WorldWideScience

Sample records for brain signal complexity

  1. Regulation of Drosophila Brain Wiring by Neuropil Interactions via a Slit-Robo-RPTP Signaling Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Carlos; Soldano, Alessia; Mora, Natalia; De Geest, Natalie; Claeys, Annelies; Erfurth, Maria-Luise; Sierralta, Jimena; Ramaekers, Ariane; Dascenco, Dan; Ejsmont, Radoslaw K; Schmucker, Dietmar; Sanchez-Soriano, Natalia; Hassan, Bassem A

    2016-10-24

    The axonal wiring molecule Slit and its Round-About (Robo) receptors are conserved regulators of nerve cord patterning. Robo receptors also contribute to wiring brain circuits. Whether molecular mechanisms regulating these signals are modified to fit more complex brain wiring processes is unclear. We investigated the role of Slit and Robo receptors in wiring Drosophila higher-order brain circuits and identified differences in the cellular and molecular mechanisms of Robo/Slit function. First, we find that signaling by Robo receptors in the brain is regulated by the Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase RPTP69d. RPTP69d increases membrane availability of Robo3 without affecting its phosphorylation state. Second, we detect no midline localization of Slit during brain development. Instead, Slit is enriched in the mushroom body, a neuronal structure covering large areas of the brain. Thus, a divergent molecular mechanism regulates neuronal circuit wiring in the Drosophila brain, partly in response to signals from the mushroom body.

  2. Differential maturation of brain signal complexity in the human auditory and visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Lippe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain development carries with it a large number of structural changes at the local level which impact on the functional interactions of distributed neuronal networks for perceptual processing. Such changes enhance information processing capacity, which can be indexed by estimation of neural signal complexity. Here, we show that during development, EEG signal complexity increases from one month to 5 years of age in response to auditory and visual stimulation. However, the rates of change in complexity were not equivalent for the two responses. Infants’ signal complexity for the visual condition was greater than auditory signal complexity, whereas adults showed the same level of complexity to both types of stimuli. The differential rates of complexity change may reflect a combination of innate and experiential factors on the structure and function of the two sensory systems.

  3. Complex network inference from P300 signals: Decoding brain state under visual stimulus for able-bodied and disabled subjects

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    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Cai, Qing; Dong, Na; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Bo, Yun; Zhang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Distinguishing brain cognitive behavior underlying disabled and able-bodied subjects constitutes a challenging problem of significant importance. Complex network has established itself as a powerful tool for exploring functional brain networks, which sheds light on the inner workings of the human brain. Most existing works in constructing brain network focus on phase-synchronization measures between regional neural activities. In contrast, we propose a novel approach for inferring functional networks from P300 event-related potentials by integrating time and frequency domain information extracted from each channel signal, which we show to be efficient in subsequent pattern recognition. In particular, we construct brain network by regarding each channel signal as a node and determining the edges in terms of correlation of the extracted feature vectors. A six-choice P300 paradigm with six different images is used in testing our new approach, involving one able-bodied subject and three disabled subjects suffering from multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain and spinal-cord injury, respectively. We then exploit global efficiency, local efficiency and small-world indices from the derived brain networks to assess the network topological structure associated with different target images. The findings suggest that our method allows identifying brain cognitive behaviors related to visual stimulus between able-bodied and disabled subjects.

  4. Altered global brain signal in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Genevieve J.; Murray, John D.; Repovs, Grega; Cole, Michael W.; Savic, Aleksandar; Glasser, Matthew F.; Pittenger, Christopher; Krystal, John H.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Glahn, David C.; Anticevic, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia display a complex neurobiology, which has long been associated with distributed brain dysfunction. However, no investigation has tested whether schizophrenia shows alterations in global brain signal (GS), a signal derived from functional MRI and often discarded as a meaningless baseline in many studies. To evaluate GS alterations associated with schizophrenia, we studied two large chronic patient samples (n = 90, n = 71), comparing them to healthy subjects (n = 220) and patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder (n = 73). We identified and replicated increased cortical power and variance in schizophrenia, an effect predictive of symptoms yet obscured by GS removal. Voxel-wise signal variance was also increased in schizophrenia, independent of GS effects. Both findings were absent in bipolar patients, confirming diagnostic specificity. Biologically informed computational modeling of shared and nonshared signal propagation through the brain suggests that these findings may be explained by altered net strength of overall brain connectivity in schizophrenia. PMID:24799682

  5. Linking brain imaging signals to visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welchman, Andrew E; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2013-11-01

    The rapid advances in brain imaging technology over the past 20 years are affording new insights into cortical processing hierarchies in the human brain. These new data provide a complementary front in seeking to understand the links between perceptual and physiological states. Here we review some of the challenges associated with incorporating brain imaging data into such "linking hypotheses," highlighting some of the considerations needed in brain imaging data acquisition and analysis. We discuss work that has sought to link human brain imaging signals to existing electrophysiological data and opened up new opportunities in studying the neural basis of complex perceptual judgments. We consider a range of approaches when using human functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify brain circuits whose activity changes in a similar manner to perceptual judgments and illustrate these approaches by discussing work that has studied the neural basis of 3D perception and perceptual learning. Finally, we describe approaches that have sought to understand the information content of brain imaging data using machine learning and work that has integrated multimodal data to overcome the limitations associated with individual brain imaging approaches. Together these approaches provide an important route in seeking to understand the links between physiological and psychological states.

  6. Analysis and simulation of brain signal data by EEG signal processing technique using MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasikumar Gurumurthy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available EEG is brain signal processing technique that allows gaining the understanding of the complex inner mechanisms of the brain and abnormal brain waves have shown to be associated with particular brain disorders. The analysis of brain waves plays an important role in diagnosis of different brain disorders. MATLAB provides an interactive graphic user interface (GUI allowing users to flexiblyand interactively process their high-density EEG dataset and other brain signal data different techniques such as independent component analysis (ICA and/or time/frequency analysis (TFA, as well as standard averaging methods. We will be showing different brain signals by comparing, analysing and simulating datasets which is already loaded in the MATLAB software to process the EEG signals.

  7. Cortical complexity in cetacean brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, Patrick R; Chanis, Rebecca; Marino, Lori

    2005-11-01

    Cetaceans (dolphins, whales, and porpoises) have a long, dramatically divergent evolutionary history compared with terrestrial mammals. Throughout their 55-60 million years of evolution, cetaceans acquired a compelling set of characteristics that include echolocation ability (in odontocetes), complex auditory and communicative capacities, and complex social organization. Moreover, although cetaceans have not shared a common ancestor with primates for over 90 million years, they possess a set of cognitive attributes that are strikingly convergent with those of many primates, including great apes and humans. In contrast, cetaceans have evolved a highly unusual combination of neurobiological features different from that of primates. As such, cetacean brains offer a critical opportunity to address questions about how complex behavior can be based on very different neuroanatomical and neurobiological evolutionary products. Cetacean brains and primate brains are arguably most meaningfully conceived as alternative evolutionary routes to neurobiological and cognitive complexity. In this article, we summarize data on brain size and hemisphere surface configuration in several cetacean species and present an overview of the cytoarchitectural complexity of the cerebral cortex of the bottlenose dolphin.

  8. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...

  9. Lactate transport and signaling in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergersen, Linda Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    , such as in physical exercise, there is net influx of lactate from blood to brain, where the lactate is used for energy production and myelin formation. Lactate binds to the lactate receptor GPR81 aka hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor (HCAR1) on brain cells and cerebral blood vessels, and regulates the levels of c...... of the favorable effects on the brain resulting from physical exercise.......Lactate acts as a ‘buffer’ between glycolysis and oxidative metabolism. In addition to being exchanged as a fuel by the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) between cells and tissues with different glycolytic and oxidative rates, lactate may be a ‘volume transmitter’ of brain signals. According...

  10. Determining mental load through measuring brain signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2012-01-01

    How can you tell whether someone working or gaming is mentally taxed too high or too low? In collaboration with Noldus IT (Wageningen) and the FC Donders Institute (Nijmegen), TNO designed and conducted an experiment to measure mental load through brain signals. 35 participants performed a computer

  11. Comparative Analysis of EEG Signals Based on Complexity Measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the functions and states of the brains according to the values of the complexity measure of the EEG signals. The EEG signals of 30 normal samples and 30 patient samples are collected. Based on the preprocessing for the raw data, a computational program for complexity measure is compiled and the complexity measures of all samples are calculated. The mean value and standard error of complexity measure of control group is as 0.33 and 0.10, and the normal group is as 0.53 an...

  12. Glutamatergic signaling in the brain's white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakiri, Y; Burzomato, V; Frugier, G; Hamilton, N B; Káradóttir, R; Attwell, D

    2009-01-12

    Glutamatergic signaling has been exceptionally well characterized in the brain's gray matter, where it underlies fast information processing, learning and memory, and also generates the neuronal damage that occurs in pathological conditions such as stroke. The role of glutamatergic signaling in the white matter, an area until recently thought to be devoid of synapses, is less well understood. Here we review what is known, and highlight what is not known, of glutamatergic signaling in the white matter. We focus on how glutamate is released, the location and properties of the receptors it acts on, the interacting molecules that may regulate trafficking or signaling of the receptors, the possible functional roles of glutamate in the white matter, and its pathological effects including the possibility of treating white matter disorders with glutamate receptor blockers.

  13. Altered calcium signaling following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Thomas Weber

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell death and dysfunction after traumatic brain injury (TBI is caused by a primary phase, related to direct mechanical disruption of the brain, and a secondary phase which consists of delayed events initiated at the time of the physical insult. Arguably, the calcium ion contributes greatly to the delayed cell damage and death after TBI. A large, sustained influx of calcium into cells can initiate cell death signaling cascades, through activation of several degradative enzymes, such as proteases and endonucleases. However, a sustained level of intracellular free calcium is not necessarily lethal, but the specific route of calcium entry may couple calcium directly to cell death pathways. Other sources of calcium, such as intracellular calcium stores, can also contribute to cell damage. In addition, calcium-mediated signal transduction pathways in neurons may be perturbed following injury. These latter types of alterations may contribute to abnormal physiology in neurons that do not necessarily die after a traumatic episode. This review provides an overview of experimental evidence that has led to our current understanding of the role of calcium signaling in death and dysfunction following TBI.

  14. Techniques and instrumental complex for research of influence of microwaves encoded by brain neural signals on biological objects’ psycho physiological state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkovskiy, B. V.; Zhuravlev, B. V.; Onishchenko, E. M.; Simakov, A. B.; Trifonova, N. Yu; Voronov, Yu A.

    2016-10-01

    New instrumental technique for research of the psycho-physiological reactions of the bio-objects under the microwave electromagnetic radiation, modulated by interval patterns of neural activity in the brain registered under different biological motivations, are suggested. The preliminary results of these new tool tests in real psycho physiological experiments on rats are presented.

  15. Understanding complexity in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Danielle S; Gazzaniga, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Although the ultimate aim of neuroscientific enquiry is to gain an understanding of the brain and how its workings relate to the mind, the majority of current efforts are largely focused on small questions using increasingly detailed data. However, it might be possible to successfully address the larger question of mind-brain mechanisms if the cumulative findings from these neuroscientific studies are coupled with complementary approaches from physics and philosophy. The brain, we argue, can be understood as a complex system or network, in which mental states emerge from the interaction between multiple physical and functional levels. Achieving further conceptual progress will crucially depend on broad-scale discussions regarding the properties of cognition and the tools that are currently available or must be developed in order to study mind-brain mechanisms.

  16. Simulating complex calcium-calcineurin signaling network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, J.; Kaandorp, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding of processes in which calcium signaling is involved is of fundamental importance in systems biology and has many applications in medicine. In this paper we have studied the particular case of the complex calcium-calcineurin-MCIP-NFAT signaling network in cardiac myocytes, the understan

  17. Brain Network Analysis from High-Resolution EEG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Babiloni, Fabio

    Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the detection of the functional connectivity in the brain from different neuroelectromagnetic and hemodynamic signals recorded by several neuro-imaging devices such as the functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanner, electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) apparatus. Many methods have been proposed and discussed in the literature with the aim of estimating the functional relationships among different cerebral structures. However, the necessity of an objective comprehension of the network composed by the functional links of different brain regions is assuming an essential role in the Neuroscience. Consequently, there is a wide interest in the development and validation of mathematical tools that are appropriate to spot significant features that could describe concisely the structure of the estimated cerebral networks. The extraction of salient characteristics from brain connectivity patterns is an open challenging topic, since often the estimated cerebral networks have a relative large size and complex structure. Recently, it was realized that the functional connectivity networks estimated from actual brain-imaging technologies (MEG, fMRI and EEG) can be analyzed by means of the graph theory. Since a graph is a mathematical representation of a network, which is essentially reduced to nodes and connections between them, the use of a theoretical graph approach seems relevant and useful as firstly demonstrated on a set of anatomical brain networks. In those studies, the authors have employed two characteristic measures, the average shortest path L and the clustering index C, to extract respectively the global and local properties of the network structure. They have found that anatomical brain networks exhibit many local connections (i.e. a high C) and few random long distance connections (i.e. a low L). These values identify a particular model that interpolate between a regular

  18. Model human heart or brain signals

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2008-01-01

    A new model is suggested and used to mimic various spatial or temporal designs in biological or non biological formations where the focus is on the normal or irregular electrical signals coming from human heart (ECG) or brain (EEG). The electrical activities in several muscles (EMG) or neurons or other organs of human or various animals, such as lobster pyloric neuron, guinea pig inferior olivary neuron, sepia giant axon and mouse neocortical pyramidal neuron and some spatial formations are also considered (in Appendix). In the biological applications, several elements (cells or tissues) in an organ are taken as various entries in a representative lattice (mesh) where the entries are connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences. The biological elements evolve in time (with the given tissue or organ) in terms of the mentioned connections (interactions) besides some individual feedings. The anatomical diversity of the species (or organs) is handled in terms o...

  19. Non-signalling energy use in the developing rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engl, Elisabeth; Jolivet, Renaud; Hall, Catherine N; Attwell, David

    2017-03-01

    Energy use in the brain constrains its information processing power, but only about half the brain's energy consumption is directly related to information processing. Evidence for which non-signalling processes consume the rest of the brain's energy has been scarce. For the first time, we investigated the energy use of the brain's main non-signalling tasks with a single method. After blocking each non-signalling process, we measured oxygen level changes in juvenile rat brain slices with an oxygen-sensing microelectrode and calculated changes in oxygen consumption throughout the slice using a modified diffusion equation. We found that the turnover of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, followed by lipid synthesis, are significant energy drains, contributing 25%, 22% and 18%, respectively, to the rate of oxygen consumption. In contrast, protein synthesis is energetically inexpensive. We assess how these estimates of energy expenditure relate to brain energy use in vivo, and how they might differ in the mature brain.

  20. A phototaxis signalling complex in Dictyostelium discoideum.

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    Bandala-Sanchez, Esther; Annesley, Sarah J; Fisher, Paul R

    2006-09-01

    Phototaxis has been studied in a variety of organisms belonging to all three major taxonomic domains - the bacteria, the archaea and the eukarya. Dictyostelium discoideum is one of a small number of eukaryotic organisms which are amenable to studying the signalling pathways involved in phototaxis. In this study we provide evidence based on protein coimmunoprecipitation for a phototaxis signalling complex in Dictyostelium that includes the proteins RasD, filamin, ErkB, GRP125 and PKB.

  1. Identifying modular relations in complex brain networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Mørup, Morten; Siebner, Hartwig

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the infinite relational model (IRM) against two simpler alternative nonparametric Bayesian models for identifying structures in multi subject brain networks. The models are evaluated for their ability to predict new data and infer reproducible structures. Prediction and reproducibility...... are measured within the data driven NPAIRS split-half framework. Using synthetic data drawn from each of the generative models we show that the IRM model outperforms the two competing models when data contain relational structure. For data drawn from the other two simpler models the IRM does not overfit...... and obtains comparable reproducibility and predictability. For resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 30 healthy controls the IRM model is also superior to the two simpler alternatives, suggesting that brain networks indeed exhibit universal complex relational structure...

  2. Cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and brain angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Zhang, Le; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Insulin performs unique non-metabolic functions within the brain. Broadly speaking, two major areas of these functions are those related to brain endothelial cells and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, and those related to behavioral effects, like cognition in disease states (Alzheimer's disease, AD) and in health. Recent studies showed that both these functions are associated with brain angiogenesis. These findings raise interesting questions such as how they are linked to each other and whether modifying brain angiogenesis by targeting certain insulin signaling pathways could be an effective strategy to treat dementia as in AD, or even to help secure healthy longevity. The two canonical downstream pathways involved in mediating the insulin signaling pathway, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, in the brain are supposed to be similar to those in the periphery. PI3K and MAPK pathways play important roles in angiogenesis. Both are involved in stimulating hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in angiogenesis and could be activated by the insulin signaling pathway. This suggests that PI3K and MAPK pathways might act as cross-talk between the insulin signaling pathway and the angiogenesis pathway in brain. But the cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and the detailed mechanism in the connection of insulin signaling pathway, brain angiogenesis pathway, and healthy aging or dementias are still mostly not clear and need further studies.

  3. Heart Failure Protein May Signal Early Brain Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162447.html Heart Failure Protein May Signal Early Brain Damage Higher levels ... stress. Blood levels of NT-proBNP rise when heart failure worsens and fall when it gets better. Previous ...

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: A survey of signal processing algorithms in brain computer interfaces based on electrical brain signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Ali; Fatourechi, Mehrdad; Ward, Rabab K.; Birch, Gary E.

    2007-06-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) aim at providing a non-muscular channel for sending commands to the external world using the electroencephalographic activity or other electrophysiological measures of the brain function. An essential factor in the successful operation of BCI systems is the methods used to process the brain signals. In the BCI literature, however, there is no comprehensive review of the signal processing techniques used. This work presents the first such comprehensive survey of all BCI designs using electrical signal recordings published prior to January 2006. Detailed results from this survey are presented and discussed. The following key research questions are addressed: (1) what are the key signal processing components of a BCI, (2) what signal processing algorithms have been used in BCIs and (3) which signal processing techniques have received more attention?

  5. Community detection by signaling on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanqing; Li, Menghui; Zhang, Peng; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru

    2008-07-01

    Based on a signaling process of complex networks, a method for identification of community structure is proposed. For a network with n nodes, every node is assumed to be a system which can send, receive, and record signals. Each node is taken as the initial signal source to excite the whole network one time. Then the source node is associated with an n -dimensional vector which records the effects of the signaling process. By this process, the topological relationship of nodes on the network could be transferred into a geometrical structure of vectors in n -dimensional Euclidean space. Then the best partition of groups is determined by F statistics and the final community structure is given by the K -means clustering method. This method can detect community structure both in unweighted and weighted networks. It has been applied to ad hoc networks and some real networks such as the Zachary karate club network and football team network. The results indicate that the algorithm based on the signaling process works well.

  6. Enhanced brain signal variability in children with autism spectrum disorder during early childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yuko; Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Chiaki; Munesue, Toshio; Higashida, Haruhiro; Minabe, Yoshio; Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extensive evidence shows that a core neurobiological mechanism of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involves aberrant neural connectivity. Recent advances in the investigation of brain signal variability have yielded important information about neural network mechanisms. That information has been applied fruitfully to the assessment of aging and mental disorders. Multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis can characterize the complexity inherent in brain signal dynamics over multiple temporal scales in the dynamics of neural networks. For this investigation, we sought to characterize the magnetoencephalography (MEG) signal variability during free watching of videos without sound using MSE in 43 children with ASD and 72 typically developing controls (TD), emphasizing early childhood to older childhood: a critical period of neural network maturation. Results revealed an age‐related increase of brain signal variability in a specific timescale in TD children, whereas atypical age‐related alteration was observed in the ASD group. Additionally, enhanced brain signal variability was observed in children with ASD, and was confirmed particularly for younger children. In the ASD group, symptom severity was associated region‐specifically and timescale‐specifically with reduced brain signal variability. These results agree well with a recently reported theory of increased brain signal variability during development and aberrant neural connectivity in ASD, especially during early childhood. Results of this study suggest that MSE analytic method might serve as a useful approach for characterizing neurophysiological mechanisms of typical‐developing and its alterations in ASD through the detection of MEG signal variability at multiple timescales. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1038–1050, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26859309

  7. Approach of Complex Networks for the Determination of Brain Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Gang; Cao, Jian-Ting; Wang, Ru-Bin

    2011-06-01

    In clinical practice, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity. Compared to current statistical methods for the determination of brain death, we focus on the approach of complex networks for real-world electroencephalography in its determination. Brain functional networks constructed by correlation analysis are derived, and statistical network quantities used for distinguishing the patients in coma or brain death state, such as average strength, clustering coefficient and average path length, are calculated. Numerical results show that the values of network quantities of patients in coma state are larger than those of patients in brain death state. Our findings might provide valuable insights on the determination of brain death.

  8. Age-Related Changes in Electroencephalographic Signal Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappasodi, Filippo; Marzetti, Laura; Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Tecchio, Franca; Pizzella, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    The study of active and healthy aging is a primary focus for social and neuroscientific communities. Here, we move a step forward in assessing electrophysiological neuronal activity changes in the brain with healthy aging. To this end, electroencephalographic (EEG) resting state activity was acquired in 40 healthy subjects (age 16-85). We evaluated Fractal Dimension (FD) according to the Higuchi algorithm, a measure which quantifies the presence of statistical similarity at different scales in temporal fluctuations of EEG signals. Our results showed that FD increases from age twenty to age fifty and then decreases. The curve that best fits the changes in FD values across age over the whole sample is a parabola, with the vertex located around age fifty. Moreover, FD changes are site specific, with interhemispheric FD asymmetry being pronounced in elderly individuals in the frontal and central regions. The present results indicate that fractal dimension well describes the modulations of brain activity with age. Since fractal dimension has been proposed to be related to the complexity of the signal dynamics, our data demonstrate that the complexity of neuronal electric activity changes across the life span of an individual, with a steady increase during young adulthood and a decrease in the elderly population.

  9. Age-Related Changes in Electroencephalographic Signal Complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Zappasodi

    Full Text Available The study of active and healthy aging is a primary focus for social and neuroscientific communities. Here, we move a step forward in assessing electrophysiological neuronal activity changes in the brain with healthy aging. To this end, electroencephalographic (EEG resting state activity was acquired in 40 healthy subjects (age 16-85. We evaluated Fractal Dimension (FD according to the Higuchi algorithm, a measure which quantifies the presence of statistical similarity at different scales in temporal fluctuations of EEG signals. Our results showed that FD increases from age twenty to age fifty and then decreases. The curve that best fits the changes in FD values across age over the whole sample is a parabola, with the vertex located around age fifty. Moreover, FD changes are site specific, with interhemispheric FD asymmetry being pronounced in elderly individuals in the frontal and central regions. The present results indicate that fractal dimension well describes the modulations of brain activity with age. Since fractal dimension has been proposed to be related to the complexity of the signal dynamics, our data demonstrate that the complexity of neuronal electric activity changes across the life span of an individual, with a steady increase during young adulthood and a decrease in the elderly population.

  10. Dynamic analysis of the human brain with complex cerebral sulci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jung-Ge; Huang, Bo-Wun; Ou, Yi-Wen; Yen, Ke-Tien; Wu, Yi-Te

    2016-07-03

    The brain is one of the most vulnerable organs inside the human body. Head accidents often appear in daily life and are easy to cause different level of brain damage inside the skull. Once the brain suffered intense locomotive impact, external injuries, falls, or other accidents, it will result in different degrees of concussion. This study employs finite element analysis to compare the dynamic characteristics between the geometric models of an assumed simple brain tissue and a brain tissue with complex cerebral sulci. It is aimed to understand the free vibration of the internal brain tissue and then to protect the brain from injury caused by external influences. Reverse engineering method is used for a Classic 5-Part Brain (C18) model produced by 3B Scientific Corporation. 3D optical scanner is employed to scan the human brain structure model with complex cerebral sulci and imported into 3D graphics software to construct a solid brain model to simulate the real complex brain tissue. Obtaining the normal mode analysis by inputting the material properties of the true human brain into finite element analysis software, and then to compare the simplified and the complex of brain models.

  11. Artifact suppression and analysis of brain activities with electroencephalography signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. Rashed-Al-Mahfuz; Md. Rabiul Islam; Keikichi Hirose; Md. Khademul Islam Molla

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface is a communication system that connects the brain with computer (or other devices) but is not dependent on the normal output of the brain (i.e., peripheral nerve and muscle). Electro-oculogram is a dominant artifact which has a significant negative influence on further analysis of real electroencephalography data. This paper presented a data adaptive technique for artifact suppression and brain wave extraction from electroencephalography signals to detect regional brain activities. Empirical mode decomposition based adaptive thresholding approach was employed here to suppress the electro-oculogram artifact. Fractional Gaussian noise was used to determine the threshold level derived from the analysis data without any training. The purified electroencephalography signal was composed of the brain waves also called rhythmic components which represent the brain activities. The rhythmic components were extracted from each electroencephalography channel using adaptive wiener filter with the original scale. The regional brain activities were mapped on the basis of the spatial distribution of rhythmic components, and the results showed that different regions of the brain are activated in response to different stimuli. This research analyzed the activities of a single rhythmic component, alpha with respect to different motor imaginations. The experimental results showed that the proposed method is very efficient in artifact suppression and identifying individual motor imagery based on the activities of alpha component.

  12. Approach of Complex Networks for the Determination of Brain Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Wei-Gang; CAO Jian-Ting; WANG Ru-Bin

    2011-01-01

    In clinical practice, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity. Compared to current statistical methods for the determination of brain death, we focus on the approach of complex networks for real-world electroencephalography in its determination. Brain functional networks constructed by correlation analysis are derived, and statistical network quantities used for distinguishing the patients in coma or brain death state, such as average strength, clustering coefficient and average path length, are calculated. Numerical results show that the values of network quantities of patients in coma state are larger than those of patients in brain death state. Our Sndings might provide valuable insights on the determination of brain death.%@@ In clinical practice, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity.Compared to current statistical methods for the determination of brain death, we focus on the approach of complex networks for real-world electroencephalography in its determination.Brain functional networks constructed by correlation analysis axe derived, and statistical network quantities used for distinguishing the patients in coma or brain death state, such as average strength, clustering coefficient and average path length, are calculated.Numerical results show that the values of network quantities of patients in coma state are larger than those of patients in brain death state.Our findings might provide valuable insights on the determination of brain death.

  13. FGF signaling is required for brain left-right asymmetry and brain midline formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Judith M; Yost, H Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Early disruption of FGF signaling alters left-right (LR) asymmetry throughout the embryo. Here we uncover a role for FGF signaling that specifically disrupts brain asymmetry, independent of normal lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) asymmetry. When FGF signaling is inhibited during mid-somitogenesis, asymmetrically expressed LPM markers southpaw and lefty2 are not affected. However, asymmetrically expressed brain markers lefty1 and cyclops become bilateral. We show that FGF signaling controls expression of six3b and six7, two transcription factors required for repression of asymmetric lefty1 in the brain. We found that Z0-1, atypical PKC (aPKC) and β-catenin protein distribution revealed a midline structure in the forebrain that is dependent on a balance of FGF signaling. Ectopic activation of FGF signaling leads to overexpression of six3b, loss of organized midline adherins junctions and bilateral loss of lefty1 expression. Reducing FGF signaling leads to a reduction in six3b and six7 expression, an increase in cell boundary formation in the brain midline, and bilateral expression of lefty1. Together, these results suggest a novel role for FGF signaling in the brain to control LR asymmetry, six transcription factor expressions, and a midline barrier structure.

  14. Predictive brain signals of linguistic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valesca eKooijman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to extract word forms from continuous speech is a prerequisite for constructing a vocabulary and emerges in the first year of life. Electrophysiological (ERP studies of speech segmentation by nine- to 12-month-old listeners in several languages have found a left-localized negativity linked to word onset as a marker of word detection. We report an ERP study showing significant evidence of speech segmentation in Dutch-learning seven-month-olds. In contrast to the left-localized negative effect reported with older infants, the observed overall mean effect had a positive polarity. Inspection of individual results revealed two participant sub-groups: a majority showing a positive-going response, and a minority showing the left negativity observed in older age groups. We retested participants at age three, on vocabulary comprehension and word and sentence production. On every test, children who at seven months had shown the negativity associated with segmentation of words from speech outperformed those who had produced positive-going brain responses to the same input. The earlier that infants show the left-localized brain responses typically indicating detection of words in speech, the better their early childhood language skills.

  15. Does Global Astrocytic Calcium Signaling Participate in Awake Brain State Transitions and Neuronal Circuit Function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Rasmussen, Rune; Andersen, Mie; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2017-02-16

    We continuously need to adapt to changing conditions within our surrounding environment, and our brain needs to quickly shift between resting and working activity states in order to allow appropriate behaviors. These global state shifts are intimately linked to the brain-wide release of the neuromodulators, noradrenaline and acetylcholine. Astrocytes have emerged as a new player participating in the regulation of brain activity, and have recently been implicated in brain state shifts. Astrocytes display global Ca(2+) signaling in response to activation of the noradrenergic system, but whether astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling is causative or correlative for shifts in brain state and neural activity patterns is not known. Here we review the current available literature on astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling in awake animals in order to explore the role of astrocytic signaling in brain state shifts. Furthermore, we look at the development and availability of innovative new methodological tools that are opening up for new ways of visualizing and perturbing astrocyte activity in awake behaving animals. With these new tools at hand, the field of astrocyte research will likely be able to elucidate the causal and mechanistic roles of astrocytes in complex behaviors within a very near future.

  16. Brain regionalization: of signaling centers and boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavodeassi, Florencia; Houart, Corinne

    2012-03-01

    Our knowledge of the general mechanisms controlling the formation of the vertebrate central nervous system has advanced tremendously in the last decade. Here, we discuss the impact of the combined use of cell manipulation, in vivo imaging and genetics in the zebrafish on recent progress in understanding how signaling processes progressively control regionalization of the central nervous system. We highlight the unresolved issues and speculate upon the fundamental role the zebrafish will continue having in answering them.

  17. Discovering Patterns in Brain Signals Using Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Even with emerging technologies, such as Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) systems, understanding how our brains work is a very difficult challenge. So we propose to use a data mining technique to help us in this task. As a case of study, we analyzed the brain's behaviour of blind people and sighted people in a spatial activity. There is a common belief that blind people compensate their lack of vision using the other senses. If an object is given to sighted people and we asked them to identify this object, probably the sense of vision will be the most determinant one. If the same experiment was repeated with blind people, they will have to use other senses to identify the object. In this work, we propose a methodology that uses decision trees (DT) to investigate the difference of how the brains of blind people and people with vision react against a spatial problem. We choose the DT algorithm because it can discover patterns in the brain signal, and its presentation is human interpretable. Our results show that using DT to analyze brain signals can help us to understand the brain's behaviour. PMID:27688746

  18. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction-induced inflammatory signaling in brain pathology and epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Young; Buckwalter, Marion; Soreq, Hermona; Vezzani, Annamaria; Kaufer, Daniela

    2012-11-01

    The protection of the brain from blood-borne toxins, proteins, and cells is critical to the brain's normal function. Accordingly, a compromise in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) function accompanies many neurologic disorders, and is tightly associated with brain inflammatory processes initiated by both infiltrating leukocytes from the blood, and activation of glial cells. Those inflammatory processes contribute to determining the severity and prognosis of numerous neurologic disorders, and can both cause, and result from BBB dysfunction. In this review we examine the role of BBB and inflammatory responses, in particular activation of transforming grown factor β (TGFβ) signaling, in epilepsy, stroke, and Parkinson's disease.

  19. Fractal Analysis of Brain Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) Signals from Children with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dona, Olga; DeMatteo, Carol; Connolly, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Conventional imaging techniques are unable to detect abnormalities in the brain following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Yet patients with mTBI typically show delayed response on neuropsychological evaluation. Because fractal geometry represents complexity, we explored its utility in measuring temporal fluctuations of brain resting state blood oxygen level dependent (rs-BOLD) signal. We hypothesized that there could be a detectable difference in rs-BOLD signal complexity between healthy subjects and mTBI patients based on previous studies that associated reduction in signal complexity with disease. Methods Fifteen subjects (13.4 ± 2.3 y/o) and 56 age-matched (13.5 ± 2.34 y/o) healthy controls were scanned using a GE Discovery MR750 3T MRI and 32-channel RF-coil. Axial FSPGR-3D images were used to prescribe rs-BOLD (TE/TR = 35/2000ms), acquired over 6 minutes. Motion correction was performed and anatomical and functional images were aligned and spatially warped to the N27 standard atlas. Fractal analysis, performed on grey matter, was done by estimating the Hurst exponent using de-trended fluctuation analysis and signal summation conversion methods. Results and Conclusions Voxel-wise fractal dimension (FD) was calculated for every subject in the control group to generate mean and standard deviation maps for regional Z-score analysis. Voxel-wise validation of FD normality across controls was confirmed, and non-Gaussian voxels (3.05% over the brain) were eliminated from subsequent analysis. For each mTBI patient, regions where Z-score values were at least 2 standard deviations away from the mean (i.e. where |Z| > 2.0) were identified. In individual patients the frequently affected regions were amygdala (p = 0.02), vermis(p = 0.03), caudate head (p = 0.04), hippocampus(p = 0.03), and hypothalamus(p = 0.04), all previously reported as dysfunctional after mTBI, but based on group analysis. It is well known that the brain is best modeled as a complex

  20. Tutorial: Signal Processing in Brain-Computer Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Molina, G.

    2010-01-01

    Research in Electroencephalogram (EEG) based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) has been considerably expanding during the last few years. Such an expansion owes to a large extent to the multidisciplinary and challenging nature of BCI research. Signal processing undoubtedly constitutes an essential co

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Cannabis Signaling in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Patrick J; Wongngamnit, Narin; Beresford, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis has been cultivated and used by humans for thousands of years. Research for decades was focused on understanding the mechanisms of an illegal/addictive drug. This led to the discovery of the vast endocannabinoid system. Research has now shifted to understanding fundamental biological questions related to one of the most widespread signaling systems in both the brain and the body. Our understanding of cannabinoid signaling has advanced significantly in the last two decades. In this review, we discuss the state of knowledge on mechanisms of Cannabis signaling in the brain and the modulation of key brain neurotransmitter systems involved in both brain reward/addiction and psychiatric disorders. It is highly probable that various cannabinoids will be found to be efficacious in the treatment of a number of psychiatric disorders. However, while there is clearly much potential, marijuana has not been properly vetted by the medical-scientific evaluation process and there are clearly a range of potentially adverse side-effects-including addiction. We are at crossroads for research on endocannabinoid function and therapeutics (including the use of exogenous treatments such as Cannabis). With over 100 cannabinoid constituents, the majority of which have not been studied, there is much Cannabis research yet to be done. With more states legalizing both the medicinal and recreational use of marijuana the rigorous scientific investigation into cannabinoid signaling is imperative.

  2. Ubiquity and specificity of reinforcement signals throughout the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, Timothy J; Chun, Marvin M; Lee, Daeyeol

    2011-10-06

    Reinforcements and punishments facilitate adaptive behavior in diverse domains ranging from perception to social interactions. A conventional approach to understanding the corresponding neural substrates focuses on the basal ganglia and its dopaminergic projections. Here, we show that reinforcement and punishment signals are surprisingly ubiquitous in the gray matter of nearly every subdivision of the human brain. Humans played either matching-pennies or rock-paper-scissors games against computerized opponents while being scanned using fMRI. Multivoxel pattern analysis was used to decode previous choices and their outcomes, and to predict upcoming choices. Whereas choices were decodable from a confined set of brain structures, their outcomes were decodable from nearly all cortical and subcortical structures. In addition, signals related to both reinforcements and punishments were recovered reliably in many areas and displayed patterns not consistent with salience-based explanations. Thus, reinforcement and punishment might play global modulatory roles in the entire brain.

  3. Preliminary study of Alzheimer's Disease diagnosis based on brain electrical signals using wireless EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, N.; Akbar, Y.; Khotimah, S. N.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.; Taruno, W. P.

    2016-03-01

    This research aims to study brain's electrical signals recorded using EEG as a basis for the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The subjects consisted of patients with AD, and normal subjects are used as the control. Brain signals are recorded for 3 minutes in a relaxed condition and with eyes closed. The data is processed using power spectral analysis, brain mapping and chaos test to observe the level of complexity of EEG's data. The results show a shift in the power spectral in the low frequency band (delta and theta) in AD patients. The increase of delta and theta occurs in lobus frontal area and lobus parietal respectively. However, there is a decrease of alpha activity in AD patients where in the case of normal subjects with relaxed condition, brain alpha wave dominates the posterior area. This is confirmed by the results of brain mapping. While the results of chaos analysis show that the average value of MMLE is lower in AD patients than in normal subjects. The level of chaos associated with neural complexity in AD patients with lower neural complexity is due to neuronal damage caused by the beta amyloid plaques and tau protein in neurons.

  4. Detecting PTEN and PI3K signaling in brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo; Baker, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The central nervous system is comprised of multiple cell types including neurons, glia and other supporting cells that may differ dramatically in levels of signaling pathway activation. Immunohistochemistry in conjunction with drug interference are powerful tools that allow evaluation of signaling pathways in different cell types of the mouse central nervous system in vivo. Here we provide detailed protocols for immunohistochemistry to evaluate three essential components in the PI3K pathway in mouse brain: Pten, p-Akt and p-4ebp1, and for rapamycin treatment to modulate mTOR signaling in vivo. PMID:27033070

  5. Radar Emitter Signal Recognition Based on Complexity Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张葛祥; 金炜东; 胡来招

    2004-01-01

    Intra-pulse characteristics of different radar emitter signals reflect on signal waveform by way of changing frequency, phase and amplitude. A novel approach was proposed to extract complexity features of radar emitter signals in a wide range of signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR), and radial basis probability neural network (RBPNN) was used to recognize different radar emitter signals. Complexity features, including Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) and correlation dimension (CD), can measure the complexity and irregularity of signals, which mirrors the intra-pulse modulation laws of radar emitter signals. In an experiment, LZC and CD features of 10 typical radar emitter signals were extracted and RBPNN was applied to identify the 10 radar emitter signals. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is effective and has good application values because average accurate recognition rate is high when SNR varies in a wide range.

  6. Complex networks: new trends for the analysis of brain connectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Chavez, Mario; Latora, Vito; Martinerie, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Today, the human brain can be studied as a whole. Electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, or functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques provide functional connectivity patterns between different brain areas, and during different pathological and cognitive neuro-dynamical states. In this Tutorial we review novel complex networks approaches to unveil how brain networks can efficiently manage local processing and global integration for the transfer of information, while being at the same time capable of adapting to satisfy changing neural demands.

  7. Development and evaluation of vinpocetine inclusion complex for brain targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaojiao Ding

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to prepare vinpocetine (VIN inclusion complex and evaluate its brain targeting effect after intranasal administration. In the present study, VIN inclusion complex was prepared in order to increase its solubility. Stability constant (Kc was used for host selection. Factors influencing properties of the inclusion complex was investigated. Formation of the inclusion complex was identified by solubility study and DSC analysis. The brain targeting effect of the complex after intranasal administration was studied in rats. It was demonstrated that properties of the inclusion complex was mainly influenced by cyclodextrin type, organic acids type, system pH and host/guest molar ratio. Multiple component complexes can be formed by the addition of citric acid, with solubility improved for more than 23 times. Furthermore, In vivo study revealed that after intranasal administration, the absolute bioavailability of vinpocetine inclusion complex was 88%. Compared with intravenous injection, significant brain targeting effect was achieved after intranasal delivery, with brain targeting index 1.67. In conclusion, by intranasal administration of VIN inclusion complex, a fast onset of action and good brain targeting effect can be achieved. Intranasal route is a promising approach for the treatment of CNS diseases.

  8. Natural brain-information interfaces: Recommending information by relevance inferred from human brain signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Manuel J. A.; Ruotsalo, Tuukka; Spapé, Michiel M.; Barral, Oswald; Ravaja, Niklas; Jacucci, Giulio; Kaski, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    Finding relevant information from large document collections such as the World Wide Web is a common task in our daily lives. Estimation of a user’s interest or search intention is necessary to recommend and retrieve relevant information from these collections. We introduce a brain-information interface used for recommending information by relevance inferred directly from brain signals. In experiments, participants were asked to read Wikipedia documents about a selection of topics while their EEG was recorded. Based on the prediction of word relevance, the individual’s search intent was modeled and successfully used for retrieving new relevant documents from the whole English Wikipedia corpus. The results show that the users’ interests toward digital content can be modeled from the brain signals evoked by reading. The introduced brain-relevance paradigm enables the recommendation of information without any explicit user interaction and may be applied across diverse information-intensive applications.

  9. Discovering Patterns in Brain Signals Using Decision Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narusci S. Bastos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Even with emerging technologies, such as Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI systems, understanding how our brains work is a very difficult challenge. So we propose to use a data mining technique to help us in this task. As a case of study, we analyzed the brain’s behaviour of blind people and sighted people in a spatial activity. There is a common belief that blind people compensate their lack of vision using the other senses. If an object is given to sighted people and we asked them to identify this object, probably the sense of vision will be the most determinant one. If the same experiment was repeated with blind people, they will have to use other senses to identify the object. In this work, we propose a methodology that uses decision trees (DT to investigate the difference of how the brains of blind people and people with vision react against a spatial problem. We choose the DT algorithm because it can discover patterns in the brain signal, and its presentation is human interpretable. Our results show that using DT to analyze brain signals can help us to understand the brain’s behaviour.

  10. Current Status and Future Directions of Research in Complex Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eileen A. HEBETS

    2011-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction The term'complex signaling'reflects a recent scientific focus on the multiple elements frequently incorporated into animal signals(reviewed in Candolin,2003; Hebets and Papaj,2005;Partan and Marler,2005;Bro-Jorgensen,2010).

  11. Pink noise: effect on complexity synchronization of brain activity and sleep consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junhong; Liu, Dongdong; Li, Xin; Ma, Jing; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2012-08-07

    In this study, we hypothesized that steady pink noise is able to change the complexity of brain activities into a characteristic level and it might have significant effect on improving sleep stability. First, we carried out the brain synchronization test in which electroencephalogram (EEG) signals of 6 subjects were recorded. The whole experiment procedure was divided into 5 blocks in the alternative feeding process of 10-min quiet and 10-min noise. After the complexity analysis of fractal dimension, we found that the complexity of the EEG signals decreased with the introduction of the pink noise exposure, showing the brain waves tended to synchronize with the pink noise induction to reach a low level. For the sleep quality experiment, 40 subjects were recruited the group of nocturnal sleep experiment and 10 participants were chosen for nap test. Each subjects slept for two consecutive experimental periods, of which one is pink noise exposed and the other is quiet. For both nocturnal sleep and nap tests, the results in the noise exposure group showed significant enhancement in the percentage of stable sleep time compared to the control group based on the analysis of electrocardiography (ECG) signal with cardiopulmonary coupling approach. This study demonstrates that steady pink noise has significant effect on reducing brain wave complexity and inducing more stable sleep time to improve sleep quality of individuals.

  12. Dystrophins, Utrophins, and Associated Scaffolding Complexes: Role in Mammalian Brain and Implications for Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Perronnet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two decades of molecular, cellular, and functional studies considerably increased our understanding of dystrophins function and unveiled the complex etiology of the cognitive deficits in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, which involves altered expression of several dystrophin-gene products in brain. Dystrophins are normally part of critical cytoskeleton-associated membrane-bound molecular scaffolds involved in the clustering of receptors, ion channels, and signaling proteins that contribute to synapse physiology and blood-brain barrier function. The utrophin gene also drives brain expression of several paralogs proteins, which cellular expression and biological roles remain to be elucidated. Here we review the structural and functional properties of dystrophins and utrophins in brain, the consequences of dystrophins loss-of-function as revealed by numerous studies in mouse models of DMD, and we discuss future challenges and putative therapeutic strategies that may compensate for the cognitive impairment in DMD based on experimental manipulation of dystrophins and/or utrophins brain expression.

  13. Hierarchical nanostructure and synergy of multimolecular signalling complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Eilon; Barr, Valarie A.; Merrill, Robert K.; Regan, Carole K.; Sommers, Connie L.; Samelson, Lawrence E.

    2016-01-01

    Signalling complexes are dynamic, multimolecular structures and sites for intracellular signal transduction. Although they play a crucial role in cellular activation, current research techniques fail to resolve their structure in intact cells. Here we present a multicolour, photoactivated localization microscopy approach for imaging multiple types of single molecules in fixed and live cells and statistical tools to determine the nanoscale organization, topology and synergy of molecular interactions in signalling complexes downstream of the T-cell antigen receptor. We observe that signalling complexes nucleated at the key adapter LAT show a hierarchical topology. The critical enzymes PLCγ1 and VAV1 localize to the centre of LAT-based complexes, and the adapter SLP-76 and actin molecules localize to the periphery. Conditional second-order statistics reveal a hierarchical network of synergic interactions between these molecules. Our results extend our understanding of the nanostructure of signalling complexes and are relevant to studying a wide range of multimolecular complexes. PMID:27396911

  14. Hierarchical nanostructure and synergy of multimolecular signalling complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Eilon; Barr, Valarie A.; Merrill, Robert K.; Regan, Carole K.; Sommers, Connie L.; Samelson, Lawrence E.

    2016-07-01

    Signalling complexes are dynamic, multimolecular structures and sites for intracellular signal transduction. Although they play a crucial role in cellular activation, current research techniques fail to resolve their structure in intact cells. Here we present a multicolour, photoactivated localization microscopy approach for imaging multiple types of single molecules in fixed and live cells and statistical tools to determine the nanoscale organization, topology and synergy of molecular interactions in signalling complexes downstream of the T-cell antigen receptor. We observe that signalling complexes nucleated at the key adapter LAT show a hierarchical topology. The critical enzymes PLCγ1 and VAV1 localize to the centre of LAT-based complexes, and the adapter SLP-76 and actin molecules localize to the periphery. Conditional second-order statistics reveal a hierarchical network of synergic interactions between these molecules. Our results extend our understanding of the nanostructure of signalling complexes and are relevant to studying a wide range of multimolecular complexes.

  15. Complexity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volinsky, Natalia; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of molecular mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling advances with ever-increasing pace. Yet our understanding of how the spatiotemporal dynamics of RTK signaling control specific cellular outcomes has lagged behind. Systems-centered experimental and computational approaches can help reveal how overlapping networks of signal transducers downstream of RTKs orchestrate specific cell-fate decisions. We discuss how RTK network regulatory structures, which involve the immediate posttranslational and delayed transcriptional controls by multiple feed forward and feedback loops together with pathway cross talk, adapt cells to the combinatorial variety of external cues and conditions. This intricate network circuitry endows cells with emerging capabilities for RTK signal processing and decoding. We illustrate how mathematical modeling facilitates our understanding of RTK network behaviors by unraveling specific systems properties, including bistability, oscillations, excitable responses, and generation of intricate landscapes of signaling activities. PMID:23906711

  16. Resting state fMRI entropy probes complexity of brain activity in adults with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokunbi, Moses O; Fung, Wilson; Sawlani, Vijay; Choppin, Sabine; Linden, David E J; Thome, Johannes

    2013-12-30

    In patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), quantitative neuroimaging techniques have revealed abnormalities in various brain regions, including the frontal cortex, striatum, cerebellum, and occipital cortex. Nonlinear signal processing techniques such as sample entropy have been used to probe the regularity of brain magnetoencephalography signals in patients with ADHD. In the present study, we extend this technique to analyse the complex output patterns of the 4 dimensional resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in adult patients with ADHD. After adjusting for the effect of age, we found whole brain entropy differences (P=0.002) between groups and negative correlation (r=-0.45) between symptom scores and mean whole brain entropy values, indicating lower complexity in patients. In the regional analysis, patients showed reduced entropy in frontal and occipital regions bilaterally and a significant negative correlation between the symptom scores and the entropy maps at a family-wise error corrected cluster level of Pentropy is a useful tool in revealing abnormalities in the brain dynamics of patients with psychiatric disorders.

  17. Analysis of the Influence of Complexity and Entropy of Odorant on Fractal Dynamics and Entropy of EEG Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, Amin; Nazeri, Sina

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge in brain research is to make out the relation between the features of olfactory stimuli and the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Yet, no one has discovered any relation between the structures of olfactory stimuli and the EEG signal. This study investigates the relation between the structures of EEG signal and the olfactory stimulus (odorant). We show that the complexity of the EEG signal is coupled with the molecular complexity of the odorant, where more structurally complex odorant causes less fractal EEG signal. Also, odorant having higher entropy causes the EEG signal to have lower approximate entropy. The method discussed here can be applied and investigated in case of patients with brain diseases as the rehabilitation purpose. PMID:27699169

  18. Unsupervised classification of operator workload from brain signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze-Kraft, Matthias; Dähne, Sven; Gugler, Manfred; Curio, Gabriel; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Objective. In this study we aimed for the classification of operator workload as it is expected in many real-life workplace environments. We explored brain-signal based workload predictors that differ with respect to the level of label information required for training, including entirely unsupervised approaches. Approach. Subjects executed a task on a touch screen that required continuous effort of visual and motor processing with alternating difficulty. We first employed classical approaches for workload state classification that operate on the sensor space of EEG and compared those to the performance of three state-of-the-art spatial filtering methods: common spatial patterns (CSPs) analysis, which requires binary label information; source power co-modulation (SPoC) analysis, which uses the subjects’ error rate as a target function; and canonical SPoC (cSPoC) analysis, which solely makes use of cross-frequency power correlations induced by different states of workload and thus represents an unsupervised approach. Finally, we investigated the effects of fusing brain signals and peripheral physiological measures (PPMs) and examined the added value for improving classification performance. Main results. Mean classification accuracies of 94%, 92% and 82% were achieved with CSP, SPoC, cSPoC, respectively. These methods outperformed the approaches that did not use spatial filtering and they extracted physiologically plausible components. The performance of the unsupervised cSPoC is significantly increased by augmenting it with PPM features. Significance. Our analyses ensured that the signal sources used for classification were of cortical origin and not contaminated with artifacts. Our findings show that workload states can be successfully differentiated from brain signals, even when less and less information from the experimental paradigm is used, thus paving the way for real-world applications in which label information may be noisy or entirely unavailable.

  19. Communication efficiency and congestion of signal traffic in large-scale brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišić, Bratislav; Sporns, Olaf; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    The complex connectivity of the cerebral cortex suggests that inter-regional communication is a primary function. Using computational modeling, we show that anatomical connectivity may be a major determinant for global information flow in brain networks. A macaque brain network was implemented as a communication network in which signal units flowed between grey matter nodes along white matter paths. Compared to degree-matched surrogate networks, information flow on the macaque brain network was characterized by higher loss rates, faster transit times and lower throughput, suggesting that neural connectivity may be optimized for speed rather than fidelity. Much of global communication was mediated by a "rich club" of hub regions: a sub-graph comprised of high-degree nodes that are more densely interconnected with each other than predicted by chance. First, macaque communication patterns most closely resembled those observed for a synthetic rich club network, but were less similar to those seen in a synthetic small world network, suggesting that the former is a more fundamental feature of brain network topology. Second, rich club regions attracted the most signal traffic and likewise, connections between rich club regions carried more traffic than connections between non-rich club regions. Third, a number of rich club regions were significantly under-congested, suggesting that macaque connectivity actively shapes information flow, funneling traffic towards some nodes and away from others. Together, our results indicate a critical role of the rich club of hub nodes in dynamic aspects of global brain communication.

  20. An evolving view of epigenetic complexity in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2014-09-26

    Recent scientific advances have revolutionized our understanding of classical epigenetic mechanisms and the broader landscape of molecular interactions and cellular functions that are inextricably linked to these processes. Our current view of epigenetics includes an increasing appreciation for the dynamic nature of DNA methylation, active mechanisms for DNA demethylation, differential functions of 5-methylcytosine and its oxidized derivatives, the intricate regulatory logic of histone post-translational modifications, the incorporation of histone variants into chromatin, nucleosome occupancy and dynamics, and direct links between cellular signalling pathways and the actions of chromatin 'reader', 'writer' and 'eraser' molecules. We also have an increasing awareness of the seemingly ubiquitous roles played by diverse classes of selectively expressed non-coding RNAs in transcriptional, post-transcriptional, post-translational and local and higher order chromatin modulatory processes. These perspectives are still evolving with novel insights continuing to emerge rapidly (e.g. those related to epigenetic regulation of mobile genetic elements, epigenetic mechanisms in mitochondria, roles in nuclear architecture and 'RNA epigenetics'). The precise functions of these epigenetic factors/phenomena are largely unknown. However, it is unequivocal that they serve as key mediators of brain complexity and flexibility, including neural development and aging, cellular differentiation, homeostasis, stress responses, and synaptic and neural network connectivity and plasticity.

  1. Sequence distance via parsing complexity: Heartbeat signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degli Esposti, M. [Department of Mathematics, University of Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: desposti@dm.unibo.it; Farinelli, C. [Department of Mathematics, University of Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: farinelli@dm.unibo.it; Menconi, G. [Department of Mathematics, University of Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: menconi@dm.unibo.it

    2009-02-15

    We compare and discuss the use of different symbolic codings of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals in order to distinguish healthy patients from hospitalized ones. To this aim, we recall a parsing-based similarity distance and compare the performances of several methods of classification of data.

  2. OPTIMAL REPRESENTATION OF MER SIGNALS APPLIED TO THE IDENTIFICATION OF BRAIN STRUCTURES DURING DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Darío Vargas Cardona

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of brain signals from microelectrode recordings (MER is a key procedure during deep brain stimulation (DBS applied in Parkinson’s disease patients. The main purpose of this research work is to identify with high accuracy a brain structure called subthalamic nucleus (STN, since it is the target structure where the DBS achieves the best therapeutic results. To do this, we present an approach for optimal representation of MER signals through method of frames. We obtain coefficients that minimize the Euclidean norm of order two. From optimal coefficients, we extract some features from signals combining the wavelet packet and cosine dictionaries. For a comparison frame with the state of the art, we also process the signals using the discrete wavelet transform (DWT with several mother functions. We validate the proposed methodology in a real data base. We employ simple supervised machine learning algorithms, as the K-Nearest Neighbors classifier (K-NN, a linear Bayesian classifier (LDC and a quadratic Bayesian classifier (QDC. Classification results obtained with the proposed method improves significantly the performance of the DWT. We achieve a positive identification of the STN superior to 97,6%. Identification outcomes achieved by the MOF are highly accurate, as we can potentially get a false positive rate of less than 2% during the DBS.

  3. Brain architecture and social complexity in modern and ancient birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burish, Mark J; Kueh, Hao Yuan; Wang, Samuel S-H

    2004-01-01

    Vertebrate brains vary tremendously in size, but differences in form are more subtle. To bring out functional contrasts that are independent of absolute size, we have normalized brain component sizes to whole brain volume. The set of such volume fractions is the cerebrotype of a species. Using this approach in mammals we previously identified specific associations between cerebrotype and behavioral specializations. Among primates, cerebrotypes are linked principally to enlargement of the cerebral cortex and are associated with increases in the complexity of social structure. Here we extend this analysis to include a second major vertebrate group, the birds. In birds the telencephalic volume fraction is strongly correlated with social complexity. This correlation accounts for almost half of the observed variation in telencephalic size, more than any other behavioral specialization examined, including the ability to learn song. A prominent exception to this pattern is owls, which are not social but still have very large forebrains. Interpolating the overall correlation for Archaeopteryx, an ancient bird, suggests that its social complexity was likely to have been on a par with modern domesticated chickens. Telencephalic volume fraction outperforms residuals-based measures of brain size at separating birds by social structure. Telencephalic volume fraction may be an anatomical substrate for social complexity, and perhaps cognitive ability, that can be generalized across a range of vertebrate brains, including dinosaurs.

  4. Building complex brains--missing pieces in an evolutionary puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaaro, Hanna; Fainzilber, Mike

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying evolution of complex nervous systems are not well understood. In recent years there have been a number of attempts to correlate specific gene families or evolutionary processes with increased brain complexity in the vertebrate lineage. Candidates for evocation of complexity include genes involved in regulating brain size, such as neurotrophic factors or microcephaly-related genes; or wider evolutionary processes, such as accelerated evolution of brain-expressed genes or enhanced RNA splicing or editing events in primates. An inherent weakness of these studies is that they are correlative by nature, and almost exclusively focused on the mammalian and specifically the primate lineage. Another problem with genomic analyses is that it is difficult to identify functionally similar yet non-homologous molecules such as different families of cysteine-rich neurotrophic factors in different phyla. As long as comprehensive experimental studies of these questions are not feasible, additional perspectives for evolutionary and genomic studies will be very helpful. Cephalopod mollusks represent the most complex nervous systems outside the vertebrate lineage, thus we suggest that genome sequencing of different mollusk models will provide useful insights into the evolution of complex brains.

  5. Anosmin-1 contributes to brain tumor malignancy through integrin signal pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Catherine T; Kim, Haseong; Lee, Ji-Young; Williams, David M; Palethorpe, David; Fellows, Greg; Wright, Alan J; Laing, Ken; Bridges, Leslie R; Howe, Franklyn A; Kim, Soo-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Anosmin-1, encoded by the KAL1 gene, is an extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated protein which plays essential roles in the establishment of olfactory and GNRH neurons during early brain development. Loss-of-function mutations of KAL1 results in Kallmann syndrome with delayed puberty and anosmia. There is, however, little comprehension of its role in the developed brain. As reactivation of developmental signal pathways often takes part in tumorigenesis, we investigated if anosmin-1-mediated cellular mechanisms associated with brain tumors. Our meta-analysis of gene expression profiles of patients' samples and public microarray datasets indicated that KAL1 mRNA was significantly upregulated in high-grade primary brain tumors compared with the normal brain and low-grade tumors. The tumor-promoting capacity of anosmin-1 was demonstrated in the glioblastoma cell lines, where anosmin-1 enhanced cell motility and proliferation. Notably, anosmin-1 formed a part of active β1 integrin complex, inducing downstream signaling pathways. ShRNA-mediated knockdown of anosmin-1 attenuated motility and growth of tumor cells and induced apoptosis. Anosmin-1 may also enhance the invasion of tumor cells within the ECM by modulating cell adhesion and activating extracellular proteases. In a mouse xenograft model, anosmin-1-expressing tumors grew faster, indicating the role of anosmin-1 in tumor microenvironment in vivo. Combined, these data suggest that anosmin-1 can facilitate tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and survival. Therefore, although the normal function of anosmin-1 is required in the proper development of GNRH neurons, overexpression of anosmin-1 in the developed brain may be an underlying mechanism for some brain tumors. PMID:24189182

  6. Isolation, characterisation and reconstitution of cell death signalling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michelle A; Langlais, Claudia; Cain, Kelvin; MacFarlane, Marion

    2013-06-01

    Apoptosis and necroptosis are dependent on the formation/activation of distinct multi-protein complexes; these include the Death-Inducing Signalling Complex (DISC), apoptosome, piddosome, necrosome and ripoptosome. Despite intense research, the mechanisms that regulate assembly/function of several of these cell death signalling platforms remain to be elucidated. It is now increasingly evident that the composition and stoichiometry of components within these key signalling platforms not only determines the final signalling outcome but also the mode of cell death. Characterising these complexes can therefore provide new insights into how cell death is regulated and also how these cell death signalling platforms could potentially be targeted in the context of disease. Large multi-protein complexes can initially be separated according to their size by gel filtration or sucrose density gradient centrifugation followed by subsequent affinity-purification or immunoprecipitation. The advantage of combining these techniques is that you can assess the assembly of individual components into a complex and then assess the size and stoichiometric composition of the native functional signalling complex within a particular cell type. This, alongside reconstitution of a complex from its individual core components can therefore provide new insight into the mechanisms that regulate assembly/function of key multi-protein signalling complexes. Here, we describe the successful application of a range of methodologies that can be used to characterise the assembly of large multi-protein complexes such as the apoptosome, DISC and ripoptosome. Together with their subsequent purification and/or reconstitution, these approaches can provide novel insights into how cell death signalling platforms are regulated in both normal cell physiology and disease.

  7. Mechanisms of CCK signaling from gut to brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Helen E

    2007-12-01

    Following the observation that exogenous peripheral injection of CCK could inhibit food intake, the mechanisms by which CCK influences the gut-brain pathway have been the subject of intense study for nearly 30 years. Recently, it has become evident that the system is more complex and that the consequences of CCK's action on the gut-brain pathway are more far reaching than previously recognized. This review will examine the recent evidence showing the role of CCK and CCK1Rs in modulating expression of other receptors for orexigenic and anorexigenic regulatory peptides at the level of vagal afferent neurons. In addition, new evidence showing the importance of the action of CCK at the level of the vagus nerve in the regulation of food intake, body weight, and in activation of an anti-inflammatory pathway will be reviewed.

  8. Metabolic triad in brain aging: mitochondria, insulin/IGF-1 signalling and JNK signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Jiang, Tianyi; Cadenas, Enrique

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria generate second messengers, such as H2O2, that are involved in the redox regulation of cell signalling and their function is regulated by several cytosolic signalling pathways. IIS [insulin/IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) signalling] in the brain proceeds mainly through the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)-Akt (protein kinase B) pathway, which is involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival via the maintenance of the bioenergetic and metabolic capacities of mitochondria. Conversely, the JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) pathway is induced by increased oxidative stress and JNK translocation to the mitochondrion results in impairment of energy metabolism. Moreover, IIS and JNK signalling interact with and antagonize each other. This review focuses on functional outcomes of a metabolic triad that entails the co-ordination of mitochondrial function (energy transducing and redox regulation), IIS and JNK signalling, in the aging brain and in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Modulation of EEG Theta Band Signal Complexity by Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Lee, Eun-Jeong

    The primary goal of this study was to investigate the impact of monochord (MC) sounds, a type of archaic sounds used in music therapy, on the neural complexity of EEG signals obtained from patients undergoing chemotherapy. The secondary goal was to compare the EEG signal complexity values for monochords with those for progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), an alternative therapy for relaxation. Forty cancer patients were randomly allocated to one of the two relaxation groups, MC and PMR, over a period of six months; continuous EEG signals were recorded during the first and last sessions. EEG signals were analyzed by applying signal mode complexity, a measure of complexity of neuronal oscillations. Across sessions, both groups showed a modulation of complexity of beta-2 band (20-29Hz) at midfrontal regions, but only MC group showed a modulation of complexity of theta band (3.5-7.5Hz) at posterior regions. Therefore, the neuronal complexity patterns showed different changes in EEG frequency band specific complexity resulting in two different types of interventions. Moreover, the different neural responses to listening to monochords and PMR were observed after regular relaxation interventions over a short time span.

  10. Differential susceptibility of mitochondrial complex II to inhibition by oxaloacetate in brain and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Anna; Shurubor, Yevgeniya; Valsecchi, Federica; Manfredi, Giovanni; Galkin, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial Complex II is a key mitochondrial enzyme connecting the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the electron transport chain. Studies of complex II are clinically important since new roles for this enzyme have recently emerged in cell signalling, cancer biology, immune response and neurodegeneration. Oxaloacetate (OAA) is an intermediate of the TCA cycle and at the same time is an inhibitor of complex II with high affinity (Kd~10(-8)M). Whether or not OAA inhibition of complex II is a physiologically relevant process is a significant, but still controversial topic. We found that complex II from mouse heart and brain tissue has similar affinity to OAA and that only a fraction of the enzyme in isolated mitochondrial membranes (30.2±6.0% and 56.4±5.6% in the heart and brain, respectively) is in the free, active form. Since OAA could bind to complex II during isolation, we established a novel approach to deplete OAA in the homogenates at the early stages of isolation. In heart, this treatment significantly increased the fraction of free enzyme, indicating that OAA binds to complex II during isolation. In brain the OAA-depleting system did not significantly change the amount of free enzyme, indicating that a large fraction of complex II is already in the OAA-bound inactive form. Furthermore, short-term ischemia resulted in a dramatic decline of OAA in tissues, but it did not change the amount of free complex II. Our data show that in brain OAA is an endogenous effector of complex II, potentially capable of modulating the activity of the enzyme.

  11. Reduced Predictable Information in Brain Signals in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eGomez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a common developmental disorder characterized by communication difficulties and impaired social interaction. Recent results suggest altered brain dynamics as a potential cause of symptoms in ASD. Here, we aim to describe potential information-processing consequences of these alterations by measuring active information storage (AIS – a key quantity in the theory of distributed computation in biological networks. AIS is defined as the mutual information between the semi-infinite past of a process and its next state. It measures the amount of stored information that is used for computation of the next time step of a process. AIS is high for rich but predictable dynamics. We recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG signals in 13 ASD patients and 14 matched control subjects in a visual task. After a beamformer source analysis, twelve task-relevant sources were obtained. For these sources, stationary baseline activity was analyzed using AIS. Our results showed a decrease of AIS values in the hippocampus of ASD patients in comparison with controls, meaning that brain signals in ASD were either less predictable, reduced in their dynamic richness or both. Our study suggests the usefulness of AIS to detect an abnormal type of dynamics in ASD. The observed changes in AIS are compatible with Bayesian theories of reduced use or precision of priors in ASD.

  12. Reduced predictable information in brain signals in autism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Carlos; Lizier, Joseph T.; Schaum, Michael; Wollstadt, Patricia; Grützner, Christine; Uhlhaas, Peter; Freitag, Christine M.; Schlitt, Sabine; Bölte, Sven; Hornero, Roberto; Wibral, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common developmental disorder characterized by communication difficulties and impaired social interaction. Recent results suggest altered brain dynamics as a potential cause of symptoms in ASD. Here, we aim to describe potential information-processing consequences of these alterations by measuring active information storage (AIS)—a key quantity in the theory of distributed computation in biological networks. AIS is defined as the mutual information between the past state of a process and its next measurement. It measures the amount of stored information that is used for computation of the next time step of a process. AIS is high for rich but predictable dynamics. We recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in 10 ASD patients and 14 matched control subjects in a visual task. After a beamformer source analysis, 12 task-relevant sources were obtained. For these sources, stationary baseline activity was analyzed using AIS. Our results showed a decrease of AIS values in the hippocampus of ASD patients in comparison with controls, meaning that brain signals in ASD were either less predictable, reduced in their dynamic richness or both. Our study suggests the usefulness of AIS to detect an abnormal type of dynamics in ASD. The observed changes in AIS are compatible with Bayesian theories of reduced use or precision of priors in ASD. PMID:24592235

  13. Complex signal amplitude analysis for complete fusion nuclear reaction products

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Yu S

    2015-01-01

    A complex analysis has been performed on the energy amplitude signals corresponding to events of Z=117 element measured in the 249Bk+48Ca complete fusion nuclear reaction. These signals were detected with PIPS position sensitive detector. The significant values of pulse height defect both for recoils (ER) and fission fragments (FF) were measured. Comparison with the computer simulations and empirical formulae has been performed both for ER and FF signals.

  14. Astrocyte Sodium Signalling and Panglial Spread of Sodium Signals in Brain White Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshrefi-Ravasdjani, Behrouz; Hammel, Evelyn L; Kafitz, Karl W; Rose, Christine R

    2017-02-18

    In brain grey matter, excitatory synaptic transmission activates glutamate uptake into astrocytes, inducing sodium signals which propagate into neighboring astrocytes through gap junctions. These sodium signals have been suggested to serve an important role in neuro-metabolic coupling. So far, it is unknown if astrocytes in white matter-that is in brain regions devoid of synapses-are also able to undergo such intra- and intercellular sodium signalling. In the present study, we have addressed this question by performing quantitative sodium imaging in acute tissue slices of mouse corpus callosum. Focal application of glutamate induced sodium transients in SR101-positive astrocytes. These were largely unaltered in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptors blockers, but strongly dampened upon pharmacological inhibition of glutamate uptake. Sodium signals induced in individual astrocytes readily spread into neighboring SR101-positive cells with peak amplitudes decaying monoexponentially with distance from the stimulated cell. In addition, spread of sodium was largely unaltered during pharmacological inhibition of purinergic and glutamate receptors, indicating gap junction-mediated, passive diffusion of sodium between astrocytes. Using cell-type-specific, transgenic reporter mice, we found that sodium signals also propagated, albeit less effectively, from astrocytes to neighboring oligodendrocytes and NG2 cells. Again, panglial spread was unaltered with purinergic and glutamate receptors blocked. Taken together, our results demonstrate that activation of sodium-dependent glutamate transporters induces sodium signals in white matter astrocytes, which spread within the astrocyte syncytium. In addition, we found a panglial passage of sodium signals from astrocytes to NG2 cells and oligodendrocytes, indicating functional coupling between these macroglial cells in white matter.

  15. Getting a handle on how the brain generates complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesenhuber, Maximilian

    2012-01-01

    Sensory processing in cortex across modalities appears to rely on a "simple-to-complex" hierarchical computational strategy in which neurons at later levels in the hierarchy combine inputs from earlier levels to create more complex neuronal selectivities. The specifics of this process are still poorly understood, however. In this issue of Network, Plebe shows how computational modeling of experimental data on neuronal tuning in secondary visual cortex can help us understand how the brain increases neuronal tuning complexity across the visual cortical hierarchy.

  16. From intracerebral EEG signals to brain connectivity: identification of epileptogenic networks in partial epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Wendling

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder characterized by recurring seizures. In 30% of patients, seizures are insufficiently reduced by anti-epileptic drugs. In the case where seizures originate from a relatively circumscribed region of the brain, epilepsy is said to be partial and surgery can be indicated. The success of epilepsy surgery depends on the accurate localisation and delineation of the epileptogenic zone (which often involves several structures, responsible for seizures. It requires a comprehensive pre-surgical evaluation of patients that includes not only imaging data but also long-term monitoring of electrophysiological signals (scalp and intracerebral EEG. During the past decades, considerable effort has been devoted to the development of signal analysis techniques aimed at characterizing the functional connectivity among spatially-distributed regions over interictal (outside seizures or ictal (during seizures periods from EEG data. Most of these methods rely on the measurement of statistical couplings among signals recorded from distinct brain sites. However, methods differ with respect to underlying theoretical principles (mostly coming from the field of statistics or the field of nonlinear physics. The objectives of this paper are: i to provide an brief overview of methods aimed at characterizing functional brain connectivity from electrophysiological data, ii to provide concrete application examples in the context of drug-refractory partial epilepsies, and iii to highlight some key points emerging from results obtained both on real intracerebral EEG signals and on signals simulated from physiologically-plausible models in which the underlying connectivity patterns are known a priori (ground truth.

  17. Oxymatrine reduces neuroinflammation in rat brain A signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahui Mao; Yae Hu; Ailing Zhou; Bing Zheng; Yi Liu; Yueming Du; Jia Li; Jinyang Lu; Pengcheng Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral neuroinflammation models were established by injecting 10 μg lipopolysaccharide into the hippocampus of male Sprague-Dawley rats.The rats were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of 120,90,or 60 mg/kg oxymatrine daily for three days prior to the lipopolysaccharide injection.Twenty-four hours after model induction,the hippocampus was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR,and the cerebral cortex was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot assay.The results of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the real-time quantitative PCR showed that the secretion and mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α were significantly decreased in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of model rats treated with oxymatrine.Western blot assay and real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that toll-like receptor 4 mRNA and protein expression were significantly decreased in the groups receiving different doses of oxymatrine.Additionally,120 and 90 mg/kg oxymatrine were shown to reduce protein levels of nuclear factor-kB p65 in the nucleus and of phosphorylated IkBα in the cytoplasm of brain cells,as detected by western blot assay.Experimental findings indicate that oxymatrine may inhibit neuroinflammation in rat brain via downregulating the expression of molecules in the toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor-kB signaling pathway.

  18. Spacial compartmentalization of Ca2+ signaling complexes in pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X; Zeng, W; Diaz, J; Muallem, S

    1996-10-04

    Imaging [Ca2+]i at high temporal resolution and measuring the properties of Ca2+ signaling in streptolysin O (SLO)-permeabilized cells were used to study the spacial organization of signaling complexes. Sequential stimulation of single cells within pancreatic acini with several Ca2+-mobilizing agonists revealed an agonist-specific pattern and propagation rate of Ca2+ waves in the same cells, with CCK8 stimulating the fastest and bombesin the slowest waves. More importantly, each agonist initiated the wave in a different region of the same cell. On the other hand, repetitive stimulation with the same agonist induced Ca2+ waves of the same pattern that were initiated from the same region of the cell. The agonist-specific Ca2+ signaling does not appear to be the result of coupling to different G proteins as infusion of an anti-Galphaq antibody into the cells through a patch pipette equally inhibited Ca2+ signaling by all agonists. Further evidence for compartmentalization of signaling complexes was developed in permeabilized cells. The time-dependent loss of Ca2+ signaling due to SLO permeabilization occurred in an agonist-specific manner in the sequence cabachol > bombesin > cholecystokinin. Signaling by all agonists could be completely restored with as low as 2 micro guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPgammaS). At this low concentration GTPgammaS recoupled inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production and Ca2+ release, rather than enhancing phospholipase C activity. Priming of Ca2+ signaling by GTPgammaS was agonist-specific. Guanosine 5'-O-(thio)diphosphate (GDPbetaS) uncoupled the ability of signaling complexes to release Ca2+ much better than stimulating inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production. The uncoupling of Ca2+ signaling by GDPbetaS was also agonist-specific. The combined findings of agonist-specific initiation sites of the Ca2+ wave and differential access of guanine nucleotides to signaling complexes suggest spacial compartmentalization of Ca2+ signaling

  19. Brain structural complexity and life course cognitive change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Nazahah; Ahearn, Trevor S; Waiter, Gordon D; Murray, Alison D; Whalley, Lawrence J; Staff, Roger T

    2012-07-02

    Fractal measures such as fractal dimension (FD) can quantify the structural complexity of the brain. These have been used in clinical neuroscience to investigate brain development, ageing and in studies of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Here, we examined associations between the FD of white matter and cognitive changes across the life course in the absence of detectable brain disease. The FD was calculated from segmented cerebral white matter MR images in 217 subjects aged about 68years, in whom archived intelligence scores from age 11years were available. Cognitive test scores of fluid and crystallised intelligence were obtained at the time of MR imaging. Significant differences were found (intracranial volume, brain volume, white matter volume and Raven's Progressive Matrices score) between men and women at age 68years and novel associations were found between FD and measures of cognitive change over the life course from age 11 to 68years. Those with greater FD were found to have greater than expected fluid abilities at age 68years than predicted by their childhood intelligence and less cognitive decline from age 11 to 68years. These results are consistent with other reports that FD measures of cortical structural complexity increase across the early life course during maturation of the cerebral cortex and add new data to support an association between FD and cognitive ageing.

  20. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mammalian TOR (mTOR). mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid) synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  1. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki eTakei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Target of rapamycin (TOR was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mTOR (mammalian TOR. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system (CNS, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  2. Astrocytic Insulin Signaling Couples Brain Glucose Uptake with Nutrient Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Quarta, Carmelo; Varela, Luis; Gao, Yuanqing; Gruber, Tim; Legutko, Beata; Jastroch, Martin; Johansson, Pia; Ninkovic, Jovica; Yi, Chun-Xia; Le Thuc, Ophelia; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Cai, Weikang; Meyer, Carola W; Pfluger, Paul T; Fernandez, Ana M; Luquet, Serge; Woods, Stephen C; Torres-Alemán, Ignacio; Kahn, C Ronald; Götz, Magdalena; Horvath, Tamas L; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2016-08-11

    We report that astrocytic insulin signaling co-regulates hypothalamic glucose sensing and systemic glucose metabolism. Postnatal ablation of insulin receptors (IRs) in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells affects hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, mitochondrial function, and circuit connectivity. Accordingly, astrocytic IR ablation reduces glucose-induced activation of hypothalamic pro-opio-melanocortin (POMC) neurons and impairs physiological responses to changes in glucose availability. Hypothalamus-specific knockout of astrocytic IRs, as well as postnatal ablation by targeting glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST)-expressing cells, replicates such alterations. A normal response to altering directly CNS glucose levels in mice lacking astrocytic IRs indicates a role in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This was confirmed in vivo in GFAP-IR KO mice by using positron emission tomography and glucose monitoring in cerebral spinal fluid. We conclude that insulin signaling in hypothalamic astrocytes co-controls CNS glucose sensing and systemic glucose metabolism via regulation of glucose uptake across the BBB.

  3. Amplified Signal Response by Neuronal Diversity on Complex Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Chuan-Sheng; CHEN Han-Shuang; ZHANG Ji-Qian

    2008-01-01

    The effect of diversity on dynamics of coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons on complex networks is numerically investigated,where each neuron is subjected to an external subthreshold signal.With the diversity the network is a mixture of excitable and oscillatory neurons,and the diversity is determined by the variance of the system's parameter.The complex network is constructed by randomly adding long-range connections (shortcuts) on a nearest-neighbouring coupled one-dimensional chain.Numerical results show that external signals are maximally magnified at an intermediate value of the diversity,as in the case of well-known stochastic resonance.Furthermore,the effects of the number of shortcuts and coupled strength on the diversity-induced phenomena are also discussed.These findings exhibit that the diversity may play a constructive role in response to external signal,and highlight the importance of the diversity on such complex networks.

  4. Brain Signal Analysis Using Different Types of Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Ayuni Mohd Nasir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Music is able to improve certain functions of human body physiologically and psychologically. Music also can improve attention, memory, and even mental math ability by listening to the music before performing any task. The purpose of this study is to study the relation between types of music and brainwaves signal that is differences in state of relaxation and attention states. The Electroencephalography (EEG signal was recorded using PowerLab, Dual Bio Amp and computer to observes and records the subject brain activity in three condition; before, during, and after listening to different types of music; Light, Rock, Mozart, Al-Quran recitation and Jazz. The brainwave reaction of the subjects is compared during these three conditions. The hypothesis of this study is; Beta wave is increased at attention state and decrease at relaxation state. To analyze the data, Labchart7 software was used. The EEG data that has been recorded is processed using Digital Filter and the features of EEG signal is extracted and recorded by Data Pad that included in Labchart7 software. Then, the data is analyzed from mean of group features and also the average amplitude of Alpha and Beta wave. The results from this study are; the attention state of students is increased (Beta increased while listening to Rock, AlQuran recitation and Mozart music when compared between during and before condition. Meanwhile, Beta wave is decreased while listening to Light and Jazz music thus showing the decrements of student’s state attention. Therefore, the result obtained may help students to choose better type of music or similar to help increases their concentration and focus while study.

  5. Darwin's evolution theory, brain oscillations, and complex brain function in a new "Cartesian view".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başar, Erol; Güntekin, Bahar

    2009-01-01

    Comparatively analyses of electrophysiological correlates across species during evolution, alpha activity during brain maturation, and alpha activity in complex cognitive processes are presented to illustrate a new multidimensional "Cartesian System" brain function. The main features are: (1) The growth of the alpha activity during evolution, increase of alpha during cognitive processes, and decrease of the alpha entropy during evolution provide an indicator for evolution of brain cognitive performance. (2) Human children younger than 3 years are unable to produce higher cognitive processes and do not show alpha activity till the age of 3 years. The mature brain can perform higher cognitive processes and demonstrates regular alpha activity. (3) Alpha activity also is significantly associated with highly complex cognitive processes, such as the recognition of facial expressions. The neural activity reflected by these brain oscillations can be considered as constituent "building blocks" for a great number of functions. An overarching statement on the alpha function is presented by extended analyzes with multiple dimensions that constitute a "Cartesian Hyperspace" as the basis for oscillatory function. Theoretical implications are considered.

  6. Systems biology and brain activity in neuronal pathways by smart device and advanced signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Gastone; Intrator, Nathan; Remondini, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary biomedicine is producing large amount of data, especially within the fields of “omic” sciences. Nevertheless, other fields, such as neuroscience, are producing similar amount of data by using non-invasive techniques such as imaging, functional magnetic resonance and electroencephalography. Nowadays a big challenge and a new research horizon for Systems Biology is to develop methods to integrate and model this data in an unifying framework capable to disentangle this amazing complexity. In this paper we show how methods from genomic data analysis can be applied to brain data. In particular the concept of pathways, networks and multiplex are discussed. These methods can lead to a clear distinction of various regimes of brain activity. Moreover, this method could be the basis for a Systems Biology analysis of brain data and for the integration of these data in a multivariate and multidimensional framework. The feasibility of this integration is strongly dependent from the feature extraction method used. In our case we used an “alphabet” derived from a multi-resolution analysis that is capable to capture the most relevant information from these complex signals. PMID:25206359

  7. Systems Biology and brain activity in neuronal pathways by smart device and advanced signal processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastone eCastellani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary biomedicine is producing large amount of data, especially within the fields of omic sciences. Nevertheless, other fields, such as neuroscience, are producing similar amount of data by using non invasive techniques such as imaging, Functional Magnetic Resonance and Electroencephalography. Nowadays a big challenge and a new research horizon for Systems Biology is to develop methods to integrate and model this data in an unifying framework capable to disentangle this amazing complexity. In this paper we show how methods from genomic data analysis can be applied to brain data. In particular the concept of pathways, networks and multiplex are discussed. These methods can lead to a clear distinction of various regimes of brain activity. Moreover, this method could be the basis for a Systems Biology analysis of brain data and for the integration of these data in a multivariate and multidimensional framework. The feasibility of this integration is strongly dependent from the feature extraction method used. In our case we used an alphabet derived from a multi-resolution analysis that is capable to capture the most relevant information from these complex signals.

  8. Complex-wave retrieval based on blind signal separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong Chai; Chengpeng Zhou; Zhaoyan Feng; Yinhua Wang; Yansheng Zuo

    2006-01-01

    In the process of the reconstruction of digital holography, the traditional methods of diffraction and filtration are commonly adopted to recover the original complex-wave signal. Influenced by twin-image and zero-order terms, the above-mentioned methods, however, either limit the field of vision or result in the loss of the amplitude and phase. A new method for complex-wave retrieval is presented, which is based on blind signal separation. Three frames of holograms are captured by a charge coupled device (CCD)camera to form an observation signal. The term containing only amplitude and phase of complex-wave is separated, by means of independent component analysis, from the observation signal, which effectively eliminates the zero-order term. Finally, the complex-wave retrieval of pure phase wavefront is achieved.Experimental results show that this method can better recover the amplitude and phase of the original complex-wave even when there is a frequency spectrum mixture in the hologram.

  9. Complex variational mode decomposition for signal processing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanxue; Liu, Fuyun; Jiang, Zhansi; He, Shuilong; Mo, Qiuyun

    2017-03-01

    Complex-valued signals occur in many areas of science and engineering and are thus of fundamental interest. The complex variational mode decomposition (CVMD) is proposed as a natural and a generic extension of the original VMD algorithm for the analysis of complex-valued data in this work. Moreover, the equivalent filter bank structure of the CVMD in the presence of white noise, and the effects of initialization of center frequency on the filter bank property are both investigated via numerical experiments. Benefiting from the advantages of CVMD algorithm, its bi-directional Hilbert time-frequency spectrum is developed as well, in which the positive and negative frequency components are formulated on the positive and negative frequency planes separately. Several applications in the real-world complex-valued signals support the analysis.

  10. Causal Mathematical Logic as a guiding framework for the prediction of "Intelligence Signals" in brain simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzalaco, Felix; Pissanetzky, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    A recent theory of physical information based on the fundamental principles of causality and thermodynamics has proposed that a large number of observable life and intelligence signals can be described in terms of the Causal Mathematical Logic (CML), which is proposed to encode the natural principles of intelligence across any physical domain and substrate. We attempt to expound the current definition of CML, the "Action functional" as a theory in terms of its ability to possess a superior explanatory power for the current neuroscientific data we use to measure the mammalian brains "intelligence" processes at its most general biophysical level. Brain simulation projects define their success partly in terms of the emergence of "non-explicitly programmed" complex biophysical signals such as self-oscillation and spreading cortical waves. Here we propose to extend the causal theory to predict and guide the understanding of these more complex emergent "intelligence Signals". To achieve this we review whether causal logic is consistent with, can explain and predict the function of complete perceptual processes associated with intelligence. Primarily those are defined as the range of Event Related Potentials (ERP) which include their primary subcomponents; Event Related Desynchronization (ERD) and Event Related Synchronization (ERS). This approach is aiming for a universal and predictive logic for neurosimulation and AGi. The result of this investigation has produced a general "Information Engine" model from translation of the ERD and ERS. The CML algorithm run in terms of action cost predicts ERP signal contents and is consistent with the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. A working substrate independent natural information logic would be a major asset. An information theory consistent with fundamental physics can be an AGi. It can also operate within genetic information space and provides a roadmap to understand the live biophysical operation of the phenotype

  11. Notch-1 Signalling Is Activated in Brain Arteriovenous Malformations in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZhuGe, Qichuan; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, WeiMing; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Mao, XiaoOu; Xie, Lin; Chen, Gourong; Chen, Yongmei; Lawton, Michael T.; Young, William L.; Greenberg, David A.; Jin, Kunlin

    2009-01-01

    A role for the Notch signalling pathway in the formation of arteriovenous malformations during development has been suggested. However, whether Notch signalling is involved in brain arteriovenous malformations in humans remains unclear. Here, we performed immunohistochemistry on surgically resected brain arteriovenous malformations and found that,…

  12. Does Global Astrocytic Calcium Signaling Participate in Awake Brain State Transitions and Neuronal Circuit Function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Rasmussen, Rune; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    We continuously need to adapt to changing conditions within our surrounding environment, and our brain needs to quickly shift between resting and working activity states in order to allow appropriate behaviors. These global state shifts are intimately linked to the brain-wide release...... of the neuromodulators, noradrenaline and acetylcholine. Astrocytes have emerged as a new player participating in the regulation of brain activity, and have recently been implicated in brain state shifts. Astrocytes display global Ca2+ signaling in response to activation of the noradrenergic system, but whether...... astrocytic Ca2+ signaling is causative or correlative for shifts in brain state and neural activity patterns is not known. Here we review the current available literature on astrocytic Ca2+ signaling in awake animals in order to explore the role of astrocytic signaling in brain state shifts. Furthermore, we...

  13. Lectures in Supercomputational Neurosciences Dynamics in Complex Brain Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Graben, Peter beim; Thiel, Marco; Kurths, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Computational Neuroscience is a burgeoning field of research where only the combined effort of neuroscientists, biologists, psychologists, physicists, mathematicians, computer scientists, engineers and other specialists, e.g. from linguistics and medicine, seem to be able to expand the limits of our knowledge. The present volume is an introduction, largely from the physicists' perspective, to the subject matter with in-depth contributions by system neuroscientists. A conceptual model for complex networks of neurons is introduced that incorporates many important features of the real brain, such as various types of neurons, various brain areas, inhibitory and excitatory coupling and the plasticity of the network. The computational implementation on supercomputers, which is introduced and discussed in detail in this book, will enable the readers to modify and adapt the algortihm for their own research. Worked-out examples of applications are presented for networks of Morris-Lecar neurons to model the cortical co...

  14. TWEAK inhibits TRAF2-mediated CD40 signaling by destabilization of CD40 signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Steffen; Lang, Isabell; Rosenthal, Alevtina; Schäfer, Viktoria; Weisenberger, Daniela; Carmona Arana, José Antonio; Trebing, Johannes; Siegmund, Daniela; Neumann, Manfred; Wajant, Harald

    2013-09-01

    We found recently that TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and fibroblast growth factor-inducible-14 (Fn14) by virtue of their strong capability to reduce the freely available cytoplasmic pool of TNFR-associated factor (TRAF)2 and cellular inhibitors of apoptosis (cIAPs) antagonize the functions of these molecules in TNFR1 signaling, resulting in sensitization for apoptosis and inhibition of classical NF-κB signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that priming of cells with TWEAK also interferes with activation of the classical NF-κB pathway by CD40. Likewise, there was strong inhibition of CD40 ligand (CD40L)-induced activation of MAPKs in TWEAK-primed cells. FACS analysis and CD40L binding studies revealed unchanged CD40 expression and normal CD40L-CD40 interaction in TWEAK-primed cells. CD40L immunoprecipitates, however, showed severely reduced amounts of CD40 and CD40-associated proteins, indicating impaired formation or reduced stability of CD40L-CD40 signaling complexes. The previously described inhibitory effect of TWEAK on TNFR1 signaling has been traced back to reduced activity of the TNFR1-associated TRAF2-cIAP1/2 ubiquitinase complex and did not affect the stability of the immunoprecipitable TNFR1 receptor complex. Thus, the inhibitory effect of TWEAK on CD40 signaling must be based at least partly on other mechanisms. In line with this, signaling by the CD40-related TRAF2-interacting receptor TNFR2 was also attenuated but still immunoprecipitable in TWEAK-primed cells. Collectively, we show that Fn14 activation by soluble TWEAK impairs CD40L-CD40 signaling complex formation and inhibits CD40 signaling and thus identify the Fn14-TWEAK system as a potential novel regulator of CD40-related cellular functions.

  15. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling: How complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Kolodkin (Alexey); F.J. Bruggeman (Frank); N. Plant (Nick); M.J. Moné (Martijn); B.M. Bakker (Barbara); M.J. Campbell (Moray); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); C. Carlberg (Carsten); J.L. Snoep (Jacky); H.V. Westerhoff (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of design aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic

  16. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling : how complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolodkin, Alexey N.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Plant, Nick; Mone, Martijn J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Campbell, Moray J.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.; Carlberg, Carsten; Snoep, Jacky L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2010-01-01

    The topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of 'design' aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic models of

  17. Cognitive signals for brain-machine interfaces in posterior parietal cortex include continuous 3D trajectory commands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Markus; Mulliken, Grant H; Fineman, Igor; Loeb, Gerald E; Andersen, Richard A

    2012-10-16

    Cortical neural prosthetics extract command signals from the brain with the goal to restore function in paralyzed or amputated patients. Continuous control signals can be extracted from the motor cortical areas, whereas neural activity from posterior parietal cortex (PPC) can be used to decode cognitive variables related to the goals of movement. Because typical activities of daily living comprise both continuous control tasks such as reaching, and tasks benefiting from discrete control such as typing on a keyboard, availability of both signals simultaneously would promise significant increases in performance and versatility. Here, we show that PPC can provide 3D hand trajectory information under natural conditions that would be encountered for prosthetic applications, thus allowing simultaneous extraction of continuous and discrete signals without requiring multisite surgical implants. We found that limb movements can be decoded robustly and with high accuracy from a small population of neural units under free gaze in a complex 3D point-to-point reaching task. Both animals' brain-control performance improved rapidly with practice, resulting in faster target acquisition and increasing accuracy. These findings disprove the notion that the motor cortical areas are the only candidate areas for continuous prosthetic command signals and, rather, suggests that PPC can provide equally useful trajectory signals in addition to discrete, cognitive variables. Hybrid use of continuous and discrete signals from PPC may enable a new generation of neural prostheses providing superior performance and additional flexibility in addressing individual patient needs.

  18. Activation of the Notch signaling pathway promotes neurovascular repair after traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-shan Ran; Yun-hu Yu; Xiao-hong Fu; Yuan-chao Wen

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a key role in angiogenesis and endothelial cell formation, but it remains unclear whether it is involved in vascular repair by endothelial progenitor cells after traumatic brain injury. Therefore, in the present study, we controlled the Notch signaling path-way using overexpression and knockdown constructs. Activation of the Notch signaling pathway by Notch1 or Jagged1 overexpression enhanced the migration, invasiveness and angiogenic ability of endothelial progenitor cells. Suppression of the Notch signaling pathway with Notch1 or Jagged1 siRNAs reduced the migratory capacity, invasiveness and angiogenic ability of endo-thelial progenitor cells. Activation of the Notch signaling pathwayin vivo in a rat model of mild traumatic brain injury promoted neurovascular repair. These ifndings suggest that the activation of the Notch signaling pathway promotes blood vessel formation and tissue repair after brain trauma.

  19. Denoising and Frequency Analysis of Noninvasive Magnetoencephalography Sensor Signals for Functional Brain Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Ukil, A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is an important noninvasive, nonhazardous technology for functional brain mapping, measuring the magnetic fields due to the intracellular neuronal current flow in the brain. However, most often, the inherent level of noise in the MEG sensor data collection process is large enough to obscure the signal(s) of interest. In this paper, a denoising technique based on the wavelet transform and the multiresolution signal decomposition technique along with thresholding is presented, substantiated by application results. Thereafter, different frequency analysis are performed on the denoised MEG signals to identify the major frequencies of the brain oscillations present in the denoised signals. Time-frequency plots (spectrograms) of the denoised signals are also provided.

  20. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress.

  1. PR65A phosphorylation regulates PP2A complex signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Kotlo

    Full Text Available Serine-threonine Protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A, a member of the PPP family of phosphatases, regulates a variety of essential cellular processes, including cell-cycling, DNA replication, transcription, translation, and secondary signaling pathways. In the heart, increased PP2A activity/signaling has been linked to cardiac remodeling, contractile dysfunction and, in failure, arrythmogenicity. The core PP2A complex is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme consisting of a 36 kDa catalytic subunit (PP2Ac; a regulatory scaffold subunit of 65 kDa (PR65A or PP2Aa; and one of at least 18 associated variable regulatory proteins (B subunits classified into 3 families. In the present study, three in vivo sites of phosphorylation in cardiac PR65A are identified (S303, T268, S314. Using HEK cells transfected with recombinant forms of PR65A with phosphomimetic (P-PR65A and non-phosphorylated (N-PR65A amino acid substitutions at these sites, these phosphorylations were shown to inhibit the interaction of PR65A with PP2Ac and PP2A holoenzyme signaling. Forty-seven phospho-proteins were increased in abundance in HEK cells transfected with P-PR65A versus N-PR65A by phospho-protein profiling using 2D-DIGE analysis on phospho-enriched whole cell protein extracts. Among these proteins were elongation factor 1α (EF1A, elongation factor 2, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60, NADPH-dehydrogenase 1 alpha sub complex, annexin A, and PR65A. Compared to controls, failing hearts from the Dahl rat had less phosphorylated PR65A protein abundance and increased PP2A activity. Thus, PR65A phosphorylation is an in vivo mechanism for regulation of the PP2A signaling complex and increased PP2A activity in heart failure.

  2. Levels of complexity in scale-invariant neural signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Nunes Amaral, Luís A.; Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Stanley, H. Eugene; Yoneyama, Mitsuru

    2009-04-01

    Many physical and physiological signals exhibit complex scale-invariant features characterized by 1/f scaling and long-range power-law correlations, indicating a possibly common control mechanism. Specifically, it has been suggested that dynamical processes, influenced by inputs and feedback on multiple time scales, may be sufficient to give rise to 1/f scaling and scale invariance. Two examples of physiologic signals that are the output of hierarchical multiscale physiologic systems under neural control are the human heartbeat and human gait. Here we show that while both cardiac interbeat interval and gait interstride interval time series under healthy conditions have comparable 1/f scaling, they still may belong to different complexity classes. Our analysis of the multifractal scaling exponents of the fluctuations in these two signals demonstrates that in contrast to the multifractal behavior found in healthy heartbeat dynamics, gait time series exhibit less complex, close to monofractal behavior. Further, we find strong anticorrelations in the sign and close to random behavior for the magnitude of gait fluctuations at short and intermediate time scales, in contrast to weak anticorrelations in the sign and strong positive correlation for the magnitude of heartbeat interval fluctuations—suggesting that the neural mechanisms of cardiac and gait control exhibit different linear and nonlinear features. These findings are of interest because they underscore the limitations of traditional two-point correlation methods in fully characterizing physiological and physical dynamics. In addition, these results suggest that different mechanisms of control may be responsible for varying levels of complexity observed in physiological systems under neural regulation and in physical systems that possess similar 1/f scaling.

  3. Towards brain-activity-controlled information retrieval: Decoding image relevance from MEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Kandemir, Melih; Saarinen, Veli-Matti; Hirvenkari, Lotta; Parkkonen, Lauri; Klami, Arto; Hari, Riitta; Kaski, Samuel

    2015-05-15

    We hypothesize that brain activity can be used to control future information retrieval systems. To this end, we conducted a feasibility study on predicting the relevance of visual objects from brain activity. We analyze both magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and gaze signals from nine subjects who were viewing image collages, a subset of which was relevant to a predetermined task. We report three findings: i) the relevance of an image a subject looks at can be decoded from MEG signals with performance significantly better than chance, ii) fusion of gaze-based and MEG-based classifiers significantly improves the prediction performance compared to using either signal alone, and iii) non-linear classification of the MEG signals using Gaussian process classifiers outperforms linear classification. These findings break new ground for building brain-activity-based interactive image retrieval systems, as well as for systems utilizing feedback both from brain activity and eye movements.

  4. Modulation of the cAMP signaling pathway after traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, Coleen M.; Oliva, Anthony A.; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Pearse, Damien D.; Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in both focal and diffuse brain pathologies that are exacerbated by the inflammatory response and progress from hours to days after the initial injury. Using a clinically relevant model of TBI, the parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury (FPI) model, we found injury-induced impairments in the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway. Levels of cAMP were depressed in the ipsilateral parietal cortex and hippocampus, as well as activation of its downstream targ...

  5. The Nonrandom Brain: Efficiency, Economy, and Complex Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf eSporns

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern anatomical tracing and imaging techniques are beginning to reveal the structural anatomy of neural circuits at small and large scales in unprecedented detail. When examined with analytic tools from graph theory and network science, neural connectivity exhibits highly nonrandom features, including high clustering and short path length, as well as modules and highly central hub nodes. These characteristic topological features of neural connections shape nonrandom dynamic interactions that occur during spontaneous activity or in response to external stimulation. Disturbances of connectivity and thus of neural dynamics are thought to underlie a number of disease states of the brain, and some evidence suggests that degraded functional performance of brain networks may be the outcome of a process of randomization affecting their nodes and edges. This article provides a survey of the nonrandom structure of neural connectivity, primarily at the large-scale of regions and pathways in the mammalian cerebral cortex. In addition, we will discuss how nonrandom connections can give rise to differentiated and complex patterns of dynamics and information flow. Finally, we will explore the idea that at least some disorders of the nervous system are associated with increased randomness of neural connections.

  6. The statistical mechanics of complex signaling networks: nerve growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K S; Hill, C C; Calero, G A; Myers, C R; Lee, K H; Sethna, J P; Cerione, R A

    2004-12-01

    The inherent complexity of cellular signaling networks and their importance to a wide range of cellular functions necessitates the development of modeling methods that can be applied toward making predictions and highlighting the appropriate experiments to test our understanding of how these systems are designed and function. We use methods of statistical mechanics to extract useful predictions for complex cellular signaling networks. A key difficulty with signaling models is that, while significant effort is being made to experimentally measure the rate constants for individual steps in these networks, many of the parameters required to describe their behavior remain unknown or at best represent estimates. To establish the usefulness of our approach, we have applied our methods toward modeling the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of neuronal cells. In particular, we study the actions of NGF and mitogenic epidermal growth factor (EGF) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Through a network of intermediate signaling proteins, each of these growth factors stimulates extracellular regulated kinase (Erk) phosphorylation with distinct dynamical profiles. Using our modeling approach, we are able to predict the influence of specific signaling modules in determining the integrated cellular response to the two growth factors. Our methods also raise some interesting insights into the design and possible evolution of cellular systems, highlighting an inherent property of these systems that we call 'sloppiness.'

  7. Better Sleep May Signal Recovery from Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... useful tool for assessing their recovery after traumatic brain injury," said study author Nadia Gosselin. She's an assistant professor in the department of psychology at the University of Montreal. "We found that ...

  8. Convergent evolution of complex brains and high intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Gerhard

    2015-12-19

    Within the animal kingdom, complex brains and high intelligence have evolved several to many times independently, e.g. among ecdysozoans in some groups of insects (e.g. blattoid, dipteran, hymenopteran taxa), among lophotrochozoans in octopodid molluscs, among vertebrates in teleosts (e.g. cichlids), corvid and psittacid birds, and cetaceans, elephants and primates. High levels of intelligence are invariantly bound to multimodal centres such as the mushroom bodies in insects, the vertical lobe in octopodids, the pallium in birds and the cerebral cortex in primates, all of which contain highly ordered associative neuronal networks. The driving forces for high intelligence may vary among the mentioned taxa, e.g. needs for spatial learning and foraging strategies in insects and cephalopods, for social learning in cichlids, instrumental learning and spatial orientation in birds and social as well as instrumental learning in primates.

  9. Multilevel complexity of calcium signaling:Modeling angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luca; Munaron; Marco; Scianna

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular calcium signaling is a universal,evolutionary conserved and versatile regulator of cell biochemistry.The complexity of calcium signaling and related cell machinery can be investigated by the use of experimental strategies,as well as by computational approaches.Vascular endothelium is a fascinating model to study the specific properties and roles of calcium signals at multiple biological levels.During the past 20 years,live cell imaging,patch clamp and other techniques have allowed us to detect and interfere with calcium signaling in endothelial cells(ECs),providing a huge amount of information on the regulation of vascularization(angiogenesis) in normal and tumoral tissues.These data range from the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium within different cell microcompartments to those in entire multicellular and organized EC networks.Beside experimental strategies,in silico endothelial models,specifically designed for simulating calcium signaling,are contributing to our knowledge of vascular physiol-ogy and pathology.They help to investigate and predict the quantitative features of proangiogenic events moving through subcellular,cellular and supracellular levels.This review focuses on some recent developments of computational approaches for proangiogenic endothelial calcium signaling.In particular,we discuss the creation of hybrid simulation environments,which combine and integrate discrete Cellular Potts Models.They are able to capture the phenomenological mechanisms of cell morphological reorganization,migration,and intercellular adhesion,with single-cell spatiotemporal models,based on reaction-diffusion equations that describe the agonist-induced intracellular calcium events.

  10. Understanding the Role of GPCR Heteroreceptor Complexes in Modulating the Brain Networks in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Carlsson, Jens; Ambrogini, Patricia; Narváez, Manuel; Wydra, Karolina; Tarakanov, Alexander O.; Li, Xiang; Millón, Carmelo; Ferraro, Luca; Cuppini, Riccardo; Tanganelli, Sergio; Liu, Fang; Filip, Malgorzata; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Fuxe, Kjell

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of allosteric receptor–receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteroreceptor complexes of the central nervous system (CNS) gave a new dimension to brain integration and neuropsychopharmacology. The molecular basis of learning and memory was proposed to be based on the reorganization of the homo- and heteroreceptor complexes in the postjunctional membrane of synapses. Long-term memory may be created by the transformation of parts of the heteroreceptor complexes into unique transcription factors which can lead to the formation of specific adapter proteins. The observation of the GPCR heterodimer network (GPCR-HetNet) indicated that the allosteric receptor–receptor interactions dramatically increase GPCR diversity and biased recognition and signaling leading to enhanced specificity in signaling. Dysfunction of the GPCR heteroreceptor complexes can lead to brain disease. The findings of serotonin (5-HT) hetero and isoreceptor complexes in the brain over the last decade give new targets for drug development in major depression. Neuromodulation of neuronal networks in depression via 5-HT, galanin peptides and zinc involve a number of GPCR heteroreceptor complexes in the raphe-hippocampal system: GalR1-5-HT1A, GalR1-5-HT1A-GPR39, GalR1-GalR2, and putative GalR1-GalR2-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes. The 5-HT1A receptor protomer remains a receptor enhancing antidepressant actions through its participation in hetero- and homoreceptor complexes listed above in balance with each other. In depression, neuromodulation of neuronal networks in the raphe-hippocampal system and the cortical regions via 5-HT and fibroblast growth factor 2 involves either FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes or the 5-HT isoreceptor complexes such as 5-HT1A-5-HT7 and 5-HT1A-5-HT2A. Neuromodulation of neuronal networks in cocaine use disorder via dopamine (DA) and adenosine signals involve A2AR-D2R and A2AR-D2R-Sigma1R heteroreceptor complexes in the dorsal and

  11. Hypoxic preconditioning induces neuroprotective stanniocalcin-1 in brain via IL-6 signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westberg, Johan A; Serlachius, Martina; Lankila, Petri

    2007-01-01

    . Increased expression of IL-6 is evident, particularly in the lungs of animals subjected to hypoxic preconditioning. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) is a 56-kDa homodimeric glycoprotein originally discovered in bony fish, where it regulates calcium/phosphate homeostasis and protects against toxic hypercalcemia. We...... mRNA levels in brains of wild-type and IL-6 deficient mice. Furthermore, we monitored the Stc-1 response in brains of wild-type and transgenic mice, overexpressing IL-6 in the astroglia, before and after induced brain injury. RESULTS: Hypoxic preconditioning induced an upregulated expression of Stc......-1 in brains of wild-type but not of IL-6-deficient mice. Induced brain injury elicited a stronger STC-1 response in brains of transgenic mice, with targeted astroglial IL-6 expression, than in brains of wild-type mice. Moreover, IL-6 induced STC-1 expression via MAPK signaling in neural Paju cells...

  12. A role for TOR complex 2 signaling in promoting autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Powers, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a central regulator of cell growth in response to nutrient availability. TOR forms 2 structurally and functionally distinct complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, and negatively regulates autophagy via TORC1. Here we demonstrate TOR also operates independently through the TORC2 signaling pathway to promote autophagy upon amino acid limitation. Under these conditions, TORC2, through its downstream target kinase Ypk1, inhibits the Ca(2+)- and Cmd1/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, to enable the activation of the amino acid-sensing EIF2S1/eIF2α kinase, Gcn2, and promote autophagy. Thus TORC2 signaling regulates autophagy in a pathway distinct from TORC1 to provide a tunable response to the cellular metabolic state.

  13. Caveolins: Targeting Pro-survival Signaling in the Heart and Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creed M. Stary

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review discusses intracellular signaling moieties specific to membrane lipid rafts (MLRs and the scaffolding proteins caveolin and introduces current data promoting their potential role in the treatment of pathologies of the heart and brain. MLRs are discreet microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in gylcosphingolipids and cholesterol that concentrate and localize signaling molecules. Caveolin proteins are necessary for the formation of MLRs, and are responsible for coordinating signaling events by scaffolding and enriching numerous signaling moieties in close proximity. Specifically in the heart and brain, caveolins are necessary for the cytoprotective phenomenon termed ischemic and anesthetic preconditioning. Targeted overexpression of caveolin in the heart and brain leads to induction of multiple pro-survival and pro-growth signaling pathways; thus, caveolins represent a potential novel therapeutic target for cardaic and neurological pathologies.

  14. Information theoretical quantification of cooperativity in signalling complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Schymkowitz, Joost;

    2009-01-01

    Background: Intra-cellular information exchange, propelled by cascades of interacting signalling proteins, is essential for the proper functioning and survival of cells. Now that the interactome of several organisms is being mapped and several structural mechanisms of cooperativity at the molecular...... level in proteins have been elucidated, the formalization of this fundamental quantity, i.e. information, in these very diverse biological contexts becomes feasible. Results: We show here that Shannon's mutual information quantifies information in biological system and more specifically...... the cooperativity inherent to the assembly of macromolecular complexes. We show how protein complexes can be considered as particular instances of noisy communication channels. Further we show, using a portion of the p27 regulatory pathway, how classical equilibrium thermodynamic quantities such as binding...

  15. Complex Interplay of Hormonal Signals during Grape Berry Ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarida Fortes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Grape and wine production and quality is extremely dependent on the fruit ripening process. Sensory and nutritional characteristics are important aspects for consumers and their development during fruit ripening involves complex hormonal control. In this review, we explored data already published on grape ripening and compared it with the hormonal regulation of ripening of other climacteric and non-climacteric fruits. The roles of abscisic acid, ethylene, and brassinosteroids as promoters of ripening are discussed, as well as the role of auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, jasmonates, and polyamines as inhibitors of ripening. In particular, the recently described role of polyamine catabolism in grape ripening is discussed, together with its putative interaction with other hormones. Furthermore, other recent examples of cross-talk among the different hormones are presented, revealing a complex interplay of signals during grape development and ripening.

  16. Prompt recognition of brain states by their EEG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, B.O.; Pfurtscheller, G.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    1997-01-01

    Brain states corresponding to intention of movement of left and right index finger and right foot are classified by a ''committee'' of artificial neural networks processing individual channels of 56-electrode electroencephalograms (EEGs). Correct recognition is achieved in 83% of cases not previo......Brain states corresponding to intention of movement of left and right index finger and right foot are classified by a ''committee'' of artificial neural networks processing individual channels of 56-electrode electroencephalograms (EEGs). Correct recognition is achieved in 83% of cases...... not previously seen by the system on the basis of 1 sec long EEGs....

  17. Correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain exposed to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Light scattering signal is a potential indicator of tissue viability in brain because cellular and subcellular structural integrity should be associated with cell viability in brain tissue. We previously performed multiwavelength diffuse reflectance measurement for a rat global ischemic brain model and observed a unique triphasic change in light scattering at a certain time after oxygen and glucose deprivation. This triphasic scattering change (TSC) was shown to precede cerebral ATP exhaustion, suggesting that loss of brain tissue viability can be predicted by detecting scattering signal. In the present study, we examined correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain in vivo. We performed transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement for rat brain; under spontaneous respiration, hypoxia was induced for the rat by nitrogen gas inhalation and reoxygenation was started at various time points. We observed a TSC, which started at 140 +/- 15 s after starting nitrogen gas inhalation (mean +/- SD, n=8). When reoxygenation was started before the TSC, all rats survived (n=7), while no rats survived when reoxygenation was started after the TSC (n=8). When reoxygenation was started during the TSC, rats survived probabilistically (n=31). Disability of motor function was not observed for the survived rats. These results indicate that TSC can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue reversibility in brains, providing useful information on the critical time zone for treatment to rescue the brain.

  18. [Shh signal and its functional roles in normal and diseased brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruat, Martial; Angot, Elodie; Traiffort, Elisabeth

    2011-11-01

    The identification of a Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway in the adult vertebrate central nervous system has paved the way to the characterization of the functional roles of Shh signals in normal and diseased brain. This morphogen is proposed to play a key role in the establishment and maintenance of adult neurogenic niches and to modulate the proliferation of neuronal or glial precursors. Consistent with its role during embryogenesis, alteration of Shh signaling is associated with tumorigenesis while its recruitment in damaged neural tissue might be part of the regenerating process. We will discuss the most recent data of the Hedgehog pathway in the adult brain and its relevance as a novel therapeutic approach for brain diseases including brain tumors.

  19. EGFR Signaling in the Brain Is Necessary for Olfactory Learning in "Drosophila" Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Tasja; Leippe, Matthias; Roeder, Thomas; Fedders, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Signaling via the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has emerged as one of the key mechanisms in the development of the central nervous system in "Drosophila melanogaster." By contrast, little is known about the functions of EGFR signaling in the differentiated larval brain. Here, promoter-reporter lines of EGFR and its most prominent…

  20. MR spectroscopy detection of lactate and lipid signals in the brains of healthy elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, PE; den Heijer, T; de Leeuw, FE; de Groot, JC; Achten, E; Heijboer, RJJ; Hofman, A; Breteler, MMB; Oudkerk, M

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to assess the presence of brain lactate and lipid signals, frequently associated with the presence of pathology, in healthy persons of 60-90 years old (n = 540). Lactate and lipid signals were observed in, respectively, 25 and 6% of women, and 18 and 2% of me

  1. Enabling complex genetic circuits to respond to extrinsic environmental signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Shopera, Tatenda; Hinman, Kristina; Creamer, John Philip; Moon, Tae Seok

    2017-03-06

    Genetic circuits have the potential to improve a broad range of metabolic engineering processes and address a variety of medical and environmental challenges. However, in order to engineer genetic circuits that can meet the needs of these real-world applications, genetic sensors that respond to relevant extrinsic and intrinsic signals must be implemented in complex genetic circuits. In this work, we construct the first AND and NAND gates that respond to temperature and pH, two signals that have relevance in a variety of real-world applications. A previously identified pH-responsive promoter and a temperature-responsive promoter were extracted from the E. coli genome, characterized, and modified to suit the needs of the genetic circuits. These promoters were combined with components of the type III secretion system in Salmonella typhimurium and used to construct a set of AND gates with up to 23-fold change. Next, an antisense RNA was integrated into the circuit architecture to invert the logic of the AND gate and generate a set of NAND gates with up to 1168-fold change. These circuits provide the first demonstration of complex pH- and temperature-responsive genetic circuits, and lay the groundwork for the use of similar circuits in real-world applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;9999: 1-6. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Damages Brain Signal Transduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Chem. 279: 41807- 41814. 9 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com SCIENCE DIRECT @ ANALYTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY ACADEMIC PRESS Analytical Biochemistry...Mol Brain Res 40:177-187. frontal cortex. Neurobiol Learn Mem 76:151-182. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com PHARMACOLOGY SCIENCE DIRECT & BIOCHEMISTRY

  3. The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田允; 黄继云; 王锐; 陶蓉蓉; 卢应梅; 廖美华; 陆楠楠; 李静; 芦博; 韩峰

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impaired social interaction and communication. However, the role of synaptic dysfunction during development of autism remains unclear. In the present study, we address the alterations of biochemical signaling in hippocampal network following induction of the autism in experimental animals. Here, the an- imal disease model and DNA array being used to investigate the differences in transcriptome or- ganization between autistic and normal brain by gene co--expression network analysis.

  4. Human-machine interface based on muscular and brain signals applied to a robotic wheelchair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, A; Silva, R L; Celeste, W C; Filho, T F Bastos; Filho, M Sarcinelli [Electrical Engineering Department, Federal University of Espirito Santo (UFES), Av. Fernando Ferrari, 514, Vitoria, 29075-910 (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a Human-Machine Interface (HMI) based on the signals generated by eye blinks or brain activity. The system structure and the signal acquisition and processing are shown. The signals used in this work are either the signal associated to the muscular movement corresponding to an eye blink or the brain signal corresponding to visual information processing. The variance is the feature extracted from such signals in order to detect the intention of the user. The classification is performed by a variance threshold which is experimentally determined for each user during the training stage. The command options, which are going to be sent to the commanded device, are presented to the user in the screen of a PDA (Personal Digital Assistant). In the experiments here reported, a robotic wheelchair is used as the device being commanded.

  5. Activation of the Notch signaling pathway promotes neurovascular repair after traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a key role in angiogenesis and endothelial cell formation, but it remains unclear whether it is involved in vascular repair by endothelial progenitor cells after traumatic brain injury. Therefore, in the present study, we controlled the Notch signaling pathway using overexpression and knockdown constructs. Activation of the Notch signaling pathway by Notch1 or Jagged1 overexpression enhanced the migration, invasiveness and angiogenic ability of endothelial pr...

  6. Pollutants increase song complexity and the volume of the brain area HVC in a songbird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Markman

    Full Text Available Environmental pollutants which alter endocrine function are now known to decrease vertebrate reproductive success. There is considerable evidence for endocrine disruption from aquatic ecosystems, but knowledge is lacking with regard to the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Here, we show for the first time that birds foraging on invertebrates contaminated with environmental pollutants, show marked changes in both brain and behaviour. We found that male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris exposed to environmentally relevant levels of synthetic and natural estrogen mimics developed longer and more complex songs compared to control males, a sexually selected trait important in attracting females for reproduction. Moreover, females preferred the song of males which had higher pollutant exposure, despite the fact that experimentally dosed males showed reduced immune function. We also show that the key brain area controlling male song complexity (HVC is significantly enlarged in the contaminated birds. This is the first evidence that environmental pollutants not only affect, but paradoxically enhance a signal of male quality such as song. Our data suggest that female starlings would bias their choice towards exposed males, with possible consequences at the population level. As the starling is a migratory species, our results suggest that transglobal effects of pollutants on terrestrial vertebrate physiology and reproduction could occur in birds.

  7. QRS complex detection in ECG signal for wearable devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefin, M Riadh; Tavakolian, Kouhyar; Fazel-Rezai, Reza

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents QRS complex detection algorithm based on dual slope technique, which is suitable for wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) applications. For cardiac patients of different arrhythmias, ECG signals are needed to be monitored over an extensive period of time. Thus, the wearable heart monitoring system needs computationally efficient QRS detection technique with good accuracy. In this paper, a method of QRS detection based on two slopes on both sides of an R peak is presented which is computationally efficient. Based on the slopes, first, a variable measuring steepness is developed, then by introducing an adjustable R-R interval based window and adaptive thresholding techniques, depending on the number of peaks detected in such window, R peaks are detected. The algorithm was evaluated against MIT/BIH arrhythmia database and achieved 99.16% detection rate with sensitivity of 0.9935 and positive predictivity of 0.9981. The method was compared with two widely used R peaks detection algorithms.

  8. A signaling network for patterning of neuronal connectivity in the Drosophila brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Srahna

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The precise number and pattern of axonal connections generated during brain development regulates animal behavior. Therefore, understanding how developmental signals interact to regulate axonal extension and retraction to achieve precise neuronal connectivity is a fundamental goal of neurobiology. We investigated this question in the developing adult brain of Drosophila and find that it is regulated by crosstalk between Wnt, fibroblast growth factor (FGF receptor, and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK signaling, but independent of neuronal activity. The Rac1 GTPase integrates a Wnt-Frizzled-Disheveled axon-stabilizing signal and a Branchless (FGF-Breathless (FGF receptor axon-retracting signal to modulate JNK activity. JNK activity is necessary and sufficient for axon extension, whereas the antagonistic Wnt and FGF signals act to balance the extension and retraction required for the generation of the precise wiring pattern.

  9. ALFY-Controlled DVL3 Autophagy Regulates Wnt Signaling, Determining Human Brain Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Rotem; Harel, Tamar; Markus, Barak; Perez, Yonatan; Bakhrat, Anna; Cohen, Idan; Volodarsky, Michael; Feintsein-Linial, Miora; Chervinski, Elana; Zlotogora, Joel; Sivan, Sara; Birnbaum, Ramon Y; Abdu, Uri; Shalev, Stavit; Birk, Ohad S

    2016-03-01

    Primary microcephaly is a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder of reduced head circumference and brain volume, with fewer neurons in the cortex of the developing brain due to premature transition between symmetrical and asymmetrical cellular division of the neuronal stem cell layer during neurogenesis. We now show through linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing, that a dominant mutation in ALFY, encoding an autophagy scaffold protein, causes human primary microcephaly. We demonstrate the dominant effect of the mutation in drosophila: transgenic flies harboring the human mutant allele display small brain volume, recapitulating the disease phenotype. Moreover, eye-specific expression of human mutant ALFY causes rough eye phenotype. In molecular terms, we demonstrate that normally ALFY attenuates the canonical Wnt signaling pathway via autophagy-dependent removal specifically of aggregates of DVL3 and not of Dvl1 or Dvl2. Thus, autophagic attenuation of Wnt signaling through removal of Dvl3 aggregates by ALFY acts in determining human brain size.

  10. ALFY-Controlled DVL3 Autophagy Regulates Wnt Signaling, Determining Human Brain Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotem Kadir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary microcephaly is a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder of reduced head circumference and brain volume, with fewer neurons in the cortex of the developing brain due to premature transition between symmetrical and asymmetrical cellular division of the neuronal stem cell layer during neurogenesis. We now show through linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing, that a dominant mutation in ALFY, encoding an autophagy scaffold protein, causes human primary microcephaly. We demonstrate the dominant effect of the mutation in drosophila: transgenic flies harboring the human mutant allele display small brain volume, recapitulating the disease phenotype. Moreover, eye-specific expression of human mutant ALFY causes rough eye phenotype. In molecular terms, we demonstrate that normally ALFY attenuates the canonical Wnt signaling pathway via autophagy-dependent removal specifically of aggregates of DVL3 and not of Dvl1 or Dvl2. Thus, autophagic attenuation of Wnt signaling through removal of Dvl3 aggregates by ALFY acts in determining human brain size.

  11. What can we learn about beat perception by comparing brain signals and stimulus envelopes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Molly J.; Herrmann, Björn; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2017-01-01

    Entrainment of neural oscillations on multiple time scales is important for the perception of speech. Musical rhythms, and in particular the perception of a regular beat in musical rhythms, is also likely to rely on entrainment of neural oscillations. One recently proposed approach to studying beat perception in the context of neural entrainment and resonance (the “frequency-tagging” approach) has received an enthusiastic response from the scientific community. A specific version of the approach involves comparing frequency-domain representations of acoustic rhythm stimuli to the frequency-domain representations of neural responses to those rhythms (measured by electroencephalography, EEG). The relative amplitudes at specific EEG frequencies are compared to the relative amplitudes at the same stimulus frequencies, and enhancements at beat-related frequencies in the EEG signal are interpreted as reflecting an internal representation of the beat. Here, we show that frequency-domain representations of rhythms are sensitive to the acoustic features of the tones making up the rhythms (tone duration, onset/offset ramp duration); in fact, relative amplitudes at beat-related frequencies can be completely reversed by manipulating tone acoustics. Crucially, we show that changes to these acoustic tone features, and in turn changes to the frequency-domain representations of rhythms, do not affect beat perception. Instead, beat perception depends on the pattern of onsets (i.e., whether a rhythm has a simple or complex metrical structure). Moreover, we show that beat perception can differ for rhythms that have numerically identical frequency-domain representations. Thus, frequency-domain representations of rhythms are dissociable from beat perception. For this reason, we suggest caution in interpreting direct comparisons of rhythms and brain signals in the frequency domain. Instead, we suggest that combining EEG measurements of neural signals with creative behavioral

  12. The sensory circumventricular organs: brain targets for circulating signals controlling ingestive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Mark; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2007-07-24

    Sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs) are specialized areas of the brain that lack a normal blood-brain barrier, and therefore are in constant contact with signaling molecules circulating in the bloodstream. Neurons of the CVOs are well endowed with a wide spectrum of receptors for hormones and other signaling molecules, and they have strong connections to hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei. Therefore, lying at the blood-brain interface, the sensory CVOs are in a unique position of being able to detect and integrate humoral and neural information and relay the resulting signals to autonomic control centers of the hypothalamus and medulla. This review focuses primarily on the roles played by the sensory CVOs in fluid balance and energy metabolism.

  13. A REVIEW ON INFLUENCE OF MUSIC ON BRAIN ACTIVITY USING SIGNAL PROCESSING AND IMAGING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. K. ADALARASU,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available As per clinical neuroscience, listening to music involves many brain activities and its study has advanced greatly in the last thirty years. Research shows that music has significant effect on our body and mind. Music has a positive effect on the hormone system and allows the brain to concentrate more easily and assimilate more information in less time, thereby boosting learning and information intake and thus augmenting cognitive skills. Studies have found that the silence between two musical notes triggers brain cells and neurons which are responsible for the development of sharp memory. Music at different pitches (for example, Madhyamavati, Sankarabarnam raga and so on elicits exceptionally emotions and is capable ofreliably affecting the mood of individuals, which in turn changes the brain activity. This article provides a brief overview of currently available signal processing and imaging techniques to study the influence of different music on human brain activity.

  14. Entropy analyses of spatiotemporal synchronizations in brain signals from patients with focal epilepsies

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2010-01-01

    The electroencephalographic (EEG) data intracerebrally recorded from 20 epileptic humans with different brain origins of focal epilepsies or types of seizures, ages and sexes are investigated (nearly 700 million data). Multi channel univariate amplitude analyses are performed and it is shown that time dependent Shannon entropies can be used to predict focal epileptic seizure onsets in different epileptogenic brain zones of different patients. Formations or time evolutions of the synchronizations in the brain signals from epileptogenic or non epileptogenic areas of the patients in ictal interval or inter-ictal interval are further investigated employing spatial or temporal differences of the entropies.

  15. Evidence-Based Filters for Signal Detection: Application to Evoked Brain Responses

    CERN Document Server

    Mubeen, M Asim

    2011-01-01

    Template-based signal detection most often relies on computing a correlation, or a dot product, between an incoming data stream and a signal template. Such a correlation results in an ongoing estimate of the magnitude of the signal in the data stream. However, it does not directly indicate the presence or absence of the signal. The problem is really one of model-testing, and the relevant quantity is the Bayesian evidence (marginal likelihood) of the signal model. Given a signal template and an ongoing data stream, we have developed an evidence-based filter that computes the Bayesian evidence that a signal is present in the data. We demonstrate this algorithm by applying it to brain-machine interface (BMI) data obtained by recording human brain electrical activity, or electroencephalography (EEG). A very popular and effective paradigm in EEG-based BMI is based on the detection of the P300 evoked brain response which is generated in response to particular sensory stimuli. The goal is to detect the presence of a...

  16. In vivo bioluminescence imaging of Ca signalling in the brain of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean-René; Rogers, Kelly L; Chagneau, Carine; Brûlet, Philippe

    2007-03-07

    Many different cells' signalling pathways are universally regulated by Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)] rises that have highly variable amplitudes and kinetic properties. Optical imaging can provide the means to characterise both the temporal and spatial aspects of Ca(2+) signals involved in neurophysiological functions. New methods for in vivo imaging of Ca(2+) signalling in the brain of Drosophila are required for probing the different dynamic aspects of this system. In studies here, whole brain Ca(2+) imaging was performed on transgenic flies with targeted expression of the bioluminescent Ca(2+) reporter GFP-aequorin (GA) in different neural structures. A photon counting based technique was used to undertake continuous recordings of cytosolic [Ca(2+)] over hours. Time integrals for reconstructing images and analysis of the data were selected offline according to the signal intensity. This approach allowed a unique Ca(2+) response associated with cholinergic transmission to be identified by whole brain imaging of specific neural structures. Notably, [Ca(2+)] transients in the Mushroom Bodies (MBs) following nicotine stimulation were accompanied by a delayed secondary [Ca(2+)] rise (up to 15 min. later) in the MB lobes. The delayed response was sensitive to thapsigargin, suggesting a role for intra-cellular Ca(2+) stores. Moreover, it was reduced in dunce mutant flies, which are impaired in learning and memory. Bioluminescence imaging is therefore useful for studying Ca(2+) signalling pathways and for functional mapping of neurophysiological processes in the fly brain.

  17. In vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Ca2+ Signalling in the Brain of Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagneau, Carine; Brûlet, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Many different cells' signalling pathways are universally regulated by Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+] rises that have highly variable amplitudes and kinetic properties. Optical imaging can provide the means to characterise both the temporal and spatial aspects of Ca2+ signals involved in neurophysiological functions. New methods for in vivo imaging of Ca2+ signalling in the brain of Drosophila are required for probing the different dynamic aspects of this system. In studies here, whole brain Ca2+ imaging was performed on transgenic flies with targeted expression of the bioluminescent Ca2+ reporter GFP-aequorin (GA) in different neural structures. A photon counting based technique was used to undertake continuous recordings of cytosolic [Ca2+] over hours. Time integrals for reconstructing images and analysis of the data were selected offline according to the signal intensity. This approach allowed a unique Ca2+ response associated with cholinergic transmission to be identified by whole brain imaging of specific neural structures. Notably, [Ca2+] transients in the Mushroom Bodies (MBs) following nicotine stimulation were accompanied by a delayed secondary [Ca2+] rise (up to 15 min. later) in the MB lobes. The delayed response was sensitive to thapsigargin, suggesting a role for intra-cellular Ca2+ stores. Moreover, it was reduced in dunce mutant flies, which are impaired in learning and memory. Bioluminescence imaging is therefore useful for studying Ca2+ signalling pathways and for functional mapping of neurophysiological processes in the fly brain. PMID:17342209

  18. In vivo bioluminescence imaging of Ca signalling in the brain of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-René Martin

    Full Text Available Many different cells' signalling pathways are universally regulated by Ca(2+ concentration [Ca(2+] rises that have highly variable amplitudes and kinetic properties. Optical imaging can provide the means to characterise both the temporal and spatial aspects of Ca(2+ signals involved in neurophysiological functions. New methods for in vivo imaging of Ca(2+ signalling in the brain of Drosophila are required for probing the different dynamic aspects of this system. In studies here, whole brain Ca(2+ imaging was performed on transgenic flies with targeted expression of the bioluminescent Ca(2+ reporter GFP-aequorin (GA in different neural structures. A photon counting based technique was used to undertake continuous recordings of cytosolic [Ca(2+] over hours. Time integrals for reconstructing images and analysis of the data were selected offline according to the signal intensity. This approach allowed a unique Ca(2+ response associated with cholinergic transmission to be identified by whole brain imaging of specific neural structures. Notably, [Ca(2+] transients in the Mushroom Bodies (MBs following nicotine stimulation were accompanied by a delayed secondary [Ca(2+] rise (up to 15 min. later in the MB lobes. The delayed response was sensitive to thapsigargin, suggesting a role for intra-cellular Ca(2+ stores. Moreover, it was reduced in dunce mutant flies, which are impaired in learning and memory. Bioluminescence imaging is therefore useful for studying Ca(2+ signalling pathways and for functional mapping of neurophysiological processes in the fly brain.

  19. Extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 signal pathway and responses of astrocytes after diffuse brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinxing Li; Haimei Zhao; Yu Li; Chong Wang; Jiashan Zhao; Xianli Zhu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of diffuse brain injury during an acute period is focused on relieving degrees of secondary brain injury. Generation and development of pathological changes of secondary brain injury depend on signal conduction, so down-regulating over response of astrocyte through interfering a key link of signal conduction pathway may bring a new thinking for the treatment of diffuse brain injury. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of over activity of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signal pathway on the response of astrocyte during an acute period of diffuse brain injury. DESIGN: Completely randomized grouping and controlled animal study.SETTINGS: Department of Neurosurgery, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University; Department of Neurosurgery, Union Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology.MATERIALS: A total of 158 healthy male SD rats, of 11 weeks old, weighing 320 - 370 g, were provided by Experimental Animal Faulty, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Rabbit-anti-phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERKl/2) polyclonal antibody was provided by R&D Company; rabbit-anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) polyclonal antibody, SP immunohistochemical kit and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled goat-anti-rabbit IgG by Santa Cruz Company; specific inhibitor U0126 of ERK1/2 signal pathway by Alexis Company. METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Neurosurgery, Union Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology from September 2004 to March 2006. ①Detection of pERKl/2 expression: A total of 110 rats were randomly divided into sham operation group (n =5), model group (n =35), high-dosage U0126 group (n =35) and low-dosage U0126 group (n =35). Rats in the sham operation group were only treated with incision of epicranium and fixation of backup plate, but not hit. Rats in the model group

  20. Insulin signaling disruption in male mice due to perinatal bisphenol A exposure: Role of insulin signaling in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fangfang; Gao, Yue; Wang, Tingwei; Chen, Donglong; Liu, Jingli; Qian, Wenyi; Cheng, Jie; Gao, Rong; Wang, Jun; Xiao, Hang

    2016-03-14

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogenic endocrine disruptor, is widely used for producing polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Available data have shown that perinatal exposure to BPA contributes to peripheral insulin resistance, while in the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of perinatal BPA exposure on insulin signaling and glucose transport in the cortex of offspring mice. The pregnant mice were administrated either vehicle or BPA (100 μg/kg/day) at three perinatal stages. Stage I: from day 6 of gestation until parturition (P6-PND0 fetus exposure); Stage II: from lactation until delactation (PND0-PND21 newborn exposure) and Stage III: from day 6 of pregnancy until delactation (P6-PND21 fetus and newborn exposure). At 8 months of age for the offspring mice, the insulin signaling pathways and glucose transporters (GLUTs) were detected. Our data indicated that the insulin signaling including insulin, phosphorylated insulin receptor (IR), phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-AKT), phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β (p-GSK3β) and phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (p-ERK) were significantly decreased in the brain. In parallel, GLUTs (GLUT1/3/4) were obviously decreased as well in BPA-treated group in mice brain. Noteworthily, the phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were markedly up-regulated in all BPA-treated groups. These results, taken together, suggest the adverse effects of BPA on insulin signaling and GLUTs, which might subsequently contribute to the increment of p-tau and APP in the brain of adult offspring. Therefore, perinatal BPA exposure might be a risk factor for the long-term neurodegenerative changes in offspring male mice.

  1. Low-latency multi-threaded processing of neuronal signals for brain-computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg eFischer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs require demanding numerical computations to transfer brain signals into control signals driving an external actuator. Increasing the computational performance of the BCI algorithms carrying out these calculations enables faster reaction to user inputs and allows using more demanding decoding algorithms. Here we introduce a modular and extensible software architecture with a multi-threaded signal processing pipeline suitable for BCI applications. The computational load and latency (the time that the system needs to react to user input are measured for different pipeline implementations in typical BCI applications with realistic parameter settings. We show that BCIs can benefit substantially from the proposed parallelization: firstly, by reducing the latency and secondly, by increasing the amount of recording channels and signal features that can be used for decoding beyond the amount which can be handled by a single thread. The proposed software architecture provides a simple, yet flexible solution for BCI applications.

  2. Identification and analysis of signaling networks potentially involved in breast carcinoma metastasis to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    Full Text Available Brain is a common site of breast cancer metastasis associated with significant neurologic morbidity, decreased quality of life, and greatly shortened survival. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning brain colonization by breast carcinoma cells are poorly understood. Here, we used 2D-DIGE (Difference in Gel Electrophoresis proteomic analysis followed by LC-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the proteins differentially expressed in brain-targeting breast carcinoma cells (MB231-Br compared with parental MDA-MB-231 cell line. Between the two cell lines, we identified 12 proteins consistently exhibiting greater than 2-fold (p<0.05 difference in expression, which were associated by the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA with two major signaling networks involving TNFα/TGFβ-, NFκB-, HSP-70-, TP53-, and IFNγ-associated pathways. Remarkably, highly related networks were revealed by the IPA analysis of a list of 19 brain-metastasis-associated proteins identified recently by the group of Dr. A. Sierra using MDA-MB-435-based experimental system (Martin et al., J Proteome Res 2008 7:908-20, or a 17-gene classifier associated with breast cancer brain relapse reported by the group of Dr. J. Massague based on a microarray analysis of clinically annotated breast tumors from 368 patients (Bos et al., Nature 2009 459: 1005-9. These findings, showing that different experimental systems and approaches (2D-DIGE proteomics used on brain targeting cell lines or gene expression analysis of patient samples with documented brain relapse yield highly related signaling networks, suggest strongly that these signaling networks could be essential for a successful colonization of the brain by metastatic breast carcinoma cells.

  3. [Complexity analysis of gait signal based on Jensen-Shannon divergence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peicun; Wang, Jun

    2014-06-01

    When people are walking, they will produce gait signals and different people will produce different gait signals. The research of the gait signal complexity is really of great significance for medicine. By calculating people's gait signal complexity, we can assess a person's health status and thus timely detect and diagnose diseases. In this study, the Jensen-Shannon divergence (JSD), the method of complexity analysis, was used to calculate the complexity of gait signal in the healthy elderly, healthy young people and patients with Parkinson's disease. Then we detected the experimental data by variance detection. The results showed that the difference among the complexity of the three gait signals was great. Through this research, we have got gait signal complexity range of patients with Parkinson's disease, the healthy elderly and healthy young people, respectively, which would provide an important basis for clinical diagnosis.

  4. Sleeping of a Complex Brain Networks with Hierarchical Organization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying-Yue; YANG Qiu-Ying; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2009-01-01

    The dynamical behavior in the cortical brain network of macaque is studied by modeling each cortical area with a subnetwork of interacting excitable neurons. We characterize the system by studying how to perform the transition, which is now topology-dependent, from the active state to that with no activity. This could be a naive model for the wakening and sleeping of a brain-like system, i.e., a multi-component system with two different dynamical behavior.

  5. Prediction of immediately occurring microsleep events from brain electric signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golz Martin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This contribution addresses the question if imminent changes of the cortical state are predictable. The analysis is based on 1484 examples of microsleep (MS and 1940 counterexamples of sustained attention (SA, both observed during overnight driving in the simulator. EEG segments (8 s in length immediately before each respective event were included. Features were extracted by (i modified periodogram and (ii Choi-Williams distribution. Machine learning algorithms, namely the optimized learning vector quantization (OLVQ and the support-vector machine with Gaussian kernel function (SVM, were trained in order to map signal features to the event type (MS or SA. Cross validation analysis yielded test set classification accuracies of 87.5 ± 0.1 % and 82.7 ± 0.1 % for feature set (i and (ii, respectively. In general, SVM outperformed OLVQ. In conclusion, EEG contains enough information to predict immediately upcoming microsleep events.

  6. Supplementation with complex milk lipids during brain development promotes neuroplasticity without altering myelination or vascular density

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Jian; Guillermo, Rosamond B.; Yang, Panzao; Vickers, Mark H.; McJarrow, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Supplementation with complex milk lipids (CML) during postnatal brain development has been shown to improve spatial reference learning in rats.Objective: The current study examined histo-biological changes in the brain following CML supplementation and their relationship to the observed improvements in memory.Design: The study used the brain tissues from the rats (male Wistar, 80 days of age) after supplementing with either CML or vehicle during postnatal day 10–80. Immunohistoche...

  7. Multivariate Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signals of the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the human brain plays an important role in the field of medical imaging as well as basic neuroscience. It measures proton spin relaxation, the time constant of which depends on tissue type, and allows us to visualize anatomical structures in the brain. It can also measure functional signals that depend on the local ratio of oxyhemoglobin to deoxyhemoglobin in the blood, which is believed to reflect the degree of neural activity in the corresponding area. MRI thus provides anatomical and functional information about the human brain with high spatial resolution. Conventionally, MRI signals are measured and analyzed for each individual voxel. However, these signals are essentially multivariate because they are measured from multiple voxels simultaneously, and the pattern of activity might carry more useful information than each individual voxel does. This paper reviews recent trends in multivariate analysis of MRI signals in the human brain, and discusses applications of this technique in the fields of medical imaging and neuroscience.

  8. Intelligent Technique for Signal Processing to Identify the Brain Disorder for Epilepsy Captures Using Fuzzy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurumurthy Sasikumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The new direction of understand the signal that is created from the brain organization is one of the main chores in the brain signal processing. Amid all the neurological disorders the human brain epilepsy is measured as one of the extreme prevalent and then programmed artificial intelligence detection technique is an essential due to the crooked and unpredictable nature of happening of epileptic seizures. We proposed an Improved Fuzzy firefly algorithm, which would enhance the classification of the brain signal efficiently with minimum iteration. An important bunching technique created on fuzzy logic is the Fuzzy C means. Together in the feature domain with the spatial domain the features gained after multichannel EEG signals remained combined by means of fuzzy algorithms. And for better precision segmentation process the firefly algorithm is applied to optimize the Fuzzy C-means membership function. Simultaneously for the efficient clustering method the convergence criteria are set. On the whole the proposed technique yields more accurate results and that gives an edge over other techniques. This proposed algorithm result compared with other algorithms like fuzzy c means algorithm and PSO algorithm.

  9. Beacon signal in transcranial color coded ultrasound: A sign for brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Topçuoğlu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A widely under-recognized brain-death confirming transcranial ultrasonography pattern resembling the red-blue beacon signal was demonstrated. Familiarity to this distinct and characteristic ultrasonic pattern seems to be important in the perspective of point-of-care neurological ultrasound use and knobology.

  10. Tryptophan as an evolutionarily conserved signal to brain serotonin : Molecular evidence and psychiatric implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, Sascha; Kema, Ido P.; Bosker, Fokko; Haavik, Jan; Korf, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    The role of serotonin (5-HT) in psychopathology has been investigated for decades. Among others, symptoms of depression, panic, aggression and suicidality have been associated with serotonergic dysfunction. Here we summarize the evidence that low brain 5-HT signals a metabolic imbalance that is evol

  11. Detecting stable phase structures in EEG signals to classify brain activity amplitude patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusely RUIZ; Guang LI; Walter J. FREEMAN; Eduardo GONZALEZ

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining an electrocorticograms (ECoG) signal requires an invasive procedure in which brain activity is recorded from the cortical surface. In contrast, obtaining electroencephalograms (EEG) recordings requires the non-invasive procedure of recording the brain activity from the scalp surface, which allows EEG recordings to be performed more easily on healthy humans. In this work, a technique previously used to study spatial-temporal patterns of brain activity on animal ECoG was adapted for use on EEG. The main issues are centered on solving the problems introduced by the increment on the interelectrode distance and the procedure to detect stable frames. The results showed that spatial patterns of beta and gamma activity can also be extracted from the EEG signal by using stable frames as time markers for feature extraction. This adapted technique makes it possible to take advantage of the cognitive and phenomenological awareness of a normal healthy subject.

  12. On the Complexity of Brain Disorders: A symptom-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Moustafa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence shows that brain disorders involve multiple and different neural dysfunctions, including regional brain damage, change to cell structure, chemical imbalance, and/or connectivity loss among different brain regions. Understanding the complexity of brain disorders can help us map these neural dysfunctions to different symptom clusters as well as understand subcategories of different brain disorders. Here, we discuss data on the mapping of symptom clusters to different neural dysfunctions using examples from brain disorders such as major depressive disorder, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, PTSD and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, we discuss data on the similarities of symptoms in different disorders. Importantly, computational modeling work may be able to shed light on plausible links between various symptoms and neural damage in brain disorders.

  13. The relation between structural and functional connectivity patterns in complex brain networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, C. J.; van Straaten, E. C W; Van Dellen, E.; Tewarie, P.; Gong, G.; Hillebrand, A.; Meier, J.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective An important problem in systems neuroscience is the relation between complex structural and functional brain networks. Here we use simulations of a simple dynamic process based upon the susceptible–infected–susceptible (SIS) model of infection dynamics on an empirical structural brain netw

  14. Opaque for the reader but transparent for the brain: neural signatures of morphological complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Marcus; Lahiri, Aditi; Flaisch, Tobias; Hannemann, Ronny; Eulitz, Carsten

    2009-07-01

    Within linguistics, words with a complex internal structure are commonly assumed to be decomposed into their constituent morphemes (e.g., un-help-ful). Nevertheless, an ongoing debate concerns the brain structures that subserve this process. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, the present study varied the internal complexity of derived words while keeping the external surface structure constant as well as controlling relevant parameters that could affect word recognition. This allowed us to tease apart brain activations specifically related to morphological processing from those related to possible confounds of perceptual cues like word length or affix type. Increased task-related activity in left inferior frontal, bilateral temporo-occipital and right parietal areas was specifically related to the processing of derivations with high complex internal structure relative to those with low complex internal structure. Our results show, that morphologically complex words are decomposed and that the brain processes the degree of internal complexity of word derivations.

  15. Critical issues in state-of-the-art brain-computer interface signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusienski, Dean J; Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz; Galán, Ferran; Coyle, Damien; Miller, Kai J; Forney, Elliott; Anderson, Charles W

    2011-04-01

    This paper reviews several critical issues facing signal processing for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) and suggests several recent approaches that should be further examined. The topics were selected based on discussions held during the 4th International BCI Meeting at a workshop organized to review and evaluate the current state of, and issues relevant to, feature extraction and translation of field potentials for BCIs. The topics presented in this paper include the relationship between electroencephalography and electrocorticography, novel features for performance prediction, time-embedded signal representations, phase information, signal non-stationarity, and unsupervised adaptation.

  16. Complex courtship displays facilitate male reproductive success and plasticity in signaling across variable environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dustin J.WILGERS; Eileen A.HEBETS

    2011-01-01

    Effective signal transmission is essential for communication.In environments where signal transmission is highly variable,signalers may utilize complex signals,which incorporate multiple components and modalities,to maintain effective communication.Male Rabidosa rabida wolf spiders produce complex courtship signals,consisting of both visual and seismic components.We test the hypothesis that the complex signaling of R.rabida contributes to male reproductive success in variable signaling environments.We first examine the condition-dependence of foreleg ornamentation(a presumed visual signal)and seismic signal components and find that both may provide potentially redundant information on foraging history.Next,we assessed reproductive success across manipulated signaling environments that varied in the effectiveness of visual and/or seismic signal transmission.in environmenis where only one signal could be successfully transmitted(e.g.,visual or seismic),pairs were still able to successfully copulate.Additionally,we found that males altered their courtship display depending on the current signaling environment.Specifically,males reduced their use of a visual display component in signaling environments where visual signal transmission was ablated.Incorporating signals in multiple modalities not only enables R.rabida males to maintain copulation success across variable signaiing environments,but it also enables males to adjust their composite courtship display to current signaling conditions.

  17. Complex brain networks: From topological communities to clustered dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lucia Zemanová; Gorka Zamora-López; Changsong Zhou; Jürgen Kurths

    2008-06-01

    Recent research has revealed a rich and complicated network topology in the cortical connectivity of mammalian brains. A challenging task is to understand the implications of such network structures on the functional organisation of the brain activities. We investigate synchronisation dynamics on the corticocortical network of the cat by modelling each node of the network (cortical area) with a subnetwork of interacting excitable neurons. We find that this network of networks displays clustered synchronisation behaviour and the dynamical clusters closely coincide with the topological community structures observed in the anatomical network. The correlation between the firing rate of the areas and the areal intensity is additionally examined. Our results provide insights into the relationship between the global organisation and the functional specialisation of the brain cortex.

  18. Predict or classify: The deceptive role of time-locking in brain signal classification

    CERN Document Server

    Rusconi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Several experimental studies claim to be able to predict the outcome of simple decisions from brain signals measured before subjects are aware of their decision. Often, these studies use multivariate pattern recognition methods with the underlying assumption that the ability to classify the brain signal is equivalent to predict the decision itself. Here we show instead that it is possible to correctly classify a signal even if it does not contain any predictive information about the decision. We first define a simple stochastic model that mimics the random decision process between two equivalent alternatives, and generate a large number of independent trials that contain no choice-predictive information. The trials are first time-locked to the time point of the final event and then classified using standard machine-learning techniques. The resulting classification accuracy is above chance level long before the time point of time-locking. We then analyze the same trials using information theory. We demonstrate...

  19. Crosstalk of Signaling and Metabolism Mediated by the NAD(+)/NADH Redox State in Brain Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ulrike; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The energy metabolism of the brain has to be precisely adjusted to activity to cope with the organ's energy demand, implying that signaling regulates metabolism and metabolic states feedback to signaling. The NAD(+)/NADH redox state constitutes a metabolic node well suited for integration of metabolic and signaling events. It is affected by flux through metabolic pathways within a cell, but also by the metabolic state of neighboring cells, for example by lactate transferred between cells. Furthermore, signaling events both in neurons and astrocytes have been reported to change the NAD(+)/NADH redox state. Vice versa, a number of signaling events like astroglial Ca(2+) signals, neuronal NMDA-receptors as well as the activity of transcription factors are modulated by the NAD(+)/NADH redox state. In this short review, this bidirectional interdependence of signaling and metabolism involving the NAD(+)/NADH redox state as well as its potential relevance for the physiology of the brain and the whole organism in respect to blood glucose regulation and body weight control are discussed.

  20. Seismic signal analysis based on the dual-tree complex wavelet packet transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢周敏; 王恩福; 张国宏; 赵国存; 陈旭庚

    2004-01-01

    We tried to apply the dual-tree complex wavelet packet transform in seismic signal analysis. The complex waveletpacket transform (CWPT) combine the merits of real wavelet packet transform with that of complex continuouswavelet transform (CCWT). It can not only pick up the phase information of signal, but also produce better "focalizing" function if it matches the phase spectrum of signals analyzed. We here described the dual-tree CWPT algorithm, and gave the examples of simulation and actual seismic signals analysis. As shown by our results, thedual-tree CWPT is a very efecfive method in analyzing seismic signals with non-linear phase.

  1. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress.

  2. Human amniotic fluid contaminants alter thyroid hormone signalling and early brain development in Xenopus embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Jean-Baptiste; Mughal, Bilal B.; Le Mével, Sébastien; Leemans, Michelle; Lettmann, Mélodie; Spirhanzlova, Petra; Affaticati, Pierre; Jenett, Arnim; Demeneix, Barbara A.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development in vertebrates. In humans, abnormal maternal thyroid hormone levels during early pregnancy are associated with decreased offspring IQ and modified brain structure. As numerous environmental chemicals disrupt thyroid hormone signalling, we questioned whether exposure to ubiquitous chemicals affects thyroid hormone responses during early neurogenesis. We established a mixture of 15 common chemicals at concentrations reported in human amniotic fluid. An in vivo larval reporter (GFP) assay served to determine integrated thyroid hormone transcriptional responses. Dose-dependent effects of short-term (72 h) exposure to single chemicals and the mixture were found. qPCR on dissected brains showed significant changes in thyroid hormone-related genes including receptors, deiodinases and neural differentiation markers. Further, exposure to mixture also modified neural proliferation as well as neuron and oligodendrocyte size. Finally, exposed tadpoles showed behavioural responses with dose-dependent reductions in mobility. In conclusion, exposure to a mixture of ubiquitous chemicals at concentrations found in human amniotic fluid affect thyroid hormone-dependent transcription, gene expression, brain development and behaviour in early embryogenesis. As thyroid hormone signalling is strongly conserved across vertebrates the results suggest that ubiquitous chemical mixtures could be exerting adverse effects on foetal human brain development. PMID:28266608

  3. Light-scattering signal may indicate critical time zone to rescue brain tissue after hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2011-02-01

    A light-scattering signal, which is sensitive to cellular/subcellular structural integrity, is a potential indicator of brain tissue viability because metabolic energy is used in part to maintain the structure of cells. We previously observed a unique triphasic scattering change (TSC) at a certain time after oxygen/glucose deprivation for blood-free rat brains; TSC almost coincided with the cerebral adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion. We examine whether such TSC can be observed in the presence of blood in vivo, for which transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement is performed for rat brains during hypoxia induced by nitrogen gas inhalation. At a certain time after hypoxia, diffuse reflectance intensity in the near-infrared region changes in three phases, which is shown by spectroscopic analysis to be due to scattering change in the tissue. During hypoxia, rats are reoxygenated at various time points. When the oxygen supply is started before TSC, all rats survive, whereas no rats survive when the oxygen supply is started after TSC. Survival is probabilistic when the oxygen supply is started during TSC, indicating that the period of TSC can be regarded as a critical time zone for rescuing the brain. The results demonstrate that light scattering signal can be an indicator of brain tissue reversibility.

  4. Human amniotic fluid contaminants alter thyroid hormone signalling and early brain development in Xenopus embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Jean-Baptiste; Mughal, Bilal B.; Le Mével, Sébastien; Leemans, Michelle; Lettmann, Mélodie; Spirhanzlova, Petra; Affaticati, Pierre; Jenett, Arnim; Demeneix, Barbara A.

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development in vertebrates. In humans, abnormal maternal thyroid hormone levels during early pregnancy are associated with decreased offspring IQ and modified brain structure. As numerous environmental chemicals disrupt thyroid hormone signalling, we questioned whether exposure to ubiquitous chemicals affects thyroid hormone responses during early neurogenesis. We established a mixture of 15 common chemicals at concentrations reported in human amniotic fluid. An in vivo larval reporter (GFP) assay served to determine integrated thyroid hormone transcriptional responses. Dose-dependent effects of short-term (72 h) exposure to single chemicals and the mixture were found. qPCR on dissected brains showed significant changes in thyroid hormone-related genes including receptors, deiodinases and neural differentiation markers. Further, exposure to mixture also modified neural proliferation as well as neuron and oligodendrocyte size. Finally, exposed tadpoles showed behavioural responses with dose-dependent reductions in mobility. In conclusion, exposure to a mixture of ubiquitous chemicals at concentrations found in human amniotic fluid affect thyroid hormone-dependent transcription, gene expression, brain development and behaviour in early embryogenesis. As thyroid hormone signalling is strongly conserved across vertebrates the results suggest that ubiquitous chemical mixtures could be exerting adverse effects on foetal human brain development.

  5. Notching on cancer’s door: Notch signaling in brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin eTeodorczyk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Notch receptors play an essential role in the regulation of central cellular processes during embryonic and postnatal development. The mammalian genome encodes for four Notch paralogs (Notch 1-4, which are activated by three Delta-like (Dll1/3/4 and two Serrate-like (Jagged1/2 ligands. Further, non-canonical Notch ligands such as EGFL7 have been identified and serve mostly as antagonists of Notch signaling. The Notch pathway prevents neuronal differentiation in the central nervous system by driving neural stem cell maintenance and commitment of neural progenitor cells into the glial lineage. Notch is therefore often implicated in the development of brain tumors, as tumor cells share various characteristics with neural stem and progenitor cells. Notch receptors are overexpressed in gliomas and their oncogenicity has been confirmed by gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro and in vivo. To this end, special attention is paid to the impact of Notch signaling on stem-like brain tumor-propagating cells as these cells contribute to growth, survival, invasion and recurrence of brain tumors. Based on the outcome of ongoing studies in vivo, Notch-directed therapies such as γ secretase inhibitors and blocking antibodies have entered and completed various clinical trials. This review summarizes the current knowledge on Notch signaling in brain tumor formation and therapy.

  6. Mitochondrial complex I dysfunction induced by cocaine and cocaine plus morphine in brain and liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Silva, Lisbeth; Silva, Ana Maria; Moreno, António J; Oliveira, Catarina R; Santos, Maria S

    2013-06-07

    Mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are affected in brains of human cocaine abusers. Cocaine is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac and hepatic tissues, but its effects on brain bioenergetics are less documented. Furthermore, the combination of cocaine and opioids (speedball) was also shown to induce mitochondrial dysfunction. In this work, we compared the effects of cocaine and/or morphine on the bioenergetics of isolated brain and liver mitochondria, to understand their specific effects in each tissue. Upon energization with complex I substrates, cocaine decreased state-3 respiration in brain (but not in liver) mitochondria and decreased uncoupled respiration and mitochondrial potential in both tissues, through a direct effect on complex I. Morphine presented only slight effects on brain and liver mitochondria, and the combination cocaine+morphine had similar effects to cocaine alone, except for a greater decrease in state-3 respiration. Brain and liver mitochondrial respirations were differentially affected, and liver mitochondria were more prone to proton leak caused by the drugs or their combination. This was possibly related with a different dependence on complex I in mitochondrial populations from these tissues. In summary, cocaine and cocaine+morphine induce mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in isolated brain and liver mitochondria, with specific effects in each tissue.

  7. Analysis on Design of Kohonen-network System Based on Classification of Complex Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The key methods of detection and classification of the electroencephalogram(EEG) used in recent years are introduced . Taking EEG for example, the design plan of Kohonen neural network system based on detection and classification of complex signals is proposed, and both the network design and signal processing are analyzed, including pre-processing of signals, extraction of signal features, classification of signal and network topology, etc.

  8. Physiological consequences of membrane-initiated estrogen signaling in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepke, Troy A.; Ronnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the actions of 17beta-estradiol (E2) in the central nervous system (CNS) are mediated via the classical nuclear steroid receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta, which interact with the estrogen response element to modulate gene expression. In addition to the nuclear-initiated estrogen signaling, E2 signaling in the brain can occur rapidly within minutes prior to any sufficient effects on transcription of relevant genes. These rapid, membrane-initiated E2 signaling mechanisms have now been characterized in many brain regions, most importantly in neurons of the hypothalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, our understanding of the physiological effects of membrane-initiated pathways is now a major field of interest in the hypothalamic control of reproduction, energy balance, thermoregulation and other homeostatic functions as well as the effects of E2 on physiological and pathophysiological functions of the hippocampus. Membrane signaling pathways impact neuronal excitability, signal transduction, cell death, neurotransmitter release and gene expression. This review will summarize recent findings on membrane-initiated E2 signaling in the hypothalamus and hippocampus and its contribution to the control of physiological and behavioral functions. PMID:21196248

  9. Midazolam sedation increases fluctuation and synchrony of the resting brain BOLD signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Vesa J; Haanpää, Hannu; Kantola, Juha-Heikki; Jauhiainen, Jukka; Vainionpää, Vilho; Alahuhta, Seppo; Tervonen, Osmo

    2005-05-01

    The blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance signal of functional brain cortices is dominated by very low frequency (VLF) fluctuations in anesthetized child patients. The temporal synchrony of the BOLD signal is also higher in anesthetized children compared with awake adults. The origin of the synchronous fluctuations can be related to maturation, pathological status or the anesthesia used in the imaging. Two of the three confounding variables (maturation and pathology) were controlled in this study. The effect of midazolam (4+/-0.8 mg) sedation on the BOLD signal was assessed in 12 healthy adults (aged 24+/-1.5 years) at 1.5 T. The VLF fluctuation power and temporal synchrony of the BOLD signal increased significantly after the sedation in the auditory and visual cortices. The fast Fourier transformation power spectral baseline fit parameters of the BOLD signal were also found to change significantly after sedation. It is concluded that the VLF fluctuation and temporal synchrony of the BOLD signal become increased after sedation in functional brain regions.

  10. ROI measurement of the signal intensity of precentral cortex in the normal brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaarslan, Ercan E-mail: arzuarslan@netscape.net; Arslan, Arzu

    2004-12-01

    Objective: It has recently been described that perirolandic cortex generally had a low signal intensity (SI) in neurologically normal brain. The aim of this study was to confirm this finding by an objective quantitative study. Materials and methods: Turbo fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images of 24 neurologically normal patients were evaluated retrospectively. Signal intensity measurements of the precentral and superior frontal cortices (SFCs) were obtained at a manually traced irregular region-of-interest (ROI). t-Test for paired samples was used to evaluate the significance of differences between signal intensity measurements. Results: Mean signal intensities of precentral and superior frontal cortices were 349.5 and 380.7, respectively, on the right, and 351.7 and 374.1 on the left hemisphere. The difference between the mean signal intensities of the side-matched precentral and superior frontal cortices was statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: Low signal intensity of the precentral cortex (PCC) in normal brain on turbo FLAIR images is an objective finding, confirmed by ROI measurement.

  11. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S;

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...

  12. Bispectral pairwise interacting source analysis for identifying systems of cross-frequency interacting brain sources from electroencephalographic or magnetoencephalographic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chella, Federico; Pizzella, Vittorio; Zappasodi, Filippo; Nolte, Guido; Marzetti, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Brain cognitive functions arise through the coordinated activity of several brain regions, which actually form complex dynamical systems operating at multiple frequencies. These systems often consist of interacting subsystems, whose characterization is of importance for a complete understanding of the brain interaction processes. To address this issue, we present a technique, namely the bispectral pairwise interacting source analysis (biPISA), for analyzing systems of cross-frequency interacting brain sources when multichannel electroencephalographic (EEG) or magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data are available. Specifically, the biPISA makes it possible to identify one or many subsystems of cross-frequency interacting sources by decomposing the antisymmetric components of the cross-bispectra between EEG or MEG signals, based on the assumption that interactions are pairwise. Thanks to the properties of the antisymmetric components of the cross-bispectra, biPISA is also robust to spurious interactions arising from mixing artifacts, i.e., volume conduction or field spread, which always affect EEG or MEG functional connectivity estimates. This method is an extension of the pairwise interacting source analysis (PISA), which was originally introduced for investigating interactions at the same frequency, to the study of cross-frequency interactions. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated in simulations for up to three interacting source pairs and for real MEG recordings of spontaneous brain activity. Simulations show that the performances of biPISA in estimating the phase difference between the interacting sources are affected by the increasing level of noise rather than by the number of the interacting subsystems. The analysis of real MEG data reveals an interaction between two pairs of sources of central mu and beta rhythms, localizing in the proximity of the left and right central sulci.

  13. The influence of complex and threatening environments in early life on brain size and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasquale, C; Neuberger, T; Hirrlinger, A M; Braithwaite, V A

    2016-01-27

    The ways in which challenging environments during development shape the brain and behaviour are increasingly being addressed. To date, studies typically consider only single variables, but the real world is more complex. Many factors simultaneously affect the brain and behaviour, and whether these work independently or interact remains untested. To address this, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were reared in a two-by-two design in housing that varied in structural complexity and/or exposure to a stressor. Fish experiencing both complexity (enrichment objects changed over time) and mild stress (daily net chasing) exhibited enhanced learning and were less anxious when tested as juveniles (between 77 and 90 days). Adults tested (aged 1 year) were also less anxious even though fish were kept in standard housing after three months of age (i.e. no chasing or enrichment). Volumetric measures of the brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that complexity alone generated fish with a larger brain, but this increase in size was not seen in fish that experienced both complexity and chasing, or chasing alone. The results highlight the importance of looking at multiple variables simultaneously, and reveal differential effects of complexity and stressful experiences during development of the brain and behaviour.

  14. Cytokinin signal transduction: Known simplicity and unknown complexity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Binglian; SUN Jiaqiang; ZHANG Suzhi; DENG Yan; ZUO Jianru

    2003-01-01

    Cytokinin plays a critical role in plant growth and development by regulating cell divisions and cell differentiation. Recent studies suggest that cytokinin signaling is presumably mediated by a two-component system analogous to those found in bacteria and fungi, which transduces an external signal via a phosphorelay from the plasma membrane-anchored receptors to downstream effectors andregulators. Moreover, cytokinin signaling is highly interactive with other pathways, and many components of the pathway appear to be functionally redundant. Proper address of these questions will be crucial for our further understanding onthis important network.

  15. Opaque for the Reader but Transparent for the Brain: Neural Signatures of Morphological Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Marcus; Lahiri, Aditi; Flaisch, Tobias; Hannemann, Ronny; Eulitz, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Within linguistics, words with a complex internal structure are commonly assumed to be decomposed into their constituent morphemes (e.g., un-help-ful). Nevertheless, an ongoing debate concerns the brain structures that subserve this process. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, the present study varied the internal complexity of derived…

  16. EEG Signal Denoising and Feature Extraction Using Wavelet Transform in Brain Computer Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ting; YAN Guo-zheng; YANG Bang-hua; SUN Hong

    2007-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal preprocessing is one of the most important techniques in brain computer interface (BCI). The target is to increase signal-to-noise ratio and make it more favorable for feature extraction and pattern recognition. Wavelet transform is a method of multi-resolution time-frequency analysis, it can decompose the mixed signals which consist of different frequencies into different frequency band. EEG signal is analyzed and denoised using wavelet transform. Moreover, wavelet transform can be used for EEG feature extraction. The energies of specific sub-bands and corresponding decomposition coefficients which have maximal separability according to the Fisher distance criterion are selected as features. The eigenvector for classification is obtained by combining the effective features from different channels. The performance is evaluated by separability and pattern recognition accuracy using the data set of BCI 2003 Competition, the final classification results have proved the effectiveness of this technology for EEG denoising and feature extraction.

  17. Adenosine receptor signaling modulates permeability of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Aaron J; Mills, Jeffrey H; Krenz, Antje; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S

    2011-09-14

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is comprised of specialized endothelial cells that form the capillary microvasculature of the CNS and is essential for brain function. It also poses the greatest impediment in the treatment of many CNS diseases because it commonly blocks entry of therapeutic compounds. Here we report that adenosine receptor (AR) signaling modulates BBB permeability in vivo. A(1) and A(2A) AR activation facilitated the entry of intravenously administered macromolecules, including large dextrans and antibodies to β-amyloid, into murine brains. Additionally, treatment with an FDA-approved selective A(2A) agonist, Lexiscan, also increased BBB permeability in murine models. These changes in BBB permeability are dose-dependent and temporally discrete. Transgenic mice lacking A(1) or A(2A) ARs showed diminished dextran entry into the brain after AR agonism. Following treatment with a broad-spectrum AR agonist, intravenously administered anti-β-amyloid antibody was observed to enter the CNS and bind β-amyloid plaques in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Selective AR activation resulted in cellular changes in vitro including decreased transendothelial electrical resistance, increased actinomyosin stress fiber formation, and alterations in tight junction molecules. These results suggest that AR signaling can be used to modulate BBB permeability in vivo to facilitate the entry of potentially therapeutic compounds into the CNS. AR signaling at brain endothelial cells represents a novel endogenous mechanism of modulating BBB permeability. We anticipate these results will aid in drug design, drug delivery and treatment options for neurological diseases such as AD, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and cancers of the CNS.

  18. A critical role for sonic hedgehog signaling in the early expansion of the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Joanne; Tannahill, David; Keynes, Roger

    2002-02-01

    The mechanisms that coordinate the three-dimensional shape of the vertebrate brain during development are largely unknown. We have found that sonic hedgehog (Shh) is crucial in driving the rapid, extensive expansion of the early vesicles of the developing midbrain and forebrain. Transient displacement of the notochord from the midbrain floor plate resulted in abnormal folding and overall collapse of the vesicles, accompanied by reduced cell proliferation and increased cell death in the midbrain. Simultaneously, expression of Shh decreased locally in the notochord and floor plate, whereas overt patterning and differentiation proceeded normally. Normal midbrain expansion was restored by implantation of Shh-secreting cells in a dose-dependent manner; conversely, expansion was retarded following antagonism of the Shh signaling pathway by cyclopamine. Our results indicate that Shh signaling from the ventral midline is essential for regulating brain morphogenesis during early development.

  19. Sexual differentiation of the brain requires perinatal kisspeptin-GnRH neuron signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Jenny; Busby, Ellen R; Kirilov, Milen; Schütz, Günther; Sherwood, Nancy M; Herbison, Allan E

    2014-11-12

    Sex differences in brain function underlie robust differences between males and females in both normal and disease states. Although alternative mechanisms exist, sexual differentiation of the male mammalian brain is initiated predominantly by testosterone secreted by the testes during the perinatal period. Despite considerable advances in understanding how testosterone and its metabolite estradiol sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that generates the male-specific perinatal testosterone surge. In mice, we show that a male-specific activation of GnRH neurons occurs 0-2 h following birth and that this correlates with the male-specific surge of testosterone occurring up to 5 h after birth. The necessity of GnRH signaling for the sexually differentiating effects of the perinatal testosterone surge was demonstrated by the persistence of female-like brain characteristics in adult male, GnRH receptor knock-out mice. Kisspeptin neurons have recently been identified to be potent, direct activators of GnRH neurons. We demonstrate that a population of kisspeptin neurons appears in the preoptic area of only the male between E19 and P1. The importance of kisspeptin inputs to GnRH neurons for the process of sexual differentiation was demonstrated by the lack of a normal neonatal testosterone surge, and disordered brain sexual differentiation of male mice in which the kisspeptin receptor was deleted selectively from GnRH neurons. These observations demonstrate the necessity of perinatal GnRH signaling for driving brain sexual differentiation and indicate that kisspeptin inputs to GnRH neurons are essential for this process to occur.

  20. Detecting the Intention to Move Upper Limbs from Electroencephalographic Brain Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiño-Mendoza, Berenice; Sanchez-Ante, Gildardo; Antelis, Javier M.

    2016-01-01

    Early decoding of motor states directly from the brain activity is essential to develop brain-machine interfaces (BMI) for natural motor control of neuroprosthetic devices. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the detection of movement information before the actual movement occurs. This information piece could be useful to provide early control signals to drive BMI-based rehabilitation and motor assisted devices, thus providing a natural and active rehabilitation therapy. In this work, electroencephalographic (EEG) brain signals from six healthy right-handed participants were recorded during self-initiated reaching movements of the upper limbs. The analysis of these EEG traces showed that significant event-related desynchronization is present before and during the execution of the movements, predominantly in the motor-related α and β frequency bands and in electrodes placed above the motor cortex. This oscillatory brain activity was used to continuously detect the intention to move the limbs, that is, to identify the motor phase prior to the actual execution of the reaching movement. The results showed, first, significant classification between relax and movement intention and, second, significant detection of movement intention prior to the onset of the executed movement. On the basis of these results, detection of movement intention could be used in BMI settings to reduce the gap between mental motor processes and the actual movement performed by an assisted or rehabilitation robotic device. PMID:27217826

  1. NF-κB Signaling in the Brain of Autistic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Malik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by problems in communication, social skills, and repetitive behavior. Recent studies suggest that apoptotic and inflammatory mechanisms may contribute to the pathogenesis of this disorder. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB is an important gene transcriptional factor involved in the mediation of inflammation and apoptosis. This study examined the activities of the NF-κB signaling pathway in the brain of autistic subjects and their age-matched controls. The NF-κB activation is also determined in the brain of BTBR mice, which is a promising animal model for study of pathogenic mechanisms responsible for autism. Our results showed that the level of IKKα kinase, which phosphorylates the inhibitory subunit IκBα, is significantly increased in the cerebellum of autistic subjects. However, the expression and phosphorylation of IκBα are not altered. In addition, our results demonstrated that the expression of NF-κB (p65, and the phosphorylation/activation of NF-κB (p65 at Ser536 are not significantly changed in the cerebellum and cortex of both autistic subjects and BTBR mice. Our findings suggest that the NF-κB signaling pathway is not disregulated in the brain of autistic subjects and thus may not be significantly involved in the processes of abnormal inflammatory responses suggested in autistic brain.

  2. A Topological Criterion for Filtering Information in Complex Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latora, Vito; Chavez, Mario

    2017-01-01

    In many biological systems, the network of interactions between the elements can only be inferred from experimental measurements. In neuroscience, non-invasive imaging tools are extensively used to derive either structural or functional brain networks in-vivo. As a result of the inference process, we obtain a matrix of values corresponding to a fully connected and weighted network. To turn this into a useful sparse network, thresholding is typically adopted to cancel a percentage of the weakest connections. The structural properties of the resulting network depend on how much of the inferred connectivity is eventually retained. However, how to objectively fix this threshold is still an open issue. We introduce a criterion, the efficiency cost optimization (ECO), to select a threshold based on the optimization of the trade-off between the efficiency of a network and its wiring cost. We prove analytically and we confirm through numerical simulations that the connection density maximizing this trade-off emphasizes the intrinsic properties of a given network, while preserving its sparsity. Moreover, this density threshold can be determined a-priori, since the number of connections to filter only depends on the network size according to a power-law. We validate this result on several brain networks, from micro- to macro-scales, obtained with different imaging modalities. Finally, we test the potential of ECO in discriminating brain states with respect to alternative filtering methods. ECO advances our ability to analyze and compare biological networks, inferred from experimental data, in a fast and principled way. PMID:28076353

  3. Graph theory analysis of complex brain networks: new concepts in brain mapping applied to neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael G; Ypma, Rolf J F; Romero-Garcia, Rafael; Price, Stephen J; Suckling, John

    2016-06-01

    Neuroanatomy has entered a new era, culminating in the search for the connectome, otherwise known as the brain's wiring diagram. While this approach has led to landmark discoveries in neuroscience, potential neurosurgical applications and collaborations have been lagging. In this article, the authors describe the ideas and concepts behind the connectome and its analysis with graph theory. Following this they then describe how to form a connectome using resting state functional MRI data as an example. Next they highlight selected insights into healthy brain function that have been derived from connectome analysis and illustrate how studies into normal development, cognitive function, and the effects of synthetic lesioning can be relevant to neurosurgery. Finally, they provide a précis of early applications of the connectome and related techniques to traumatic brain injury, functional neurosurgery, and neurooncology.

  4. Matched signal detection on graphs: Theory and application to brain imaging data classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenhui; Sepulcre, Jorge; Johnson, Keith A; Fakhri, Georges E; Lu, Yue M; Li, Quanzheng

    2016-01-15

    Motivated by recent progress in signal processing on graphs, we have developed a matched signal detection (MSD) theory for signals with intrinsic structures described by weighted graphs. First, we regard graph Laplacian eigenvalues as frequencies of graph-signals and assume that the signal is in a subspace spanned by the first few graph Laplacian eigenvectors associated with lower eigenvalues. The conventional matched subspace detector can be applied to this case. Furthermore, we study signals that may not merely live in a subspace. Concretely, we consider signals with bounded variation on graphs and more general signals that are randomly drawn from a prior distribution. For bounded variation signals, the test is a weighted energy detector. For the random signals, the test statistic is the difference of signal variations on associated graphs, if a degenerate Gaussian distribution specified by the graph Laplacian is adopted. We evaluate the effectiveness of the MSD on graphs both with simulated and real data sets. Specifically, we apply MSD to the brain imaging data classification problem of Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on two independent data sets: 1) positron emission tomography data with Pittsburgh compound-B tracer of 30 AD and 40 normal control (NC) subjects, and 2) resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) data of 30 early mild cognitive impairment and 20 NC subjects. Our results demonstrate that the MSD approach is able to outperform the traditional methods and help detect AD at an early stage, probably due to the success of exploiting the manifold structure of the data.

  5. Complex network analysis of brain functional connectivity under a multi-step cognitive task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shi-Min; Chen, Wei; Liu, Dong-Bai; Tang, Ming; Chen, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Functional brain network has been widely studied to understand the relationship between brain organization and behavior. In this paper, we aim to explore the functional connectivity of brain network under a multi-step cognitive task involving consecutive behaviors, and further understand the effect of behaviors on the brain organization. The functional brain networks are constructed based on a high spatial and temporal resolution fMRI dataset and analyzed via complex network based approach. We find that at voxel level the functional brain network shows robust small-worldness and scale-free characteristics, while its assortativity and rich-club organization are slightly restricted to the order of behaviors performed. More interestingly, the functional connectivity of brain network in activated ROIs strongly correlates with behaviors and is obviously restricted to the order of behaviors performed. These empirical results suggest that the brain organization has the generic properties of small-worldness and scale-free characteristics, and its diverse functional connectivity emerging from activated ROIs is strongly driven by these behavioral activities via the plasticity of brain.

  6. Comparative analysis of brain EEG signals generated from the right and left hand while writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardesai, Neha; Jamali Mahabadi, S. E.; Meng, Qinglei; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides a comparative analysis of right handed people and left handed people when they write with both their hands. Two left handed and one right handed subject were asked to write their respective names on a paper using both, their left and right handed, and their brain signals were measured using EEG. Similarly, they were asked to perform simple mathematical calculations using both their hand. The data collected from the EEG from writing with both hands is compared. It is observed that though it is expected that the right brain only would contribute to left handed writing and vice versa, it is not so. When a right handed person writes with his/her left hand, the initial instinct is to go for writing with the right hand. Hence, both parts of the brain are active when a subject writes with the other hand. However, when the activity is repeated, the brain learns to expect to write with the other hand as the activity is repeated and then only the expected part of the brain is active.

  7. Study on Brain Dynamics by Non Linear Analysis of Music Induced EEG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Archi; Sanyal, Shankha; Patranabis, Anirban; Banerjee, Kaushik; Guhathakurta, Tarit; Sengupta, Ranjan; Ghosh, Dipak; Ghose, Partha

    2016-02-01

    Music has been proven to be a valuable tool for the understanding of human cognition, human emotion, and their underlying brain mechanisms. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of Hindustani music on brain activity during normal relaxing conditions using electroencephalography (EEG). Ten male healthy subjects without special musical education participated in the study. EEG signals were acquired at the frontal (F3/F4) lobes of the brain while listening to music at three experimental conditions (rest, with music and without music). Frequency analysis was done for the alpha, theta and gamma brain rhythms. The finding shows that arousal based activities were enhanced while listening to Hindustani music of contrasting emotions (romantic/sorrow) for all the subjects in case of alpha frequency bands while no significant changes were observed in gamma and theta frequency ranges. It has been observed that when the music stimulus is removed, arousal activities as evident from alpha brain rhythms remain for some time, showing residual arousal. This is analogous to the conventional 'Hysteresis' loop where the system retains some 'memory' of the former state. This is corroborated in the non linear analysis (Detrended Fluctuation Analysis) of the alpha rhythms as manifested in values of fractal dimension. After an input of music conveying contrast emotions, withdrawal of music shows more retention as evidenced by the values of fractal dimension.

  8. SELF-ADAPTIVE CONTROLS OF A COMPLEX CELLULAR SIGNALING TRANSDUCTION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; ZHOU Zhiyuan; DAI Rongyang; LUO Bo; ZHENG Xiaoli; YANG Wenli; HE Tao; WU Minglu

    2004-01-01

    In cells, the interactions of distinct signaling transduction pathways originating from cross-talkings between signaling molecules give rise to the formation of signaling transduction networks, which contributes to the changes (emergency) of kinetic behaviors of signaling system compared with single molecule or pathway. Depending on the known experimental data, we have constructed a model for complex cellular signaling transduction system, which is derived from signaling transduction of epidermal growth factor receptor in neuron. By the computational simulating methods, the self-adaptive controls of this system have been investigated. We find that this model exhibits a relatively stable selfadaptive system, especially to over-stimulation of agonist, and the amplitude and duration of signaling intermediates in it could be controlled by multiple self-adaptive effects, such as "signal scattering", "positive feedback", "negative feedback" and "B-Raf shunt". Our results provide an approach to understanding the dynamic behaviors of complex biological systems.

  9. L-Ornithine is a potential acute satiety signal in the brain of neonatal chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuong V; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S; Do, Phong H; Bahry, Mohammad A; Yang, Hui; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Recently, we observed that neonatal chicks exhibit feeding behavior characterized by frequent food intake and short resting intervals, with changes detected in the brain amino acid and monoamine concentrations. In this study, we aimed to clarify further the relationship between the appetite of neonatal chicks and brain amino acid metabolism. In Experiment 1, changes were investigated in free amino acids in the brain under conditions of regulated appetite induced by fasting and subsequent short-term re-feeding. Chicks (5 days old) were distributed into four treatment groups--namely, fasting for 3h, and fasting for 3h followed by re-feeding for 10, 20 or 30 min. Brain samples were collected after treatment to analyze free amino acid concentrations. Amino adipic acid and proline in all brain parts as well as arginine and ornithine in all brain parts--except mesencephalic arginine and cerebellar ornithine--were increased in a time-dependent manner following re-feeding. In Experiment 2, we further examined the effect of exogenous administration of some amino acids altered in association with feeding behavior in Experiment 1. We chose L-arginine and its functional metabolite, L-ornithine, to analyze their effects on food intake in chicks. Intracerebroventricular injection (2 μmol) of L-ornithine, but not L-arginine, significantly inhibited food intake in neonatal chicks. In Experiment 3, we found that central injection of L-ornithine (2, 4, and 6 μmol) dose-dependently suppressed food intake in chicks. These results suggested that L-ornithine may have an important role in the control of food intake as an acute satiety signal in the neonatal chick brain.

  10. Prothrombin complex concentrate use in coagulopathy of lethal brain injuries increases organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Aziz, Hassan; Pandit, Viraj; Hays, Daniel; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Tang, Andrew; Wynne, Julie; O' Keeffe, Terence; Green, Donald J; Friese, Randall S; Gruessner, Rainer; Rhee, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Coagulopathy is a defined barrier for organ donation in patients with lethal traumatic brain injuries. The purpose of this study was to document our experience with the use of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) to facilitate organ donation in patients with lethal traumatic brain injuries. We performed a 4-year retrospective analysis of all patients with devastating gunshot wounds to the brain. The data were analyzed for demographics, change in international normalized ratio (INR), and subsequent organ donation. The primary end point was organ donation. Eighty-eight patients with lethal traumatic brain injury were identified from the trauma registry of whom 13 were coagulopathic at the time of admission (mean INR 2.2 ± 0.8). Of these 13 patients, 10 patients received PCC in an effort to reverse their coagulopathy. Mean INR before PCC administration was 2.01 ± 0.7 and 1.1 ± 0.7 after administration (P brain injuries.

  11. Complex Dynamics in Physiological Systems: From Heart to Brain

    CERN Document Server

    Dana, Syamal K; Kurths, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics has become an important field of research in recent years in many areas of the natural sciences. In particular, it has potential applications in biology and medicine; nonlinear data analysis has helped to detect the progress of cardiac disease, physiological disorders, for example episodes of epilepsy, and others. This book focuses on the current trends of research concerning the prediction of sudden cardiac death and the onset of epileptic seizures, using the nonlinear analysis based on ECG and EEG data. Topics covered include the analysis of cardiac models and neural models. The book is a collection of recent research papers by leading physicists, mathematicians, cardiologists and neurobiologists who are actively involved in using the concepts of nonlinear dynamics to explore the functional behaviours of heart and brain under normal and pathological conditions. This collection is intended for students in physics, mathematics and medical sciences, and researchers in interdisciplinary areas...

  12. DEVELOPMENTAL CHANGES IN SEROTONIN SIGNALING: IMPLICATIONS FOR EARLY BRAIN FUNCTION, BEHAVIOR AND ADAPTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRUMMELTE, S.; GLANAGHY, E. MC; BONNIN, A.; OBERLANDER, T. F.

    2017-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) plays a central role in brain development, regulation of mood, stress reactivity and risk of psychiatric disorders, and thus alterations in 5-HT signaling early in life have critical implications for behavior and mental health across the life span. Drawing on preclinical and emerging human evidence this narrative review paper will examine three key aspects when considering the consequences of early life changes in 5-HT: (1) developmental origins of variations of 5-HT signaling; (2) influence of genetic and epigenetic factors; and (3) preclinical and clinical consequences of 5-HT-related changes associated with antidepressant exposure (SSRIs). The developmental consequences of altered prenatal 5-HT signaling varies greatly and outcomes depend on an ongoing interplay between biological (genetic/epigenetic variations) and environmental factors, both pre and postnatally. Emerging evidence suggests that variations in 5-HT signaling may increase sensitivity to risky home environments, but may also amplify a positive response to a nurturing environment. In this sense, factors that change central 5-HT levels may act as ‘plasticity’ rather than ‘risk’ factors associated with developmental vulnerability. Understanding the impact of early changes in 5-HT levels offers critical insights that might explain the variations in early typical brain development that underlies behavioral risk. PMID:26905950

  13. HBpF-proBDNF: A New Tool for the Analysis of Pro-Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Receptor Signaling and Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaub, Perrine; de Léon, Andrès; Gibon, Julien; Soubannier, Vincent; Dorval, Geneviève; Séguéla, Philippe; Barker, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins activate intracellular signaling pathways necessary for neuronal survival, growth and apoptosis. The most abundant neurotrophin in the adult brain, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is first synthesized as a proBDNF precursor and recent studies have demonstrated that proBDNF can be secreted and that it functions as a ligand for a receptor complex containing p75NTR and sortilin. Activation of proBDNF receptors mediates growth cone collapse, reduces synaptic activity, and facilitates developmental apoptosis of motoneurons but the precise signaling cascades have been difficult to discern. To address this, we have engineered, expressed and purified HBpF-proBDNF, an expression construct containing a 6X-HIS tag, a biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) sequence, a PreScission™ Protease cleavage site and a FLAG-tag attached to the N-terminal part of murine proBDNF. Intact HBpF-proBDNF has activities indistinguishable from its wild-type counterpart and can be used to purify proBDNF signaling complexes or to monitor proBDNF endocytosis and retrograde transport. HBpF-proBDNF will be useful for characterizing proBDNF signaling complexes and for deciphering the role of proBDNF in neuronal development, synapse function and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26950209

  14. Denoising performance of modified dual-tree complex wavelet transform for processing quadrature embolic Doppler signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbes, Gorkem; Aydin, Nizamettin

    2014-01-01

    Quadrature signals are dual-channel signals obtained from the systems employing quadrature demodulation. Embolic Doppler ultrasound signals obtained from stroke-prone patients by using Doppler ultrasound systems are quadrature signals caused by emboli, which are particles bigger than red blood cells within circulatory system. Detection of emboli is an important step in diagnosing stroke. Most widely used parameter in detection of emboli is embolic signal-to-background signal ratio. Therefore, in order to increase this ratio, denoising techniques are employed in detection systems. Discrete wavelet transform has been used for denoising of embolic signals, but it lacks shift invariance property. Instead, dual-tree complex wavelet transform having near-shift invariance property can be used. However, it is computationally expensive as two wavelet trees are required. Recently proposed modified dual-tree complex wavelet transform, which reduces the computational complexity, can also be used. In this study, the denoising performance of this method is extensively evaluated and compared with the others by using simulated and real quadrature signals. The quantitative results demonstrated that the modified dual-tree-complex-wavelet-transform-based denoising outperforms the conventional discrete wavelet transform with the same level of computational complexity and exhibits almost equal performance to the dual-tree complex wavelet transform with almost half computational cost.

  15. FILDIG: a program to filter brain electrical signals in the frequency domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, M A; Ramos, J; Hernández-González, M; Corsi-Cabrera, M

    2005-11-01

    A software program to filter brain electrical signals in the frequency domain has been developed and is presently reported. Many other filters are commercially available; however, most of them are linked to data acquisition and/or analysis programs rendering them costly. Depending on the experimental field, the full programs are not always needed. To overcome the need to obtain narrow bands in EEG research and other biological signals in an easy, fast and cheap way, we developed a computer program (FILDIG) that renders an almost ideal in-phase filter in the frequency domain and can be used in all types of personal microcomputers (PC and Mac's) and with few resources. The system uses an interactive graphic display and, with a minimum interface, it is capable of filtering multiple channels and simultaneously obtaining electrical signals (EEG, EMG, EOG, etc.) without noise or specific frequency bands.

  16. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway in depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yingquan; Qiao, Mingqi

    2013-03-25

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  17. Effects of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Signal Exposure on Brain Glucos Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Vaska, P.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Alexoff, D.; Logan, J.; Wong, C.

    2011-03-01

    The dramatic increase in use of cellular telephones has generated concern about possible negative effects of radiofrequency signals delivered to the brain. However, whether acute cell phone exposure affects the human brain is unclear. To evaluate if acute cell phone exposure affects brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain activity. Randomized crossover study conducted between January 1 and December 31, 2009, at a single US laboratory among 47 healthy participants recruited from the community. Cell phones were placed on the left and right ears and positron emission tomography with ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose injection was used to measure brain glucose metabolism twice, once with the right cell phone activated (sound muted) for 50 minutes ('on' condition) and once with both cell phones deactivated ('off' condition). Statistical parametric mapping was used to compare metabolism between on and off conditions using paired t tests, and Pearson linear correlations were used to verify the association of metabolism and estimated amplitude of radiofrequency-modulated electromagnetic waves emitted by the cell phone. Clusters with at least 1000 voxels (volume >8 cm{sup 3}) and P < .05 (corrected for multiple comparisons) were considered significant. Brain glucose metabolism computed as absolute metabolism ({micro}mol/100 g per minute) and as normalized metabolism (region/whole brain). Whole-brain metabolism did not differ between on and off conditions. In contrast, metabolism in the region closest to the antenna (orbitofrontal cortex and temporal pole) was significantly higher for on than off conditions (35.7 vs 33.3 {micro}mol/100 g per minute; mean difference, 2.4 [95% confidence interval, 0.67-4.2]; P = .004). The increases were significantly correlated with the estimated electromagnetic field amplitudes both for absolute metabolism (R = 0.95, P < .001) and normalized metabolism (R = 0.89; P < .001). In healthy participants and compared with no

  18. Histone deacetylases control neurogenesis in embryonic brain by inhibition of BMP2/4 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Shakèd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histone-modifying enzymes are essential for a wide variety of cellular processes dependent upon changes in gene expression. Histone deacetylases (HDACs lead to the compaction of chromatin and subsequent silencing of gene transcription, and they have recently been implicated in a diversity of functions and dysfunctions in the postnatal and adult brain including ocular dominance plasticity, memory consolidation, drug addiction, and depression. Here we investigate the role of HDACs in the generation of neurons and astrocytes in the embryonic brain. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a variety of HDACs are expressed in differentiating neural progenitor cells, we have taken a pharmacological approach to inhibit multiple family members. Inhibition of class I and II HDACs in developing mouse embryos with trichostatin A resulted in a dramatic reduction in neurogenesis in the ganglionic eminences and a modest increase in neurogenesis in the cortex. An identical effect was observed upon pharmacological inhibition of HDACs in in vitro-differentiating neural precursors derived from the same brain regions. A reduction in neurogenesis in ganglionic eminence-derived neural precursors was accompanied by an increase in the production of immature astrocytes. We show that HDACs control neurogenesis by inhibition of the bone morphogenetic protein BMP2/4 signaling pathway in radial glial cells. HDACs function at the transcriptional level by inhibiting and promoting, respectively, the expression of Bmp2 and Smad7, an intracellular inhibitor of BMP signaling. Inhibition of the BMP2/4 signaling pathway restored normal levels of neurogenesis and astrogliogenesis to both ganglionic eminence- and cortex-derived cultures in which HDACs were inhibited. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate a transcriptionally-based regulation of BMP2/4 signaling by HDACs both in vivo and in vitro that is critical for neurogenesis in the ganglionic eminences and that modulates cortical

  19. Vitamin B-complex initiates growth and development of human embryonic brain cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielyan, K E; Abramyan, R A; Galoyan, A A; Kevorkian, G A

    2011-09-01

    We studied a combined effect of subcomponents of vitamin B complex on the growth, development, and death of human embryonic brain-derived cells (E90) cultured using a modified method of Matson. Cell death was detected by trypan blue staining. According to our results, vitamin B-complex in low-doses promote the development, maturation, and enlargement of human embryonic brain cells, on the one hand, and increases the percent of cell death, which attests to accelerated maturation and metabolism, on the other.

  20. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications.

  1. Brain signal variability as a window into the bidirectionality between music and language processing: moving from a linear to a nonlinear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutka, Stefanie; Bidelman, Gavin M; Moreno, Sylvain

    2013-12-30

    There is convincing empirical evidence for bidirectional transfer between music and language, such that experience in either domain can improve mental processes required by the other. This music-language relationship has been studied using linear models (e.g., comparing mean neural activity) that conceptualize brain activity as a static entity. The linear approach limits how we can understand the brain's processing of music and language because the brain is a nonlinear system. Furthermore, there is evidence that the networks supporting music and language processing interact in a nonlinear manner. We therefore posit that the neural processing and transfer between the domains of language and music are best viewed through the lens of a nonlinear framework. Nonlinear analysis of neurophysiological activity may yield new insight into the commonalities, differences, and bidirectionality between these two cognitive domains not measurable in the local output of a cortical patch. We thus propose a novel application of brain signal variability (BSV) analysis, based on mutual information and signal entropy, to better understand the bidirectionality of music-to-language transfer in the context of a nonlinear framework. This approach will extend current methods by offering a nuanced, network-level understanding of the brain complexity involved in music-language transfer.

  2. Contributions and complexities from the use of in-vivo animal models to improve understanding of human neuroimaging signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eMartin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Many of the major advances in our understanding of how functional brain imaging signals relate to neuronal activity over the previous two decades have arisen from physiological research studies involving experimental animal models. This approach has been successful partly because it provides opportunities to measure both the hemodynamic changes that underpin many human functional brain imaging techniques and the neuronal activity about which we wish to make inferences. Although research into the coupling of neuronal and hemodynamic responses using animal models has provided a general validation of the correspondence of neuroimaging signals to specific types of neuronal activity, it is also highlighting the key complexities and uncertainties in estimating neural signals from hemodynamic markers. This review will detail how research in animal models is contributing to our rapidly evolving understanding of what human neuroimaging techniques tell us about neuronal activity. It will highlight emerging issues in the interpretation of neuroimaging data that arise from in-vivo research studies, for example spatial and temporal constraints to neuroimaging signal interpretation, or the effects of disease and modulatory neurotransmitters upon neurovascular coupling. We will also give critical consideration to the limitations and possible complexities of translating data acquired in the typical animals models used in this area to the arena of human fMRI. These include the commonplace use of anaesthesia in animal research studies and the fact that many neuropsychological questions that are being actively explored in humans have limited homologues within current animal models for neuroimaging research. Finally we will highlighting approaches, both in experimental animals models (e.g. imaging in conscious, behaving animals and human studies (e.g. combined fMRI-EEG, that mitigate against these challenges.

  3. CD73 is a major regulator of adenosinergic signalling in mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Kulesskaya

    Full Text Available CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase is a cell surface enzyme that regulates purinergic signalling by desphosphorylating extracellular AMP to adenosine. 5'-nucleotidases are known to be expressed in brain, but the expression of CD73 and its putative physiological functions at this location remain elusive. Here we found, using immunohistochemistry of wild-type and CD73 deficient mice, that CD73 is prominently expressed in the basal ganglia core comprised of striatum (caudate nucleus and putamen and globus pallidus. Furthermore, meninges and the olfactory tubercle were found to specifically express CD73. Analysis of wild type (wt and CD73 deficient mice revealed that CD73 confers the majority of 5'-nucleotidase activity in several areas of the brain. In a battery of behavioural tests and in IntelliCage studies, the CD73 deficient mice demonstrated significantly enhanced exploratory locomotor activity, which probably reflects the prominent expression of CD73 in striatum and globus pallidus that are known to control locomotion. Furthermore, the CD73 deficient mice displayed altered social behaviour. Overall, our data provide a novel mechanistic insight into adenosinergic signalling in brain, which is implicated in the regulation of normal and pathological behaviour.

  4. The Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling pathway contributes to the integrity of tight junctions in brain endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Wnt morphogens released by neural precursor cells were recently reported to control blood–brain barrier (BBB) formation during development. Indeed, in mouse brain endothelial cells, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, also known as the canonical Wnt pathway, was shown to stabilize endothelial tight junctions (TJs) through transcriptional regulation of the expression of TJ proteins. Because Wnt proteins activate several distinct β-catenin-dependent and independent signaling path...

  5. The evolution of relative brain size in marsupials is energetically constrained but not driven by behavioral complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbecker, Vera; Blomberg, Simon; Goldizen, Anne W; Brown, Meredeth; Fisher, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary increases in mammalian brain size relative to body size are energetically costly but are also thought to confer selective advantages by permitting the evolution of cognitively complex behaviors. However, many suggested associations between brain size and specific behaviors - particularly related to social complexity - are possibly confounded by the reproductive diversity of placental mammals, whose brain size evolution is the most frequently studied. Based on a phylogenetic generalized least squares analysis of a data set on the reproductively homogenous clade of marsupials, we provide the first quantitative comparison of two hypotheses based on energetic constraints (maternal investment and seasonality) with two hypotheses that posit behavioral selection on relative brain size (social complexity and environmental interactions). We show that the two behavioral hypotheses have far less support than the constraint hypotheses. The only unambiguous associates of brain size are the constraint variables of litter size and seasonality. We also found no association between brain size and specific behavioral complexity categories within kangaroos, dasyurids, and possums. The largest-brained marsupials after phylogenetic correction are from low-seasonality New Guinea, supporting the notion that low seasonality represents greater nutrition safety for brain maintenance. Alternatively, low seasonality might improve the maternal support of offspring brain growth. The lack of behavioral brain size associates, found here and elsewhere, supports the general 'cognitive buffer hypothesis' as the best explanatory framework of mammalian brain size evolution. However, it is possible that brain size alone simply does not provide sufficient resolution on the question of how brain morphology and cognitive capacities coevolve.

  6. Perception of acoustically complex phonological features in vowels is reflected in the induced brain-magnetic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obleser Jonas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A central issue in speech recognition is which basic units of speech are extracted by the auditory system and used for lexical access. One suggestion is that complex acoustic-phonetic information is mapped onto abstract phonological representations of speech and that a finite set of phonological features is used to guide speech perception. Previous studies analyzing the N1m component of the auditory evoked field have shown that this holds for the acoustically simple feature place of articulation. Brain magnetic correlates indexing the extraction of acoustically more complex features, such as lip rounding (ROUND in vowels, have not been unraveled yet. The present study uses magnetoencephalography (MEG to describe the spatial-temporal neural dynamics underlying the extraction of phonological features. We examined the induced electromagnetic brain response to German vowels and found the event-related desynchronization in the upper beta-band to be prolonged for those vowels that exhibit the lip rounding feature (ROUND. It was the presence of that feature rather than circumscribed single acoustic parameters, such as their formant frequencies, which explained the differences between the experimental conditions. We conclude that the prolonged event-related desynchronization in the upper beta-band correlates with the computational effort for the extraction of acoustically complex phonological features from the speech signal. The results provide an additional biomagnetic parameter to study mechanisms of speech perception.

  7. On the Non-Uniform Complexity of Brain Connectivity (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    cluster diffusion MRI datasets by considering them as point clouds in Rm (m ≥ 6 depends on the order of the SH approximation of ODFs), without any spatial...SH series coefficients of the ODFs. They respectively correspond to point clouds in R30, R6 and R(l+1)(l+2)/2, for SH series of order l. The k-NN...labeled known neuro-anatomical areas by examining the complexity of the point clouds obtained from a set of Orientational Dis- tribution Functions

  8. Immune-to-brain signaling and substrates of altered behavior during inlfammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Pieter Konsman

    2016-01-01

    During the systemic inlfammatory response to acute infection, and when in a safe environment, endothermic mammals typically display reduced activity and food intake, increased sleep, and the adoption of a curled-up position. These changes in behavior, in concert with fever, are adaptive in that they contribute to host survival. The present review addresses the immune-to-brain signaling pathways as well as possible neural substrates mediating reduced exploration and food intake during acute systemic inlfammation. These involve rapid activation of peripheral nerves and glutamatergic brainstem circuits as well as slower IL-1β action in the brain activating limbic and possibly ventral hypothalamic structures. Although mostly adaptive acutely, behavioral changes during inlfammation may also relfect brain dysfunction in severe sepsis-associated delirium or become maladaptive and result in depression due to medical conditions that involve long-term inlfammatory episodes with pain or discomfort. The mechanisms underlying these conditions are presently ill-understood even though neuroinlfammation and neurodegeneration occur during and subsequent to sepsis-associated brain dysfunction, respectively.

  9. Machines vs. ensembles: effective MAPK signaling through heterogeneous sets of protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Suderman

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of intracellular signaling networks, there is currently no consensus regarding the fundamental nature of the protein complexes such networks employ. One prominent view involves stable signaling machines with well-defined quaternary structures. The combinatorial complexity of signaling networks has led to an opposing perspective, namely that signaling proceeds via heterogeneous pleiomorphic ensembles of transient complexes. Since many hypotheses regarding network function rely on how we conceptualize signaling complexes, resolving this issue is a central problem in systems biology. Unfortunately, direct experimental characterization of these complexes has proven technologically difficult, while combinatorial complexity has prevented traditional modeling methods from approaching this question. Here we employ rule-based modeling, a technique that overcomes these limitations, to construct a model of the yeast pheromone signaling network. We found that this model exhibits significant ensemble character while generating reliable responses that match experimental observations. To contrast the ensemble behavior, we constructed a model that employs hierarchical assembly pathways to produce scaffold-based signaling machines. We found that this machine model could not replicate the experimentally observed combinatorial inhibition that arises when the scaffold is overexpressed. This finding provides evidence against the hierarchical assembly of machines in the pheromone signaling network and suggests that machines and ensembles may serve distinct purposes in vivo. In some cases, e.g. core enzymatic activities like protein synthesis and degradation, machines assembled via hierarchical energy landscapes may provide functional stability for the cell. In other cases, such as signaling, ensembles may represent a form of weak linkage, facilitating variation and plasticity in network evolution. The capacity of ensembles to signal effectively

  10. A Complexity-Based Approach for the Detection of Weak Signals in Ocean Ambient Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashidhar Siddagangaiah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous studies showing that there is a constant increase in the ocean ambient noise level and the ever-growing demand for developing algorithms for detecting weak signals in ambient noise. In this study, we utilize dynamical and statistical complexity to detect the presence of weak ship noise embedded in ambient noise. The ambient noise and ship noise were recorded in the South China Sea. The multiscale entropy (MSE method and the complexity-entropy causality plane (C-H plane were used to quantify the dynamical and statistical complexity of the measured time series, respectively. We generated signals with varying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR by varying the amplification of a ship signal. The simulation results indicate that the complexity is sensitive to change in the information in the ambient noise and the change in SNR, a finding that enables the detection of weak ship signals in strong background ambient noise. The simulation results also illustrate that complexity is better than the traditional spectrogram method, particularly effective for detecting low SNR signals in ambient noise. In addition, complexity-based MSE and C-H plane methods are simple, robust and do not assume any underlying dynamics in time series. Hence, complexity should be used in practical situations.

  11. Molecular complexities of patched signaling in cancer development

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Basal Cell Cancer (BCC) is the most common cancer in the Western world. Although BCCs hardly ever metastasize, invasive growth may cause considerable local tissue destruction. BCCs mainly occur as sporadic tumors but can also be found in a hereditary form in the Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS). The gene underlying the NBCCS is Patched1 (PTCH1), a tumor suppressor gene that is mutated or deleted in these patients. This thesis is focusing in deciphering complex...

  12. Astrocyte sodium signaling and neuro-metabolic coupling in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, C R; Chatton, J-Y

    2016-05-26

    At tripartite synapses, astrocytes undergo calcium signaling in response to release of neurotransmitters and this calcium signaling has been proposed to play a critical role in neuron-glia interaction. Recent work has now firmly established that, in addition, neuronal activity also evokes sodium transients in astrocytes, which can be local or global depending on the number of activated synapses and the duration of activity. Furthermore, astrocyte sodium signals can be transmitted to adjacent cells through gap junctions and following release of gliotransmitters. A main pathway for activity-related sodium influx into astrocytes is via high-affinity sodium-dependent glutamate transporters. Astrocyte sodium signals differ in many respects from the well-described glial calcium signals both in terms of their temporal as well as spatial distribution. There are no known buffering systems for sodium ions, nor is there store-mediated release of sodium. Sodium signals thus seem to represent rather direct and unbiased indicators of the site and strength of neuronal inputs. As such they have an immediate influence on the activity of sodium-dependent transporters which may even reverse in response to sodium signaling, as has been shown for GABA transporters for example. Furthermore, recovery from sodium transients through Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase requires a measurable amount of ATP, resulting in an activation of glial metabolism. In this review, we present basic principles of sodium regulation and the current state of knowledge concerning the occurrence and properties of activity-related sodium transients in astrocytes. We then discuss different aspects of the relationship between sodium changes in astrocytes and neuro-metabolic coupling, putting forward the idea that indeed sodium might serve as a new type of intracellular ion signal playing an important role in neuron-glia interaction and neuro-metabolic coupling in the healthy and diseased brain.

  13. Hand posture classification using electrocorticography signals in the gamma band over human sensorimotor brain areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestek, Cynthia A.; Gilja, Vikash; Blabe, Christine H.; Foster, Brett L.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Parvizi, Josef; Henderson, Jaimie M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interface systems translate recorded neural signals into command signals for assistive technology. In individuals with upper limb amputation or cervical spinal cord injury, the restoration of a useful hand grasp could significantly improve daily function. We sought to determine if electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals contain sufficient information to select among multiple hand postures for a prosthetic hand, orthotic, or functional electrical stimulation system.Approach. We recorded ECoG signals from subdural macro- and microelectrodes implanted in motor areas of three participants who were undergoing inpatient monitoring for diagnosis and treatment of intractable epilepsy. Participants performed five distinct isometric hand postures, as well as four distinct finger movements. Several control experiments were attempted in order to remove sensory information from the classification results. Online experiments were performed with two participants. Main results. Classification rates were 68%, 84% and 81% for correct identification of 5 isometric hand postures offline. Using 3 potential controls for removing sensory signals, error rates were approximately doubled on average (2.1×). A similar increase in errors (2.6×) was noted when the participant was asked to make simultaneous wrist movements along with the hand postures. In online experiments, fist versus rest was successfully classified on 97% of trials; the classification output drove a prosthetic hand. Online classification performance for a larger number of hand postures remained above chance, but substantially below offline performance. In addition, the long integration windows used would preclude the use of decoded signals for control of a BCI system. Significance. These results suggest that ECoG is a plausible source of command signals for prosthetic grasp selection. Overall, avenues remain for improvement through better electrode designs and placement, better participant training

  14. Supraspinal brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling: a novel mechanism for descending pain facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Robbins, Meredith T; Wei, Feng; Zou, Shiping; Dubner, Ronald; Ren, Ke

    2006-01-04

    In the adult mammalian brain, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critically involved in long-term synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that supraspinal BDNF-tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) signaling contributes to pain facilitation. We show that BDNF-containing neurons in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), the central structure for pain modulation, project to and release BDNF in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), a relay between the PAG and spinal cord. BDNF in PAG and TrkB phosphorylation in RVM neurons are upregulated after inflammation. Intra-RVM sequestration of BDNF and knockdown of TrkB by RNA interference attenuate inflammatory pain. Microinjection of BDNF (10-100 fmol) into the RVM facilitates nociception, which is dependent on NMDA receptors (NMDARs). In vitro studies with RVM slices show that BDNF induces tyrosine phosphorylation of the NMDAR NR2A subunit in RVM via a signal transduction cascade involving IP(3), PKC, and Src. The supraspinal BDNF-TrkB signaling represents a previously unknown mechanism underlying the development of persistent pain. Our findings also caution that application of BDNF for recovery from CNS disorders could lead to undesirable central pain.

  15. A guide to delineate the logic of neurovascular signaling in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eKleinfeld

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The neurovascular system may be viewed as a distributed nervous system within the brain. It transforms local neuronal activity into a change in the tone of smooth muscle that lines the walls of arterioles and microvessels. We review the current state of neurovascular coupling, with an emphasis on signaling molecules that convey information from neurons to neighboring vessels. At the level of neocortex, this coupling is mediated by: (i a likely direct interaction with inhibitory neurons, (ii indirect interaction, via astrocytes, with excitatory neurons, and (iii fiber tracts from subcortical layers. Substantial evidence shows that control involves competition between signals that promote vasoconstriction versus vasodilation. Consistent with this picture is evidence that, under certain circumstances, increased neuronal activity can lead to vasoconstriction rather than vasodilation. This confounds naïve interpretations of functional brain images. We discuss experimental approaches to detect signaling molecules in vivo with the goal of formulating an empirical basis for the observed logic of neurovascular control.

  16. Reelin signaling in the migration of ventral brain stem and spinal cord neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eBlaess

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix protein Reelin is an important orchestrator of neuronal migration during the development of the central nervous system. While its role and mechanism of action have been extensively studied and reviewed in the formation of dorsal laminar brain structures like the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, its functions during the neuronal migration events that result in the nuclear organization of the ventral central nervous system are less well understood. In an attempt to delineate an underlying pattern of Reelin action in the formation of neuronal cell clusters, this review highlights the role of Reelin signaling in the migration of neuronal populations that originate in the ventral brain stem and the spinal cord.

  17. Local signal time-series during rest used for areal boundary mapping in individual human brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Hirose

    Full Text Available It is widely thought that resting state functional connectivity likely reflects functional interaction among brain areas and that different functional areas interact with different sets of brain areas. A method for mapping areal boundaries has been formulated based on the large-scale spatial characteristics of regional interaction revealed by resting state functional connectivity. In the present study, we present a novel analysis for areal boundary mapping that requires only the signal timecourses within a region of interest, without reference to the information from outside the region. The areal boundaries were generated by the novel analysis and were compared with those generated by the previously-established standard analysis. The boundaries were robust and reproducible across the two analyses, in two regions of interest tested. These results suggest that the information for areal boundaries is readily available inside the region of interest.

  18. Resveratrol: Brain effects on SIRT1, GPR50 and photoperiodic signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Robert Leheste

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SIRT1 deacetylase, a sensor of intermittent energy restriction, is inextricably intertwined with circadian regulation of central and peripheral clock genes. The purpose of this study was to identify SIRT1-specific target genes that are expressed in a circadian rhythm pattern and driven, in part, by specific components of foodstuffs. Using human cells and rats fed with a resveratrol diet we show that SIRT1 binds to, and transcriptionally regulates, a gene locus encoding the G protein-coupled receptor, GPR50 in the brain. GPR50 is the mammalian orthologue of the melatonin1c membrane-bound receptor which has been identified as a genetic risk factor for bipolar disorder and major depression in women. In general, our findings support and expand the notion that circadian clock signaling components and dietary interventions are adaptively linked, and suggest that the brain may be particularly sensitive to metabolic events in response to light-dark cycles.

  19. From EEG signals to brain connectivity: a model-based evaluation of interdependence measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Fabrice; Ansari-Asl, Karim; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Senhadji, Lotfi

    2009-09-30

    In the past, considerable effort has been devoted to the development of signal processing techniques aimed at characterizing brain connectivity from signals recorded from spatially-distributed regions during normal or pathological conditions. In this paper, three families of methods (linear and nonlinear regression, phase synchronization, and generalized synchronization) are reviewed. Their performances were evaluated according to a model-based methodology in which a priori knowledge about the underlying relationship between systems that generate output signals is available. This approach allowed us to relate the interdependence measures computed by connectivity methods to the actual values of the coupling parameter explicitly represented in various models of signal generation. Results showed that: (i) some of the methods were insensitive to the coupling parameter; (ii) results were dependent on signal properties (broad band versus narrow band); (iii) there was no "ideal" method, i.e., none of the methods performed better than the other ones in all studied situations. Nevertheless, regression methods showed sensitivity to the coupling parameter in all tested models with average or good performances. Therefore, it is advised to first apply these "robust" methods in order to characterize brain connectivity before using more sophisticated methods that require specific assumptions about the underlying model of relationship. In all cases, it is recommended to compare the results obtained from different connectivity methods to get more reliable interpretation of measured quantities with respect to underlying coupling. In addition, time-frequency methods are also recommended when coupling in specific frequency sub-bands ("frequency-locking") is likely to occur as in epilepsy.

  20. Application of the dual-tree complex wavelet transform in biomedical signal denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Ji, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    In biomedical signal processing, Gibbs oscillation and severe frequency aliasing may occur when using the traditional discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Herein, a new denoising algorithm based on the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT) is presented. Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals and heart sound signals are denoised based on the DTCWT. The results prove that the DTCWT is efficient. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the mean square error (MSE) are used to compare the denoising effect. Results of the paired samples t-test show that the new method can remove noise more thoroughly and better retain the boundary and texture of the signal.

  1. Effect of Acupuncture Signal after Brachial Plexus Blockade on Cerebral Blood Perfusion and Brain Cell Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任永功; 郭长春; 贾少微

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to observe the influence of the up-transmitting of acupuncture signal into the brain in health volunteers whose nerve trunk was blocked by anesthetics. Methods: Thirty-one healthy volunteers were divided into two groups, the control group of 20 cases, and the brachial plexus blockade (BPB) group of 11 cases, with supraclavicular BPB route adopted. With the control group 2 acupoints were randomly selected (Hegu and Quchi of both sides), while with the BPB group Hegu and Quchi of anesthetic arm side were selected. Siemens ECAM/ICON SPECT system was used to conduct brain imaging using double imaging assay before acupuncture and 99mTc-ECD imaging agent during acupuncture for cerebral perfusion. The data were quantitatively analyzed by blood functional changing rate (BFCR%) mathematics model. Results: Before acupuncture, the control and BPB groups showed insignificant change by SPECT, but after electro-acupuncture (EA), the control group displayed improved motor and sensory cortex excitability in basal nuclei, contra-lateral thalamus, parietal and frontal lobe; while BPB group was characterized with reduction of the blood perfusion and cell function of contra-lateral thalamus of anesthetized arm. The difference between the two groups was significant (P<0.01). Conclusion: (1) After BPB, the up-transmitting of the acupuncture signal via upper limb into the brain, and its strength was impaired or blocked; (2) After BPB, the effect of acupuncture on cerebral perfusion and brain cell function of contra-lateral thalamus was impaired or blocked.

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling rewrites the glucocorticoid transcriptome via glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, W Marcus; Xu, Chong-Feng; Neubert, Thomas A; Chao, Moses V; Garabedian, Michael J; Jeanneteau, Freddy D

    2013-09-01

    Abnormal glucocorticoid and neurotrophin signaling has been implicated in numerous psychiatric disorders. However, the impact of neurotrophic signaling on glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent gene expression is not understood. We therefore examined the impact of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling on GR transcriptional regulatory function by gene expression profiling in primary rat cortical neurons stimulated with the selective GR agonist dexamethasone (Dex) and BDNF, alone or in combination. Simultaneous treatment with BDNF and Dex elicited a unique set of GR-responsive genes associated with neuronal growth and differentiation and also enhanced the induction of a large number of Dex-sensitive genes. BDNF via its receptor TrkB enhanced the transcriptional activity of a synthetic GR reporter, suggesting a direct effect of BDNF signaling on GR function. Indeed, BDNF treatment induces the phosphorylation of GR at serine 155 (S155) and serine 287 (S287). Expression of a nonphosphorylatable mutant (GR S155A/S287A) impaired the induction of a subset of BDNF- and Dex-regulated genes. Mechanistically, BDNF-induced GR phosphorylation increased GR occupancy and cofactor recruitment at the promoter of a BDNF-enhanced gene. GR phosphorylation in vivo is sensitive to changes in the levels of BDNF and TrkB as well as stress. Therefore, BDNF signaling specifies and amplifies the GR transcriptome through a coordinated GR phosphorylation-dependent detection mechanism.

  3. Restoring susceptibility induced MRI signal loss in rat brain at 9.4 T: A step towards whole brain functional connectivity imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupeng Li

    Full Text Available The aural cavity magnetic susceptibility artifact leads to significant echo planar imaging (EPI signal dropout in rat deep brain that limits acquisition of functional connectivity fcMRI data. In this study, we provide a method that recovers much of the EPI signal in deep brain. Needle puncture introduction of a liquid-phase fluorocarbon into the middle ear allows acquisition of rat fcMRI data without signal dropout. We demonstrate that with seeds chosen from previously unavailable areas, including the amygdala and the insular cortex, we are able to acquire large scale networks, including the limbic system. This tool allows EPI-based neuroscience and pharmaceutical research in rat brain using fcMRI that was previously not feasible.

  4. NONINVASIVE DETECTION OF BRAIN ACTIVITY VARIATION UNDER DIFFERENT DEPTH OF ANESTHESIA BY EEG COMPLEXITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    For a principal action of general anestheticagents takes place inthe brain,it wouldinduce EEGchange.It is reasonable to monitor the brain activityand esti mate the depth of anesthesia(DOA)byEEG[1].EEG signal was used to detect DOA since1940.Up to now,numerous efforts have beenmade to develop and test various EEG-derived pa-rameters in ti me-domain,frequency-domain,bis-pectral-domain etc.[2-3],but none of these methodshas beenshownto be sufficiently reliable for gener-al use for assessing DOAaccurately.Compl...

  5. Free-running ADC- and FPGA-based signal processing method for brain PET using GAPD arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wei [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Key Jo [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jihoon [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin Ho [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Youn Suk [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyun Keong; Kim, Sang Su [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Tae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yonghyun [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Health Science, 234 Meaji, Heungup Wonju, Kangwon-Do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    then transferred to a host computer for coincidence sorting and image reconstruction. In order to evaluate the functionality of the developed signal processing method, energy and timing resolutions for brain PET were measured via the placement of a 6 {mu}Ci {sup 22}Na point source at the center of the PET scanner. Furthermore the PET image of the hot rod phantom (rod diameter: from 2.5 mm to 6.5 mm) with activity of 1 mCi was simulated, and then image acquisition experiment was performed using the brain PET. Measured average energy resolution for 1152 GAPD channels and system timing resolution were 19.5% (FWHM%) and 2.7 ns (FWHM), respectively. With regard to the acquisition of the hot rod phantom image, rods could be resolved down to a diameter of 2.5 mm, which was similar to simulated results. The experimental results demonstrated that the signal processing method developed herein was successfully implemented for brain PET. This reduced the complexity, cost and developing duration for PET system relative to normal PET electronics, and it will obviously be useful for the development of high-performance investigational PET systems.

  6. Free-running ADC- and FPGA-based signal processing method for brain PET using GAPD arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Choi, Yong; Hong, Key Jo; Kang, Jihoon; Jung, Jin Ho; Huh, Youn Suk; Lim, Hyun Keong; Kim, Sang Su; Kim, Byung-Tae; Chung, Yonghyun

    2012-02-01

    evaluate the functionality of the developed signal processing method, energy and timing resolutions for brain PET were measured via the placement of a 6 μCi 22Na point source at the center of the PET scanner. Furthermore the PET image of the hot rod phantom (rod diameter: from 2.5 mm to 6.5 mm) with activity of 1 mCi was simulated, and then image acquisition experiment was performed using the brain PET. Measured average energy resolution for 1152 GAPD channels and system timing resolution were 19.5% (FWHM%) and 2.7 ns (FWHM), respectively. With regard to the acquisition of the hot rod phantom image, rods could be resolved down to a diameter of 2.5 mm, which was similar to simulated results. The experimental results demonstrated that the signal processing method developed herein was successfully implemented for brain PET. This reduced the complexity, cost and developing duration for PET system relative to normal PET electronics, and it will obviously be useful for the development of high-performance investigational PET systems.

  7. [Music-Acoustic Signals Controlled by Subject's Brain Potentials in the Correction of Unfavorable Functional States].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar, A T; Bakhchina, A V; Parin, S B; Polevaya, S A; Radchenko, G S

    2016-01-01

    Literature review and the results of own studies on the development and experimental testing of musical EEG neurofeedback technology are presented. The technology is based on exposure of subjects to music or music-like signals that are organized in strict accordance with the current values of brain potentials of the patient. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the effectiveness of several versions of the technology, using specific and meaningful for the individual narrow-frequency EEG oscillators during the correction of unfavorable changes of the functional state.

  8. Alteration of brain insulin and leptin signaling promotes energy homeostasis impairment and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taouis Mohammed

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS controls vital functions, by efficiently coordinating peripheral and central cascades of signals and networks in a coordinated manner. Historically, the brain was considered to be an insulin-insensitive tissue. But, new findings demonstrating that insulin is present in different regions of themammalian brain, in particular the hypothalamus and the hippocampus. Insulin acts through specific receptors and dialogues with numerous peptides, neurotransmitters and adipokines such as leptin. The cross-talk between leptin and insulin signaling pathways at the hypothalamic level is clearly involved in the control of energy homeostasis. Both hormones are anorexigenic through their action on hypothalamic arcuate nucleus by inducing the expression of anorexigenic neuropetides such as POMC (pro-opiomelanocortin, the precursor of aMSH and reducing the expression of orexigenic neuropeptide such as NPY (Neuropeptide Y. Central defect of insulin and leptin signaling predispose to obesity (leptin-resistant state and type-2 diabetes (insulin resistant state. Obesity and type-2 diabetes are associated to deep alterations in energy homeostasis control but also to other alterations of CNS functions as the predisposition to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by distinct hallmarks within the brain. Postmortem observation of AD brains showed the presence of parenchymal plaques due to the accumulation of the amyloid beta (AB peptide and neurofibrillary tangles. These accumulations result from the hyperphosphorylation of tau (a mictrotubule-interacting protein. Both insulin and leptin have been described to modulate tau phosphorylation and therefore in leptin and insulin resistant states may contribute to AD. The concentrations of leptin and insulin cerebrospinal fluid are decreased type2 diabetes and obese patients. In addition, the concentration of insulin in the

  9. In vivo optical microprobe imaging for intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in response to dopaminergic signaling in deep brain evoked by cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhongchi; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Ca2+ plays a vital role as second messenger in signal transduction and the intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) change is an important indicator of neuronal activity in the brain, including both cortical and subcortical brain regions. Due to the highly scattering and absorption of brain tissue, it is challenging to optically access the deep brain regions (e.g., striatum at >3mm under the brain surface) and image [Ca2+]i changes with cellular resolutions. Here, we present two micro-probe approaches (i.e., microlens, and micro-prism) integrated with a fluorescence microscope modified to permit imaging of neuronal [Ca2+]i signaling in the striatum using a calcium indicator Rhod2(AM). While a micro-prism probe provides a larger field of view to image neuronal network from cortex to striatum, a microlens probe enables us to track [Ca2+]i dynamic change in individual neurons within the brain. Both techniques are validated by imaging neuronal [Ca2+]i changes in transgenic mice with dopamine receptors (D1R, D2R) expressing EGFP. Our results show that micro-prism images can map the distribution of D1R- and D2R-expressing neurons in various brain regions and characterize their different mean [Ca2+]i changes induced by an intervention (e.g., cocaine administration, 8mg/kg., i.p). In addition, microlens images can characterize the different [Ca2+]i dynamics of D1 and D2 neurons in response to cocaine, including new mechanisms of these two types of neurons in striatum. These findings highlight the power of the optical micro-probe imaging for dissecting the complex cellular and molecular insights of cocaine in vivo.

  10. On the space and time evolution of regular or irregular human heart or brain signals

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2011-01-01

    A coupled map is suggested to investigate various spatial or temporal designs in biology: Several cells (or tissues) in an organ are considered as connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences and so on. The biological systems (groups of cells) start from various initial conditions for spatial designs (or initial signals for temporal designs) and they evolve in time in terms of the mentioned interactions (connections) besides some individual feedings. The basic aim of the present contribution is to mimic various empirical data for the heart (in normal, quasi-stable, unstable and post operative physiological conditions) or brain (regular or irregular; for epilepsy) signals. The mentioned empirical data are borrowed from various literatures which are cited. The suggested model (to be used besides or instead of the artificial network models) involves simple mathematics and the related software is easy. The results may be considered as in good agreement with the...

  11. Time sparsification of EEG signals in motor-imagery based brain computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method of sparsifying EEG signals in the time domain for common spatial patterns (CSP) which are often used for feature extraction in brain computer interfaces (BCI). For accurate classification, it is important to analyze the period of time when a BCI user performs a mental task. We address this problem by optimizing the CSP cost with a time sparsification that removes unnecessary samples from the classification. We design a cost function that has CSP spatial weights and time window as optimization parameters. To find these parameters, we use alternating optimization. In an experiment on classification of motor-imagery EEG signals, the proposed method increased classification accuracy by 6% averaged over five subjects.

  12. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Grab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  13. Brain Machine Interface: Analysis of segmented EEG Signal Classification Using Short-Time PCA and Recurrent Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hema

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain machine interface provides a communication channel between the human brain and an external device. Brain interfaces are studied to provide rehabilitation to patients with neurodegenerative diseases; such patients loose all communication pathways except for their sensory and cognitive functions. One of the possible rehabilitation methods for these patients is to provide a brain machine interface (BMI for communication; the BMI uses the electrical activity of the brain detected by scalp EEG electrodes. Classification of EEG signals extracted during mental tasks is a technique for designing a BMI. In this paper a BMI design using five mental tasks from two subjects were studied, a combination of two tasks is studied per subject. An Elman recurrent neural network is proposed for classification of EEG signals. Two feature extraction algorithms using overlapped and non overlapped signal segments are analyzed. Principal component analysis is used for extracting features from the EEG signal segments. Classification performance of overlapping EEG signal segments is observed to be better in terms of average classification with a range of 78.5% to 100%, while the non overlapping EEG signal segments show better classification in terms of maximum classifications.

  14. Complex Signal Kurtosis and Independent Component Analysis for Wideband Radio Frequency Interference Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenwald, Adam; Mohammed, Priscilla; Bradley, Damon; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Wong, Englin; Gholian, Armen

    2016-01-01

    Radio-frequency interference (RFI) has negatively implicated scientific measurements across a wide variation passive remote sensing satellites. This has been observed in the L-band radiometers SMOS, Aquarius and more recently, SMAP [1, 2]. RFI has also been observed at higher frequencies such as K band [3]. Improvements in technology have allowed wider bandwidth digital back ends for passive microwave radiometry. A complex signal kurtosis radio frequency interference detector was developed to help identify corrupted measurements [4]. This work explores the use of ICA (Independent Component Analysis) as a blind source separation technique to pre-process radiometric signals for use with the previously developed real and complex signal kurtosis detectors.

  15. Preparation of new technetium-99m NNS/X complexes and selection for brain imaging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qiange; CHEN Xiangji; MIAO Yubin; LIU Boli

    2004-01-01

    Based on excellent experiment results of 99mTcO-MPBDA-Cl, two new ligands MPTDA and MPDAA are synthesized. Then series of 99mTcO3+ complexes are prepared through adding different halide anions, followed by tests of physical chemistry qualities and biodistribution experiments. And results of these experiments show that complexes formed with MPTDA and MPDAA have better lipophilicity than those formed with MPBDA, still maintain the good brain retention ability of this type of compounds, but radioactivity uptake in blood is higher than that of 99mTcO-MPBDA and ratios of brain/blood are reduced. Obvious affections are fetched out on brain uptake and retention if fluoride, bromide or iodide anions are added. Results of experiments can be explained in reason with theoretic computation. It is confirmed that 99mTcO-MPBDA-Cl has potential to develop a new type of brain imaging agent considering integrated factors such as brain uptake, retention and toxicity.

  16. Abnormal EEG Complexity and Functional Connectivity of Brain in Patients with Acute Thalamic Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Guo, Jie; Meng, Jiayuan; Wang, Zhijun; Yao, Yang; Yang, Jiajia; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic thalamus stroke has become a serious cardiovascular and cerebral disease in recent years. To date the existing researches mostly concentrated on the power spectral density (PSD) in several frequency bands. In this paper, we investigated the nonlinear features of EEG and brain functional connectivity in patients with acute thalamic ischemic stroke and healthy subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) in resting condition with eyes closed was recorded for 12 stroke patients and 11 healthy subjects as control group. Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC), Sample Entropy (SampEn), and brain network using partial directed coherence (PDC) were calculated for feature extraction. Results showed that patients had increased mean LZC and SampEn than the controls, which implied the stroke group has higher EEG complexity. For the brain network, the stroke group displayed a trend of weaker cortical connectivity, which suggests a functional impairment of information transmission in cortical connections in stroke patients. These findings suggest that nonlinear analysis and brain network could provide essential information for better understanding the brain dysfunction in the stroke and assisting monitoring or prognostication of stroke evolution. PMID:27403202

  17. AMPA receptor-induced local brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling mediates motor recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Andrew N; Overman, Justine J; Zhong, Sheng; Mueller, Rudolf; Lynch, Gary; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2011-03-09

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Recovery after stroke shares similar molecular and cellular properties with learning and memory. A main component of learning-induced plasticity involves signaling through AMPA receptors (AMPARs). We systematically tested the role of AMPAR function in motor recovery in a mouse model of focal stroke. AMPAR function controls functional recovery beginning 5 d after the stroke. Positive allosteric modulators of AMPARs enhance recovery of limb control when administered after a delay from the stroke. Conversely, AMPAR antagonists impair motor recovery. The contributions of AMPARs to recovery are mediated by release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in periinfarct cortex, as blocking local BDNF function in periinfarct cortex blocks AMPAR-mediated recovery and prevents the normal pattern of motor recovery. In contrast to a delayed AMPAR role in motor recovery, early administration of AMPAR agonists after stroke increases stroke damage. These findings indicate that the role of glutamate signaling through the AMPAR changes over time in stroke: early potentiation of AMPAR signaling worsens stroke damage, whereas later potentiation of the same signaling system improves functional recovery.

  18. Astroglial CB1 cannabinoid receptors regulate leptin signaling in mouse brain astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosier, Barbara; Bellocchio, Luigi; Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Matias, Isabelle; Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne; Cannich, Astrid; Maitre, Marlène; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Cardinal, Pierre; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Canduela, Miren Josune; Reguero, Leire; Hermans, Emmanuel; Grandes, Pedro; Cota, Daniela; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Type-1 cannabinoid (CB1) and leptin (ObR) receptors regulate metabolic and astroglial functions, but the potential links between the two systems in astrocytes were not investigated so far. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations of CB1 receptor expression and activity in cultured cortical and hypothalamic astrocytes demonstrated that cannabinoid signaling controls the levels of ObR expression. Lack of CB1 receptors also markedly impaired leptin-mediated activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 and 5 (STAT3 and STAT5) in astrocytes. In particular, CB1 deletion determined a basal overactivation of STAT5, thereby leading to the downregulation of ObR expression, and leptin failed to regulate STAT5-dependent glycogen storage in the absence of CB1 receptors. These results show that CB1 receptors directly interfere with leptin signaling and its ability to regulate glycogen storage, thereby representing a novel mechanism linking endocannabinoid and leptin signaling in the regulation of brain energy storage and neuronal functions.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Diffusion Weighted MR Images of Brain Tumor Using Signal Intensity Gradient Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Shanbhag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion weighted-magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI in the examination and classification of brain tumors, namely, glioma and meningioma. Our hypothesis was that as signal intensity variations on diffusion weighted (DW images depend on histology and cellularity of the tumor, analysing the signal intensity characteristics on DW images may allow differentiating between the tumor types. Towards this end the signal intensity variations on DW images of the entire tumor volume data of 20 subjects with glioma and 12 subjects with meningioma were investigated and quantified using signal intensity gradient (SIG parameter. The relative increase in the SIG values (RSIG for the subjects with glioma and meningioma was in the range of 10.08–28.36 times and 5.60–9.86 times, respectively, compared to their corresponding SIG values on the contralateral hemisphere. The RSIG values were significantly different between the subjects with glioma and meningioma (P<0.01, with no overlap between RSIG values across the two tumors. The results indicate that the quantitative changes in the RSIG values could be applied in the differential diagnosis of glioma and meningioma, and their adoption in clinical diagnosis and treatment could be helpful and informative.

  20. When the brain simulates stopping: Neural activity recorded during real and imagined stop-signal tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Villar, Alberto J; Bonilla, F Mauricio; Carrillo-de-la-Peña, María T

    2016-10-01

    It has been suggested that mental rehearsal activates brain areas similar to those activated by real performance. Although inhibition is a key function of human behavior, there are no previous reports of brain activity during imagined response cancellation. We analyzed event-related potentials (ERPs) and time-frequency data associated with motor execution and inhibition during real and imagined performance of a stop-signal task. The ERPs characteristic of stop trials-that is, the stop-N2 and stop-P3-were also observed during covert performance of the task. Imagined stop (IS) trials yielded smaller stop-N2 amplitudes than did successful stop (SS) and unsuccessful stop (US) trials, but midfrontal theta power similar to that in SS trials. The stop-P3 amplitude for IS was intermediate between those observed for SS and US. The results may be explained by the absence of error-processing and correction processes during imagined performance. For go trials, real execution was associated with higher mu and beta desynchronization over motor areas, which confirms previous reports of lower motor activation during imagined execution and also with larger P3b amplitudes, probably indicating increased top-down attention to the real task. The similar patterns of activity observed for imagined and real performance suggest that imagination tasks may be useful for training inhibitory processes. Nevertheless, brain activation was generally weaker during mental rehearsal, probably as a result of the reduced engagement of top-down mechanisms and limited error processing.

  1. Computational modeling of chemotactic signaling and aggregation of microglia around implantation site during deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silchenko, A. N.; Tass, P. A.

    2013-10-01

    It is well established that prolonged electrical stimulation of brain tissue causes massive release of ATP in the extracellular space. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y2,12 as well as A3A and A2A adenosine receptors. The size of the sheath around the electrode formed by the microglial cells is an important criterion for the optimization of the parameters of electrical current delivered to brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards the implanted electrode during deep brain stimulation. We present a computational model describing formation of a stable aggregate around the implantation site due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP together with a mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The model was built in accordance with the classical Keller-Segel approach and includes an equation for the cells' density as well as equations describing the hydrolysis of extracellular ATP via successive reaction steps ATP →ADP →AMP →adenosine. The results of our modeling allowed us to reveal the dependence of the width of the encapsulating layer around the electrode on the amount of ATP released due to permanent electrical stimulation. The dependences of the aggregates' size on the parameter governing the nonlinearity of interaction between extracellular adenosine and adenosine receptors are also analyzed.

  2. Investigating Irregularly Patterned Deep Brain Stimulation Signal Design Using Biophysical Models

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    Samantha Rose Summerson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder which follows from cell loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc, a nucleus in the basal ganglia (BG. Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an electrical therapy that modulates the pathological activity to treat the motor symptoms of PD. Although this therapy is currently used in clinical practice, the sufficient conditions for therapeutic efficacy are unknown. In this work we develop a model of critical motor circuit structures in the brain using biophysical cell models as the base components and then evaluate performance of different DBS signals in this model to perform comparative studies of their efficacy. Biological models are an important tool for gaining insights into neural function and, in this case, serve as effective tools for investigating innovative new DBS paradigms. Experiments were performed using the hemi-parkinsonian rodent model to test the same set of signals, verifying the obedience of the model to physiological trends. We show that antidromic spiking from DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN has a significant impact on cortical neural activity, which is frequency dependent and additionally modulated by the regularity of the stimulus pulse train used. Irregular spacing between stimulus pulses, where the amount of variability added is bounded, is shown to increase diversification of response of basal ganglia neurons and reduce entropic noise in cortical neurons, which may be fundamentally important to restoration of information flow in the motor circuit.

  3. Signal peptide peptidase (SPP) assembles with substrates and misfolded membrane proteins into distinct oligomeric complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrul, Bianca; Kapp, Katja; Sinning, Irmgard; Dobberstein, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    SPP (signal peptide peptidase) is an aspartyl intramembrane cleaving protease, which processes a subset of signal peptides, and is linked to the quality control of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) membrane proteins. We analysed SPP interactions with signal peptides and other membrane proteins by co-immunoprecipitation assays. We found that SPP interacts specifically and tightly with a large range of newly synthesized membrane proteins, including signal peptides, preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins, but not with all co-expressed type II membrane proteins. Signal peptides are trapped by the catalytically inactive SPP mutant SPPD/A. Preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins interact with both SPP and the SPPD/A mutant, and are not substrates for SPP-mediated intramembrane proteolysis. Proteins interacting with SPP are found in distinct complexes of different sizes. A signal peptide is mainly trapped in a 200 kDa SPP complex, whereas a preprotein is predominantly found in a 600 kDa SPP complex. A misfolded membrane protein is detected in 200, 400 and 600 kDa SPP complexes. We conclude that SPP not only processes signal peptides, but also collects preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins that are destined for disposal. PMID:20196774

  4. Classification of Brain Signals in Normal Subjects and Patients with Epilepsy Using Mixture of Experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Amoozegar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available EEG is one of the most important and common sources for study of brain function and neurological disorders. Automated systems are under study for many years to detect EEG changes. Because of the importance of making correct decision, we are looking for better classification methods for EEG signals. In this paper a smart compound system is used for classifying EEG signals to different groups. Since in each classification the system accuracy of making decision is very important, in this study we look for some methods to improve the accuracy of EEG signals classification. In this paper the use of Mixture of Experts for improving the EEG signals classification of normal subjects and patients with epilepsy is shown and the classification accuracy is evaluated. Decision making was performed in two stages: 1 feature extractions with different methods of eigenvector and 2 Classification using the classifier trained by extracted features. This smart system inputs are formed from composites features that are selected appropriate with network structure. In this study tree methods based on eigenvectors (Minimum Norm, MUSIC, Pisarenko are chosen for the estimation of Power Spectral Density (PSD. After the implementation of ME and train it on composite features, we propose that this technique can reach high classification accuracy. Hence, EEG signals classification of epilepsy patients in different situations and control subjects is available. In this study, Mixture of Experts structure was used for EEG signals classification. Proper performance of Neural Network depends on the size of train and test data. Combination of multiple Neural Networks even without using the probable structure in obtaining weights in classification problem can produce high accuracy in less time, which is important and valuable in the classification point of view.

  5. Videogame training strategy-induced change in brain function during a complex visuomotor task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunkyu; Voss, Michelle W; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Boot, Walter R; Vo, Loan T K; Basak, Chandramallika; Vanpatter, Matt; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica; Kramer, Arthur F

    2012-07-01

    Although changes in brain function induced by cognitive training have been examined, functional plasticity associated with specific training strategies is still relatively unexplored. In this study, we examined changes in brain function during a complex visuomotor task following training using the Space Fortress video game. To assess brain function, participants completed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after 30 h of training with one of two training regimens: Hybrid Variable-Priority Training (HVT), with a focus on improving specific skills and managing task priority, or Full Emphasis Training (FET), in which participants simply practiced the game to obtain the highest overall score. Control participants received only 6 h of FET. Compared to FET, HVT learners reached higher performance on the game and showed less brain activation in areas related to visuo-spatial attention and goal-directed movement after training. Compared to the control group, HVT exhibited less brain activation in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), coupled with greater performance improvement. Region-of-interest analysis revealed that the reduction in brain activation was correlated with improved performance on the task. This study sheds light on the neurobiological mechanisms of improved learning from directed training (HVT) over non-directed training (FET), which is related to visuo-spatial attention and goal-directed motor planning, while separating the practice-based benefit, which is related to executive control and rule management.

  6. LPA signaling initiates schizophrenia-like brain and behavioral changes in a mouse model of prenatal brain hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirendil, H; Thomas, E A; De Loera, C; Okada, K; Inomata, Y; Chun, J

    2015-04-07

    Genetic, environmental and neurodevelopmental factors are thought to underlie the onset of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. How these risk factors collectively contribute to pathology is unclear. Here, we present a mouse model of prenatal intracerebral hemorrhage--an identified risk factor for schizophrenia--using a serum-exposure paradigm. This model exhibits behavioral, neurochemical and schizophrenia-related gene expression alterations in adult females. Behavioral alterations in amphetamine-induced locomotion, prepulse inhibition, thigmotaxis and social interaction--in addition to increases in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area and decreases in parvalbumin-positive cells in the prefrontal cortex--were induced upon prenatal serum exposure. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lipid component of serum, was identified as a key molecular initiator of schizophrenia-like sequelae induced by serum. Prenatal exposure to LPA alone phenocopied many of the schizophrenia-like alterations seen in the serum model, whereas pretreatment with an antagonist against the LPA receptor subtype LPA1 prevented many of the behavioral and neurochemical alterations. In addition, both prenatal serum and LPA exposure altered the expression of many genes and pathways related to schizophrenia, including the expression of Grin2b, Slc17a7 and Grid1. These findings demonstrate that aberrant LPA receptor signaling associated with fetal brain hemorrhage may contribute to the development of some neuropsychiatric disorders.

  7. Brain serotonin signaling does not determine sexual preference in male mice.

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    Mariana Angoa-Pérez

    Full Text Available It was reported recently that male mice lacking brain serotonin (5-HT lose their preference for females (Liu et al., 2011, Nature, 472, 95-100, suggesting a role for 5-HT signaling in sexual preference. Regulation of sex preference by 5-HT lies outside of the well established roles in this behavior established for the vomeronasal organ (VNO and the main olfactory epithelium (MOE. Presently, mice with a null mutation in the gene for tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2, which are depleted of brain 5-HT, were tested for sexual preference. When presented with inanimate (urine scents from male or estrous female or animate (male or female mouse in estrus sexual stimuli, TPH2-/- males show a clear preference for female over male stimuli. When a TPH2-/- male is offered the simultaneous choice between an estrous female and a male mouse, no sexual preference is expressed. However, when confounding behaviors that are seen among 3 mice in the same cage are controlled, TPH2-/- mice, like their TPH2+/+ counterparts, express a clear preference for female mice. Female TPH2-/- mice are preferred by males over TPH2+/+ females but this does not lead to increased pregnancy success. In fact, if one or both partners in a mating pair are TPH2-/- in genotype, pregnancy success rates are significantly decreased. Finally, expression of the VNO-specific cation channel TRPC2 and of CNGA2 in the MOE of TPH2-/- mice is normal, consistent with behavioral findings that sexual preference of TPH2-/- males for females is intact. In conclusion, 5-HT signaling in brain does not determine sexual preference in male mice. The use of pharmacological agents that are non-selective for the 5-HT neuronal system and that have serious adverse effects may have contributed historically to the stance that 5-HT regulates sexual behavior, including sex partner preference.

  8. Reiteration of Hankel singular value decomposition for modeling of complex-valued signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniszewski, Michał; Skorupa, Agnieszka; Boguszewicz, Łukasz; Wicher, Magdalena; Konopka, Marek; Sokół, Maria; Polański, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Modeling signal which forms complex values is a common scientific problem, which is present in many applications, i.e. in medical signals, computer graphics and vision. One of the possible solution is utilization of Hankel Singular Value Decomposition. In the first step complex-valued signal is arranged in a special form called Hankel matrix, which is in the next step decomposed in operation of Singular Value Decomposition. Obtained matrices can be then reformulated in order to get parameters describing system. Basic method can be applied for fitting whole signal but it fails in modeling each particular component of signal. Modification of basic HSVD method, which relies on reiteration and is used for main components, and application of prior knowledge solves presented problem.

  9. A Smoothened-Evc2 complex transduces the Hedgehog signal at primary cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Karolin V; Hughes, Casey E; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2012-10-16

    Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that localize in cilia but are displaced from the EvC zone are dominant inhibitors of Hh signaling. Disabling Evc2 function blocks Hh signaling at a specific step between Smo and the downstream regulators protein kinase A and Suppressor of Fused, preventing activation of the Gli transcription factors. Our data suggest that the Smo-Evc2 signaling complex at the EvC zone is required for Hh signal transmission and elucidate the molecular basis of two human ciliopathies.

  10. A stochastic mechanism for signal propagation in the brain: Force of rapid random fluctuations in membrane potentials of individual neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Dawei; Man, Shushuang; Martin, Joseph V

    2016-01-21

    There are two functionally important factors in signal propagation in a brain structural network: the very first synaptic delay-a time delay about 1ms-from the moment when signals originate to the moment when observation on the signal propagation can begin; and rapid random fluctuations in membrane potentials of every individual neuron in the network at a timescale of microseconds. We provide a stochastic analysis of signal propagation in a general setting. The analysis shows that the two factors together result in a stochastic mechanism for the signal propagation as described below. A brain structural network is not a rigid circuit rather a very flexible framework that guides signals to propagate but does not guarantee success of the signal propagation. In such a framework, with the very first synaptic delay, rapid random fluctuations in every individual neuron in the network cause an "alter-and-concentrate effect" that almost surely forces signals to successfully propagate. By the stochastic mechanism we provide analytic evidence for the existence of a force behind signal propagation in a brain structural network caused by rapid random fluctuations in every individual neuron in the network at a timescale of microseconds with a time delay of 1ms.

  11. Comparison of Matching Pursuit Algorithm with Other Signal Processing Techniques for Computation of the Time-Frequency Power Spectrum of Brain Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran K S, Subhash; Mishra, Ashutosh; Shirhatti, Vinay; Ray, Supratim

    2016-03-23

    Signals recorded from the brain often show rhythmic patterns at different frequencies, which are tightly coupled to the external stimuli as well as the internal state of the subject. In addition, these signals have very transient structures related to spiking or sudden onset of a stimulus, which have durations not exceeding tens of milliseconds. Further, brain signals are highly nonstationary because both behavioral state and external stimuli can change on a short time scale. It is therefore essential to study brain signals using techniques that can represent both rhythmic and transient components of the signal, something not always possible using standard signal processing techniques such as short time fourier transform, multitaper method, wavelet transform, or Hilbert transform. In this review, we describe a multiscale decomposition technique based on an over-complete dictionary called matching pursuit (MP), and show that it is able to capture both a sharp stimulus-onset transient and a sustained gamma rhythm in local field potential recorded from the primary visual cortex. We compare the performance of MP with other techniques and discuss its advantages and limitations. Data and codes for generating all time-frequency power spectra are provided.

  12. A simple iterative independent component analysis algorithm for vibration source signal identification of complex structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Dong-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Independent Component Analysis (ICA, one of the blind source separation methods, can be applied for extracting unknown source signals only from received signals. This is accomplished by finding statistical independence of signal mixtures and has been successfully applied to myriad fields such as medical science, image processing, and numerous others. Nevertheless, there are inherent problems that have been reported when using this technique: instability and invalid ordering of separated signals, particularly when using a conventional ICA technique in vibratory source signal identification of complex structures. In this study, a simple iterative algorithm of the conventional ICA has been proposed to mitigate these problems. The proposed method to extract more stable source signals having valid order includes an iterative and reordering process of extracted mixing matrix to reconstruct finally converged source signals, referring to the magnitudes of correlation coefficients between the intermediately separated signals and the signals measured on or nearby sources. In order to review the problems of the conventional ICA technique and to validate the proposed method, numerical analyses have been carried out for a virtual response model and a 30 m class submarine model. Moreover, in order to investigate applicability of the proposed method to real problem of complex structure, an experiment has been carried out for a scaled submarine mockup. The results show that the proposed method could resolve the inherent problems of a conventional ICA technique.

  13. Apo-ghrelin receptor (apo-GHSR1a Regulates Dopamine Signaling in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras eKern

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The orexigenic peptide hormone ghrelin is synthesized in the stomach and its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a is expressed mainly in the central nervous system (CNS. In this review we confine our discussion to the physiological role of GHSR1a in the brain. Paradoxically, despite broad expression of GHSR1a in the CNS, other than trace amounts in the hypothalamus, ghrelin is undetectable in the brain. In our efforts to elucidate the function of the ligand-free ghrelin receptor (apo-GHSR1a we identified subsets of neurons that co-express GHSR1a and dopamine receptors. In this review we focus on interactions between apo-GHSR1a and dopamine-2 receptor (DRD2 and formation of GHSR1a:DRD2 heteromers in hypothalamic neurons that regulate appetite, and discuss implications for the treatment of Prader-Willi syndrome. GHSR1a antagonists of distinct chemical structures, a quinazolinone and a triazole, respectively enhance and inhibit dopamine signaling through GHSR1a:DRD2 heteromers by an allosteric mechanism. This finding illustrates a potential strategy for designing the next generation of drugs for treating eating disorders as well as psychiatric disorders caused by abnormal dopamine signaling. Treatment with a GHSR1a antagonist that enhances dopamine/DRD2 activity in GHSR1a:DRD2 expressing hypothalamic neurons has the potential to inhibit the uncontrollable hyperphagia associated with Prader-Willi syndrome. DRD2 antagonists are prescribed for treating schizophrenia, but these block dopamine signaling in all DRD2 expressing neurons and are associated with adverse side effects, including enhanced appetite and excessive weight gain. A GHSR1a antagonist of structural class that allosterically blocks dopamine/DRD2 action in GHSR1a:DRD2 expressing neurons would have no effect on neurons expressing DRD2 alone; therefore, the side effects of DRD2 antagonists would potentially be reduced thereby enhancing patient compliance.

  14. Cerebral complexity preceded enlarged brain size and reduced olfactory bulbs in Old World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Lauren A; Benefit, Brenda R; McCrossin, Monte L; Spoor, Fred

    2015-07-03

    Analysis of the only complete early cercopithecoid (Old World monkey) endocast currently known, that of 15-million-year (Myr)-old Victoriapithecus, reveals an unexpectedly small endocranial volume (ECV) relative to body size and a large olfactory bulb volume relative to ECV, similar to extant lemurs and Oligocene anthropoids. However, the Victoriapithecus brain has principal and arcuate sulci of the frontal lobe not seen in the stem catarrhine Aegyptopithecus, as well as a distinctive cercopithecoid pattern of gyrification, indicating that cerebral complexity preceded encephalization in cercopithecoids. Since larger ECVs, expanded frontal lobes, and reduced olfactory bulbs are already present in the 17- to 18-Myr-old ape Proconsul these features evolved independently in hominoids (apes) and cercopithecoids and much earlier in the former. Moreover, the order of encephalization and brain reorganization was apparently different in hominoids and cercopithecoids, showing that brain size and cerebral organization evolve independently.

  15. SPATA2 links CYLD to the TNF-α receptor signaling complex and modulates the receptor signaling outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Satpathy, Shankha; Beli, Petra; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2016-09-01

    TNF-α is a key regulator of innate immune and proinflammatory responses. However, the composition of the TNF-α receptor-associated signaling complexes (TNF-RSC) and the architecture of the downstream signaling networks are incompletely understood. We employed quantitative mass spectrometry to demonstrate that TNF-α stimulation induces widespread protein phosphorylation and that the scope of phosphorylation expands in a temporal manner. TNF-α stimulation also induces rapid ubiquitylation of components of the TNF-RSC Temporal analysis of the TNF-RSC composition identified SPATA2 as a novel component of the TNF-RSC The predicted PUB domain in the N-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with the USP domain of CYLD, whereas the C-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with HOIP SPATA2 is required for recruitment of CYLD to the TNF-RSC Downregulation of SPATA2 augments transcriptional activation of NF-κB and inhibits TNF-α-induced necroptosis, pointing to an important function of SPATA2 in modulating the outcomes of TNF-α signaling. Taken together, our study draws a detailed map of TNF-α signaling, identifies SPATA2 as a novel component of TNF-α signaling, and provides a rich resource for further functional investigations.

  16. Effects of tramadol, clonazepam, and their combination on brain mitochondrial complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tarek Mostafa; Ghaffar, Hamdy M Abdel; El Husseiny, Rabee M R

    2015-12-01

    The present study is an unsubstantiated qualitative assessment of the abused drugs-tramadol and clonazepam. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the effects of tramadol, clonazepam, and their combination on mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes were influential at therapeutic or at progressively increasing doses. The study comprised of a total of 70 healthy male rats, aged 3 months. According to the drug intake regimen, animals were divided into seven groups: control, tramadol therapeutic, clonazepam therapeutic, combination therapeutic, tramadol abuse, clonazepam abuse, and combination abuse group. At the end of the experiment, brain mitochondrial ETC complexes (I, II, III, and IV) were evaluated. Histopathological examinations were also performed on brain tissues. The results showed that groups that received tramadol (therapeutic and abuse) suffered from weight loss. Tramadol abuse group and combination abuse group showed significant decrease in the activities of I, III, and IV complexes but not in the activity of complex II. In conclusion, tramadol but not clonazepam has been found to partially inhibit the activities of respiratory chain complexes I, III, and IV but not the activity of complex II and such inhibition occurred only at doses that exceeded the maximum recommended adult human daily therapeutic doses. This result explains the clinical and histopathological effects of tramadol, such as seizures and red neurons (marker for apoptosis), respectively.

  17. Cannabinoid-Induced Changes in the Activity of Electron Transport Chain Complexes of Brain Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the activity of individual mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II/III, IV) and citrate synthase induced by pharmacologically different cannabinoids. In vitro effects of selected cannabinoids on mitochondrial enzymes were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Both cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, anandamide, and R-(+)-WIN55,212-2, and antagonist/inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptors, AM251, and cannabidiol were examined in pig brain mitochondria. Different effects of these cannabinoids on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase were found. Citrate synthase activity was decreased only by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and AM251. Significant increase in the complex I activity was induced by anandamide. At micromolar concentration, all the tested cannabinoids inhibited the activity of electron transport chain complexes II/III and IV. Stimulatory effect of anandamide on activity of complex I may participate on distinct physiological effects of endocannabinoids compared to phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids. Common inhibitory effect of cannabinoids on activity of complex II/III and IV confirmed a non-receptor-mediated mechanism of cannabinoid action on individual components of system of oxidative phosphorylation.

  18. Forget-me-not:Complex floral displays,inter-signal interactions,and pollinator cognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne S.LEONARD; Anna DORNHAUS; Daniel R.PAPAJ

    2011-01-01

    Flowers are multisensory displays used by plants to influence the behavior of pollinators.Although we know a great deal about how individual signal components are preduced by plants and detected or learned by pollinators,very few experiments directly address the function of floral signal complexity,I.e.how the multicompenent nature of these signals benefits plant or pollinator.Yet,experimental psychology suggests that increasing complexity can enhance subjects'ability to deteCt,learn and remember stimuli,and the plant,sreproductive success depends upon ensuring that pollinators learn their signals and so transport pollen to other similar(conspecific)flowers.Here we explore functional hypotheses for why plants invest in complex floral displays focusing on hypotheses in which floral signals interact to promote pollinator learning and memory'Specifically,we discuss how an attention-altering or context-providing function of one signal may promote acquisition or recall of a second signal.Although we focus on communication between plants and poilinators,these process-based hypotheses should apply to any situation where a sender benefits from enhancing a receiver's acquisition or recall of informtion.

  19. Brain connectivity analysis from EEG signals using stable phase-synchronized states during face perception tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Wasifa; Das, Saptarshi; Maharatna, Koushik; Pan, Indranil; Kuyucu, Doga

    2015-09-01

    Degree of phase synchronization between different Electroencephalogram (EEG) channels is known to be the manifestation of the underlying mechanism of information coupling between different brain regions. In this paper, we apply a continuous wavelet transform (CWT) based analysis technique on EEG data, captured during face perception tasks, to explore the temporal evolution of phase synchronization, from the onset of a stimulus. Our explorations show that there exists a small set (typically 3-5) of unique synchronized patterns or synchrostates, each of which are stable of the order of milliseconds. Particularly, in the beta (β) band, which has been reported to be associated with visual processing task, the number of such stable states has been found to be three consistently. During processing of the stimulus, the switching between these states occurs abruptly but the switching characteristic follows a well-behaved and repeatable sequence. This is observed in a single subject analysis as well as a multiple-subject group-analysis in adults during face perception. We also show that although these patterns remain topographically similar for the general category of face perception task, the sequence of their occurrence and their temporal stability varies markedly between different face perception scenarios (stimuli) indicating toward different dynamical characteristics for information processing, which is stimulus-specific in nature. Subsequently, we translated these stable states into brain complex networks and derived informative network measures for characterizing the degree of segregated processing and information integration in those synchrostates, leading to a new methodology for characterizing information processing in human brain. The proposed methodology of modeling the functional brain connectivity through the synchrostates may be viewed as a new way of quantitative characterization of the cognitive ability of the subject, stimuli and information integration

  20. Simulation study on effects of signaling network structure on the developmental increase in complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keranen, Soile V.E.

    2003-04-02

    The developmental increase in structural complexity in multicellular life forms depends on local, often non-periodic differences in gene expression. These depend on a network of gene-gene interactions coded within the organismal genome. To better understand how genomic information generates complex expression patterns, I have modeled the pattern forming behavior of small artificial genomes in virtual blastoderm embryos. I varied several basic properties of these genomic signaling networks, such as the number of genes, the distributions of positive (inductive) and negative (repressive) interactions, and the strengths of gene-gene interactions, and analyzed their effects on developmental pattern formation. The results show how even simple genomes can generate complex non-periodic patterns under suitable conditions. They also show how the frequency of complex patterns depended on the numbers and relative arrangements of positive and negative interactions. For example, negative co-regulation of signaling pathway components increased the likelihood of (complex) patterns relative to differential negative regulation of the pathway components. Interestingly, neither quantitative differences either in strengths of signaling interactions nor multiple response thresholds to signal concentration (as in morphogen gradients) were essential for formation of multiple, spatially unique cell types. Thus, with combinatorial code of gene regulation and hierarchical signaling interactions, it is theoretically possible to organize metazoan embryogenesis with just a small fraction of the metazoan genome. Because even small networks can generate complex patterns when they contain a suitable set of connections, evolution of metazoan complexity may have depended more on selection for favourable configurations of signaling interactions than on the increase in numbers of regulatory genes.

  1. Transient carbon isotope changes in complex systems: Finding the global signal, embracing the local signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. J.; Schneider-Mor, A.; Filley, T. R.

    2008-12-01

    Global, transient carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) in the geological record are increasingly invoked as evidence of short-lived changes in carbon fluxes to/from the ocean-atmosphere-biosphere (exogenic) system. Reconstructing the dynamics of carbon cycle perturbation and response during such events requires that the global extent, magnitude, and temporal pattern of carbon isotope change are well understood. Unfortunately, no simple, globally integrated measure of exogenic δ13C change exists in the geological record: during major global perturbations even the best-case candidates such as deep-ocean carbonate δ13C values likely respond to a complex of factors including ocean carbonate chemistry and circulation. Here we consider the utility of organic carbon isotope records from two complex depositional systems common in the geological record, fossil soils and continental margin sediments, which are of interest in terms of their relationship to organic carbon cycling and records of past ecological change. Within both systems changes in ecology, climate, carbon source, residence time, and molecular composition have clear potential to modulate the preserved record of global exogenic δ13C change, compromising 1st-order interpretations of bulk or compound-specific isotopic records. Process-explicit eco- geochemical models, ideally combined with multi-substrate data, provide one approach to the isolation of global δ13C change and identification of local or regional processes reflected in such records. Examples from both systems drawn from ongoing work on the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum illustrate the potential pitfalls, as well as opportunities, afforded by coupled data/model assessment of transient δ13C changes in complex systems.

  2. A novel feature extracting method of QRS complex classification for mobile ECG signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingyun; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xianying; Wang, Yue

    2007-12-01

    The conventional classification parameters of QRS complex suffer from larger activity rang of patients and lower signal to noise ratio in mobile cardiac telemonitoring system and can not meet the identification needs of ECG signal. Based on individual sinus heart rhythm template built with mobile ECG signals in time window, we present semblance index to extract the classification features of QRS complex precisely and expeditiously. Relative approximation r2 and absolute error r3 are used as estimating parameters of semblance between testing QRS complex and template. The evaluate parameters corresponding to QRS width and types are demonstrated to choose the proper index. The results show that 99.99 percent of the QRS complex for sinus and superventricular ECG signals can be distinguished through r2 but its average accurate ratio is only 46.16%. More than 97.84 percent of QRS complexes are identified using r3 but its accurate ratio to the sinus and superventricular is not better than r2. By the feature parameter of width, only 42.65 percent of QRS complexes are classified correctly, but its accurate ratio to the ventricular is superior to r2. To combine the respective superiority of three parameters, a nonlinear weighing computation of QRS width, r2 and r3 is introduced and the total classification accuracy up to 99.48% by combing indexes.

  3. Analysis of signal transduction in brain cells using molecular signal microscope; Bunshi jiho kenbikyo wo mochiita nousaibou no joho henkan kiko no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawato, Suguru [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Biophysics and Life Sciences

    1999-12-16

    We analyzed the signal transduction in brain neurons by real-time imaging of Ca/NO signals using the Molecular Signal Microscope. We also analyzed synthesis and action of neurosteroids in the hippocampus. We discovered steroid synthesis machinery containing cytochrome P 450 scc in hippocampal neurons. We found that pregnenolone sulfate acutely potentiated NMDA receptor-mediated Ca conductivity in hippocampal neurons. We also found that stress steroid corticosterone acutely prolonged NMDA receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} influx, resulting in Ca-induced neuro-toxicity. (author)

  4. Contribution of altered signal transduction associated to glutamate receptors in brain to the neurological alterations of hepatic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vicente Felipo

    2006-01-01

    Patients with liver disease may present hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome covering a wide range of neurological alterations,including cognitive and motor disturbances. HE reduces the quality of life of the patients and is associated with poor prognosis. In the worse cases HE may lead to coma or death.The mechanisms leading to HE which are not well known are being studied using animal models. The neurological alterations in HE are a consequence of impaired cerebral function mainly due to alterations in neurotransmission. We review here some studies indicating that alterations in neurotransmission associated to different types of glutamate receptors are responsible for some of the cognitive and motor alterations present in HE.These studies show that the function of the signal transduction pathway glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP associated to the NMDA type of glutamate receptors is impaired in brain in vivo in HE animal models as well as in brain of patients died of HE. Activation of NMDA receptors in brain activates this pathway and increases cGMP. In animal models of HE this increase in cGMP induced by activation of NMDA receptors is reduced,which is responsible for the impairment in learning ability in these animal models. Increasing cGMP by pharmacological means restores learning ability in rats with HE and may be a new therapeutic approach to improve cognitive function in patients with HE.However, it is necessary to previously assess the possible secondary effects.Patients with HE may present psychomotor slowing,hypokinesia and bradykinesia. Animal models of HE also show hypolocomotion. It has been shown in rats with HE that hypolocomotion is due to excessive activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in substantia nigra pars reticulata. Blocking mGluR1 in this brain area normalizes motor activity in the rats, suggesting that a similar treatment for patients with HE could be useful to treat psychomotor slowing and

  5. Biochemical Analysis of Initiator Caspase-Activating Complexes: The Apoptosome and the Death-Inducing Signaling Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, Claudia; Hughes, Michelle A; Cain, Kelvin; MacFarlane, Marion

    2015-12-02

    Apoptosis is a highly regulated process that can be initiated by activation of death receptors or perturbation of mitochondria causing the release of apoptogenic proteins. This results in the activation of caspases, which are responsible for many of the biochemical and morphological changes associated with apoptosis. Caspases are normally inactive and require activation in a cascade emanating from an "initiator" or activating caspase, which in turn activates a downstream or "effector" caspase. Activation of initiator caspases is tightly regulated and requires the assembly of caspase-9 (via mitochondrial perturbation) or caspase-8/10 (via death receptor ligation) activating complexes, which are termed the apoptosome and the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), respectively. These large multiprotein complexes can initially be separated according to size by gel filtration chromatography and subsequently analyzed by affinity purification or immunoprecipitation. The advantage of combining these techniques is one can first assess the assembly of individual components into a multiprotein complex, and then assess the size and composition of the native functional signaling platform within a particular cell type alongside a biochemical analysis of the enriched/purified complex. Here, we describe various methods currently used for characterization of the apoptosome and DISC.

  6. Synaptic signal streams generated by ex vivo neuronal networks contain non-random, complex patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmook; Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham; Vo, Anh; Maron, Ben Y; Therrien, Mikaela; Courtright, Christina; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-11-01

    Cultured embryonic neurons develop functional networks that transmit synaptic signals over multiple sequentially connected neurons as revealed by multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) embedded within the culture dish. Signal streams of ex vivo networks contain spikes and bursts of varying amplitude and duration. Despite the random interactions inherent in dissociated cultures, neurons are capable of establishing functional ex vivo networks that transmit signals among synaptically connected neurons, undergo developmental maturation, and respond to exogenous stimulation by alterations in signal patterns. These characteristics indicate that a considerable degree of organization is an inherent property of neurons. We demonstrate herein that (1) certain signal types occur more frequently than others, (2) the predominant signal types change during and following maturation, (3) signal predominance is dependent upon inhibitory activity, and (4) certain signals preferentially follow others in a non-reciprocal manner. These findings indicate that the elaboration of complex signal streams comprised of a non-random distribution of signal patterns is an emergent property of ex vivo neuronal networks.

  7. Mutations in Two Genes Encoding Different Subunits of a Receptor Signaling Complex Result in an Identical Disease Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloneva, Juha; Manninen, Tuula; Christman, Grant; Hovanes, Karine; Mandelin, Jami; Adolfsson, Rolf; Bianchin, Marino; Bird, Thomas; Miranda, Roxana; Salmaggi, Andrea; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Konttinen, Yrjö; Peltonen, Leena

    2002-01-01

    Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (PLOSL), also known as “Nasu-Hakola disease,” is a globally distributed recessively inherited disease leading to death during the 5th decade of life and is characterized by early-onset progressive dementia and bone cysts. Elsewhere, we have identified PLOSL mutations in TYROBP (DAP12), which codes for a membrane receptor component in natural-killer and myeloid cells, and also have identified genetic heterogeneity in PLOSL, with some patients carrying no mutations in TYROBP. Here we complete the molecular pathology of PLOSL by identifying TREM2 as the second PLOSL gene. TREM2 forms a receptor signaling complex with TYROBP and triggers activation of the immune responses in macrophages and dendritic cells. Patients with PLOSL have no defects in cell-mediated immunity, suggesting a remarkable capacity of the human immune system to compensate for the inactive TYROBP-mediated activation pathway. Our data imply that the TYROBP-mediated signaling pathway plays a significant role in human brain and bone tissue and provide an interesting example of how mutations in two different subunits of a multisubunit receptor complex result in an identical human disease phenotype. PMID:12080485

  8. Activity-dependent, stress-responsive BDNF signaling and the quest for optimal brain health and resilience throughout the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, S M; Mattson, M P

    2013-06-03

    During development of the nervous system, the formation of connections (synapses) between neurons is dependent upon electrical activity in those neurons, and neurotrophic factors produced by target cells play a pivotal role in such activity-dependent sculpting of the neural networks. A similar interplay between neurotransmitter and neurotrophic factor signaling pathways mediates adaptive responses of neural networks to environmental demands in adult mammals, with the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) being particularly prominent regulators of synaptic plasticity throughout the central nervous system. Optimal brain health throughout the lifespan is promoted by intermittent challenges such as exercise, cognitive stimulation and dietary energy restriction, that subject neurons to activity-related metabolic stress. At the molecular level, such challenges to neurons result in the production of proteins involved in neurogenesis, learning and memory and neuronal survival; examples include proteins that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, protein quality control, and resistance of cells to oxidative, metabolic and proteotoxic stress. BDNF signaling mediates up-regulation of several such proteins including the protein chaperone GRP-78, antioxidant enzymes, the cell survival protein Bcl-2, and the DNA repair enzyme APE1. Insufficient exposure to such challenges, genetic factors may conspire to impair BDNF production and/or signaling resulting in the vulnerability of the brain to injury and neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. Further, BDNF signaling is negatively regulated by glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoids impair synaptic plasticity in the brain by negatively regulating spine density, neurogenesis and long-term potentiation, effects that are potentially linked to glucocorticoid regulation of BDNF. Findings suggest that BDNF signaling in specific brain regions mediates some

  9. Inhibitory effects of matrine on electrical signals and amino acid neurotransmitters in hippocampal brain slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuping Wang; Jiping Chen; Guizhi Zhao; Dan Shou; Xuezhi Hong; Jianmin Zhang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on electrical signals of hippocampal brain slices in vivo have shown that matrine inhibits benzylpenicillin sodium-induced activation of neuronal signal transduction.OBJECTIVE: To verify the inhibition effect of matrine on activation of electrical signals in rat brain slices and the role matrine plays in hippocampal amino acid transmitter release.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The in vitro, neurophysiological, controlled experiment was performed in the Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Cardio-cerebrovascular Disease and Nerve System Drugs Appraisement and Chinese Traditional Medicine Screening and Research between July 2003 and May 2004. The in vivo, neuronal, biochemical experiment was performed in the Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Chinese Traditional Medicine Quality Standardization from July 2005 to December 2006.MATERIALS: Forty healthy, Sprague Dawley rats, 7-8 weeks old, and 120 healthy, ICR mice, 5-6weeks old, were included in this study, irrespective of gender. Matrine powder was provided by the National Institute for the Control of Pharmaceutical and Biological Products, China. Matrine injection was purchased from Zhuhai Biochemical Pharmaceutical Factory, China. Penicillin was bought from Shijiazhuang Pharmaceutical Group Co., Ltd., China.METHODS: (1) Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: control, penicillin model, and matrine high-dose and low-dose, with 10 rats in each group. The control group was perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, in the remaining three groups, hippocampal brain slices were perfused with normal artificial cerebrospinal fluid containing 1x106 U/L penicillin for the first 10 minutes. The penicillin model group received artificial cerebrospinal fluid for an additional 30 minutes, while the matrine high-dose and low-dose groups received 0.1 g/L and 0.05 g/L matdne, respectively, for an additional 30 minutes. (2) Mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n=30). The matrine high-,medium-, and low

  10. Large-scale modeling - a tool for conquering the complexity of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Djurfeldt

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Is there any hope of achieving a thorough understanding of higher functions such as perception, memory, thought and emotion or is the stunning complexity of the brain a barrier which will limit such efforts for the foreseeable future? In this perspective we discuss methods to handle complexity, approaches to model building, and point to detailed large-scale models as a new contribution to the toolbox of the computational neuroscientist. We elucidate some aspects which distinguishes large-scale models and some of the technological challenges which they entail.

  11. Adaptation of brain regions to habitat complexity: a comparative analysis in bats (Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Kamran; Dechmann, Dina K N

    2005-01-22

    Vertebrate brains are organized in modules which process information from sensory inputs selectively. Therefore they are probably under different evolutionary pressures. We investigated the impact of environmental influences on specific brain centres in bats. We showed in a phylogenetically independent contrast analysis that the wing area of a species corrected for body size correlated with estimates of habitat complexity. We subsequently compared wing area, as an indirect measure of habitat complexity, with the size of regions associated with hearing, olfaction and spatial memory, while controlling for phylogeny and body mass. The inferior colliculi, the largest sub-cortical auditory centre, showed a strong positive correlation with wing area in echolocating bats. The size of the main olfactory bulb did not increase with wing area, suggesting that the need for olfaction may not increase during the localization of food and orientation in denser habitat. As expected, a larger wing area was linked to a larger hippocampus in all bats. Our results suggest that morphological adaptations related to flight and neuronal capabilities as reflected by the sizes of brain regions coevolved under similar ecological pressures. Thus, habitat complexity presumably influenced and shaped sensory abilities in this mammalian order independently of each other.

  12. A Measure for Brain Complexity: Relating Functional Segregation and Integration in the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tononi, Giulio; Sporns, Olaf; Edelman, Gerald M.

    1994-05-01

    In brains of higher vertebrates, the functional segregation of local areas that differ in their anatomy and physiology contrasts sharply with their global integration during perception and behavior. In this paper, we introduce a measure, called neural complexity (C_N), that captures the interplay between these two fundamental aspects of brain organization. We express functional segregation within a neural system in terms of the relative statistical independence of small subsets of the system and functional integration in terms of significant deviations from independence of large subsets. C_N is then obtained from estimates of the average deviation from statistical independence for subsets of increasing size. C_N is shown to be high when functional segregation coexists with integration and to be low when the components of a system are either completely independent (segregated) or completely dependent (integrated). We apply this complexity measure in computer simulations of cortical areas to examine how some basic principles of neuroanatomical organization constrain brain dynamics. We show that the connectivity patterns of the cerebral cortex, such as a high density of connections, strong local connectivity organizing cells into neuronal groups, patchiness in the connectivity among neuronal groups, and prevalent reciprocal connections, are associated with high values of C_N. The approach outlined here may prove useful in analyzing complexity in other biological domains such as gene regulation and embryogenesis.

  13. Direct Signaling from Astrocytes to Neurons in Cultures of Mammalian Brain Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedergaard, Maiken

    1994-03-01

    Although astrocytes have been considered to be supportive, rather than transmissive, in the adult nervous system, recent studies have challenged this assumption by demonstrating that astrocytes possess functional neurotransmitter receptors. Astrocytes are now shown to directly modulate the free cytosolic calcium, and hence transmission characteristics, of neighboring neurons. When a focal electric field potential was applied to single astrocytes in mixed cultures of rat forebrain astrocytes and neurons, a prompt elevation of calcium occurred in the target cell. This in turn triggered a wave of calcium increase, which propagated from astrocyte to astrocyte. Neurons resting on these astrocytes responded with large increases in their concentration of cytosolic calcium. The gap junction blocker octanol attenuated the neuronal response, which suggests that the astrocytic-neuronal signaling is mediated through intercellular connections rather than synaptically. This neuronal response to local astrocytic stimulation may mediate local intercellular communication within the brain.

  14. Structure function relationship in complex brain networks expressed by hierarchical synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changsong; Zemanová, Lucia; Zamora-López, Gorka; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    The brain is one of the most complex systems in nature, with a structured complex connectivity. Recently, large-scale corticocortical connectivities, both structural and functional, have received a great deal of research attention, especially using the approach of complex network analysis. Understanding the relationship between structural and functional connectivity is of crucial importance in neuroscience. Here we try to illuminate this relationship by studying synchronization dynamics in a realistic anatomical network of cat cortical connectivity. We model the nodes (cortical areas) by a neural mass model (population model) or by a subnetwork of interacting excitable neurons (multilevel model). We show that if the dynamics is characterized by well-defined oscillations (neural mass model and subnetworks with strong couplings), the synchronization patterns are mainly determined by the node intensity (total input strengths of a node) and the detailed network topology is rather irrelevant. On the other hand, the multilevel model with weak couplings displays more irregular, biologically plausible dynamics, and the synchronization patterns reveal a hierarchical cluster organization in the network structure. The relationship between structural and functional connectivity at different levels of synchronization is explored. Thus, the study of synchronization in a multilevel complex network model of cortex can provide insights into the relationship between network topology and functional organization of complex brain networks.

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling is altered in the forebrain of Engrailed-2 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, G; Messina, A; Sgadò, P; Baj, G; Casarosa, S; Bozzi, Y

    2016-06-02

    Engrailed-2 (En2), a homeodomain transcription factor involved in regionalization and patterning of the midbrain and hindbrain regions has been associated to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). En2 knockout (En2(-/-)) mice show ASD-like features accompanied by a significant loss of GABAergic subpopulations in the hippocampus and neocortex. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a crucial factor for the postnatal development of forebrain GABAergic neurons, and altered GABA signaling has been hypothesized to underlie the symptoms of ASD. Here we sought to determine whether interneuron loss in the En2(-/-) forebrain might be related to altered expression of BDNF and its signaling receptors. We first evaluated the expression of different BDNF mRNA isoforms in the neocortex and hippocampus of wild-type (WT) and En2(-/-) mice. Quantitative RT-PCR showed a marked down-regulation of several splicing variants of BDNF mRNA in the neocortex but not hippocampus of adult En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT controls. Accordingly, levels of mature BDNF protein were lower in the neocortex but not hippocampus of En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT. Increased levels of phosphorylated TrkB and decreased levels of p75 receptor were also detected in the neocortex of mutant mice. Accordingly, the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and RhoA, two genes regulated via p75 was significantly altered in forebrain areas of mutant mice. These data indicate that BDNF signaling alterations might be involved in the anatomical changes observed in the En2(-/-) forebrain and suggest a pathogenic role of altered BDNF signaling in this mouse model of ASD.

  16. Organization and functional roles of the central complex in the insect brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Keram; Homberg, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The central complex is a group of modular neuropils across the midline of the insect brain. Hallmarks of its anatomical organization are discrete layers, an organization into arrays of 16 slices along the right-left axis, and precise inter-hemispheric connections via chiasmata. The central complex is connected most prominently with the adjacent lateral complex and the superior protocerebrum. Its developmental appearance corresponds with the appearance of compound eyes and walking legs. Distinct dopaminergic neurons control various forms of arousal. Electrophysiological studies provide evidence for roles in polarized light vision, sky compass orientation, and integration of spatial information for locomotor control. Behavioral studies on mutant and transgenic flies indicate roles in spatial representation of visual cues, spatial visual memory, directional control of walking and flight, and place learning. The data suggest that spatial azimuthal directions (i.e., where) are represented in the slices, and cue information (i.e., what) are represented in different layers of the central complex.

  17. TNF signaling inhibition in the CNS: implications for normal brain function and neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansey Malú G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF as an immune mediator has long been appreciated but its function in the brain is still unclear. TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 is expressed in most cell types, and can be activated by binding of either soluble TNF (solTNF or transmembrane TNF (tmTNF, with a preference for solTNF; whereas TNFR2 is expressed primarily by microglia and endothelial cells and is preferentially activated by tmTNF. Elevation of solTNF is a hallmark of acute and chronic neuroinflammation as well as a number of neurodegenerative conditions including ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's (AD, Parkinson's (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and multiple sclerosis (MS. The presence of this potent inflammatory factor at sites of injury implicates it as a mediator of neuronal damage and disease pathogenesis, making TNF an attractive target for therapeutic development to treat acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions. However, new and old observations from animal models and clinical trials reviewed here suggest solTNF and tmTNF exert different functions under normal and pathological conditions in the CNS. A potential role for TNF in synaptic scaling and hippocampal neurogenesis demonstrated by recent studies suggest additional in-depth mechanistic studies are warranted to delineate the distinct functions of the two TNF ligands in different parts of the brain prior to large-scale development of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS. If inactivation of TNF-dependent inflammation in the brain is warranted by additional pre-clinical studies, selective targeting of TNFR1-mediated signaling while sparing TNFR2 activation may lessen adverse effects of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS.

  18. Roles of brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B (BDNF/TrkB) signalling in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Kang, Zhilong; Li, Wen; Xiao, Zhicheng; Zhou, Xinfu

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly. It is characterized by extracellular deposition of the neurotoxic peptide, amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide fibrils, and is accompanied by extensive loss of neurons in the brains of affected individuals. However, the pathogenesis of AD is not fully understood. The aim of this review is to discuss the possible role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) signalling in the development of AD, focusing on BDNF/TrkB signalling in the production of Aβ, tau hyperphosphorylation and cognition decline, and exploring new possibilities for AD intervention.

  19. Denoising embolic Doppler ultrasound signals using Dual Tree Complex Discrete Wavelet Transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbes, Gorkem; Aydin, Nizamettin

    2010-01-01

    Early and accurate detection of asymptomatic emboli is important for monitoring of preventive therapy in stroke-prone patients. One of the problems in detection of emboli is the identification of an embolic signal caused by very small emboli. The amplitude of the embolic signal may be so small that advanced processing methods are required to distinguish these signals from Doppler signals arising from red blood cells. In this study instead of conventional discrete wavelet transform, the Dual Tree Complex Discrete Wavelet Transform was used for denoising embolic signals. Performances of both approaches were compared. Unlike the conventional discrete wavelet transform discrete complex wavelet transform is a shift invariant transform with limited redundancy. Results demonstrate that the Dual Tree Complex Discrete Wavelet Transform based denoising outperforms conventional discrete wavelet denoising. Approximately 8 dB improvement is obtained by using the Dual Tree Complex Discrete Wavelet Transform compared to the improvement provided by the conventional Discrete Wavelet Transform (less than 5 dB).

  20. Processing of simple and complex acoustic signals in a tonotopically organized ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Jennifer; Wolf, Konstantin; Kössl, Manfred; Nowotny, Manuela

    2014-12-07

    Processing of complex signals in the hearing organ remains poorly understood. This paper aims to contribute to this topic by presenting investigations on the mechanical and neuronal response of the hearing organ of the tropical bushcricket species Mecopoda elongata to simple pure tone signals as well as to the conspecific song as a complex acoustic signal. The high-frequency hearing organ of bushcrickets, the crista acustica (CA), is tonotopically tuned to frequencies between about 4 and 70 kHz. Laser Doppler vibrometer measurements revealed a strong and dominant low-frequency-induced motion of the CA when stimulated with either pure tone or complex stimuli. Consequently, the high-frequency distal area of the CA is more strongly deflected by low-frequency-induced waves than by high-frequency-induced waves. This low-frequency dominance will have strong effects on the processing of complex signals. Therefore, we additionally studied the neuronal response of the CA to native and frequency-manipulated chirps. Again, we found a dominant influence of low-frequency components within the conspecific song, indicating that the mechanical vibration pattern highly determines the neuronal response of the sensory cells. Thus, we conclude that the encoding of communication signals is modulated by ear mechanics.

  1. Effects of therapeutic hypothermia on inflammasome signaling after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomura, Satoshi; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Keane, Robert W; Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2012-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) activates the NALP1/NLRP1 inflammasome, which is an important component of the early innate inflammatory response to injury. We investigated the influence of therapeutic hypothermia on inflammasome activation after TBI. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to moderate fluid percussion brain injury. Temperature manipulation (33°C or 37°C) was initiated 30 minutes after TBI and maintained for 4 hours. At 4 or 24 hours after TBI, traumatized cortex and hippocampus were prepared for immunoblot or immunohistochemical analysis. In the normothermic groups, caspase-1, caspase-11 and expression of the purinergic receptor P2X7 increased at 24 hours after TBI. Posttraumatic hypothermia lead to decreased expression of these proteins at 24 hours compared with normothermic levels. Immunocytochemical studies showed that posttraumatic hypothermia also decreased caspase-1 staining in cerebral cortical neurons compared with normothermic TBI. Cultured cortical neurons subjected to stretch injury demonstrated significant secretion of caspase-1 into the culture medium and caspase-3 activation, both results reduced by hypothermic treatment. Posttraumatic hypothermia decreases inflammasome signaling in neurons and reduces the innate immune response to TBI at 24 hours after injury. Therapeutic hypothermia may protect the injured central nervous system by targeting the detrimental consequences of the innate immune response to injury.

  2. Independent Component Analysis of Complex Valued Signals Based on First-order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Xu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel method based on first-order statistics, aims to solve the problem of the independent component extraction of complex valued signals in instantaneous linear mixtures. Single-step and iterative algorithms are proposed and discussed under the engineering practice. Theoretical performance analysis about asymptotic interference-to-signal ratio (ISR and probability of correct support estimation (PCE are accomplished. Simulation examples validate the theoretic analysis, and demonstrate that the single-step algorithm is extremely effective. Moreover, the iterative algorithm is more efficient than complex FastICA under certain circumstances.

  3. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Preciados

    2016-12-01

    findings suggest that in addition to estrogen signaling, EEDs influencing NRF1 regulated communities of genes across genomic and epigenomic multiple networks may contribute in the development of complex chronic human brain health disorders.

  4. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciados, Mark; Yoo, Changwon; Roy, Deodutta

    2016-01-01

    suggest that in addition to estrogen signaling, EEDs influencing NRF1 regulated communities of genes across genomic and epigenomic multiple networks may contribute in the development of complex chronic human brain health disorders. PMID:27983596

  5. SPATA2 links CYLD to the TNF-α receptor signaling complex and modulates the receptor signaling outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Satpathy, Shankha; Beli, Petra;

    2016-01-01

    of the TNF-RSC The predicted PUB domain in the N-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with the USP domain of CYLD, whereas the C-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with HOIP SPATA2 is required for recruitment of CYLD to the TNF-RSC Downregulation of SPATA2 augments transcriptional activation of NF-κB and inhibits TNF......TNF-α is a key regulator of innate immune and proinflammatory responses. However, the composition of the TNF-α receptor-associated signaling complexes (TNF-RSC) and the architecture of the downstream signaling networks are incompletely understood. We employed quantitative mass spectrometry...... to demonstrate that TNF-α stimulation induces widespread protein phosphorylation and that the scope of phosphorylation expands in a temporal manner. TNF-α stimulation also induces rapid ubiquitylation of components of the TNF-RSC Temporal analysis of the TNF-RSC composition identified SPATA2 as a novel component...

  6. Activation of the yeast Hippo pathway by phosphorylation-dependent assembly of signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Jeremy M; Lim, Daniel; Stach, Lasse; Ogrodowicz, Roksana W; Keck, Jamie M; Jones, Michele H; Wong, Catherine C L; Yates, John R; Winey, Mark; Smerdon, Stephen J; Yaffe, Michael B; Amon, Angelika

    2013-05-17

    Scaffold-assisted signaling cascades guide cellular decision-making. In budding yeast, one such signal transduction pathway called the mitotic exit network (MEN) governs the transition from mitosis to the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The MEN is conserved and in metazoans is known as the Hippo tumor-suppressor pathway. We found that signaling through the MEN kinase cascade was mediated by an unusual two-step process. The MEN kinase Cdc15 first phosphorylated the scaffold Nud1. This created a phospho-docking site on Nud1, to which the effector kinase complex Dbf2-Mob1 bound through a phosphoserine-threonine binding domain, in order to be activated by Cdc15. This mechanism of pathway activation has implications for signal transmission through other kinase cascades and might represent a general principle in scaffold-assisted signaling.

  7. Use of multiple singular value decompositions to analyze complex intracellular calcium ion signals

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, Josue G.

    2009-12-01

    We compare calcium ion signaling (Ca(2+)) between two exposures; the data are present as movies, or, more prosaically, time series of images. This paper describes novel uses of singular value decompositions (SVD) and weighted versions of them (WSVD) to extract the signals from such movies, in a way that is semi-automatic and tuned closely to the actual data and their many complexities. These complexities include the following. First, the images themselves are of no interest: all interest focuses on the behavior of individual cells across time, and thus, the cells need to be segmented in an automated manner. Second, the cells themselves have 100+ pixels, so that they form 100+ curves measured over time, so that data compression is required to extract the features of these curves. Third, some of the pixels in some of the cells are subject to image saturation due to bit depth limits, and this saturation needs to be accounted for if one is to normalize the images in a reasonably un-biased manner. Finally, the Ca(2+) signals have oscillations or waves that vary with time and these signals need to be extracted. Thus, our aim is to show how to use multiple weighted and standard singular value decompositions to detect, extract and clarify the Ca(2+) signals. Our signal extraction methods then lead to simple although finely focused statistical methods to compare Ca(2+) signals across experimental conditions.

  8. EXPRESSION OF SV40 Tag AND FORMATION Tag-p53 AND Tag-Rb COMPLEXES IN CHINESE BRAIN TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of SV40 Tag andformation of Tag-p53 and Tag-Rb complexes in Chinese brain tumors. Methods: SV40 large tumor antigen (Tag) were investigated by immunoprecipitation, silver staining and Western blot in 65 cases of Chinese brain tumors and 8 cases of normal brain tissues. Tag-p53 and Tag-Rb complexes were screened by the same way in 20 and 15 Tag positive tumor tissues respectively. Results: Tag was found in all of 8 ependymomas and 2 choroid plexus papillomas, 90% (9/10) of pituitary adenomas, 73% (11/15) of astrocytomas, 70% (7/10) of meningiomas, 50% (4/8) of glioblastoma multiform, 33% (2/6) of medulloblastomas, 5 oligodendrogliomas, 1 pineocytoma and 8 normal brain tissues were negative for Tag. Tag-p53 complex was detected in all of 20 Tag positive tumors as well as Tag-Rb complex in all of 15 Tag positive tumors. Conclusion: SV40 Tag is not only expressed in human brain tumors, but also it can form specific complexes with tumor suppressors p53 and Rb. SV40 is correlated to human brain tumorigenesis. The inactivation of p53 and Rb due to the formation of Tag-p53 and Tag-Rb complexes is possibly an important mechanism in the etiopathogenesis of human brain tumors.

  9. Normobaric hyperoxia stimulates superoxide and nitric oxide production in the caudal solitary complex of rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Dean, Jay B

    2016-12-01

    Central CO2-chemosensitive neurons in the caudal solitary complex (cSC) are stimulated not only by hypercapnic acidosis, but by hyperoxia as well. While a cellular mechanism for the CO2 response has yet to be isolated, previous data show that a redox-sensitive mechanism underlies neuronal excitability to hyperoxia. However, it remains unknown how changes in Po2 affect the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the cSC that can lead to increased cellular excitability and, with larger doses, to cellular dysfunction and death. To this end, we used fluorescence microscopy in real time to determine how normobaric hyperoxia increases the production of key RONS in the cSC. Because neurons in the region are CO2 sensitive, we also examined the potential effects of CO2 narcosis, used during euthanasia before brain slice harvesting, on RONS production. Our findings show that normobaric hyperoxia (0.4 → 0.95 atmospheres absolute O2) increases the fluorescence rates of fluorogenic dyes specific to both superoxide and nitric oxide. Interestingly, different results were seen for superoxide fluorescence when CO2 narcosis was used during euthanasia, suggesting long-lasting changes in superoxide production and/or antioxidant activity subsequent to CO2 narcosis before brain slicing. Further research needs to distinguish whether the increased levels of RONS reported here are merely increases in oxidative and nitrosative signaling or, alternatively, evidence of redox and nitrosative stress.

  10. Performance Analysis of a Hardware Implemented Complex Signal Kurtosis Radio-Frequency Interference Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenwald, Adam J.; Bradley, Damon C.; Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Radio-frequency interference (RFI) is a known problem for passive remote sensing as evidenced in the L-band radiometers SMOS, Aquarius and more recently, SMAP. Various algorithms have been developed and implemented on SMAP to improve science measurements. This was achieved by the use of a digital microwave radiometer. RFI mitigation becomes more challenging for microwave radiometers operating at higher frequencies in shared allocations. At higher frequencies larger bandwidths are also desirable for lower measurement noise further adding to processing challenges. This work focuses on finding improved RFI mitigation techniques that will be effective at additional frequencies and at higher bandwidths. To aid the development and testing of applicable detection and mitigation techniques, a wide-band RFI algorithm testing environment has been developed using the Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware System (ROACH) built by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) Group. The testing environment also consists of various test equipment used to reproduce typical signals that a radiometer may see including those with and without RFI. The testing environment permits quick evaluations of RFI mitigation algorithms as well as show that they are implementable in hardware. The algorithm implemented is a complex signal kurtosis detector which was modeled and simulated. The complex signal kurtosis detector showed improved performance over the real kurtosis detector under certain conditions. The real kurtosis is implemented on SMAP at 24 MHz bandwidth. The complex signal kurtosis algorithm was then implemented in hardware at 200 MHz bandwidth using the ROACH. In this work, performance of the complex signal kurtosis and the real signal kurtosis are compared. Performance evaluations and comparisons in both simulation as well as experimental hardware implementations were done with the use of receiver operating characteristic (ROC

  11. β1 integrin signaling promotes neuronal migration along vascular scaffolds in the post-stroke brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei Fujioka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemic stroke is a main cause of chronic disability. However, there is currently no effective treatment to promote recovery from stroke-induced neurological symptoms. Recent studies suggest that after stroke, immature neurons, referred to as neuroblasts, generated in a neurogenic niche, the ventricular-subventricular zone, migrate toward the injured area, where they differentiate into mature neurons. Interventions that increase the number of neuroblasts distributed at and around the lesion facilitate neuronal repair in rodent models for ischemic stroke, suggesting that promoting neuroblast migration in the post-stroke brain could improve efficient neuronal regeneration. To move toward the lesion, neuroblasts form chain-like aggregates and migrate along blood vessels, which are thought to increase their migration efficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating these migration processes are largely unknown. Here we studied the role of β1-class integrins, transmembrane receptors for extracellular matrix proteins, in these migrating neuroblasts. We found that the neuroblast chain formation and blood vessel-guided migration critically depend on β1 integrin signaling. β1 integrin facilitated the adhesion of neuroblasts to laminin and the efficient translocation of their soma during migration. Moreover, artificial laminin-containing scaffolds promoted neuroblast chain formation and migration toward the injured area. These data suggest that laminin signaling via β1 integrin supports vasculature-guided neuronal migration to efficiently supply neuroblasts to injured areas. This study also highlights the importance of vascular scaffolds for cell migration in development and regeneration.

  12. Conditional ablation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-TrkB signaling impairs striatal neuron development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Yui, Daishi; Luikart, Bryan W; McKay, Renée M; Li, Yanjiao; Rubenstein, John L; Parada, Luis F

    2012-09-18

    Neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are associated with the physiology of the striatum and the loss of its normal functioning under pathological conditions. The role of BDNF and its downstream signaling in regulating the development of the striatum has not been fully investigated, however. Here we report that ablation of Bdnf in both the cortex and substantia nigra depletes BDNF in the striatum, and leads to impaired striatal development, severe motor deficits, and postnatal lethality. Furthermore, striatal-specific ablation of TrkB, the gene encoding the high-affinity receptor for BDNF, is sufficient to elicit an array of striatal developmental abnormalities, including decreased anatomical volume, smaller neuronal nucleus size, loss of dendritic spines, reduced enkephalin expression, diminished nigral dopaminergic projections, and severe deficits in striatal dopamine signaling through DARPP32. In addition, TrkB ablation in striatal neurons elicits a non-cell-autonomous reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase protein level in the axonal projections of substantia nigral dopaminergic neurons. Thus, our results establish an essential function for TrkB in regulating the development of striatal neurons.

  13. β1 integrin signaling promotes neuronal migration along vascular scaffolds in the post-stroke brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Teppei; Kaneko, Naoko; Ajioka, Itsuki; Nakaguchi, Kanako; Omata, Taichi; Ohba, Honoka; Fässler, Reinhard; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2017-02-01

    Cerebral ischemic stroke is a main cause of chronic disability. However, there is currently no effective treatment to promote recovery from stroke-induced neurological symptoms. Recent studies suggest that after stroke, immature neurons, referred to as neuroblasts, generated in a neurogenic niche, the ventricular-subventricular zone, migrate toward the injured area, where they differentiate into mature neurons. Interventions that increase the number of neuroblasts distributed at and around the lesion facilitate neuronal repair in rodent models for ischemic stroke, suggesting that promoting neuroblast migration in the post-stroke brain could improve efficient neuronal regeneration. To move toward the lesion, neuroblasts form chain-like aggregates and migrate along blood vessels, which are thought to increase their migration efficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating these migration processes are largely unknown. Here we studied the role of β1-class integrins, transmembrane receptors for extracellular matrix proteins, in these migrating neuroblasts. We found that the neuroblast chain formation and blood vessel-guided migration critically depend on β1 integrin signaling. β1 integrin facilitated the adhesion of neuroblasts to laminin and the efficient translocation of their soma during migration. Moreover, artificial laminin-containing scaffolds promoted neuroblast chain formation and migration toward the injured area. These data suggest that laminin signaling via β1 integrin supports vasculature-guided neuronal migration to efficiently supply neuroblasts to injured areas. This study also highlights the importance of vascular scaffolds for cell migration in development and regeneration.

  14. Mu-Opioid (MOP) receptor mediated G-protein signaling is impaired in specific brain regions in a rat model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szűcs, Edina; Büki, Alexandra; Kékesi, Gabriella; Horváth, Gyöngyi; Benyhe, Sándor

    2016-04-21

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder. Clinical reports suggest that many patients with schizophrenia are less sensitive to pain than other individuals. Animal models do not interpret schizophrenia completely, but they can model a number of symptoms of the disease, including decreased pain sensitivities and increased pain thresholds of various modalities. Opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides have a substantial role in analgesia. In this biochemical study we investigated changes in the signaling properties of the mu-opioid (MOP) receptor in different brain regions, which are involved in the pain transmission, i.e., thalamus, olfactory bulb, prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Our goal was to compare the transmembrane signaling mediated by MOP receptors in control rats and in a recently developed rat model of schizophrenia. Regulatory G-protein activation via MOP receptors were measured in [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays in the presence of a highly selective MOP receptor peptide agonist, DAMGO. It was found that the MOP receptor mediated activation of G-proteins was substantially lower in membranes prepared from the 'schizophrenic' model rats than in control animals. The potency of DAMGO to activate MOP receptor was also decreased in all brain regions studied. Taken together in our rat model of schizophrenia, MOP receptor mediated G-proteins have a reduced stimulatory activity compared to membrane preparations taken from control animals. The observed distinct changes of opioid receptor functions in different areas of the brain do not explain the augmented nociceptive threshold described in these animals.

  15. Supplementation with complex milk lipids during brain development promotes neuroplasticity without altering myelination or vascular density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosamond B. Guillermo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supplementation with complex milk lipids (CML during postnatal brain development has been shown to improve spatial reference learning in rats. Objective: The current study examined histo-biological changes in the brain following CML supplementation and their relationship to the observed improvements in memory. Design: The study used the brain tissues from the rats (male Wistar, 80 days of age after supplementing with either CML or vehicle during postnatal day 10–80. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin, glutamate receptor-1, myelin basic protein, isolectin B-4, and glial fibrillary acidic protein was performed. The average area and the density of the staining and the numbers of astrocytes and capillaries were assessed and analysed. Results: Compared with control rats, CML supplementation increased the average area of synaptophysin staining and the number of GFAP astrocytes in the CA3 sub-region of the hippocampus (p<0.01, but not in the CA4 sub-region. The supplementation also led to an increase in dopamine output in the striatum that was related to nigral dopamine expression (p<0.05, but did not alter glutamate receptors, myelination or vascular density. Conclusion: CML supplementation may enhance neuroplasticity in the CA3 sub-regions of the hippocampus. The brain regions-specific increase of astrocyte may indicate a supporting role for GFAP in synaptic plasticity. CML supplementation did not associate with postnatal white matter development or vascular remodelling.

  16. Hierarchical organization of functional connectivity in the mouse brain: a complex network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardella, Giampiero; Bifone, Angelo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gozzi, Alessandro; Squartini, Tiziano

    2016-08-01

    This paper represents a contribution to the study of the brain functional connectivity from the perspective of complex networks theory. More specifically, we apply graph theoretical analyses to provide evidence of the modular structure of the mouse brain and to shed light on its hierarchical organization. We propose a novel percolation analysis and we apply our approach to the analysis of a resting-state functional MRI data set from 41 mice. This approach reveals a robust hierarchical structure of modules persistent across different subjects. Importantly, we test this approach against a statistical benchmark (or null model) which constrains only the distributions of empirical correlations. Our results unambiguously show that the hierarchical character of the mouse brain modular structure is not trivially encoded into this lower-order constraint. Finally, we investigate the modular structure of the mouse brain by computing the Minimal Spanning Forest, a technique that identifies subnetworks characterized by the strongest internal correlations. This approach represents a faster alternative to other community detection methods and provides a means to rank modules on the basis of the strength of their internal edges.

  17. Simple and cost-effective hardware and software for functional brain mapping using intrinsic optical signal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Thomas C; Sigler, Albrecht; Murphy, Timothy H

    2009-09-15

    We describe a simple and low-cost system for intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging using stable LED light sources, basic microscopes, and commonly available CCD cameras. IOS imaging measures activity-dependent changes in the light reflectance of brain tissue, and can be performed with a minimum of specialized equipment. Our system uses LED ring lights that can be mounted on standard microscope objectives or video lenses to provide a homogeneous and stable light source, with less than 0.003% fluctuation across images averaged from 40 trials. We describe the equipment and surgical techniques necessary for both acute and chronic mouse preparations, and provide software that can create maps of sensory representations from images captured by inexpensive 8-bit cameras or by 12-bit cameras. The IOS imaging system can be adapted to commercial upright microscopes or custom macroscopes, eliminating the need for dedicated equipment or complex optical paths. This method can be combined with parallel high resolution imaging techniques such as two-photon microscopy.

  18. Aldosterone-induced brain MAPK signaling and sympathetic excitation are angiotensin II type-1 receptor dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Felder, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling upregulates angiotensin II type-1 receptors (AT(1)R) in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and contributes to AT(1)R-mediated sympathetic excitation in heart failure. Aldosterone has similar effects to increase AT(1)R expression in the PVN and sympathetic drive. The present study was undertaken to determine whether aldosterone also activates the sympathetic nervous system via MAPK signaling and, if so, whether its effect is independent of ANG II and AT(1)R. In anesthetized rats, a 4-h intravenous infusion of aldosterone induced increases (P < 0.05) in phosphorylated (p-) p44/42 MAPK in PVN, PVN neuronal excitation, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean blood pressure (MBP), and heart rate (HR). Intracerebroventricular or bilateral PVN microinjection of the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD-98059 reduced the aldosterone-induced RSNA, HR, and MBP responses. Intracerebroventricular pretreatment (5 days earlier) with pooled small interfering RNAs targeting p44/42 MAPK reduced total and p-p44/42 MAPK, aldosterone-induced c-Fos expression in the PVN, and the aldosterone-induced increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of either the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-28318 or the AT(1)R antagonist losartan blocked aldosterone-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK and prevented the increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. These data suggest that aldosterone-induced sympathetic excitation depends upon that AT(1)R-induced MAPK signaling in the brain. The short time course of this interaction suggests a nongenomic mechanism, perhaps via an aldosterone-induced transactivation of the AT(1)R as described in peripheral tissues.

  19. Akt2 negatively regulates assembly of the POSH-MLK-JNK signaling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Claudia; Tarras, Samantha; Taylor, Jennifer; Vojtek, Anne B

    2003-11-28

    We demonstrate that POSH, a scaffold for the JNK signaling pathway, binds to Akt2. A POSH mutant that is unable to bind Akt2 (POSH W489A) exhibits enhanced-binding to MLK3, and this increase in binding is accompanied by increased activation of the JNK signaling pathway. In addition, we show that the association of MLK3 with POSH is increased upon inhibition of the endogenous phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. Thus, the assembly of an active JNK signaling complex by POSH is negatively regulated by Akt2. Further, the level of Akt-phosphorylated MLK3 is reduced in cells expressing the Akt2 binding domain of POSH, which acts as a dominant interfering protein. Taken together, our results support a model in which Akt2 binds to a POSH-MLK-MKK-JNK complex and phosphorylates MLK3; phosphorylation of MLK3 by Akt2 results in the disassembly of the JNK complex bound to POSH and down-regulation of the JNK signaling pathway.

  20. A functional TOC complex contributes to gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Allison K; Barrett-Wilt, Greg A; Masson, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Although plastid sedimentation has long been recognized as important for a plant's perception of gravity, it was recently shown that plastids play an additional function in gravitropism. The Translocon at the Outer envelope membrane of Chloroplasts (TOC) complex transports nuclear-encoded proteins into plastids, and a receptor of this complex, Toc132, was previously hypothesized to contribute to gravitropism either by directly functioning as a gravity signal transducer or by indirectly mediating the plastid localization of a gravity signal transducer. Here we show that mutations in multiple genes encoding TOC complex components affect gravitropism in a genetically sensitized background and that the cytoplasmic acidic domain of Toc132 is not required for its involvement in this process. Furthermore, mutations in TOC132 enhance the gravitropic defect of a mutant whose amyloplasts lack starch. Finally, we show that the levels of several nuclear-encoded root proteins are altered in toc132 mutants. These data suggest that the TOC complex indirectly mediates gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis and support the idea that plastids are involved in gravitropism not only through their ability to sediment but also as part of the signal transduction mechanism.

  1. Temporal coherence for complex signals in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and humans (Homo sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilans, Erikson G; Dent, Micheal L

    2015-05-01

    The auditory scene is filled with an array of overlapping acoustic signals, yet relatively little work has focused on how animals are able to perceptually isolate different sound sources necessary for survival. Much of the previous work on auditory scene analysis has investigated how sequential pure tone stimuli are perceived, but how temporally overlapping complex communication signals are segregated has been largely ignored. In this study, budgerigars and humans were tested using psychophysical procedures to measure their perception of synchronous, asynchronous, and partially overlapping complex signals, including bird calls and human vowels. Segregation thresholds for complex stimuli were significantly lower than those for pure tone stimuli in both humans and birds. Additionally, a species effect was discovered such that relative to humans, budgerigars required significantly less temporal separation between 2 sounds in order to segregate them. Overall, and similar to previous behavioral results investigating temporal coherence, the results from this experiment illustrate that temporal cues are particularly important for auditory scene analysis across multiple species and for both simple and complex acoustic signals.

  2. Cripto forms a complex with activin and type II activin receptors and can block activin signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter C.; Harrison, Craig A.; Vale, Wylie

    2003-01-01

    Activin, nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 are members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and signal via the activin type II (ActRII/IIB) and type I (ALK4) serine/threonine kinase receptors. Unlike activins, however, signaling by nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 requires a coreceptor from the epidermal growth factor-Cripto-FRL1-Cryptic protein family such as Cripto. Cripto has important roles during development and oncogenesis and binds nodal or related ligands and ALK4 to facilitate assembly of type I and type II receptor signaling complexes. Because Cripto mediates signaling via activin receptors and binds directly to ALK4, we tested whether transfection with Cripto would affect the ability of activin to signal and/or interact with its receptors. Here we show that Cripto can form a complex with activin and ActRII/IIB. We were unable to detect activin binding to Cripto in the absence of ActRII/IIB, indicating that unlike nodal, activin requires type II receptors to bind Cripto. If cotransfected with ActRII/IIB and ALK4, Cripto inhibited crosslinking of activin to ALK4 and the association of ALK4 with ActRII/IIB. In addition, Cripto blocked activin signaling when transfected into either HepG2 cells or 293T cells. We have also shown that under conditions in which Cripto facilitates nodal signaling, it antagonizes activin. Inhibition of activin signaling provides an additional example of a Cripto effect on the regulation of signaling by transforming growth factor-β superfamily members. Because activin is a potent inhibitor of cell growth in multiple cell types, these results provide a mechanism that may partially explain the oncogenic action of Cripto. PMID:12682303

  3. Reactive astrocytes promote the metastatic growth of breast cancer stem-like cells by activating Notch signalling in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fei; Kobayashi, Aya; Okuda, Hiroshi; Watabe, Misako; Pai, Sudha K; Pandey, Puspa R; Hirota, Shigeru; Wilber, Andrew; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Moore, Brian E; Liu, Wen; Fukuda, Koji; Iiizumi, Megumi; Sharma, Sambad; Liu, Yin; Wu, Kerui; Peralta, Elizabeth; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2013-03-01

    Brain metastasis of breast cancer profoundly affects the cognitive and sensory functions as well as morbidity of patients, and the 1 year survival rate among these patients remains less than 20%. However, the pathological mechanism of brain metastasis is as yet poorly understood. In this report, we found that metastatic breast tumour cells in the brain highly expressed IL-1β which then 'activated' surrounding astrocytes. This activation significantly augmented the expression of JAG1 in the astrocytes, and the direct interaction of the reactivated astrocytes and cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) significantly stimulated Notch signalling in CSCs. We also found that the activated Notch signalling in CSCs up-regulated HES5 followed by promoting self-renewal of CSCs. Furthermore, we have shown that the blood-brain barrier permeable Notch inhibitor, Compound E, can significantly suppress the brain metastasis in vivo. These results represent a novel paradigm for the understanding of how metastatic breast CSCs re-establish their niche for their self-renewal in a totally different microenvironment, which opens a new avenue to identify a novel and specific target for the brain metastatic disease.

  4. Control of a two-dimensional movement signal by a noninvasive brain-computer interface in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; McFarland, Dennis J.

    2004-12-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can provide communication and control to people who are totally paralyzed. BCIs can use noninvasive or invasive methods for recording the brain signals that convey the user's commands. Whereas noninvasive BCIs are already in use for simple applications, it has been widely assumed that only invasive BCIs, which use electrodes implanted in the brain, can provide multidimensional movement control of a robotic arm or a neuroprosthesis. We now show that a noninvasive BCI that uses scalp-recorded electroencephalographic activity and an adaptive algorithm can provide humans, including people with spinal cord injuries, with multidimensional point-to-point movement control that falls within the range of that reported with invasive methods in monkeys. In movement time, precision, and accuracy, the results are comparable to those with invasive BCIs. The adaptive algorithm used in this noninvasive BCI identifies and focuses on the electroencephalographic features that the person is best able to control and encourages further improvement in that control. The results suggest that people with severe motor disabilities could use brain signals to operate a robotic arm or a neuroprosthesis without needing to have electrodes implanted in their brains. brain-machine interface | electroencephalography

  5. Beyond 'furballs' and 'dumpling soups' - towards a molecular architecture of signaling complexes and networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewitzky, Marc; Simister, Philip C; Feller, Stephan M

    2012-08-14

    The molecular architectures of intracellular signaling networks are largely unknown. Understanding their design principles and mechanisms of processing information is essential to grasp the molecular basis of virtually all biological processes. This is particularly challenging for human pathologies like cancers, as essentially each tumor is a unique disease with vastly deranged signaling networks. However, even in normal cells we know almost nothing. A few 'signalosomes', like the COP9 and the TCR signaling complexes have been described, but detailed structural information on their architectures is largely lacking. Similarly, many growth factor receptors, for example EGF receptor, insulin receptor and c-Met, signal via huge protein complexes built on large platform proteins (Gab, Irs/Dok, p130Cas[BCAR1], Frs families etc.), which are structurally not well understood. Subsequent higher order processing events remain even more enigmatic. We discuss here methods that can be employed to study signaling architectures, and the importance of too often neglected features like macromolecular crowding, intrinsic disorder in proteins and the sophisticated cellular infrastructures, which need to be carefully considered in order to develop a more mature understanding of cellular signal processing.

  6. Maternal Inflammation Contributes to Brain Overgrowth and Autism-Associated Behaviors through Altered Redox Signaling in Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janel E. Le Belle

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A period of mild brain overgrowth with an unknown etiology has been identified as one of the most common phenotypes in autism. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal inflammation during critical periods of embryonic development can cause brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors as a result of altered neural stem cell function. Pregnant mice treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide at embryonic day 9 had offspring with brain overgrowth, with a more pronounced effect in PTEN heterozygotes. Exposure to maternal inflammation also enhanced NADPH oxidase (NOX-PI3K pathway signaling, stimulated the hyperproliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells, increased forebrain microglia, and produced abnormal autism-associated behaviors in affected pups. Our evidence supports the idea that a prenatal neuroinflammatory dysregulation in neural stem cell redox signaling can act in concert with underlying genetic susceptibilities to affect cellular responses to environmentally altered cellular levels of reactive oxygen species.

  7. Maternal inflammation contributes to brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors through altered redox signaling in stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Belle, Janel E; Sperry, Jantzen; Ngo, Amy; Ghochani, Yasmin; Laks, Dan R; López-Aranda, Manuel; Silva, Alcino J; Kornblum, Harley I

    2014-11-11

    A period of mild brain overgrowth with an unknown etiology has been identified as one of the most common phenotypes in autism. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal inflammation during critical periods of embryonic development can cause brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors as a result of altered neural stem cell function. Pregnant mice treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide at embryonic day 9 had offspring with brain overgrowth, with a more pronounced effect in PTEN heterozygotes. Exposure to maternal inflammation also enhanced NADPH oxidase (NOX)-PI3K pathway signaling, stimulated the hyperproliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells, increased forebrain microglia, and produced abnormal autism-associated behaviors in affected pups. Our evidence supports the idea that a prenatal neuroinflammatory dysregulation in neural stem cell redox signaling can act in concert with underlying genetic susceptibilities to affect cellular responses to environmentally altered cellular levels of reactive oxygen species.

  8. Feynman Clocks, Casual Networks, and the Origin of Hierarchical "Arrows of Time" in Complex Systems from the Big Bang to the Brain

    CERN Document Server

    Hitchcock, S M

    2000-01-01

    A theory of 'time' as a form of 'information' is proposed. New tools such as Feynman Clocks, Collective Excitation Networks, Sequential Excitation Networks, Plateaus of Complexity, Causal Networks, and Quantum Computation methods are used to unify previously separate 'arrows of time'. The 'direction' and 'dimension' of 'time' are found to be secondary information structures created by the 'processing' of the information carried by signals connecting 'clocks' together in networks. The 'problem of time' may be solved by identification of a fundamental 'irreversible' Quantum Arrow of Time and 'reversible' Classical Arrows of Time. These 'arrows' can used to map information flow through complex causal networks from the Big Bang to the Brain. Keywords; unification of the fundamental interactions of matter, consciousness, entangled states, time reversal, time travel, and FTL or superluminal signals

  9. Suppressor of cytokine Signaling-3 inhibits interleukin-1 signaling by targeting the TRAF-6/TAK1 complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobøse, Helle; Rønn, Sif Groth; Heding, Peter E;

    2006-01-01

    -activated kinase 1, TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)6, and TGFbeta-activated kinase (TAK)1, but not when the MAP3K MAPK/ERK kinase kinase-1 is used instead of TAK1, indicating that the target for SOCS-3 is the TRAF6/TAK1 signaling complex. By coimmunoprecipitation, it was shown that SOCS-3 inhibited...... of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3 was shown to inhibit IL-1-induced transcription and activation of NFkappaB and the MAPKs JNK and p38, but the mechanism is unknown. We show here that SOCS-3 inhibits NFkappaB-dependent transcription induced by overexpression of the upstream IL-1 signaling molecules MyD88, IL-1R...... the association between TRAF6 and TAK1 and that SOCS-3 coimmunoprecipitated with TAK1 and TRAF6. Furthermore, SOCS-3 inhibited the IL-1-induced catalytic activity of TAK1. Because ubiquitination of TRAF6 is required for activation of TAK1, we analyzed the role of SOCS-3 on TRAF6 ubiquitination and found that SOCS...

  10. Decoding the complex brain: multivariate and multimodal analyses of neuroimaging data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salami, Alireza

    2012-07-01

    various cognitive questions. These methods are used in order to extract features that are inaccessible using univariate / unimodal analytic approaches. To this end, I implemented multivariate partial least squares analysis in study I and II in order to identify neural commonalities and differences between the available and accessible information in memory (study I), and also between episodic encoding and episodic retrieval (study II). Study I provided evidence of a qualitative differences between availability and accessibility signals in memory by linking memory access to modality-independent brain regions, and availability in memory to elevated activity in modality-specific brain regions. Study II provided evidence in support of general and specific memory operations during encoding and retrieval by linking general processes to the joint demands on attentional, executive, and strategic processing, and a process-specific network to core episodic memory function. In study II, III, and IV, I explored whether the age-related changes/differences in one modality were driven by age-related changes/differences in another modality. To this end, study II investigated whether age-related functional differences in hippocampus during an episodic memory task could be accounted for by age-related structural differences. I found that age-related local structural deterioration could partially but not entirely account for age-related diminished hippocampal activation. In study III, I sought to explore whether age-related changes in the prefrontal and occipital cortex during a semantic memory task were driven by local and/or distal gray matter loss. I found that age-related diminished prefrontal activation was driven, at least in part, by local gray matter atrophy, whereas the age-related decline in occipital cortex was accounted for by distal gray matter atrophy. Finally, in study IV, I investigated whether white matter (WM) microstructural differences mediated age-related decline in

  11. Evolution of NMDA receptor cytoplasmic interaction domains: implications for organisation of synaptic signalling complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emes Richard D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate gated postsynaptic receptors in the central nervous system (CNS are essential for environmentally stimulated behaviours including learning and memory in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Though their genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and role in behaviour have been intensely studied in vitro and in vivo, their molecular evolution and structural aspects remain poorly understood. To understand how these receptors have evolved different physiological requirements we have investigated the molecular evolution of glutamate gated receptors and ion channels, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, which is essential for higher cognitive function. Studies of rodent NMDA receptors show that the C-terminal intracellular domain forms a signalling complex with enzymes and scaffold proteins, which is important for neuronal and behavioural plasticity Results The vertebrate NMDA receptor was found to have subunits with C-terminal domains up to 500 amino acids longer than invertebrates. This extension was specific to the NR2 subunit and occurred before the duplication and subsequent divergence of NR2 in the vertebrate lineage. The shorter invertebrate C-terminus lacked vertebrate protein interaction motifs involved with forming a signaling complex although the terminal PDZ interaction domain was conserved. The vertebrate NR2 C-terminal domain was predicted to be intrinsically disordered but with a conserved secondary structure. Conclusion We highlight an evolutionary adaptation specific to vertebrate NMDA receptor NR2 subunits. Using in silico methods we find that evolution has shaped the NMDA receptor C-terminus into an unstructured but modular intracellular domain that parallels the expansion in complexity of an NMDA receptor signalling complex in the vertebrate lineage. We propose the NR2 C-terminus has evolved to be a natively unstructured yet flexible hub organising postsynaptic signalling. The evolution of

  12. Processing of audiovisual associations in the human brain: dependency on expectations and rule complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riikka eLindström

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to respond to environmental changes appropriately, the human brain must not only be able to detect environmental changes but also to form expectations of forthcoming events. The events in the external environment often have a number of multisensory features such as pitch and form. For integrated percepts of objects and events, crossmodal processing and crossmodally induced expectations of forthcoming events are needed. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the expectations created by visual stimuli can modulate the deviance detection in the auditory modality, as reflected by auditory event-related potentials (ERPs. Additionally, it was studied whether the complexity of the rules linking auditory and visual stimuli together affects this process. The N2 deflection of the ERP was observed in response to violations in the subjects' expectation of a forthcoming tone. Both temporal aspects and cognitive demands during the audiovisual deviance detection task modulated the brain processes involved.

  13. HSV-1 infection of human brain cells induces miRNA-146a and Alzheimer-type inflammatory signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, James M; Zhao, Yuhai; Clement, Christian; Neumann, Donna M; Lukiw, Walter J

    2009-10-28

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection of human brain cells induces changes in gene expression favorable to the propagation of the infecting agent and detrimental to the function of the host cells. We report that infection of human primary neural cells with a high phenotypic reactivator HSV-1 (17syn+) induces upregulation of a brain-enriched microRNA (miRNA)-146a that is associated with proinflammatory signaling in stressed brain cells and Alzheimer's disease. Expression of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2, the inducible prostaglandin synthase cyclooxygenase-2, and the neuroinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta were each upregulated. A known miRNA-146a target in the brain, complement factor H, was downregulated. These data suggest a role for HSV-1-induced miRNA-146a in the evasion of HSV-1 from the complement system, and the activation of key elements of the arachidonic acid cascade known to contribute to Alzheimer-type neuropathological change.

  14. Stochastic effects as a force to increase the complexity of signaling networks

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-29

    Cellular signaling networks are complex and appear to include many nonfunctional elements. Recently, it was suggested that nonfunctional interactions of proteins cause signaling noise, which, perhaps, shapes the signal transduction mechanism. However, the conditions under which molecular noise influences cellular information processing remain unclear. Here, we explore a large number of simple biological models of varying network sizes to understand the architectural conditions under which the interactions of signaling proteins can exhibit specific stochastic effects - called deviant effects - in which the average behavior of a biological system is substantially altered in the presence of molecular noise. We find that a small fraction of these networks does exhibit deviant effects and shares a common architectural feature whereas most of the networks show only insignificant levels of deviations. Interestingly, addition of seemingly unimportant interactions into protein networks gives rise to deviant effects.

  15. Influence of Signal Intensity Non-Uniformity on Brain Volumetry Using an Atlas-Based Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takao, Hidemasa; Kunimatsu, Akira; Mori, Harushi [University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); and others

    2012-07-15

    Many studies have reported pre-processing effects for brain volumetry; however, no study has investigated whether non-parametric non-uniform intensity normalization (N3) correction processing results in reduced system dependency when using an atlas-based method. To address this shortcoming, the present study assessed whether N3 correction processing provides reduced system dependency in atlas-based volumetry. Contiguous sagittal T1-weighted images of the brain were obtained from 21 healthy participants, by using five magnetic resonance protocols. After image preprocessing using the Statistical Parametric Mapping 5 software, we measured the structural volume of the segmented images with the WFU-PickAtlas software. We applied six different bias-correction levels (Regularization 10, Regularization 0.0001, Regularization 0, Regularization 10 with N3, Regularization 0.0001 with N3, and Regularization 0 with N3) to each set of images. The structural volume change ratio (%) was defined as the change ratio (%) = (100 X[measured volume - mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols] / mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols) for each bias-correction level. A low change ratio was synonymous with lower system dependency. The results showed that the images with the N3 correction had a lower change ratio compared with those without the N3 correction. The present study is the first atlas-based volumetry study to show that the precision of atlas-based volumetry improves when using N3-corrected images. Therefore, correction for signal intensity non-uniformity is strongly advised for multi-scanner or multi-site imaging trials.

  16. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Pleger

    Full Text Available The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1 and motor cortex (M1 contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  17. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleger, Burkhard; Draganski, Bogdan; Schwenkreis, Peter; Lenz, Melanie; Nicolas, Volkmar; Maier, Christoph; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls) were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  18. Increase in estrogen signaling in the early brain of orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Ganesan; Aruna, Adimoolam; Chang, Ching-Fong

    2013-02-01

    Despite neurosteroidogenic enzymes are playing important roles in the regulation of brain development and function, the potential link between brain and gonad by the action of steroid hormones during gonadal sex differentiation is still not clear in teleosts. In this mini-review, we summarized our understanding on the early brain development related to the synthesis of neurosteroids and receptor signaling during gonadal sex differentiation in protogynous orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides (functional females for the first 6 years of life and start to sex change around the age of 7 years) and protandrous black porgy (functional males for the first 2 years of life but begin to change sex during the third year). We found a similar profile in the increased expression of brain aromatase gene (aromatatse B or cyp19a1b), aromatase activity, estradiol (E(2)), and estrogen signaling in the brain of both grouper and black porgy fish during gonadal sex differentiation. In contrast to mammals, teleost fish Cyp19a1b expressed in a unique cell type, a radial glial cell, which is acted as progenitors in the brain of developing and adult fish. In agreement with these pioneer studies, we demonstrated that the grouper cyp19a1b/Cyp19a1b was expressed in radial glial cells. Further, in vivo data in the grouper brain showed that exogenous E(2) upregulated Cyp19a1b immunoreactivity (ir) in radial glial cells. These data suggest the possible roles of Cyp19a1b and E(2) in early brain development which is presumably related to gonadal sex differentiation.

  19. [The P300-based brain-computer interface: presentation of the complex "flash + movement" stimuli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganin, I P; Kaplan, A Ia

    2014-01-01

    The P300 based brain-computer interface requires the detection of P300 wave of brain event-related potentials. Most of its users learn the BCI control in several minutes and after the short classifier training they can type a text on the computer screen or assemble an image of separate fragments in simple BCI-based video games. Nevertheless, insufficient attractiveness for users and conservative stimuli organization in this BCI may restrict its integration into real information processes control. At the same time initial movement of object (motion-onset stimuli) may be an independent factor that induces P300 wave. In current work we checked the hypothesis that complex "flash + movement" stimuli together with drastic and compact stimuli organization on the computer screen may be much more attractive for user while operating in P300 BCI. In 20 subjects research we showed the effectiveness of our interface. Both accuracy and P300 amplitude were higher for flashing stimuli and complex "flash + movement" stimuli compared to motion-onset stimuli. N200 amplitude was maximal for flashing stimuli, while for "flash + movement" stimuli and motion-onset stimuli it was only a half of it. Similar BCI with complex stimuli may be embedded into compact control systems requiring high level of user attention under impact of negative external effects obstructing the BCI control.

  20. Structural features of the Nogo receptor signaling complexes at the neuron/myelin interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Nayanendu; Kolev, Momchil; Nikolov, Dimitar B

    2014-10-01

    Upon spinal cord injury, the central nervous system axons are unable to regenerate, partially due to the repulsive action of myelin inhibitors, such as the myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), Nogo-A and the oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp). These inhibitors bind and signal through a single receptor/co-receptor complex that comprises of NgR1/LINGO-1 and either p75 or TROY, triggering intracellular downstream signaling that impedes the re-growth of axons. Structure-function analysis of myelin inhibitors and their neuronal receptors, particularly the NgRs, have provided novel information regarding the molecular details of the inhibitor/receptor/co-receptor interactions. Structural and biochemical studies have revealed the architecture of many of these proteins and identified the molecular regions important for assembly of the inhibitory signaling complexes. It was also recently shown that gangliosides, such as GT1b, mediate receptor/co-receptor binding. In this review, we highlight these studies and summarize our current understanding of the multi-protein cell-surface complexes mediating inhibitory signaling events at the neuron/myelin interface.

  1. The assembly of a GTPase–kinase signalling complex by a bacterial catalytic scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selyunin, Andrey S.; Sutton, Sarah E.; Weigele, Bethany A.; Reddick, L. Evan; Orchard, Robert C.; Bresson, Stefan M.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Alto, Neal M.

    2011-01-01

    The fidelity and specificity of information flow within a cell is controlled by scaffolding proteins that assemble and link enzymes into signalling circuits1,2. These circuits can be inhibited by bacterial effector proteins that post-translationally modify individual pathway components3–6. However, there is emerging evidence that pathogens directly organize higher-order signalling networks through enzyme scaffolding7,8, and the identity of the effectors and their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Here we identify the enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 type III effector EspG as a regulator of endomembrane trafficking using a functional screen, and report ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) GTPases and p21-activated kinases (PAKs) as its relevant host substrates. The 2.5 Å crystal structure of EspG in complex with ARF6 shows how EspG blocks GTPase-activating-protein-assisted GTP hydrolysis, revealing a potent mechanism of GTPase signalling inhibition at organelle membranes. In addition, the 2.8 Å crystal structure of EspG in complex with the autoinhibitory Iα3-helix of PAK2 defines a previously unknown catalytic site in EspG and provides an allosteric mechanism of kinase activation by a bacterial effector. Unexpectedly, ARF and PAKs are organized on adjacent surfaces of EspG, indicating its role as a ‘catalytic scaffold’ that effectively reprograms cellular events through the functional assembly of GTPase-kinase signalling complex. PMID:21170023

  2. Cutting the Gordian knot:Complex signaling in African cichlids is more than multimodal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Moira J.VAN STAADEN; Adam R.SMITH

    2011-01-01

    The active transmission of information from sender to recelver is a fundamental component of communication,and is therefore a primary facet in evolutionary models of sexual selection.Research in several systetms has underlined the importance of multiple sensory modalities in courtship signals.However,we still tend to think of individuals as having a relatively static signal in consecutive communicative events.While this may be true for certain traits such as body size or coloration,behaviorally modulated signals can quickly violate this assumption.In this work,we explore how intraspecific variation may be an important component of interspeclfic signal divergence using cichlid fishes from Lake Maiawi.Behavloral analyses were made using six species of Malawian cichlids from two divergent genera.while interspecific differences were found between congeners based on species-level analyses of both acoustic and audiovisual signais,intraspecific variation was of a similar magnitude.Specifically,individual fishes were found to possess highiy plastic signal repertoires.This finding was ubiquitous across all species and resulted in a great deal of overlap between heterospecific individuals,despite statistically distinct species means.These results demonstrate that some aspects of courtship in Malawian cichlids are more plastic than previously proposed,and that studies must account for signal variability within individuals.We propose here that bebavioral variability in signaling is important in determining the communication landscape on which signals are perceived.We review potential complexity deriving from multimodal signaling,discuss the sources for such lability,and suggest ways in which is issue may be approached experimentally.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of brain and gonad transcripts reveals changes of key sex reversal-related genes expression and signaling pathways in three stages of Monopterus albus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing; Guo, Wei; Li, Dapeng

    2017-01-01

    Background The natural sex reversal severely affects the sex ratio and thus decreases the productivity of the rice field eel (Monopterus albus). How to understand and manipulate this process is one of the major issues for the rice field eel stocking. So far the genomics and transcriptomics data available for this species are still scarce. Here we provide a comprehensive study of transcriptomes of brain and gonad tissue in three sex stages (female, intersex and male) from the rice field eel to investigate changes in transcriptional level during the sex reversal process. Results Approximately 195 thousand unigenes were generated and over 44.4 thousand were functionally annotated. Comparative study between stages provided multiple differentially expressed genes in brain and gonad tissue. Overall 4668 genes were found to be of unequal abundance between gonad tissues, far more than that of the brain tissues (59 genes). These genes were enriched in several different signaling pathways. A number of 231 genes were found with different levels in gonad in each stage, with several reproduction-related genes included. A total of 19 candidate genes that could be most related to sex reversal were screened out, part of these genes’ expression patterns were validated by RT-qPCR. The expression of spef2, maats1, spag6 and dmc1 were abundant in testis, but was barely detected in females, while the 17β-hsd12, zpsbp3, gal3 and foxn5 were only expressed in ovary. Conclusion This study investigated the complexity of brain and gonad transcriptomes in three sex stages of the rice field eel. Integrated analysis of different gene expression and changes in signaling pathways, such as PI3K-Akt pathway, provided crucial data for further study of sex transformation mechanisms. PMID:28319194

  4. Neuroprotective Effects of Physical Activity on the Brain A Closer Look at Trophic Factor Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristy ePhillips

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available While the relationship between increased physical activity and cognitive ability hasbeen conjectured for centuries, only recently have the mechanisms underlying this relationship began to emerge. Convergent evidence suggests that physical activity offers an affordable and effective method to improve cognitive function in all ages, particularly the elderly who are most vulnerable to neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to improving cardiac and immune function, physical activity alters trophic factor signaling and, in turn, neuronal function and structure in areas critical for cognition. Sustained exercise plays a role in modulating anti-inflammatory effects and may play a role in preserving cognitive function in aging and neuropathological conditions. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that myokines released by exercising muscles affect the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor synthesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a finding that could lead to the identification of new and therapeutically important mediating factors. Given the growing numbers of individuals with cognitive impairment in the US population, a better understanding of how these factors work in aggregate to contribute to cognition is imperative, and constitutes an important first step toward developing non-pharmacological therapeutic strategies to improve cognition in vulnerable populations.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of physical activity on the brain: a closer look at trophic factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Cristy; Baktir, Mehmet Akif; Srivatsan, Malathi; Salehi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    While the relationship between increased physical activity and cognitive ability has been conjectured for centuries, only recently have the mechanisms underlying this relationship began to emerge. Convergent evidence suggests that physical activity offers an affordable and effective method to improve cognitive function in all ages, particularly the elderly who are most vulnerable to neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to improving cardiac and immune function, physical activity alters trophic factor signaling and, in turn, neuronal function and structure in areas critical for cognition. Sustained exercise plays a role in modulating anti-inflammatory effects and may play a role in preserving cognitive function in aging and neuropathological conditions. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that myokines released by exercising muscles affect the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor synthesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a finding that could lead to the identification of new and therapeutically important mediating factors. Given the growing number of individuals with cognitive impairments worldwide, a better understanding of how these factors contribute to cognition is imperative, and constitutes an important first step toward developing non-pharmacological therapeutic strategies to improve cognition in vulnerable populations.

  6. The early signal substances induced by heat stress in brains of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunxu WANG; Hanxing WANG

    2008-01-01

    To study the effects of early signal substances induced by heat stress in brains of Kunming mice, six-month-old mice (n=72) were pretreated with heat stress and subsequent ischemia/reperfusion by clipping of their bilateral cervical common arteries for 7 min. According to different treatments, animals were randomly divided into four groups: (1) normal control group; (2) heat stress pre-treatment followed by ischemia and reperfusion group (HS/IR); (3) ischemia and reperfusion group (IR); (4) heat stress group (HS). Animals in the later three groups were subdivided into 3 subgroups (1 day, 4 days, 14 days), respectively. The changes in the expression of cAMP res-ponse element binding protein (CREB) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were detected by immuno-histochemistry and computer image analysis methods. The results showed that compared with the normal group, the expressions of CREB in the hippocampal CA1 region increased significantly in the HS, HS/IR and IR groups (P<0.05). Compared to the normal group, heat stress could result in CGRP excretion and redistribution in the cerebrum, with the highest level in the 4 d HS/IR group. Following heat stress, CGRP immunoreactivity was observed in varicose fibers and neuronal perikarya within the CA1 region. The results indicate that heat stress can induce CREB expression, which in turn stimulates CGRP secretion.

  7. Effects of oxytocin on GABA signalling in the foetal brain during delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazipov, Rustem; Tyzio, Roman; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) exerts multiple effects in the adult central nervous system. However, little is known about the effects of OXT on foetal neurons during delivery, at the time when a surge of OXT occurs. In a recent study, the effects of OXT on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signalling have been reported in foetal and newborn rats. In the immature rat hippocampal and neocortical neurons at birth, endogenous OXT induced a switch in the action of GABA from excitatory to inhibitory. This excitatory-to-inhibitory switch was caused by a switch in the polarity of the GABAergic responses from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing, reflecting a decrease in the intracellular chloride concentration. The effects of OXT were mimicked and occluded by bumetanide, a selective blocker of the chloride co-transporter NKCC1, suggesting that the effects of OXT involve inhibition of NKCC1. Neuronal death caused by anoxic-aglycaemic episodes was substantially delayed in the foetal hippocampus by endogenous OXT. These findings suggest that OXT plays important role in the preparation of the foetal brain to delivery.

  8. Signal Transduction Pathways Involved in Brain Death-Induced Renal Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, H. R.; Ploeg, R. J.; Schuurs, T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Kidneys derived from brain death organ donors show an inferior survival when compared to kidneys derived from living donors. Brain death is known to induce organ injury by evoking an inflammatory response in the donor. Neuronal injury triggers an inflammatory response in the brain, leading to endoth

  9. Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal and cognitive function: an exploratory study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Yazigi Solis

    Full Text Available Two independent studies were conducted to examine the effects of 28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g d(-1 on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in omnivores and vegetarians (Study 1 and on cognitive function before and after exercise in trained cyclists (Study 2.In Study 1, seven healthy vegetarians (3 women and 4 men and seven age- and sex-matched omnivores undertook a brain 1H-MRS exam at baseline and after beta-alanine supplementation. In study 2, nineteen trained male cyclists completed four 20-Km cycling time trials (two pre supplementation and two post supplementation, with a battery of cognitive function tests (Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm, Rapid Visual Information Processing task being performed before and after exercise on each occasion.In Study 1, there were no within-group effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in either vegetarians (p = 0.99 or omnivores (p = 0.27; nor was there any effect when data from both groups were pooled (p = 0.19. Similarly, there was no group by time interaction for brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal (p = 0.27. In study 2, exercise improved cognitive function across all tests (P 0.05 of beta-alanine supplementation on response times or accuracy for the Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm or RVIP task at rest or after exercise.28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g d(-1 appeared not to influence brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in either omnivores or vegetarians; nor did it influence cognitive function before or after exercise in trained cyclists.

  10. A potential neural substrate for processing functional classes of complex acoustic signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle George

    Full Text Available Categorization is essential to all cognitive processes, but identifying the neural substrates underlying categorization processes is a real challenge. Among animals that have been shown to be able of categorization, songbirds are particularly interesting because they provide researchers with clear examples of categories of acoustic signals allowing different levels of recognition, and they possess a system of specialized brain structures found only in birds that learn to sing: the song system. Moreover, an avian brain nucleus that is analogous to the mammalian secondary auditory cortex (the caudo-medial nidopallium, or NCM has recently emerged as a plausible site for sensory representation of birdsong, and appears as a well positioned brain region for categorization of songs. Hence, we tested responses in this non-primary, associative area to clear and distinct classes of songs with different functions and social values, and for a possible correspondence between these responses and the functional aspects of songs, in a highly social songbird species: the European starling. Our results clearly show differential neuronal responses to the ethologically defined classes of songs, both in the number of neurons responding, and in the response magnitude of these neurons. Most importantly, these differential responses corresponded to the functional classes of songs, with increasing activation from non-specific to species-specific and from species-specific to individual-specific sounds. These data therefore suggest a potential neural substrate for sorting natural communication signals into categories, and for individual vocal recognition of same-species members. Given the many parallels that exist between birdsong and speech, these results may contribute to a better understanding of the neural bases of speech.

  11. [Application of nootropic agents in complex treatment of patients with concussion of the brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachev, A V

    2007-01-01

    65 patients with a mild craniocereberal trauma have been observed. Medical examination included among general clinical methods the following methods: KT (MRT) of the brain, oculist examination including the observation of eye fundus. For objectification of a patient' complaints the authors used orientation and Galvestona's amnesia tests, feeling scale (psychological test), the table to determine the level of memory. Tests have been carried out on the first, tenth and thirty day of the treatment. Patients of the first group received in a complex treatment -pramistar, patients of the second group - piracetam. Patients of both groups noted considerable improvement during a complex treatment (disappearance of headache, dizziness and nausea) and at the same time patients receiving pramistar had better restoration of orientation and feeling. Pramistar was also more effective in patients with amnesia.

  12. Signaling and Adaptation Modulate the Dynamics of the Photosensoric Complex of Natronomonas pharaonis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp S Orekhov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Motile bacteria and archaea respond to chemical and physical stimuli seeking optimal conditions for survival. To this end transmembrane chemo- and photoreceptors organized in large arrays initiate signaling cascades and ultimately regulate the rotation of flagellar motors. To unravel the molecular mechanism of signaling in an archaeal phototaxis complex we performed coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of a trimer of receptor/transducer dimers, namely NpSRII/NpHtrII from Natronomonas pharaonis. Signaling is regulated by a reversible methylation mechanism called adaptation, which also influences the level of basal receptor activation. Mimicking two extreme methylation states in our simulations we found conformational changes for the transmembrane region of NpSRII/NpHtrII which resemble experimentally observed light-induced changes. Further downstream in the cytoplasmic domain of the transducer the signal propagates via distinct changes in the dynamics of HAMP1, HAMP2, the adaptation domain and the binding region for the kinase CheA, where conformational rearrangements were found to be subtle. Overall these observations suggest a signaling mechanism based on dynamic allostery resembling models previously proposed for E. coli chemoreceptors, indicating similar properties of signal transduction for archaeal photoreceptors and bacterial chemoreceptors.

  13. A Lesion-Mimic Syntaxin Double Mutant in Arabidopsis Reveals Novel Complexity of Pathogen Defense Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziguo Zhang; Hans Thordal-Christensen; Andrea Lenk; Mats X. Andersson; Torben Gjetting; Carsten Pedersen; Mads E. Nielsen; Marl-Anne Newman; Bi-Huei Hou; Shauna C. Somerville

    2008-01-01

    The lesion-mimicArabidopsis mutant, syp121 syp122, constitutively expresses the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway and has low penetration resistance to powdery mildew fungi. Genetic analyses of the lesion-mimic phenotype have expanded our understanding of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. Inactivation of SA signaling genes in syp121 syp 122 only partially rescues the lesion-mimic phenotype, indicating that additional defenses contribute to the PCD. Whole genome transcriptome analysis confirmed that SA-induced transcripts, as well as numerous other known pathogenresponse transcripts, are up-regulated after inactivation of the syntaxin genes. A suppressor mutant analysis of syp121 syp122 revealed that FMO1, ALD1, and PAD4 are important for lesion development. Mutant alleles of EDS1, NDR1, RAR1, and SGT1b also partially rescued the lesion-mimic phenotype, suggesting that mutating syntaxin genes stimulates TIR-NB-LRR and CC-NB-LRR-type resistances. The syntaxin double knockout potentiated a powdery mildewinduced HR-like response. This required functional PAD4 but not functional SA signaling. However, SA signaling potentiated the PAD4-dependent HR-like response. Analyses of quadruple mutants suggest that EDS5 and SID2 confer separate SA-independent signaling functions, and that FMO1 and ALD1 mediate SA-independent signals that are NPRl-dependent.These studies highlight the contribution of multiple pathways to defense and point to the complexity of their interactions.

  14. Heterogeneous intracellular trafficking dynamics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor complexes in the neuronal soma revealed by single quantum dot tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Vermehren-Schmaedick

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence underscores the importance of ligand-receptor dynamics in shaping cellular signaling. In the nervous system, growth factor-activated Trk receptor trafficking serves to convey biochemical signaling that underlies fundamental neural functions. Focus has been placed on axonal trafficking but little is known about growth factor-activated Trk dynamics in the neuronal soma, particularly at the molecular scale, due in large part to technical hurdles in observing individual growth factor-Trk complexes for long periods of time inside live cells. Quantum dots (QDs are intensely fluorescent nanoparticles that have been used to study the dynamics of ligand-receptor complexes at the plasma membrane but the value of QDs for investigating ligand-receptor intracellular dynamics has not been well exploited. The current study establishes that QD conjugated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (QD-BDNF binds to TrkB receptors with high specificity, activates TrkB downstream signaling, and allows single QD tracking capability for long recording durations deep within the soma of live neurons. QD-BDNF complexes undergo internalization, recycling, and intracellular trafficking in the neuronal soma. These trafficking events exhibit little time-synchrony and diverse heterogeneity in underlying dynamics that include phases of sustained rapid motor transport without pause as well as immobility of surprisingly long-lasting duration (several minutes. Moreover, the trajectories formed by dynamic individual BDNF complexes show no apparent end destination; BDNF complexes can be found meandering over long distances of several microns throughout the expanse of the neuronal soma in a circuitous fashion. The complex, heterogeneous nature of neuronal soma trafficking dynamics contrasts the reported linear nature of axonal transport data and calls for models that surpass our generally limited notions of nuclear-directed transport in the soma. QD-ligand probes are

  15. Reduction of brain mitochondrial β-oxidation impairs complex I and V in chronic alcohol intake: the underlying mechanism for neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Haorah

    Full Text Available Neuropathy and neurocognitive deficits are common among chronic alcohol users, which are believed to be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain. The specific type of brain mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (mRCC that are adversely affected by alcohol abuse has not been studied. Thus, we examined the alterations of mRCC in freshly isolated mitochondria from mice brain that were pair-fed the ethanol (4% v/v and control liquid diets for 7-8 weeks. We observed that alcohol intake severely reduced the levels of complex I and V. A reduction in complex I was associated with a decrease in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (cPT1 and cPT2 levels. The mitochondrial outer (cPT1 and inner (cPT2 membrane transporter enzymes are specialized in acylation of fatty acid from outer to inner membrane of mitochondria for ATP production. Thus, our results showed that alterations of cPT1 and cPT2 paralleled a decrease β-oxidation of palmitate and ATP production, suggesting that impairment of substrate entry step (complex I function can cause a negative impact on ATP production (complex V function. Disruption of cPT1/cPT2 was accompanied by an increase in cytochrome C leakage, while reduction of complex I and V paralleled a decrease in depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ, monitored by JC-1 fluorescence and ATP production in alcohol intake. We noted that acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC, a cofactor of cPT1 and cPT2 prevented the adverse effects of alcohol while coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 was not very effective against alcohol insults. These results suggest that understanding the molecular, biochemical, and signaling mechanisms of the CNS mitochondrial β-oxidation such as ALC can mitigate alcohol related neurological disorders.

  16. Low complexity method for spreading sequence estimation of DSSS signal in non-cooperative communication systems*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Liang; Wang Fuping; Wang Zanji

    2009-01-01

    It is a necessary step to estimate the spreading sequence of direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) signal for blind despreading and demodulation in non-cooperative communications. Two innovative and effective detection statistics axe proposed to implement the synchronization and spreading sequence estimation procedure. The proposed algorithm also has a low computational complexity with only linear additions and modifications. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the algorithm performs quite well in low SNR environment, and is much better than all the existing typical algorithms with a comprehensive consideration both in performance and computational complexity.

  17. Brain source localization: a new method based on MUltiple SIgnal Classification algorithm and spatial sparsity of the field signal for electroencephalogram measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergallo, P; Lay-Ekuakille, A

    2013-08-01

    Brain activity can be recorded by means of EEG (Electroencephalogram) electrodes placed on the scalp of the patient. The EEG reflects the activity of groups of neurons located in the head, and the fundamental problem in neurophysiology is the identification of the sources responsible of brain activity, especially if a seizure occurs and in this case it is important to identify it. The studies conducted in order to formalize the relationship between the electromagnetic activity in the head and the recording of the generated external field allow to know pattern of brain activity. The inverse problem, that is given the sampling field at different electrodes the underlying asset must be determined, is more difficult because the problem may not have a unique solution, or the search for the solution is made difficult by a low spatial resolution which may not allow to distinguish between activities involving sources close to each other. Thus, sources of interest may be obscured or not detected and known method in source localization problem as MUSIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) could fail. Many advanced source localization techniques achieve a best resolution by exploiting sparsity: if the number of sources is small as a result, the neural power vs. location is sparse. In this work a solution based on the spatial sparsity of the field signal is presented and analyzed to improve MUSIC method. For this purpose, it is necessary to set a priori information of the sparsity in the signal. The problem is formulated and solved using a regularization method as Tikhonov, which calculates a solution that is the better compromise between two cost functions to minimize, one related to the fitting of the data, and another concerning the maintenance of the sparsity of the signal. At the first, the method is tested on simulated EEG signals obtained by the solution of the forward problem. Relatively to the model considered for the head and brain sources, the result obtained allows to

  18. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1.

  19. Science Signaling Podcast for 2 August 2016: Patient-specific protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrum, Adam G; Neier, Steven C; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-08-02

    This Podcast features an interview with Adam Schrum and Steven Neier, authors of a Research Article that appears in the 2 August 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about a method for identifying protein-protein interactions in patient tissue samples. The authors used this method to compare signaling complexes downstream of the T cell receptor in T cells from healthy skin with those in T cells from the skin of patients with the autoimmune disease alopecia areata. The study revealed differences in the relative abundance of some protein complexes between T cells from the control and patient groups. This technique could be adapted for use as a diagnostic tool to stratify patients by molecular phenotype and predict the therapeutic strategy that is likely to work best for each patient.Listen to Podcast.

  20. Multifractal analysis of sEMG signal of the complex muscle activity

    CERN Document Server

    Trybek, Paulina; Nowakowski, Michal; Machura, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    The neuro--muscular activity while working on laparoscopic trainer is the example of the complex (and complicated) movement. This class of problems are still waiting for the proper theory which will be able to describe the actual properties of the muscle performance. Here we consider the signals obtained from three states of muscle activity: at maximum contraction, during complex movements (at actual work) and in the completely relaxed state. In addition the difference between a professional and an amateur is presented. The Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis was used in description of the properties the kinesiological surface electromyographic signals (sEMG). We demonstrate the dissimilarity between each state of work for the selected group of muscles as well as between trained and untrained individuals.

  1. Electrocommunication signals alone are sufficient to increase neurogenesis in the brain of adult electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Kent D; McCarthy, Elizabeth A; Jashari, Denisa

    2008-10-01

    Social interaction can have profound influences on the structure of the adult brain, but little is known about the precise stimulus feature found within social interaction that induces such brain plasticity. We examined the effects of social stimuli on cell addition and radial glial fiber formation in the brains of adult electric fish. These fish communicate primarily through weak, quasi-sinusoidal electric signals. Fish were housed in isolation, paired with another fish or exposed to only the electrocommunication signals of another fish for 7 days. After 3 days of exposure to these stimulus conditions, fish were injected with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to mark newborn cells. We sacrificed the fish 4 days after BrdU injection and used immunohistochemistry to measure cell addition (BrdU+), the fraction of added cells that differentiated into neurons (BrdU+/NeuroTrace+) and the density of radial glia fibers (vimentin+) in the periventricular zone of the diencephalon. Fish that were exposed only to the electrocommunication signals of another fish and no other social stimuli had equivalent levels of cell addition and radial glial fiber density to fish that were housed with full social interaction and higher levels than fish housed in isolation. About 60% of the added cells differentiated into neurons; this fraction did not differ among treatment groups. Artificial sine wave electrical stimuli that mimicked electrocommunication signals were ineffective in increasing cell addition and glia fiber formation above those found in isolated fish. Thus, stimuli through a single modality are sufficient for inducing this brain plasticity, but the waveform or dynamic features of communication signals are crucial for the effect.

  2. Parallel algorithm to analyze the brain signals: application on epileptic spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Anup Kumar; Das, Barda Nand; Mallick, Dheeresh Kumar; Sinha, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-02-01

    In the current work, we have proposed a parallel algorithm for the recognition of Epileptic Spikes (ES) in EEG. The automated systems are used in biomedical field to help the doctors and pathologist by producing the result of an inspection in real time. Generally, the biomedical signal data to be processed are very large in size. A uniprocessor computer is having its own limitation regarding its speed. So the fastest available computer with latest configuration also may not produce results in real time for the immense computation. Parallel computing can be proved as a useful tool for processing the huge data with higher speed. In the proposed algorithm 'Data Parallelism' has been applied where multiple processors perform the same operation on different part of the data to produce fast result. All the processors are interconnected with each other by an interconnection network. The complexity of the algorithm was analyzed as Θ((n + δn) / N) where, 'n' is the length of the input data, 'N' is the number of processor used in the algorithm and 'δn' is the amount of overlapped data between two consecutive intermediate processors (IPs). This algorithm is scalable as the level of parallelism increase linearly with the increase in number of processors. The algorithm has been implemented in Message Passing Interface (MPI). It was tested with 60 min recorded EEG signal data files. The recognition rate of ES on an average was 95.68%.

  3. Mitochondrial proteome analysis reveals depression of the Ndufs3 subunit and activity of complex I in diabetic rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurino, Federica; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Trentadue, Raffaella; Papa, Sergio; Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio

    2012-04-18

    Type-1 diabetes resulting from defective insulin secretion and consequent hyperglycemia, is associated with "diabetic encephalopathy." This is characterized by brain neurophysiological and structural changes resulting in impairment of cognitive function. The present proteomic analysis of brain mitochondrial proteins from streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetic rats, shows a large decrement of the Ndufs3 protein subunit of complex I, decreased level of the mRNA and impaired catalytic activity of the complex in the diabetic rats as compared to controls. The severe depression of the expression and enzymatic activity of complex I can represent a critical contributing factor to the onset of the diabetic encephalopathy in type-1 diabetes.

  4. Methylglyoxal activates the target of rapamycin complex 2-protein kinase C signaling pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Wataru; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2015-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is a typical 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis. We show here that methylglyoxal activates the Pkc1-Mpk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in a target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent manner in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that TORC2 phosphorylates Pkc1 at Thr(1125) and Ser(1143). Methylglyoxal enhanced the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), which transmitted the signal to the downstream Mpk1 MAP kinase cascade. We found that the phosphorylation status of Pkc1(T1125) affected the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), in addition to its protein levels. Methylglyoxal activated mammalian TORC2 signaling, which, in turn, phosphorylated Akt at Ser(473). Our results suggest that methylglyoxal is a conserved initiator of TORC2 signaling among eukaryotes.

  5. A Smoothened-Evc2 Complex Transduces the Hedgehog Signal at Primary Cilia

    OpenAIRE

    Dorn, Karolin V.; Hughes, Casey E.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that...

  6. Receiver discriminability drives the evolution of complex sexual signals by sexual selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianguo; Song, Xiaowei; Zhu, Bicheng; Fang, Guangzhan; Tang, Yezhong; Ryan, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    A hallmark of sexual selection by mate choice is the evolution of exaggerated traits, such as longer tails in birds and more acoustic components in the calls of birds and frogs. Trait elaboration can be opposed by costs such as increased metabolism and greater predation risk, but cognitive processes of the receiver can also put a brake on trait elaboration. For example, according to Weber's Law traits of a fixed absolute difference will be more difficult to discriminate as the absolute magnitude increases. Here, we show that in the Emei music frog (Babina daunchina) increases in the fundamental frequency between successive notes in the male advertisement call, which increases the spectral complexity of the call, facilitates the female's ability to compare the number of notes between calls. These results suggest that female's discriminability provides the impetus to switch from enhancement of signaling magnitude (i.e., adding more notes into calls) to employing a new signal feature (i.e., increasing frequency among notes) to increase complexity. We suggest that increasing the spectral complexity of notes ameliorates some of the effects of Weber's Law, and highlights how perceptual and cognitive biases of choosers can have important influences on the evolution of courtship signals.

  7. Brain MR imaging in patients with hepatic cirrhosis: relationship between high intensity signal in basal ganglia on T{sub 1}-weighted images and elemental concentrations in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, H. [Department of Radiology, Wakayama Medical College, 27-7, Wakayama City, 640 (Japan); Sato, M. [Department of Radiology, Wakayama Medical College, 27-7, Wakayama City, 640 (Japan); Yoshikawa, A. [Department of Radiology, Wakayama Medical College, 27-7, Wakayama City, 640 (Japan); Kimura, M. [Department of Radiology, Wakayama Medical College, 27-7, Wakayama City, 640 (Japan); Sonomura, T. [Department of Radiology, Wakayama Medical College, 27-7, Wakayama City, 640 (Japan); Terada, M. [Department of Radiology, Wakayama Medical College, 27-7, Wakayama City, 640 (Japan); Kishi, K. [Department of Radiology, Wakayama Medical College, 27-7, Wakayama City, 640 (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    In patients with hepatic cirrhosis, the globus pallidus and putamen show high intensity on T1-weighted MRI. While the causes of this high signal have been thought to include paramagnetic substances, especially manganese, no evidence for this has been presented. Autopsy in four cases of hepatic cirrhosis permitted measurement of metal concentrations in brain and histopathological examination. In three cases the globus pallidus showed high intensity on T1-weighted images. Mean manganese concentrations in globus pallidus, putamen and frontal white matter were 3.03 {+-} 0.38, 2.12 {+-} 0.37, and 1.38 {+-} 0.24 ({mu}g/g wet weight), respectively, being approximately four- to almost ten-fold the normal values. Copper concentrations in globus pallidus and putamen were also high, 50 % more than normal. Calcium, iron, zinc and magnesium concentrations were all normal. The fourth case showed no abnormal intensity in the basal ganglia and brain metal concentrations were all normal. Histopathologically, cases with showing high signal remarkable atrophy, necrosis, and deciduation of nerve cells and proliferation of glial cells and microglia in globus pallidus. These findings were similar to those in chronic manganese poisoning. On T1-weighted images, copper deposition shows no abnormal intensity. It is therefore inferred that deposition of highly concentrations of manganese may caused high signal on T1-weighted images and nerve cell death in the globus pallidus. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Rules rule! Brain activity dissociates the representations of stimulus contingencies with varying levels of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Chun-Yu; Low, Kathy A; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2012-09-01

    The significance of stimuli is linked not only to their nature but also to the sequential structure in which they are embedded, which gives rise to contingency rules. Humans have an extraordinary ability to extract and exploit these rules, as exemplified by the role of grammar and syntax in language. To study the brain representations of contingency rules, we recorded ERPs and event-related optical signal (EROS; which uses near-infrared light to measure the optical changes associated with neuronal responses). We used sequences of high- and low-frequency tones varying according to three contingency rules, which were orthogonally manipulated and differed in processing requirements: A Single Repetition rule required only template matching, a Local Probability rule required relating a stimulus to its context, and a Global Probability rule could be derived through template matching or with reference to the global sequence context. ERP activity at 200-300 msec was related to the Single Repetition and Global Probability rules (reflecting access to representations based on template matching), whereas longer-latency activity (300-450 msec) was related to the Local Probability and Global Probability rules (reflecting access to representations incorporating contextual information). EROS responses with corresponding latencies indicated that the earlier activity involved the superior temporal gyrus, whereas later responses involved a fronto-parietal network. This suggests that the brain can simultaneously hold different models of stimulus contingencies at different levels of the information processing system according to their processing requirements, as indicated by the latency and location of the corresponding brain activity.

  9. Absence of Doppler signal in transcranial color-coded ultrasonography may be confirmatory for brain death: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Topçuoğlu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD is a valuable tool for demonstrating cerebral circulatory arrest (CCA in the setting of brain death. Complete reversal of diastolic flow (to-and-fro flow and systolic spikes in bilateral terminal internal carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar circulation are considered as specific sonogram configurations supporting the diagnosis of CCA. Because of the possibility of sonic bone window impermeability, absence of any waveform in TCD is not confirmatory for CCA unless there is documentation of disappearance of a previously well detected signal by the same recording settings. Transcranial color-coded sonography (TCCS with B-mode imaging can reliably detect adequacy of bone windows with clarity contralateral skull and ipsilateral planum temporale visualization. Therefore, absence of detectable intracranial Doppler signal along with available ultrasound window in TCCS can confirm clinical diagnosis of brain death. We herein discuss this entity from the frame of a representative case.

  10. TOR Complex 2-Ypk1 Signaling Maintains Sphingolipid Homeostasis by Sensing and Regulating ROS Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Niles

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced during normal metabolism and can function as signaling molecules. However, ROS at elevated levels can damage cells. Here, we identify the conserved target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2/Ypk1 signaling module as an important regulator of ROS in the model eukaryotic organism, S. cerevisiae. We show that TORC2/Ypk1 suppresses ROS produced both by mitochondria as well as by nonmitochondrial sources, including changes in acidification of the vacuole. Furthermore, we link vacuole-related ROS to sphingolipids, essential components of cellular membranes, whose synthesis is also controlled by TORC2/Ypk1 signaling. In total, our data reveal that TORC2/Ypk1 act within a homeostatic feedback loop to maintain sphingolipid levels and that ROS are a critical regulatory signal within this system. Thus, ROS sensing and signaling by TORC2/Ypk1 play a central physiological role in sphingolipid biosynthesis and in the maintenance of cell growth and viability.

  11. Nutrient export from catchments on forested landscapes reveals complex nonstationary and stationary climate signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengistu, Samson G.; Quick, Christopher G.; Creed, Irena F.

    2013-06-01

    Headwater catchment hydrology and biogeochemistry are influenced by climate, including linear trends (nonstationary signals) and climate oscillations (stationary signals). We used an analytical framework to detect nonstationary and stationary signals in yearly time series of nutrient export [dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), nitrate (NO3--N), and total dissolved phosphorus (TDP)] in forested headwater catchments with differential water loading and water storage potential at the Turkey Lakes Watershed in Ontario, Canada. We tested the hypotheses that (1) climate has nonstationary and stationary effects on nutrient export, the combination of which explains most of the variation in nutrient export; (2) more metabolically active nutrients (e.g., DON, NO3--N, and TDP) are more sensitive to these signals; and (3) catchments with relatively low water loading and water storage capacity are more sensitive to these signals. Both nonstationary and stationary signals were identified, and the combination of both explained the majority of the variation in nutrient export data. More variation was explained in more labile nutrients (DON, NO3--N, and TDP), which were also more sensitive to climate signals. The catchment with low-water storage potential and low water loading was most sensitive to nonstationary and stationary climatic oscillations, suggesting that these hydrologic features are characteristic of the most effective sentinels of climate change. The observed complex links between climate change, climatic oscillations, and water nutrient fluxes in headwater catchments suggest that climate may have considerable influence on the productivity and biodiversity of surface waters, in addition to other drivers such as atmospheric pollution.

  12. Involvement of extracellular signal regulated kinases in traumatic brain injury-induced depression in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Cheng, Yi-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Shion; Chio, Chung-Ching; Gean, Po-Wu

    2013-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the most common cause of death and acquired disability among children and young adults in the developed countries. In clinical studies, the incidence of depression is high after TBI, and the mechanisms behind TBI-induced depression remain unclear. In the present study, we subjected rats to a moderate fluid percussion into the closed cranial cavity to induce TBI. After 3 days of recovery, injured rats were given a forced swim test (FST) and novelty-suppressed feeding tests. We found that TBI rats exhibited increased duration of immobility and longer latency to begin chewing food in a new environment compared with sham-operated rats. Western blot analysis showed that TBI led to a decrease in the phosphorylated levels of extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), significantly reduced the duration of immobility when administered once per day for 14 days. Consistent with behavioral tests, fluoxetine treatment reversed TBI-induced decrease in p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 MAPK levels. Pre-treatment with a selective tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) blocked the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine. PCPA also prevented the effect of fluoxetine on ERK1/2 phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Pre-treatment with ERK inhibitor SL327 but not p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 prevented the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine. These results suggest that ERK1/2 plays a critical role in TBI-induced depression.

  13. Differentiation of brain metastases by percentagewise quantification of intratumoral-susceptibility-signals at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radbruch, Alexander, E-mail: Alexander.Radbruch@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Heidelberg Medical Center (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) (Germany); Graf, Markus, E-mail: m.graf@dkfz.de [Software Development for Integrated Diagnosis and Therapy, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) (Germany); Kramp, Linda, E-mail: linda.kramp@gmx.de [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Heidelberg Medical Center (Germany); Wiestler, Benedikt, E-mail: b.wiestler@dkfz.de [Department of Neurooncology, University of Heidelberg Medical Center (Germany); Floca, Ralf, E-mail: r.floca@dkfz.de [Software Development for Integrated Diagnosis and Therapy, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) (Germany); Bäumer, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.baeumer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Heidelberg Medical Center (Germany); Roethke, Matthias, E-mail: m.roethke@dkfz.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) (Germany); Stieltjes, Bram, E-mail: b.stieltjes@dkfz.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) (Germany); Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter, E-mail: h.schlemmer@dkfz.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) (Germany); Heiland, Sabine, E-mail: sabine.heiland@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Heidelberg Medical Center (Germany); Bendszus, Martin, E-mail: martin.bendszus@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Heidelberg Medical Center (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Introduction: Evaluation of intratumoral-susceptibility-signals (ITSS) in susceptibility-weighted-imaging (SWI) has been reported to improve diagnostic performance for solitary enhancing brain lesions. Due to the distinct morphologic variability of ITSS, standardized evaluation proved to be difficult. We analyzed, if a new postprocessing method using percentagewise quantification (PQ) of ITSS enables differentiation between different entities of cerebral metastases and may thus improve differential diagnosis in cases of unknown primary. Materials and methods: SWI and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MR images were acquired from 84 patients with intracerebral metastases (20 patients with mamma carcinoma (MC), 15 patients with malignant melanoma (MM), 49 patients with bronchial carcinoma (BC)) at 3 Tesla MR. Images were co-registered and enhancing lesions were delineated on T1-weighted images and the outline transferred to the corresponding SWI map. All voxels within the lesion presenting values below a reference value placed in the ventricular system were determined and percentagewise calculated. Results: Diagnostic performance of percentagewise quantification (PQ) of ITSS, as determined with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was excellent (AUC = 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90, 1.00) to discriminate MM from MC, good for the discrimination of MM and BC (AUC = 0.81, 95% CI 0.70, 0.92) and poor for the discrimination of MC and BC (AUC = 0.60; 95% CI 0.47, 0.73). Conclusion: PQ is a new approach for the assessment of SWI that can be used for differential diagnosis of intracerebral metastases. Metastases of MM and MC or BC can be distinguished with high sensitivity and specificity.

  14. IPP Complex Reinforces Adhesion by Relaying Tension-Dependent Signals to Inhibit Integrin Turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina M. Vakaloglou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytoskeleton-mediated forces regulate the assembly and function of integrin adhesions; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The tripartite IPP complex, comprising ILK, Parvin, and PINCH, mediates the integrin-actin link at Drosophila embryo muscle attachment sites (MASs. Here, we demonstrate a developmentally earlier function for the IPP complex: to reinforce integrin-extracellular matrix (ECM adhesion in response to tension. In IPP-complex mutants, the integrin-ECM linkage at MASs breaks in response to intense muscle contractility. Mechanistically, the IPP complex is required to relay force-elicited signals that decelerate integrin turnover at the plasma membrane so that the integrin immobile fraction is adequate to withstand tension. Epistasis analysis shows that alleviation of muscle contractility, downregulation of endocytosis, and enhanced integrin binding to the ECM are sufficient to restore integrin-ECM adhesion and maintain integrin-adhesome organization in IPP-complex mutants. Our findings reveal a role for the IPP complex as an essential mechanosensitive regulatory switch of integrin turnover in vivo.

  15. Herpes Virus Entry Mediator Signaling in the Brain Is Imperative in Acute Inflammation-Induced Anorexia and Body Weight Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Kon Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundReduced appetite and body weight loss are typical symptoms of inflammatory diseases. A number of inflammatory stimuli are responsible for the imbalance in energy homeostasis, leading to metabolic disorders. The herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM protein plays an important role in the development of various inflammatory diseases, such as intestinal inflammation and diet-induced obesity. However, the role of HVEM in the brain is largely unknown. This study aims to investigate whether HVEM signaling in the brain is involved in inflammation-induced anorexia and body weight loss.MethodsFood intake and body weight were measured at 24 hours after intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS or intracerebroventricular injection of recombinant mouse LIGHT (also called tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14, TNFSF14, an HVEM ligand, into 8- to 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice and mice lacking HVEM expression (HVEM-/-. We also assessed LPS-induced change in hypothalamic expression of HVEM using immunohistochemistry.ResultsAdministration of LPS significantly reduced food intake and body weight, and moreover, increased expression of HVEM in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. However, LPS induced only minor decreases in food intake and body weight in HVEM-/- mice. Administration of LIGHT into the brain was very effective at decreasing food intake and body weight in wild-type mice, but was less effective in HVEM-/- mice.ConclusionActivation of brain HVEM signaling is responsible for inflammation-induced anorexia and body weight loss.

  16. Ceramide 1-Phosphate Increases P-Glycoprotein Transport Activity at the Blood-Brain Barrier via Prostaglandin E2 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesev, Emily V; Miller, David S; Cannon, Ronald E

    2017-04-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven efflux pump, regulates permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Sphingolipids, endogenous to brain tissue, influence inflammatory responses and cell survival in vitro. Our laboratory has previously shown that sphingolipid signaling by sphingosine 1-phosphate decreases basal P-glycoprotein transport activity. Here, we investigated the potential for another sphingolipid, ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), to modulate efflux pumps at the BBB. Using confocal microscopy and measuring luminal accumulation of fluorescent substrates, we assessed the transport activity of several efflux pumps in isolated rat brain capillaries. C1P treatment induced P-glycoprotein transport activity in brain capillaries rapidly and reversibly. In contrast, C1P did not affect transport activity of two other major efflux transporters, multidrug resistance protein 2 and breast cancer resistance protein. C1P induced P-glycoprotein transport activity without changing transporter protein expression. Inhibition of the key signaling components in the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 signaling cascade (phospholipase A2, COX-2, multidrug resistance protein 4, and G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E2 receptors 1 and 2), abolished P-glycoprotein induction by C1P. We show that COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 are required for C1P-mediated increases in P-glycoprotein activity independent of transporter protein expression. This work describes how C1P activates a signaling cascade to dynamically regulate P-glycoprotein transport at the BBB and offers potential clinical targets to modulate neuroprotection and drug delivery to the CNS.

  17. Transport of receptors, receptor signaling complexes and ion channels via neuropeptide-secretory vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhao; Hai-Bo Wang; Ying-Jin Lu; Jian-Wen Hu; Lan Bao; Xu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Stimulus-induced exocytosis of large dense-core vesicles(LDCVs)leads to discharge of neuropeptides and fusion of LDCV membranes with the plasma membrane. However, the contribution of LDCVs to the properties of the neuronal membrane remains largely unclear. The present study found that LDCVs were associated with multiple receptors, channels and signaling molecules, suggesting that neuronal sensitivity is modulated by an LDCV-mediated mechanism. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with immunoblotting of subcellular fractions identified 298 proteins in LDCV membranes purified from the dorsal spinal cord, including Gprotein-coupled receptors, Gproteins and other signaling molecules, ion channels and trafficking-related proteins. Morphological assays showed that δ-opioid receptor 1(DORI), β2 adrenergic receptor(AR), Gα12,voltage-gated calcium channel a2δ1subunit and P2X purinoceptor 2 were localized in substance P(SP)-positive LDCVs in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons, whereas β1 AR, Wnt receptor frizzled 8 and dishevelled 1 were present in SP-negative LDCVs.Furthermore, DOR1/α12/Gβ1γ5/phospholipase C β2 complexes were associated with LDCVs. Blockade of the DOR1/Gαi2 interaction largely abolished the LDCV localization of Gαi2 and impaired stimulation-induced surface expression of Gαi2. Thus, LDCVs serve as carriers of receptors, ion channels and preassembled receptor signaling complexes, enabling a rapid, activity-dependent modulation of neuronal sensitivity.

  18. Refined composite multivariate generalized multiscale fuzzy entropy: A tool for complexity analysis of multichannel signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azami, Hamed; Escudero, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Multiscale entropy (MSE) is an appealing tool to characterize the complexity of time series over multiple temporal scales. Recent developments in the field have tried to extend the MSE technique in different ways. Building on these trends, we propose the so-called refined composite multivariate multiscale fuzzy entropy (RCmvMFE) whose coarse-graining step uses variance (RCmvMFEσ2) or mean (RCmvMFEμ). We investigate the behavior of these multivariate methods on multichannel white Gaussian and 1/ f noise signals, and two publicly available biomedical recordings. Our simulations demonstrate that RCmvMFEσ2 and RCmvMFEμ lead to more stable results and are less sensitive to the signals' length in comparison with the other existing multivariate multiscale entropy-based methods. The classification results also show that using both the variance and mean in the coarse-graining step offers complexity profiles with complementary information for biomedical signal analysis. We also made freely available all the Matlab codes used in this paper.

  19. D3.1 BRAIN - Initial prototype of advanced SSVEP signal processing tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlovic, V.; Garcia Molina, G.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes the High Frequency (HF) Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP) based Brain Computer Interface (BCI) developed at Philips Research Europe (PRE). The interface is based on the fact that the oscillatory visual stimuli can elicit oscillatory brain activity at the same frequ

  20. Structural bases for neurophysiological investigations of amygdaloid complex of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimullina, Liliya B.; Kalkamanov, Kh. A.; Akhmadeev, Azat V.; Zakharov, Vadim P.; Sharafullin, Ildus F.

    2015-11-01

    Amygdala (Am) as a part of limbic system of the brain defines such important functions as adaptive behavior of animals, formation of emotions and memory, regulation of endocrine and visceral functions. We worked out, with the help of mathematic modelling of the pattern recognition theory, principles for organization of neurophysiological and neuromorphological studies of Am nuclei, which take into account the existing heterogeneity of its formations and optimize, to a great extent, the protocol for carrying out of such investigations. The given scheme of studies of Am’s structural-functional organization at its highly-informative sections can be used as a guide for precise placement of electrodes’, cannulae’s and microsensors into particular Am nucleus in the brain with the registration not only the nucleus itself, but also its extensions. This information is also important for defining the number of slices covering specific Am nuclei which must be investigated to reveal the physiological role of a particular part of amygdaloid complex.

  1. Complex brain network properties in late L2 learners and native speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Alejandro; Gillon Dowens, Margaret; Molinaro, Nicola; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Barraza, Paulo; García-Pentón, Lorna; Carreiras, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    Whether the neural mechanisms that underlie the processing of a second language in highly proficient late bilinguals (L2 late learners) are similar or not to those that underlie the processing of the first language (L1) is still an issue under debate. In this study, a group of late learners of Spanish whose native language is English and a group of Spanish monolinguals were compared while they read sentences, some of which contained syntactic violations. A brain complex network analysis approach was used to assess the time-varying topological properties of the functional networks extracted from the electroencephalography (EEG) recording. Late L2 learners showed a lower degree of parallel information transfer and a slower propagation between regions of the brain functional networks while processing sentences containing a gender mismatch condition as compared with a standard sentence configuration. In contrast, no such differences between these conditions were detected in the Spanish monolinguals. This indicates that when a morphosyntactic language incongruence that does not exist in the native language is presented in the second language, the neural activation pattern is configured differently in highly proficient late bilinguals than in monolinguals.

  2. Signals Analysis and Clinical Validation of Blood and Oxygen Data in Human Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kai-yang; LIU Li-jun; WANG Xiang; QIN Zhao; XIE Ze-ping

    2005-01-01

    With a self-made near-infrared analytical instrument to blood and oxygen parameters in human brain, 80 cases in which 20 are healthy persons and 30are anaesthetised cases and others are patients with heart function lack is taken to examine, and the data of blood and oxygen in brain tissue were collected and analyzed by the method of power spectrum and correlation function. The results indicate that: (1) The average brain oxygen saturation of healthy persons and anaesthetised cases is about 80%, in accord with normal parameter of physiology. Contrastively, the average brain oxygen saturation of patients with heart function lack is 72. 8%, which is obviously less than that of healthy persons and anaesthetised cases. The probability of medical statistics is less than 0. 01. (2) The shapes of wave of brain blood and oxygen for the healthy person and the anaesthetised case reveal small periodical fluctuations with stable shape and base line, and the trend of increase or decrease of blood and oxygen parameters in brain tissue is synchronous and a phase reversal, but for the patient with heart function lack in a brain oxygen lack state, the shapes of wave are irregular. This is a hint that near infrared light passing through tissue can reflect the intuitionistic change of brain blood and oxygen parameters. (3) The power spectra of brain blood and oxygen for the healthy person and the anaesthetised case has a clear main peak, narrow bandwidth and perfect superposition each other, but the power spectra for the patient with heart function lack in a brain oxygen lack state is on the contrary. (4) The average cross correlation coefficient of brain blood and oxygen for healthy persons and anaesthetised cases is -0. 9825±0. 1027 close to -1. But the average cross correlation coefficient for patients with heart function lack in a brain oxygen lack state is merely -0. 8923± 0. 1035 which is obviously greater than -1 and the probability of medical statistics is less than 0. 01

  3. Abstracting meaning from complex information (gist reasoning) in adult traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, Asha Kuppachi; Spence, Jeffrey; Chapman, Sandra Bond

    2015-01-01

    Gist reasoning (abstracting meaning from complex information) was compared between adults with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI, n = 30) at least one year post injury and healthy adults (n = 40). The study also examined the contribution of executive functions (working memory, inhibition, and switching) and memory (immediate recall and memory for facts) to gist reasoning. The correspondence between gist reasoning and daily function was also examined in the TBI group. Results indicated that the TBI group performed significantly lower than the control group on gist reasoning, even after adjusting for executive functions and memory. Executive function composite was positively associated with gist reasoning (p reasoning significantly predicted daily function in the TBI group beyond the predictive ability of executive function alone (p = .011). Synthesizing and abstracting meaning(s) from information (i.e., gist reasoning) could provide an informative index into higher order cognition and daily functionality.

  4. USING OF COMPLEX HARMONIOUS SIGNALS IN PROBLEMS OF ACOUSTIC SPECTROMETRY OF POLYMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Bitiukov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. In article features of definition of acoustic properties of polymers with application of ultrasonic fluctuations are considered. The opportunity of definition with single method of such parameters of quality as a relaxation spectra of polymer and function of molecular-mass distribution in a solution that results in increase in time of carrying out of measurements is shown. For reduction of time, may use narrowing of a range of frequencies of the ultrasonic fluctuations rendered on the measured sample, or increase the step of quantization of a registered signal with the oscillograph. Thus both variants result in reduction in reliability of the received information because of a possible extends for limits of an effective frequency range or loss of a high-frequency component of a registered signal at increase in a step of quantization. For the decision of the listed problems it is offered to use the complex harmonious signal being superposition of several signals. Frequency is necessary for choosing proceeding from sensitivity of each determined polymer parameter of quality. On concrete examples it is shown, that sensitivity of such parameters of quality as strength and viscosity on Mooney essentially depends on frequency. For initial research, in a case when properties of a material beforehand are not known and it is necessary to reveal effective ranges of frequencies, for each determined property of a material, it is offered to use a signal such as «white noise» which will allow to reveal ranges of frequencies with the greatest sensitivity each measured parameter of quality. That, it is in turn connected to uniform distribution of spectral making frequencies on all possible frequency range. Necessity for definition of an effective range of time of registration and a step of quantization for a kind of limitation of technical opportunities of means of registration of electric signals (oscillographs is shown.

  5. Complex oscillatory redox dynamics with signaling potential at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembro, Jackelyn M; Cortassa, Sonia; Aon, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The time-keeping properties bestowed by oscillatory behavior on functional rhythms represent an evolutionarily conserved trait in living systems. Mitochondrial networks function as timekeepers maximizing energetic output while tuning reactive oxygen species (ROS) within physiological levels compatible with signaling. In this work, we explore the potential for timekeeping functions dependent on mitochondrial dynamics with the validated two-compartment mitochondrial energetic-redox (ME-R) computational model, that takes into account (a) four main redox couples [NADH, NADPH, GSH, Trx(SH)2], (b) scavenging systems (glutathione, thioredoxin, SOD, catalase) distributed in matrix and extra-matrix compartments, and (c) transport of ROS species between them. Herein, we describe that the ME-R model can exhibit highly complex oscillatory dynamics in energetic/redox variables and ROS species, consisting of at least five frequencies with modulated amplitudes and period according to power spectral analysis. By stability analysis we describe that the extent of steady state-as against complex oscillatory behavior-was dependent upon the abundance of Mn and Cu, Zn SODs, and their interplay with ROS production in the respiratory chain. Large parametric regions corresponding to oscillatory dynamics of increasingly complex waveforms were obtained at low Cu, Zn SOD concentration as a function of Mn SOD. This oscillatory domain was greatly reduced at higher levels of Cu, Zn SOD. Interestingly, the realm of complex oscillations was located at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial energetic behavior, and was characterized by oxidative stress. We conclude that complex oscillatory dynamics could represent a frequency- and amplitude-modulated H2O2 signaling mechanism that arises under intense oxidative stress. By modulating SOD, cells could have evolved an adaptive compromise between relative constancy and the flexibility required under stressful redox/energetic conditions.

  6. The locust standard brain: a 3D standard of the central complex as a platform for neural network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil El Jundi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Many insects use the pattern of polarized light in the sky for spatial orientation and navigation. We have investigated the polarization vision system in the desert locust. To create a common platform for anatomical studies on polarization vision pathways, Kurylas et al. (2008 have generated a three-dimensional (3D standard brain from confocal microscopy image stacks of 10 male brains, using two different standardization methods, the Iterative Shape Averaging (ISA procedure and the Virtual Insect Brain (VIB protocol. Comparison of both standardization methods showed that the VIB standard is ideal for comparative volume analysis of neuropils, whereas the ISA standard is the method of choice to analyze the morphology and connectivity of neurons. The central complex is a key processing stage for polarization information in the locust brain. To investigate neuronal connections between diverse central-complex neurons, we generated a higher-resolution standard atlas of the central complex and surrounding areas, using the ISA method based on brain sections from 20 individual central complexes. To explore the usefulness of this atlas, two central-complex neurons, a polarization-sensitive columnar neuron (type CPU1a and a tangential neuron that is activated during flight, the giant-fan shaped (GFS neuron, were reconstructed three-dimensionally from brain sections. To examine whether the GFS neuron is a candidate to contribute to synaptic input to the CPU1a neuron, we registered both neurons into the standardized central complex. Visualization of both neurons revealed a potential connection of the CPU1a and GFS neurons in layer II of the upper division of the central body.

  7. Efficient physical embedding of topologically complex information processing networks in brains and computer circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle S Bassett

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nervous systems are information processing networks that evolved by natural selection, whereas very large scale integrated (VLSI computer circuits have evolved by commercially driven technology development. Here we follow historic intuition that all physical information processing systems will share key organizational properties, such as modularity, that generally confer adaptivity of function. It has long been observed that modular VLSI circuits demonstrate an isometric scaling relationship between the number of processing elements and the number of connections, known as Rent's rule, which is related to the dimensionality of the circuit's interconnect topology and its logical capacity. We show that human brain structural networks, and the nervous system of the nematode C. elegans, also obey Rent's rule, and exhibit some degree of hierarchical modularity. We further show that the estimated Rent exponent of human brain networks, derived from MRI data, can explain the allometric scaling relations between gray and white matter volumes across a wide range of mammalian species, again suggesting that these principles of nervous system design are highly conserved. For each of these fractal modular networks, the dimensionality of the interconnect topology was greater than the 2 or 3 Euclidean dimensions of the space in which it was embedded. This relatively high complexity entailed extra cost in physical wiring: although all networks were economically or cost-efficiently wired they did not strictly minimize wiring costs. Artificial and biological information processing systems both may evolve to optimize a trade-off between physical cost and topological complexity, resulting in the emergence of homologous principles of economical, fractal and modular design across many different kinds of nervous and computational networks.

  8. Distinct conformations of GPCR–β-arrestin complexes mediate desensitization, signaling, and endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Thomas J.; Thomsen, Alex R. B.; Tarrasch, Jeffrey T.; Plouffe, Bianca; Nguyen, Anthony H.; Yang, Fan; Huang, Li-Yin; Kahsai, Alem W.; Bassoni, Daniel L.; Gavino, Bryant J.; Lamerdin, Jane E.; Triest, Sarah; Shukla, Arun K.; Berger, Benjamin; Little, John; Antar, Albert; Blanc, Adi; Qu, Chang-Xiu; Chen, Xin; Kawakami, Kouki; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken; Steyaert, Jan; Sun, Jin-Peng; Bouvier, Michel; Skiniotis, Georgios; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    β-Arrestins (βarrs) interact with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to desensitize G protein signaling, to initiate signaling on their own, and to mediate receptor endocytosis. Prior structural studies have revealed two unique conformations of GPCR–βarr complexes: the “tail” conformation, with βarr primarily coupled to the phosphorylated GPCR C-terminal tail, and the “core” conformation, where, in addition to the phosphorylated C-terminal tail, βarr is further engaged with the receptor transmembrane core. However, the relationship of these distinct conformations to the various functions of βarrs is unknown. Here, we created a mutant form of βarr lacking the “finger-loop” region, which is unable to form the core conformation but retains the ability to form the tail conformation. We find that the tail conformation preserves the ability to mediate receptor internalization and βarr signaling but not desensitization of G protein signaling. Thus, the two GPCR–βarr conformations can carry out distinct functions. PMID:28223524

  9. Brain components

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can make complex movements without thinking. The brain stem connects the brain with the spinal cord and is composed of ... structures: the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. The brain stem provides us with automatic functions that are necessary ...

  10. Toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor-kappa B signaling detected in brain after early subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chun-xiao; YIN Wei-ning; CAI Bo-wen; WU Jian; WANG Jun-yi; HE Min; SUN Hong; DING Jun-li; YOU Chao

    2009-01-01

    Background Inflammation and immunity play a vital role in the pathogenesis of early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-KB) regulates many genes essential for inflammation and immunity and is activated by toll-like receptor (TLR). This study aimed to detect the expression of the toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor-kappa B (TLR4/NF-KB) signaling in the rat brain after early SAH. Methods The rats were decapitated and their brains were removed at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after a single injection of blood into the prechiasmatic cistern, mRNA expression of TLR4 was measured by Taqman real-time RT-PCR, and protein expression by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. NF-KB activity and concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-lbeta (IL-β) and intedeukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Results TaqMan real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting identified a biphasic change in TLR4 expression in both mRNA and protein: an initial peak (2-6 hours) and a sustained elevation (12-48 hours). Immunohistochemical staining showed the inducible expression of TLR4-1ike immunoreactions predominantly in glial cells and vascular endothelium. A similar biphasic change in the activation of NF-KB subunit p65 as well as the production of NF-KB-regulated proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) were detected by ELISA. Conclusions These data suggest that experimental SAH induces significant up-regulation of TLR4 expression and the NF-KB signaling in early brain injury. Activation of the TLR4/NF-KB signaling may regulate the inflammatory responses after SAH.

  11. Ageing alters the supramolecular architecture of OxPhos complexes in rat brain cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Monika; Rommelspacher, Hans; Sugawa, Michiru D; Dencher, Norbert A

    2010-08-01

    Activity and stability of life-supporting proteins are determined not only by their abundance and by post-translational modifications, but also by specific protein-protein interactions. This holds true both for signal-transduction and energy-converting cascades. For vital processes such as life-span control and senescence, to date predominantly age-dependent alterations in abundance and to lesser extent in post-translational modifications of proteins are examined to elucidate the cause of ageing at the molecular level. In mitochondria of rat cortex, we quantified profound changes in the proportion of supramolecular assemblies (supercomplexes) of the respiratory chain complexes I, III(2), IV as well as of the MF(o)F(1) ATP synthase (complex V) by 2D-native/SDS electrophoresis and fluorescent staining. Complex I was present solely in supercomplexes and those lacking complex IV were least stable in aged animals (2.4-fold decline). The ATP synthase was confirmed as a prominent target of age-associated degradation by an overall decline in abundance of 1.5-fold for the monomer and an 2.8-fold increase of unbound F(1). Oligomerisation of the ATP synthase increases during ageing and might modulate the cristae architecture. These data could explain the link between ageing and respiratory control as well as ROS generation.

  12. Using structural information to change the phosphotransfer specificity of a two-component chemotaxis signalling complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian H Bell

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction pathways comprising histidine protein kinases (HPKs and their response regulators (RRs are widely used to control bacterial responses to environmental challenges. Some bacteria have over 150 different two-component pathways, and the specificity of the phosphotransfer reactions within these systems is tightly controlled to prevent unwanted crosstalk. One of the best understood two-component signalling pathways is the chemotaxis pathway. Here, we present the 1.40 A crystal structure of the histidine-containing phosphotransfer domain of the chemotaxis HPK, CheA(3, in complex with its cognate RR, CheY(6. A methionine finger on CheY(6 that nestles in a hydrophobic pocket in CheA(3 was shown to be important for the interaction and was found to only occur in the cognate RRs of CheA(3, CheY(6, and CheB(2. Site-directed mutagenesis of this methionine in combination with two adjacent residues abolished binding, as shown by surface plasmon resonance studies, and phosphotransfer from CheA(3-P to CheY(6. Introduction of this methionine and an adjacent alanine residue into a range of noncognate CheYs, dramatically changed their specificity, allowing protein interaction and rapid phosphotransfer from CheA(3-P. The structure presented here has allowed us to identify specificity determinants for the CheA-CheY interaction and subsequently to successfully reengineer phosphotransfer signalling. In summary, our results provide valuable insight into how cells mediate specificity in one of the most abundant signalling pathways in biology, two-component signal transduction.

  13. Cinnamon counteracts the negative effects of a high fat/high fructose diet on behavior, brain insulin signaling and Alzheimer-associated changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin resistance leads to memory impairment. Cinnamon (CN) improves whole body insulin resistance but its effects in the brain are not known. Changes in behavior, insulin signaling, and Alzheimer-associated gene expression in the brain were measured in male Wistar rats fed a high fat/high fructose...

  14. Hierarchical random cellular neural networks for system-level brain-like signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Robert; Puljic, Marko

    2013-09-01

    Sensory information processing and cognition in brains are modeled using dynamic systems theory. The brain's dynamic state is described by a trajectory evolving in a high-dimensional state space. We introduce a hierarchy of random cellular automata as the mathematical tools to describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of the cortex. The corresponding brain model is called neuropercolation which has distinct advantages compared to traditional models using differential equations, especially in describing spatio-temporal discontinuities in the form of phase transitions. Phase transitions demarcate singularities in brain operations at critical conditions, which are viewed as hallmarks of higher cognition and awareness experience. The introduced Monte-Carlo simulations obtained by parallel computing point to the importance of computer implementations using very large-scale integration (VLSI) and analog platforms.

  15. The brain as a complex system: plasticity at multiple scales and criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tony; Miller, Paul

    2015-03-01

    As a complex system, a successful organism is one that can react effectively to environmental fluctuations. Not only should its response repertoire be commensurate with the number of independent conditions that it encounters, behavioral and environmental variations need to be matched at the appropriate scales. In the cortex, neuronal clusters, not individual cells, operate at the proper scale that is necessary to generate appropriate responses to external states of the world. Single neurons, however, serve on a finer scale to mediate interactions between neuronal assemblies. The distinction of scales is significant, as plasticity mechanisms can operate on various spatial and temporal scales. The brain has apparently evolved complex-system strategies to calibrate its own dynamics at multiple scales. This makes the joint study of local balance and global homeostasis fundamentally important, where criticality emerges as a signature of a computationally powerful system. We show via simulations how plasticity mechanisms at multiple scales are inextricably tied to spike-based neuronal avalanches, which are microscopic in origin and poorly predictive of animal behavior, and cluster-based avalanches, which are manifest macroscopically and are relevant to cognition and behavior.

  16. Nonessential Role for the NLRP1 Inflammasome Complex in a Murine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brickler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI elicits the immediate production of proinflammatory cytokines which participate in regulating the immune response. While the mechanisms of adaptive immunity in secondary injury are well characterized, the role of the innate response is unclear. Recently, the NLR inflammasome has been shown to become activated following TBI, causing processing and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLR, caspase-1, and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC. ASC is upregulated after TBI and is critical in coupling the proteins during complex formation resulting in IL-1β cleavage. To directly test whether inflammasome activation contributes to acute TBI-induced damage, we assessed IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 expression, contusion volume, hippocampal cell death, and motor behavior recovery in Nlrp1−/−, Asc−/−, and wild type mice after moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI injury. Although IL-1β expression is significantly attenuated in the cortex of Nlrp1−/− and Asc−/− mice following CCI injury, no difference in motor recovery, cell death, or contusion volume is observed compared to wild type. These findings indicate that inflammasome activation does not significantly contribute to acute neural injury in the murine model of moderate CCI injury.

  17. NONINVASIVE DETECTION OF BRAIN ACTIVITY VARIATION UNDER DIFFERENT DEPTH OF ANESTHESIA BY EEG COMPLEXITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jin; Li Wenwen; Zheng Chongxun; Jing Guixia; Liu Xueliang

    2006-01-01

    Objective To detect the change of brain activity under different depth of anesthesia (DOA)noninvasively. Methods The Lempel-Ziv complexity C(n) was used to analyze EEG and its four components (delta,theta, alpha, beta), which was recorded from SD rats under different DOA. The relationship between C(n) and DOA was studied. Results The C(n) of EEG will decrease while the depth of anesthesia increasing and vice versa. It can be used to detect the change of DOA sensitively. Compared with power spectrum, the change of C(n) is opposite to that of power spectru,. Only the C(n) of delta rhythm has obvious variations induced by the change of DOA, and the variations of delta is as similar as the EEG's. Conclusion The study shows that the desynchronized EEG is replaced by the synchronized EEG when rat goes into anesthesia state from awake, that is just the reason why complexity and power spectrum appear corresponding changes under different DOA. C(n) of delta rhythm dynamic change leads to the change of EEG, and the delta rhythm is the dominant rhythm during anesthesia for rats.

  18. Demonstration of brain noise on human EEG signals in perception of bistable images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Kurovskaya, Maria K.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2016-03-01

    In this report we studied human brain activity in the case of bistable visual perception. We proposed a new approach for quantitative characterization of this activity based on analysis of EEG oscillatory patterns and evoked potentials. Accordingly to theoretical background, obtained experimental EEG data and results of its analysis we studied a characteristics of brain activity during decision-making. Also we have shown that decisionmaking process has the special patterns on the EEG data.

  19. Acute and chronic administration of cannabidiol increases mitochondrial complex and creatine kinase activity in the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira S. Valvassori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of cannabidiol (CBD on mitochondrial complex and creatine kinase (CK activity in the rat brain using spectrophotometry. Method: Male adult Wistar rats were given intraperitoneal injections of vehicle or CBD (15, 30, or 60 mg/kg in an acute (single dose or chronic (once daily for 14 consecutive days regimen. The activities of mitochondrial complexes and CK were measured in the hippocampus, striatum, and prefrontal cortex. Results: Both acute and chronic injection of CBD increased the activity of the mitochondrial complexes (I, II, II-III, and IV and CK in the rat brain. Conclusions: Considering that metabolism impairment is certainly involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders, the modulation of energy metabolism (e.g., by increased mitochondrial complex and CK activity by CBD could be an important mechanism implicated in the action of CBD.

  20. Melatonin attenuated early brain injury induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage via regulating NLRP3 inflammasome and apoptosis signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yushu; Fan, Chongxi; Hu, Wei; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Zhiqiang; Yan, Xiaolong; Deng, Chao; Di, Shouyin; Xin, Zhenlong; Wu, Guiling; Yang, Yang; Reiter, Russel J; Liang, Guobiao

    2016-04-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating condition with high morbidity and mortality rates due to the lack of effective therapy. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation associated with the upregulation of apoptotic signaling pathway has been implicated in various inflammatory diseases including hemorrhagic insults. Melatonin is reported to possess substantial anti-inflammatory properties, which is beneficial for early brain injury (EBI) after SAH. However, the molecular mechanisms have not been clearly identified. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin against EBI induced by SAH and to elucidate the potential mechanisms. The adult mice were subjected to SAH. Melatonin or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally 2 hr after SAH. Melatonin was neuroprotective, as shown by increased survival rate, as well as elevated neurological score, greater survival of neurons, preserved brain glutathione levels, and reduced brain edema, malondialdehyde concentrations, apoptotic ratio, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Melatonin also attenuated the expressions of NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), cleaved caspase-1, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6); these changes were also associated with an increase in the anti-apoptotic factor (Bcl2) and reduction in the pro-apoptotic factor (Bim). In summary, our results demonstrate that melatonin treatment attenuates the EBI following SAH by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome-associated apoptosis.

  1. Content of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex membranes positively correlates with the proliferative status of brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, David C; Maccioni, Hugo J F; Caputto, Beatriz L

    2009-03-01

    Although the molecular and cellular basis of particular events that lead to the biogenesis of membranes in eukaryotic cells has been described in detail, understanding of the intrinsic complexity of the pleiotropic response by which a cell adjusts the overall activity of its endomembrane system to accomplish these requirements is limited. Here we carried out an immunocytochemical and biochemical examination of the content and quality of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus membranes in two in vivo situations characterized by a phase of active cell proliferation followed by a phase of declination in proliferation (rat brain tissue at early and late developmental stages) or by permanent active proliferation (gliomas and their most malignant manifestation, glioblastomas multiforme). It was found that, in highly proliferative phases of brain development (early embryo brain cells), the content of ER and Golgi apparatus membranes, measured as total lipid phosphorous content, is higher than in adult brain cells. In addition, the concentration of protein markers of ER and Golgi is also higher in early embryo brain cells and in human glioblastoma multiforme cells than in adult rat brain or in nonpathological human brain cells. Results suggest that the amount of endomembranes and the concentration of constituent functional proteins diminish as cells decline in their proliferative activity.

  2. LINGO-1 is a component of the Nogo-66 receptor/p75 signaling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Sha; Lee, Xinhua; Shao, Zhaohui; Thill, Greg; Ji, Benxiu; Relton, Jane; Levesque, Melissa; Allaire, Norm; Perrin, Steve; Sands, Bryan; Crowell, Thomas; Cate, Richard L; McCoy, John M; Pepinsky, R Blake

    2004-03-01

    Axon regeneration in the adult CNS is prevented by inhibitors in myelin. These inhibitors seem to modulate RhoA activity by binding to a receptor complex comprising a ligand-binding subunit (the Nogo-66 receptor NgR1) and a signal transducing subunit (the neurotrophin receptor p75). However, in reconstituted non-neuronal systems, NgR1 and p75 together are unable to activate RhoA, suggesting that additional components of the receptor may exist. Here we describe LINGO-1, a nervous system-specific transmembrane protein that binds NgR1 and p75 and that is an additional functional component of the NgR1/p75 signaling complex. In non-neuronal cells, coexpression of human NgR1, p75 and LINGO-1 conferred responsiveness to oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein, as measured by RhoA activation. A dominant-negative human LINGO-1 construct attenuated myelin inhibition in transfected primary neuronal cultures. This effect on neurons was mimicked using an exogenously added human LINGO-1-Fc fusion protein. Together these observations suggest that LINGO-1 has an important role in CNS biology.

  3. Use of multiple singular value decompositions to analyze complex intracellular calcium ion signals

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Josue G; Burghardt, Robert C; Barhoumi, Rola; Carroll, Raymond J; 10.1214/09-AOAS253

    2010-01-01

    We compare calcium ion signaling ($\\mathrm {Ca}^{2+}$) between two exposures; the data are present as movies, or, more prosaically, time series of images. This paper describes novel uses of singular value decompositions (SVD) and weighted versions of them (WSVD) to extract the signals from such movies, in a way that is semi-automatic and tuned closely to the actual data and their many complexities. These complexities include the following. First, the images themselves are of no interest: all interest focuses on the behavior of individual cells across time, and thus, the cells need to be segmented in an automated manner. Second, the cells themselves have 100$+$ pixels, so that they form 100$+$ curves measured over time, so that data compression is required to extract the features of these curves. Third, some of the pixels in some of the cells are subject to image saturation due to bit depth limits, and this saturation needs to be accounted for if one is to normalize the images in a reasonably unbiased manner. ...

  4. Measurement of the formation of complexes in tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladbury, John E., E-mail: j.ladbury@biochem.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-01

    The use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a full thermodynamic characterization of an interaction in one experiment. The determination of the affinity is an important value; however, the additional layer of information provided by the change in enthalpy and entropy can help in understanding the biology. This is demonstrated with respect to tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides highly complementary data to high-resolution structural detail. An overview of the methodology of the technique is provided. Ultimately, the correlation of the thermodynamic parameters determined by ITC with structural perturbation observed on going from the free to the bound state should be possible at an atomic level. Currently, thermodynamic data provide some insight as to potential changes occurring on complex formation. Here, this is demonstrated in the context of in vitro quantification of intracellular tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction and the issue of specificity of the important interactions. The apparent lack of specificity in the interactions of domains of proteins involved in early signalling from membrane-bound receptors is demonstrated using data from ITC.

  5. Antibody fragments for stabilization and crystallization of G protein-coupled receptors and their signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Arun K; Gupta, Charu; Srivastava, Ashish; Jaiman, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the key players in extracellular signal recognition and their subsequent communications with cellular signaling machinery. Crystallization and high-resolution structure determination of GPCRs has been one of the major advances in the area of GPCR biology over the last 7-8 years. There have primarily been three approaches to GPCR crystallization till date. These are fusion protein strategy, thermostabilization, and antibody fragment-mediated crystallization. Of these, antibody fragment-mediated crystallization has not only provided the first breakthrough in structure determination of a non-rhodopsin GPCR but it has also assisted in obtaining structures of fully active conformations of GPCRs. Antibody fragment approach has also been crucial in obtaining structural information on GPCR signaling complexes. Here, we highlight the specific examples of GPCR crystal structures that have utilized antibody fragments for promoting crystallogenesis and structure solution. We also discuss emerging powerful technologies such as the nanobody technology and the synthetic phage display libraries in the context of GPCR crystallization and underline how these tools are likely to propel key GPCR structural studies in future.

  6. Resting and Task-Modulated High-Frequency Brain Rhythms Measured by Scalp Encephalography in Infants with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Degregorio, Geneva; Jeste, Shafali S.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    The electrophysiological correlates of cognitive deficits in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are not well understood, and modulations of neural dynamics by neuroanatomical abnormalities that characterize the disorder remain elusive. Neural oscillations (rhythms) are a fundamental aspect of brain function, and have dominant frequencies in a wide…

  7. Chronic pain and evoked responses in the brain: A magnetoencephalographic study in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I and II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theuvenet, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type I and II are chronic pain syndromes with comparable symptoms, only in CRPS II a peripheral nerve injury is present. No objective tests are currently available to differentiate the two types which hampers diagnosis and treatment. Non-invasive brain imaging t

  8. Atypical Brain Activation during Simple & Complex Levels of Processing in Adult ADHD: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, T. Sigi; Bookheimer, Susan; McGough, James J.; Phillips, Joseph M.; McCracken, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Executive dysfunction in ADHD is well supported. However, recent studies suggest that more fundamental impairments may be contributing. We assessed brain function in adults with ADHD during simple and complex forms of processing. Method: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging with forward and backward digit spans to investigate…

  9. Using ipsilateral motor signals in the unaffected cerebral hemisphere as a signal platform for brain-computer interfaces in hemiplegic stroke survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, David T.; Wronkiewicz, Mark; Sharma, Mohit; Moran, Daniel W.; Corbetta, Maurizio; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2012-06-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems have emerged as a method to restore function and enhance communication in motor impaired patients. To date, this has been applied primarily to patients who have a compromised motor outflow due to spinal cord dysfunction, but an intact and functioning cerebral cortex. The cortical physiology associated with movement of the contralateral limb has typically been the signal substrate that has been used as a control signal. While this is an ideal control platform in patients with an intact motor cortex, these signals are lost after a hemispheric stroke. Thus, a different control signal is needed that could provide control capability for a patient with a hemiparetic limb. Previous studies have shown that there is a distinct cortical physiology associated with ipsilateral, or same-sided, limb movements. Thus far, it was unknown whether stroke survivors could intentionally and effectively modulate this ipsilateral motor activity from their unaffected hemisphere. Therefore, this study seeks to evaluate whether stroke survivors could effectively utilize ipsilateral motor activity from their unaffected hemisphere to achieve this BCI control. To investigate this possibility, electroencephalographic (EEG) signals were recorded from four chronic hemispheric stroke patients as they performed (or attempted to perform) real and imagined hand tasks using either their affected or unaffected hand. Following performance of the screening task, the ability of patients to utilize a BCI system was investigated during on-line control of a one-dimensional control task. Significant ipsilateral motor signals (associated with movement intentions of the affected hand) in the unaffected hemisphere, which were found to be distinct from rest and contralateral signals, were identified and subsequently used for a simple online BCI control task. We demonstrate here for the first time that EEG signals from the unaffected hemisphere, associated with overt and

  10. Using Ipsilateral Motor Signals in the Unaffected Cerebral Hemisphere as a Signal Platform for Brain Computer Interfaces in Hemiplegic Stroke Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, David T.; Wronkiewicz, Mark; Sharma, Mohit; Moran, Daniel W.; Corbetta, Maurizio; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Brain computer interface (BCI) systems have emerged as a method to restore function and enhance communication in motor impaired patients. To date, this has been primarily applied to patients who have a compromised motor outflow due to spinal cord dysfunction, but an intact and functioning cerebral cortex. The cortical physiology associated with movement of the contralateral limb has typically been the signal substrate that has been used as a control signal. While this is an ideal control platform in patients with an intact motor cortex, these signals are lost after a hemispheric stroke. Thus, a different control signal is needed that could provide control capability for a patient with a hemiparetic limb. Previous studies have shown that there is a distinct cortical physiology associated with ipsilateral, or same sided, limb movements. Thus far, it was unknown whether stroke survivors could intentionally and effectively modulate this ipsilateral motor activity from their unaffected hemisphere. Therefore, this study seeks to evaluate whether stroke survivors could effectively utilize ipsilateral motor activity from their unaffected hemisphere to achieve this BCI control. Approach To investigate this possibility, electroencephalographic (EEG) signals were recorded from four chronic hemispheric stroke patients as they performed (or attempted to perform) real and imagined hand tasks using either their affected or unaffected hand. Following performance of the screening task, the ability of patients to utilize a BCI system was investigated during on-line control of a 1-dimensional control task. Main Results Significant ipsilateral motor signals (associated with movement intentions of the affected hand) in the unaffected hemisphere, which were found to be distinct from rest and contralateral signals, were identified and subsequently used for a simple online BCI control task. We demonstrate here for the first time that EEG signals from the unaffected hemisphere

  11. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Effect of Acupuncture Signal after Brachial Plexus Blockade on Cerebral Blood Perfusion and Brain Cell Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RENYong-gong; JIAShao-wei

    2003-01-01

    Objective:Using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)to observe the influence of the up-transmitting of acupuncture signal into the brain in health volunteers whose nerve trunk was blocked by anesthetics.Methods:Thirty-one healthy volunteers were divided into two groups,the control group of 20 cases,and the brachial plexus blockade(BPB)group of 11cases,with supraclavicular BPB route adopted.With the control group 2 acupoints were randomly selected(Hegu and Quchi of both sides),while with the BPB group Hegu and Quchi of anesthetic arm side were selected.Siemens ECAM/ICON SPECT system was used to conduct brain imaging using double imaging assay before acupuncture and 99m Tc-ECD imaging agent during acupuncture for cerebral perfusion.The data were quantitatively ana-lyzed by blood functional changing rate (BFCR%) mathematics model.Results:Before acupuncture,the control and BPB groups showed insignificant change by SPECT, but after electro-acupuncture(EA),the control group displayed improved motor and sensory cortex excitability in basal nuclei,contra-lateral thal-amus,parietal and frontal lobe; while BPB group was characterized with reduction of the blood perfusion and cell function of contra-lateral thalamus of anesthetized arm.The difference between the two groups was significant(P<0.01).Conclusion:(1)After BPB,the up-transmitting of the acupuncture signal viaupper limb into the brain,and its strength was impaired or blocked; (2)After BPB, the effect of acupunc-ture on cerebral perfusion and brain cell function of contra-lateral thalamus was impaired or blocked.

  12. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is regulated by the Wnt signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Hyun; Hu, Jianfei; Qian, Jiang; Hackam, Abigail S.

    2012-01-01

    BDNF is a well-characterized neurotrophin that mediates a wide variety of activities in the central nervous system (CNS), including neuronal differentiation, neuroprotection and synaptic plasticity. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway is a critical regulator of embryonic development and homeostasis in adult tissues. Our group and others recently demonstrated that Wnt signaling induces BDNF expression in neurons and glia. However, the precise relationship between BDNF and Wnt signaling pathway...

  13. Feasibility of the Application of Moment Of Inertia as a Feature to Study High-Frequency Bands in Brain Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Shafiei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Many features, emerging from mathematical techniques, have been used in the analysis of brain signals. In this study, the physical quantity of “moment of inertia” (MOI was introduced as a feature to enhance high-frequency waves (HFWs in electroencephalography (EEG. Materials and Methods In this research, the recorded EEGs from F3, F4, and Cz points in 20 males were used. A total of 30 noiseless epochs (4 sec with a 1 sec overlap were selected for each eyes-open and eyes-closed state from each brain signal. After averaging the relative power spectrum (RPS of 30 epochs and obtaining an RPS with low fluctuation, the MOIs of the power spectrum and each EEG band were calculated. Results The MOI enhanced the HFWs of brain signals; therefore, HFW fluctuations in the power spectrum of MOI were more evaluable and observable than those of RPS. Paired t-test showed no significant difference in the asymmetry of MOI between the eyes-open and eyes-closed states (P=0.227, while the MOIs of alpha and beta bands between these two states were significantly different [F(1, 38=11.8; P=0.001 and F(1, 38=12.9; P=0.001, respectively]. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the MOI of different frequency bands might be used as a feature for some patients who are different from healthy subjects in terms of high-frequency bands or performance of two hemispheres. Therefore, in order to ensure the applicability of the obtained results, evaluation of MOI for EEG of some disorders, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, alcoholism, and autism is suggested in future studies.

  14. Miniaturized Swimming Soft Robot with Complex Movement Actuated and Controlled by Remote Light Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chaolei; Lv, Jiu-An; Tian, Xiaojun; Wang, Yuechao; Yu, Yanlei; Liu, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Powering and communication with micro robots to enable complex functions is a long-standing challenge as the size of robots continues to shrink. Physical connection of wires or components needed for wireless communication are complex and limited by the size of electronic and energy storage devices, making miniaturization of robots difficult. To explore an alternative solution, we designed and fabricated a micro soft swimming robot with both powering and controlling functions provided by remote light, which does not carry any electronic devices and batteries. In this approach, a polymer film containing azobenzene chromophore which is sensitive to ultra-violet (UV) light works as “motor”, and the UV light and visible light work as “power and signal lines”. Periodically flashing UV light and white light drives the robot flagellum periodically to swing to eventually push forward the robot in the glass tube filled with liquid. The gripper on robot head can be opened or closed by lights to grab and carry the load. This kind of remotely light-driven approach realizes complex driving and controlling of micro robotic structures, making it possible to design and fabricate even smaller robots. It will have great potential among applications in the micro machine and robot fields.

  15. Corticolimbic Brain Reactivity to Social Signals of Threat Before and After Sertraline Treatment in Generalized Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, K. Luan; Coccaro, Emil F.; Angstadt, Mike; Kreger, K. Jane; Mayberg, Helen S.; Liberzon, Israel; Stein, Murray B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Generalized social phobia (gSP), also known as generalized social anxiety disorder, is characterized by excessive fear of scrutiny by others and pervasive avoidance of social interactions. Pathophysiological models of gSP implicate exaggerated reactivity of the amygdala and insula in response to social evaluative threat, making them plausible targets for treatment. Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment is known to be an effective treatment, little is known about the mechanism by which these agents exert their anxiolytic effects at a brain level in gSP. Method We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of brain response to social signals of threat (fearful/angry faces) in twenty-one GSAD patients before and after they completed 12 weeks of open label treatment with the SSRI sertraline. For comparison, nineteen healthy control (HC) subjects also underwent two fMRI scans, 12 weeks apart. Results Whole-brain voxel-wise analysis of variance revealed significant Group×Time interactions in the amygdala and the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Follow up analyses showed that treatment in gSP subjects: 1) reduced amygdala reactivity to fearful faces (which was exaggerated relative to HCs prior to treatment); and 2) enhanced vmPFC activation to angry faces (which was attenuated relative to HCs prior to treatment). However, these brain changes were not significantly related to social anxiety symptom improvement. Conclusions SSRI treatment response in gSP is associated with changes in a discrete limbic-paralimbic brain network, representing a neural mechanism by which SSRIs may exert their actions. PMID:23164370

  16. Music Composition from the Brain Signal: Representing the Mental State by Music

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Wu; Chaoyi Li; Yu Yin; Changzheng Zhou; Dezhong Yao

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to translate human EEG into music, so as to represent mental state by music. The arousal levels of the brain mental state and music emotion are implicitly used as the bridge between the mind world and the music. The arousal level of the brain is based on the EEG features extracted mainly by wavelet analysis, and the music arousal level is related to the musical parameters such as pitch, tempo, rhythm, and tonality. While composing, some music principles (harmonics...

  17. Pseudo-stokes vector from complex signal representation of a speckle pattern and its applications to micro-displacement measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W.; Ishijima, R.; Matsuda, A.

    2010-01-01

    As an improvement of the intensity correlation used widely in conventional electronic speckle photography, we propose a new technique for displacement measurement based on correlating Stokes-like parameters derivatives for transformed speckle patterns. The method is based on a Riesz transform...... of the intensity speckle pattern, which converts the original real-valued signal into a complex signal. In closest analogy to the polarisation of a vector wave, the Stokes-like vector constructed from the spatial derivative of the generated complex signal has been applied for correlation. Experimental results...... are presented that demonstrate the validity and advantage of the proposed pseudo-Stokes vector correlation technique over conventional intensity correlation technique....

  18. The Hrs/Stam complex acts as a positive and negative regulator of RTK signaling during Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Chanut-Delalande

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endocytosis is a key regulatory step of diverse signalling pathways, including receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK signalling. Hrs and Stam constitute the ESCRT-0 complex that controls the initial selection of ubiquitinated proteins, which will subsequently be degraded in lysosomes. It has been well established ex vivo and during Drosophila embryogenesis that Hrs promotes EGFR down regulation. We have recently isolated the first mutations of stam in flies and shown that Stam is required for air sac morphogenesis, a larval respiratory structure whose formation critically depends on finely tuned levels of FGFR activity. This suggest that Stam, putatively within the ESCRT-0 complex, modulates FGF signalling, a possibility that has not been examined in Drosophila yet. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we assessed the role of the Hrs/Stam complex in the regulation of signalling activity during Drosophila development. We show that stam and hrs are required for efficient FGFR signalling in the tracheal system, both during cell migration in the air sac primordium and during the formation of fine cytoplasmic extensions in terminal cells. We find that stam and hrs mutant cells display altered FGFR/Btl localisation, likely contributing to impaired signalling levels. Electron microscopy analyses indicate that endosome maturation is impaired at distinct steps by hrs and stam mutations. These somewhat unexpected results prompted us to further explore the function of stam and hrs in EGFR signalling. We show that while stam and hrs together downregulate EGFR signalling in the embryo, they are required for full activation of EGFR signalling during wing development. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows that the ESCRT-0 complex differentially regulates RTK signalling, either positively or negatively depending on tissues and developmental stages, further highlighting the importance of endocytosis in modulating signalling pathways during development.

  19. A toolbox for real-time subject-independent and subject-dependent classification of brain states from fMRI signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit eRana

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a recent increase in the use of multivariate analysis and pattern classification in prediction and real-time feedback of brain states from functional imaging signals and mapping of spatio-temporal patterns of brain activity. Here we present MANAS, a generalized software toolbox for performing online and offline classification of fMRI signals. MANAS has been developed using MATLAB, LIBSVM and SVMlight packages to achieve a cross-platform environment. MANAS is targeted for neuroscience investigations and brain rehabilitation applications, based on neurofeedback and brain-computer interface (BCI paradigms. MANAS provides two different approaches for real-time classification: subject dependent and subject independent classification. In this article, we present the methodology of real-time subject dependent and subject independent pattern classification of fMRI signals; the MANAS software architecture and subsystems; and finally demonstrate the use of the system with experimental results.* M. Rana and N. Gupta are equally contributing authors.

  20. Reversible brain atrophy and subcortical high signal on MRI in a patient with anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelengas, A. [Asklipios-Aristotelio Diagnostic Centre, Thessaloniki (Greece); Dept. of Radiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Chourmouzi, D.; Boulogianni, G. [Asklipios-Aristotelio Diagnostic Centre, Thessaloniki (Greece); Pitsavas, G. [Paediatric Clinic, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Charitandi, A. [Dept. of Radiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2001-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), usually seen in young girls, is characterised by severe emaciation induced by self-imposed starvation. Enlargement of the ventricular system and sulci has been reported, as has high signal on T2-weighted images. We present a case with atrophic changes and high signal on T2-weighted images, which resolved completely following weight gain. (orig.)

  1. Avian sleep homeostasis: convergent evolution of complex brains, cognition and sleep functions in mammals and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattenborg, Niels C; Martinez-Gonzalez, Dolores; Lesku, John A

    2009-03-01

    Birds are the only taxonomic group other than mammals that exhibit high-amplitude slow-waves in the electroencephalogram (EEG) during sleep. This defining feature of slow-wave sleep (SWS) apparently evolved independently in mammals and birds, as reptiles do not exhibit similar EEG activity during sleep. In mammals, the level of slow-wave activity (SWA) (low-frequency spectral power density) during SWS increases and decreases as a function of prior time spent awake and asleep, respectively, and therefore reflects homeostatically regulated sleep processes potentially tied to the function of SWS. Although birds also exhibit SWS, previous sleep deprivation studies in birds did not detect a compensatory increase in SWS-related SWA during recovery, as observed in similarly sleep-deprived mammals. This suggested that, unlike mammalian SWS, avian SWS is not homeostatically regulated, and therefore might serve a different function. However, we recently demonstrated that SWA during SWS increases in pigeons following short-term sleep deprivation. Herein we summarize research on avian sleep homeostasis, and cast our evidence for this phenomenon within the context of theories for the function of SWS in mammals. We propose that the convergent evolution of homeostatically regulated SWS in mammals and birds was directly linked to the convergent evolution of large, heavily interconnected brains capable of performing complex cognitive processes in each group. Specifically, as has been proposed for mammals, the interconnectivity that forms the basis of complex cognition in birds may also instantiate slow, synchronous network oscillations during SWS that in turn maintain interconnectivity and cognition at an optimal level.

  2. Functional brain imaging of a complex navigation task following one night of total sleep deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangman, Gary; Thompson, John H.; Strauss, Monica M.; Marshburn, Thomas H.; Sutton, Jeffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the cerebral effects associated with sleep deprivation in a simulation of a complex, real-world, high-risk task. Design and Interventions: A two-week, repeated measures, cross-over experimental protocol, with counterbalanced orders of normal sleep (NS) and total sleep deprivation (TSD). Setting: Each subject underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing a dual-joystick, 3D sensorimotor navigation task (simulated orbital docking). Scanning was performed twice per subject, once following a night of normal sleep (NS), and once following a single night of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Five runs (eight 24s docking trials each) were performed during each scanning session. Participants: Six healthy, young, right-handed volunteers (2 women; mean age 20) participated. Measurements and Results: Behavioral performance on multiple measures was comparable in the two sleep conditions. Neuroimaging results within sleep conditions revealed similar locations of peak activity for NS and TSD, including left sensorimotor cortex, left precuneus (BA 7), and right visual areas (BA 18/19). However, cerebral activation following TSD was substantially larger and exhibited higher amplitude modulations from baseline. When directly comparing NS and TSD, most regions exhibited TSD>NS activity, including multiple prefrontal cortical areas (BA 8/9,44/45,47), lateral parieto-occipital areas (BA 19/39, 40), superior temporal cortex (BA 22), and bilateral thalamus and amygdala. Only left parietal cortex (BA 7) demonstrated NS>TSD activity. Conclusions: The large network of cerebral differences between the two conditions, even with comparable behavioral performance, suggests the possibility of detecting TSD-induced stress via functional brain imaging techniques on complex tasks before stress-induced failures.

  3. HRas signal transduction promotes hepatitis C virus cell entry by triggering assembly of the host tetraspanin receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zona, Laetitia; Lupberger, Joachim; Sidahmed-Adrar, Nazha; Thumann, Christine; Harris, Helen J; Barnes, Amy; Florentin, Jonathan; Tawar, Rajiv G; Xiao, Fei; Turek, Marine; Durand, Sarah C; Duong, François H T; Heim, Markus H; Cosset, François-Loïc; Hirsch, Ivan; Samuel, Didier; Brino, Laurent; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Le Naour, François; McKeating, Jane A; Baumert, Thomas F

    2013-03-13

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry is dependent on coreceptor complex formation between the tetraspanin superfamily member CD81 and the tight junction protein claudin-1 (CLDN1) on the host cell membrane. The receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR acts as a cofactor for HCV entry by promoting CD81-CLDN1 complex formation via unknown mechanisms. We identify the GTPase HRas, activated downstream of EGFR signaling, as a key host signal transducer for EGFR-mediated HCV entry. Proteomic analysis revealed that HRas associates with tetraspanin CD81, CLDN1, and the previously unrecognized HCV entry cofactors integrin β1 and Ras-related protein Rap2B in hepatocyte membranes. HRas signaling is required for lateral membrane diffusion of CD81, which enables tetraspanin receptor complex assembly. HRas was also found to be relevant for entry of other viruses, including influenza. Our data demonstrate that viruses exploit HRas signaling for cellular entry by compartmentalization of entry factors and receptor trafficking.

  4. Signal changes in gradient echo images of human brain induced by hypo- and hyperoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B;

    1995-01-01

    The effect of hypoxia (inspired oxygen fraction, FiO2 of 10% and 16%) and hyperoxia (FiO2) of 100%) on gradient echo images of the brain using long echo times was investigated in six healthy volunteers (age 24-28 years). Different flip angles were used with an FiO2 of 10% to assess the importance...

  5. Ant Queen Egg-Marking Signals: Matching Deceptive Laboratory Simplicity with Natural Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zweden, Jelle Stijn; Heinze, Jürgen; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background Experiments under controlled laboratory conditions can produce decisive evidence for testing biological hypotheses, provided they are representative of the more complex natural conditions. However, whether this requirement is fulfilled is seldom tested explicitly. Here we provide a lab....../field comparison to investigate the identity of an egg-marking signal of ant queens. Our study was based on ant workers resolving conflict over male production by destroying each other's eggs, but leaving queen eggs unharmed. For this, the workers need a proximate cue to discriminate between the two egg types...... that this compound by itself is not the natural queen egg-marking pheromone. We subsequently investigated the overall differences of entire chemical profiles of eggs, and found that queen-laid eggs in field colonies are more distinct from worker-laid eggs than in lab colonies, have more variation in profiles...

  6. On chip complex signal processing devices using coupled phononic crystal slab resonators and waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Mohammadi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the evidence for the possibility of achieving complex signal processing functionalities such as multiplexing/demultiplexing at high frequencies using phononic crystal (PnC slabs. It is shown that such functionalities can be obtained by appropriate cross-coupling of PnC resonators and waveguides. PnC waveguides and waveguide-based resonators are realized and cross-coupled through two different methods of mechanical coupling (i.e., direct coupling and side coupling. Waveguide-based PnC resonators are employed because of their high-Q, compactness, large spurious-free spectral ranges, and the possibility of better control over coupling to PnC waveguides. It is shown that by modifying the defects in the formation of the resonators, the frequency of the resonance can be tuned.

  7. A low complexity, low spur digital IF conversion circuit for high-fidelity GNSS signal playback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fei; Ying, Rendong

    2016-01-01

    A low complexity high efficiency and low spur digital intermediate frequency (IF) conversion circuit is discussed in the paper. This circuit is key element in high-fidelity GNSS signal playback instrument. We analyze the spur performance of a finite state machine (FSM) based numerically controlled oscillators (NCO), by optimization of the control algorithm, a FSM based NCO with 3 quantization stage can achieves 65dB SFDR in the range of the seventh harmonic. Compare with traditional lookup table based NCO design with the same Spurious Free Dynamic Range (SFDR) performance, the logic resource require to implemented the NCO is reduced to 1/3. The proposed design method can be extended to the IF conversion system with good SFDR in the range of higher harmonic components by increasing the quantization stage.

  8. Silicon Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Beyond the digital neural networks of Chap. 16, the more radical mapping of brain-like structures and processes into VLSI substrates has been pioneered by Carver Mead more than 30 years ago [1]. The basic idea was to exploit the massive parallelism of such circuits and to create low-power and fault-tolerant information-processing systems. Neuromorphic engineering has recently seen a revival with the availability of deep-submicron CMOS technology, which allows for the construction of very-large-scale mixed-signal systems combining local analog processing in neuronal cells with binary signalling via action potentials. Modern implementations are able to reach the complexity-scale of large functional units of the human brain, and they feature the ability to learn by plasticity mechanisms found in neuroscience. Combined with high-performance programmable logic and elaborate software tools, such systems are currently evolving into user-configurable non-von-Neumann computing systems, which can be used to implement and test novel computational paradigms. The chapter introduces basic properties of biological brains with up to 200 Billion neurons and their 1014 synapses, where action on a synapse takes ˜10 ms and involves an energy of ˜10 fJ. We outline 10x programs on neuromorphic electronic systems in Europe and the USA, which are intended to integrate 108 neurons and 1012 synapses, the level of a cat's brain, in a volume of 1 L and with a power dissipation design an intelligent technical response.

  9. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaltransduction pathway in depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Yingquan Zhang; Mingqi Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  10. Developmental changes of TrkB signaling in response to exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianju; Xiao, Hua; Wang, Hongbing

    2011-12-01

    Neocortical circuits are most sensitive to sensory experience during a critical period of early development. Previous studies implicate that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and GABAergic inhibition may control the timing of the critical period. By using an in vitro maturation model, we found that neurons at DIV (day in vitro) 7, around a period when functional synapses start to form and GABAergic inhibition emerges, displayed the most dynamic activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and CREB by exogenous BDNF. The BDNF-stimulated transcriptional up-regulation of CREB target genes was also the highest in DIV 7 neurons. The basal level of ERK1/2 and CREB activity, as well as the expression of CREB target genes, increased along with maturation, and neurons at DIV 13 and 22 displayed less dynamic responses to BDNF. Furthermore, we found that the developmentally regulated GABAergic inhibition correlated with the decline of BDNF-mediated signaling during maturation. BDNF stimulation along with suppression of GABAergic inhibition enhanced the activation of ERK1/2-CREB signaling and gene transcription in mature neurons. Conversely, BDNF stimulation along with enhancement of GABAergic inhibition reduced the overall induction of intracellular signaling in younger neurons. We propose that the less dynamic molecular changes may play a certain role in the loss of plasticity during maturation.

  11. Dysregulation of FMRP/mTOR Signaling Cascade in Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury of Premature Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechpammer, Mirna; Wintermark, Pia; Merry, Katherine M; Jackson, Michele C; Jantzie, Lauren L; Jensen, Frances E

    2016-03-01

    In this study the authors investigated whether dysregulation of the fragile X mental retardation protein and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling cascade can have a role in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy of prematurity following perinatal hypoxia-ischemia. The authors examined the brain tissue of newborns with encephalopathy and compared it to age-matched controls with normal brain development and adults. In normal controls, the fragile X mental retardation protein expression in cortical gray matter spiked 4-fold during 36-39 gestational weeks compared to the adult, with a concomitant suppression of p70S6K and S6. In encephalopathy cases, the developmental spike of fragile X mental retardation protein was not observed, and fragile X mental retardation protein levels remained significantly lower than in normal controls. Importantly, this fragile X mental retardation protein downregulation was followed by a significant overexpression of p70S6K and S6. These novel findings thus suggest that premature hypoxic-ischemic brain injury can affect the fragile X mental retardation protein/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, as otherwise observed in inherited syndromes of cognitive disability and autism spectrum disorders.

  12. Astaxanthin Alleviates Early Brain Injury Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats: Possible Involvement of Akt/Bad Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Sheng Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis has been proven to play a crucial role in early brain injury pathogenesis and to represent a target for the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Previously, we demonstrated that astaxanthin (ATX administration markedly reduced neuronal apoptosis in the early period after SAH. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. In the present study, we tried to investigate whether ATX administration is associated with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt (PI3K/Akt pathway, which can play an important role in the signaling of apoptosis. Our results showed that post-SAH treatment with ATX could cause a significant increase of phosphorylated Akt and Bad levels, along with a significant decrease of cleaved caspase-3 levels in the cortex after SAH. In addition to the reduced neuronal apoptosis, treatment with ATX could also significantly reduce secondary brain injury characterized by neurological dysfunction, cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier disruption. In contrast, the PI3K/Akt inhibitor, LY294002, could partially reverse the neuroprotection of ATX in the early period after SAH by downregulating ATX-induced activation of Akt/Bad and upregulating cleaved caspase-3 levels. These results provided the evidence that ATX could attenuate apoptosis in a rat SAH model, potentially, in part, through modulating the Akt/Bad pathway.

  13. Micro-earthquake signal analysis and hypocenter determination around Lokon volcano complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firmansyah, Rizky, E-mail: rizkyfirmansyah@hotmail.com [Geophysical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysical Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Kristianto, E-mail: kris@vsi.esdm.go.id [Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM), Geological Agency, Bandung, 40122 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Mount Lokon is one of five active volcanoes which is located in the North Sulawesi region. Since June 26{sup th}, 2011, standby alert set by the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM) for this mountain. The Mount Lokon volcano erupted on July 4{sup th}, 2011 and still continuously erupted until August 28{sup th}, 2011. Due to its high seismic activity, this study is focused to analysis of micro-earthquake signal and determine the micro-earthquake hypocenter location around the complex area of Lokon-Empung Volcano before eruption phase in 2011 (time periods of January, 2009 up to March, 2010). Determination of the hypocenter location was conducted with Geiger Adaptive Damping (GAD) method. We used initial model from previous study in Volcan de Colima, Mexico. The reason behind the model selection was based on the same characteristics that shared between Mount Lokon and Colima including andesitic stratovolcano and small-plinian explosions volcanian types. In this study, a picking events was limited to the volcano-tectonics of A and B types, hybrid, long-period that has a clear signal onset, and local tectonic with different maximum S – P time are not more than three seconds. As a result, we observed the micro-earthquakes occurred in the area north-west of Mount Lokon region.

  14. Micro-earthquake signal analysis and hypocenter determination around Lokon volcano complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmansyah, Rizky; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Kristianto

    2015-04-01

    Mount Lokon is one of five active volcanoes which is located in the North Sulawesi region. Since June 26th, 2011, standby alert set by the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM) for this mountain. The Mount Lokon volcano erupted on July 4th, 2011 and still continuously erupted until August 28th, 2011. Due to its high seismic activity, this study is focused to analysis of micro-earthquake signal and determine the micro-earthquake hypocenter location around the complex area of Lokon-Empung Volcano before eruption phase in 2011 (time periods of January, 2009 up to March, 2010). Determination of the hypocenter location was conducted with Geiger Adaptive Damping (GAD) method. We used initial model from previous study in Volcan de Colima, Mexico. The reason behind the model selection was based on the same characteristics that shared between Mount Lokon and Colima including andesitic stratovolcano and small-plinian explosions volcanian types. In this study, a picking events was limited to the volcano-tectonics of A and B types, hybrid, long-period that has a clear signal onset, and local tectonic with different maximum S - P time are not more than three seconds. As a result, we observed the micro-earthquakes occurred in the area north-west of Mount Lokon region.

  15. Final Report on LDRD project 130784 : functional brain imaging by tunable multi-spectral Event-Related Optical Signal (EROS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Spahn, Olga Blum; Hsu, Alan Yuan-Chun

    2009-09-01

    Functional brain imaging is of great interest for understanding correlations between specific cognitive processes and underlying neural activity. This understanding can provide the foundation for developing enhanced human-machine interfaces, decision aides, and enhanced cognition at the physiological level. The functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) based event-related optical signal (EROS) technique can provide direct, high-fidelity measures of temporal and spatial characteristics of neural networks underlying cognitive behavior. However, current EROS systems are hampered by poor signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and depth of measure, limiting areas of the brain and associated cognitive processes that can be investigated. We propose to investigate a flexible, tunable, multi-spectral fNIRS EROS system which will provide up to 10x greater SNR as well as improved spatial and temporal resolution through significant improvements in electronics, optoelectronics and optics, as well as contribute to the physiological foundation of higher-order cognitive processes and provide the technical foundation for miniaturized portable neuroimaging systems.

  16. Isoflurane Damages the Developing Brain of Mice and Induces Subsequent Learning and Memory Deficits through FASL-FAS Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuwen Yi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Isoflurane disrupts brain development of neonatal mice, but its mechanism is unclear. We explored whether isoflurane damaged developing hippocampi through FASL-FAS signaling pathway, which is a well-known pathway of apoptosis. Method. Wild type and FAS- or FASL-gene-knockout mice aged 7 days were exposed to either isoflurane or pure oxygen. We used western blotting to study expressions of caspase-3, FAS (CD95, and FAS ligand (FASL or CD95L proteins, TUNEL staining to count apoptotic cells in hippocampus, and Morris water maze (MWM to evaluate learning and memory. Result. Isoflurane increased expression of FAS and FASL proteins in wild type mice. Compared to isoflurane-treated FAS- and FASL-knockout mice, isoflurane-treated wild type mice had higher expression of caspase-3 and more TUNEL-positive hippocampal cells. Expression of caspase-3 in wild isoflurane group, wild control group, FAS/FASL-gene-knockout control group, and FAS/FASL-gene-knockout isoflurane group showed FAS or FASL gene knockout might attenuate increase of caspase-3 caused by isoflurane. MWM showed isoflurane treatment of wild type mice significantly prolonged escape latency and reduced platform crossing times compared with gene-knockout isoflurane-treated groups. Conclusion. Isoflurane induces apoptosis in developing hippocampi of wild type mice but not in FAS- and FASL-knockout mice and damages brain development through FASL-FAS signaling.

  17. A brain-computer interface for potential non-verbal facial communication based on EEG signals related to specific emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashihara, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Unlike assistive technology for verbal communication, the brain-machine or brain-computer interface (BMI/BCI) has not been established as a non-verbal communication tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Face-to-face communication enables access to rich emotional information, but individuals suffering from neurological disorders, such as ALS and autism, may not express their emotions or communicate their negative feelings. Although emotions may be inferred by looking at facial expressions, emotional prediction for neutral faces necessitates advanced judgment. The process that underlies brain neuronal responses to neutral faces and causes emotional changes remains unknown. To address this problem, therefore, this study attempted to decode conditioned emotional reactions to neutral face stimuli. This direction was motivated by the assumption that if electroencephalogram (EEG) signals can be used to detect patients' emotional responses to specific inexpressive faces, the results could be incorporated into the design and development of BMI/BCI-based non-verbal communication tools. To these ends, this study investigated how a neutral face associated with a negative emotion modulates rapid central responses in face processing and then identified cortical activities. The conditioned neutral face-triggered event-related potentials that originated from the posterior temporal lobe statistically significantly changed during late face processing (600-700 ms) after stimulus, rather than in early face processing activities, such as P1 and N170 responses. Source localization revealed that the conditioned neutral faces increased activity in the right fusiform gyrus (FG). This study also developed an efficient method for detecting implicit negative emotional responses to specific faces by using EEG signals. A classification method based on a support vector machine enables the easy classification of neutral faces that trigger specific individual emotions. In

  18. Functional complexity emerging from anatomical constraints in the brain: the significance of network modularity and rich-clubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-López, Gorka; Chen, Yuhan; Deco, Gustavo; Kringelbach, Morten L.; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-12-01

    The large-scale structural ingredients of the brain and neural connectomes have been identified in recent years. These are, similar to the features found in many other real networks: the arrangement of brain regions into modules and the presence of highly connected regions (hubs) forming rich-clubs. Here, we examine how modules and hubs shape the collective dynamics on networks and we find that both ingredients lead to the emergence of complex dynamics. Comparing the connectomes of C. elegans, cats, macaques and humans to surrogate networks in which either modules or hubs are destroyed, we find that functional complexity always decreases in the perturbed networks. A comparison between simulated and empirically obtained resting-state functional connectivity indicates that the human brain, at rest, lies in a dynamical state that reflects the largest complexity its anatomical connectome can host. Last, we generalise the topology of neural connectomes into a new hierarchical network model that successfully combines modular organisation with rich-club forming hubs. This is achieved by centralising the cross-modular connections through a preferential attachment rule. Our network model hosts more complex dynamics than other hierarchical models widely used as benchmarks.

  19. Efficient transmission of subthreshold signals in complex networks of spiking neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin J Torres

    Full Text Available We investigate the efficient transmission and processing of weak, subthreshold signals in a realistic neural medium in the presence of different levels of the underlying noise. Assuming Hebbian weights for maximal synaptic conductances--that naturally balances the network with excitatory and inhibitory synapses--and considering short-term synaptic plasticity affecting such conductances, we found different dynamic phases in the system. This includes a memory phase where population of neurons remain synchronized, an oscillatory phase where transitions between different synchronized populations of neurons appears and an asynchronous or noisy phase. When a weak stimulus input is applied to each neuron, increasing the level of noise in the medium we found an efficient transmission of such stimuli around the transition and critical points separating different phases for well-defined different levels of stochasticity in the system. We proved that this intriguing phenomenon is quite robust, as it occurs in different situations including several types of synaptic plasticity, different type and number of stored patterns and diverse network topologies, namely, diluted networks and complex topologies such as scale-free and small-world networks. We conclude that the robustness of the phenomenon in different realistic scenarios, including spiking neurons, short-term synaptic plasticity and complex networks topologies, make very likely that it could also occur in actual neural systems as recent psycho-physical experiments suggest.

  20. Music Composition from the Brain Signal: Representing the Mental State by Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to translate human EEG into music, so as to represent mental state by music. The arousal levels of the brain mental state and music emotion are implicitly used as the bridge between the mind world and the music. The arousal level of the brain is based on the EEG features extracted mainly by wavelet analysis, and the music arousal level is related to the musical parameters such as pitch, tempo, rhythm, and tonality. While composing, some music principles (harmonics and structure were taken into consideration. With EEGs during various sleep stages as an example, the music generated from them had different patterns of pitch, rhythm, and tonality. 35 volunteers listened to the music pieces, and significant difference in music arousal levels was found. It implied that different mental states may be identified by the corresponding music, and so the music from EEG may be a potential tool for EEG monitoring, biofeedback therapy, and so forth.

  1. Music composition from the brain signal: representing the mental state by music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Li, Chaoyi; Yin, Yu; Zhou, Changzheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to translate human EEG into music, so as to represent mental state by music. The arousal levels of the brain mental state and music emotion are implicitly used as the bridge between the mind world and the music. The arousal level of the brain is based on the EEG features extracted mainly by wavelet analysis, and the music arousal level is related to the musical parameters such as pitch, tempo, rhythm, and tonality. While composing, some music principles (harmonics and structure) were taken into consideration. With EEGs during various sleep stages as an example, the music generated from them had different patterns of pitch, rhythm, and tonality. 35 volunteers listened to the music pieces, and significant difference in music arousal levels was found. It implied that different mental states may be identified by the corresponding music, and so the music from EEG may be a potential tool for EEG monitoring, biofeedback therapy, and so forth.

  2. Remarkable Activation of the Complement System and Aberrant Neuronal Localization of the Membrane Attack Complex in the Brain Tissues of Scrapie-Infected Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yan; Chen, Cao; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Xiao, Kang; Wang, Jing; Chen, Li-Na; Sun, Jing; Gao, Chen; Shi, Qi; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2015-12-01

    As an integral part of the innate immunity, the complement system has been reported to involve in the pathogenesis of prion diseases (PrD). However, the states of expression and activity of complement proteins in experimental models of scrapie infection are still not fully understood. Herein, the state of complement activation, the presence, and distribution as well as localization of C3 and membrane attack complex (MAC) in the brains of several scrapie-infected rodents were comparatively assessed through various methodologies. Our data illustrated a significant increase in the total complement activity (CH50, U/ml) in several scrapie-infected rodent brains at the terminal stage and a time-dependent upregulation of C1q in 263K-infected hamsters during the incubation period, intimating the sustained and progressive activation of the classical pathway during PrD progression. Confocal microscopy revealed robust activation of C3 and its localization to various central nervous system (CNS) cells with differential morphology in the brain tissues of both 263K-infected hamsters and 139A-infected C57BL/6 mice at disease end stages. Dynamic analyses of MAC in the brains of 263K-infected hamsters and 139A-infected C57BL/6 mice demonstrated remarkably time-dependent deposition during the incubation period, which may highlight a persistently activated terminal complement components. Moreover, immunofluorescent assays (IFAs) showed that MAC-specific signals appeared to overlap with morphologically abnormal neurons rather than proliferative astrocytes or activated microglia throughout the CNS of both 263K-infected hamsters and 139A-infected C57BL/6 mice. Overall, these results indicate that the activation of the complement system and the subsequent localization of the complement components to neurons may be a hallmark during prion infection, which ultimately contribute to the neurodegeneration in PrD.

  3. Another kind of 'BOLD Response': answering multiple-choice questions via online decoded single-trial brain signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorger, Bettina; Dahmen, Brigitte; Reithler, Joel; Gosseries, Olivia; Maudoux, Audrey; Laureys, Steven; Goebel, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    The term 'locked-in'syndrome (LIS) describes a medical condition in which persons concerned are severely paralyzed and at the same time fully conscious and awake. The resulting anarthria makes it impossible for these patients to naturally communicate, which results in diagnostic as well as serious practical and ethical problems. Therefore, developing alternative, muscle-independent communication means is of prime importance. Such communication means can be realized via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) circumventing the muscular system by using brain signals associated with preserved cognitive, sensory, and emotional brain functions. Primarily, BCIs based on electrophysiological measures have been developed and applied with remarkable success. Recently, also blood flow-based neuroimaging methods, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), have been explored in this context. After reviewing recent literature on the development of especially hemodynamically based BCIs, we introduce a highly reliable and easy-to-apply communication procedure that enables untrained participants to motor-independently and relatively effortlessly answer multiple-choice questions based on intentionally generated single-trial fMRI signals that can be decoded online. Our technique takes advantage of the participants' capability to voluntarily influence certain spatio-temporal aspects of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal: source location (by using different mental tasks), signal onset and offset. We show that healthy participants are capable of hemodynamically encoding at least four distinct information units on a single-trial level without extensive pretraining and with little effort. Moreover, real-time data analysis based on simple multi-filter correlations allows for automated answer decoding with a high accuracy (94.9%) demonstrating the robustness of the presented method. Following our 'proof of concept', the

  4. Power law scaling in synchronization of brain signals depends on cognitive load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Jesse; Velazquez, Jose Luis Perez

    2014-01-01

    As it has several features that optimize information processing, it has been proposed that criticality governs the dynamics of nervous system activity. Indications of such dynamics have been reported for a variety of in vitro and in vivo recordings, ranging from in vitro slice electrophysiology to human functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, there still remains considerable debate as to whether the brain actually operates close to criticality or in another governing state such as stochastic or oscillatory dynamics. A tool used to investigate the criticality of nervous system data is the inspection of power-law distributions. Although the findings are controversial, such power-law scaling has been found in different types of recordings. Here, we studied whether there is a power law scaling in the distribution of the phase synchronization derived from magnetoencephalographic recordings during executive function tasks performed by children with and without autism. Characterizing the brain dynamics that is different between autistic and non-autistic individuals is important in order to find differences that could either aid diagnosis or provide insights as to possible therapeutic interventions in autism. We report in this study that power law scaling in the distributions of a phase synchrony index is not very common and its frequency of occurrence is similar in the control and the autism group. In addition, power law scaling tends to diminish with increased cognitive load (difficulty or engagement in the task). There were indications of changes in the probability distribution functions for the phase synchrony that were associated with a transition from power law scaling to lack of power law (or vice versa), which suggests the presence of phenomenological bifurcations in brain dynamics associated with cognitive load. Hence, brain dynamics may fluctuate between criticality and other regimes depending upon context and behaviors.

  5. Power law scaling in synchronization of brain signals depends on cognitive load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis ePerez Velazquez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As it has several features that optimize information processing, it has been proposed that criticality governs the dynamics of nervous system activity. Indications of such dynamics have been reported for a variety of in vitro and in vivo recordings, ranging from in vitro slice electrophysiology to human functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, there still remains considerable debate as to whether the brain actually operates close to criticality or in another governing state such as stochastic or oscillatory dynamics. A tool used to investigate the criticality of nervous system data is the inspection of power-law distributions. Although the findings are controversial, such power-law scaling has been found in different types of recordings. Here, we studied whether there is a power law scaling in the distribution of the phase synchronization derived from magnetoencephalographic recordings during executive function tasks performed by children with and without autism. Characterizing the brain dynamics that is different between autistic and non-autistic individuals is important in order to find differences that could either aid diagnosis or provide insights as to possible therapeutic interventions in autism. We report in this study that power law scaling in the distributions of a phase synchrony index is not very common and its frequency of occurrence is similar in the control and the autism group. In addition, power law scaling tends to diminish with increased cognitive load (difficulty or engagement in the task. There were indications of changes in the probability distribution functions for the phase synchrony that were associated with a transition from power law scaling to lack of power law (or vice versa, which suggests the presence of phenomenological bifurcations in brain dynamics associated with cognitive load. Hence, brain dynamics may fluctuate between criticality and other regimes depending upon context and behaviours.

  6. Involvement of Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinases in Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Depression in Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Cheng, Yi-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Shion; Chio, Chung-Ching; Gean, Po-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the most common cause of death and acquired disability among children and young adults in the developed countries. In clinical studies, the incidence of depression is high after TBI, and the mechanisms behind TBI-induced depression remain unclear. In the present study, we subjected rats to a moderate fluid percussion into the closed cranial cavity to induce TBI. After 3 days of recovery, injured rats were given a forced swim test (FST) and novelty-suppressed fe...

  7. Candesartan and glycyrrhizin ameliorate ischemic brain damage through downregulation of the TLR signaling cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Waleed; Safwet, Nancy; El-Maraghy, Nabila N; Zakaria, Mohamed N M

    2014-02-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death in industrialized countries and the most frequent cause of permanent disability in adults worldwide. The final outcome of stroke is determined not only by the volume of the ischemic core, but also by the extent of secondary brain damage inflicted to penumbral tissues by brain swelling, impaired microcirculation, and inflammation. The only drug approved for the treatment ischemic stroke is recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). The current study was designed to investigate the protective effects of candesartan (0.15 mg/kg, orally) and glycyrrhizin (30 mg/kg, orally) experimentally-induced ischemic brain damage in C57BL/6 mice (middle cerebral artery occlusion, MCAO) in comparison to the effects of a standard neuroprotective drug (cerebrolysin, 7.5 mg/kg, IP). All drugs were administered 30 min before and 24h after MCAO. Both candesartan and glycyrrhizin ameliorated the deleterious effects of MCAO as indicated by the improvement in the performance of the animals in behaviour tests, reduction in brain infarction, neuronal degeneration, and leukocyte infiltration. In addition, MCAO induced a significant upregulation in the different elements of the TLR pathway including TLR-2 and TLR-4, Myd88, TRIF and IRF-3 and the downstream effectors TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and NF-kB. All these changes were significantly ameliorated by treatment with candesartan and glycyrrhizin. The results of the current study represent a new indication for both candesartan and glycyrrhizin in the management of ischemic stroke with effects comparable to those of the standard neuroprotective drug cerebrolysin.

  8. CEST signal at 2ppm (CEST@2ppm) from Z-spectral fitting correlates with creatine distribution in brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kejia; Singh, Anup; Poptani, Harish; Li, Weiguo; Yang, Shaolin; Lu, Yang; Hariharan, Hari; Zhou, Xiaohong J; Reddy, Ravinder

    2015-01-01

    In general, multiple components such as water direct saturation, magnetization transfer (MT), chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and aliphatic nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) contribute to the Z-spectrum. The conventional CEST quantification method based on asymmetrical analysis may lead to quantification errors due to the semi-solid MT asymmetry and the aliphatic NOE located on a single side of the Z-spectrum. Fitting individual contributors to the Z-spectrum may improve the quantification of each component. In this study, we aim to characterize the multiple exchangeable components from an intracranial tumor model using a simplified Z-spectral fitting method. In this method, the Z-spectrum acquired at low saturation RF amplitude (50 Hz) was modeled as the summation of five Lorentzian functions that correspond to NOE, MT effect, bulk water, amide proton transfer (APT) effect and a CEST peak located at +2 ppm, called CEST@2ppm. With the pixel-wise fitting, the regional variations of these five components in the brain tumor and the normal brain tissue were quantified and summarized. Increased APT effect, decreased NOE and reduced CEST@2ppm were observed in the brain tumor compared with the normal brain tissue. Additionally, CEST@2ppm decreased with tumor progression. CEST@2ppm was found to correlate with the creatine concentration quantified with proton MRS. Based on the correlation curve, the creatine contribution to CEST@2ppm was quantified. The CEST@2ppm signal could be a novel imaging surrogate for in vivo creatine, the important bioenergetics marker. Given its noninvasive nature, this CEST MRI method may have broad applications in cancer bioenergetics.

  9. Signal or noise: brain network interactions underlying the experience and training of mindfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooneyham, Benjamin W; Mrazek, Michael D; Mrazek, Alissa J; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2016-04-01

    A broad set of brain regions has been associated with the experience and training of mindfulness. Many of these regions lie within key intrinsic brain networks, including the executive control, salience, and default networks. In this paper, we review the existing literature on the cognitive neuroscience of mindfulness through the lens of network science. We describe the characteristics of the intrinsic brain networks implicated in mindfulness and summarize the relevant findings pertaining to changes in functional connectivity (FC) within and between these networks. Convergence across these findings suggests that mindfulness may be associated with increased FC between two regions within the default network: the posterior cingulate cortex and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, extensive meditation experience may be associated with increased FC between the insula and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. However, little consensus has emerged within the existing literature owing to the diversity of operational definitions of mindfulness, neuroimaging methods, and network characterizations. We describe several challenges to develop a coherent cognitive neuroscience of mindfulness and to provide detailed recommendations for future research.

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... their final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons ...

  11. Complex extreme learning machine applications in terahertz pulsed signals feature sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, X-X; Hadjiloucas, S; Zhang, Y

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to the automatic classification of very large data sets composed of terahertz pulse transient signals, highlighting their potential use in biochemical, biomedical, pharmaceutical and security applications. Two different types of THz spectra are considered in the classification process. Firstly a binary classification study of poly-A and poly-C ribonucleic acid samples is performed. This is then contrasted with a difficult multi-class classification problem of spectra from six different powder samples that although have fairly indistinguishable features in the optical spectrum, they also possess a few discernable spectral features in the terahertz part of the spectrum. Classification is performed using a complex-valued extreme learning machine algorithm that takes into account features in both the amplitude as well as the phase of the recorded spectra. Classification speed and accuracy are contrasted with that achieved using a support vector machine classifier. The study systematically compares the classifier performance achieved after adopting different Gaussian kernels when separating amplitude and phase signatures. The two signatures are presented as feature vectors for both training and testing purposes. The study confirms the utility of complex-valued extreme learning machine algorithms for classification of the very large data sets generated with current terahertz imaging spectrometers. The classifier can take into consideration heterogeneous layers within an object as would be required within a tomographic setting and is sufficiently robust to detect patterns hidden inside noisy terahertz data sets. The proposed study opens up the opportunity for the establishment of complex-valued extreme learning machine algorithms as new chemometric tools that will assist the wider proliferation of terahertz sensing technology for chemical sensing, quality control, security screening and clinic diagnosis. Furthermore, the proposed

  12. In vivo analysis of formation and endocytosis of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling complex in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Anja I H; Kurz, Jennifer; Kauffeld, Silke; Chen, Qing; Reeves, Patrick M; Weber, Sabrina; Schindler, Simone; Davidson, Gary; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Scholpp, Steffen

    2014-09-15

    After activation by Wnt/β-Catenin ligands, a multi-protein complex assembles at the plasma membrane as membrane-bound receptors and intracellular signal transducers are clustered into the so-called Lrp6-signalosome [Corrected]. However, the mechanism of signalosome formation and dissolution is yet not clear. Our imaging studies of live zebrafish embryos show that the signalosome is a highly dynamic structure. It is continuously assembled by Dvl2-mediated recruitment of the transducer complex to the activated receptors and partially disassembled by endocytosis. We find that, after internalization, the ligand-receptor complex and the transducer complex take separate routes. The Wnt-Fz-Lrp6 complex follows a Rab-positive endocytic path. However, when still bound to the transducer complex, Dvl2 forms intracellular aggregates. We show that this endocytic process is not only essential for ligand-receptor internalization but also for signaling. The μ2-subunit of the endocytic Clathrin adaptor Ap2 interacts with Dvl2 to maintain its stability during endocytosis. Blockage of Ap2μ2 function leads to Dvl2 degradation, inhibiton of signalosome formation at the plasma membrane and, consequently, reduction of signaling. We conclude that Ap2μ2-mediated endocytosis is important to maintain Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vertebrates.

  13. The minute brain of the copepod Tigriopus californicus supports a complex ancestral ground pattern of the tetraconate cerebral nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, David R; Brown, Sheena M; Strausfeld, Nicholas J

    2012-10-15

    Copepods are a diverse and ecologically crucial group of minute crustaceans that are relatively neglected in terms of studies on nervous system organization. Recently, morphological neural characters have helped clarify evolutionary relationships within Arthropoda, particularly among Tetraconata (i.e., crustaceans and hexapods), and indicate that copepods occupy an important phylogenetic position relating to both Malacostraca and Hexapoda. This taxon therefore provides the opportunity to evaluate those neural characters common to these two clades likely to be results of shared ancestry (homology) versus convergence (homoplasy). Here we present an anatomical characterization of the brain and central nervous system of the well-studied harpacticoid copepod species Tigriopus californicus. We show that this species is endowed with a complex brain possessing a central complex comprising a protocerebral bridge and central body. Deutocerebral glomeruli are supplied by the antennular nerves, and a lateral protocerebral olfactory neuropil corresponds to the malacostracan hemiellipsoid body. Glomeruli contain synaptic specializations comparable to the presynaptic "T-bars" typical of dipterous insects, including Drosophila melanogaster. Serotonin-like immunoreactivity pervades the brain and ventral nervous system, with distinctive deutocerebral distributions. The present observations suggest that a suite of morphological characters typifying the Tigriopus brain reflect a ground pattern organization of an ancestral Tetraconata, which possessed an elaborate and structurally differentiated nervous system.

  14. Fodrin in centrosomes: implication of a role of fodrin in the transport of gamma-tubulin complex in brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasidharan Shashikala

    Full Text Available Gamma-tubulin is the major protein involved in the nucleation of microtubules from centrosomes in eukaryotic cells. It is present in both cytoplasm and centrosome. However, before centrosome maturation prior to mitosis, gamma-tubulin concentration increases dramatically in the centrosome, the mechanism of which is not known. Earlier it was reported that cytoplasmic gamma-tubulin complex isolated from goat brain contains non-erythroid spectrin/fodrin. The major role of erythroid spectrin is to help in the membrane organisation and integrity. However, fodrin or non-erythroid spectrin has a distinct pattern of localisation in brain cells and evidently some special functions over its erythroid counterpart. In this study, we show that fodrin and γ-tubulin are present together in both the cytoplasm and centrosomes in all brain cells except differentiated neurons and astrocytes. Immunoprecipitation studies in purified centrosomes from brain tissue and brain cell lines confirm that fodrin and γ-tubulin interact with each other in centrosomes. Fodrin dissociates from centrosome just after the onset of mitosis, when the concentration of γ-tubulin attains a maximum at centrosomes. Further it is observed that the interaction between fodrin and γ-tubulin in the centrosome is dependent on actin as depolymerisation of microfilaments stops fodrin localization. Image analysis revealed that γ-tubulin concentration also decreased drastically in the centrosome under this condition. This indicates towards a role of fodrin as a regulatory transporter of γ-tubulin to the centrosomes for normal progression of mitosis.

  15. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes:understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kjell Fuxe; Dasiel O Borroto-Escuela

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neu-rons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular lfuid and the cerebral spinal lfuid through diffusion and lfow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume trans-mission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  16. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Fuxe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  17. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  18. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses. PMID:27651759

  19. Dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer signaling pathway in the brain: emerging physiological relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasbi Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine is an important catecholamine neurotransmitter modulating many physiological functions, and is linked to psychopathology of many diseases such as schizophrenia and drug addiction. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are the most abundant dopaminergic receptors in the striatum, and although a clear segregation between the pathways expressing these two receptors has been reported in certain subregions, the presence of D1-D2 receptor heteromers within a unique subset of neurons, forming a novel signaling transducing functional entity has been shown. Recently, significant progress has been made in elucidating the signaling pathways activated by the D1-D2 receptor heteromer and their potential physiological relevance.

  20. PAK2 is an effector of TSC1/2 signaling independent of mTOR and a potential therapeutic target for Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Maria M; Fuhler, Gwenny M; Queiroz, Karla C S; Scholma, Jetse; Goorden, Susan; Anink, Jasper; Spek, C Arnold; Hoogeveen-Westerveld, Marianne; Bruno, Marco J; Nellist, Mark; Elgersma, Ype; Aronica, Eleonora; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P

    2015-09-28

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by inactivating mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 and is characterized by uncontrolled mTORC1 activation. Drugs that reduce mTOR activity are only partially successful in the treatment of TSC, suggesting that mTOR-independent pathways play a role in disease development. Here, kinome profiles of wild-type and Tsc2(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were generated, revealing a prominent role for PAK2 in signal transduction downstream of TSC1/2. Further investigation showed that the effect of the TSC1/2 complex on PAK2 is mediated through RHEB, but is independent of mTOR and p21RAC. We also demonstrated that PAK2 over-activation is likely responsible for the migratory and cell cycle abnormalities observed in Tsc2(-/-) MEFs. Finally, we detected high levels of PAK2 activation in giant cells in the brains of TSC patients. These results show that PAK2 is a direct effector of TSC1-TSC2-RHEB signaling and a new target for rational drug therapy in TSC.

  1. Integrative Tissue-Specific Functional Annotations in the Human Genome Provide Novel Insights on Many Complex Traits and Improve Signal Prioritization in Genome Wide Association Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; He, Beixin Julie; Zhao, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to understand genomic function through both experimental and computational approaches, yet proper annotation still remains challenging, especially in non-coding regions. In this manuscript, we introduce GenoSkyline, an unsupervised learning framework to predict tissue-specific functional regions through integrating high-throughput epigenetic annotations. GenoSkyline successfully identified a variety of non-coding regulatory machinery including enhancers, regulatory miRNA, and hypomethylated transposable elements in extensive case studies. Integrative analysis of GenoSkyline annotations and results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to novel biological insights on the etiologies of a number of human complex traits. We also explored using tissue-specific functional annotations to prioritize GWAS signals and predict relevant tissue types for each risk locus. Brain and blood-specific annotations led to better prioritization performance for schizophrenia than standard GWAS p-values and non-tissue-specific annotations. As for coronary artery disease, heart-specific functional regions was highly enriched of GWAS signals, but previously identified risk loci were found to be most functional in other tissues, suggesting a substantial proportion of still undetected heart-related loci. In summary, GenoSkyline annotations can guide genetic studies at multiple resolutions and provide valuable insights in understanding complex diseases. GenoSkyline is available at http://genocanyon.med.yale.edu/GenoSkyline. PMID:27058395

  2. Integrative Tissue-Specific Functional Annotations in the Human Genome Provide Novel Insights on Many Complex Traits and Improve Signal Prioritization in Genome Wide Association Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiongshi Lu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Extensive efforts have been made to understand genomic function through both experimental and computational approaches, yet proper annotation still remains challenging, especially in non-coding regions. In this manuscript, we introduce GenoSkyline, an unsupervised learning framework to predict tissue-specific functional regions through integrating high-throughput epigenetic annotations. GenoSkyline successfully identified a variety of non-coding regulatory machinery including enhancers, regulatory miRNA, and hypomethylated transposable elements in extensive case studies. Integrative analysis of GenoSkyline annotations and results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS led to novel biological insights on the etiologies of a number of human complex traits. We also explored using tissue-specific functional annotations to prioritize GWAS signals and predict relevant tissue types for each risk locus. Brain and blood-specific annotations led to better prioritization performance for schizophrenia than standard GWAS p-values and non-tissue-specific annotations. As for coronary artery disease, heart-specific functional regions was highly enriched of GWAS signals, but previously identified risk loci were found to be most functional in other tissues, suggesting a substantial proportion of still undetected heart-related loci. In summary, GenoSkyline annotations can guide genetic studies at multiple resolutions and provide valuable insights in understanding complex diseases. GenoSkyline is available at http://genocanyon.med.yale.edu/GenoSkyline.

  3. Signal Delay Reconstruction Metho d Based on Dynamic Index and Complex-Co efficient Lagrange Interp olation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yang,ZHENG Zhe; WU Siliang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a large-range, high-precision and continuously variable delay reconstruction method for wideband and arbitrary bandlimited signal, which combines dynamic index technique with complex-coefficient Lagrange interpolation technique. The method samples time-continuous bandlimited signal and stores samples in sequence. It manages to obtain the high-precision delay parameters of every sampling period from desired delay to compute the so-called index position variable and interpolator parameters. It dynamically in-dexes and chooses a set of samples to implement piecewise complex-coefficient Lagrange interpolation for reconstruct-ing the delayed sequences. The time-continuous delay re-construction signal can be simply accomplished through digital-to-analog conversion. The mathematical model of the method and its transformed form is given, and the arithmetic of dynamic index and complex-coefficient La-grange interpolation is derived. Simulation and test results show the validity and performance of the method.

  4. Single-Step Affinity Purification of ERK Signaling Complexes Using the Streptavidin-Binding Peptide (SBP) Tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Veraksa, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Elucidation of biological functions of signaling proteins is facilitated by studying their protein-protein interaction networks. Affinity purification combined with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) has become a favorite method to study protein complexes. Here we describe a procedure for single-step purification of ERK (Rolled) and associated proteins from Drosophila cultured cells. The use of the streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP) tag allows for a highly efficient isolation of native ERK signaling complexes, which are suitable for subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry. Our analysis of the ERK interactome has identified both known and novel signaling components. This method can be easily adapted for SBP-based purification of protein complexes in any expression system.

  5. Kurtosis based blind source extraction of complex noncircular signals with application in EEG artifact removal in real-time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush eJavidi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A new class of complex domain blind source extraction (BSE algorithms suitable for the extraction of both circular and noncircular complex signals is proposed. This is achieved through sequential extraction based on the degree of kurtosis and in the presence of noncircular measurement noise. The existence and uniqueness analysis of the solution is followed by a study of fast converging variants of the algorithm. The performance is first assessed through simulations on well understood benchmark signals, followed by a case study on real-time artifact removal from EEG signals, verified using both qualitative and quantitative metrics. The results illustrate the power of the proposed approach in real-time blind extraction of general complex-valued sources.

  6. Cbln family proteins promote synapse formation by regulating distinct neurexin signaling pathways in various brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Keiko; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2011-04-01

    Cbln1 (a.k.a. precerebellin) is a unique bidirectional synaptic organizer that plays an essential role in the formation and maintenance of excitatory synapses between granule cells and Purkinje cells in the mouse cerebellum. Cbln1 secreted from cerebellar granule cells directly induces presynaptic differentiation and indirectly serves as a postsynaptic organizer by binding to its receptor, the δ2 glutamate receptor. However, it remains unclear how Cbln1 binds to the presynaptic sites and interacts with other synaptic organizers. Furthermore, although Cbln1 and its family members Cbln2 and Cbln4 are expressed in brain regions other than the cerebellum, it is unknown whether they regulate synapse formation in these brain regions. In this study, we showed that Cbln1 and Cbln2, but not Cbln4, specifically bound to its presynaptic receptor -α and β isoforms of neurexin carrying the splice site 4 insert [NRXs(S4+)] - and induced synaptogenesis in cerebellar, hippocampal and cortical neurons in vitro. Cbln1 competed with synaptogenesis mediated by neuroligin 1, which lacks the splice sites A and B, but not leucine-rich repeat transmembrane protein 2, possibly by sharing the presynaptic receptor NRXs(S4+). However, unlike neurexins/neuroligins or neurexins/leucine-rich repeat transmembrane proteins, the interaction between NRX1β(S4+) and Cbln1 was insensitive to extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. These findings revealed the unique and general roles of Cbln family proteins in mediating the formation and maintenance of synapses not only in the cerebellum but also in various other brain regions.

  7. Measurement of signal intensity depth profiles in rat brains with cardiac arrest maintaining primary temperature by wide-field optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Manabu; Nomura, Daisuke; Tsunenari, Takashi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2010-09-10

    We have already reported that after an injection for euthanasia, the signal intensity of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images are 2.7 times increased before cardiac arrest (CA) using OCT and rat brains without temperature control to show the potential of OCT to monitor tissue viability in brains [Appl. Opt.48, 4354 (2009)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.48.004354]. In this paper, we similarly measured maintaining the primary temperature of rat brains. It was confirmed that when maintaining the primary temperature, the time courses of the ratios of signal intensity (RSIs) were almost the same as those without temperature control. RSIs after CA varied from 1.6 to 4.5 and depended on positions measured in tissues. These results mean that the OCT technique has clinical potential for applications to monitor or diagnose a focal degraded area, such as cerebral infarctions due to focal ischemia in brains.

  8. Common and distinct brain regions processing multisensory bodily signals for peripersonal space and body ownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivaz, Petr; Blanke, Olaf; Serino, Andrea

    2017-02-15

    We take the feeling that our body belongs to us for granted. However, recent research has shown that it is possible to alter the subjective sensation of body ownership (BO) by manipulating multisensory bodily inputs. Several frontal and parietal regions are known to specifically process multisensory cues presented close to the body, i.e., within the peripersonal space (PPS). It has been proposed that these PPS fronto-parietal regions also underlie BO. However, most previous studies investigated the brain mechanisms of either BO or of PPS processing separately and by using a variety of paradigms. Here, we conducted an extensive meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies to investigate PPS and BO processing in humans in order to: a) assess quantitatively where each one of these functions was individually processed in the brain; b) identify whether and where these processes shared common or engaged distinct brain mechanisms; c) characterize these areas in terms of whole-brain co-activation networks and functions, respectively. We identified (i) a bilateral PPS network including superior parietal, temporo-parietal and ventral premotor regions and (ii) a BO network including posterior parietal cortex (right intraparietal sulcus, IPS; and left IPS and superior parietal lobule, SPL), right ventral premotor cortex, and the left anterior insula. Co-activation maps related to both PPS and BO encompassed largely overlapping fronto-parietal networks, but whereas the PPS network was more frequently associated with sensorimotor tasks, the BO network was rather associated with attention and awareness tasks. Finally, the conjunction analysis showed that (iii) PPS and BO tasks anatomically overlapped only in two clusters located in the left parietal cortex (dorsally at the intersection between the SPL, the IPS and area 2 and ventrally between areas 2 and IPS). Distinct activations were located for PPS at the temporo-parietal junction and for BO in the anterior insula. These

  9. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)-TrkB Signaling in Inflammation-related Depression and Potential Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Chun; Yao, Wei; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Depression is the most prevalent and among the most debilitating of psychiatric disorders. The precise neurobiology of this illness is unknown. Several lines of evidence suggest that peripheral and central inflammation plays a role in depressive symptoms, and that anti-inflammatory drugs can improve depressive symptoms in patients with inflammation-related depression. Signaling via brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, tropomycin receptor kinase B (TrkB) plays a key role in the pathophysiology of depression and in the therapeutic mechanisms of antidepressants. A recent paper showed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation gave rise to depression-like phenotype by altering BDNF-TrkB signaling in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens, areas thought to be involved in the antidepressant effects of TrkB agonist, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) and TrkB antagonist, ANA-12. Here we provide an overview of the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway and BDNF-TrkB signaling in the pathophysiology of inflammation-induced depression, and propose mechanistic actions for potential therapeutic agents. Additionally, the authors discuss the putative role of TrkB agonists and antagonists as novel therapeutic drugs for inflammation-related depression.

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signalling mediates the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in chronically stressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qing-Qiu; Huang, Zhen; Zhong, Xiao-Ming; Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Siu-Po

    2014-03-15

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that piperine produced antidepressant-like action in various mouse models of behavioral despair. This study aimed to investigate the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). The results showed that CUMS caused depression-like behavior in mice, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test. It was also found that BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex were significantly decreased in CUMS-treated mice. Chronic treatment of piperine at the dose of 10mg/kg significantly ameliorated behavioural deficits of CUMS-treated mice in the sucrose preference test and forced swim test. Piperine treatment also significantly decreased immobility time in the forced swim test in naive mice. In parallel, chronic piperine treatment significantly increased BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of both naive and CUMS-treated mice. In addition, inhibition of BDNF signalling by injection of K252a, an inhibitor of the BDNF receptor TrkB, significantly blocked the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in the sucrose preference test and forced swim test of CUMS-treated mice. Taken together, this study suggests that BDNF signalling is an essential mediator for the antidepressant-like effect of piperine.

  11. In vitro analysis of PDZ-dependent CFTR macromolecular signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanning; Wang, Shuo; Li, Chunying

    2012-08-13

    has been shown to be of functional significance, suggesting that PDZ scaffold proteins may facilitate formation of CFTR macromolecular signaling complexes for specific/selective and efficient signaling in cells(16-18). Multiple biochemical assays have been developed to study CFTR-involving protein interactions, such as co-immunoprecipitation, pull-down assay, pair-wise binding assay, colorimetric pair-wise binding assay, and macromolecular complex assembly assay(16-19,28,29). Here we focus on the detailed procedures of assembling a PDZ motif-dependent CFTR-containing macromolecular complex in vitro, which is used extensively by our laboratory to study protein-protein or domain-domain interactions involving CFTR(16-19,28,29).

  12. Interleukin-1 beta impairs brain derived neurotrophic factor-induced signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Liqi; Balazs, Robert; Soiampornkul, Rungtip; Thangnipon, Wipawan; Cotman, Carl W

    2008-09-01

    The expression of IL-1 is elevated in the CNS in diverse neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. The hypothesis was tested that IL-1 beta renders neurons vulnerable to degeneration by interfering with BDNF-induced neuroprotection. In trophic support-deprived neurons, IL-1 beta compromised the PI3-K/Akt pathway-mediated protection by BDNF and suppressed Akt activation. The effect was specific as in addition to Akt, the activation of MAPK/ERK, but not PLC gamma, was decreased. Activation of CREB, a target of these signaling pathways, was severely depressed by IL-1 beta. As the cytokine did not influence TrkB receptor and PLC gamma activation, IL-1 beta might have interfered with BDNF signaling at the docking step conveying activation to the PI3-K/Akt and Ras/MAPK pathways. Indeed, IL-1 beta suppressed the activation of the respective scaffolding proteins IRS-1 and Shc; this effect might involve ceramide generation. IL-1-induced interference with BDNF neuroprotection and signal transduction was corrected, in part, by ceramide production inhibitors and mimicked by the cell-permeable C2-ceramide. These results suggest that IL-1 beta places neurons at risk by interfering with BDNF signaling involving a ceramide-associated mechanism.

  13. Multiple-scale neuroendocrine signals connect brain and pituitary hormone rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanò, Nicola; Guillou, Anne; Martin, Agnès O; Mollard, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Small assemblies of hypothalamic “parvocellular” neurons release their neuroendocrine signals at the median eminence (ME) to control long-lasting pituitary hormone rhythms essential for homeostasis. How such rapid hypothalamic neurotransmission leads to slowly evolving hormonal signals remains unknown. Here, we show that the temporal organization of dopamine (DA) release events in freely behaving animals relies on a set of characteristic features that are adapted to the dynamic dopaminergic control of pituitary prolactin secretion, a key reproductive hormone. First, locally generated DA release signals are organized over more than four orders of magnitude (0.001 Hz–10 Hz). Second, these DA events are finely tuned within and between frequency domains as building blocks that recur over days to weeks. Third, an integration time window is detected across the ME and consists of high-frequency DA discharges that are coordinated within the minutes range. Thus, a hierarchical combination of time-scaled neuroendocrine signals displays local–global integration to connect brain–pituitary rhythms and pace hormone secretion. PMID:28193889

  14. Toll-like receptor 2 signaling in response to brain injury: an innate bridge to neuroinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Holm, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Reactive gliosis is a prominent feature of neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory disease in the CNS, yet the stimuli that drive this response are not known. There is growing appreciation that signaling through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which is key to generating innate responses to infection,...... to neuroinflammation. Udgivelsesdato: Dec-6...

  15. Gosha-jinki-gan (a Herbal Complex Corrects Abnormal Insulin Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolin Qin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the traditional herbal complex Gosha-jinki-gan (GJG improves diabetic neuropathy and insulin resistance. The present study was undertaken to elucidate the molecular mechanisms related with the long-term effects of GJG administration on insulin action in vivo and the early steps of insulin signaling in skeletal muscle in streptozotocin (STZ diabetes. Rats were randomized into five subgroups: (1 saline treated control, (2 GJG treated control, (3 2-unit insulin + saline treated diabetic, (4 saline + GJG treated diabetic and (5 2-unit insulin + GJG treated diabetic groups. After seven days of treatment, euglycemic clamp experiment at an insulin infusion rate of 6 mU/kg/min was performed in overnight fasted rats. Despite the 2-unit insulin treatment, the metabolic clearance rates of glucose (MCR, ml/kg/min in diabetic rats were significantly lower compared with the controls (11.4 ± 1.0 vs 44.1 ± 1.5; P < 0.001, and were significantly improved by insulin combined with GJG or GJG alone (26 ± 3.2 and 24.6 ± 2.2, P < 0.01, respectively. The increased insulin receptor (IR-β protein content in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats was not affected by insulin combined with GJG administration. However, the decreased insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 protein content was significantly improved by treatment with GJG. Additionally, the increased tyrosine phosphorylation levels of IR-β and IRS-1 were significantly inhibited in insulin combined with GJG treated diabetes. The present results suggest that the improvement of the impaired insulin sensitivity in STZ-diabetic rats by administration of GJG may be due, at least in part, to correction in the abnormal early steps of insulin signaling in skeletal muscle.

  16. Decomposition of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Signals Using Oblique Subspace Projections: Applications in Brain Hemodynamic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Alexander; Varon, Carolina; Hunyadi, Borbala; Papademetriou, Maria; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Clinical data is comprised by a large number of synchronously collected biomedical signals that are measured at different locations. Deciphering the interrelationships of these signals can yield important information about their dependence providing some useful clinical diagnostic data. For instance, by computing the coupling between Near-Infrared Spectroscopy signals (NIRS) and systemic variables the status of the hemodynamic regulation mechanisms can be assessed. In this paper we introduce an algorithm for the decomposition of NIRS signals into additive components. The algorithm, SIgnal DEcomposition base on Obliques Subspace Projections (SIDE-ObSP), assumes that the measured NIRS signal is a linear combination of the systemic measurements, following the linear regression model y = Ax + ϵ. SIDE-ObSP decomposes the output such that, each component in the decomposition represents the sole linear influence of one corresponding regressor variable. This decomposition scheme aims at providing a better understanding of the relation between NIRS and systemic variables, and to provide a framework for the clinical interpretation of regression algorithms, thereby, facilitating their introduction into clinical practice. SIDE-ObSP combines oblique subspace projections (ObSP) with the structure of a mean average system in order to define adequate signal subspaces. To guarantee smoothness in the estimated regression parameters, as observed in normal physiological processes, we impose a Tikhonov regularization using a matrix differential operator. We evaluate the performance of SIDE-ObSP by using a synthetic dataset, and present two case studies in the field of cerebral hemodynamics monitoring using NIRS. In addition, we compare the performance of this method with other system identification techniques. In the first case study data from 20 neonates during the first 3 days of life was used, here SIDE-ObSP decoupled the influence of changes in arterial oxygen saturation from the

  17. Treadmill Exercise Promotes Neurogenesis in Ischemic Rat Brains via Caveolin-1/VEGF Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Pang, Qiongyi; Liu, Meixia; Pan, Jingzi; Xiang, Bingwu; Huang, Tingting; Tu, Fengxia; Liu, Chan; Chen, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Using a model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), we have previously demonstrated that treadmill exercise promotes angiogenesis in the ischemic penumbra through caveolin-1/VEGF signaling pathways. However, the function of caveolin-1/VEGF signaling in neurogenesis after MCAO has not been determined. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of treadmill exercise to promote neurogenesis after MCAO and whether caveolin-1/VEGF signaling pathways are involved. After MCAO, rats were subjected to a program of treadmill exercise. Daidzein (a specific inhibitor of caveolin-1 protein expression, 0.4 mg/kg) was used to confirm the effect of caveolin-1/VEGF signaling on exercise-mediated neurogenesis. We found that the total protein expression of both caveolin-1 and VEGF was increased by exercise and consistent with the improved neurological recovery, decreased infarct volumes and increased 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in the ipsilateral Subventricular zone (SVZ), as well as increased numbers of BrdU/DCX and BrdU/Neun-positive cells in the peri-infarct region. Furthermore, we observed that the treadmill exercise-induced increased VEGF expression, improved neurological recovery, decreased infarct volumes, increased BrdU/DCX and BrdU/Neun-positive cells were significantly inhibited by the caveolin-1 inhibitor. Our results indicate that treadmill exercise improves neurological recovery in ischemic rats, possibly by enhancement of SVZ-derived neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, migration and differentiation in the penumbra. Moreover, caveolin-1/VEGF signaling is involved in exercise-mediated NSC migration and neuronal differentiation.

  18. Storm in a coffee cup: caffeine modifies brain activation to social signals of threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessica E; Lawrence, Andrew D; Diukova, Ana; Wise, Richard G; Rogers, Peter J

    2012-10-01

    Caffeine, an adenosine A₁ and A(2A) receptor antagonist, is the most popular psychostimulant drug in the world, but it is also anxiogenic. The neural correlates of caffeine-induced anxiety are currently unknown. This study investigated the effects of caffeine on brain regions implicated in social threat processing and anxiety. Participants were 14 healthy male non/infrequent caffeine consumers. In a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design, they underwent blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an emotional face processing task 1 h after receiving caffeine (250 mg) or placebo in two fMRI sessions (counterbalanced, 1-week washout). They rated anxiety and mental alertness, and their blood pressure was measured, before and 2 h after treatment. Results showed that caffeine induced threat-related (angry/fearful faces > happy faces) midbrain-periaqueductal gray activation and abolished threat-related medial prefrontal cortex wall activation. Effects of caffeine on extent of threat-related amygdala activation correlated negatively with level of dietary caffeine intake. In concurrence with these changes in threat-related brain activation, caffeine increased self-rated anxiety and diastolic blood pressure. Caffeine did not affect primary visual cortex activation. These results are the first to demonstrate potential neural correlates of the anxiogenic effect of caffeine, and they implicate the amygdala as a key site for caffeine tolerance.

  19. Signal intensity in T2' magnetic resonance imaging is related to brain glioma grade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitta, Laura; Castellan, Lucio [San Martino Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Genoa (Italy); Heese, Oliver; Westphal, Manfred [UKE, Department of Neurosurgery, Hamburg (Germany); Foerster, Ann-Freya; Siemonsen, Susanne; Fiehler, Jens; Goebell, Einar [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Matschke, Jakob [UKE, Department of Neuropathology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    T2' values reflect the presence of deoxyhaemoglobin related to high local oxygen extraction. We assessed the feasibility of T2' imaging to display regions with high metabolic activity in brain gliomas. MRI was performed in 25 patients (12 female; median age 46 years; range 2-69) with brain gliomas with additional T2 and T2* sequences. T2' maps were derived from T2 and T2*. Dynamic susceptibility weighted contrast (DSC) perfusion was performed in 12/25 patients. Images were visually assessed by two readers and five ROIs were evaluated for each patient. Pearson correlation, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests were applied for statistical analysis. Three patients were not further evaluated because of artefacts. Mean values of high-grade (III-IV) gliomas showed significantly lower T2' values than low-grade (II) gliomas (p < 0.001). An inverse relationship was observed between rCBV and sqr (T2') (r = -0.463, p < 0.001). No correlation was observed between T2' and rCBV for grade II tumours (r = 0.038; p = 0.875). High-grade tumours revealed lower T2' values, presumably because of higher oxygen consumption in proliferating tissue. Our results indicate that T2' imaging can be used as an alternative to DSC perfusion in the detection of subtle deviations in tumour metabolism. (orig.)

  20. Rheb may complex with RASSF1A to coordinate Hippo and TOR signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicholas; Clark, Geoffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    The TOR pathway is a vital component of cellular homeostasis that controls the synthesis of proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Its core is the TOR kinase. Activation of the TOR pathway suppresses autophagy, which plays a vital but complex role in tumorigenesis. The TOR pathway is regulated by activation of the Ras-related protein Rheb, which can bind mTOR. The Hippo pathway is a major growth control module that regulates cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Its core consists of an MST/LATS kinase cascade that can be activated by the RASSF1A tumor suppressor. The TOR and Hippo pathways may be coordinately regulated to promote cellular homeostasis. However, the links between the pathways remain only partially understood. We now demonstrate that in addition to mTOR regulation, Rheb also impacts the Hippo pathway by forming a complex with RASSF1A. Using stable clones of two human lung tumor cell lines (NCI-H1792 and NCI-H1299) with shRNA-mediated silencing or ectopic overexpression of RASSF1A, we show that activated Rheb stimulates the Hippo pathway, but is suppressed in its ability to stimulate the TOR pathway. Moreover, by selectively labeling autophagic vacuoles we show that RASSF1A inhibits the ability of Rheb to suppress autophagy and enhance cell growth. Thus, we identify a new connection that impacts coordination of Hippo and TOR signaling. As RASSF1A expression is frequently lost in human tumors, the RASSF1A status of a tumor may impact not just its Hippo pathway status, but also its TOR pathway status. PMID:27034171

  1. Rheb may complex with RASSF1A to coordinate Hippo and TOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicholas; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2016-06-01

    The TOR pathway is a vital component of cellular homeostasis that controls the synthesis of proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Its core is the TOR kinase. Activation of the TOR pathway suppresses autophagy, which plays a vital but complex role in tumorigenesis. The TOR pathway is regulated by activation of the Ras-related protein Rheb, which can bind mTOR. The Hippo pathway is a major growth control module that regulates cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Its core consists of an MST/LATS kinase cascade that can be activated by the RASSF1A tumor suppressor. The TOR and Hippo pathways may be coordinately regulated to promote cellular homeostasis. However, the links between the pathways remain only partially understood. We now demonstrate that in addition to mTOR regulation, Rheb also impacts the Hippo pathway by forming a complex with RASSF1A. Using stable clones of two human lung tumor cell lines (NCI-H1792 and NCI-H1299) with shRNA-mediated silencing or ectopic overexpression of RASSF1A, we show that activated Rheb stimulates the Hippo pathway, but is suppressed in its ability to stimulate the TOR pathway. Moreover, by selectively labeling autophagic vacuoles we show that RASSF1A inhibits the ability of Rheb to suppress autophagy and enhance cell growth. Thus, we identify a new connection that impacts coordination of Hippo and TOR signaling. As RASSF1A expression is frequently lost in human tumors, the RASSF1A status of a tumor may impact not just its Hippo pathway status, but also its TOR pathway status.

  2. Development of a novel microbubble-liposome complex conjugated with peptide ligands targeting IL4R on brain tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, See-Hyoung; Yoon, Young Ii; Moon, Hyoungwon; Lee, Ga-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Heon; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Lee, Hak Jong

    2016-07-01

    Gas (SF6)-filled microbubbles (MBs) were prepared by emulsion and solvent-evaporation method. The prepared MBs were further conjugated with doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded nano-sized liposome and peptide ligands to interleukin-4 receptor (IL4R) for targeting brain tumor cells. The final MB-liposome (Dox)-IL4R targeting peptide ligand [MB-Lipo (Dox)-IL4RTP] had a spherical structure with the mean size of 1,500 nm. The MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP exhibited cellular uptake in U87MG brain tumor cells (a brain tumor cell line expressing strongly IL4R) with frequency ultrasound energy suggesting that MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP provided effective targeting ability for brain tumor cells. In addition, WST-1 assay results showed that MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP inhibited the proliferation of U87MG cells IL4R‑dependently. This was confirmed by western blotting of γH2AX, phospho (Ser15)-p53, p53 and p21 which are signal transduction proteins involved in DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, these results indicate that MB-Lipo (Dox)-IL4RTP represents a promising ultrasonic contrast agent for tumor-targeting ultrasonic imaging.

  3. Complex linear minimum mean-squared-error equalization of spatially quadrature-amplitude-modulated signals in holographic data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takanori; Kanno, Kazutaka; Bunsen, Masatoshi

    2016-09-01

    We applied complex linear minimum mean-squared-error equalization to spatially quadrature-amplitude-modulated signals in holographic data storage (HDS). The equalization technique can improve dispersion in constellation outputs due to intersymbol interference. We confirm the effectiveness of the equalization technique in numerical simulations and basic optical experiments. Our numerical results have shown that intersymbol interference of a retrieved signal in a HDS system can be improved by using the equalization technique. In our experiments, a mean squared error (MSE), which indicates the deviation from an ideal signal, has been used for quantitatively evaluating the dispersion of equalized signals. Our equalization technique has been able to improve the MSE. However, symbols in the equalized signal have remained inseparable. To further improve the MSE and make the symbols separable, reducing errors in repeated measurements is our future task.

  4. Robust estimation of fractal measures for characterizing the structural complexity of the human brain: optimization and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi, Joaquín; Sporns, Olaf; Cheng, Hu; Aznárez-Sanado, Maite; Wang, Yang; Josa, Santiago; Arrondo, Gonzalo; Mathews, Vincent P; Hummer, Tom A; Kronenberger, William G; Avena-Koenigsberger, Andrea; Saykin, Andrew J; Pastor, María A

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution isotropic three-dimensional reconstructions of human brain gray and white matter structures can be characterized to quantify aspects of their shape, volume and topological complexity. In particular, methods based on fractal analysis have been applied in neuroimaging studies to quantify the structural complexity of the brain in both healthy and impaired conditions. The usefulness of such measures for characterizing individual differences in brain structure critically depends on their within-subject reproducibility in order to allow the robust detection of between-subject differences. This study analyzes key analytic parameters of three fractal-based methods that rely on the box-counting algorithm with the aim to maximize within-subject reproducibility of the fractal characterizations of different brain objects, including the pial surface, the cortical ribbon volume, the white matter volume and the gray matter/white matter boundary. Two separate datasets originating from different imaging centers were analyzed, comprising 50 subjects with three and 24 subjects with four successive scanning sessions per subject, respectively. The reproducibility of fractal measures was statistically assessed by computing their intra-class correlations. Results reveal differences between different fractal estimators and allow the identification of several parameters that are critical for high reproducibility. Highest reproducibility with intra-class correlations in the range of 0.9-0.95 is achieved with the correlation dimension. Further analyses of the fractal dimensions of parcellated cortical and subcortical gray matter regions suggest robustly estimated and region-specific patterns of individual variability. These results are valuable for defining appropriate parameter configurations when studying changes in fractal descriptors of human brain structure, for instance in studies of neurological diseases that do not allow repeated measurements or for disease

  5. ADP-regulation of mitochondrial free radical production is different with complex I- or complex II-linked substrates: implications for the exercise paradox and brain hypermetabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, A; Barja, G

    1997-06-01

    In agreement with classic studies, succinate-supplemented rat and pigeon heart and nonsynaptic brain mitochondrial free radical production is stopped by ADP additions causing the stimulation of respiration from State 4 to State 3. Nevertheless, with Complex I-linked substrates, mitochondria produce free radicals in State 3 at rates similar or somewhat higher than during resting respiration. The absence of sharp increases in free radical production during intense respiration is possible due to strong decreases of free radical leak in State 3. The results indicate that Complex I is the main mitochondrial free radical generator in State 3, adding to its already known important generation of active oxygen species in State 4. The observed rate of mitochondrial free radical production with Complex I-linked substrates in the active State 3 can help to explain two paradoxes: (a) the lack of massive muscle oxidative damage and shortening of life span due to exercise, in spite of up to 23-fold increases of oxygen consumption together with the very low levels of antioxidants present in heart, skeletal muscle, and brain; (b) the presence of some degree of oxidative stress during exercise and hyperactivity in spite of the stop of mitochondrial free radical production by ADP with succinate as substrate.

  6. AMPA Receptor-Induced Local Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Signaling Mediates Motor Recovery after Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Clarkson, Andrew N.; Overman, Justine J; Zhong, Sheng; Mueller, Rudolf; Lynch, Gary; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Recovery after stroke shares similar molecular and cellular properties with learning and memory. A main component of learning-induced plasticity involves signaling through AMPA receptors (AMPARs). We systematically tested the role of AMPAR function in motor recovery in a mouse model of focal stroke. AMPAR function controls functional recovery beginning 5 d after the stroke. Positive allosteric modulators of AMPARs enhance recovery of limb contr...

  7. Indices of brain beta-adrenergic receptor signal transduction in the learned helplessness animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurguis, G N; Kramer, G; Petty, F

    1996-01-01

    Both stress response and antidepressant drug action may be mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors (beta AR). Since learned helplessness is a stress-induced animal model of depression, beta AR are relevant to investigate in this model. To date, studies have measured changes in total receptor density (RT), but have not examined more detailed aspects of signal transduction mechanisms such as coupling of the receptor to GS protein. We have investigated brain beta AR coupling in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus of rats exposed to inescapable shock and then tested for learned helplessness, and in both tested and naive controls using [125I]-iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) as the ligand. Both antagonist-saturation and agonist-displacement experiments were conducted, and the specificity for the beta AR was optimized by excluding ICYP binding to 5HT1B receptors. The percentage receptor density in the high-conformational state (%RH) and the ratio of agonist (isoproterenol) dissociation constant from the receptor in the low-/high-conformational states (KL/KH) were used as indices of coupling to GS protein. No significant differences were found between rats developing learned helplessness and non-helpless rats after inescapable stress in any parameter measured in any brain region. In the frontal cortex, exposure to inescapable shock induced beta AR uncoupling from GS protein as suggested by a low KL/KH ratio both in helpless and non-helpless rats but not in either control group. In the hypothalamus, there were trends for higher RL, RT and KL/KH ratio in helpless rats and stressed controls compared to naive controls. These findings suggest that beta AR binding parameters in frontal cortex, hippocampus or hypothalamus did not differentiate between helpless and non-helpless rats. Changes in beta AR coupling observed in these brain regions may reflect effects of stress, which appeared to be region-specific, rather than stress-induced behavioral depression.

  8. The IFT-A complex regulates Shh signaling through cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Karel F; Ashe, Alyson; He, Mu; Satir, Peter; Moran, Jennifer; Beier, David; Wicking, Carol; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2012-06-11

    Two intraflagellar transport (IFT) complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, build and maintain primary cilia and are required for activity of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. A weak allele of the IFT-A gene, Ift144, caused subtle defects in cilia structure and ectopic activation of the Shh pathway. In contrast, strong loss of IFT-A, caused by either absence of Ift144 or mutations in two IFT-A genes, blocked normal ciliogenesis and decreased Shh signaling. In strong IFT-A mutants, the Shh pathway proteins Gli2, Sufu, and Kif7 localized correctly to cilia tips, suggesting that these pathway components were trafficked by IFT-B. In contrast, the membrane proteins Arl13b, ACIII, and Smo failed to localize to primary cilia in the absence of IFT-A. We propose that the increased Shh activity seen in partial loss-of-function IFT-A mutants may be a result of decreased ciliary ACIII and that the loss of Shh activity in the absence of IFT-A is a result of severe disruptions of cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking.

  9. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Pro-Inflammatory Signaling in Human Brain Cells in Primary Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukiw, Walter J; Bjattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Zhao, Yuhai; Pogue, Aileen I; Percy, Maire E

    2012-01-25

    The cellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in contributing to the pathology of human neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). To further understand the triggering and participation of ROS-generating species to pro-inflammatory and pathological signaling in human brain cells, in these experiments we studied the effects of 22 different substances (including various common drugs, interleukins, amyloid precursor protein, amyloid peptides and trace metals) at nanomolar concentrations, in a highly sensitive human neuronal-glial (HNG) cell primary co-culture assay. The evolution of ROS was assayed using the cell-permeate fluorescent indicator 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA), that reacts with major ROS species, including singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radicals or superoxides (λEx 488 nm; λEm 530 nm). Western analysis was performed for cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and cytosolic phospholipase A (cPLA2) to study the effects of induced ROS on inflammatory gene expression within the same brain cell sample. The data indicate that apart from acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and simvastatin, several neurophysiologically-relevant concentrations of Aβpeptides and neurotoxic trace metals variably induced ROS induction, COX-2 and cPLA2 expression. These findings have mechanistic implications for ROS-triggered inflammatory gene expression programs that may contribute to AD and PD neuropathologic mechanisms.

  10. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling attenuates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated brain microvascular endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiu-Long; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to investigate the role of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to oxLDL. The results indicated that treatment of MBMECs with oxLDL decreased the cell viability, and oxidative stress was involved in oxLDL-induce MBMECs dysfunction with increasing intracellular ROS and MDA formation as well as decreasing NO release and eNOS mRNA expression. In addition, SHH signaling components, such as SHH, Smo and Gli1, mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased after incubation with increasing concentrations of oxLDL. Treatment with oxLDL alone or SHH loss-of-function significantly increased the permeability of MBMECs, and overexpression of SHH attenuated oxLDL-induced elevation of permeability in MBMECs. Furthermore, SHH gain-of-function could reverse oxLDL-induced apoptosis through inhibition caspase3 and caspase8 levels in MBMECs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the suppression of SHH in MBMECs might contribute to the oxLDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. However, the overexpression of SHH could reverse oxLDL-induced endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

  11. Effect of cannabis on glutamate signalling in the brain: A systematic review of human and animal evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizzi, Marco; McGuire, Philip; Pertwee, Roger G; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2016-05-01

    Use of cannabis or delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), its main psychoactive ingredient, is associated with psychotic symptoms or disorder. However, the neurochemical mechanism that may underlie this psychotomimetic effect is poorly understood. Although dopaminergic dysfunction is generally recognized as the final common pathway in psychosis, evidence of the effects of Δ9-THC or cannabis use on dopaminergic measures in the brain is equivocal. In fact, it is thought that cannabis or Δ9-THC may not act on dopamine firing directly but indirectly by altering glutamate neurotransmission. Here we systematically review all studies examining acute and chronic effects of cannabis or Δ9-THC on glutamate signalling in both animals and man. Limited research carried out in humans tends to support the evidence that chronic cannabis use reduces levels of glutamate-derived metabolites in both cortical and subcortical brain areas. Research in animals tends to consistently suggest that Δ9-THC depresses glutamate synaptic transmission via CB1 receptor activation, affecting glutamate release, inhibiting receptors and transporters function, reducing enzyme activity, and disrupting glutamate synaptic plasticity after prolonged exposure.

  12. Getting mixed messages: the impact of conflicting social signals on the brain's target emotional response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amting, Jayna M; Miller, Jodi E; Chow, Melody; Mitchell, Derek G V

    2009-10-01

    Amidst a barrage of sensory information in the environment, the impact that individual stimuli have on our behaviour is thought to depend on the outcome of competition that occurs within and between multiple brain regions. Although biased competition models of attention have been tested in visual cortices and to a lesser extent in auditory cortex, little is known about the nature of stimulus competition outside of sensory areas. Given the hypothesized role of multiple pathways (cortical and subcortical) and specialized brain regions for processing valence information, studies involving conflicting basic emotional stimuli provide a unique opportunity to examine whether the principles of biased competition apply outside of sensory cortex. We used fMRI to examine the neural representation and resolution of emotional conflict in a sample of healthy individuals. Participants made explicit judgments about the valence of happy or fearful target facial expressions in the context of emotionally congruent, neutral, or incongruent distracters. The results suggest that emotional conflict is reflected in a dissociable manner across distinct neural regions. Posterior areas of visual cortex showed enhanced responding to congruent relative to neutral or incongruent stimuli. Orbitofrontal cortex remained sensitive to positive affect in the context of conflicting emotional stimuli. In contrast, within the amygdala, activity associated with identifying positive target expressions declined with the introduction of neutral and incongruent expressions; however, activity associated with fearful target expressions was less susceptible to the influence of emotional context. Enhanced functional connectivity was observed between medial prefrontal cortex and the amygdala during incongruent trials; the degree of connectivity was correlated with reaction time costs incurred during incongruent trials. The results are interpreted with reference to current models of emotional attention and

  13. Treatment with gelsolin reduces brain inflammation and apoptotic signaling in mice following thermal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhi-Yong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burn survivors develop long-term cognitive impairment with increased inflammation and apoptosis in the brain. Gelsolin, an actin-binding protein with capping and severing activities, plays a crucial role in the septic response. We investigated if gelsolin infusion could attenuate neural damage in burned mice. Methods Mice with 15% total body surface area burns were injected intravenously with bovine serum albumin as placebo (2 mg/kg, or with low (2 mg/kg or high doses (20 mg/kg of gelsolin. Samples were harvested at 8, 24, 48 and 72 hours postburn. The immune function of splenic T cells was analyzed. Cerebral pathology was examined by hematoxylin/eosin staining, while activated glial cells and infiltrating leukocytes were detected by immunohistochemistry. Cerebral cytokine mRNAs were further assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, while apoptosis was evaluated by caspase-3. Neural damage was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of neuron-specific enolase (NSE and soluble protein-100 (S-100. Finally, cerebral phospho-ERK expression was measured by western blot. Results Gelsolin significantly improved the outcomes of mice following major burns in a dose-dependent manner. The survival rate was improved by high dose gelsolin treatment compared with the placebo group (56.67% vs. 30%. Although there was no significant improvement in outcome in mice receiving low dose gelsolin (30%, survival time was prolonged against the placebo control (43.1 ± 4.5 h vs. 35.5 ± 5.0 h; P Conclusion Exogenous gelsolin infusion improves survival of mice following major burn injury by partially attenuating inflammation and apoptosis in brain, and by enhancing peripheral T lymphocyte function as well. These data suggest a novel and effective strategy to combat excessive neuroinflammation and to preserve cognition in the setting of major burns.

  14. The vasopressin receptor of the blood-brain barrier in the rat hippocampus is linked to calcium signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, J.; Jensen, Claus V.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, vasopressin receptor, VI subtype, blood-brain barrier, cerebral endothelium, hippocampus, Fura-2......Neuropathology, vasopressin receptor, VI subtype, blood-brain barrier, cerebral endothelium, hippocampus, Fura-2...

  15. [Asthenic syndrome in clinical course of acute period of brain concussion during complex treatment using nootropic agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachov, A V

    2008-01-01

    The comparative analysis of a complex examination of 108 persons aged from 16 till 60 years in acute period of closed craniocerebral injury (CCCT) has been done. Every participants have been divided into 2 groups depending on a nootrop medication they receive in a complex treatment. A control group consisted of 30 practically healthy people. Objective examination by means of tests was done on the 1-st, 10-th that 30-th day of treatment. Patients of 1-st (37 persons) group received piracetam in complex treatment and patients of the 2-nd group (71 persons) pramistar. Patients of the first group received a base treatment (analgetics, tranquilizers, vitamins of group B, magnesium sulfate, diuretic preparations) as well as piracetam at dosage 0.2, two tablets three times per day. The Patients of the 2-nd group received a base treatment as well as pramistar at dosage 0.6, one tablet 2 times per day. Specially developed multiaspects scales and questionnaires, MRT of the brain and EEG have been used for objectification of patient, complaints. During a complex clinico-neuropsychological examination it was found that all cases of concussion of the brain are accompanied by those or other asthenic disorders.

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase is autonomous from the dominant extrasynaptic NMDA receptor extracellular signal-regulated kinase shutoff pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, P J; Luong, N T; Woodward, J J; Chandler, L J

    2008-01-24

    NMDA receptors bidirectionally modulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) through the coupling of synaptic NMDA receptors to an ERK activation pathway that is opposed by a dominant ERK shutoff pathway thought to be coupled to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors. In the present study, synaptic NMDA receptor activation of ERK in rat cortical cultures was partially inhibited by the highly selective NR2B antagonist Ro25-6981 (Ro) and the less selective NR2A antagonist NVP-AAM077 (NVP). When Ro and NVP were added together, inhibition appeared additive and equal to that observed with the NMDA open-channel blocker MK-801. Consistent with a selective coupling of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors to the dominant ERK shutoff pathway, pre-block of synaptic NMDA receptors with MK-801 did not alter the inhibitory effect of bath-applied NMDA on ERK activity. Lastly, in contrast to a complete block of synaptic NMDA receptor activation of ERK by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors had no effect upon ERK activation by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. These results suggest that the synaptic NMDA receptor ERK activation pathway is coupled to both NR2A and NR2B containing receptors, and that the extrasynaptic NMDA receptor ERK inhibitory pathway is not a non-selective global ERK shutoff.

  17. Notching on Cancer’s Door: Notch Signaling in Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Notch receptors play an essential role in the regulation of central cellular processes during embryonic and postnatal development. The mammalian genome encodes for four Notch paralogs (Notch 1–4), which are activated by three Delta-like (Dll1/3/4) and two Serrate-like (Jagged1/2) ligands. Further, non-canonical Notch ligands such as epidermal growth factor like protein 7 (EGFL7) have been identified and serve mostly as antagonists of Notch signaling. The Notch pathway prevents neuronal differ...

  18. Maternal oxytocin triggers a transient inhibitory switch in GABA signaling in the fetal brain during delivery.

    Science.gov