2-arachydonoylglycerol (2-AG signaling. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings revealed that E2 significantly diminished the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs in GnRH neurons (49. 62±7.6% which effect was abolished by application of the ERα/β blocker Faslodex (1 µM. Pretreatment of the brain slices with cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 inverse agonist AM251 (1 µM and intracellularly applied endocannabinoid synthesis blocker THL (10 µM significantly attenuated the effect of E2 on the sPSCs. E2 remained effective in the presence of TTX indicating a direct action of E2 on GnRH cells. The ERβ specific agonist DPN (10 pM also significantly decreased the frequency of miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs in GnRH neurons. In addition, the suppressive effect of E2 was completely blocked by the selective ERβ antagonist PHTPP (1 µM indicating that ERβ is required for the observed rapid effect of the E2. In contrast, the ERα agonist PPT (10 pM or the membrane-associated G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30 agonist G1 (10 pM had no significant effect on the frequency of mPSCs in these neurons. AM251 and THL significantly abolished the effect of E2 whereas AM251 eliminated the action of DPN on the mPSCs. These

  9. A three-dimensional MRI atlas of the zebra finch brain in stereotaxic coordinates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poirier, Colline; Vellema, Michiel; Verhoye, Marleen;

    2008-01-01

    of different brain areas (nuclei) involved in the sensory and motor control of song. Until now, the only published atlases of songbird brains consisted in drawings based on histological slices of the canary and of the zebra finch brain. Taking advantage of high-magnetic field (7 Tesla) MRI technique, we...

  10. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Effect of mescaline on the stability of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R K; Ghosh, J J

    1970-05-01

    1. During the action of mescaline sulphate on goat brain-cortex slices the ribosomal particles become susceptible to breakdown, releasing protein, RNA, acidsoluble nucleotides and ninhydrin-positive materials, resulting in loss of ribosomal enzyme activities. 2. Ribosomes of the mescaline-treated cortex slices undergo rapid degradation in the presence of trypsin and ribonuclease. 3. Mescaline does not alter the chemical and nucleotide compositions or the u.v.-absorption characteristics of ribosomal particles, however.

  11. Astrocytes, but not neurons, exhibit constitutive activation of P2X7 receptors in mouse acute cortical slices under non-stimulated resting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatsuka, Yosuke; Fukagawa, Manami; Furuta, Takahiro; Ohishi, Akihiro; Nishida, Kentaro; Nagasawa, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), a purinergic receptor, expressed by mouse cultured cortical astrocytes is constitutively activated without any exogenous stimulus, differing from the case of neurons. It is well known that astrocytic morphology differs between in vitro and in vivo situations, implying different functionalities. Brain acute slices are widely accepted as an in vitro experimental system that reflects in vivo cell conditions better than in vitro cell culture ones. We examined whether astrocytic P2X7Rs exhibited constitutive activation in mouse cortical slices. In acute cortical slices, P2X7R-immunoreactivity was detected in both glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunopositive astrocytes and microtubule-associated protein 2-immunopositive neurons. Astrocytic, but not neuronal, spontaneous uptake of propidium iodide, an indicator of P2X7R channel/pore activity, was inhibited by representative antagonists of P2X7R, but they had no effect on the uptake by astrocytes in membrane-permeabilized fixed slices. These findings indicate that astrocytes, but not neurons, in acute cortical slices exhibit constitutive activation of P2X7Rs under non-stimulated resting conditions as in the case of cell culture systems.

  12. [Pharmacological influences on the brain level and transport of GABA. II) Effect of various psychoactive drugs on brain level and uptake of GABA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabana, M A; Varotto, M; Saladini, M; Zanchin, G; Battistin, L

    1981-04-30

    The effects of some psychoactive drugs on the level and uptake of GABA in the mouse brain was studied using well standardized procedures, mainely the silica-gel cromatography for determining the GABA content and the brain slices for measuring GABA uptake. It was found that levomepromazine, sulpiride, haloperidol and amytryptiline were without effects on the cerebral level of GABA; it was also found that these drugs do not influence the rates of uptake of GABA by mouse brain slices. Such results do indicate that the psychoactive drugs studied are without effects on the level and uptake of GABA in the brain.

  13. Multi-slice myelin water imaging for practical clinical applications at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junyu; Ji, Qing; Reddick, Wilburn E

    2013-09-01

    Myelin water imaging is a promising, noninvasive technique for evaluating white matter diseases such as multiple sclerosis and other leukoencephalopathies (LE), and monitoring myelination in early childhood. Unfortunately, poor image quality and a long acquisition time are major obstacles to practical clinical applications. In this study, a novel postprocessing method with an efficient multi-slice acquisition scheme, called T2 spectrum analysis using a weighted regularized non-negative least squares algorithm and nonlocal mean filter (T2SPARC), is presented to overcome these obstacles and achieve a shorter acquisition time, higher image quality, and large volume coverage. In vivo results from healthy volunteers and a patient with LE showed that the T2SPARC method can generate robust and high-quality myelin water fraction maps of 10 slices within 11 min. This method also yields some useful byproducts such as intra- and extracellular water fraction and long T2 tissue water fraction maps, which can quantify lesions in different brain diseases.

  14. Drying kinetics and colour change of lemon slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishi, Hosain; Khoshtaghaza, Mohammad H.; Minaei, Saeid

    2014-03-01

    The effect of microwave-convective heating on drying characteristics and colour change of lemon slices was investigated. The drying experiments were carried out at 180, 360, 540 and 720Wand at 22°C, with air velocity of 1ms-1. The values of effective moisture diffusivity were found to be in the range between 1.87 10-8 and 3.95 10-8 m2 s-1, and the activation energy was estimated to be 10.91 Wg-1. The drying data were fitted with ten mathematical models available in the literature. The model describing drying kinetics of lemon slices in the best way was found. The colour change of the dried lemon slices was analysed and considered as a quality index affecting the drying quality of the product. The values of lightness/darkness, yellowness/blueness and hue angle increased, while the value of redness/greenness decreased with increasing microwave power.

  15. Feature extraction from slice data for reverse engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yingjie; LU Shangning

    2007-01-01

    A new approach to feature extraction for slice data points is presented. The reconstruction of objects is performed as follows. First, all contours in each slice are extracted by contour tracing algorithms. Then the data points on the contours are analyzed, and the curve segments of the contours are divided into three categories: straight lines, conic curves and B-spline curves. The curve fitting methods are applied for each curve segment to remove the unwanted points with pre-determined tolerance. Finally, the features, which consist of the object and connection relations among them, are founded by matching the corresponding contours in adjacent slices, and 3D models are reconstructed based on the features. The proposed approach has been implemented in OpenGL, and the feasibility of the proposed method has been verified by several cases.

  16. On Synergy of Metal, Slicing, and Symbolic Execution

    CERN Document Server

    Slabý, Jiří; Trtík, Marek

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel technique for finding real errors in programs. The technique is based on a synergy of three well-known methods: metacompilation, slicing, and symbolic execution. More precisely, we instrument a given program with a code that tracks runs of state machines representing various kinds of errors. Next we slice the program to reduce its size without affecting runs of state machines. And then we symbolically execute the sliced program. Depending on the kind of symbolic execution, the technique can be applied as a stand-alone bug finding technique, or to weed out some false positives from an output of another bug-finding tool. We provide several examples demonstrating the practical applicability of our technique.

  17. Automatic Circuit Extractor for HDL Description Using Program Slicing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tun Li; Yang Guo; Si-Kun Li

    2004-01-01

    Design extraction and reduction have been extensively used in modern VLSI design process. The extracted and reduced design can be efficiently processed by various applications, such as formal verification,simulation, automatic test pattern generation (ATPG), etc. This paper presents a new circuit extraction method using program slicing technique, and develops an elegant theoretical basis based on program slicing for circuit extraction from Verilog description. The technique can obtain a chaining slice for given signals of interest. Compared with related researches, the main advantages of the method include that it is fine grain; it has no hardware description language (HDL) coding style limitation; it is precise and is capable of dealing with various Verilog constructions. The technique has been integrated with a commercial simulation environment and incorporated into a design process. The results of practical designs show the significant benefits of the approach.

  18. Autoregressive trispectrum and its slices analysis of magnetorheological damping device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丙三; 黄宜坚

    2008-01-01

    A combined magnetorheological damper combined with rubber spring and magnetorheological damper is addressed.This type of damping device has inherited the merits of rubber spring and the magnetorheological damper.The test damping device is made up of combined magnetorheological damper,amplitude controller,signal collecting device,computer software for dynamic analysis,etc.When a zeromean and non-Gaussian white noise interfere with the device,a time series autoregressive(AR) model is conducted by using the sampled experimental data.Trispectrum and its slices analysis are emerging as a new powerful technique in signal processing,which is put forward for investigating the dynamic characteristics of the magnetorheological vibrant device.The present of trispectrum and its slices analysis change with the variation of controllable working magnetic field of the damper correspondingly.It is indicated that AR trispectrum and its slices analysis methods are feasible and effective for investigation of magnetorheological vibrant device.

  19. GEAR CRACK EARLY DIAGNOSIS USING BISPECTRUM DIAGONAL SLICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A study of bispectral analysis in gearbox condition monitoring is presented.The theory of bispectrum and quadratic phase coupling (QPC) is first introduced, and then equations for computing bispectrum slices are obtained.To meet the needs of online monitoring, a simplified method of computing bispectrum diagonal slice is adopted.Industrial gearbox vibration signals measured from normal and tooth cracked conditions are analyzed using the above method.Experiments results indicate that bispectrum can effectively suppress the additive Gaussian noise and chracterize the QPC phenomenon.It is also shown that the 1-D bispectrum diagonal slice can capture the non-Gaussian and nonlinear feature of gearbox vibration when crack occurred, hence, this method can be employed to gearbox real time monitoring and early diagnosis.

  20. Slice Energy and Conformal Frames in Theories of Gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Cotsakis, S

    2004-01-01

    We examine and compare the behaviour of the scalar field slice energy in different classes of theories of gravity, in particular higher-order and scalar-tensor theories. We find a universal formula for the energy and compare the resulting conservation laws with those known in general relativity. This leads to a comparison between the inflaton, the dilaton and other forms of scalar fields present in these generalized theories. It also shows that all such conformally-related, generalized theories of gravitation allow for the energy on a slice to be invariably defined and its fundamental properties be insensitive to conformal transformations.

  1. Preparing polished crystal slices with high precision orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, S. Ipsen; Gerward, Leif; Pedersen, O.

    1974-01-01

    A polishing procedure is described which utilizes a high precision Laue technique for crystal orientation. Crystal slices with their final polished surfaces parallel to a crystallographic plane within 0.02° can be prepared. ©1974 The American Institute of Physics......A polishing procedure is described which utilizes a high precision Laue technique for crystal orientation. Crystal slices with their final polished surfaces parallel to a crystallographic plane within 0.02° can be prepared. ©1974 The American Institute of Physics...

  2. Dibucaine mitigates spreading depolarization in human neocortical slices and prevents acute dendritic injury in the ischemic rodent neocortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Christopher Risher

    Full Text Available Spreading depolarizations that occur in patients with malignant stroke, subarachnoid/intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury are known to facilitate neuronal damage in metabolically compromised brain tissue. The dramatic failure of brain ion homeostasis caused by propagating spreading depolarizations results in neuronal and astroglial swelling. In essence, swelling is the initial response and a sign of the acute neuronal injury that follows if energy deprivation is maintained. Choosing spreading depolarizations as a target for therapeutic intervention, we have used human brain slices and in vivo real-time two-photon laser scanning microscopy in the mouse neocortex to study potentially useful therapeutics against spreading depolarization-induced injury.We have shown that anoxic or terminal depolarization, a spreading depolarization wave ignited in the ischemic core where neurons cannot repolarize, can be evoked in human slices from pediatric brains during simulated ischemia induced by oxygen/glucose deprivation or by exposure to ouabain. Changes in light transmittance (LT tracked terminal depolarization in time and space. Though spreading depolarizations are notoriously difficult to block, terminal depolarization onset was delayed by dibucaine, a local amide anesthetic and sodium channel blocker. Remarkably, the occurrence of ouabain-induced terminal depolarization was delayed at a concentration of 1 µM that preserves synaptic function. Moreover, in vivo two-photon imaging in the penumbra revealed that, though spreading depolarizations did still occur, spreading depolarization-induced dendritic injury was inhibited by dibucaine administered intravenously at 2.5 mg/kg in a mouse stroke model.Dibucaine mitigated the effects of spreading depolarization at a concentration that could be well-tolerated therapeutically. Hence, dibucaine is a promising candidate to protect the brain from ischemic injury with an approach that does not rely on

  3. Multi-slice spiral CT three-dimensional imaging and perfusion imaging in acute brain injury of dynamic application%多层螺旋CT三维图像重建和脑灌注成像在急性颅脑损伤动态变化中应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨小秦; 柳少光; 王治民; 王学斌; 张可; 魏晓东; 张冬志

    2012-01-01

    Objective Discussion of ultrathin multilayer spiral CT 3D image reconstruction,skull and brain perfusion imaging in acute brain injury to dynamic changes in the clinical value.Methods 2009December to 2011 October were collected in our hospital in 245 patients with acute traumatic brain injury patients check information,both in the 3-6 h after injury within conventional multislice spiral CT,thin multilayer spiral CT and three-dimensional image reconstruction of skull and brain CT perfusion imaging examination,all the cases in 2 to 7 days after injury dynamic review of conventional MSCT and ultrathin multilayer spiral CT,the data were retrospectively analyzed,using the chi-squared test evaluation.Results Super thin multilayer spiral CT in cerebral contusion and laceration,intracerebral hematoma in TBI with mixed diagnosis has statistics difference is better than the conventional MSCT.CTP in acute traumatic brain injury diagnosis was superior to conventional MSCT except diffuse axonal injury.CTP in cerebral contusion and laceration,subdural hematoma and intracerebral hematoma associated with intracerebral hematoma in the diagnosis with statistical difference,better than the ultrathin multilayer spiral CT (P < 0.05).The 3D image reconstruction of skull fracture demonstrated great advantages in the treatment of skull fracture,which include cranial suture separation and basal skull fracture.Conclusion combined Super thin multilayer spiral CT 3D image reconstruction skull and brain CT perfusion imaging for acute craniocerebral injury early diagnosis and minimal injury diagnosis is superior to conventional multislice spiral CT,The rate of misdiagnosis can be decreased.which provide Reliable basis for early diagnosis and Prognosis of TBI.%目的 探讨超薄多层螺旋CT、颅骨三维图像重建和脑灌注成像在急性颅脑外伤动态变化中的临床应用价值.方法 收集2009年12月至2011年10月我院收治的245例急性颅脑外

  4. An optogenetics- and imaging-assisted simultaneous multiple patch-clamp recording system for decoding complex neural circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangfu; Wyskiel, Daniel R; Yang, Weiguo; Wang, Yiqing; Milbern, Lana C; Lalanne, Txomin; Jiang, Xiaolong; Shen, Ying; Sun, Qian-Quan; Zhu, J Julius

    2015-03-01

    Deciphering neuronal circuitry is central to understanding brain function and dysfunction, yet it remains a daunting task. To facilitate the dissection of neuronal circuits, a process requiring functional analysis of synaptic connections and morphological identification of interconnected neurons, we present here a method for stable simultaneous octuple patch-clamp recordings. This method allows physiological analysis of synaptic interconnections among 4-8 simultaneously recorded neurons and/or 10-30 sequentially recorded neurons, and it allows anatomical identification of >85% of recorded interneurons and >99% of recorded principal neurons. We describe how to apply the method to rodent tissue slices; however, it can be used on other model organisms. We also describe the latest refinements and optimizations of mechanics, electronics, optics and software programs that are central to the realization of a combined single- and two-photon microscopy-based, optogenetics- and imaging-assisted, stable, simultaneous quadruple-viguple patch-clamp recording system. Setting up the system, from the beginning of instrument assembly and software installation to full operation, can be completed in 3-4 d.

  5. Rabbit cerebellar slice analysis of long-term depression and its role in classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, B G; Alkon, D L

    1993-12-24

    Cerebellar long-term depression (LTD) has been proposed as a mechanism underlying classical conditioning of the rabbit nictitating membrane/eyelid response (NMR). However, LTD has only been obtained reliably when (1) cerebellar slices are bathed in GABA antagonists which abolish disynaptic inhibitory post synaptic potentials, and (2) the temporal sequence of stimulation used in slice or intact preparations is the opposite of that used in classical conditioning. Based on intradendritic Purkinje cell recordings obtained from rabbit cerebellar slices, we report that stimulation of climbing fibers and then parallel fibers in the presence of the GABA antagonist, bicuculline, produced significant depression of parallel fiber excitatory post synaptic potential (epsp) amplitude that continued to increase for at least 20 min after stimulation. However, application of the same stimulation protocol without GABA antagonists produced a brief depression of parallel fiber epsps that disappeared within minutes. Activation of parallel fibers and then climbing fibers in an order opposite to the LTD-producing sequence (i.e. a classical conditioning-like order) produced a brief depression that dissipated quickly. Stimulation of parallel fibers alone produced a small, slowly developing potentiation, but stimulation of parallel fibers during depolarization-induced local dendritic calcium spikes produced significant depression almost immediately which then declined slowly to more modest levels. Finally, stimulation of parallel fibers at frequencies used in in vivo parallel fiber-climbing fiber stimulation experiments (e.g. 100 Hz) produced an immediate and profound long-lasting epsp depression. The depression occurred, however, whether parallel and climbing fibers were stimulated separately (unpaired) or in a classical conditioning-like protocol (paired) where parallel fiber stimulation coterminated with climbing fiber stimulation (10 Hz).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Imaging skeletal anatomy of injured cervical spine specimens: comparison of single-slice vs multi-slice helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obenauer, S.; Alamo, L.; Herold, T.; Funke, M.; Kopka, L.; Grabbe, E. [Department of Radiology, Georg August-University Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Our objective was to compare a single-slice CT (SS-CT) scanner with a multi-slice CT (MS-CT) scanner in the depiction of osseous anatomic structures and fractures of the upper cervical spine. Two cervical spine specimens with artificial trauma were scanned with a SS-CT scanner (HighSpeed, CT/i, GE, Milwaukee, Wis.) by using various collimations (1, 3, 5 mm) and pitch factors (1, 1.5, 2, 3) and a four-slice helical CT scanner (LightSpeed, QX/i, GE, Milwaukee, Wis.) by using various table speeds ranging from 3.75 to 15 mm/rotation for a pitch of 0.75 and from 7.5 to 30 mm/rotation for a pitch of 1.5. Images were reconstructed with an interval of 1 mm. Sagittal and coronal multiplanar reconstructions of the primary and reconstructed data set were performed. For MS-CT a tube current resulting in equivalent image noise as with SS-CT was used. All images were judged by two observers using a 4-point scale. The best image quality for SS-CT was achieved with the smallest slice thickness (1 mm) and a pitch smaller than 2 resulting in a table speed of up to 2 mm per gantry rotation (4 points). A reduction of the slice thickness rather than of the table speed proved to be beneficial at MS-CT. Therefore, the optimal scan protocol in MS-CT included a slice thickness of 1.25 mm with a table speed of 7.5 mm/360 using a pitch of 1.5 (4 points), resulting in a faster scan time than when a pitch of 0.75 (4 points) was used. This study indicates that MS-CT could provide equivalent image quality at approximately four times the volume coverage speed of SS-CT. (orig.)

  7. BRAIN VOLUMES OF THE LAMB, RAT AND BIRD DO NOT SHOW HEMISPHERIC ASYMMETRY: A STEREOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bünyamin Sahin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that there are functional differences between right and left brain hemispheres. However, it is not clear whether these functional differences are reflected in morphometric differences. This study was carried out to investigate the right-left asymmetry, and sex and species differences of the brains using the Cavalieri principle for volume estimation. Seventeen lambs, 10 rats and 12 avian brains were used to estimate brain volumes. A transparent point grid was superimposed on the slices of lamb brains directly and the slices of the rat and avian brains were projected onto a screen at 10x magnification. Surface areas of the cut slice faces were estimated by simply counting the points that hit the slices. Mean brain volumes were 37.74 cm3, 598.95 mm3 and 730.38 mm3 and the coefficients of variations were 0.08, 0.05 and 0.05 for lamb, rat and avian brains respectively. The differences between left and right hemispheres did not show statistical significance (P > 0.05. However, the male brain volumes were larger than the females for the lamb and bird (P < 0.05. In light of such findings, it will be necessary to evaluate neuron number of the brain hemispheres to provide more useful data regarding inter-hemispheric brain asymmetry.

  8. Single slice US-MRI registration for neurosurgical MRI-guided US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardasani, Utsav; Baxter, John S. H.; Peters, Terry M.; Khan, Ali R.

    2016-03-01

    Image-based ultrasound to magnetic resonance image (US-MRI) registration can be an invaluable tool in image-guided neuronavigation systems. State-of-the-art commercial and research systems utilize image-based registration to assist in functions such as brain-shift correction, image fusion, and probe calibration. Since traditional US-MRI registration techniques use reconstructed US volumes or a series of tracked US slices, the functionality of this approach can be compromised by the limitations of optical or magnetic tracking systems in the neurosurgical operating room. These drawbacks include ergonomic issues, line-of-sight/magnetic interference, and maintenance of the sterile field. For those seeking a US vendor-agnostic system, these issues are compounded with the challenge of instrumenting the probe without permanent modification and calibrating the probe face to the tracking tool. To address these challenges, this paper explores the feasibility of a real-time US-MRI volume registration in a small virtual craniotomy site using a single slice. We employ the Linear Correlation of Linear Combination (LC2) similarity metric in its patch-based form on data from MNI's Brain Images for Tumour Evaluation (BITE) dataset as a PyCUDA enabled Python module in Slicer. By retaining the original orientation information, we are able to improve on the poses using this approach. To further assist the challenge of US-MRI registration, we also present the BOXLC2 metric which demonstrates a speed improvement to LC2, while retaining a similar accuracy in this context.

  9. Ear Identification by Fusion of Segmented Slice Regions using Invariant Features: An Experimental Manifold with Dual Fusion Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kisku, Dakshina Ranjan; Sing, Jamuna Kanta

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a robust ear identification system which is developed by fusing SIFT features of color segmented slice regions of an ear. The proposed ear identification method makes use of Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to build ear model with mixture of Gaussian using vector quantization algorithm and K-L divergence is applied to the GMM framework for recording the color similarity in the specified ranges by comparing color similarity between a pair of reference ear and probe ear. SIFT features are then detected and extracted from each color slice region as a part of invariant feature extraction. The extracted keypoints are then fused separately by the two fusion approaches, namely concatenation and the Dempster-Shafer theory. Finally, the fusion approaches generate two independent augmented feature vectors which are used for identification of individuals separately. The proposed identification technique is tested on IIT Kanpur ear database of 400 individuals and is found to achieve 98.25% accuracy for id...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  12. Repair pathways evident in human liver organ slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vickers, Alison E. M.; Fisher, Robyn; Olinga, Peter; Dial, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The extension of human liver slice culture viability for several days broadens the potential of this ex vivo model for characterizing pathways of organ injury and repair, and allows for the multiple dosing of compounds. Extended viability is demonstrated by continued synthesis of GSH and ATP, and ma

  13. The Slice Algorithm For Irreducible Decomposition of Monomial Ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roune, Bjarke Hammersholt

    2009-01-01

    Irreducible decomposition of monomial ideals has an increasing number of applications from biology to pure math. This paper presents the Slice Algorithm for computing irreducible decompositions, Alexander duals and socles of monomial ideals. The paper includes experiments showing good performance...... in practice....

  14. Spontaneous calcium waves in granule cells in cerebellar slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apuschkin, Mia; Ougaard, Maria; Rekling, Jens C

    2013-01-01

    and establishment of synaptic transmission. Here, we used calcium imaging in slice cultures of the postnatal cerebellum, and observe spontaneous propagating calcium waves in NeuN-positive granule-like cells. Wave formation was blocked by TTX and the AMPA antagonist NBQX, but persisted after NMDA receptor blockade...

  15. Slicing Recognition of Aircraft Integral Panel Generalized Pocket

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Fangfang; Du Baorui; Ren Wenjie; Zheng Guolei; Chu Hongzhen

    2008-01-01

    To automatically obtain a machining area in numerical control (NC) programming, a data model of generalized pocket is estab-lished by analyzing aireraft integral panel characteristics, and a feature recognition approach is proposed. First, by reference to the prao- tieal slice-machining process of an aircraft integral panel, both the part and the blank are sliced in the Z-axis direction; hence a feature profile is created acceding to the slicing planes and the contours are formed by the intersection of the slicing planes with the part and its blanK. Second, the auxiliary features of the generalized pocket are also determined based on the face type and the position, to correct the profile of the pocket. Finally, the generalized pocket feature relationship tree is constructed by matching the vertical relationships among the features. Machining feature information produced by using this method can be directly used to calculate the cutter path. The validity and practicability of the method is verified by NC programming for aircraft panels.

  16. Evaluation of fibrosis in precision-cut tissue slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, I. M.; Pham, B. T.; Groothuis, G. M. M.; Olinga, P.

    2013-01-01

    1. In this review, the use of precision-cut tissue slices (PCTS) of the liver, kidney, lung and intestine in fibrosis research are evaluated and future possibilities are discussed. 2. In vivo models or techniques that are applicabless to be investigated in PCTS are discussed. 3. It is concluded that

  17. Reduction of acrylamide formation in potato slices during frying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedreschi, Franco; Kaack, K.; Granby, Kit

    2004-01-01

    Reduction of acrylamide formation in potato chips was investigated in relation to frying temperature and three treatments before frying. Potato slices (Tivoli variety, diameter: 37 mm, width: 2.2 mm) were fried at 150degreesC, 170degreesC and 190degreesC until reaching moisture contents of simila...

  18. Stochastic neural network model for spontaneous bursting in hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, B; Dasgupta, C

    2002-11-01

    A biologically plausible, stochastic, neural network model that exhibits spontaneous transitions between a low-activity (normal) state and a high-activity (epileptic) state is studied by computer simulation. Brief excursions of the network to the high-activity state lead to spontaneous population bursting similar to the behavior observed in hippocampal slices bathed in a high-potassium medium. Although the variability of interburst intervals in this model is due to stochasticity, first return maps of successive interburst intervals show trajectories that resemble the behavior expected near unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) of systems exhibiting deterministic chaos. Simulations of the effects of the application of chaos control, periodic pacing, and anticontrol to the network model yield results that are qualitatively similar to those obtained in experiments on hippocampal slices. Estimation of the statistical significance of UPOs through surrogate data analysis also leads to results that resemble those of similar analysis of data obtained from slice experiments and human epileptic activity. These results suggest that spontaneous population bursting in hippocampal slices may be a manifestation of stochastic bistable dynamics, rather than of deterministic chaos. Our results also question the reliability of some of the recently proposed, UPO-based, statistical methods for detecting determinism and chaos in experimental time-series data.

  19. Blanching, salting and sun drying of different pumpkin fruit slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workneh, T S; Zinash, A; Woldetsadik, K

    2014-11-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the quality of pumpkin (Cucuribita Spp.) slices that were subjected to pre-drying treatments and drying using two drying methods (uncontrolled sun and oven) fruit accessions. Pre-drying had significant (P ≤ 0.05) effect on the quality of dried pumpkin slices. 10 % salt solution dipped pumpkin fruit slices had good chemical quality. The two-way interaction between drying methods and pre-drying treatments had significant (P ≤ 0.05) effect on chemical qualities. Pumpkin subjected to salt solution dipping treatment and oven dried had higher chemical concentrations. Among the pumpkin fruit accessions, pumpkin accession 8007 had the superior TSS, total sugar and sugar to acid ratio after drying. Among the three pre-drying treatment, salt solution dipping treatment had significant (P ≤ 0.05) effect and the most efficient pre-drying treatment to retain the quality of dried pumpkin fruits without significant chemical quality deterioration. Salt dipping treatment combined with low temperature (60 °C) oven air circulation drying is recommended to maintain quality of dried pumpkin slices. However, since direct sun drying needs extended drying time due to fluctuation in temperature, it is recommended to develop or select best successful solar dryer for use in combination with pre-drying salt dipping or blanching treatments.

  20. Melatonin protects against oxygen and glucose deprivation by decreasing extracellular glutamate and Nox-derived ROS in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño, Paloma; Parada, Esther; Farré-Alins, Victor; Molz, Simone; Cacabelos, Ramón; Marco-Contelles, José; López, Manuela G; Tasca, Carla I; Ramos, Eva; Romero, Alejandro; Egea, Javier

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic interventions on pathological processes involved in the ischemic cascade, such as oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and/or apoptosis, are of urgent need for stroke treatment. Melatonin regulates a large number of physiological actions and its beneficial properties have been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate whether melatonin mediates neuroprotection in rat hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) and glutamate excitotoxicity. Thus, we describe here that melatonin significantly reduced the amount of lactate dehydrogenase released in the OGD-treated slices, reverted neuronal injury caused by OGD-reoxygenation in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions, restored the reduction of GSH content of the hippocampal slices induced by OGD, and diminished the oxidative stress produced in the reoxygenation period. Furthermore, melatonin afforded maximum protection against glutamate-induced toxicity and reversed the glutamate released almost basal levels, at 10 and 30μM concentration, respectively. Consequently, we propose that melatonin might strongly and positively influence the outcome of brain ischemia/reperfusion.

  1. "The Most Famous Brain in the World" Performance and Pedagogy on an Amnesiac's Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweaney, Katherine W.

    2012-01-01

    Project H.M. was just the sort of thing one might expect the Internet to latch onto: it was a live streaming video of a frozen human brain being slowly sliced apart. Users who clicked the link on Twitter or Facebook between the 2nd and 4th of December 2009 were immediately confronted with a close-up shot of the brain's interior, which was…

  2. Step-by-step instructions for retina recordings with perforated multi electrode arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Reinhard

    Full Text Available Multi-electrode arrays are a state-of-the-art tool in electrophysiology, also in retina research. The output cells of the retina, the retinal ganglion cells, form a monolayer in many species and are well accessible due to their proximity to the inner retinal surface. This structure has allowed the use of multi-electrode arrays for high-throughput, parallel recordings of retinal responses to presented visual stimuli, and has led to significant new insights into retinal organization and function. However, using conventional arrays where electrodes are embedded into a glass or ceramic plate can be associated with three main problems: (1 low signal-to-noise ratio due to poor contact between electrodes and tissue, especially in the case of strongly curved retinas from small animals, e.g. rodents; (2 insufficient oxygen and nutrient supply to cells located on the bottom of the recording chamber; and (3 displacement of the tissue during recordings. Perforated multi-electrode arrays (pMEAs have been found to alleviate all three issues in brain slice recordings. Over the last years, we have been using such perforated arrays to study light evoked activity in the retinas of various species including mouse, pig, and human. In this article, we provide detailed step-by-step instructions for the use of perforated MEAs to record visual responses from the retina, including spike recordings from retinal ganglion cells and in vitro electroretinograms (ERG. In addition, we provide in-depth technical and methodological troubleshooting information, and show example recordings of good quality as well as examples for the various problems which might be encountered. While our description is based on the specific equipment we use in our own lab, it may also prove useful when establishing retinal MEA recordings with other equipment.

  3. Fan beam image reconstruction with generalized Fourier slice theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuangren; Yang, Kang; Yang, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    For parallel beam geometry the Fourier reconstruction works via the Fourier slice theorem (or central slice theorem, projection slice theorem). For fan beam situation, Fourier slice can be extended to a generalized Fourier slice theorem (GFST) for fan-beam image reconstruction. We have briefly introduced this method in a conference. This paper reintroduces the GFST method for fan beam geometry in details. The GFST method can be described as following: the Fourier plane is filled by adding up the contributions from all fanbeam projections individually; thereby the values in the Fourier plane are directly calculated for Cartesian coordinates such avoiding the interpolation from polar to Cartesian coordinates in the Fourier domain; inverse fast Fourier transform is applied to the image in Fourier plane and leads to a reconstructed image in spacial domain. The reconstructed image is compared between the result of the GFST method and the result from the filtered backprojection (FBP) method. The major differences of the GFST and the FBP methods are: (1) The interpolation process are at different data sets. The interpolation of the GFST method is at projection data. The interpolation of the FBP method is at filtered projection data. (2) The filtering process are done in different places. The filtering process of the GFST is at Fourier domain. The filtering process of the FBP method is the ramp filter which is done at projections. The resolution of ramp filter is variable with different location but the filter in the Fourier domain lead to resolution invariable with location. One advantage of the GFST method over the FBP method is in short scan situation, an exact solution can be obtained with the GFST method, but it can not be obtained with the FBP method. The calculation of both the GFST and the FBP methods are at O(N^3), where N is the number of pixel in one dimension.

  4. Comparative study of the sectional slice of the anterior commissure and the internal capsule with its MRI images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dandan; MA Wenyi; Zhang Xiaoyang; YUAN Lixiang; YUAN Wu; LI Yunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The brain of 100 normal persons were performed MRI scan and image analysis. 12 adult female brain specimens fixed by formalin, were made into the thickness of 0. 5mm by celloidin embedding technique. We analyzed the anatomical position of the relationship about the anterior limb of internal capsule and the anterior commissure in eollodion-embedded plans, and then compared with the brain MRI of normal people. We also further compared the statistical differences of the internal capsule’ s volume. This research aimed to pro-vide a reliable sectional anatomic basis for the study of the central nervous system and deep brain stimulation to treat the mental neurological diseases. Results:1. Continous observation of celloid in brain slices horizontal section:Approximately 130 slices of each specimen, from the parietal lobe,the internal capsule was the typical structure"><" on the level of about 35 mm . On the level of about 41mm, the anterior commissure was"arc" through the bot-tom head of the caudate nucleus connecting the bilateral anterior limb, which located between the caudate nucleus and the lentiform nucleus. The posterior limb of internal capsule situated between the dorsal thalamus and the lenti-form nucleus on the level of about 46 mm. Coronal section:about 150 slices of per specimen, from the former lat-eral ventricle horn back,on the level of about 16 mm the anterior commissure was "arch" connecting the anterior limb. About 28 mm dimension, the interior capsule fore limb located between the caudate nucleus and the puta-men, the posterior limb of internal capsule located between the globus pallidus and the dorsal thalamus, extending down to the cerebral peduncle. Sagittal section:about 180 slices of per specimen, from the outside to the inside at the beginning of the temporal lobe, the corona radia taextends between the putamen and dorsal thalamus, and then formsthe posterior limb of the internal capsule at the level of about 21 mm. About 25 mm level

  5. Imaging and recording subventricular zone progenitor cells in live tissue of postnatal mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Lacar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The subventricular zone (SVZ is one of two regions where neurogenesis persists in the postnatal brain. The SVZ, located along the lateral ventricle, is the largest neurogenic zone in the brain that contains multiple cell populations including astrocyte-like cells and neuroblasts. Neuroblasts migrate in chains to the olfactory bulb where they differentiate into interneurons. Here, we discuss the experimental approaches to record the electrophysiology of these cells and image their migration and calcium activity in acute slices. Although these techniques were in place for studying glial cells and neurons in mature networks, the SVZ raises new challenges due to the unique properties of SVZ cells, the cellular diversity, and the architecture of the region. We emphasize different methods, such as the use of transgenic mice and in vivo electroporation that permit identification of the different SVZ cell populations for patch clamp recording or imaging. Electroporation also permits genetic labeling of cells using fluorescent reporter mice and modification of the system using either RNA interference technology or floxed mice. In this review, we aim to provide conceptual and technical details of the approaches to perform electrophysiological and imaging studies of SVZ cells.

  6. Effect of simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration on quality characteristics of carrot slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the effects of various processing parameters on carrot slices exposed to infrared (IR) radiation heating for achieving simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration (SIRDBD). The investigated parameters were product surface temperature, slice thickness and processing ti...

  7. A distinct boundary between the higher brain's susceptibility to ischemia and the lower brain's resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Devin Brisson

    Full Text Available Higher brain regions are more susceptible to global ischemia than the brainstem, but is there a gradual increase in vulnerability in the caudal-rostral direction or is there a discrete boundary? We examined the interface between `higher` thalamus and the hypothalamus the using live brain slices where variation in blood flow is not a factor. Whole-cell current clamp recording of 18 thalamic neurons in response to 10 min O2/glucose deprivation (OGD revealed a rapid anoxic depolarization (AD from which thalamic neurons do not recover. Newly acquired neurons could not be patched following AD, confirming significant regional thalamic injury. Coinciding with AD, light transmittance (LT imaging during whole-cell recording showed an elevated LT front that initiated in midline thalamus and that propagated into adjacent hypothalamus. However, hypothalamic neurons patched in paraventricular nucleus (PVN, n= 8 magnocellular and 12 parvocellular neurons and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, n= 18 only slowly depolarized as AD passed through these regions. And with return to control aCSF, hypothalamic neurons repolarized and recovered their input resistance and action potential amplitude. Moreover, newly acquired hypothalamic neurons could be readily patched following exposure to OGD, with resting parameters similar to neurons not previously exposed to OGD. Thalamic susceptibility and hypothalamic resilience were also observed following ouabain exposure which blocks the Na(+/K(+ pump, evoking depolarization similar to OGD in all neuronal types tested. Finally, brief exposure to elevated [K(+]o caused spreading depression (SD, a milder, AD-like event only in thalamic neurons so SD generation is regionally correlated with strong AD. Therefore the thalamus-hypothalamus interface represents a discrete boundary where neuronal vulnerability to ischemia is high in thalamus (like more rostral neocortex, striatum, hippocampus. In contrast hypothalamic neurons are

  8. A new algorithm of brain volume contours segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建明; 施鹏飞

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores brain CT slices segmentation technique and some related problems, including contours segmentation algorithms, edge detector, algorithm evaluation and experimental results. This article describes a method for contour-based segmentation of anatomical structures in 3D medical data sets. With this method, the user manually traces one or more 2D contours of an anatomical structure of interest on parallel planes arbitrarily cutting the data set. The experimental results showes the segmentation based on 3D brain volume and 2D CT slices. The main creative contributions in this paper are: (1) contours segmentation algorithm; (2) edge detector; (3) algorithm evaluation.

  9. A quantitative evaluation of brain computerized tomography in children using color image analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamatani, Miwa; Naganuma, Yoshihiro; Hongoh, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Miyako; Konishi, Tohru; Okada, Toshio (Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutifal Univ. (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    We attempted the quantitative analysis of brain computerized tomographic (CT) scans in children using color image analyzer. A consecutive series of 167 CT scans were reviewed. Areas of subarachnoid space, cavum, ventricle and cerebellum were measured on three slices: A slice is at the level of head of caudate nucleus, anterior horn of lateral ventricle and third ventricle. B slice is at the level of body of lateral ventricle. B slice is at the level of body of lateral ventricle. C slice is at the level of sella turcica and pons. We investigated these values compared with Evans ratio, Cella Media Index, cerebellar atrophy score and visual evaluation. Serial brain CT scans of 8 patients with infantile spasm were evaluated for the assessment of the brain shrinkage after ACTH therapy. The ratios of subarachnoid space/intracranial area on A and B slices (SAS A%, SAS B%) were significantly higher in the patients with severe brain atrophy. There were linear relationships between Evans ratio and SAS A%(r=0.405, p<0.001), Cella Media Index and the ratio of the lateral ventricle/intracranial area on B slice (r=-0.501, p<0.001), and the cerebellar atrophy score by Une and SAS C% (r=0.369, p<0.001). In the normal patients, the values of SAS A% and SAS B% were much greater in less than 1.5 years old children. These results suggest that the trend of CT findings related to age may reflect physiological changes of the space between the skull and the brain with age. Brain shrinkage after ACTH therapy was more pronounced in the subarachnoid space than the ventricle. The prognosis of infantile spasm concerning convulsive attacks was relatively good in patients with severely brain shrinkage after ACTH therapy. Quantitative analysis of brain CT scans seemed to be available to clinical and objective evaluations. (author).

  10. Distribution of melatonin receptor in human fetal brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guo-quan; SHAO Fu-yuan; ZHAO Ying; LIU Zhi-min

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution of 2 kinds of melatonin receptor subtypes (mtl and MT2) in human fetal brain. Methods: The fetal brain tissues were sliced and the distribution ofmelatonin receptors in human fetal brain were detected using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Results: Melatonin receptor mtl existed in the cerebellun and hypothalamus, melatonin receptor MT2 exists in hypothalamus, occipital and medulla. Conclusion: Two kinds of melatonin receptors, mtl and MT2 exist in the membrane and cytosol of brain cells, indicating that human fetal brain is a target organ of melatonin.

  11. Performance of a Self-Paced Brain Computer Interface on Data Contaminated with Eye-Movement Artifacts and on Data Recorded in a Subsequent Session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Fatourechi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a specific self-paced BCI (SBCI is investigated using two different datasets to determine its suitability for using online: (1 data contaminated with large-amplitude eye movements, and (2 data recorded in a session subsequent to the original sessions used to design the system. No part of the data was rejected in the subsequent session. Therefore, this dataset can be regarded as a “pseudo-online” test set. The SBCI under investigation uses features extracted from three specific neurological phenomena. Each of these neurological phenomena belongs to a different frequency band. Since many prominent artifacts are either of mostly low-frequency (e.g., eye movements or mostly high-frequency nature (e.g., muscle movements, it is expected that the system shows a fairly robust performance over artifact-contaminated data. Analysis of the data of four participants using epochs contaminated with large-amplitude eye-movement artifacts shows that the system's performance deteriorates only slightly. Furthermore, the system's performance during the session subsequent to the original sessions remained largely the same as in the original sessions for three out of the four participants. This moderate drop in performance can be considered tolerable, since allowing artifact-contaminated data to be used as inputs makes the system available for users at ALL times.

  12. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  13. Administration of copper reduced the hyper-excitability of neurons in CA1 hippocampal slices from epileptic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Juan; Infante, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Copper as a trace metal is involved in several neurodegenerative illnesses, such as Menkes, Wilson's, Alzheimer's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Creutzfeldt-Jakob. Electrophysiological evidence indicates that acute perfusion of copper can inhibit long-term synaptic potentiation in hippocampal slices. The objective of this work is to determine whether Cu perfusion can perturb synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices derived from pilocarpine treated epileptic rats. Field potential (FP) recordings of the CA1 neurons of rats with chronic epilepsy showed voltage and response duration decrease following copper sulfate perfusion. However, voltage and response duration were higher after removing copper by washing. The discharge frequency of the CA1 neurons of hippocampal slices from non-epileptic control rats was increased after acute perfusion of 10 μM of pilocarpine. This increase was blocked by administering copper sulphate 10 μM. Krebs-Ringer solution washing re-established the discharges, with a higher frequency than that provoked by pilocarpine perfusion. We discuss the blocking effect of copper and the synaptic hyper-excitability generated by its removal.

  14. Differential expression of voltage-gated K+ and Ca2+ currents in bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, V P; Maguire, G

    1998-04-01

    Whole-cell voltage-gated currents were recorded from bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice. Two physiological populations of bipolar cells were identified. In the first, depolarizing voltage steps elicited a rapidly activating A-current that reached peak amplitude or = 10 ms after step onset and did not inactivate. IK was antagonized by internal caesium and external tetraethylammonium. Bipolar cells expressing IK also expressed a time-dependent h-current at membrane potentials calcium-dependent potassium current (IK(Ca)) were identified. Depolarizing voltage steps > -50 mV activated ICa, which reached peak amplitude between -20 and -10 mV. ICa was eliminated in Ca+2-free Ringer and blocked by cadmium and cobalt, but not tetrodotoxin. In most cells, Ica was transient, activating rapidly at -50 mV. This current was antagonized by nickel. The remaining bipolar cells expressed a nifedipine-sensitive sustained current that activated between -40 and -30 mV, with both slower kinetics and smaller amplitude than transient ICa. IK(Ca) was elicited by membrane depolarizations > -20 mV. Bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice preparation express an array of voltage-gated currents which contribute to non-linear I-V characteristics. The zebrafish retinal slice preparation is well-suited to patch clamp analyses of membrane mechanisms and provides a suitable model for studying genetic defects in visual system development.

  15. Whole-brain perfusion imaging and angiography performed with 256-slice CTin evaluation of cerebrovascular reserve capacity in unilateral carotid artery stenosis%256层CT全脑灌注成像联合CTA评估单侧颈动脉狭窄的脑血管储备能力的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐健; 常军; 侯海燕; 姜旭栋; 堵红群; 姜建威

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the value of combination of whole-brain perfusion imaging and CTA in evaluating cerebrovascular reserve capacity in unilateral carotid artery stenosis. Methods Twenty-seven patients with unilateral carotid artery stenosis of ≥50% were divided into 2 groups according to CTA results: carotid moderate stenosis groupfcarotid stenosis of 50%-69%, group A) and carotid severe stenosis or occlusion group(carotid stenosis of ≥70% , group B). The relative cerebral blood volume(rCBV) , the relative cerebral blood folw(rCBF) , the difference in mean transit time(dMTT) and the difference in time to peak(dTTP) in bilateral temporal white matter and gray matter supplied by middle cerebral artery were measured and calculated. CTA was used to assess the configuration of the circle of Willis and if primary collaterals were patent. Differences in perfusion parameters between group A and group B, and between patients with patent primary collaterals or not were determined by using one way ANOVA test. Results There were statistical differences in rCBV, rCBF, dMTT and dTTP between two groups in white matter. Statistical difference of dMTT and dTTP was found between two groups in gray matter. There was significant increase in dTTP in the group B of the patients without patent primary collaterals. Conclusion Combined whole-brain perfusion imaging and CTA is a good way to evaluate cerebrovascular reserve capacity in unilateral carotid artery stenosis, and to provide a reliable method for choice of clinic treatments.%目的 探讨256层CT全脑灌注成像联合CTA评估单侧颈动脉狭窄的脑血管储备能力的价值.方法 单侧颈动脉狭窄≥50%的患者27例,根据CTA结果 按颈动脉狭窄程度划分为第一组中度狭窄组(血管阻塞50%~69%)和第二组重度狭窄或闭塞组(血管阻塞≥70%).测量并计算2组大脑中动脉供血区的白质和灰质的相对脑血容量(relative cerebral blood volume,r

  16. Effect of Blanching on Structural Quality of Dried Potato Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté; Quartaert; Meerdink; van't Riet K

    1998-02-16

    Mechanical properties of potato slices were monitored during blanching, as indicators of structural changes. As expected, blanching resulted in weakening of potato structure. Gelatinization, which occurred during the first 2 min, did not promote an immediate weakening of the potato tissue. More than 80% of the changes in mechanical properties occurred during the first 30 min of blanching. Potato slices blanched for 2 and 30 min as well as unblanched ones were dried in a convective air drier at 48 degrees C. Bulk and true density, porosity, and shrinkage were monitored with time. Blanched potatoes resulted in a significantly more compact, less porous product with lower effective water diffusivity than unblanched potatoes. The results indicated that changes that occurred during the first 2 min of blanching had a much greater influence on structural quality of dried potatoes than changes that occurred from 2 to 30 min of blanching.

  17. Microbiological quality of sliced and block mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Fontanetti Marinheiro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the microbiological quality of mozzarella cheese sold in retail markets of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Forty samples of mozzarella cheese were analyzed, comprising 20 samples of block cheese and 20 of sliced cheese. The cheese samples were analyzed for thermotolerant coliform counts and coagulase positive staphylococci counts, and presence of Salmonella spp and Listeria monocytogenes. The percentage of 12,5% and 5% of the sliced and block cheese samples analyzed, respectively, exceeded the microbiological standards accepted by Brazilian legislation. These results indicate the need for a better product monitoring and more concern with hygiene and sanitary practices during industrial process.

  18. Role of Nitric Oxide and Nitric Oxide Synthases in Ischemia-reperfusion Injury in Rat Organotypic Hippocampus Slice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xianfang; SHI Jing; LIU Xiaochun; ZHANG Jing; SUN Ning

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effects of ischemia-reperfusion on the levels of nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase isoforms (nNOS and iNOS), rat organotypic hippocampus slice were cultured in vitro and subjected to ischemia by oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) for 30 min and then placed in the normal culture condition. The ischemia-reperfusion produced a time-dependent increase in nitrite levels in the culture medium. Reverse transcriptional-polymerase chain reaction showed augmented levels of mRNA for both nNOS and iNOS when compared with control at 12 h and remained increase at 36 h after OGD (P<0.05). The protein levels of both nitric oxide synthase isoforms increased significantly as determined by Western Blot. OGD also caused neurotoxicity in this model as revealed by the elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) efflux into the incubation solution. The results suggest that organotypic hippocampus slice is a useful model in studying ischemia-reperfusion brain injury. NO and NOS may play a critical role in the ischemia-reperfusion brain damage in vitro.

  19. Slicepedia: Content-agnostic slicing resource production for adaptive hypermedia

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    PUBLISHED he production of resources supporting the needs of Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHSs) is labor-intensive. As a result, content production is focused upon meeting the needs of resources with higher demand, which limits the extent to which numerous and diverse content requirements of AHSs can be met. Open Corpus Slicing attempts to convert the wealth of information available on the web, into customisable information objects. This approach could provide the basis of an open corpus s...

  20. Slice Energy in Higher Order Gravity Theories and Conformal Transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Cotsakis, S

    2004-01-01

    We show that there is a generic transport of energy between the scalar field generated by the conformal transformation of higher order gravity theories and the matter component. We give precise relations of this exchange and show that, unless we are in a stationary spacetime, slice energy is not generically conserved. These results translate into statements about the relative behaviour of ordinary matter, dark matter and dark energy in the context of higher order gravity.

  1. Comparison between powder and slices diffraction methods in teeth samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaco, Marcos V.; Barroso, Regina C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IF/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada; Porto, Isabel M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FOP/UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Morfologia; Gerlach, Raquel F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FORP/USP), Rieirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Morfologia, Estomatologia e Fisiologia; Costa, Fanny N. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (LIN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Propose different methods to obtain crystallographic information about biological materials are important since powder method is a nondestructive method. Slices are an approximation of what would be an in vivo analysis. Effects of samples preparation cause differences in scattering profiles compared with powder method. The main inorganic component of bones and teeth is a calcium phosphate mineral whose structure closely resembles hydroxyapatite (HAp). The hexagonal symmetry, however, seems to work well with the powder diffraction data, and the crystal structure of HAp is usually described in space group P63/m. Were analyzed ten third molar teeth. Five teeth were separated in enamel, detin and circumpulpal detin powder and five in slices. All the scattering profile measurements were carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory - LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. The LNLS synchrotron light source is composed of a 1.37 GeV electron storage ring, delivering approximately 4x10{sup -1}0 photons/s at 8 keV. A double-crystal Si(111) pre-monochromator, upstream of the beamline, was used to select a small energy bandwidth at 11 keV . Scattering signatures were obtained at intervals of 0.04 deg for angles from 24 deg to 52 deg. The human enamel experimental crystallite size obtained in this work were 30(3)nm (112 reflection) and 30(3)nm (300 reflection). These values were obtained from measurements of powdered enamel. When comparing the slice obtained 58(8)nm (112 reflection) and 37(7)nm (300 reflection) enamel diffraction patterns with those generated by the powder specimens, a few differences emerge. This work shows differences between powder and slices methods, separating characteristics of sample of the method's influence. (author)

  2. Establishment of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) reference level in Johor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bakar, K. A.; Muhammad, H.; Sabarudin, A.; Ang, W. C.; Bahruddin, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation doses from computed tomography (CT) are the highest and most hazardous compared to other imaging modalities. This study aimed to evaluate radiation dose in Johor, Malaysia to patients during computed tomography examinations of the brain, chest and abdomen and to establish the local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) as are present with the current, state- of-art, multi-slice CT scanners. Survey forms were sent to five centres performing CT to obtain data regarding acquisition parameters as well as the dose information from CT consoles. CT- EXPO (Version 2.3.1, Germany) was used to validate the dose information. The proposed DRLs were indicated by rounding the third quartiles of whole dose distributions where mean values of CTDIw (mGy), CTDIvol (mGy) and DLP (mGy.cm) were comparable with other reference levels; 63, 63, and 1015 respectively for CT Brain; 15, 14, and 450 respectively for CT thorax and 16, 17, and 590 respectively for CT abdomen. The study revealed that the CT practice and dose output were revolutionised, and must keep up with the pace of introductory technology. We suggest that CTDIvol should be included in current national DRLs, as modern CTs are configured with a higher number of detectors and are independent of pitch factors.

  3. Direct Slicing Based on Material Performance and Process Parameters for Selective Laser Sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Direct slicing from CAD models to generate sectional contours of thepart to be sintered for Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) may overcome inherent disadvantages of using a Stereo Lithography ( STL ) format. In this paper, a direct slicing procedure is proposed for Selective Laser Sintering based on material performance and process parameters. Slicing thickness depends on the 3 D geometric model,material performance and process parameters. The relationship among material performance, process parameters and the largest slicing thickness is established using analysis of a sintering temperature field. A dynamic linked library is developed to realize direct slicing from a CAD model.

  4. Post-mortem MRI-guided sampling of multiple sclerosis brain lesions: increased yield of active demyelinating and (p)reactive lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groot, C J; Bergers, E; Kamphorst, W; Ravid, R; Polman, C H; Barkhof, F; van der Valk, P

    2001-08-01

    Macroscopic sampling of multiple sclerosis lesions in the brain tends to find chronic lesions. For a better understanding of the dynamics of the multiple sclerosis disease process, research into new and developing lesions is of great interest. As MRI in vivo effectively demonstrates lesions in multiple sclerosis patients, we have applied it to unfixed post-mortem brain slices to identify abnormalities, in order to obtain a higher yield of active lesions. The Netherlands Brain Bank organized the rapid autopsy of 29 multiple sclerosis patients. The brain was cut in 1 cm coronal slices. One or two slices were subjected to T(1)- and T(2)-weighted MRI, and then cut at the plane of the MRI scan into 5 mm thick opposing sections. Areas of interest were identified based on the MRI findings and excised. One half was fixed in 10% formalin and paraffin-embedded, and the corresponding area in the adjacent half was snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen. In total, 136 out of 174 brain tissue samples could be matched with the abnormalities seen on T(2)-weighted MRIs. The stage of lesional development was determined (immuno) histochemically. For 54 MRI-detectable samples, it was recorded whether they were macroscopically detectable, i.e. visible and/or palpable. Histopathological analysis revealed that 48% of the hyperintense areas seen on T(2)-weighted images represented active lesions, including lesions localized in the normal appearing white matter, without apparent loss of myelin but nevertheless showing a variable degree of oedema, small clusters of microglial cells with enhanced major histocompatibility complex class II antigen, CD45 and CD68 antigen expression and a variable number of perivascular lymphocytes around small blood vessels [designated as (p)reactive lesions]. From the macroscopically not-visible/not-palpable MRI-detected abnormalities, 58% were (p)reactive lesions and 21% contained active demyelinating lesions. In contrast, visible and/or palpable brain tissue samples

  5. Gain of Imaging Fidelity by Employing a Higher Number of Independent Transmit Channels Together with Slice-Selective Radio-Frequency (RF Shimming at 7T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niravkumar Darji

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric resonance effects and radio-frequency (RF power deposition have become challenging issues for magnetic resonance imaging at ultrahigh-field (UHF strengths. The use of transmit (Tx coil arrays with independently-driven RF sources using a parallel transmission system is a promising method for alleviating the resulting RF inhomogeneities. In this study, the effect on homogeneity and RF-power when employing a higher number of transmit channels with multi-slice acquisition in vivo at high field strength (7T is scrutinized. An 8-channel head coil array was driven to emulate circular polarized (CP and 2-, 4-, and 8-channel independent transmit configurations at 7T. Static RF shimming was employed on human subjects in order to homogenize the B1+ field in the excited volume. Slice-selective and global RF shimming methods were applied with CP and 2-, 4-, and 8-channel transmit channel configurations. RF shimming was performed from CP to 2-, 4-, and 8-channel Tx configurations globally and slice-selectively. Systematic improvement in B1+ homogeneity and/or reduction in RF-power were observed. RF shimming in the human brain with 8-channel transmit and slice-selective shimming yields an increase in B1+ homogeneity of 43% and/or reduces RF-power by 68% when compared with CP global RF shimming at 7T.

  6. Power law scaling in synchronization of brain signals depends on cognitive load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Jesse; Velazquez, Jose Luis Perez

    2014-01-01

    As it has several features that optimize information processing, it has been proposed that criticality governs the dynamics of nervous system activity. Indications of such dynamics have been reported for a variety of in vitro and in vivo recordings, ranging from in vitro slice electrophysiology to human functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, there still remains considerable debate as to whether the brain actually operates close to criticality or in another governing state such as stochastic or oscillatory dynamics. A tool used to investigate the criticality of nervous system data is the inspection of power-law distributions. Although the findings are controversial, such power-law scaling has been found in different types of recordings. Here, we studied whether there is a power law scaling in the distribution of the phase synchronization derived from magnetoencephalographic recordings during executive function tasks performed by children with and without autism. Characterizing the brain dynamics that is different between autistic and non-autistic individuals is important in order to find differences that could either aid diagnosis or provide insights as to possible therapeutic interventions in autism. We report in this study that power law scaling in the distributions of a phase synchrony index is not very common and its frequency of occurrence is similar in the control and the autism group. In addition, power law scaling tends to diminish with increased cognitive load (difficulty or engagement in the task). There were indications of changes in the probability distribution functions for the phase synchrony that were associated with a transition from power law scaling to lack of power law (or vice versa), which suggests the presence of phenomenological bifurcations in brain dynamics associated with cognitive load. Hence, brain dynamics may fluctuate between criticality and other regimes depending upon context and behaviors.

  7. Power law scaling in synchronization of brain signals depends on cognitive load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis ePerez Velazquez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As it has several features that optimize information processing, it has been proposed that criticality governs the dynamics of nervous system activity. Indications of such dynamics have been reported for a variety of in vitro and in vivo recordings, ranging from in vitro slice electrophysiology to human functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, there still remains considerable debate as to whether the brain actually operates close to criticality or in another governing state such as stochastic or oscillatory dynamics. A tool used to investigate the criticality of nervous system data is the inspection of power-law distributions. Although the findings are controversial, such power-law scaling has been found in different types of recordings. Here, we studied whether there is a power law scaling in the distribution of the phase synchronization derived from magnetoencephalographic recordings during executive function tasks performed by children with and without autism. Characterizing the brain dynamics that is different between autistic and non-autistic individuals is important in order to find differences that could either aid diagnosis or provide insights as to possible therapeutic interventions in autism. We report in this study that power law scaling in the distributions of a phase synchrony index is not very common and its frequency of occurrence is similar in the control and the autism group. In addition, power law scaling tends to diminish with increased cognitive load (difficulty or engagement in the task. There were indications of changes in the probability distribution functions for the phase synchrony that were associated with a transition from power law scaling to lack of power law (or vice versa, which suggests the presence of phenomenological bifurcations in brain dynamics associated with cognitive load. Hence, brain dynamics may fluctuate between criticality and other regimes depending upon context and behaviours.

  8. Recording Gamma Band Oscillations in Pedunculopontine Nucleus Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Francisco J; Luster, Brennon R; D'Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2016-09-14

    Synaptic efferents from the PPN are known to modulate the neuronal activity of several intralaminar thalamic regions (e.g., the centrolateral/parafascicular; Cl/Pf nucleus). The activation of either the PPN or Cl/Pf nuclei in vivo has been described to induce the arousal of the animal and an increment in gamma band activity in the cortical electroencephalogram (EEG). The cellular mechanisms for the generation of gamma band oscillations in Reticular Activating System (RAS) neurons are the same as those found to generate gamma band oscillations in other brains nuclei. During current-clamp recordings of PPN neurons (from parasagittal slices from 9 - 25 day-old rats), the use of depolarizing square steps rapidly activated voltage-dependent potassium channels that prevented PPN neurons from being depolarized beyond -25 mV. Injecting 1 - 2 sec long depolarizing current ramps gradually depolarized PPN membrane potential resting values towards 0 mV. However, injecting depolarizing square pulses generated gamma-band oscillations of membrane potential that showed to be smaller in amplitude compared to the oscillations generated by ramps. All experiments were performed in the presence of voltage-gated sodium channels and fast synaptic receptors blockers. It has been shown that the activation of high-threshold voltage-dependent calcium channels underlie gamma-band oscillatory activity in PPN neurons. Specific methodological and pharmacological interventions are described here, providing the necessary tools to induce and sustain PPN subthreshold gamma band oscillation in vitro.

  9. The topology of large-scale structure. VI - Slices of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. R., III; Melott, Adrian L.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the topology of large-scale structure in two observed slices of the universe are presented. Both slices pass through the Coma cluster and their depths are 100 and 230/h Mpc. The present topology study shows that the largest void in the CfA slice is divided into two smaller voids by a statistically significant line of galaxies. The topology of toy models like the white noise and bubble models is shown to be inconsistent with that of the observed slices. A large N-body simulation was made of the biased cloud dark matter model and the slices are simulated by matching them in selection functions and boundary conditions. The genus curves for these simulated slices are spongelike and have a small shift in the direction of a meatball topology like those of observed slices.

  10. Alteration in rectification of potassium channels in perinatal hypoxia ischemia brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Penghui; Wang, Liyan; Deng, Qiyue; Ruan, Huaizhen; Cai, Wenqin

    2015-01-15

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are susceptible to perinatal hypoxia ischemia brain damage (HIBD), which results in infant cerebral palsy due to the effects on myelination. The origin of OPC vulnerability in HIBD, however, remains controversial. In this study, we defined the HIBD punctate lesions by MRI diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) in postnatal 7-day-old rats. The electrophysiological functional properties of OPCs in HIBD were recorded by patch-clamp in acute cerebral cortex slices. The slices were intracellularly injected with Lucifer yellow and immunohistochemically labeled with NG2 antibody to identify local OPCs. Passive membrane properties and K(+) channel functions in OPCs were analyzed to estimate the onset of vulnerability in HIBD. The resting membrane potential, membrane resistance, and membrane capacitance of OPCs were increased in both the gray and white matter of the cerebral cortex. OPCs in both the gray and white matter exhibited voltage-dependent K(+) currents, which consisted of the initiated rectified potassium currents (IA) and the sustained rectified currents (IK). The significant alternation in membrane resistance was influenced by the diversity of potassium channel kinetics. These findings suggest that the rectification of IA and IK channels may play a significant role in OPC vulnerability in HIBD.

  11. Large-scale, high-resolution multielectrode-array recording depicts functional network differences of cortical and hippocampal cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ito

    Full Text Available Understanding the detailed circuitry of functioning neuronal networks is one of the major goals of neuroscience. Recent improvements in neuronal recording techniques have made it possible to record the spiking activity from hundreds of neurons simultaneously with sub-millisecond temporal resolution. Here we used a 512-channel multielectrode array system to record the activity from hundreds of neurons in organotypic cultures of cortico-hippocampal brain slices from mice. To probe the network structure, we employed a wavelet transform of the cross-correlogram to categorize the functional connectivity in different frequency ranges. With this method we directly compare, for the first time, in any preparation, the neuronal network structures of cortex and hippocampus, on the scale of hundreds of neurons, with sub-millisecond time resolution. Among the three frequency ranges that we investigated, the lower two frequency ranges (gamma (30-80 Hz and beta (12-30 Hz range showed similar network structure between cortex and hippocampus, but there were many significant differences between these structures in the high frequency range (100-1000 Hz. The high frequency networks in cortex showed short tailed degree-distributions, shorter decay length of connectivity density, smaller clustering coefficients, and positive assortativity. Our results suggest that our method can characterize frequency dependent differences of network architecture from different brain regions. Crucially, because these differences between brain regions require millisecond temporal scales to be observed and characterized, these results underscore the importance of high temporal resolution recordings for the understanding of functional networks in neuronal systems.

  12. Chloride-cotransport blockade desynchronizes neuronal discharge in the "epileptic" hippocampal slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, D W; Schwartzkroin, P A

    2000-01-01

    Antagonism of the chloride-cotransport system in hippocampal slices has been shown to block spontaneous epileptiform (i.e., hypersynchronized) discharges without diminishing excitatory synaptic transmission. Here we test the hypotheses that chloride-cotransport blockade, with furosemide or low-chloride (low-[Cl(-)](o)) medium, desynchronizes the firing activity of neuronal populations and that this desynchronization is mediated through nonsynaptic mechanisms. Spontaneous epileptiform discharges were recorded from the CA1 and CA3 cell body layers of hippocampal slices. Treatment with low-[Cl(-)](o) medium led to cessation of spontaneous synchronized bursting in CA1 >/=5-10 min before its disappearance from CA3. During the time that CA3 continued to burst spontaneously but CA1 was silent, electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals showed that hyperexcited CA1 synaptic responses were maintained. Paired intracellular recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells showed that during low-[Cl(-)](o) treatment, the timing of action potential discharges became desynchronized; desynchronization was identified with phase lags in firing times of action potentials between pairs of neurons as well as a with a broadening and diminution of the CA1 field amplitude. Continued exposure to low-[Cl(-)](o) medium increased the degree of the firing-time phase shifts between pairs of CA1 pyramidal cells until the epileptiform CA1 field potential was abolished completely. Intracellular recordings during 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) treatment showed that prolonged low-[Cl(-)](o) exposure did not diminish the frequency or amplitude of spontaneous postsynaptic potentials. CA3 antidromic responses to Schaffer collateral stimulation were not significantly affected by prolonged low-[Cl(-)](o) exposure. In contrast to CA1, paired intracellular recordings from CA3 pyramidal cells showed that chloride-cotransport blockade did not cause a significant desynchronization of action potential firing times in the

  13. Neuroprotection of Persea major extract against oxygen and glucose deprivation in hippocampal slices involves increased glutamate uptake and modulation of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielli Letícia Fedalto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is characterised by a lack of oxygen and glucose in the brain, leading to excessive glutamate release and neuronal cell death. Adenosine is produced in response to ATP depletion and acts as an endogenous neuromodulator that reduces excitotoxicity. Persea major (Meins. L.E. Kopp (Lauraceae is a medical plant that is indigenous to South Brazil, and the rural population has used it medicinally due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of Persea major methanolic extract against oxygen and glucose deprivation and re-oxygenation as well as to determine its underlying mechanism of action in hippocampal brain slices. Persea major methanolic extract (0.5 mg/ml has a neuroprotective effect on hippocampal slices when added before or during 15 min of oxygen and glucose deprivation or 2 h of re-oxygenation. Hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation and re-oxygenation showed significantly reduced glutamate uptake, and the addition of Persea major methanolic extract in the re-oxygenation period counteracted the reduction of glutamate uptake. The presence of A1 or A2A, but not A2B or A3 receptor antagonists, abolished the neuroprotective effect of Persea major methanolic extract. In conclusion, the neuroprotective effect of Persea majormethanolic extract involves augmentation of glutamate uptake and modulation of A1 and A2B adenosine receptors.

  14. Cellular resilience: 5-HT neurons in Tph2(-/-) mice retain normal firing behavior despite the lack of brain 5-HT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbano, Alberto; Waider, Jonas; Barbieri, Mario; Baytas, Ozan; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Corradetti, Renato; Mlinar, Boris

    2015-11-01

    Considerable evidence links dysfunction of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transmission to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders characterized by compromised "social" cognition and emotion regulation. It is well established that the brain 5-HT system is under autoregulatory control by its principal transmitter 5-HT via its effects on activity and expression of 5-HT system-related proteins. To examine whether 5-HT itself also has a crucial role in the acquisition and maintenance of characteristic rhythmic firing of 5-HT neurons, we compared their intrinsic electrophysiological properties in mice lacking brain 5-HT, i.e. tryptophan hydroxylase-2 null mice (Tph2(-/-)) and their littermates, Tph2(+/-) and Tph2(+/+), by using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in a brainstem slice preparation and single unit recording in anesthetized animals. We report that the active properties of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) 5-HT neurons in vivo (firing rate magnitude and variability; the presence of spike doublets) and in vitro (firing in response to depolarizing current pulses; action potential shape) as well as the resting membrane potential remained essentially unchanged across Tph2 genotypes. However, there were subtle differences in subthreshold properties, most notably, an approximately 25% higher input conductance in Tph2(-/-) mice compared with Tph2(+/-) and Tph2(+/+) littermates (presilience to complete brain 5-HT deficiency.

  15. Detachment within subducted continental crust and multi-slice successive exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks: Evidence from the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YiCan; LI ShuGuang

    2008-01-01

    Although tectonic models were presented for exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks during the continental collision, there is increasing evidence for the decoupling between crustal slices at various depths within deeply subducted continental crust. This lends support to the multi-slice successive exhumation model of the UHP metamorphic rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogen. The available evidence is summarized as follows: (1) the low-grade metamorphic slices, which have geotectonic af-finity to the South China Block and part of them records the Triassic metamorphism, occur in the northern margin of the Dabie-Sulu UHP metamorphic zone, suggesting decoupling of the upper crust from the underlying basement during the initial stages of continental subduction; (2) the Dabie and Sulu HP to UHP metamorphic zones comprise several HP to UHP slices, which have an increased trend of metamorphic grade from south to north but a decreased trend of peak metamorphic ages corre-spondingly; and (3) the Chinese Continental Science Drilling (CCSD) project at Donghai in the Sulu orogen reveals that the UHP metamorphic zone is composed of several stacked slices, which display distinctive high and low radiogenic Pb from upper to lower parts in the profile, suggesting that these UHP crustal slices were derived from the subducted upper and middle crusts, respectively. Detachment surfaces within the deeply subducted crust may occur either along an ancient fault as a channel of fluid flow, which resulted in weakening of mechanic strength of the rocks adjacent to the fault due to fluid-rock interaction, or along the low-viscosity zones which resulted from variations of geotherms and lithospheric compositions at different depths. The multi-slice successive exhumation model is different from the traditional exhumation model of the UHP metamorphic rocks in that the latter as-sumes the detachment of the entire subducted continental crust from the underlying mantle lithosphere and its

  16. Robert Recorde

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The 16th-Century intellectual Robert Recorde is chiefly remembered for introducing the equals sign into algebra, yet the greater significance and broader scope of his work is often overlooked. This book presents an authoritative and in-depth analysis of the man, his achievements and his historical importance. This scholarly yet accessible work examines the latest evidence on all aspects of Recorde's life, throwing new light on a character deserving of greater recognition. Topics and features: presents a concise chronology of Recorde's life; examines his published works; describes Recorde's pro

  17. Simultaneous activation of gamma and theta network oscillations in rat hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Yacov; Wittner, Lucia; Freund, Tamas F; Gähwiler, Beat H

    2002-03-15

    Hippocampal activity in vivo is characterized by concurrent oscillations at theta (4-15 Hz) and gamma (20-80 Hz) frequencies. Here we show that cholinergic receptor activation (methacholine 10-20 nm) in hippocampal slice cultures induces an oscillatory mode of activity, in which the intrinsic network oscillator (located in the CA3 area) expresses simultaneous theta and gamma network oscillations. Pyramidal cells display synaptic theta oscillations, characterized by cycles consisting of population EPSP-IPSP sequences that are dominated by population IPSPs. These rhythmic IPSPs most probably result from theta-modulated spiking activity of several interneurons. At the same time, the majority of interneurons consistently display synaptic gamma oscillations. These oscillatory cycles consist of fast depolarizing rhythmic events that are likely to reflect excitatory input from CA3 pyramidal cells. Interneurons comprising this functional group were identified morphologically. They include four known types of interneurons (basket, O-LM, bistratified and str. lucidum-specific cells) and one new type of CA3 interneuron (multi-subfield cell). The oscillatory activity of these interneurons is only weakly correlated between neighbouring cells, and in about half of these (44 %) is modulated by depolarizing theta rhythmicity. The overall characteristics of acetylcholine-induced oscillations in slice cultures closely resemble the rhythmicity observed in hippocampal field and single cell recordings in vivo. Both rhythmicities depend on intrinsic synaptic interactions, and are expressed by different cell types. The fact that these oscillations persist in a network lacking extra-hippocampal connections emphasizes the importance of intrinsic mechanisms in determining this form of hippocampal activity.

  18. Time-slice last millennium experiments with interactive gas-phase chemistry and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigaridis, K.; Legrande, A. N.; Koch, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Preliminary results from coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations with interactive gas-phase chemistry and aerosols are presented. These experiments are decadal scale time-slices within millennial-length simulations performed with the GISS GCM (ModelE), using two different ocean models. The boundary conditions for the transient simulations follow the last millennium coordinated PMIP3 experiment protocol. This experiment directly links in with other pre-Industrial experiments being completed as part of IPCC AR5, using the same model and resolution as in GISS IPCC AR5. Preliminary time-slice results from the early medieval and Maunder Minimum periods will be presented. The impact of the presence of short-lived gases and aerosols on the simulated climate is studied. An initial attempt to identify previously omitted additional forcing mechanisms will be performed during these contrasting climate periods, in short duration experiments driven by ocean conditions from the transient experiments. The results presented are the initial runs from a larger set of experiments that will assess the climate impact of changes to dust, sea-salt, and ocean-derived sulfate, biomass burning ozone-precursors and aerosols, organic carbon, wetland methane emissions, and a final set with all components. These species are standard components in the GISS model’s 20th century simulations, so that we may compare millennial variability characteristics with those better constrained from more recent climate periods. Dust and sea-salt are wind-driven aerosols from deserts and oceans, sulfate comes from oxidation of volcanic and oceanic precursors, while organic carbon comes from biomass burning, secondary plant sources and primary oceanic emissions. Comparison of model and proxy records will test model-simulated mechanisms while the model provides insight into factors contributing to proxy variability. The addition of potentially important forcing mechanisms will enable a more comprehensive

  19. Optimization of Parameters in 16-slice CT-‌‌scan Protocols for Reduction of the Absorbed Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh Naseri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In computed tomography (CT technology, an optimal radiation dose can be achieved via changing radiation parameters such as mA, pitch factor, rotation time and tube voltage (kVp for diagnostic images. Materials and Methods In this study, the brain, abdomen, and thorax scaning was performed using Toshiba 16-slice scannerand standard AAPM and CTDI phantoms. AAPM phantom was used for the measurement of image-related parameters and CTDI phantom was utilized for the calculation of absorbed dose to patients. Imaging parameters including mA (50-400 mA, pitch factor (1 and 1.5 and rotation time (range of 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5 and 2 seconds were considered as independent variables. The brain, abdomen and chest imaging was performed multi-slice and spiral modes. Changes in image quality parameters including contrast resolution (CR and spatial resolution (SR in each condition were measured and determined by MATLAB software. Results After normalizing data by plotting the full width at half maximum (FWHM of point spread function (PSF in each condition, it was observed that image quality was not noticeably affected by each cases. Therefore, in brain scan, the lowest patient dose was in 150 mA and rotation time of 1.5 seconds. Based on results of scanning of the abdomen and chest, the lowest patient dose was obtained by 100 mA and pitch factors of 1 and 1.5. Conclusion It was found that images with acceptable quality and reliable detection ability could be obtained using smaller doses of radiation, compared to protocols commonly used by operators.

  20. Rational-slice Knots via Strongly Negative-amphicheiral Knots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KAWAUCHI AKIO

    2009-01-01

    We show that certain satellite knots of every strongly negative-amphicheiral rational knot are rational-slice knots. This proof also shows that the 0-surgery man-ifold of a certain strongly negative amphicheiral knot such as the figure-eight knot bounds a compact oriented smooth 4-manifold homotopy equivalent to the 2-sphere such that a second homology class of the 4-manifold is represented by a smoothly embedded 2-sphere if and only if the modulo two reduction of it is zero.

  1. Evaluation of methylmercury biotransformation using rat liver slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasutake, A. [Biochemistry Section, National Inst. for Minamata Disease, Minamata, Kumamoto (Japan); Hirayama, K. [Kumamoto University College of Medical Science, Kuhonji (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    To examine the demethylation reaction of methylmercury (MeHg) in rat liver, slices prepared from MeHg-treated rats were incubated in L-15 medium under 95% O{sub 2}/5% CO{sub 2} atmosphere. During the incubation, the amount of inorganic Hg in the slices markedly increased in a time-dependent manner, although the concentration of total Hg remained unchanged. Since the C-Hg bond in MeHg was demonstrated to be cleaved by the action of some reactive oxygen species, the effects on MeHg demethylation of several reagents that could modify reactive oxygen production were examined in the present system. Methylviologen was found to be an effective enhancer of the demethylation reaction with only a minor effect on lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, ferrous ion added to the medium showed no effect on demethylation in the presence or absence of methylviologen, although lipid peroxide levels were increased significantly by ferrous ion. Similarly, deferoxamine mesylate, which effectively suppressed the increase in lipid peroxide levels, also had no effect on demethylation. Furthermore, hydroxy radical scavengers, such as mannitol and dimethylsulfoxide, had no effect on inorganic Hg production. Rotenone, an inhibitor of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport system, increased levels of both inorganic Hg and lipid peroxide. However, other inhibitors, such as antimycin A, myxothiazole and NaCN, significantly suppressed the demethylation reaction. Cell fractionation of the MeHg-treated rat liver revealed that the ratio of inorganic Hg to total Hg was highest in the mitochondrial fraction. Furthermore, superoxide anion could degrade MeHg in an organic solvent but not in water. These results suggested that the demethylation of MeHg by the liver slice would proceed with the aid of superoxide anion produced in the electron transfer system at the hydrophobic mitochondrial inner membrane. Furthermore, the involvement of hydroxy radicals, which have been demonstrated to be

  2. Maximal slicings in spherical symmetry: local existence and construction

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero-Carrión, Isabel; Morales-Lladosa, Juan Antonio; 10.1063/1.3658864

    2011-01-01

    We show that any spherically symmetric spacetime locally admits a maximal spacelike slicing and we give a procedure allowing its construction. The construction procedure that we have designed is based on purely geometrical arguments and, in practice, leads to solve a decoupled system of first order quasi-linear partial differential equations. We have explicitly built up maximal foliations in Minkowski and Friedmann spacetimes. Our approach admits further generalizations and efficient computational implementation. As by product, we suggest some applications of our work in the task of calibrating Numerical Relativity complex codes, usually written in Cartesian coordinates.

  3. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION XRF MICROPROBE STUDY OF HUMAN BONE TUMOR SLICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The experimental apparatus of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analysis at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) is described Using the bovine liver as the standard reference.the minimum detection limit(MDL) of trace element was measured to determine the capability of biological sample analysis by synchrotron radiation XRF microprobe.The relative change of the content of the major or trace element in the normal and tumor part of human bone tissue slice was investigated The experimental result relation to the clinical medicine was also discussed.

  4. Alteration in NMDA receptor subunit mRNA expression in vulnerable and resistant regions of in vitro ischemic rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, D L; Poulter, M O; Buchan, A M; Morley, P

    1997-08-29

    Brain insults, including cerebral ischemia, can alter glutamate receptor subunit expression in vulnerable neurons. Understanding these post-ischemic changes in glutamate receptors could enhance our ability to identify specific, novel neuroprotective compounds. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification was used to quantify the altered expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) NR2A, NR2B and NR2C subunits relative to one another in rat hippocampal slices in resistant and vulnerable regions following in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation. Ninety minutes after re-oxygenation and return to 10 mM glucose, there was a significant increase in the expression of NR2C relative to NR2B and NR2A in the slice as a whole, as well as in the selectively vulnerable CA1 region and the resistant CA3 and dentate gyrus regions.

  5. Physiological modulators of Kv3.1 channels adjust firing patterns of auditory brain stem neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Maile R; El-Hassar, Lynda; Zhang, Yalan; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Large, Charles H; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-07-01

    Many rapidly firing neurons, including those in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) in the auditory brain stem, express "high threshold" voltage-gated Kv3.1 potassium channels that activate only at positive potentials and are required for stimuli to generate rapid trains of actions potentials. We now describe the actions of two imidazolidinedione derivatives, AUT1 and AUT2, which modulate Kv3.1 channels. Using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing rat Kv3.1 channels, we found that lower concentrations of these compounds shift the voltage of activation of Kv3.1 currents toward negative potentials, increasing currents evoked by depolarization from typical neuronal resting potentials. Single-channel recordings also showed that AUT1 shifted the open probability of Kv3.1 to more negative potentials. Higher concentrations of AUT2 also shifted inactivation to negative potentials. The effects of lower and higher concentrations could be mimicked in numerical simulations by increasing rates of activation and inactivation respectively, with no change in intrinsic voltage dependence. In brain slice recordings of mouse MNTB neurons, both AUT1 and AUT2 modulated firing rate at high rates of stimulation, a result predicted by numerical simulations. Our results suggest that pharmaceutical modulation of Kv3.1 currents represents a novel avenue for manipulation of neuronal excitability and has the potential for therapeutic benefit in the treatment of hearing disorders.

  6. Induction of c-fos mRNA expression in an in vitro hippocampal slice model of adult rats after kainate but not gamma-aminobutyric acid or bicuculline treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massamiri, T; Khrestchatisky, M; Ben-Ari, Y

    1994-01-17

    Levels of gene expression following in vitro treatment of rat hippocampal slices with kainate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), or bicuculline were measured by the reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction method. Following a short-term exposure to kainate, c-fos gene expression was induced by 12-fold in the adult, but not the newborn, hippocampus. Under the same experimental conditions, zifl268 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression were unchanged. Our results also demonstrate a lack of induction of c-fos, zifl268 and BDNF after short-time treatment of either adult or newborn hippocampal slices with GABA or bicuculline. The relevance of the differential induction of gene expression in the adult and newborn in an in vitro hippocampal slice model as compared to previously described in vivo models is discussed.

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  8. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalography (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain.

  9. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ravi kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalograph y (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain

  10. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  11. Role of multichannel microelectrode recording on location of lead implants for deep brain stimulation%多通道微电极记录在帕金森病脑深部电刺激定位中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐欣; 凌至培; 余新光; 潘隆盛; 崔志强; 毛之奇

    2016-01-01

    Objective Subthalamic nucleus ( STN ) was recognized as a major target for deep brain stimulation ( DBS) for Parkinson ' s disease ( PD) .Multichannel microelectrode recording could accurate identify the sensory-motor area of STN , improve the precision and treatment effect of DBS . However , the reports of the method and risk of multichannel microelectrode recording were rare .In 10 patients with PD, multichannel microelectrode recording were used during STN-DBS surgeries, to explore the role and risk of multichannel microelectrode recording on the accurate location of lead implants for DBS.Methods From Oct, 2012 to May, 2013, in 10 patients with PD, multichannel microelectrode recording ( 4-5 channels ) were used during STN-DBS surgeries .Final lead implanted channel was chosen by synchronous scores and the result of macro electrode stimulation . We compared the differences between the predetermined location and the final location of lead implants, and measure the length of channels .Results Different channel recorded neuronal firing pattern , intensity and length of different neuron discharge .The final implanted channels and predet ermined central targets were compared .During left-STN location , central channel was chosen in 6 sides,while non-central channel in 4 sides, including anterior channel in 2 sides ( 20%);lateral channel in 1 side;medial channel in 1 side.During right-STN location,central channel was chosen in 5 sides,while non-central channel in 5 sides,including lateral channel in 4 side;medial channel in 1 side.The average length of the sensory-motor area of left STN activity was 4.85 ±1(3-6 mm), and the average length of the sensory-motor area of right STN activity was 4.83 ±0.7(4-6 mm).There was on significant bleeding complication during total 10 surgeries .Conclusions Only in 50%~60%patients ,predetermined central targetz were chosen , while in 40%~50%patients ,the final implanted targets were inconsistent with the predetermined target

  12. Calcium-dependent plateau potentials in rostral ambiguus neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Feldman, J L

    1997-01-01

    Calcium-dependent plateau potentials in rostral ambiguus neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro. J. Neurophysiol. 78: 2483-2492, 1997. The nucleus ambiguus contains vagal and glossopharyngeal motoneurons and preganglionic neurons involved in respiration, swallowing, vocalization......, and control of heart beat. Here we show that the rostral compact formation's ambiguus neurons, which control the esophageal phase of swallowing, display calcium-dependent plateau potentials in response to tetanic orthodromic stimulation or current injection. Whole cell recordings were made from visualized...... neurons in the rostral nucleus ambiguus using a slice preparation from the newborn mouse. Biocytin-labeling revealed dendritic trees with pronounced rostrocaudal orientations confined to the nucleus ambiguus, a morphological profile matching that of vagal motoneurons projecting to the esophagus. Single...

  13. Can outer-to-outer diameter be used alone in diagnosing appendicitis on 128-slice MDCT?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jamal; Yaqoob; Muhammad; Idris; Muhammad; Shahbaz; Alam; Nazia; Kashif

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the frequency of visualization, position and diameter of normal appendix on 128-slice multidetector computed tomography(MDCT) in adult population.METHODS: Retrospective cross sectional study conducted at Radiology Department, Dallah Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from March 2013 to October 2013. Non-enhanced computed tomography scans of abdomen and pelvis of 98 patients presenting with hematuria(not associated with abdominal pain, fever or colonic disease) were reviewed by two radiologists, blinded to patient history. The study group included 55 females and 43 males with overall mean age of 54.7 years(range 21 to 94 years). The coronal reformatted images were reviewed in addition to the axial images. The frequency of visualization of appendix was recorded with assessment of position, diameter and luminal contents.RESULTS: The appendix was recorded as definitely visualized in 99% of patients and mean outer-to-outer diameter of the appendix was 5.6 ± 1.3 mm(range 3.0-11.0 mm).CONCLUSION: MDCT with its multiplanar reformation display is extremely useful for visualization of normal appendix. The normal appendix is very variable in its position and diameter. In the absence of other signs, the diagnosis of acute appendix should not be made solely on outer-to-outer appendiceal diameter.

  14. Slices: A shape-proxy based on planar sections

    KAUST Repository

    McCrae, James

    2011-12-01

    Minimalist object representations or shape-proxies that spark and inspire human perception of shape remain an incompletely understood, yet powerful aspect of visual communication. We explore the use of planar sections, i.e., the contours of intersection of planes with a 3D object, for creating shape abstractions, motivated by their popularity in art and engineering. We first perform a user study to show that humans do define consistent and similar planar section proxies for common objects. Interestingly, we observe a strong correlation between user-defined planes and geometric features of objects. Further we show that the problem of finding the minimum set of planes that capture a set of 3D geometric shape features is both NP-hard and not always the proxy a user would pick. Guided by the principles inferred from our user study, we present an algorithm that progressively selects planes to maximize feature coverage, which in turn influence the selection of subsequent planes. The algorithmic framework easily incorporates various shape features, while their relative importance values are computed and validated from the user study data. We use our algorithm to compute planar slices for various objects, validate their utility towards object abstraction using a second user study, and conclude showing the potential applications of the extracted planar slice shape proxies.

  15. Delivery of recombinant alphavirus into hippocampal slice tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2012-08-01

    The alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus (SIN) have been used frequently as expression vectors in vitro and in vivo. Usually, these systems consist of replication-deficient vectors that require a helper vector for packaging of recombinant particles. Replication-proficient vectors have also been engineered. Alphaviral vectors can be used as nucleic-acid-based vectors (DNA and RNA) or infectious particles. High-titer viral production is achieved in alphaviruses facilitates studies in mammalian and nonmammalian cell lines, primary cells in culture, and in vivo. The strong preference for expression in neuronal cells has made alphaviruses particularly useful in neurobiological studies. Unfortunately, their strong cytotoxic effect on host cells, relatively short-term transient expression patterns, and the reasonably high cost of viral production remain drawbacks. However, novel mutant alphaviruses have shown reduced cytotoxicity and prolonged expression. This protocol describes gene delivery of recombinant alphavirus to hippocampal slice cultures. Organotypic slices are covered by a layer of glial cells that impedes the penetration of viral particles to the neurons. Thus, viral particles should be injected manually into the extracellular space of the tissue.

  16. Projection-slice theorem based 2D-3D registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Homan, R.; Timmer, J.; Bartels, L. W.

    2007-03-01

    In X-ray guided procedures, the surgeon or interventionalist is dependent on his or her knowledge of the patient's specific anatomy and the projection images acquired during the procedure by a rotational X-ray source. Unfortunately, these X-ray projections fail to give information on the patient's anatomy in the dimension along the projection axis. It would be very profitable to provide the surgeon or interventionalist with a 3D insight of the patient's anatomy that is directly linked to the X-ray images acquired during the procedure. In this paper we present a new robust 2D-3D registration method based on the Projection-Slice Theorem. This theorem gives us a relation between the pre-operative 3D data set and the interventional projection images. Registration is performed by minimizing a translation invariant similarity measure that is applied to the Fourier transforms of the images. The method was tested by performing multiple exhaustive searches on phantom data of the Circle of Willis and on a post-mortem human skull. Validation was performed visually by comparing the test projections to the ones that corresponded to the minimal value of the similarity measure. The Projection-Slice Theorem Based method was shown to be very effective and robust, and provides capture ranges up to 62 degrees. Experiments have shown that the method is capable of retrieving similar results when translations are applied to the projection images.

  17. Promoting consumption of fruit in elementary school cafeterias. The effects of slicing apples and oranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Mark; Branscum, Adam; Nakayima, Peace Julie

    2009-10-01

    We examined how slicing apples and oranges affected elementary students' selection and consumption of fruit. Slicing increased the percentage of children selecting and consuming oranges, while a similar effect was not found for apples. The impact of slicing fruit was greatest among younger students. These findings suggest that school cafeterias can increase accessibility and consumption of foods through simple, inexpensive food preparation techniques, with the impact of such measures varying by foods and student characteristics.

  18. Unified Mathematical Framework for Slicing and Symmetry Reduction over Event Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Xinyan Gao; Yingcai Ding; Wenbo Liu; Kaidi Zheng; Siyu Huang; Ning Zhou; Dakui Li

    2014-01-01

    Nonclassical slicing and symmetry reduction can act as efficient structural abstract methods for pruning state space when dealing with verification problems. In this paper, we mainly address theoretical and algorithmic aspects for nonclassical slicing and symmetry reduction over prime event structures. We propose sliced and symmetric quotient reduction models of event structures and present their corresponding algorithms. To construct the underlying foundation of the proposed methodologies, w...

  19. Brain components

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can make complex movements without thinking. The brain stem connects the brain with the spinal cord and is composed of ... structures: the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. The brain stem provides us with automatic functions that are necessary ...

  20. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  1. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  4. The clinical efficacy of 1 mm-slice CT of the middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kazuhiro; Noiri, Teruhisa [Kawanishi Municipal Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Doi, Katsumi; Koizuka, Izumi; Tanaka, Hisashi; Mishiro, Yasuo; Okumura, Shin-ichi; Kubo, Takeshi

    2000-02-01

    The efficacy of the preoperative 1 mm-slice CT for evaluating the condition of the ossicular chain and the facial canal was assessed. CT findings were compared with the operative findings of middle ears in 120 cases of chronic otitis media or cholesteatoma that underwent tympanoplasty. The reliability of 1 mm-slice CT in detecting any defect of the ossicular chain was much superior to those of 2 mm-slice CT previously reported, and the difference between them is essential for preoperative information. On the other hand, thinner slice than 1 mm may be unnecessary, especially in routine use. (author)

  5. A comparative risk assessment for Listeria monocytogenes in prepackaged versus retail-sliced deli meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrikat, Sarah; Gallagher, Daniel; Pouillot, Régis; Hicks Quesenberry, Heather; Labarre, David; Schroeder, Carl M; Kause, Janell

    2010-04-01

    Deli meat was ranked as the highest-risk ready-to-eat food vehicle of Listeria monocytogenes within the 2003 U.S. Food and Drug Administration and U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service risk assessment. The comparative risk of L. monocytogenes in retail-sliced versus prepackaged deli meats was evaluated with a modified version of this model. Other research has found that retail-sliced deli meats have both higher prevalence and levels of L. monocytogenes than have product sliced and packaged at the manufacturer level. The updated risk assessment model considered slicing location as well as the use of growth inhibitors. The per annum comparative risk ratio for the number of deaths from retail-sliced versus prepackaged deli meats was found to be 4.89, and the per-serving comparative risk ratio was 4.27. There was a significant interaction between the use of growth inhibitors and slicing location. Almost 70% of the estimated deaths occurred from retail-sliced product that did not possess a growth inhibitor. A sensitivity analysis, assessing the effect of the model's consumer storage time and shelf life assumptions, found that even if retail-sliced deli meats were stored for a quarter of the time prepackaged deli meats were stored, retail-sliced product is 1.7 times more likely to result in death from listeriosis. Sensitivity analysis also showed that the shelf life assumption had little effect on the comparative risk ratio.

  6. Asymptotics for Kernel Estimation of Slicing Average Third-Moment Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-ping Zhu; Li-xing Zhu

    2006-01-01

    To estimate central dimension-reduction space in multivariate nonparametric regression, Sliced Inverse Regression[7] (SIR), Sliced Average Variance Estimation[4] (SAVE) and Slicing Average Third-moment Estimation[14] (SAT) have been developed. Since slicing estimation has very different asymptotic behavior for SIR and SAVE, the relevant study has been made case by case, when the kernel estimators of SIR and SAVE share similar asymptotic properties. In this paper, we also investigate kernel estimation of SAT. We prove the asymptotic normality, and show that, compared with the existing results, the kernel smoothing for SIR, SAVE and SAT has very similar asymptotic behavior.

  7. Erythropoietin improves synaptic transmission during and following ischemia in rat hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Astrid; Maier, Rolf F; Hoffmann, Ulrike; Grips, Martin; Hoppenz, Marc; Aktas, Ayse G; Heinemann, Uwe; Obladen, Michael; Schuchmann, Sebastian

    2002-12-27

    Erythropoietin (EPO) prevents neuronal damage following ischemic, metabolic, and excitotoxic stress. In this study evoked extracellular field potentials (FP) were used to investigate the effect of EPO on synaptic transmission in hippocampal slice cultures. EPO treated cultured slices (40 units/ml for 48 h) showed significantly increased FP during and following oxygen and glucose deprivation compared with untreated control slices. The addition of the Jak2 inhibitor AG490 (50 microM for 48 h) blocked the EPO effect. These data suggest that EPO improves synaptic transmission during and following ischemia in hippocampal slice cultures.

  8. Can brains generate random numbers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvátal, V.; Goldsmith, M.

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by EEG recordings of normal brain activity, we construct arbitrarily large McCulloch-Pitts neural networks that, without any external input, make every subset of their neurons fire in some iteration (and therefore in infinitely many iterations).

  9. Playing with your Brain: Brain-Computer Interfaces and Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Tan, Desney; Bernhaupt, R.; Tscheligi, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this workshop we investigate a possible role of brain-computer interaction in computer games and entertainment computing. The assumption is that brain activity, whether it is consciously controlled and directed by the user or just recorded in order to obtain information about the user’s affective

  10. Oxygen glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal slice cultures results in alterations in carnitine homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Rau

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and the initiation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis are pathological responses to hypoxia-ischemia (HI in the neonatal brain. Carnitine metabolism directly supports mitochondrial metabolism by shuttling long chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for beta-oxidation. Our previous studies have shown that HI disrupts carnitine homeostasis in neonatal rats and that L-carnitine can be neuroprotective. Thus, this study was undertaken to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which HI alters carnitine metabolism and to begin to elucidate the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-carnitine (LCAR supplementation. Utilizing neonatal rat hippocampal slice cultures we found that oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD decreased the levels of free carnitines (FC and increased the acylcarnitine (AC: FC ratio. These changes in carnitine homeostasis correlated with decreases in the protein levels of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT 1 and 2. LCAR supplementation prevented the decrease in CPT1 and CPT2, enhanced both FC and the AC∶FC ratio and increased slice culture metabolic viability, the mitochondrial membrane potential prior to OGD and prevented the subsequent loss of neurons during later stages of reperfusion through a reduction in apoptotic cell death. Finally, we found that LCAR supplementation preserved the structural integrity and synaptic transmission within the hippocampus after OGD. Thus, we conclude that LCAR supplementation preserves the key enzymes responsible for maintaining carnitine homeostasis and preserves both cell viability and synaptic transmission after OGD.

  11. Neuronal Ca2+-activated K+ channels limit brain infarction and promote survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiliu Liao

    Full Text Available Neuronal calcium-activated potassium channels of the BK type are activated by membrane depolarization and intracellular Ca(2+ ions. It has been suggested that these channels may play a key neuroprotective role during and after brain ischemia, but this hypothesis has so far not been tested by selective BK-channel manipulations in vivo. To elucidate the in vivo contribution of neuronal BK channels in acute focal cerebral ischemia, we performed middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in mice lacking BK channels (homozygous mice lacking the BK channel alpha subunit, BK(-/-. MCAO was performed in BK(-/- and WT mice for 90 minutes followed by a 7-hour-reperfusion period. Coronal 1 mm thick sections were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride to reveal the infarction area. We found that transient focal cerebral ischemia by MCAO produced larger infarct volume, more severe neurological deficits, and higher post-ischemic mortality in BK(-/- mice compared to WT littermates. However, the regional cerebral blood flow was not significantly different between genotypes as measured by Laser Doppler (LD flowmetry pre-ischemically, intra-ischemically, and post-ischemically, suggesting that the different impact of MCAO in BK(-/- vs. WT was not due to vascular BK channels. Furthermore, when NMDA was injected intracerebrally in non-ischemic mice, NMDA-induced neurotoxicity was found to be larger in BK(-/- mice compared to WT. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures revealed that BK channels contribute to rapid action potential repolarization, as previously found in acute slices. When these cultures were exposed to ischemia-like conditions this induced significantly more neuronal death in BK(-/- than in WT cultures. These results indicate that neuronal BK channels are important for protection against ischemic brain damage.

  12. Neuronal Ca2+-activated K+ channels limit brain infarction and promote survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yiliu; Kristiansen, Ase-Marit; Oksvold, Cecilie P; Tuvnes, Frode A; Gu, Ning; Rundén-Pran, Elise; Ruth, Peter; Sausbier, Matthias; Storm, Johan F

    2010-12-30

    Neuronal calcium-activated potassium channels of the BK type are activated by membrane depolarization and intracellular Ca(2+) ions. It has been suggested that these channels may play a key neuroprotective role during and after brain ischemia, but this hypothesis has so far not been tested by selective BK-channel manipulations in vivo. To elucidate the in vivo contribution of neuronal BK channels in acute focal cerebral ischemia, we performed middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice lacking BK channels (homozygous mice lacking the BK channel alpha subunit, BK(-/-)). MCAO was performed in BK(-/-) and WT mice for 90 minutes followed by a 7-hour-reperfusion period. Coronal 1 mm thick sections were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride to reveal the infarction area. We found that transient focal cerebral ischemia by MCAO produced larger infarct volume, more severe neurological deficits, and higher post-ischemic mortality in BK(-/-) mice compared to WT littermates. However, the regional cerebral blood flow was not significantly different between genotypes as measured by Laser Doppler (LD) flowmetry pre-ischemically, intra-ischemically, and post-ischemically, suggesting that the different impact of MCAO in BK(-/-) vs. WT was not due to vascular BK channels. Furthermore, when NMDA was injected intracerebrally in non-ischemic mice, NMDA-induced neurotoxicity was found to be larger in BK(-/-) mice compared to WT. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures revealed that BK channels contribute to rapid action potential repolarization, as previously found in acute slices. When these cultures were exposed to ischemia-like conditions this induced significantly more neuronal death in BK(-/-) than in WT cultures. These results indicate that neuronal BK channels are important for protection against ischemic brain damage.

  13. Inter-Slice Blood Flow and Magnetization Transfer Effects as A New Simultaneous Imaging Strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Kyu Han

    Full Text Available The recent blood flow and magnetization transfer (MT technique termed alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN achieves the contrast using interslice blood flow and MT effects with no separate preparation RF pulse, thereby potentially overcoming limitations of conventional methods. In this study, we examined the signal characteristics of ALADDIN as a simultaneous blood flow and MT imaging strategy, by comparing it with pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL and conventional MT asymmetry (MTA methods, all of which had the same bSSFP readout. Bloch-equation simulations and experiments showed ALADDIN perfusion signals increased with flip angle, whereas MTA signals peaked at flip angle around 45°-60°. ALADDIN provided signals comparable to those of pCASL and conventional MTA methods emulating the first, second, and third prior slices of ALADDIN under the same scan conditions, suggesting ALADDIN signals to be superposition of signals from multiple labeling planes. The quantitative cerebral blood flow signals from a modified continuous ASL model overestimated the perfusion signals compared to those measured with a pulsed ASL method. Simultaneous mapping of blood flow, MTA, and MT ratio in the whole brain is feasible with ALADDIN within a clinically reasonable time, which can potentially help diagnosis of various diseases.

  14. Rat brain slices produce and liberate kynurenic acid upon exposure to L-kynurenine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turski, W A; Gramsbergen, J B; Traitler, H;

    1989-01-01

    aminooxyacetic acid (IC50, approximately 25 microM), and showed pronounced regional distribution (hippocampus greater than cortical areas greater than thalamus much greater than cerebellum). The conversion of L-KYN to KYNA was dependent on oxygenation and on the presence of glucose in the incubation medium...... of extracellular KYNA appears to occur at the level of L-KYN uptake and/or kynurenine transaminase, the biosynthetic enzyme of KYNA. KYNA production from L-KYN was linear up to 4 h and reached a plateau at a L-KYN concentration of 250 microM. The process was effectively inhibited by the transaminase inhibitor...

  15. Imaging of molecular surface dynamics in brain slices using single-particle tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermann, N.B.; Sokoll, S.; Klueva, J.; Missler, M.; Wiegert, J.S.; Sibarita, J.B.; Heine, M.

    2014-01-01

    Organization of signalling molecules in biological membranes is crucial for cellular communication. Many receptors, ion channels and cell adhesion molecules are associated with proteins important for their trafficking, surface localization or function. These complexes are embedded in a lipid environ

  16. Dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells mediated by co-cultured rat striatal brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Mohammad Raffaqat; Andreasen, Christian Maaløv; Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa;

    2008-01-01

    Properly committed neural stem cells constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but a protocol for controlled dopaminergic differentiation is not yet available. To establish a setting for identification of secreted neural compounds promoting dopaminergic...

  17. DiOlistic labeling in fixed brain slices: phenotype, morphology, and dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staffend, Nancy A; Meisel, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    Identifying neuronal morphology is a key component in understanding neuronal function. Several techniques have been developed to address this issue, including Golgi staining, electroporation of fluorescent dyes, and transfection of fluorescent constructs. Ballistic delivery of transgenic constructs has been a successful means of rapidly transfecting a nonbiased population of cells within tissue or culture. Recently, this technique was modified for the ballistic delivery of dye-coated gold or tungsten particles, enabling a nonbiased, rapid fluorescent membrane labeling of individual neurons in both fixed and nonfixed tissue. This unit outlines a step-by-step protocol for the ballistic method of dye delivery ("DiOlistic" labeling) to fixed tissue, including optimal tissue fixation conditions. In addition, a protocol for coupling "DiOlistic" labeling with other immunofluorescent methods is detailed, enabling the association of neuronal morphology with a specific cellular phenotype.

  18. Phenological Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phenology is the scientific study of periodic biological phenomena, such as flowering, breeding, and migration, in relation to climatic conditions. The few records...

  19. Rhythm generation by the pre-Bötzinger Complex in medullary slice and island preparations: Effects of adenosine A1 receptor activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shields Edward J

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC is a central pattern generator within the ventrolateral medulla oblongata's ventral respiratory group that is important for the generation of respiratory rhythm. Activation of adenosine A1 receptors (A1R depresses preBötC rhythmogenesis. Although it remains unclear whether A1R activation is important for organisms in a normal metabolic state, A1R activation is important to the response of the preBötC to metabolic stress, such as hypoxia. This study examined mechanisms linking A1R activation to depression of preBötC rhythmogenesis in medullary slice and island preparations from neonatal mice. Results Converting medullary slices to islands by cutting away much of the medullary tissue adjacent to the preBötC decreased the amplitude of action potential bursts generated by a population of neurons within the preBötC (recorded with an extracellular electrode, and integrated using a hardware integrator, without noticeably affecting burst frequency. The A1R agonist N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (NCPA reduced population burst frequency in slices by ca. 33% and in islands by ca. 30%. As in normal (drug-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF, NCPA decreased burst frequency in slices when GABAAergic or GABAAergic and glycinergic transmission were blocked, and in islands when GABAAergic transmission was antagonized. Converting slices to island preparations decreased synaptic input to inspiratory neurons. NCPA further decreased the frequency of synaptic inputs to neurons in island preparations and lowered the input resistance of inspiratory neurons, even when chemical communication between neurons and other cells was impeded. Conclusion Together these data support the suggestion that depression of preBötC activity by A1R activation involves both decreased neuronal excitability and diminished inter-neuronal communication.

  20. Spectral decomposition of black-hole perturbations on hyperboloidal slices

    CERN Document Server

    Ansorg, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a spectral decomposition of solutions to relativistic wave equations described on horizon penetrating hyperboloidal slices within a given Schwarzschild-black-hole background. The wave equa- tion in question is Laplace-transformed which leads to a spatial differential equation with a complex parameter. For initial data which are analytic with respect to a compactified spatial coordinate, this equation is treated with the help of the Mathematica-package in terms of a sophisticated Taylor series analysis. Thereby, all ingredients of the desired spectral decomposition arise explicitly to arbitrarily prescribed accuracy, including quasi normal modes, quasi normal mode amplitudes as well as the jump of the Laplace-transform along the branch cut. Finally, all contributions are put together to obtain via the inverse Laplace transformation the spectral de- composition in question. The paper explains extensively this procedure and includes detailed discussions of relevant aspects, such as the d...

  1. Strong optomechanical interactions in a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijssen, Rick; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-11-01

    Coupling between mechanical and optical degrees of freedom is strongly enhanced by using subwavelength optical mode profiles. We realize an optomechanical system based on a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam, which combines such highly confined optical fields with a low-mass mechanical mode. Analyzing the transduction of motion and effects of radiation pressure we find the system exhibits a photon-phonon coupling rate g0 /2π ≈ 11.5 MHz, exceeding previously reported values by an order of magnitude. We show that the large optomechanical interaction enables detecting thermal motion with detection noise below that at the standard quantum limit, even in broad bandwidth devices, important for both sensor applications as well as measurement-based quantum control.

  2. Optical slicing of large scenes by synthetic aperture integral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Héctor; Saavedra, Genaro; Molina, Ainhoa; Martínez-Corral, Manuel; Martínez-Cuenca, Raúl; Javidi, Bahram

    2010-04-01

    Integral imaging (InI) technology was created with the aim of providing the binocular observers of monitors, or matrix display devices, with auto-stereoscopic images of 3D scenes. However, along the last few years the inventiveness of researches has allowed to find many other interesting applications of integral imaging. Examples of this are the application of InI in object recognition, the mapping of 3D polarization distributions, or the elimination of occluding signals. One of the most interesting applications of integral imaging is the production of views focused at different depths of the 3D scene. This application is the natural result of the ability of InI to create focal stacks from a single input image. In this contribution we present new algorithm for this optical slicing application, and show that it is possible the 3D reconstruction with improved lateral resolution.

  3. Semiquantitative correction of posttraumatic enophthalmos with sliced cartilage grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, K; Hirose, T; Furuta, S; Hayashi, M; Watanabe, T

    1989-03-01

    A simple surgical technique for correcting posttraumatic enophthalmos is described. The steps are as follows: (1) a plaster mold is obtained of the patient's face, (2) wax is added to the enophthalmic eye of the plaster mold until it becomes symmetrical, (3) the quantity of wax is measured, and (4) the same amount of sliced costal cartilage is implanted beneath the periosteum of the extended orbital wall behind the vertical axis of the globe. Using this technique, we have successfully treated six patients with traumatic orbital floor defects without complication. This approach is useful for decreasing the orbital volume using a semiquantitative procedure to estimate the amount of graft material required. In this respect, costal cartilage demonstrates a marked advantage, with stability and cosmetic appearance verified over 12 months of follow-up.

  4. Anatomy of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors ... form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors ...

  5. Persistent gliosis interferes with neurogenesis in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eGerlach

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has become an intensively investigated research topic, as it is essential for proper hippocampal function and considered to bear therapeutic potential for the replacement of pathologically lost neurons. On the other hand, neurogenesis itself is frequently affected by CNS insults. To identify processes leading to the disturbance of neurogenesis, we made use of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC, which, for unknown reasons, lose their neurogenic potential during cultivation. In the present study, we show by BrdU/Prox1 double-immunostaining that the generation of new granule cells drops by 90% during the first week of cultivation. Monitoring neurogenesis dynamically in OHSC from POMC-eGFP mice, in which immature granule cells are endogenously labeled, revealed a gradual decay of the eGFP signal, reaching 10% of initial values within seven days of cultivation. Accordingly, RT-qPCR analysis showed the downregulation of the neurogenesis-related genes doublecortin and Hes5, a crucial target of the stem cell-maintaining Notch signaling pathway. In parallel, we demonstrate a strong and long-lasting activation of astrocytes and microglial cells, both, morphologically and on the level of gene expression. Enhancement of astroglial activation by treating OHSC with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF accelerated the loss of neurogenesis, whereas treatment with indomethacin or an antagonist of the purinergic P2Y12 receptor exhibited potent protective effects on the neurogenic outcome. Therefore, we conclude that OHSC rapidly lose their neurogenic capacity due to persistent inflammatory processes taking place after the slice preparation. As inflammation is also considered to affect neurogenesis in many CNS pathologies, OHSC appear as a useful tool to study this interplay and its molecular basis. Furthermore, we propose that modification of glial activation might bear the therapeutic potential of enabling

  6. Persistent Gliosis Interferes with Neurogenesis in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Johannes; Donkels, Catharina; Münzner, Gert; Haas, Carola A

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has become an intensively investigated research topic, as it is essential for proper hippocampal function and considered to bear therapeutic potential for the replacement of pathologically lost neurons. On the other hand, neurogenesis itself is frequently affected by CNS insults. To identify processes leading to the disturbance of neurogenesis, we made use of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC), which, for unknown reasons, lose their neurogenic potential during cultivation. In the present study, we show by BrdU/Prox1 double-immunostaining that the generation of new granule cells drops by 90% during the first week of cultivation. Monitoring neurogenesis dynamically in OHSC from POMC-eGFP mice, in which immature granule cells are endogenously labeled, revealed a gradual decay of the eGFP signal, reaching 10% of initial values within 7 days of cultivation. Accordingly, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed the downregulation of the neurogenesis-related genes doublecortin and Hes5, a crucial target of the stem cell-maintaining Notch signaling pathway. In parallel, we demonstrate a strong and long-lasting activation of astrocytes and microglial cells, both, morphologically and on the level of gene expression. Enhancement of astroglial activation by treating OHSC with ciliary neurotrophic factor accelerated the loss of neurogenesis, whereas treatment with indomethacin or an antagonist of the purinergic P2Y12 receptor exhibited potent protective effects on the neurogenic outcome. Therefore, we conclude that OHSC rapidly lose their neurogenic capacity due to persistent inflammatory processes taking place after the slice preparation. As inflammation is also considered to affect neurogenesis in many CNS pathologies, OHSC appear as a useful tool to study this interplay and its molecular basis. Furthermore, we propose that modification of glial activation might bear the therapeutic potential

  7. True Density Prediction of Garlic Slices Dehydrated by Convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ortiz, Anabel; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Juan; Méndez-Lagunas, Lilia

    2016-01-01

    Physiochemical parameters with constant values are employed for the mass-heat transfer modeling of the air drying process. However, structural properties are not constant under drying conditions. Empirical, semi-theoretical, and theoretical models have been proposed to describe true density (ρp). These models only consider the ideal behavior and assume a linear relationship between ρp and moisture content (X); nevertheless, some materials exhibit a nonlinear behavior of ρp as a function of X with a tendency toward being concave-down. This comportment, which can be observed in garlic and carrots, has been difficult to model mathematically. This work proposes a semi-theoretical model for predicting ρp values, taking into account the concave-down comportment that occurs at the end of the drying process. The model includes the ρs dependency on external conditions (air drying temperature (Ta)), the inside temperature of the garlic slices (Ti ), and the moisture content (X) obtained from experimental data on the drying process. Calculations show that the dry solid density (ρs ) is not a linear function of Ta, X, and Ti . An empirical correlation for ρs is proposed as a function of Ti and X. The adjustment equation for Ti is proposed as a function of Ta and X. The proposed model for ρp was validated using experimental data on the sliced garlic and was compared with theoretical and empirical models that are available in the scientific literature. Deviation between the experimental and predicted data was determined. An explanation of the nonlinear behavior of ρs and ρp in the function of X, taking into account second-order phase changes, are then presented.

  8. Please Mind the Gap: How To Podcast Your Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Spaceinvaders

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Audio. Please click to listen to the mp3 files of deep brain recordings of individual brain cells, the smallest unit of the brain, in a whole, intact living brain. Each brain region’s cells possess an electrical signature. During recordings electrical signals are transformed into sound to facilitate auditory identification of cells during a process called “mapping.”

  9. Visual patch clamp recording of neurons in thick portions of the adult spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Anders Sonne; Smith, Morten; Moldovan, Mihai

    2010-01-01

    The study of visually identified neurons in slice preparations from the central nervous system offers considerable advantages over in vivo preparations including high mechanical stability in the absence of anaesthesia and full control of the extracellular medium. However, because of their relative...... thinness, slices are not appropriate for investigating how individual neurons integrate synaptic inputs generated by large numbers of neurons. Here we took advantage of the exceptional resistance of the turtle to anoxia to make slices of increasing thicknesses (from 300 to 3000 microm) from the lumbar...... enlargement of the spinal cord. With a conventional upright microscope in which the light condenser was carefully adjusted, we could visualize neurons present at the surface of the slice and record them with the whole-cell patch clamp technique. We show that neurons present in the middle of the preparation...

  10. Microelectrode arrays of diamond-insulated graphitic channels for real time detection of exocytotic events from cultured chromaffin cells and slices of adrenal glands

    CERN Document Server

    Picollo, F; Bernardi, E; Marcantoni, A; Pasquarelli, A; Carbone, E; Olivero, P; Carabelli, V

    2016-01-01

    A microstructured graphitic 4x4 multielectrode array was embedded in a single crystal diamond substrate (4x4 {uG-SCD MEA) for real-time monitoring of exocytotic events from cultured chromaffin cells and adrenal slices. The current approach relies on the development of a parallel ion beam lithographic technique, which assures the time effective fabrication of extended arrays with reproducible electrode dimensions. The reported device is suitable for performing amperometric and voltammetric recordings with high sensitivity and temporal resolution, by simultaneously acquiring data from 16 rectangularly shaped microelectrodes (20x3.5 um^2) separated by 200 um gaps. Taking advantage of the array geometry we addressed the following specific issues: i) detect both the spontaneous and KCl-evoked secretion simultaneously from several chromaffin cells directly cultured on the device surface, ii) resolve the waveform of different subsets of exocytotic events, iii) monitoring quantal secretory events from thin slices of ...

  11. [A quantitative evaluation of brain computerized tomography in children using color image analyzer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamatani, M; Naganuma, Y; Hongoh, K; Murakami, M; Konishi, T; Okada, T

    1989-11-01

    We attempted the quantitative analysis of brain computerized tomographic scans in children using Color Image Analyzer. A consecutive series of 167 computerized tomographic scans were reviewed. Areas of subarachnoid spaces, cavums, ventricles and cerebellums were measured on three slices: A slice is at the level of head of caudate nucleus, anterior horn of lateral ventricle and third ventricle. B slice is at the level of body of lateral ventricle. C slice is at the level of sella turcica and pons. We investigated these values compared with Evans ratio, Cella Media Index, cerebellar atrophy score and visually evaluations. Serial brain CT scans of eight patient with infantile spasms were also evaluated for the assessment of the brain shrinkage after ACTH therapy. 1) The ratios of the subarachnoid space/the intracranial area on A and B slices (SAS A%, SAS B%) were significantly higher in the patients of severe brain atrophy. 2) There were linear relationship between Evans ratio and SAS A% (r = 0.405, p less than 0.001), Cella Media Index and the ratio of the lateral ventricles/the intracranial areas on B slice (r = -0.501, p less than 0.001), and the cerebellar atrophy score by Une and SAS C% (r = 0.369, p less than 0.001). 3) In the normal patients, the values of SAS A% and SAS B% were much greater in less than 1.5 years old children. These results suggest that the trend of CT findings related to age may reflect physiological changes of the space between the skull and the brain with age. 4) Brain shrinkage after ACTH therapy was more pronounced in the subarachnoid space than the ventricle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Performance Analysis of Generic vs.Sliced Tags in HepODBMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KurtStockinger

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a performance analysis of accessing tag data clustered in two different ways,namely event-wise clustering (generic tag)vs.attribute-wise clustering (sliced tag).The results show that especially "Prefetch-optimisation" results in an additional performance gain of sliced tags over generic tags when only a subset of all the tag attributes is accessed.

  13. Impairment-Aware Routing in Translucent Spectrum-Sliced Elastic Optical Path Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, S.; Kuipers, F.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrum-sliced elastic optical path (SLICE) technology offers a more flexible bandwidth allocation in optical networks than wavelength division multiplexing. It allows different connections to be served via different modulation formats. However, as with any optical network, the optical signal may b

  14. The Utility of Thin Slice Ratings for Predicting Language Growth in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Katherine M.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.

    2016-01-01

    Literature on "Thin Slice" ratings indicates that a number of personality characteristics and behaviors can be accurately predicted by ratings of very short segments (utility of Thin Slice ratings of young children with autism spectrum disorder for predicting developmental skills and…

  15. The GABAA receptor agonist THIP is neuroprotective in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Noraberg, Jens; Zimmer, Jens

    2003-01-01

    interneurons, were examined in hippocampal slice cultures exposed to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The NMDA-induced excitotoxicity was quantified by densitometric measurements of propidium iodide (PI) uptake. THIP (100-1000 microM) was neuroprotective in slice cultures co-exposed to NMDA (10 microM) for 48 h...

  16. On the local existence of maximal slicings in spherically symmetric spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero-Carrión, Isabel; Morales-Lladosa, Juan Antonio

    2010-01-01

    In this talk we show that any spherically symmetric spacetime admits locally a maximal spacelike slicing. The above condition is reduced to solve a decoupled system of first order quasi-linear partial differential equations. The solution may be accomplished analytical or numerically. We provide a general procedure to construct such maximal slicings.

  17. On the local existence of maximal slicings in spherically symmetric spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero-Carrion, Isabel; Ibanez, Jose MarIa; Morales-Lladosa, Juan Antonio, E-mail: isabel.cordero@uv.e, E-mail: jose.m.ibanez@uv.e, E-mail: antonio.morales@uv.e [Departamento de AstronomIa y Astrofisica, Universidad de Valencia, C/ Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    In this talk we show that any spherically symmetric spacetime admits locally a maximal spacelike slicing. The above condition is reduced to solve a decoupled system of first order quasi-linear partial differential equations. The solution may be accomplished analytical or numerically. We provide a general procedure to construct such maximal slicings.

  18. Comparison of five incubation systems for rat liver slices using functional and viability parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olinga, P; Groen, K; Hof, IH; DeKanter, R; Leeman, WR; Rutten, AAJJL; VanTwillert, K; Groothuis, GMM; Koster, H

    1997-01-01

    Precision-cut liver slices are presently used for various research objects, e.g. to study metabolism, transport, and toxicity of xenobiotics. Various incubation systems are presently employed, but a systematic comparison between these incubation systems with respect to preservation of slice function

  19. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A van Geer; Koert FD Kuhlmann; Conny T Bakker; Fibo JW ten Kate; Ronald PJ Oude Elferink; Piter J Bosma

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions.METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices.Tissue slices were cultured ex vivo for 1-6 d in an incubator using 95% O2. Slices were subsequently analyzed for viability and morphology. In addition the slices were incubated with different viral vectors expressing the repor ter genes GFP or DsRed.Expression of these reporter genes was measured at 72 h after infection.RESULTS: With the Krumdieck tissue slicer, uniform slices could be generated from pancreatic tissue but only upon embedding the tissue in 3% low melting agarose. Immunohistological examination showed the presence of all pancreatic cell types. Pancreatic normal and cancer tissue slices could be cultured for up to 6 d, while retaining viability and a moderate to good morphology. Reporter gene expression indicated that the slices could be infected and transduced efficiently by adenoviral vectors and by adeno associated viral vectors, whereas transduction with lentiviral vectors was limited. For the adenoviral vector, the transduction seemed limited to the peripheral layers of the explants.CONCLUSION: The presented sys tem al lows reproducible processing of minimal amounts of pancreatic tissue into slices uniform in size, suitable for pre-clinical evaluation of gene therapy vectors.

  20. Presynaptic. cap alpha. -adrenoceptors and opiate receptors: inhibition of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline release from rat cerebral cortex slices by different mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.; Mulder, A.H. (Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1982-04-23

    The inhibitory effects of morphine and Cd/sup 2 +/ on electrically evoked (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline release from superfused brain slices were unaffected when release was enhanced by increasing the pulse duration, while the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline and the enhancing effect of phentolamine were diminished. A similar enhancement of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline release by 4-aminopyridine reduced the modulatory effects of all drugs examined. Therefore there seem to be different mechanisms for the effect of presynaptic ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptors and opiate receptors on the availability of Ca/sup 2 +/ for the stimulus-secretion coupling process in noradrenergic nerve terminals.

  1. Application of an indirect immunofluorescent staining method for detection of Salmonella enteritidis in paraffin slices and antigen location in infected duck tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Yan; An-Chun Cheng; Ming-Shu Wang; Shu-Xuan Deng; Zhen-Hua Zhang; Nian-Chun Yin; Ping Cao; Sheng-Yan Cao

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To detect Salmonella enteritidis (S.enteritidis)in paraffin slices and antigen location in infected duck tissues.METHODS:The rabbits were immunized with purified bacillus to obtain S.enteritidis-specific antibody,which were then extracted by the caprylic-ammonium sulphate method,purified through High-Q columns.An indirect immuno-fluorescent staining method (IFA) was established to detect the S.enteritidis antigen in paraffin slices.Detected S.enteritidis in each organ tissue of ducklings experimentally infected with S.enteritidis.RESULTS:The gland of Garder,heart,kidney,spleen,liver,brain,ileum,jejunum,bursa of Fabricius from S.enteritidis experimentally infected ducklings were positive or strongly positive,and the S.enteritidis antigen mainly distributed in the infected cell cytoplasm.CONCLUSION:IFA is an intuitioni/st,sensitive and specific method in detecting S.enteritidis antigen in paraffin wax slices,and it is a good method in diagnosis and antigen location of S.enteritidis.We also conclude that the gland of Garder,heart,kidney,spleen,liver,ileum,jejunum are target organs in S.enteritidis infections of duck,and S.enteritidis is an intracellular parasitic bacterium.

  2. Physical performance evaluation of a 256-slice CT-scanner for four-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Tsunoo, Takanori; Kandatsu, Susumu; Tanada, Shuji; Aradate, Hiroshi; Saito, Yasuo; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Satoh, Kazumasa; Matsushita, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Masahiro

    2004-06-01

    We have developed a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner for four-dimensional (4D) imaging that employs continuous rotations of a cone-beam. Since a cone-beam scan along a circular orbit does not collect a complete set of data to make an exact reconstruction of a volume [three-dimensional (3D) image], it might cause disadvantages or artifacts. To examine effects of the cone-beam data collection on image quality, we have evaluated physical performance of the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner with 0.5 mm slices and compared it to that of a 16-slice CT-scanner with 0.75 mm slices. As a result, we found that image noise, uniformity, and high contrast detectability were independent of z coordinate. A Feldkamp artifact was observed in distortion measurements. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of slice sensitivity profiles (SSP) increased with z coordinate though it seemed to be caused by other reasons than incompleteness of data. With regard to low contrast detectability, smaller objects were detected more clearly at the midplane (z = 0 mm) than at z = 40 mm, though circular-band like artifacts affected detection. The comparison between the 16-slice and the 256-slice scanners showed better performance for the 16-slice scanner regarding the SSP, low contrast detectability, and distortion. The inferiorities of the 256-slice scanner in other than distortion measurement (Feldkamp artifact) seemed to be partly caused by the prototype nature of the scanner and should be improved in the future scanner. The image noise, uniformity, and high contrast detectability were almost identical for both CTs. The 256-slice scanner was superior to the 16-slice scanner regarding the PSF, though it was caused by the smaller transverse beam width of the 256-slice scanner. In order to compare both scanners comprehensively in terms of exposure dose, noise, slice thickness, and transverse spatial resolution, K=Dsigma2ha3 was calculated, where D was exposure dose (CT dose index), sigma was magnitude of

  3. Modeling and Realization of a Bearingless Flux-Switching Slice Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Gruber

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This work introduces a novel bearingless slice motor design: the bearingless flux-switching slice motor. In contrast to state-of-the-art bearingless slice motors, the rotor in this new design does not include any permanent rotor magnets. This offers advantages for disposable devices, such as those used in the medical industry, and extends the range of bearingless slice motors toward high-temperature applications. In this study, our focus is on the analytical modeling of the suspension force torque generation of a single coil and the bearingless motor. We assessed motor performance in relation to motor topology by applying performance factors. A prototype motor was optimized, designed, and manufactured. We also presented the state-of-the-art nonlinear feedback control scheme used. The motor was operated, and both static and dynamic measurements were taken on a test bench, thus successfully demonstrating the functionality and applicability of the novel bearingless slice motor concept.

  4. Measurement of slice thickness using partial volume effect in MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashida, Mitsuji; Yamazaki, Masaru [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Hospital; Ogura, Akio; Inoue, Hiroshi; Hongou, Takaharu

    1998-08-01

    The NEMA standard and AAPM method have been approved for the determination of slice thickness in diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging. In these methods, the slice thickness is obtained as the full width at half maximum of the slice profile. However, these methods are affected by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and pixel size. In addition, the measurement procedure required for accurate evaluation is troublesome. Therefore, a new method of evaluation using the partial volume effect, called the PVE method, is proposed. With the PVE method, slice thickness can be evaluated without the slice profile. A comparison of accuracy and simplicity of measurement is made between the PVE method and the wedge method of the NEMA standard. Results showed the PVE method to be accurate and easier to use than the wedge method. (author)

  5. Cell-attached recordings of responses evoked by photorelease of GABA in the immature cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat eMinlebaev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel non-invasive technique to measure the polarity of GABAergic responses based on cell-attached recordings of currents activated by laser-uncaging of GABA. For these recordings, a patch pipette was filled with a solution containing RuBi-GABA, and GABA was released from this complex by a laser beam conducted to the tip of the patch pipette via an optic fiber. In cell-attached recordings from neocortical and hippocampal neurons in postnatal days P2-5 rat brain slices in vitro, we found that laser-uncaging of GABA activates integral cell-attached currents mediated by tens of GABA(A channels. The initial response was inwardly directed, indicating a depolarizing response to GABA. The direction of the initial response was dependent on the pipette potential and analysis of its slope-voltage relationships revealed a depolarizing driving force of +11 mV for the currents through GABA channels. Initial depolarizing responses to GABA uncaging were inverted to hyperpolarizing in the presence of the NKCC1 blocker bumetanide. Current-voltage relationships of the currents evoked by Rubi-GABA uncaging using voltage-ramps at the peak of responses not only revealed a bumetanide-sensitive depolarizing reversal potential of the GABA(A receptor mediated responses, but also showed a strong voltage-dependent hysteresis. Upon desensitization of the uncaged-GABA response, current-voltage relationships of the currents through single GABA(A channels revealed depolarizing responses with the driving force values similar to those obtained for the initial response. Thus, cell-attached recordings of the responses evoked by local intrapipette GABA uncaging are suitable to assess the polarity of the GABA(A-Rs mediated signals in small cell compartments.

  6. Record dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robe, Dominic M.; Boettcher, Stefan; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    -facto irreversible and become increasingly harder to achieve. Thus, a progression of record-sized dynamical barriers are traversed in the approach to equilibration. Accordingly, the statistics of the events is closely described by a log-Poisson process. Originally developed for relaxation in spin glasses...

  7. Student Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Another topic involving privacy has attracted considerable attention in recent months--the "student unit record" issue. The U.S. Department of Education concluded in March that it would be feasible to help address lawmakers' concerns about accountability in higher education by constructing a database capable of tracking students from institution…

  8. Involvement of MEK/ERK pathway in cephaloridine-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Yuka; Hiramatsu, Jun; Gemba, Munekazu

    2003-07-20

    We have previously reported that free radical-mediated injury induced by cephaloridine (CER) is enhanced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, in rat renal cortical slices. We have also shown that PKC activation in mitochondria is involved in CER-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. We investigated the role of a downstream PKC pathway, a MEK/ERK pathway, in free radical-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices exposed to CER. Immediately after preparing slices from rat renal cortex, the slices were incubated in the medium containing MEK inhibitors. ERK1/2 activation was determined by Western blot analysis for phosphorylated ERK (pERK) 1/2 protein in nucleus fraction prepared from the slices exposed to CER. Prominently, CER caused not only increases in lipid peroxidation as an index of free radical generation and in LDH leakage as that of cell injury in the slices, but also marked activation of ERK1/2 in nucleus fraction. PD98059 and U0126, MEK1/2 inhibitors, significantly attenuated CER-induced increases in lipid peroxidation and LDH leakage in the slices. PD98059 also suppressed ERK1/2 activation in nucleus fraction prepared from the slices treated with CER. Inhibition of other MAP kinase pathways, p38 MAP kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) had no effect on CER-induced increases in lipid peroxidation level and LDH leakage in the slices. The present results suggest that a MEK/ERK pathway down stream of a PKC pathway is probably involved in free radical-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices exposed to CER.

  9. [Ecological environment of cultivated Astragali radix and market specification of prepared slices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kunzi; Liu, Jing; Hong, Hao; Guo, Baolin; Cai, Shaoqing; Chen, Hubiao

    2010-05-01

    Astragali Radix is derived from roots of Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus and A. membranaceus. The exhaustion of wild Astragali Radix has made cultivated Astragali Radix possess the commercial market of Astragali Radix. So the ecological environment of cultivated Astragali Radix should be investigated through field survey. Through investigation, we found that A. membranaceus var. mongholicus are cultivated in Hengshan mountain of Shanxi province, Longnan of Gansu province, south of Inner Mongolia and Qinghai provinces. A. membranaceus var. mongholicus is almost planted on the plain, except in Shanxi province it grows on the sunny side of the mountain. What is more, soil type, elevation, annual temperature and annual rainfall of these locations are different. So the ecological environments of cultivated location of Astragali Radix are different from each other. A. membranaceus is wild in Heilongjiang and northeast of Inner Mongolia, but the resource is drying up. It is also planted in few places of the provinces of Shanxi, Shandong, Hebei, Gansu, but cultivated scope of A. membranaceus is smaller than A. membranaceus var. mongholicus.. So A. membranaceus var. mongholicus possesses large part of Astragali Radix market. In market, there exists no unified specification fro slices of Astragali Radix, and specification of prepared slices will influence the contents of chemical components. Through investigation, different kind of prepared slices can be collected and compared, this provides evidences for quality control of prepared slices. Through investigation, five different specifications of prepared slices were found in market. The distributions of some specification of prepared slices are specified, like transverseprepared slices prepared from A. membranaceus only found in Heilongjiang province. Transverse prepared slices possess half part of prepared slice market, and can be used to identify original plant of Astragali Radix. So transverse prepared slices

  10. Axonal and dendritic density field estimation from incomplete single-slice neuronal reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap evan Pelt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal information processing in cortical networks critically depends on the organization of synaptic connectivity. Synaptic connections can form when axons and dendrites come in close proximity of each other. The spatial innervation of neuronal arborizations can be described by their axonal and dendritic density fields. Recently we showed that potential locations of synapses between neurons can be estimated from their overlapping axonal and dendritic density fields. However, deriving density fields from single-slice neuronal reconstructions is hampered by incompleteness because of cut branches.Here, we describe a method for recovering the lost axonal and dendritic mass. This so-called completion method is based on an estimation of the mass inside the slice and an extrapolation to the space outside the slice, assuming axial symmetry in the mass distribution. We validated the method using a set of neurons generated with our NETMORPH simulator. The model-generated neurons were artificially sliced and subsequently recovered by the completion method. Depending on slice thickness and arbor extent, branches that have lost their outside parents (orphan branches may occur inside the slice. Not connected anymore to the contiguous structure of the sliced neuron, orphan branches result in an underestimation of neurite mass. For 300 m thick slices, however, the validation showed a full recovery of dendritic and an almost full recovery of axonal mass.The completion method was applied to three experimental data sets of reconstructed rat cortical L2/3 pyramidal neurons. The results showed that in 300 m thick slices intracortical axons lost about 50% and dendrites about 16% of their mass. The completion method can be applied to single-slice reconstructions as long as axial symmetry can be assumed in the mass distribution. This opens up the possibility of using incomplete neuronal reconstructions from open-access data bases to determine population mean

  11. First ATLAS Events Recorded Underground

    CERN Multimedia

    Teuscher, R

    As reported in the CERN Bulletin, Issue No.30-31, 25 July 2005 The ATLAS barrel Tile calorimeter has recorded its first events underground using a cosmic ray trigger, as part of the detector commissioning programme. This is not a simulation! A cosmic ray muon recorded by the barrel Tile calorimeter of ATLAS on 21 June 2005 at 18:30. The calorimeter has three layers and a pointing geometry. The light trapezoids represent the energy deposited in the tiles of the calorimeter depicted as a thick disk. On the evening of June 21, the ATLAS detector, now being installed in the underground experimental hall UX15, reached an important psychological milestone: the barrel Tile calorimeter recorded the first cosmic ray events in the underground cavern. An estimated million cosmic muons enter the ATLAS cavern every 3 minutes, and the ATLAS team decided to make good use of some of them for the commissioning of the detector. Although only 8 of the 128 calorimeter slices ('superdrawers') were included in the trigg...

  12. Assessments of Coronary Artery Visibility and Radiation Dose in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease on Cardiac 128-slice CT and on Cardiac 64-slice CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y; Huang, M; Zheng, J; Li, J; Liu, H; Liang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coronary artery visibility and radiation dose in infants with CHD on cardiac 128-slice CT and on cardiac 64-slice CT. The images of 200 patients were analyzed in this study, 100 patients were selected randomly from a group of 789 infants (coronary artery segments was graded on a four-point scale. The coronary arteries were considered to be detected or visible when grade was 2 or higher. The visibility of the coronary artery segments and the radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Except for the rate of LM (96 vs. 99%), the detection rates of the total, LAD, LCX, RCA, and the proximal segment of the RCA in the 256-slice CT group were significantly higher than those in the 64-slice CT group (51.7, 53.33, 33.67, 53.33, and 99 vs. 34.8, 34.33, 18, 30.67, and 75%, respectively). The counts of visibility score (4/3/2/1) for the LM and the proximal segment of the RCA were 62/22/12/4 and 56/20/17/7, respectively, in the 128-slice CT group and 17/42/30/1 and 9/30/38/25, respectively, in the 64-slice CT group. There were significant differences, especially for score 4 and 3, between the two groups. The radiation dose in the 128-slice CT group was significantly decreased than those in the 64-slice CT group (CTDIvol 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 5.61 ± 0.63 mGy; SSDE 4.48 ± 1.15 vs. 13.97 ± 1.52 mGy; effective radiation dose 1.36 ± 0.44 vs. 4.06 ± 0.7 mSv). With reduced radiation dose, the visibility of the coronary artery in infants with CHD via prospective ECG-triggered mode on a 128-slice CT is superior to that of the 64-slice CT using retrospective ECG-gated spiral mode.

  13. Effects of the alkaloids 6-benzoylheteratisine and heteratisine on neuronal activity in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A

    1997-08-01

    Alkaloids of different Aconitum species are employed as analgesics in traditional Chinese folk medicine. The present study was designed in order to investigate the effects of the structurally related alkaloids 6-benzoylheteratisine and heteratisine on neuronal activity in rat hippocampus. Experiments were performed as extracellular recordings of stimulus evoked population spikes in rat hippocampal slices. 6-Benzoylheteratisine (0.01-10 microM) inhibited the ortho- and antidromic population spike as well as the field EPSP in a concentration- and frequency-dependent manner. Heteratisine (1-100 microM) was a less potent inhibitor. It exerted a depression of the orthodromic spike, but failed to affect the antidromic population spike. 6-Benzoylheteratisine (10 microM) diminished epileptiform activity induced by bicuculline. In hippocampal neurons, this compound reduced the peak amplitude of the sodium current. There was no effect of heteratisine on the sodium current in concentrations up to 100 microM. It is concluded that the frequency-dependent action of 6-benzoylheteratisine suggests an inhibition of neuronal activity which underlies epileptiform burst discharges. The predominant effect is a suppression of neuronal activity due to a blockade of sodium channels.

  14. Design and Fabrication of a Hand Fed Motorized Oil Bean Slicing Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Oduma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A hand fed African oil bean slicing machine which would be affordable, simple to operate and easy to maintain by local and/or small scale farmers and processors was designed and fabricated with locally available materials. The design was based on the engineering standard and specifications. Factors such as physical and mechanical properties of oil bean seeds, mechanical properties of construction materials, mach inability or deformability of construction materials, wear resistance, availability of power and cost of materials were considered in the fabrication of the device. 1hp electric motor powered the machine. The machine was tested for performance and it recorded an efficiency of 96.64% with minimal damage of the product. The bill of engineering measurement and evaluation revealed that the machine was fabricated at a total cost of ₦91,353.00. The device match the need of the oil bean processors and with adequate maintenance and/or management, it would ameliorate the difficulties involved in oil bean processing and, therefore boost the farmers’ production

  15. Effects of Etomidate on GABAergic and Glutamatergic Transmission in Rat Thalamocortical Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bao; Wang, Yuan; Yang, Hao; Yu, Tian

    2016-12-01

    Although accumulative evidence indicates that the thalamocortical system is an important target for general anesthetics, the underlying mechanisms of anesthetic action on thalamocortical neurotransmission are not fully understood. The aim of the study is to explore the action of etomidate on glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission in rat thalamocortical slices by using whole cell patch-clamp recording. We found that etomidate mainly prolonged the decay time of spontaneous GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs), without changing the frequency. Furthermore, etomidate not only prolonged the decay time of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) but also increased the amplitude. On the other hand, etomidate significantly decreased the frequency of spontaneous glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs), without altering the amplitude or decay time in the absence of bicuculline. When GABAA receptors were blocked using bicuculline, the effects of etomidate on sEPSCs were mostly eliminated. These results suggest that etomidate enhances GABAergic transmission mainly through postsynaptic mechanism in thalamocortical neuronal network. Etomidate attenuates glutamatergic transmission predominantly through presynaptic action and requires presynaptic GABAA receptors involvement.

  16. Neuroprotection Promoted by Guanosine Depends on Glutamine Synthetase and Glutamate Transporters Activity in Hippocampal Slices Subjected to Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Cim, Tharine; Martins, Wagner C; Thomaz, Daniel T; Coelho, Victor; Poluceno, Gabriela Godoy; Lanznaster, Débora; Vandresen-Filho, Samuel; Tasca, Carla I

    2016-05-01

    Guanosine (GUO) has been shown to act as a neuroprotective agent against glutamatergic excitotoxicity by increasing glutamate uptake and decreasing its release. In this study, a putative effect of GUO action on glutamate transporters activity modulation was assessed in hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model of brain ischemia. Slices subjected to OGD showed increased excitatory amino acids release (measured by D-[(3)H]aspartate release) that was prevented in the presence of GUO (100 µM). The glutamate transporter blockers, DL-TBOA (10 µM), DHK (100 µM, selective inhibitor of GLT-1), and sulfasalazine (SAS, 250 µM, Xc(-) system inhibitor) decreased OGD-induced D-aspartate release. Interestingly, DHK or DL-TBOA blocked the decrease in glutamate release induced by GUO, whereas SAS did not modify the GUO effect. GUO protected hippocampal slices from cellular damage by modulation of glutamate transporters, however selective blockade of GLT-1 or Xc- system only did not affect this protective action of GUO. OGD decreased hippocampal glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and GUO recovered GS activity to control levels without altering the kinetic parameters of GS activity, thus suggesting GUO does not directly interact with GS. Additionally, the pharmacological inhibition of GS activity with methionine sulfoximine abolished the effect of GUO in reducing D-aspartate release and cellular damage evoked by OGD. Altogether, results in hippocampal slices subjected to OGD show that GUO counteracts the release of excitatory amino acids, stimulates the activity of GS, and decreases the cellular damage by modulation of glutamate transporters activity.

  17. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials from 2005 until this past month are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the Trigger-Aware Analysis Tutorial by Monika Wielers on March 23 and the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal.Feedback WelcomeOur group is making arrangements now to record plenary sessions, tutorials, and other important ATLAS events for 2007. Your suggestions for potential recording, as well as your feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you.Enjoy the Lectures!

  18. Specific accumulation of {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose in three-dimensional long-term cultures of human and rodent brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocke, C.; Prante, O.; Kuwert, T. [Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Bluemcke, I.; Jeske, I. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Romstoeck, J. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Stefan, H. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Aim: Organotypic slice cultures (OSC) of human brain specimens represent an intriguing experimental model for translational studies addressing, e.g., stem cell transplantation in neurodegenerative diseases or targeting invasion by malignant glioma ex vivo. However, long-term viability and phenomena of structural reorganization of human OSC remain to be further characterized. Here, we report the use of {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose (FDG) for evaluating the viability of brain slice preparations obtained either from postnatal rats or human hippocampal specimens. Methods: Anatomically well preserved human hippocampi obtained from epilepsy surgery and rat hippocampus slice cultures obtained from six day old Wistar rats were dissected into horizontal slices. The slices were incubated with FDG in phosphate buffered saline up to 1 h, either with or without supplementation of glucose at a concentration of 2.5 mg/ml. Radioactivity within the medium or slice cultures was measured using a gamma-counter. In addition, distribution of radioactivity was autoradiographically visualized and quantified as counts per mm{sup 2}. Results: In rat hippocampal slices, FDG accumulated with 1 300 000 {+-} 68 000 counts/mm{sup 2}, whereas the incorporation of the radioactive label in human slices was in the order of 1 500 000 {+-} 370 000 counts/mm{sup 2}. The elevation of glucose concentration within the medium led to a significant three-fold decrease of FDG accumulation in rat slices and to a 2.4-fold decrease in human specimens. Conclusions: FDG accumulated in organotypic brain cultures of human or rodent origin. FDG is thus suited to investigate the viability of OSC. Furthermore, these preparations open new ways to study the factors governing cerebral FDG uptake in brain tissue ex vivo. (orig.)

  19. Visualization and volumetric structures from MR images of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parvin, B.; Johnston, W.; Robertson, D.

    1994-03-01

    Pinta is a system for segmentation and visualization of anatomical structures obtained from serial sections reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging. The system approaches the segmentation problem by assigning each volumetric region to an anatomical structure. This is accomplished by satisfying constraints at the pixel level, slice level, and volumetric level. Each slice is represented by an attributed graph, where nodes correspond to regions and links correspond to the relations between regions. These regions are obtained by grouping pixels based on similarity and proximity. The slice level attributed graphs are then coerced to form a volumetric attributed graph, where volumetric consistency can be verified. The main novelty of our approach is in the use of the volumetric graph to ensure consistency from symbolic representations obtained from individual slices. In this fashion, the system allows errors to be made at the slice level, yet removes them when the volumetric consistency cannot be verified. Once the segmentation is complete, the 3D surfaces of the brain can be constructed and visualized.

  20. Adaptive SLICE method: an enhanced method to determine nonlinear dynamic respiratory system mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhanqi; Guttmann, Josef; Möller, Knut

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce and evaluate the adaptive SLICE method (ASM) for continuous determination of intratidal nonlinear dynamic compliance and resistance. The tidal volume is subdivided into a series of volume intervals called slices. For each slice, one compliance and one resistance are calculated by applying a least-squares-fit method. The volume window (width) covered by each slice is determined based on the confidence interval of the parameter estimation. The method was compared to the original SLICE method and evaluated using simulation and animal data. The ASM was also challenged with separate analysis of dynamic compliance during inspiration. If the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the respiratory data decreased from +∞ to 10 dB, the relative errors of compliance increased from 0.1% to 22% for the ASM and from 0.2% to 227% for the SLICE method. Fewer differences were found in resistance. When the SNR was larger than 40 dB, the ASM delivered over 40 parameter estimates (42.2 ± 1.3). When analyzing the compliance during inspiration separately, the estimates calculated with the ASM were more stable. The adaptive determination of slice bounds results in consistent and reliable parameter values. Online analysis of nonlinear respiratory mechanics will profit from such an adaptive selection of interval size.

  1. Effect of Superheated Steam Treatment on Changes in Moisture Content and Colour Properties of Coconut Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mah Sook Yun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drying is one of the methods to preserve the quality and prolong the shelf life of food. Coconut meat was sliced and dried using superheated steam oven at 140°C, 160°C and 180°C. Drying was carried out at different drying time (5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 minutes. The effect of drying temperature and time on the moisture content and colour properties (L, a, b and BI of the coconut slices were studied. The temperature and time significantly (p < 0.05 affected the moisture loss and colour values of coconut slices during superheated steam drying. The moisture content decreased with increased drying temperature and time. The values of L decreased with drying temperature and time. The a and b value of coconut slice dried at 140°C decreased initially then increased with time. Coconut slices dried at 160°C had their a values increased up to 20 minutes then decreased and b values increased up to 20 minutes then fluctuated. The a and b values of coconut slices dried at 180°C showed fluctuation. BI values of coconut slices increased with increasing drying time and temperature.

  2. Physical Principles for Scalable Neural Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Henry Marblestone*

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneously measuring the activities of all neurons in a mammalian brain at millisecond resolution is a challenge beyond the limits of existing techniques in neuroscience. Entirely new approaches may be required, motivating an analysis of the fundamental physical constraints on the problem. We outline the physical principles governing brain activity mapping using optical, electrical,magnetic resonance, and molecular modalities of neural recording. Focusing on the mouse brain, we analyze the scalability of each method, concentrating on the limitations imposed by spatiotemporal resolution, energy dissipation, and volume displacement. We also study the physics of powering and communicating with microscale devices embedded in brain tissue.

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  8. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... their final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

  12. Fiber optic biofluorometer for physiological research on muscle slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Mathias; Dendorfer, Andreas; Werner, Jan; Lambertz, Daniel; Klein, Karl-Friedrich

    2016-03-01

    A focus of research in cell physiology is the detection of Ca2+, NADH, FAD, ATPase activity or membrane potential, only to name a few, in muscle tissues. In this work, we report on a biofluorometer using ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), optical fibers and two photomultipliers (PMTs) using synchronized fluorescence detection with integrated background correction to detect free calcium, Ca2+, in cardiac muscle tissue placed in a horizontal tissue bath and a microscope setup. Fiber optic probes with imaging optics have been designed to transport excitation light from the biofluorometer's light output to a horizontal tissue bath and to collect emission light from a tissue sample of interest to two PMTs allowing either single excitation / single emission or ratiometric, dual excitation / single emission or single excitation / dual emission fluorescence detection of indicator dyes or natural fluorophores. The efficient transport of light from the excitation LEDs to the tissue sample, bleaching effects of the excitation light in both, polymer and fused silica-based fibers will be discussed. Furthermore, a new approach to maximize light collection of the emission light using high NA fibers and high NA coupling optics will be shown. Finally, first results on Ca2+ measurements in cardiac muscle slices in a traditional microscope setup and a horizontal tissue bath using fiber optic probes will be introduced and discussed.

  13. Prion pathogenesis is faithfully reproduced in cerebellar organotypic slice cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Falsig

    Full Text Available Prions cause neurodegeneration in vivo, yet prion-infected cultured cells do not show cytotoxicity. This has hampered mechanistic studies of prion-induced neurodegeneration. Here we report that prion-infected cultured organotypic cerebellar slices (COCS experienced progressive spongiform neurodegeneration closely reproducing prion disease, with three different prion strains giving rise to three distinct patterns of prion protein deposition. Neurodegeneration did not occur when PrP was genetically removed from neurons, and a comprehensive pharmacological screen indicated that neurodegeneration was abrogated by compounds known to antagonize prion replication. Prion infection of COCS and mice led to enhanced fodrin cleavage, suggesting the involvement of calpains or caspases in pathogenesis. Accordingly, neurotoxicity and fodrin cleavage were prevented by calpain inhibitors but not by caspase inhibitors, whereas prion replication proceeded unimpeded. Hence calpain inhibition can uncouple prion replication from its neurotoxic sequelae. These data validate COCS as a powerful model system that faithfully reproduces most morphological hallmarks of prion infections. The exquisite accessibility of COCS to pharmacological manipulations was instrumental in recognizing the role of calpains in neurotoxicity, and significantly extends the collection of tools necessary for rigorously dissecting prion pathogenesis.

  14. State-correlated DC slice imaging of formaldehyde photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, Arthur G.; Chambreau, Steven D.; Lahankar, Sridhar A.

    High-resolution slice imaging methods allow for detection of single product quantum states with sufficient velocity resolution to infer the full correlated product state distribution of the undetected fragment. This is a level of detail not available in previous studies of formaldehyde photodissociation, and in this application it reveals startling new aspects of unimolecular decomposition. The CO rotational distributions from near ultraviolet dissociation of formaldehyde are bimodal, and the imaging experiments allow us to decompose these into two dynamically distinct components: the conventional molecular dissociation over a high exit barrier, and a novel `roaming atom' reaction in which frustrated radical dissociation events lead to intramolecular H abstraction, bypassing the transition state entirely. In probing the dynamics of the conventional molecular dissociation over the barrier, we use the complete vH2-jCO correlation to model the exit channel dynamics in new detail. Furthermore, these state-correlated measurements provide insight into radical-radical reactions and the underlying dynamics and energy dependence of the roaming pathway.

  15. Vehicle tracking and classification in challenging scenarios via slice sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Marcos; Unzueta, Luis; Barandiaran, Javier; Cortés, Andoni; Otaegui, Oihana; Sánchez, Pedro

    2011-12-01

    This article introduces a 3D vehicle tracking system in a traffic surveillance environment devised for shadow tolling applications. It has been specially designed to operate in real time with high correct detection and classification rates. The system is capable of providing accurate and robust results in challenging road scenarios, with rain, traffic jams, casted shadows in sunny days at sunrise and sunset times, etc. A Bayesian inference method has been designed to generate estimates of multiple variable objects entering and exiting the scene. This framework allows easily mixing different nature information, gathering in a single step observation models, calibration, motion priors and interaction models. The inference of results is carried out with a novel optimization procedure that generates estimates of the maxima of the posterior distribution combining concepts from Gibbs and slice sampling. Experimental tests have shown excellent results for traffic-flow video surveillance applications that can be used to classify vehicles according to their length, width, and height. Therefore, this vision-based system can be seen as a good substitute to existing inductive loop detectors.

  16. Slicing-independent RISC activation requires the argonaute PAZ domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuo; Jin, Lan; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Feijie; Kay, Mark A

    2012-08-21

    Small RNAs regulate genetic networks through a ribonucleoprotein complex called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which, in mammals, contains at its center one of four Argonaute proteins (Ago1-Ago4). A key regulatory event in the RNA interference (RNAi) and microRNA (miRNA) pathways is Ago loading, wherein double-stranded small-RNA duplexes are incorporated into RISC (pre-RISC) and then become single-stranded (mature RISC), a process that is not well understood. The Agos contain an evolutionarily conserved PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domain whose primary function is to bind the 3' end of small RNAs. We created multiple PAZ-domain-disrupted mutant Ago proteins and studied their biochemical properties and biological functionality in cells. We found that the PAZ domain is dispensable for Ago loading of slicing-competent RISC. In contrast, in the absence of slicer activity or slicer-substrate duplex RNAs, PAZ-disrupted Agos bound duplex small interfering RNAs, but were unable to unwind or eject the passenger strand and form functional RISC complexes. We have discovered that the highly conserved PAZ domain plays an important role in RISC activation, providing new mechanistic insights into how miRNAs regulate genes, as well as new insights for future design of miRNA- and RNAi-based therapeutics.

  17. Process variables in the osmotic dehydration of sliced peaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Pimentel Marconi Germer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluated the influence of temperature and concentration of the sucrose syrup on the pre-osmotic dehydration of peaches. Physical (colour and texture and chemical variables (soluble solid content; total sugar, reducing and non-reducing sugar contents; and titratable acidity were investigated, as well as the osmotic dehydration parameters (loss of weight and water; solids incorporation. An experimental central composite design was employed varying the temperature (from 30 to 50 ºC and concentration (from 45 to 65 ºBrix and maintaining the syrup to fruit ratio (4:1, process time (4 hours, and format (slices. The degree of acceptance was used in the sensory analysis evaluating the following characteristics: appearance, taste, texture, colour, and overall quality using a hedonic scale. The results were modelled using the Statistica program (v. 6.0 and the Response Surface Methodology. The mathematical models of the following dimensionless variations yielded significant (p < 0.05 and predictive results: soluble solids content, total and non-reducing sugar contents, titratable acidity, colour parameter L*, and water loss. The models of the attributes colour and appearance yielded significant (p < 0.10 but not predictive results. Temperature was the prevalent effect in the models. The process conditions in the range from 50 to 54.1 ºC and from 45 to 65 ºBrix led to greater water losses and better sensory performances.

  18. Strong optomechanical interactions in a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam

    CERN Document Server

    Leijssen, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanical systems can be used for sensitive detection of mechanical motion and to control mechanical resonators, down to the quantum level. The strength with which optical and mechanical degrees of freedom interact is defined by the photon-phonon coupling rate $g_0$, which is especially large in nanoscale systems. Here, we demonstrate an optomechanical system based on a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam, that combines subwavelength optical confinement with a low-mass mechanical mode. Analyzing the transduction of motion and effects of radiation pressure we find a coupling rate $g_0$/2{\\pi} = 11.5 MHz, exceeding previously reported values by an order of magnitude. Using this interaction we detect the resonator's motion with a noise imprecision below that at the standard quantum limit, even though the system has optical and mechanical quality factors smaller than $10^3$. The broad bandwidth is useful for application in miniature sensors, and for measurement-based control of the resonator's motional s...

  19. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E. M. Vickers

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM, diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM. Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM, while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM, terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM, and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM. Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%, CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%–11%, and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%–6%. Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%, while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%. Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%, ETM (66%, DCF, TBF, MMI (61%–60%, APAP, CBZ (57%–56%, and DTL (48%. Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%, CBZ and ETM (44%–43%, APAP and DCF (40%–38%, MMI, TBF and CSA (37%–35%. This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects.

  20. Efficient Face Recognition in Video by Bit Planes Slicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa R. Inbathini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Video-based face recognition must be able to overcome the imaging interference such as pose and illumination. Approach: A model is designed to study for face recognition based on video sequence and also test image. In training stage, single frontal image is taken as a input to the recognition system. A new virtual image is generated using bit plane feature fusion to effectively reduce the sensitivity to illumination variances. A Self-PCA is performed to get each set of Eigen faces and to get projected image. In recognition stage, automatic face detection scheme is first applied to the video sequences. Frames are extracted from the video and virtual frame is created. Each bit plane of test face is extracted and then the feature fusion face is constructed, followed by the projection and reconstruction using each set of the corresponding Eigen faces. Results: This algorithm is compared with conventional PCA algorithm. The minimum error of reconstruction is calculated. If error is less than a threshold value, then it recognizes the face from the database. Conclusion: Bit plane slicing mechanism is applied in video based face recognition. Experimental results shows that its far more superior than conventional method under various pose and illumination condition.