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Sample records for brain reveals unexpected

  1. Saturn's Rings Reveal Unexpected Phenomena

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李颖

    2004-01-01

    Safely in orbit around Saturn, NASA's Cassini spacecraft sent back its first close-up images of the massive planet's rings on July 1, revealing an unexpectedly varied terrain featuring surprisingly sharp edges, braids and delicate ridges.

  2. Effects of unexpected chords and of performer's expression on brain responses and electrodermal activity.

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    Stefan Koelsch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is lack of neuroscientific studies investigating music processing with naturalistic stimuli, and brain responses to real music are, thus, largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study investigates event-related brain potentials (ERPs, skin conductance responses (SCRs and heart rate (HR elicited by unexpected chords of piano sonatas as they were originally arranged by composers, and as they were played by professional pianists. From the musical excerpts played by the pianists (with emotional expression, we also created versions without variations in tempo and loudness (without musical expression to investigate effects of musical expression on ERPs and SCRs. Compared to expected chords, unexpected chords elicited an early right anterior negativity (ERAN, reflecting music-syntactic processing and an N5 (reflecting processing of meaning information in the ERPs, as well as clear changes in the SCRs (reflecting that unexpected chords also elicited emotional responses. The ERAN was not influenced by emotional expression, whereas N5 potentials elicited by chords in general (regardless of their chord function differed between the expressive and the non-expressive condition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that the neural mechanisms of music-syntactic processing operate independently of the emotional qualities of a stimulus, justifying the use of stimuli without emotional expression to investigate the cognitive processing of musical structure. Moreover, the data indicate that musical expression affects the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of musical meaning. Our data are the first to reveal influences of musical performance on ERPs and SCRs, and to show physiological responses to unexpected chords in naturalistic music.

  3. Brain abscess with an unexpected finding: Actinomyces meyeri CNS infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiset, Andreas Halgreen; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Wejse, Christian

    oedema. By MRI an abscess was suspected and the patient was transferred to the department of neurosurgery, where drainage was performed. Microscopy revealed gram-positive cocci and gram-negative rods and iv. treatment with ceftriaxone 4g x 1 and metronidazole 1g x 1 was commenced. Pus cultures showed...... Prevotella spp. and A. meyeri and the initial treatment was changed to penicillin G 5 MIU x 4 and metronidazole 500 mg x 3 for four weeks followed by oral amoxicillin 500 mg x 3 for three months. The abscess regressed on this treatment and there were no CNS related symptoms at three months follow......-up. The source of infection was most likely periodontitis with spread to the lungs from aspiration or oropharyngeal secretion into the respiratory tract, alternatively from haematogenous spread. Conclusions: We report of the successful treatment of a cerebral abscess caused by A. meyeri with narrow spectrum...

  4. Unexpected events induce motor slowing via a brain mechanism for action-stopping with global suppressive effects.

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    Wessel, Jan R; Aron, Adam R

    2013-11-20

    When an unexpected event occurs in everyday life (e.g., a car honking), one experiences a slowing down of ongoing action (e.g., of walking into the street). Motor slowing following unexpected events is a ubiquitous phenomenon, both in laboratory experiments as well as such everyday situations, yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that unexpected events recruit the same inhibition network in the brain as does complete cancellation of an action (i.e., action-stopping). Using electroencephalography and independent component analysis in humans, we show that a brain signature of successful outright action-stopping also exhibits activity following unexpected events, and more so in blocks with greater motor slowing. Further, using transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure corticospinal excitability, we show that an unexpected event has a global motor suppressive effect, just like outright action-stopping. Thus, unexpected events recruit a common mechanism with outright action-stopping, moreover with global suppressive effects. These findings imply that we can now leverage the considerable extant knowledge of the neural architecture and functional properties of the stopping system to better understand the processing of unexpected events, including perhaps how they induce distraction via global suppression.

  5. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

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    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  6. Molecular architecture of the yeast Elongator complex reveals an unexpected asymmetric subunit arrangement.

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    Setiaputra, Dheva T; Cheng, Derrick Th; Lu, Shan; Hansen, Jesse M; Dalwadi, Udit; Lam, Cindy Hy; To, Jeffrey L; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yip, Calvin K

    2017-02-01

    Elongator is a ~850 kDa protein complex involved in multiple processes from transcription to tRNA modification. Conserved from yeast to humans, Elongator is assembled from two copies of six unique subunits (Elp1 to Elp6). Despite the wealth of structural data on the individual subunits, the overall architecture and subunit organization of the full Elongator and the molecular mechanisms of how it exerts its multiple activities remain unclear. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we revealed that yeast Elongator adopts a bilobal architecture and an unexpected asymmetric subunit arrangement resulting from the hexameric Elp456 subassembly anchored to one of the two Elp123 lobes that form the structural scaffold. By integrating the EM data with available subunit crystal structures and restraints generated from cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry, we constructed a multiscale molecular model that showed the two Elp3, the main catalytic subunit, are located in two distinct environments. This work provides the first structural insights into Elongator and a framework to understand the molecular basis of its multifunctionality.

  7. VNTR analysis reveals unexpected genetic diversity within Mycoplasma agalactiae, the main causative agent of contagious agalactia

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    Ayling Roger D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma agalactiae is the main cause of contagious agalactia, a serious disease of sheep and goats, which has major clinical and economic impacts. Previous studies of M. agalactiae have shown it to be unusually homogeneous and there are currently no available epidemiological techniques which enable a high degree of strain differentiation. Results We have developed variable number tandem repeat (VNTR analysis using the sequenced genome of the M. agalactiae type strain PG2. The PG2 genome was found to be replete with tandem repeat sequences and 4 were chosen for further analysis. VNTR 5 was located within the hypothetical protein MAG6170 a predicted lipoprotein. VNTR 14 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG3350 and the hypothetical protein MAG3340. VNTR 17 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG4060 and the hypothetical protein MAG4070 and VNTR 19 spanned the 5' end of the pseudogene for a lipoprotein MAG4310 and the 3' end of the hypothetical lipoprotein MAG4320. We have investigated the genetic diversity of 88 M. agalactiae isolates of wide geographic origin using VNTR analysis and compared it with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis. Simpson's index of diversity was calculated to be 0.324 for PFGE and 0.574 for VNTR analysis. VNTR analysis revealed unexpected diversity within M. agalactiae with 9 different VNTR types discovered. Some correlation was found between geographical origin and the VNTR type of the isolates. Conclusion VNTR analysis represents a useful, rapid first-line test for use in molecular epidemiological analysis of M. agalactiae for outbreak tracing and control.

  8. Proteomic and bioinformatic analysis of epithelial tight junction reveals an unexpected cluster of synaptic molecules

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    Tang Vivian W

    2006-12-01

    double membranes, satellite Golgi apparatus and associated vesicular structures. A working model of the tight junction consisting of multiple functions and sub-domains has been generated using the proteomics and structural data. Conclusion This study provides an unbiased proteomics and bioinformatics approach to elucidate novel functions of the tight junction. The approach has revealed an unexpected cluster associating with synaptic function. This surprising finding suggests that the tight junction may be a novel epithelial synapse for cell-cell communication. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Gáspár Jékely, Etienne Joly and Neil Smalheiser.

  9. Whole-Exome Sequencing Reveals CLCNKB Mutations in a Case of Sudden Unexpected Infant Death.

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    Lopez, Hector U; Haverfield, Eden; Chung, Wendy K

    2015-01-01

    Cases of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) leave many families devastated, especially in those without an identified cause of death. Here, we describe the case of an apparently healthy 15-day-old infant who died suddenly and unexpectedly. Through whole-exome sequencing, the infant was posthumously found to have 2 mutations in the CLCNKB gene, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type III, the likely cause of death. This case illustrates the potential utility of exome sequencing in cases of SUID to suggest a diagnosis, with important implications for families, allowing them to come to closure over the cause of death, informing their future reproductive decisions, and minimizing the risk of recurrence.

  10. Citizen science reveals unexpected continental-scale evolutionary change in a model organism.

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    Jonathan Silvertown

    Full Text Available Organisms provide some of the most sensitive indicators of climate change and evolutionary responses are becoming apparent in species with short generation times. Large datasets on genetic polymorphism that can provide an historical benchmark against which to test for recent evolutionary responses are very rare, but an exception is found in the brown-lipped banded snail (Cepaea nemoralis. This species is sensitive to its thermal environment and exhibits several polymorphisms of shell colour and banding pattern affecting shell albedo in the majority of populations within its native range in Europe. We tested for evolutionary changes in shell albedo that might have been driven by the warming of the climate in Europe over the last half century by compiling an historical dataset for 6,515 native populations of C. nemoralis and comparing this with new data on nearly 3,000 populations. The new data were sampled mainly in 2009 through the Evolution MegaLab, a citizen science project that engaged thousands of volunteers in 15 countries throughout Europe in the biggest such exercise ever undertaken. A known geographic cline in the frequency of the colour phenotype with the highest albedo (yellow was shown to have persisted and a difference in colour frequency between woodland and more open habitats was confirmed, but there was no general increase in the frequency of yellow shells. This may have been because snails adapted to a warming climate through behavioural thermoregulation. By contrast, we detected an unexpected decrease in the frequency of Unbanded shells and an increase in the Mid-banded morph. Neither of these evolutionary changes appears to be a direct response to climate change, indicating that the influence of other selective agents, possibly related to changing predation pressure and habitat change with effects on micro-climate.

  11. A new GFP-tagged line reveals unexpected Otx2 protein localization in retinal photoreceptors

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    Godement Pierre

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamic monitoring of protein expression and localization is fundamental to the understanding of biological processes. The paired-class homeodomain-containing transcription factor Otx2 is essential for normal head and brain development in vertebrates. Recent conditional knockout studies have pointed to multiple roles of this protein during late development and post-natal life. Yet, later expression and functions remain poorly characterized as specific reagents to detect the protein at any stage of development are still missing. Results We generated a new mouse line harbouring an insertion of the GFP gene within the Otx2 coding sequence to monitor the gene activity while preserving most of its functions. Our results demonstrate that this line represents a convenient tool to capture the dynamics of Otx2 gene expression from early embryonic stages to adulthood. In addition, we could visualize the intracellular location of Otx2 protein. In the retina, we reinterpret the former view of protein distribution and show a further level of regulation of intranuclear protein localization, which depends on the cell type. Conclusion The GFP-tagged Otx2 mouse line fully recapitulates previously known expression patterns and brings additional accuracy and easiness of detection of Otx2 gene activity. This opens up the way to live imaging of a highly dynamic actor of brain development and can be adapted to any mutant background to probe for genetic interaction between Otx2 and the mutated gene.

  12. Metatranscriptomic Analysis Reveals Unexpectedly Diverse Microbial Metabolism in a Biogeochemical Hot Spot in an Alluvial Aquifer

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    Jewell, Talia N. M.; Karaoz, Ulas; Bill, Markus; Chakraborty, Romy; Brodie, Eoin L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Beller, Harry R.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter deposits in alluvial aquifers have been shown to result in the formation of naturally reduced zones (NRZs), which can modulate aquifer redox status and influence the speciation and mobility of metals, affecting groundwater geochemistry. In this study, we sought to better understand how natural organic matter fuels microbial communities within anoxic biogeochemical hot spots (NRZs) in a shallow alluvial aquifer at the Rifle (CO) site. We conducted a 20-day microcosm experiment in which NRZ sediments, which were enriched in buried woody plant material, served as the sole source of electron donors and microorganisms. The microcosms were constructed and incubated under anaerobic conditions in serum bottles with an initial N2 headspace and were sampled every 5 days for metagenome and metatranscriptome profiles in combination with biogeochemical measurements. Biogeochemical data indicated that the decomposition of native organic matter occurred in different phases, beginning with mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to CO2 during the first week of incubation, followed by a pulse of acetogenesis that dominated carbon flux after 2 weeks. A pulse of methanogenesis co-occurred with acetogenesis, but only accounted for a small fraction of carbon flux. The depletion of DOM over time was strongly correlated with increases in expression of many genes associated with heterotrophy (e.g., amino acid, fatty acid, and carbohydrate metabolism) belonging to a Hydrogenophaga strain that accounted for a relatively large percentage (~8%) of the metatranscriptome. This Hydrogenophaga strain also expressed genes indicative of chemolithoautotrophy, including CO2 fixation, H2 oxidation, S-compound oxidation, and denitrification. The pulse of acetogenesis appears to have been collectively catalyzed by a number of different organisms and metabolisms, most prominently pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Unexpected genes were identified among the most highly expressed

  13. Comparative analyses of developmental transcription factor repertoires in sponges reveal unexpected complexity of the earliest animals.

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    Fortunato, Sofia A V; Adamski, Marcin; Adamska, Maja

    2015-12-01

    Developmental transcription factors (DTFs) control development of animals by affecting expression of target genes, some of which are transcription factors themselves. In bilaterians and cnidarians, conserved DTFs are involved in homologous processes such as gastrulation or specification of neurons. The genome of Amphimedon queenslandica, the first sponge to be sequenced, revealed that only a fraction of these conserved DTF families are present in demosponges. This finding was in line with the view that morphological complexity in the animal lineage correlates with developmental toolkit complexity. However, as the phylum Porifera is very diverse, Amphimedon's genome may not be representative of all sponges. The recently sequenced genomes of calcareous sponges Sycon ciliatum and Leucosolenia complicata allowed investigations of DTFs in a sponge lineage evolutionarily distant from demosponges. Surprisingly, the phylogenetic analyses of identified DTFs revealed striking differences between the calcareous sponges and Amphimedon. As these differences appear to be a result of independent gene loss events in the two sponge lineages, the last common ancestor of sponges had to possess a much more diverse repertoire of DTFs than extant sponges. Developmental expression of sponge homologs of genes involved in specification of the Bilaterian endomesoderm and the neurosensory cells suggests that roles of many DTFs date back to the last common ancestor of all animals. Strikingly, even DTFs displaying apparent pan-metazoan conservation of sequence and function are not immune to being lost from individual species genomes. The quest for a comprehensive picture of the developmental toolkit in the last common metazoan ancestor is thus greatly benefitting from the increasing accessibility of sequencing, allowing comparisons of multiple genomes within each phylum.

  14. Deep phenotyping of 89 xeroderma pigmentosum patients reveals unexpected heterogeneity dependent on the precise molecular defect

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    Fassihi, Hiva; Sethi, Mieran; Fawcett, Heather; Wing, Jonathan; Chandler, Natalie; Mohammed, Shehla; Craythorne, Emma; Morley, Ana M. S.; Lim, Rongxuan; Turner, Sally; Henshaw, Tanya; Garrood, Isabel; Giunti, Paola; Hedderly, Tammy; Abiona, Adesoji; Naik, Harsha; Harrop, Gemma; McGibbon, David; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; Botta, Elena; Nardo, Tiziana; Stefanini, Miria; Young, Antony R.; Sarkany, Robert P. E.; Lehmann, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare DNA repair disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to UV radiation (UVR)-induced skin pigmentation, skin cancers, ocular surface disease, and, in some patients, sunburn and neurological degeneration. Genetically, it is assigned to eight complementation groups (XP-A to -G and variant). For the last 5 y, the UK national multidisciplinary XP service has provided follow-up for 89 XP patients, representing most of the XP patients in the United Kingdom. Causative mutations, DNA repair levels, and more than 60 clinical variables relating to dermatology, ophthalmology, and neurology have been measured, using scoring systems to categorize disease severity. This deep phenotyping has revealed unanticipated heterogeneity of clinical features, between and within complementation groups. Skin cancer is most common in XP-C, XP-E, and XP-V patients, previously considered to be the milder groups based on cellular analyses. These patients have normal sunburn reactions and are therefore diagnosed later and are less likely to adhere to UVR protection. XP-C patients are specifically hypersensitive to ocular damage, and XP-F and XP-G patients appear to be much less susceptible to skin cancer than other XP groups. Within XP groups, different mutations confer susceptibility or resistance to neurological damage. Our findings on this large cohort of XP patients under long-term follow-up reveal that XP is more heterogeneous than has previously been appreciated. Our data now enable provision of personalized prognostic information and management advice for each XP patient, as well as providing new insights into the functions of the XP proteins. PMID:26884178

  15. Unexpected Regularity in Swimming Behavior of Clausocalanus furcatus Revealed by a Telecentric 3D Computer Vision System.

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    Giuseppe Bianco

    Full Text Available Planktonic copepods display a large repertoire of motion behaviors in a three-dimensional environment. Two-dimensional video observations demonstrated that the small copepod Clausocalanus furcatus, one the most widely distributed calanoids at low to medium latitudes, presented a unique swimming behavior that was continuous and fast and followed notably convoluted trajectories. Furthermore, previous observations indicated that the motion of C. furcatus resembled a random process. We characterized the swimming behavior of this species in three-dimensional space using a video system equipped with telecentric lenses, which allow tracking of zooplankton without the distortion errors inherent in common lenses. Our observations revealed unexpected regularities in the behavior of C. furcatus that appear primarily in the horizontal plane and could not have been identified in previous observations based on lateral views. Our results indicate that the swimming behavior of C. furcatus is based on a limited repertoire of basic kinematic modules but exhibits greater plasticity than previously thought.

  16. Single molecule atomic force microscopy of aerolysin pore complexes reveals unexpected star-shaped topography.

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    He, Jianfeng; Wang, Jiabin; Hu, Jun; Sun, Jielin; Czajkowsky, Daniel Mark; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-04-01

    Aerolysin is the paradigmatic member of a large family of toxins that convert from a water-soluble monomer/dimer into a membrane-spanning oligomeric pore. While there is x-ray crystallographic data of its water-soluble conformation, the most recent structural model of the membrane-inserted pore is based primarily on data of water-soluble tetradecamers of mutant protein, together with computational modeling ultimately performed in vacuum. Here we examine this pore model with atomic force microscopy (AFM) of membrane-associated wild-type complexes and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in water. In striking contrast to a disc-shaped cap region predicted by the present model, the AFM images reveal a star-shaped complex, with a central ring surrounded by seven radial projections. Further, the MD simulations suggest that the locations of the receptor-binding (D1) domains in the present model are not correct. However, a modified model in which the D1 domains, rather than localized at fixed positions, adopt a wide range of configurations through fluctuations of an intervening linker is compatible with existing data. Thus our work not only demonstrates the importance of directly resolving such complexes in their native environment but also points to a dynamic receptor binding region, which may be critical for toxin assembly on the cell surface.

  17. Integrated analyses resolve conflicts over squamate reptile phylogeny and reveal unexpected placements for fossil taxa.

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    Reeder, Tod W; Townsend, Ted M; Mulcahy, Daniel G; Noonan, Brice P; Wood, Perry L; Sites, Jack W; Wiens, John J

    2015-01-01

    Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a pivotal group whose relationships have become increasingly controversial. Squamates include >9000 species, making them the second largest group of terrestrial vertebrates. They are important medicinally and as model systems for ecological and evolutionary research. However, studies of squamate biology are hindered by uncertainty over their relationships, and some consider squamate phylogeny unresolved, given recent conflicts between molecular and morphological results. To resolve these conflicts, we expand existing morphological and molecular datasets for squamates (691 morphological characters and 46 genes, for 161 living and 49 fossil taxa, including a new set of 81 morphological characters and adding two genes from published studies) and perform integrated analyses. Our results resolve higher-level relationships as indicated by molecular analyses, and reveal hidden morphological support for the molecular hypothesis (but not vice-versa). Furthermore, we find that integrating molecular, morphological, and paleontological data leads to surprising placements for two major fossil clades (Mosasauria and Polyglyphanodontia). These results further demonstrate the importance of combining fossil and molecular information, and the potential problems of estimating the placement of fossil taxa from morphological data alone. Thus, our results caution against estimating fossil relationships without considering relevant molecular data, and against placing fossils into molecular trees (e.g. for dating analyses) without considering the possible impact of molecular data on their placement.

  18. Metagenomic investigation of the geologically unique Hellenic Volcanic Arc reveals a distinctive ecosystem with unexpected physiology.

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    Oulas, Anastasis; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Seshadri, Rekha; Tripp, H James; Mandalakis, Manolis; Paez-Espino, A David; Pati, Amrita; Chain, Patrick; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Carey, Steven; Kilias, Stephanos; Christakis, Christos; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents represent a deep, hot, aphotic biosphere where chemosynthetic primary producers, fuelled by chemicals from Earth's subsurface, form the basis of life. In this study, we examined microbial mats from two distinct volcanic sites within the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is geologically and ecologically unique, with reported emissions of CO2 -saturated fluids at temperatures up to 220°C and a notable absence of macrofauna. Metagenomic data reveals highly complex prokaryotic communities composed of chemolithoautotrophs, some methanotrophs, and to our surprise, heterotrophs capable of anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our data suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons may indeed be a significant source of carbon in these sites, and instigate additional research into the nature and origin of these compounds in the HVA. Novel physiology was assigned to several uncultured prokaryotic lineages; most notably, a SAR406 representative is attributed with a role in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. This dataset, the largest to date from submarine volcanic ecosystems, constitutes a significant resource of novel genes and pathways with potential biotechnological applications.

  19. Expression of secreted Wnt pathway components reveals unexpected complexity of the planarian amputation response.

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    Gurley, Kyle A; Elliott, Sarah A; Simakov, Oleg; Schmidt, Heiko A; Holstein, Thomas W; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2010-11-01

    Regeneration is widespread throughout the animal kingdom, but our molecular understanding of this process in adult animals remains poorly understood. Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays crucial roles throughout animal life from early development to adulthood. In intact and regenerating planarians, the regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling functions to maintain and specify anterior/posterior (A/P) identity. Here, we explore the expression kinetics and RNAi phenotypes for secreted members of the Wnt signaling pathway in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Smed-wnt and sFRP expression during regeneration is surprisingly dynamic and reveals fundamental aspects of planarian biology that have been previously unappreciated. We show that after amputation, a wounding response precedes rapid re-organization of the A/P axis. Furthermore, cells throughout the body plan can mount this response and reassess their new A/P location in the complete absence of stem cells. While initial stages of the amputation response are stem cell independent, tissue remodeling and the integration of a new A/P address with anatomy are stem cell dependent. We also show that WNT5 functions in a reciprocal manner with SLIT to pattern the planarian mediolateral axis, while WNT11-2 patterns the posterior midline. Moreover, we perform an extensive phylogenetic analysis on the Smed-wnt genes using a method that combines and integrates both sequence and structural alignments, enabling us to place all nine genes into Wnt subfamilies for the first time.

  20. Morphology and molecules reveal unexpected cryptic diversity in the enigmatic genus Sinobirma Bryk, 1944 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae.

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    Rodolphe Rougerie

    Full Text Available The wild silkmoth genus Sinobirma Bryk, 1944 is a poorly known monotypic taxon from the eastern end of the Himalaya Range. It was convincingly proposed to be closely related to some members of an exclusively Afro-tropical group of Saturniidae, but its biogeographical and evolutionary history remains enigmatic. After examining recently collected material from Tibet, northern India, and northeastern Myanmar, we realized that this unique species, S. malaisei Bryk, 1944 only known so far from a few specimens and from a very restricted area near the border between north-eastern Myanmar and the Yunnan province of China, may in fact belong to a group of closely related cryptic species. In this work, we combined morphological comparative study, DNA barcoding, and the sequences of a nuclear marker (D2 expansion segment of the 28S rRNA gene to unequivocally delimit three distinct species in the genus Sinobirma, of which two are described as new to science: S. myanmarensis sp. n. and S. bouyeri sp. n. An informative DNA barcode sequence was obtained from the female holotype of S. malaisei--collected in 1934--ensuring the proper assignation of this name to the newly collected and studied specimens. Our findings represent another example of the potential of coupling traditional taxonomy and DNA barcoding for revealing and solving difficult cases of cryptic diversity. This approach is now being generalized to the world fauna of Saturniidae, with the participation of most of the taxonomists studying these moths.

  1. The Crystal Structure of Cancer Osaka Thyroid Kinase Reveals an Unexpected Kinase Domain Fold*

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    Gutmann, Sascha; Hinniger, Alexandra; Fendrich, Gabriele; Drückes, Peter; Antz, Sylvie; Mattes, Henri; Möbitz, Henrik; Ofner, Silvio; Schmiedeberg, Niko; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Rieffel, Sebastien; Strauss, André; Troxler, Thomas; Glatthar, Ralf; Sparrer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are important cellular effectors in innate immune responses and play a major role in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Cancer Osaka thyroid (COT) kinase, also known as mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 8 (MAP3K8) and tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl-2), is a serine-threonine (ST) kinase and is a key regulator in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Due to its pivotal role in immune biology, COT kinase has been identified as an attractive target for pharmaceutical research that is directed at the discovery of orally available, selective, and potent inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and cancer. The production of monomeric, recombinant COT kinase has proven to be very difficult, and issues with solubility and stability of the enzyme have hampered the discovery and optimization of potent and selective inhibitors. We developed a protocol for the production of recombinant human COT kinase that yields pure and highly active enzyme in sufficient yields for biochemical and structural studies. The quality of the enzyme allowed us to establish a robust in vitro phosphorylation assay for the efficient biochemical characterization of COT kinase inhibitors and to determine the x-ray co-crystal structures of the COT kinase domain in complex with two ATP-binding site inhibitors. The structures presented in this study reveal two distinct ligand binding modes and a unique kinase domain architecture that has not been observed previously. The structurally versatile active site significantly impacts the design of potent, low molecular weight COT kinase inhibitors. PMID:25918157

  2. Brain rhythms reveal a hierarchical network organization.

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    G Karl Steinke

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recordings of ongoing neural activity with EEG and MEG exhibit oscillations of specific frequencies over a non-oscillatory background. The oscillations appear in the power spectrum as a collection of frequency bands that are evenly spaced on a logarithmic scale, thereby preventing mutual entrainment and cross-talk. Over the last few years, experimental, computational and theoretical studies have made substantial progress on our understanding of the biophysical mechanisms underlying the generation of network oscillations and their interactions, with emphasis on the role of neuronal synchronization. In this paper we ask a very different question. Rather than investigating how brain rhythms emerge, or whether they are necessary for neural function, we focus on what they tell us about functional brain connectivity. We hypothesized that if we were able to construct abstract networks, or "virtual brains", whose dynamics were similar to EEG/MEG recordings, those networks would share structural features among themselves, and also with real brains. Applying mathematical techniques for inverse problems, we have reverse-engineered network architectures that generate characteristic dynamics of actual brains, including spindles and sharp waves, which appear in the power spectrum as frequency bands superimposed on a non-oscillatory background dominated by low frequencies. We show that all reconstructed networks display similar topological features (e.g. structural motifs and dynamics. We have also reverse-engineered putative diseased brains (epileptic and schizophrenic, in which the oscillatory activity is altered in different ways, as reported in clinical studies. These reconstructed networks show consistent alterations of functional connectivity and dynamics. In particular, we show that the complexity of the network, quantified as proposed by Tononi, Sporns and Edelman, is a good indicator of brain fitness, since virtual brains modeling diseased states

  3. Genetic analysis reveals an unexpected role of BMP7 in initiation of ureteric bud outgrowth in mouse embryos.

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    Alexandre Gonçalves

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic analysis in the mouse revealed that GREMLIN1 (GREM1-mediated antagonism of BMP4 is essential for ureteric epithelial branching as the disruption of ureteric bud outgrowth and renal agenesis in Grem1-deficient embryos is restored by additional inactivation of one Bmp4 allele. Another BMP ligand, BMP7, was shown to control the proliferative expansion of nephrogenic progenitors and its requirement for nephrogenesis can be genetically substituted by Bmp4. Therefore, we investigated whether BMP7 in turn also participates in inhibiting ureteric bud outgrowth during the initiation of metanephric kidney development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic inactivation of one Bmp7 allele in Grem1-deficient mouse embryos does not alleviate the bilateral renal agenesis, while complete inactivation of Bmp7 restores ureteric bud outgrowth and branching. In mouse embryos lacking both Grem1 and Bmp7, GDNF/WNT11 feedback signaling and the expression of the Etv4 target gene, which regulates formation of the invading ureteric bud tip, are restored. In contrast to the restoration of ureteric bud outgrowth and branching, nephrogenesis remains aberrant as revealed by the premature loss of Six2 expressing nephrogenic progenitor cells. Therefore, very few nephrons develop in kidneys lacking both Grem1 and Bmp7 and the resulting dysplastic phenotype is indistinguishable from the one of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study reveals an unexpected inhibitory role of BMP7 during the onset of ureteric bud outgrowth. As BMP4, BMP7 and GREM1 are expressed in distinct mesenchymal and epithelial domains, the localized antagonistic interactions of GREM1 with BMPs could restrict and guide ureteric bud outgrowth and branching. The robustness and likely significant redundancy of the underlying signaling system is evidenced by the fact that global reduction of Bmp4 or inactivation of Bmp7 are both able to restore ureteric bud outgrowth

  4. High-throughput sequencing-based analysis of endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps reveals unexpectedly high fungal diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Chen, Xin; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Yan; Shen, Guang-Rong; Li, Yu-Ling; Lin, Juan; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2016-09-14

    Chinese Cordyceps, known in Chinese as "DongChong XiaCao", is a parasitic complex of a fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis) and a caterpillar. The current study explored the endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting Chinese Cordyceps. Samples were collected from five different geographical regions of Qinghai and Tibet, and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 sequences from each sample were obtained using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that Ascomycota was the dominant fungal phylum in Chinese Cordyceps and its soil microhabitat from different sampling regions. Among the Ascomycota, 65 genera were identified, and the abundant operational taxonomic units showed the strongest sequence similarity to Ophiocordyceps, Verticillium, Pseudallescheria, Candida and Ilyonectria Not surprisingly, the genus Ophiocordyceps was the largest among the fungal communities identified in the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. In addition, fungal communities in the soil microhabitats were clustered separately from the external mycelial cortices and fruiting bodies of Chinese Cordyceps from different sampling regions. There was no significant structural difference in the fungal communities between the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. This study revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps and its microhabitats.

  5. Post-genomic analyses of fungal lignocellulosic biomass degradation reveal the unexpected potential of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couturier Marie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous fungi are potent biomass degraders due to their ability to thrive in ligno(hemicellulose-rich environments. During the last decade, fungal genome sequencing initiatives have yielded abundant information on the genes that are putatively involved in lignocellulose degradation. At present, additional experimental studies are essential to provide insights into the fungal secreted enzymatic pools involved in lignocellulose degradation. Results In this study, we performed a wide analysis of 20 filamentous fungi for which genomic data are available to investigate their biomass-hydrolysis potential. A comparison of fungal genomes and secretomes using enzyme activity profiling revealed discrepancies in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes sets dedicated to plant cell wall. Investigation of the contribution made by each secretome to the saccharification of wheat straw demonstrated that most of them individually supplemented the industrial Trichoderma reesei CL847 enzymatic cocktail. Unexpectedly, the most striking effect was obtained with the phytopathogen Ustilago maydis that improved the release of total sugars by 57% and of glucose by 22%. Proteomic analyses of the best-performing secretomes indicated a specific enzymatic mechanism of U. maydis that is likely to involve oxido-reductases and hemicellulases. Conclusion This study provides insight into the lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms by filamentous fungi and allows for the identification of a number of enzymes that are potentially useful to further improve the industrial lignocellulose bioconversion process.

  6. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Spain

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring’s source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (<1 µM of oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons.

  7. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Najar, Fares Z.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2015-01-01

    Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring’s source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons. PMID:26417542

  8. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N, Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio García-Moyano

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharacterized. Several abandoned mining areas were explored in the search for active AMD and a culture-independent approach was applied with samples from two different runoffs for the identification and quantification of the native microbial communities. The results obtained revealed two distinct microbial communities. One of the runoffs was more extreme with regards to pH and higher concentration of soluble iron and heavy metals. These conditions favored the development of algal-dominated microbial mats. Typical AMD microorganisms related to known iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria dominated the bacterial community although some unexpected populations related to Chloroflexi were also significant. No microbial mats were found in the second area. The geochemistry here showed less extreme drainage, most likely in direct contact with the ore under the waste pile. Large deposits of secondary minerals were found and the presence of iron stalks was revealed by microscopy analysis. Although typical AMD microorganisms were also detected here, the microbial community was dominated by other populations, some of them new to this type of system (Saccharibacteria, Gallionellaceae. These were absent or lowered in numbers the farther from the spring source and they could represent native populations involved in the oxidation of sulphide rocks within the waste rock pile. This environment appears thus as a highly interesting

  9. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremaine, Mary; Hebert, Alexander S.; Myers, Kevin S.; Sardi, Maria; Dickinson, Quinn; Reed, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J.; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gasch, Audrey P.; Landick, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3), a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling (HOG1), a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling (IRA2), and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis (ISU1). Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism. PMID:27741250

  10. Resting-state brain organization revealed by functional covariance networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain network studies using techniques of intrinsic connectivity network based on fMRI time series (TS-ICN and structural covariance network (SCN have mapped out functional and structural organization of human brain at respective time scales. However, there lacks a meso-time-scale network to bridge the ICN and SCN and get insights of brain functional organization. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We proposed a functional covariance network (FCN method by measuring the covariance of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF in BOLD signals across subjects, and compared the patterns of ALFF-FCNs with the TS-ICNs and SCNs by mapping the brain networks of default network, task-positive network and sensory networks. We demonstrated large overlap among FCNs, ICNs and SCNs and modular nature in FCNs and ICNs by using conjunctional analysis. Most interestingly, FCN analysis showed a network dichotomy consisting of anti-correlated high-level cognitive system and low-level perceptive system, which is a novel finding different from the ICN dichotomy consisting of the default-mode network and the task-positive network. CONCLUSION: The current study proposed an ALFF-FCN approach to measure the interregional correlation of brain activity responding to short periods of state, and revealed novel organization patterns of resting-state brain activity from an intermediate time scale.

  11. NMR spectroscopy reveals unexpected structural variation at the protein-protein interface in MHC class I molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerbaum, Monika; Ballaschk, Martin; Erdmann, Natalja [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Schnick, Christina [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Diehl, Anne [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Schmieder, Peter, E-mail: schmieder@fmp-berlin.de [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    {beta}{sub 2}-Microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}m) is a small, monomorphic protein non-covalently bound to the heavy chain (HC) in polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Given the high evolutionary conservation of structural features of {beta}{sub 2}m in various MHC molecules as shown by X-ray crystallography, {beta}{sub 2}m is often considered as a mere scaffolding protein. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we investigate here whether {beta}{sub 2}m residues at the interface to the HC exhibit changes depending on HC polymorphisms and the peptides bound to the complex in solution. First we show that human {beta}{sub 2}m can effectively be produced in deuterated form using high-cell-density-fermentation and we employ the NMR resonance assignments obtained for triple-labeled {beta}{sub 2}m bound to the HLA-B*27:09 HC to examine the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface. We then proceed to compare the resonances of {beta}{sub 2}m in two minimally distinct subtypes, HLA-B*27:09 and HLA-B*27:05, that are differentially associated with the spondyloarthropathy Ankylosing Spondylitis. Each of these subtypes is complexed with four distinct peptides for which structural information is already available. We find that only the resonances at the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface show a variation of their chemical shifts between the different complexes. This indicates the existence of an unexpected plasticity that enables {beta}{sub 2}m to accommodate changes that depend on HC polymorphism as well as on the bound peptide through subtle structural variations of the protein-protein interface.

  12. Crystal structure of the predicted phospholipase LYPLAL1 reveals unexpected functional plasticity despite close relationship to acyl protein thioesterases

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Sequence homology indicates the existence of three human cytosolic acyl protein thioesterases, including APT1 that is known to depalmitoylate H- and N-Ras. One of them is the lysophospholipase-like 1 (LYPLAL1) protein that on the one hand is predicted to be closely related to APT1 but on the other hand might also function as a potential triacylglycerol lipase involved in obesity. However, its role remained unclear. The 1.7 Å crystal structure of LYPLAL1 reveals a fold very similar to APT1, as...

  13. Culture-independent genome sequencing of clinical samples reveals an unexpected heterogeneity of infections by Chlamydia pecorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Nathan L; Sullivan, Mitchell J; Jelocnik, Martina; Myers, Garry S A; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Chlamydia pecorum is an important global pathogen of livestock, and it is also a significant threat to the long-term survival of Australia's koala populations. This study employed a culture-independent DNA capture approach to sequence C. pecorum genomes directly from clinical swab samples collected from koalas with chlamydial disease as well as from sheep with arthritis and conjunctivitis. Investigations into single-nucleotide polymorphisms within each of the swab samples revealed that a portion of the reads in each sample belonged to separate C. pecorum strains, suggesting that all of the clinical samples analyzed contained mixed populations of genetically distinct C. pecorum isolates. This observation was independent of the anatomical site sampled and the host species. Using the genomes of strains identified in each of these samples, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis revealed that a clade containing a bovine and a koala isolate is distinct from other clades comprised of livestock or koala C. pecorum strains. Providing additional evidence to support exposure of koalas to Australian livestock strains, two minor strains assembled from the koala swab samples clustered with livestock strains rather than koala strains. Culture-independent probe-based genome capture and sequencing of clinical samples provides the strongest evidence yet to suggest that naturally occurring chlamydial infections are comprised of multiple genetically distinct strains.

  14. An unexpected pulmonary bystander

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M.; Vorm, van der P. A.; Koning, K. J.; van der Werf, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old man from Eritrea was admitted with a pulmonary bacterial abscess. Unexpectedly, histopathology of the resected lobe also revealed an infection with Schistosoma mansoni with surrounding granulomatous tissue and fibrosis. Patients from endemic areas are often asymptomatic with blood eosi

  15. Intensive trapping of blood-fed Anopheles darlingi in Amazonian Peru reveals unexpectedly high proportions of avian blood-meals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Marlon P.; Bickersmith, Sara A.; Prussing, Catharine; Michalski, Adrian; Tong Rios, Carlos; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Conn, Jan E.

    2017-01-01

    Anopheles darlingi, the main malaria vector in the Neotropics, has been considered to be highly anthropophilic. However, many behavioral aspects of this species remain unknown, such as the range of blood-meal sources. Barrier screens were used to collect resting Anopheles darlingi mosquitoes from 2013 to 2015 in three riverine localities (Lupuna, Cahuide and Santa Emilia) in Amazonian Peru. Overall, the Human Blood Index (HBI) ranged from 0.58–0.87, with no significant variation among years or sites. Blood-meal analysis revealed that humans are the most common blood source, followed by avian hosts (Galliformes-chickens and turkeys), and human/Galliforme mixed-meals. The Forage Ratio and Selection Index both show a strong preference for Galliformes over humans in blood-fed mosquitoes. Our data show that 30% of An. darlingi fed on more than one host, including combinations of dogs, pigs, goats and rats. There appears to be a pattern of host choice in An. darlingi, with varying proportions of mosquitoes feeding only on humans, only on Galliformes and some taking mixed-meals of blood (human plus Galliforme), which was detected in the three sites in different years, indicating that there could be a structure to these populations based on blood-feeding preferences. Mosquito age, estimated in two localities, Lupuna and Cahuide, ranged widely between sites and years. This variation may reflect the range of local environmental factors that influence longevity or possibly potential changes in the ability of the mosquito to transmit the parasite. Of 6,204 resting An. darlingi tested for Plasmodium infection, 0.42% were infected with P. vivax. This study provides evidence for the first time of the usefulness of barrier screens for the collection of blood-fed resting mosquitoes to calculate the Human Blood Index (HBI) and other blood-meal sources in a neotropical malaria endemic setting. PMID:28231248

  16. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  17. Intra-arterial administration improves temozolomide delivery and efficacy in a model of intracerebral metastasis, but has unexpected brain toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Leslie L; Pagel, Michael A; Netto, Joao Prola; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2016-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that intra-arterial (IA) infusion of temozolomide into the internal carotid artery would safely improve drug delivery to brain and enhance chemotherapy efficacy in a chemosensitive rat brain tumor model. Quantitative autoradiography after 25 µCi (14)C-temozolomide was given by oral, intravenous, or IA route of administration, or IA with osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) (n = 5-7 per group) showed that both IA and IA/BBBD administration increased drug delivery in tumor by over threefold compared to normal brain (P Temozolomide (20 mg/kg; ~150 mg/m(2)) increased median survival when given by oral (25.5 days), intravenous (25.5 days), or IA (33 days) route of administration, compared to 17.5 days in untreated controls (n = 8 per group; overall P temozolomide was significantly longer than all other groups (P temozolomide was toxic in the efficacy study, but there was no evidence of symptomatic neurotoxicity in rats given IA temozolomide. After these promising animal results, a 49 year old male with glioblastoma multiforme who failed all standard therapy received temozolomide 100 mg/m(2) IA. Upon initiation of the second course of IA infusion the patient had increased heart rate, blood pressure, and rash, and the procedure was terminated without sequelae. Follow up IA infusion of temozolomide diluent in normal rats showed damaged cerebrovasculature as determined by dye leakage. These results demonstrate that IA infusion of temozolomide was toxic, with or without BBBD. We conclude that under the current formulation temozolomide is not safe for IA infusion in patients.

  18. Unexpected effects of peripherally administered kynurenic acid on cortical spreading depression and related blood–brain barrier permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oláh G

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gáspár Oláh,1 Judit Herédi,1 Ákos Menyhárt,1 Zsolt Czinege,2 Dávid Nagy,1 János Fuzik,1 Kitti Kocsis,1 Levente Knapp,1 Erika Krucsó,1 Levente Gellért,1 Zsolt Kis,1 Tamás Farkas,1 Ferenc Fülöp,3 Árpád Párdutz,4 János Tajti,4 László Vécsei,4 József Toldi1 1Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Neuroscience, 2Department of Software Engineering, 3Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and MTA-SZTE Research Group for Stereochemistry, 4Department of Neurology and MTA-SZTE Neuroscience Research Group, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary Abstract: Cortical spreading depression (CSD involves a slowly-propagating depolarization wave in the cortex, which can appear in numerous pathophysiological conditions, such as migraine with aura, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Neurons and glial cells are also depolarized transiently during the phenomena. CSD is followed by a massive increase in glutamate release and by changes in the brain microcirculation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, endogenous kynurenic acid (KYNA and dizocilpine, on CSD and the related blood–brain barrier (BBB permeability in rats. In intact animals, KYNA hardly crosses the BBB but has some positive features as compared with its precursor L-Kynurenine, which is frequently used in animal studies (KYNA cannot be metabolized to excitotoxic agents such as 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid. We therefore investigated the possible effects of peripherally administered KYNA. Repetitive CSD waves were elicited by the application of 1 M KCl solution to the cortex. Direct current-electrocorticograms were measured for 1 hour. Four parameters of the waves were compared. Evans blue dye and fluorescent microscopy were used to study the possible changes in the permeability of the BBB. The results demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists can reduce the number of CSD waves and decrease

  19. Centrosomal-ciliary gene CEP290/NPHP6 mutations result in blindness with unexpected sparing of photoreceptors and visual brain: implications for therapy of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Aleman, Tomas S; Jacobson, Samuel G; Khanna, Hemant; Sumaroka, Alexander; Aguirre, Geoffrey K; Schwartz, Sharon B; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; He, Shirley; Chang, Bo; Stone, Edwin M; Swaroop, Anand

    2007-11-01

    Mutations in the centrosomal-ciliary gene CEP290/NPHP6 are associated with Joubert syndrome and are the most common cause of the childhood recessive blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). An in-frame deletion in Cep290 shows rapid degeneration in the rod-rich mouse retina. To explore the mechanisms of the human retinal disease, we studied CEP290-LCA in patients of different ages (7-48 years) and compared results to Cep290-mutant mice. Unexpectedly, blind CEP290-mutant human retinas retained photoreceptor and inner laminar architecture in the cone-rich central retina, independent of severity of visual loss. Surrounding the cone-rich island was photoreceptor loss and distorted retina, suggesting neural-glial remodeling. The mutant mouse retina at 4-6 weeks of age showed similar features of retinal remodeling, with altered neural and synaptic laminae and Muller glial activation. The visual brain pathways in CEP290-LCA were anatomically intact. Our findings of preserved foveal cones and visual brain anatomy in LCA with CEP290 mutations, despite severe blindness and rapid rod cell death, suggest an opportunity for visual restoration of central vision in this common form of inherited blindness.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Zinc-Binding Transport Protein ZnuA from Escherichia coli Reveals an Unexpected Variation in Metal Coordination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li,H.; Jogl, G.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette transport systems for high-affinity uptake of zinc and manganese use a cluster 9 solute-binding protein. Structures of four cluster 9 transport proteins have been determined previously. However, the structural determinants for discrimination between zinc and manganese remain under discussion. To further investigate the variability of metal binding sites in bacterial transporters, we have determined the structure of the zinc-bound transport protein ZnuA from Escherichia coli to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. The overall structure of ZnuA is similar to other solute-binding transporters. A scaffolding {alpha}-helix forms the backbone for two structurally related globular domains. The metal-binding site is located at the domain interface. The bound zinc ion is coordinated by three histidine residues (His78, His161 and His225) and one glutamate residue (Glu77). The functional role of Glu77 for metal binding is unexpected, because this residue is not conserved in previously determined structures of zinc and manganese-specific transport proteins. The observed metal coordination by four protein residues differs significantly from the zinc-binding site in the ZnuA transporter from Synechocystis 6803, which binds zinc via three histidine residues. In addition, the E. coli ZnuA structure reveals the presence of a disulfide bond in the C-terminal globular domain that is not present in previously determined cluster 9 transport protein structures.

  1. Analysis of tumor metabolism reveals mitochondrial glucose oxidation in genetically diverse, human glioblastomas in the mouse brain in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Yang, Chendong; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Cho, Steve; Baek, Hyeonman; Yang, Xiao-Li; Rajagopalan, Kartik N.; Maddie, Melissa; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Zhao, Zhenze; Cai, Ling; Good, Levi; Tu, Benjamin P.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Matés, José M.; Pascual, Juan M.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer cell lines, but little is known about the fate of glucose and other nutrients in tumors growing in their native microenvironment. To study tumor metabolism in vivo, we used an orthotopic mouse model of primary human glioblastoma (GBM). We infused 13C-labeled nutrients into mice bearing three independent GBM lines, each with a distinct set of mutations. All three lines displayed glycolysis, as expected for aggressive tumors. They also displayed unexpected metabolic complexity, oxidizing glucose via pyruvate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle, and using glucose to supply anaplerosis and other biosynthetic activities. Comparing the tumors to surrounding brain revealed obvious metabolic differences, notably the accumulation of a large glutamine pool within the tumors. Many of these same activities were conserved in cells cultured ex vivo from the tumors. Thus GBM cells utilize mitochondrial glucose oxidation during aggressive tumor growth in vivo. PMID:22682223

  2. Occurrence of specific environmental risk factors in brain tissues of sudden infant death and sudden intrauterine unexpected death victims assessed with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termopoli, Veronica; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Magrini, Laura; Cappiello, Achille

    2015-03-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sudden intrauterine unexpected death syndrome (SIUDS) are an unresolved teaser in the social-medical and health setting of modern medicine and are the result of multifactorial interactions. Recently, prenatal exposure to environmental contaminants has been associated with negative pregnancy outcomes, and verification of their presence in fetal and newborn tissues is of crucial importance. A gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method, using a triple quadrupole analyzer, is proposed to assess the presence of 20 organochlorine pesticides, two organophosphate pesticides, one carbamate (boscalid), and a phenol (bisphenol A) in human brain tissues. Samples were collected during autopsies of infants and fetuses that died suddenly without any evident cause. The method involves a liquid-solid extraction using n-hexane as the extraction solvent. The extracts were purified with Florisil cartridges prior to the final determination. Recovery experiments using lamb brain spiked at three different concentrations in the range of 1-50 ng g(-1) were performed, with recoveries ranging from 79 to 106%. Intraday and interday repeatability were evaluated, and relative standard deviations lower than 10% and 18%, respectively, were obtained. The selectivity and sensitivity achieved in multiple reaction monitoring mode allowed us to achieve quantification and confirmation in a real matrix at levels as low as 0.2-0.6 ng g(-1). Two MS/MS transitions were acquired for each analyte, using the Q/q ratio as the confirmatory parameter. This method was applied to the analysis of 14 cerebral cortex samples (ten SIUDS and four SIDS cases), and confirmed the presence of several selected compounds.

  3. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders

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    Qingying Meng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient–host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control and hippocampus (cognitive processing from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine.

  4. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingying; Ying, Zhe; Noble, Emily; Zhao, Yuqi; Agrawal, Rahul; Mikhail, Andrew; Zhuang, Yumei; Tyagi, Ethika; Zhang, Qing; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Morselli, Marco; Orozco, Luz; Guo, Weilong; Kilts, Tina M; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xiao, Xinshu; Young, Marian F; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Yang, Xia

    2016-05-01

    Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient-host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control) and hippocampus (cognitive processing) from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine.

  5. Study Reveals Brain Biology behind Self-Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    A new neuroscience twist on a classic psychology study offers some clues to what makes one student able to buckle down for hours of homework before a test while his classmates party. The study published in the September 2011 edition of "Proceedings of the National Academy of Science," suggests environmental cues may "hijack" the brain's mechanisms…

  6. What Brain Sciences Reveal about Integrating Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Theory and practice are integrated in the human brain. Situation recognition and response are key to this integration. Scholars of decision making and expertise have found that people with great expertise are more adept at situational recognition and intentional about their decision-making processes. Several interdisciplinary fields of inquiry…

  7. Unexpected tolerance of glycosylation by UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase revealed by electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry: carbohydrate as potential protective groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yayoi; Matsushita, Takahiko; Fujitani, Naoki; Takegawa, Yasuhiro; Fujihira, Haruhiko; Naruchi, Kentarou; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Manri, Naomi; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Kato, Kentaro; Hinou, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2010-07-20

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (ppGalNAcTs, EC 2.4.1.41), a family of key enzymes that initiate posttranslational modification with O-glycans in mucin synthesis by introduction of alpha-GalNAc residues, are structurally composed of a catalytic domain and a lectin domain. It has been known that multiple Ser/Thr residues are assigned in common mucin glycoproteins as potential O-glycosylation sites and more than 20 distinct isoforms of this enzyme family contribute to produce densely O-glycosylated mucin glycoproteins. However, it seems that the functional role of the lectin domain of ppGalNAcTs remains unclear. We considered that electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry (ECD-MS), a promising method for highly selective fragmentation at peptide linkages of glycopeptides to generate unique c and z series of ions, should allow for precise structural characterization to uncover the mechanism in O-glycosylation of mucin peptides by ppGalNAcTs. In the present study, it was demonstrated that a system composed of an electrospray source, a linear RFQ ion trap that isolates precursor ions, the ECD device, and a TOF mass spectrometer is a nice tool to identify the preferential O-glycosylation sites without any decomposition of the carbohydrate moiety. It should be noted that electrons used for ECD are accelerated within a range from 1.75 to 9.75 eV depending on the structures of glycopeptides of interest. We revealed for the first time that additional installation of a alpha-GalNAc residue at potential glycosylation sites by ppGalNAcT2 proceeds smoothly in various unnatural glycopeptides having alpha-Man, alpha-Fuc, and beta-Gal residues as well as alpha-GalNAc residues. The results may suggest that ppGalNAcT2 did not differentiate totally presubstituted sugar residues in terms of configuration of functional groups, d-, l-configuration, and even alpha-, beta-stereochemistry at an anomeric carbon atom when relatively short synthetic

  8. What body parts reveal about the organization of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelen, Marius V; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2010-11-04

    In this issue of Neuron, Orlov et al. show that the human occipitotemporal cortex contains regions responding preferentially to body part categories, such as upper limbs (hand, elbow), torsos, or lower faces (mouth, chin). This organization may reflect differences in the connectivity of these regions with other brain regions, to support the efficient processing of the different types of information different body parts provide.

  9. PET imaging reveals brain functional changes in internet gaming disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Mei; Zhang, Ying; Du, Fenglei; Hou, Haifeng; Chao, Fangfang; Zhang, Hong [The Second Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Chen, Qiaozhen [The Second Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-07-15

    Internet gaming disorder is an increasing problem worldwide, resulting in critical academic, social, and occupational impairment. However, the neurobiological mechanism of internet gaming disorder remains unknown. The aim of this study is to assess brain dopamine D{sub 2} (D{sub 2})/Serotonin 2A (5-HT{sub 2A}) receptor function and glucose metabolism in the same subjects by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging approach, and investigate whether the correlation exists between D{sub 2} receptor and glucose metabolism. Twelve drug-naive adult males who met criteria for internet gaming disorder and 14 matched controls were studied with PET and {sup 11}C-N-methylspiperone ({sup 11}C-NMSP) to assess the availability of D{sub 2}/5-HT{sub 2A} receptors and with {sup 18}F-fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) to assess regional brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain function. {sup 11}C-NMSP and {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging data were acquired in the same individuals under both resting and internet gaming task states. In internet gaming disorder subjects, a significant decrease in glucose metabolism was observed in the prefrontal, temporal, and limbic systems. Dysregulation of D{sub 2} receptors was observed in the striatum, and was correlated to years of overuse. A low level of D{sub 2} receptors in the striatum was significantly associated with decreased glucose metabolism in the orbitofrontal cortex. For the first time, we report the evidence that D{sub 2} receptor level is significantly associated with glucose metabolism in the same individuals with internet gaming disorder, which indicates that D{sub 2}/5-HT{sub 2A} receptor-mediated dysregulation of the orbitofrontal cortex could underlie a mechanism for loss of control and compulsive behavior in internet gaming disorder subjects. (orig.)

  10. Brain potentials reveal unconscious translation during foreign-language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Guillaume; Wu, Yan Jing

    2007-07-24

    Whether the native language of bilingual individuals is active during second-language comprehension is the subject of lively debate. Studies of bilingualism have often used a mix of first- and second-language words, thereby creating an artificial "dual-language" context. Here, using event-related brain potentials, we demonstrate implicit access to the first language when bilinguals read words exclusively in their second language. Chinese-English bilinguals were required to decide whether English words presented in pairs were related in meaning or not; they were unaware of the fact that half of the words concealed a character repetition when translated into Chinese. Whereas the hidden factor failed to affect behavioral performance, it significantly modulated brain potentials in the expected direction, establishing that English words were automatically and unconsciously translated into Chinese. Critically, the same modulation was found in Chinese monolinguals reading the same words in Chinese, i.e., when Chinese character repetition was evident. Finally, we replicated this pattern of results in the auditory modality by using a listening comprehension task. These findings demonstrate that native-language activation is an unconscious correlate of second-language comprehension.

  11. Sleep Deprivation Reveals Altered Brain Perfusion Patterns in Somnambulism.

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    Thien Thanh Dang-Vu

    Full Text Available Despite its high prevalence, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of somnambulism. Increasing evidence indicates that somnambulism is associated with functional abnormalities during wakefulness and that sleep deprivation constitutes an important drive that facilitates sleepwalking in predisposed patients. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms associated with somnambulism using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT with 99mTc-Ethylene Cysteinate Dimer (ECD, during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation.Ten adult sleepwalkers and twelve controls with normal sleep were scanned using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in morning wakefulness after a full night of sleep. Eight of the sleepwalkers and nine of the controls were also scanned during wakefulness after a night of total sleep deprivation. Between-group comparisons of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF were performed to characterize brain activity patterns during wakefulness in sleepwalkers.During wakefulness following a night of total sleep deprivation, rCBF was decreased bilaterally in the inferior temporal gyrus in sleepwalkers compared to controls.Functional neural abnormalities can be observed during wakefulness in somnambulism, particularly after sleep deprivation and in the inferior temporal cortex. Sleep deprivation thus not only facilitates the occurrence of sleepwalking episodes, but also uncovers patterns of neural dysfunction that characterize sleepwalkers during wakefulness.

  12. Comparative analysis of encephalization in mammals reveals relaxed constraints on anthropoid primate and cetacean brain scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddy, A M; McGowen, M R; Sherwood, C C; Grossman, L I; Goodman, M; Wildman, D E

    2012-05-01

    There is a well-established allometric relationship between brain and body mass in mammals. Deviation of relatively increased brain size from this pattern appears to coincide with enhanced cognitive abilities. To examine whether there is a phylogenetic structure to such episodes of changes in encephalization across mammals, we used phylogenetic techniques to analyse brain mass, body mass and encephalization quotient (EQ) among 630 extant mammalian species. Among all mammals, anthropoid primates and odontocete cetaceans have significantly greater variance in EQ, suggesting that evolutionary constraints that result in a strict correlation between brain and body mass have independently become relaxed. Moreover, ancestral state reconstructions of absolute brain mass, body mass and EQ revealed patterns of increase and decrease in EQ within anthropoid primates and cetaceans. We propose both neutral drift and selective factors may have played a role in the evolution of brain-body allometry.

  13. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eFissler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control, and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research.

  14. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissler, Patrick; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Schrader, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control), and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages) improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research.

  15. Altered brain structural networks in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children revealed by cortical thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Chen, Yanni; Li, Chenxi; Li, Youjun; Wang, Jue

    2017-01-18

    This study investigated the cortical thickness and topological features of human brain anatomical networks related to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Data were collected from 40 attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children and 40 normal control children. Interregional correlation matrices were established by calculating the correlations of cortical thickness between all pairs of cortical regions (68 regions) of the whole brain. Further thresholds were applied to create binary matrices to construct a series of undirected and unweighted graphs, and global, local, and nodal efficiencies were computed as a function of the network cost. These experimental results revealed abnormal cortical thickness and correlations in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and showed that the brain structural networks of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder subjects had inefficient small-world topological features. Furthermore, their topological properties were altered abnormally. In particular, decreased global efficiency combined with increased local efficiency in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children led to a disorder-related shift of the network topological structure toward regular networks. In addition, nodal efficiency, cortical thickness, and correlation analyses revealed that several brain regions were altered in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients. These findings are in accordance with a hypothesis of dysfunctional integration and segregation of the brain in patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and provide further evidence of brain dysfunction in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients by observing cortical thickness on magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Deep brain stimulation reveals emotional impact processing in ventromedial prefrontal cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Albert; Geday, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that modulation of monoaminergic tone with deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of subthalamic nucleus would reveal a site of reactivity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex that we previously identified by modulating serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms by blocking serotonin......-noradrenaline reuptake sites. We tested the hypothesis in patients with Parkinson's disease in whom we had measured the changes of blood flow everywhere in the brain associated with the deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We determined the emotional reactivity of the patients as the average impact...... of emotive images rated by the patients off the DBS. We then searched for sites in the brain that had significant correlation of the changes of blood flow with the emotional impact rated by the patients. The results indicate a significant link between the emotional impact when patients are not stimulated...

  17. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Human Brain Anatomical Network Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-01-01

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. However, few studies have investigated the hemispheric asymmetries of the human brain from the perspective of the network model, and little is known about the asymmetries of the connection patterns of brain regions, which may reflect the functional integration and interaction between different regions. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 72 right-handed healthy adult subjects. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and subcortical regions using deterministic tractography. To investigate the hemispheric asymmetries of the brain, statistical analyses were performed to reveal the brain regions with significant differences between bilateral topological properties, such as degree of connectivity, characteristic path length, and betweenness centrality. Furthermore, local structural connections were also investigated to examine the local asymmetries of some specific white matter tracts. From the perspective of both the global and local connection patterns, we identified the brain regions with hemispheric asymmetries. Combined with the previous studies, we suggested that the topological asymmetries in the anatomical network may reflect the functional lateralization of the human brain.

  18. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Human Brain Anatomical Network Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Tractography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Shu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. However, few studies have investigated the hemispheric asymmetries of the human brain from the perspective of the network model, and little is known about the asymmetries of the connection patterns of brain regions, which may reflect the functional integration and interaction between different regions. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 72 right-handed healthy adult subjects. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and subcortical regions using deterministic tractography. To investigate the hemispheric asymmetries of the brain, statistical analyses were performed to reveal the brain regions with significant differences between bilateral topological properties, such as degree of connectivity, characteristic path length, and betweenness centrality. Furthermore, local structural connections were also investigated to examine the local asymmetries of some specific white matter tracts. From the perspective of both the global and local connection patterns, we identified the brain regions with hemispheric asymmetries. Combined with the previous studies, we suggested that the topological asymmetries in the anatomical network may reflect the functional lateralization of the human brain.

  19. N-CAM dysfunction and unexpected accumulation of PSA-NCAM in brain of adult-onset autosomal-dominant leukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, Marco; Buccinnà, Barbara; De Marco, Giovanni; Lupino, Elisa; Ramondetti, Cristina; Grifoni, Silvia; Votta, Barbara; Giordana, Maria Teresa; Rinaudo, Maria Teresa

    2010-03-01

    Previously, myelin from cerebral white matter (CWM) of two subjects of a family with orthochromatic adult-onset autosomal-dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) was disclosed to exhibit defective large isoform of myelin-associated glycoprotein (L-MAG) and patchy distribution only in the elder subject. L-MAG and neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) (N-CAM 180, 140, and 120) are structurally related and concur to myelin/axon interaction. In early developmental stages, in neurons and glia N-CAM is converted into polysialylated (PSA)-NCAM by two sialyltransferases sialyltransferase-X (STX) and polysialyltransferase-1 (PST). Notably, PSA-NCAM disrupts N-CAM adhesive properties and is nearly absent in the adult brain. Here, CWM extracts and myelin of the two subjects were searched for the expression pattern of the N-CAM isoforms and PSA-NCAM, and their CWM was evaluated for N-CAM, STX and PST gene copy number and gene expression as mRNA. Biochemically, we disclosed that in CWM extracts and myelin from both subjects, PSA-NCAM accumulates, N-CAM 180 considerably increases, N-CAM 140 is modestly modified and N-CAM 120 remarkably decreases; duplication of genes encoding N-CAM, STX and PST was not revealed, whereas PST mRNA was clearly increased. Immunohistochemically, in CWM of both subjects, we found an unusually diffuse accumulation of PSA-NCAM without inflammation markers. PSA-NCAM persistence, up-regulated PST mRNA and previously uncovered defective L-MAG may be early pathogenetic events in this ADLD form.

  20. Characterization of traumatic brain injury in human brains reveals distinct cellular and molecular changes in contusion and pericontusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Gangadharappa; Mahadevan, Anita; Pruthi, Nupur; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi K; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Shankar, Susarla Krishna; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to fatalities and neurological disabilities worldwide. While primary injury causes immediate damage, secondary events contribute to long-term neurological defects. Contusions (Ct) are primary injuries correlated with poor clinical prognosis, and can expand leading to delayed neurological deterioration. Pericontusion (PC) (penumbra), the region surrounding Ct, can also expand with edema, increased intracranial pressure, ischemia, and poor clinical outcome. Analysis of Ct and PC can therefore assist in understanding the pathobiology of TBI and its management. This study on human TBI brains noted extensive neuronal, astroglial and inflammatory changes, alterations in mitochondrial, synaptic and oxidative markers, and associated proteomic profile, with distinct differences in Ct and PC. While Ct displayed petechial hemorrhages, thrombosis, inflammation, neuronal pyknosis, and astrogliosis, PC revealed edema, vacuolation of neuropil, axonal loss, and dystrophic changes. Proteomic analysis demonstrated altered immune response, synaptic, and mitochondrial dysfunction, among others, in Ct, while PC displayed altered regulation of neurogenesis and cytoskeletal architecture, among others. TBI brains displayed oxidative damage, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction, and loss of synaptic proteins, with these changes being more profound in Ct. We suggest that analysis of markers specific to Ct and PC may be valuable in the evaluation of TBI pathobiology and therapeutics. We have characterized the primary injury in human traumatic brain injury (TBI). Contusions (Ct) - the injury core displayed hemorrhages, inflammation, and astrogliosis, while the surrounding pericontusion (PC) revealed edema, vacuolation, microglial activation, axonal loss, and dystrophy. Proteomic analysis demonstrated altered immune response, synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in Ct, and altered regulation of neurogenesis and cytoskeletal architecture in

  1. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  2. From Amazonia to the Atlantic forest: molecular phylogeny of Phyzelaphryninae frogs reveals unexpected diversity and a striking biogeographic pattern emphasizing conservation challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Antoine; Loebmann, Daniel; Castroviejo-Fisher, Santiago; Padial, José M; Orrico, Victor G D; Lyra, Mariana L; Roberto, Igor Joventino; Kok, Philippe J R; Haddad, Célio F B; Rodrigues, Miguel T

    2012-11-01

    Documenting the Neotropical amphibian diversity has become a major challenge facing the threat of global climate change and the pace of environmental alteration. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies have revealed that the actual number of species in South American tropical forests is largely underestimated, but also that many lineages are millions of years old. The genera Phyzelaphryne (1 sp.) and Adelophryne (6 spp.), which compose the subfamily Phyzelaphryninae, include poorly documented, secretive, and minute frogs with an unusual distribution pattern that encompasses the biotic disjunction between Amazonia and the Atlantic forest. We generated >5.8 kb sequence data from six markers for all seven nominal species of the subfamily as well as for newly discovered populations in order to (1) test the monophyly of Phyzelaphryninae, Adelophryne and Phyzelaphryne, (2) estimate species diversity within the subfamily, and (3) investigate their historical biogeography and diversification. Phylogenetic reconstruction confirmed the monophyly of each group and revealed deep subdivisions within Adelophryne and Phyzelaphryne, with three major clades in Adelophryne located in northern Amazonia, northern Atlantic forest and southern Atlantic forest. Our results suggest that the actual number of species in Phyzelaphryninae is, at least, twice the currently recognized species diversity, with almost every geographically isolated population representing an anciently divergent candidate species. Such results highlight the challenges for conservation, especially in the northern Atlantic forest where it is still degraded at a fast pace. Molecular dating revealed that Phyzelaphryninae originated in Amazonia and dispersed during early Miocene to the Atlantic forest. The two Atlantic forest clades of Adelophryne started to diversify some 7 Ma minimum, while the northern Amazonian Adelophryne diversified much earlier, some 13 Ma minimum. This striking biogeographic pattern coincides with

  3. Whole-brain activity maps reveal stereotyped, distributed networks for visuomotor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugues, Ruben; Feierstein, Claudia E; Engert, Florian; Orger, Michael B

    2014-03-19

    Most behaviors, even simple innate reflexes, are mediated by circuits of neurons spanning areas throughout the brain. However, in most cases, the distribution and dynamics of firing patterns of these neurons during behavior are not known. We imaged activity, with cellular resolution, throughout the whole brains of zebrafish performing the optokinetic response. We found a sparse, broadly distributed network that has an elaborate but ordered pattern, with a bilaterally symmetrical organization. Activity patterns fell into distinct clusters reflecting sensory and motor processing. By correlating neuronal responses with an array of sensory and motor variables, we find that the network can be clearly divided into distinct functional modules. Comparing aligned data from multiple fish, we find that the spatiotemporal activity dynamics and functional organization are highly stereotyped across individuals. These experiments systematically reveal the functional architecture of neural circuits underlying a sensorimotor behavior in a vertebrate brain.

  4. Metabolomics reveals metabolic alterations by intrauterine growth restriction in the fetal rabbit brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin van Vliet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5-10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40-50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR. CONCLUSIONS: IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino

  5. Metabolomics Reveals Metabolic Alterations by Intrauterine Growth Restriction in the Fetal Rabbit Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Erwin; Eixarch, Elisenda; Illa, Miriam; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; González-Tendero, Anna; Hogberg, Helena T.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas; Gratacos, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5–10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development. Methodology/Principal Findings At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40–50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR. Conclusions IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino acid levels, fatty

  6. Whole-brain circuit dissection in free-moving animals reveals cell-specific mesocorticolimbic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, Michael; Anderson, Sarah Ann R.; Ananth, Mala; Smirnov, Denis; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Neumaier, John F.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to map the functional connectivity of discrete cell types in the intact mammalian brain during behavior is crucial for advancing our understanding of brain function in normal and disease states. We combined designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug (DREADD) technology and behavioral imaging with μPET and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to generate whole-brain metabolic maps of cell-specific functional circuits during the awake, freely moving state. We have termed this approach DREADD-assisted metabolic mapping (DREAMM) and documented its ability in rats to map whole-brain functional anatomy. We applied this strategy to evaluating changes in the brain associated with inhibition of prodynorphin-expressing (Pdyn-expressing) and of proenkephalin-expressing (Penk-expressing) medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh), which have been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. DREAMM revealed discrete behavioral manifestations and concurrent engagement of distinct corticolimbic networks associated with dysregulation of Pdyn and Penk in MSNs of the NAcSh. Furthermore, distinct neuronal networks were recruited in awake versus anesthetized conditions. These data demonstrate that DREAMM is a highly sensitive, molecular, high-resolution quantitative imaging approach. PMID:24231358

  7. Interspecies activity correlations reveal functional correspondence between monkey and human brain areas.

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    Mantini, Dante; Hasson, Uri; Betti, Viviana; Perrucci, Mauro G; Romani, Gian Luca; Corbetta, Maurizio; Orban, Guy A; Vanduffel, Wim

    2012-02-05

    Evolution-driven functional changes in the primate brain are typically assessed by aligning monkey and human activation maps using cortical surface expansion models. These models use putative homologous areas as registration landmarks, assuming they are functionally correspondent. For cases in which functional changes have occurred in an area, this assumption prohibits to reveal whether other areas may have assumed lost functions. Here we describe a method to examine functional correspondences across species. Without making spatial assumptions, we assessed similarities in sensory-driven functional magnetic resonance imaging responses between monkey (Macaca mulatta) and human brain areas by temporal correlation. Using natural vision data, we revealed regions for which functional processing has shifted to topologically divergent locations during evolution. We conclude that substantial evolution-driven functional reorganizations have occurred, not always consistent with cortical expansion processes. This framework for evaluating changes in functional architecture is crucial to building more accurate evolutionary models.

  8. Severe Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Small Pericardial Effusion, and Diffuse Late Gadolinium Enhancement by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Suspecting Cardiac Amyloidosis: Endomyocardial Biopsy Reveals an Unexpected Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P. Hofmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular (LV hypertrophy can be related to a multitude of cardiac disorders, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, cardiac amyloidosis, and hypertensive heart disease. Although the presence of LV hypertrophy is generally associated with poorer cardiac outcomes, the early differentiation between these pathologies is crucial due to the presence of specific treatment options. The diagnostic process with LV hypertrophy requires the integration of clinical evaluation, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography, biochemical markers, and if required CMR and endomyocardial biopsy in order to reach the correct diagnosis. Here, we present a case of a patient with severe LV hypertrophy (septal wall thickness of 23 mm, LV mass of 264 g, and LV mass index of 147 g/m2, severely impaired longitudinal function, and preserved radial contractility (ejection fraction = 55%, accompanied by small pericardial effusion and diffuse late gadolinium enhancement (LGE by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR. Due to the imaging findings, an infiltrative cardiomyopathy, such as cardiac amyloidosis, was suspected. However, amyloid accumulation was excluded by endomyocardial biopsy, which revealed the presence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in an advanced hypertensive heart disease.

  9. Evans blue staining reveals vascular leakage associated with focal areas of host-parasite interaction in brains of pigs infected with Taenia solium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzal, Miguel; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Paredes, Adriana; Cangalaya, Carla; Rivera, Andrea; Gonzalez, Armando E; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Garcia, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E

    2014-01-01

    Cysticidal drug treatment of viable Taenia solium brain parenchymal cysts leads to an acute pericystic host inflammatory response and blood brain barrier breakdown (BBB), commonly resulting in seizures. Naturally infected pigs, untreated or treated one time with praziquantel were sacrificed at 48 hr and 120 hr following the injection of Evans blue (EB) to assess the effect of treatment on larval parasites and surrounding tissue. Examination of harvested non encapsulated muscle cysts unexpectedly revealed one or more small, focal round region(s) of Evans blue dye infiltration (REBI) on the surface of otherwise non dye-stained muscle cysts. Histopathological analysis of REBI revealed focal areas of eosinophil-rich inflammatory infiltrates that migrated from the capsule into the tegument and internal structures of the parasite. In addition some encapsulated brain cysts, in which the presence of REBI could not be directly assessed, showed histopathology identical to that of the REBI. Muscle cysts with REBI were more frequent in pigs that had received praziquantel (6.6% of 3736 cysts; n = 6 pigs) than in those that were untreated (0.2% of 3172 cysts; n = 2 pigs). Similar results were found in the brain, where 20.7% of 29 cysts showed histopathology identical to muscle REBI cysts in praziquantel-treated pigs compared to the 4.3% of 47 cysts in untreated pigs. Closer examination of REBI infiltrates showed that EB was taken up only by eosinophils, a major component of the cellular infiltrates, which likely explains persistence of EB in the REBI. REBI likely represent early damaging host responses to T. solium cysts and highlight the focal nature of this initial host response and the importance of eosinophils at sites of host-parasite interaction. These findings suggest new avenues for immunomodulation to reduce inflammatory side effects of anthelmintic therapy.

  10. Complex within a Complex: Integrative Taxonomy Reveals Hidden Diversity in Cicadetta brevipennis (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) and Unexpected Relationships with a Song Divergent Relative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertach, Thomas; Puissant, Stéphane; Gogala, Matija; Trilar, Tomi; Hagmann, Reto; Baur, Hannes; Kunz, Gernot; Wade, Elizabeth J.; Loader, Simon P.; Simon, Chris; Nagel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sources of data in combination are essential for species delimitation and classification of difficult taxonomic groups. Here we investigate a cicada taxon with unusual cryptic diversity and we attempt to resolve seemingly contradictory data sets. Cicada songs act as species-specific premating barriers and have been used extensively to reveal hidden taxonomic diversity in morphologically similar species. The Palaearctic Cicadetta montana species complex is an excellent example where distinct song patterns have disclosed multiple recently described species. Indeed, two taxa turned out to be especially diverse in that they form a “complex within the complex”: the Cicadetta cerdaniensis song group (four species studied previously) and Cicadetta brevipennis (examined in details here). Based on acoustic, morphological, molecular, ecological and spatial data sampled throughout their broad European distribution, we find that Cicadetta brevipennis s. l. comprises five lineages. The most distinct lineage is identified as Cicadetta petryi Schumacher, 1924, which we re-assign to the species level. Cicadetta brevipennis litoralis Puissant & Hertach ssp. n. and Cicadetta brevipennis hippolaidica Hertach ssp. n. are new to science. The latter hybridizes with Cicadetta brevipennis brevipennis Fieber, 1876 at a zone inferred from intermediate song patterns. The fifth lineage requires additional investigation. The C. cerdaniensis and the C. brevipennis song groups exhibit characteristic, clearly distinct basic song patterns that act as reproductive barriers. However, they remain completely intermixed in the Bayesian and maximum likelihood COI and COII mitochondrial DNA phylogenies. The closest relative of each of the four cerdaniensis group species is a brevipennis group taxon. In our favoured scenario the phylogenetic pairs originated in common Pleistocene glacial refuges where the taxa speciated and experienced sporadic inter-group hybridization leading to extensive

  11. Revealing time-unlocked brain activity from MEG measurements by common waveform estimation.

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    Yusuke Takeda

    Full Text Available Brain activities related to cognitive functions, such as attention, occur with unknown and variable delays after stimulus onsets. Recently, we proposed a method (Common Waveform Estimation, CWE that could extract such brain activities from magnetoencephalography (MEG or electroencephalography (EEG measurements. CWE estimates spatiotemporal MEG/EEG patterns occurring with unknown and variable delays, referred to here as unlocked waveforms, without hypotheses about their shapes. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the usefulness of CWE for cognitive neuroscience. For this purpose, we show procedures to estimate unlocked waveforms using CWE and to examine their role. We applied CWE to the MEG epochs during Go trials of a visual Go/NoGo task. This revealed unlocked waveforms with interesting properties, specifically large alpha oscillations around the temporal areas. To examine the role of the unlocked waveform, we attempted to estimate the strength of the brain activity of the unlocked waveform in various conditions. We made a spatial filter to extract the component reflecting the brain activity of the unlocked waveform, applied this spatial filter to MEG data under different conditions (a passive viewing, a simple reaction time, and Go/NoGo tasks, and calculated the powers of the extracted components. Comparing the powers across these conditions suggests that the unlocked waveforms may reflect the inhibition of the task-irrelevant activities in the temporal regions while the subject attends to the visual stimulus. Our results demonstrate that CWE is a potential tool for revealing new findings of cognitive brain functions without any hypothesis in advance.

  12. Revealing pathologies in the liquid crystalline structures of the brain by polarimetric studies (Presentation Recording)

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    Bakhshetyan, Karen; Melkonyan, Gurgen G.; Galstian, Tigran V.; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2015-10-01

    Natural or "self" alignment of molecular complexes in living tissue represents many similarities with liquid crystals (LC), which are anisotropic liquids. The orientational characteristics of those complexes may be related to many important functional parameters and their study may reveal important pathologies. The know-how, accumulated thanks to the study of LC materials, may thus be used to this end. One of the traditionally used methods, to characterize those materials, is the polarized light imaging (PLI) that allows for label-free analysis of anisotropic structures in the brain tissue and can be used, for example, for the analysis of myelinated fiber bundles. In the current work, we first attempted to apply the PLI on the mouse histological brain sections to create a map of anisotropic structures using cross-polarizer transmission light. Then we implemented the PLI for comparative study of histological sections of human postmortem brain samples under normal and pathological conditions, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Imaging the coronal, sagittal and horizontal sections of mouse brain allowed us to create a false color-coded fiber orientation map under polarized light. In human brain datasets for both control and PD groups we measured the pixel intensities in myelin-rich subregions of internal capsule and normalized these to non-myelinated background signal from putamen and caudate nucleus. Quantification of intensities revealed a statistically significant reduction of fiber intensity of PD compared to control subjects (2.801 +/- 0.303 and 3.724 +/- 0.07 respectively; *p < 0.05). Our study confirms the validity of PLI method for visualizing myelinated axonal fibers. This relatively simple technique can become a promising tool for study of neurodegenerative diseases where labeling-free imaging is an important benefit.

  13. Traumatic brain injury reveals novel cell lineage relationships within the subventricular zone

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    Gretchen M. Thomsen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The acute response of the rodent subventricular zone (SVZ to traumatic brain injury (TBI involves a physical expansion through increased cell proliferation. However, the cellular underpinnings of these changes are not well understood. Our analyses have revealed that there are two distinct transit-amplifying cell populations that respond in opposite ways to injury. Mash1+ transit-amplifying cells are the primary SVZ cell type that is stimulated to divide following TBI. In contrast, the EGFR+ population, which has been considered to be a functionally equivalent progenitor population to Mash1+ cells in the uninjured brain, becomes significantly less proliferative after injury. Although normally quiescent GFAP+ stem cells are stimulated to divide in SVZ ablation models, we found that the GFAP+ stem cells do not divide more after TBI. We found, instead, that TBI results in increased numbers of GFAP+/EGFR+ stem cells via non-proliferative means—potentially through the dedifferentiation of progenitor cells. EGFR+ progenitors from injured brains only were competent to revert to a stem cell state following brief exposure to growth factors. Thus, our results demonstrate previously unknown changes in lineage relationships that differ from conventional models and likely reflect an adaptive response of the SVZ to maintain endogenous brain repair after TBI.

  14. Computerized three-dimensional reconstruction reveals cerebrovascular regulatory subregions in rat brain stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, M D; Arango, V; Smith, R W; Bakalian, M J; Mann, J J

    1993-09-01

    Three-dimensional wireframe reconstructions were used to examine the relationship between the anatomical localization of electrode sites and the cerebrovascular response which was elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Reconstructions of the rat brain and DRN were done from atlas plates and from Nissl-stained coronal sections (100-micron increments). Data points were entered and three-dimensional reconstructions were performed using commercially available software and a personal computer. Display of the entire brain yielded views which obscured visualization of the DRN. The data file was edited to reduce the number of contours without affecting the display resolution of the DRN. Selective display of the DRN and electronic rotation from the coronal to a sagittal view revealed a functional organization of the cerebral blood flow responses which was not apparent in two-dimensional coronal sections.

  15. Insights into the metabolic response to traumatic brain injury as revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

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    Brenda eBartnik-Olson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review highlights critical issues related to cerebral metabolism following traumatic brain injury (TBI and the use of 13C labeled substrates and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy to study these changes. First we address some pathophysiologic factors contributing to metabolic dysfunction following TBI. We then examine how 13C NMR spectroscopy strategies have been used to investigate energy metabolism, neurotransmission, the intracellular redox state, and neuroglial compartmentation following injury. 13C NMR spectroscopy studies of brain extracts from animal models of TBI have revealed enhanced glycolytic production of lactate, evidence of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP activation, and alterations in neuronal and astrocyte oxidative metabolism that are dependent on injury severity. Differential incorporation of label into glutamate and glutamine from 13C labeled glucose or acetate also suggest TBI-induced adaptations to the glutamate-glutamine cycle.

  16. BRAIN DYSFUNCTION OF PATIENTS WITH QIGONG INDUCED MENTAL DISORDER REVEALED BY EVOKED POTENTIALS RECORDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yingzhi; ZONG Wenbin; CHEN Xingshi

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In order to investigate the brain function of patients with Qigong induced mental disorder (QIMD), this study was carried out. Methods: Four kinds of evoked potentials, including contingent negative variation (CNV), auditory evoked potentials (AEP), visual evoked potentials (VEP), and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP), were recorded from 12 patients with Qigong induced mental disorder.Comparison of their evoked potentials with the data from some normal controls was made. Results: The results revealed that there were 3 kinds of abnormal changes in evoked potentials of patients with QIMD that is latency prolongation, amplitude increase and amplitude decrease, as compared with normal controls. Conclusion: Brain dysfunction of patients with QIMD was confirmed. Its biological mechanism needs further studying.

  17. Intact-Brain Analyses Reveal Distinct Information Carried by SNc Dopamine Subcircuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Talia N; Shilyansky, Carrie; Davidson, Thomas J; Evans, Kathryn E; Beier, Kevin T; Zalocusky, Kelly A; Crow, Ailey K; Malenka, Robert C; Luo, Liqun; Tomer, Raju; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-07-30

    Recent progress in understanding the diversity of midbrain dopamine neurons has highlighted the importance--and the challenges--of defining mammalian neuronal cell types. Although neurons may be best categorized using inclusive criteria spanning biophysical properties, wiring of inputs, wiring of outputs, and activity during behavior, linking all of these measurements to cell types within the intact brains of living mammals has been difficult. Here, using an array of intact-brain circuit interrogation tools, including CLARITY, COLM, optogenetics, viral tracing, and fiber photometry, we explore the diversity of dopamine neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). We identify two parallel nigrostriatal dopamine neuron subpopulations differing in biophysical properties, input wiring, output wiring to dorsomedial striatum (DMS) versus dorsolateral striatum (DLS), and natural activity patterns during free behavior. Our results reveal independently operating nigrostriatal information streams, with implications for understanding the logic of dopaminergic feedback circuits and the diversity of mammalian neuronal cell types.

  18. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain

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    Godin, Antoine G.; Varela, Juan A.; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P.; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  19. Gene set based integrated data analysis reveals phenotypic differences in a brain cancer model.

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    Kjell Petersen

    Full Text Available A key challenge in the data analysis of biological high-throughput experiments is to handle the often low number of samples in the experiments compared to the number of biomolecules that are simultaneously measured. Combining experimental data using independent technologies to illuminate the same biological trends, as well as complementing each other in a larger perspective, is one natural way to overcome this challenge. In this work we investigated if integrating proteomics and transcriptomics data from a brain cancer animal model using gene set based analysis methodology, could enhance the biological interpretation of the data relative to more traditional analysis of the two datasets individually. The brain cancer model used is based on serial passaging of transplanted human brain tumor material (glioblastoma--GBM through several generations in rats. These serial transplantations lead over time to genotypic and phenotypic changes in the tumors and represent a medically relevant model with a rare access to samples and where consequent analyses of individual datasets have revealed relatively few significant findings on their own. We found that the integrated analysis both performed better in terms of significance measure of its findings compared to individual analyses, as well as providing independent verification of the individual results. Thus a better context for overall biological interpretation of the data can be achieved.

  20. Neural correlates of apathy revealed by lesion mapping in participants with traumatic brain injuries.

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    Knutson, Kristine M; Monte, Olga Dal; Raymont, Vanessa; Wassermann, Eric M; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-03-01

    Apathy, common in neurological disorders, is defined as disinterest and loss of motivation, with a reduction in self-initiated activity. Research in diseased populations has shown that apathy is associated with variations in the volume of brain regions such as the anterior cingulate and the frontal lobes. The goal of this study was to determine the neural signatures of apathy in people with penetrating traumatic brain injuries (pTBIs), as to our knowledge, these have not been studied in this sample. We studied 176 male Vietnam War veterans with pTBIs using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) and apathy scores from the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), a structured inventory of symptoms completed by a caregiver. Our results revealed that increased apathy symptoms were associated with brain damage in limbic and cortical areas of the left hemisphere including the anterior cingulate, inferior, middle, and superior frontal regions, insula, and supplementary motor area. Our results are consistent with the literature, and extend them to people with focal pTBI. Apathy is a significant symptom since it can reduce participation of the patient in family and other social interactions, and diminish affective decision-making.

  1. Laterality of brain areas associated with arithmetic calculations revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yun-ting; ZHANG Quan; ZHANG Jing; LI Wei

    2005-01-01

    Background Asymmetry of bilateral cerebral function, i.e. laterality, is an important phenomenon in many brain actions: arithmetic calculation may be one of these phenomena. In this study, first, laterality of brain areas associated with arithmetic calculations was revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Second, the relationship among laterality, handedness, and types of arithmetic task was assessed. Third, we postulate possible reasons for laterality.Methods Using a block-designed experiment, twenty-five right-handed and seven left-handed healthy volunteers carried out simple calculations, complex calculations and proximity judgments. T1WI and GRE-EPI fMRI were performed with a GE 1.5T whole body MRI scanner. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) was used to process data and localize functional areas. Numbers of activated voxels were recorded to calculate laterality index for evaluating the laterality of functional brain areas.Results For both groups, the activation of functional areas in the frontal lobe showed a tendency towards the nonpredominant hand side, but the functional areas in the inferior parietal lobule had left laterality. During simple and complex calculations, the laterality indices of the prefrontal cortex and premotor area were higher in the right-handed group than that in the left-handed group, whereas the laterality of the inferior parietal lobule had no such significant difference. In both groups, when the difficulty of the task increased, the laterality of the prefrontal cortex, premotor area, and inferior parietal lobule decreased, but the laterality of posterior part of the inferior frontal gyrus increased.Conclusions The laterality of the functional brain areas associated with arithmetic calculations can be detected with fMRI. The laterality of the functional areas was related to handedness and task difficulty.

  2. Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA) Reveals Context Related Influence of Brain Network Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Yael; Winetraub, Yonatan; Raz, Gal; Ben-Simon, Eti; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Rosenberg-Katz, Keren; Hendler, Talma; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2016-01-01

    Communication between and within brain regions is essential for information processing within functional networks. The current methods to determine the influence of one region on another are either based on temporal resolution, or require a predefined model for the connectivity direction. However these requirements are not always achieved, especially in fMRI studies, which have poor temporal resolution. We thus propose a new graph theory approach that focuses on the correlation influence between selected brain regions, entitled Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA). Partial correlations are used to quantify the level of influence of each node during task performance. As a proof of concept, we conducted the DEPNA on simulated datasets and on two empirical motor and working memory fMRI tasks. The simulations revealed that the DEPNA correctly captures the network’s hierarchy of influence. Applying DEPNA to the functional tasks reveals the dynamics between specific nodes as would be expected from prior knowledge. To conclude, we demonstrate that DEPNA can capture the most influencing nodes in the network, as they emerge during specific cognitive processes. This ability opens a new horizon for example in delineating critical nodes for specific clinical interventions. PMID:27271458

  3. Theory of mind for processing unexpected events across contexts.

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    Dungan, James A; Stepanovic, Michael; Young, Liane

    2016-08-01

    Theory of mind, or mental state reasoning, may be particularly useful for making sense of unexpected events. Here, we investigated unexpected behavior across both social and non-social contexts in order to characterize the precise role of theory of mind in processing unexpected events. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine how people respond to unexpected outcomes when initial expectations were based on (i) an object's prior behavior, (ii) an agent's prior behavior and (iii) an agent's mental states. Consistent with prior work, brain regions for theory of mind were preferentially recruited when people first formed expectations about social agents vs non-social objects. Critically, unexpected vs expected outcomes elicited greater activity in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, which also discriminated in its spatial pattern of activity between unexpected and expected outcomes for social events. In contrast, social vs non-social events elicited greater activity in precuneus across both expected and unexpected outcomes. Finally, given prior information about an agent's behavior, unexpected vs expected outcomes elicited an especially robust response in right temporoparietal junction, and the magnitude of this difference across participants correlated negatively with autistic-like traits. Together, these findings illuminate the distinct contributions of brain regions for theory of mind for processing unexpected events across contexts.

  4. Artificial selection on relative brain size in the guppy reveals costs and benefits of evolving a larger brain.

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    Kotrschal, Alexander; Rogell, Björn; Bundsen, Andreas; Svensson, Beatrice; Zajitschek, Susanne; Brännström, Ioana; Immler, Simone; Maklakov, Alexei A; Kolm, Niclas

    2013-01-21

    The large variation in brain size that exists in the animal kingdom has been suggested to have evolved through the balance between selective advantages of greater cognitive ability and the prohibitively high energy demands of a larger brain (the "expensive-tissue hypothesis"). Despite over a century of research on the evolution of brain size, empirical support for the trade-off between cognitive ability and energetic costs is based exclusively on correlative evidence, and the theory remains controversial. Here we provide experimental evidence for costs and benefits of increased brain size. We used artificial selection for large and small brain size relative to body size in a live-bearing fish, the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), and found that relative brain size evolved rapidly in response to divergent selection in both sexes. Large-brained females outperformed small-brained females in a numerical learning assay designed to test cognitive ability. Moreover, large-brained lines, especially males, developed smaller guts, as predicted by the expensive-tissue hypothesis, and produced fewer offspring. We propose that the evolution of brain size is mediated by a functional trade-off between increased cognitive ability and reproductive performance and discuss the implications of these findings for vertebrate brain evolution.

  5. K-shell decomposition reveals hierarchical cortical organization of the human brain

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    Lahav, Nir; Ksherim, Baruch; Ben-Simon, Eti; Maron-Katz, Adi; Cohen, Reuven; Havlin, Shlomo

    2016-08-01

    In recent years numerous attempts to understand the human brain were undertaken from a network point of view. A network framework takes into account the relationships between the different parts of the system and enables to examine how global and complex functions might emerge from network topology. Previous work revealed that the human brain features ‘small world’ characteristics and that cortical hubs tend to interconnect among themselves. However, in order to fully understand the topological structure of hubs, and how their profile reflect the brain’s global functional organization, one needs to go beyond the properties of a specific hub and examine the various structural layers that make up the network. To address this topic further, we applied an analysis known in statistical physics and network theory as k-shell decomposition analysis. The analysis was applied on a human cortical network, derived from MRI\\DSI data of six participants. Such analysis enables us to portray a detailed account of cortical connectivity focusing on different neighborhoods of inter-connected layers across the cortex. Our findings reveal that the human cortex is highly connected and efficient, and unlike the internet network contains no isolated nodes. The cortical network is comprised of a nucleus alongside shells of increasing connectivity that formed one connected giant component, revealing the human brain’s global functional organization. All these components were further categorized into three hierarchies in accordance with their connectivity profile, with each hierarchy reflecting different functional roles. Such a model may explain an efficient flow of information from the lowest hierarchy to the highest one, with each step enabling increased data integration. At the top, the highest hierarchy (the nucleus) serves as a global interconnected collective and demonstrates high correlation with consciousness related regions, suggesting that the nucleus might serve as a

  6. RNA Sequence Analysis of Human Huntington Disease Brain Reveals an Extensive Increase in Inflammatory and Developmental Gene Expression.

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    Adam Labadorf

    Full Text Available Huntington's Disease (HD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT gene. Transcriptional dysregulation in the human HD brain has been documented but is incompletely understood. Here we present a genome-wide analysis of mRNA expression in human prefrontal cortex from 20 HD and 49 neuropathologically normal controls using next generation high-throughput sequencing. Surprisingly, 19% (5,480 of the 28,087 confidently detected genes are differentially expressed (FDR<0.05 and are predominantly up-regulated. A novel hypothesis-free geneset enrichment method that dissects large gene lists into functionally and transcriptionally related groups discovers that the differentially expressed genes are enriched for immune response, neuroinflammation, and developmental genes. Markers for all major brain cell types are observed, suggesting that HD invokes a systemic response in the brain area studied. Unexpectedly, the most strongly differentially expressed genes are a homeotic gene set (represented by Hox and other homeobox genes, that are almost exclusively expressed in HD, a profile not widely implicated in HD pathogenesis. The significance of transcriptional changes of developmental processes in the HD brain is poorly understood and warrants further investigation. The role of inflammation and the significance of non-neuronal involvement in HD pathogenesis suggest anti-inflammatory therapeutics may offer important opportunities in treating HD.

  7. Transcriptomic analyses reveal novel genes with sexually dimorphic expression in the zebrafish gonad and brain.

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    Rajini Sreenivasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our knowledge on zebrafish reproduction is very limited. We generated a gonad-derived cDNA microarray from zebrafish and used it to analyze large-scale gene expression profiles in adult gonads and other organs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified 116638 gonad-derived zebrafish expressed sequence tags (ESTs, 21% of which were isolated in our lab. Following in silico normalization, we constructed a gonad-derived microarray comprising 6370 unique, full-length cDNAs from differentiating and adult gonads. Labeled targets from adult gonad, brain, kidney and 'rest-of-body' from both sexes were hybridized onto the microarray. Our analyses revealed 1366, 881 and 656 differentially expressed transcripts (34.7% novel that showed highest expression in ovary, testis and both gonads respectively. Hierarchical clustering showed correlation of the two gonadal transcriptomes and their similarities to those of the brains. In addition, we have identified 276 genes showing sexually dimorphic expression both between the brains and between the gonads. By in situ hybridization, we showed that the gonadal transcripts with the strongest array signal intensities were germline-expressed. We found that five members of the GTP-binding septin gene family, from which only one member (septin 4 has previously been implicated in reproduction in mice, were all strongly expressed in the gonads. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have generated a gonad-derived zebrafish cDNA microarray and demonstrated its usefulness in identifying genes with sexually dimorphic co-expression in both the gonads and the brains. We have also provided the first evidence of large-scale differential gene expression between female and male brains of a teleost. Our microarray would be useful for studying gonad development, differentiation and function not only in zebrafish but also in related teleosts via cross-species hybridizations. Since several genes have been shown to play similar

  8. Artificial selection on relative brain size reveals a positive genetic correlation between brain size and proactive personality in the guppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Lievens, Eva J P; Dahlbom, Josefin; Bundsen, Andreas; Semenova, Svetlana; Sundvik, Maria; Maklakov, Alexei A; Winberg, Svante; Panula, Pertti; Kolm, Niclas

    2014-04-01

    Animal personalities range from individuals that are shy, cautious, and easily stressed (a "reactive" personality type) to individuals that are bold, innovative, and quick to learn novel tasks, but also prone to routine formation (a "proactive" personality type). Although personality differences should have important consequences for fitness, their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated how genetic variation in brain size affects personality. We put selection lines of large- and small-brained guppies (Poecilia reticulata), with known differences in cognitive ability, through three standard personality assays. First, we found that large-brained animals were faster to habituate to, and more exploratory in, open field tests. Large-brained females were also bolder. Second, large-brained animals excreted less cortisol in a stressful situation (confinement). Third, large-brained animals were slower to feed from a novel food source, which we interpret as being caused by reduced behavioral flexibility rather than lack of innovation in the large-brained lines. Overall, the results point toward a more proactive personality type in large-brained animals. Thus, this study provides the first experimental evidence linking brain size and personality, an interaction that may affect important fitness-related aspects of ecology such as dispersal and niche exploration.

  9. Electrical brain responses in language-impaired children reveal grammar-specific deficits.

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    Elisabeth Fonteneau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scientific and public fascination with human language have included intensive scrutiny of language disorders as a new window onto the biological foundations of language and its evolutionary origins. Specific language impairment (SLI, which affects over 7% of children, is one such disorder. SLI has received robust scientific attention, in part because of its recent linkage to a specific gene and loci on chromosomes and in part because of the prevailing question regarding the scope of its language impairment: Does the disorder impact the general ability to segment and process language or a specific ability to compute grammar? Here we provide novel electrophysiological data showing a domain-specific deficit within the grammar of language that has been hitherto undetectable through behavioural data alone. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We presented participants with Grammatical(G-SLI, age-matched controls, and younger child and adult controls, with questions containing syntactic violations and sentences containing semantic violations. Electrophysiological brain responses revealed a selective impairment to only neural circuitry that is specific to grammatical processing in G-SLI. Furthermore, the participants with G-SLI appeared to be partially compensating for their syntactic deficit by using neural circuitry associated with semantic processing and all non-grammar-specific and low-level auditory neural responses were normal. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that grammatical neural circuitry underlying language is a developmentally unique system in the functional architecture of the brain, and this complex higher cognitive system can be selectively impaired. The findings advance fundamental understanding about how cognitive systems develop and all human language is represented and processed in the brain.

  10. Pain facilitation brain regions activated by nalbuphine are revealed by pharmacological fMRI.

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    Robert Gear

    Full Text Available Nalbuphine, an agonist-antagonist kappa-opioid, produces brief analgesia followed by enhanced pain/hyperalgesia in male postsurgical patients. However, it produces profound analgesia without pain enhancement when co-administration with low dose naloxone. To examine the effect of nalbuphine or nalbuphine plus naloxone on activity in brain regions that may explain these differences, we employed pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI in a double blind cross-over study with 13 healthy male volunteers. In separate imaging sessions subjects were administered nalbuphine (5 mg/70 kg preceded by either saline (Sal-Nalb or naloxone 0.4 mg (Nalox-Nalb. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD activation maps followed by contrast and connectivity analyses revealed marked differences. Sal-Nalb produced significantly increased activity in 60 brain regions and decreased activity in 9; in contrast, Nalox-Nalb activated only 14 regions and deactivated only 3. Nalbuphine, like morphine in a previous study, attenuated activity in the inferior orbital cortex, and, like noxious stimulation, increased activity in temporal cortex, insula, pulvinar, caudate, and pons. Co-administration/pretreatment of naloxone selectively blocked activity in pulvinar, pons and posterior insula. Nalbuphine induced functional connectivity between caudate and regions in the frontal, occipital, temporal, insular, middle cingulate cortices, and putamen; naloxone co-admistration reduced all connectivity to non-significant levels, and, like phMRI measures of morphine, increased activation in other areas (e.g., putamen. Naloxone pretreatment to nalbuphine produced changes in brain activity possess characteristics of both analgesia and algesia; naloxone selectively blocks activity in areas associated with algesia. Given these findings, we suggest that nalbuphine interacts with a pain salience system, which can modulate perceived pain intensity.

  11. Lost for emotion words: what motor and limbic brain activity reveals about autism and semantic theory.

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    Moseley, Rachel L; Shtyrov, Yury; Mohr, Bettina; Lombardo, Michael V; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are characterised by deficits in understanding and expressing emotions and are frequently accompanied by alexithymia, a difficulty in understanding and expressing emotion words. Words are differentially represented in the brain according to their semantic category and these difficulties in ASC predict reduced activation to emotion-related words in limbic structures crucial for affective processing. Semantic theories view 'emotion actions' as critical for learning the semantic relationship between a word and the emotion it describes, such that emotion words typically activate the cortical motor systems involved in expressing emotion actions such as facial expressions. As ASC are also characterised by motor deficits and atypical brain structure and function in these regions, motor structures would also be expected to show reduced activation during emotion-semantic processing. Here we used event-related fMRI to compare passive processing of emotion words in comparison to abstract verbs and animal names in typically-developing controls and individuals with ASC. Relatively reduced brain activation in ASC for emotion words, but not matched control words, was found in motor areas and cingulate cortex specifically. The degree of activation evoked by emotion words in the motor system was also associated with the extent of autistic traits as revealed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient. We suggest that hypoactivation of motor and limbic regions for emotion word processing may underlie difficulties in processing emotional language in ASC. The role that sensorimotor systems and their connections might play in the affective and social-communication difficulties in ASC is discussed.

  12. Diversity of sharp-wave-ripple LFP signatures reveals differentiated brain-wide dynamical events.

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    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F; Logothetis, Nikos K; Besserve, Michel

    2015-11-17

    Sharp-wave-ripple (SPW-R) complexes are believed to mediate memory reactivation, transfer, and consolidation. However, their underlying neuronal dynamics at multiple scales remains poorly understood. Using concurrent hippocampal local field potential (LFP) recordings and functional MRI (fMRI), we study local changes in neuronal activity during SPW-R episodes and their brain-wide correlates. Analysis of the temporal alignment between SPW and ripple components reveals well-differentiated SPW-R subtypes in the CA1 LFP. SPW-R-triggered fMRI maps show that ripples aligned to the positive peak of their SPWs have enhanced neocortical metabolic up-regulation. In contrast, ripples occurring at the trough of their SPWs relate to weaker neocortical up-regulation and absent subcortical down-regulation, indicating differentiated involvement of neuromodulatory pathways in the ripple phenomenon mediated by long-range interactions. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for the existence of SPW-R subtypes with differentiated CA1 activity and metabolic correlates in related brain areas, possibly serving different memory functions.

  13. Diversity of sharp-wave–ripple LFP signatures reveals differentiated brain-wide dynamical events

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    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F.; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Besserve, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Sharp-wave–ripple (SPW-R) complexes are believed to mediate memory reactivation, transfer, and consolidation. However, their underlying neuronal dynamics at multiple scales remains poorly understood. Using concurrent hippocampal local field potential (LFP) recordings and functional MRI (fMRI), we study local changes in neuronal activity during SPW-R episodes and their brain-wide correlates. Analysis of the temporal alignment between SPW and ripple components reveals well-differentiated SPW-R subtypes in the CA1 LFP. SPW-R–triggered fMRI maps show that ripples aligned to the positive peak of their SPWs have enhanced neocortical metabolic up-regulation. In contrast, ripples occurring at the trough of their SPWs relate to weaker neocortical up-regulation and absent subcortical down-regulation, indicating differentiated involvement of neuromodulatory pathways in the ripple phenomenon mediated by long-range interactions. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for the existence of SPW-R subtypes with differentiated CA1 activity and metabolic correlates in related brain areas, possibly serving different memory functions. PMID:26540729

  14. The time course of word retrieval revealed by event-related brain potentials during overt speech.

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    Costa, Albert; Strijkers, Kristof; Martin, Clara; Thierry, Guillaume

    2009-12-15

    Speech production is one of the most fundamental activities of humans. A core cognitive operation involved in this skill is the retrieval of words from long-term memory, that is, from the mental lexicon. In this article, we establish the time course of lexical access by recording the brain electrical activity of participants while they named pictures aloud. By manipulating the ordinal position of pictures belonging to the same semantic categories, the cumulative semantic interference effect, we were able to measure the exact time at which lexical access takes place. We found significant correlations between naming latencies, ordinal position of pictures, and event-related potential mean amplitudes starting 200 ms after picture presentation and lasting for 180 ms. The study reveals that the brain engages extremely fast in the retrieval of words one wishes to utter and offers a clear time frame of how long it takes for the competitive process of activating and selecting words in the course of speech to be resolved.

  15. Whole brain white matter changes revealed by multiple diffusion metrics in multiple sclerosis: A TBSS study

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    Liu, Yaou, E-mail: asiaeurope80@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Duan, Yunyun, E-mail: xiaoyun81.love@163.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); He, Yong, E-mail: yong.h.he@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Yu, Chunshui, E-mail: csyuster@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Wang, Jun, E-mail: jun_wang@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Huang, Jing, E-mail: sainthj@126.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Ye, Jing, E-mail: jingye.2007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Parizel, Paul M., E-mail: paul.parizel@ua.ac.be [Department of Radiology, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, 8 Belgium (Belgium); Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli55@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Shu, Ni, E-mail: nshu55@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To investigate whole brain white matter changes in multiple sclerosis (MS) by multiple diffusion indices, we examined patients with diffusion tensor imaging and utilized tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method to analyze the data. Methods: Forty-one relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and 41 age- and gender-matched normal controls were included in this study. Diffusion weighted images were acquired by employing a single-shot echo planar imaging sequence on a 1.5 T MR scanner. Voxel-wise analyses of multiple diffusion metrics, including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) were performed with TBSS. Results: The MS patients had significantly decreased FA (9.11%), increased MD (8.26%), AD (3.48%) and RD (13.17%) in their white matter skeletons compared with the controls. Through TBSS analyses, we found abnormal diffusion changes in widespread white matter regions in MS patients. Specifically, decreased FA, increased MD and increased RD were involved in whole-brain white matter, while several regions exhibited increased AD. Furthermore, white matter regions with significant correlations between the diffusion metrics and the clinical variables (the EDSS scores, disease durations and white matter lesion loads) in MS patients were identified. Conclusion: Widespread white matter abnormalities were observed in MS patients revealed by multiple diffusion metrics. The diffusion changes and correlations with clinical variables were mainly attributed to increased RD, implying the predominant role of RD in reflecting the subtle pathological changes in MS.

  16. Human subcortical brain asymmetries in 15,847 people worldwide reveal effects of age and sex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, M.P.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Flor, H.; Fouche, J.P.; Frouin, V.; Wolfers, T.; Fisher, S.E.; Francks, C.

    2016-01-01

    The two hemispheres of the human brain differ functionally and structurally. Despite over a century of research, the extent to which brain asymmetry is influenced by sex, handedness, age, and genetic factors is still controversial. Here we present the largest ever analysis of subcortical brain asymm

  17. The categorization of natural scenes: brain attention networks revealed by dense sensor ERPs.

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    Codispoti, Maurizio; Ferrari, Vera; Junghöfer, Markus; Schupp, Harald T

    2006-08-15

    The present study examined cortical indicators of selective attention underlying categorization based on target features in natural scenes. The primary focus was to determine the neural sources associated with the processing of target stimuli containing animals compared to non-target control stimuli. Neural source estimation techniques [current source density (CSD) and L2-minimum norm estimate (L2-MNE)] were used to determine the sources of the potential fields measured from 58 sensor sites. Assuring an excellent signal-to-noise ratio, the categorization task consisted of 2400 trials. Replicating previous findings, target and non-target ERP activity diverged sharply around 150 ms after stimulus onset and the early differential ERP activity appeared as positive deflection over fronto-central sensor sites and as negative deflection over temporo-occipital regions. Both source estimation techniques (CSD and L2-MNE) suggested primary sources of the early differential ERP activity in posterior, visual-associative brain regions and, although less pronounced, revealed the contribution of additional anterior sources. These findings suggest that selective attention to category-relevant features reflects the interactions between prefrontal and inferior temporal cortex during visual processing of natural scenes.

  18. Microfiberoptic fluorescence photobleaching reveals size-dependent macromolecule diffusion in extracellular space deep in brain.

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    Zador, Zsolt; Magzoub, Mazin; Jin, Songwan; Manley, Geoffrey T; Papadopoulos, Marios C; Verkman, A S

    2008-03-01

    Diffusion in brain extracellular space (ECS) is important for nonsynaptic intercellular communication, extracellular ionic buffering, and delivery of drugs and metabolites. We measured macromolecular diffusion in normally light-inaccessible regions of mouse brain by microfiberoptic epifluorescence photobleaching, in which a fiberoptic with a micron-size tip is introduced deep in brain tissue. In brain cortex, the diffusion of a noninteracting molecule [fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran, 70 kDa] was slowed 4.5 +/- 0.5-fold compared with its diffusion in water (D(o)/D), and was depth-independent down to 800 microm from the brain surface. Diffusion was significantly accelerated (D(o)/D of 2.9+/-0.3) in mice lacking the glial water channel aquaporin-4. FITC-dextran diffusion varied greatly in different regions of brain, with D(o)/D of 3.5 +/- 0.3 in hippocampus and 7.4 +/- 0.3 in thalamus. Remarkably, D(o)/D in deep brain was strongly dependent on solute size, whereas diffusion in cortex changed little with solute size. Mathematical modeling of ECS diffusion required nonuniform ECS dimensions in deep brain, which we call "heterometricity," to account for the size-dependent diffusion. Our results provide the first data on molecular diffusion in ECS deep in brain in vivo and demonstrate previously unrecognized hindrance and heterometricity for diffusion of large macromolecules in deep brain.

  19. Interspecies avian brain chimeras reveal that large brain size differences are influenced by cell-interdependent processes.

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    Chen, Chun-Chun; Balaban, Evan; Jarvis, Erich D

    2012-01-01

    Like humans, birds that exhibit vocal learning have relatively delayed telencephalon maturation, resulting in a disproportionately smaller brain prenatally but enlarged telencephalon in adulthood relative to vocal non-learning birds. To determine if this size difference results from evolutionary changes in cell-autonomous or cell-interdependent developmental processes, we transplanted telencephala from zebra finch donors (a vocal-learning species) into Japanese quail hosts (a vocal non-learning species) during the early neural tube stage (day 2 of incubation), and harvested the chimeras at later embryonic stages (between 9-12 days of incubation). The donor and host tissues fused well with each other, with known major fiber pathways connecting the zebra finch and quail parts of the brain. However, the overall sizes of chimeric finch telencephala were larger than non-transplanted finch telencephala at the same developmental stages, even though the proportional sizes of telencephalic subregions and fiber tracts were similar to normal finches. There were no significant changes in the size of chimeric quail host midbrains, even though they were innervated by the physically smaller zebra finch brain, including the smaller retinae of the finch eyes. Chimeric zebra finch telencephala had a decreased cell density relative to normal finches. However, cell nucleus size differences between each species were maintained as in normal birds. These results suggest that telencephalic size development is partially cell-interdependent, and that the mechanisms controlling the size of different brain regions may be functionally independent.

  20. Interspecies avian brain chimeras reveal that large brain size differences are influenced by cell-interdependent processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Like humans, birds that exhibit vocal learning have relatively delayed telencephalon maturation, resulting in a disproportionately smaller brain prenatally but enlarged telencephalon in adulthood relative to vocal non-learning birds. To determine if this size difference results from evolutionary changes in cell-autonomous or cell-interdependent developmental processes, we transplanted telencephala from zebra finch donors (a vocal-learning species into Japanese quail hosts (a vocal non-learning species during the early neural tube stage (day 2 of incubation, and harvested the chimeras at later embryonic stages (between 9-12 days of incubation. The donor and host tissues fused well with each other, with known major fiber pathways connecting the zebra finch and quail parts of the brain. However, the overall sizes of chimeric finch telencephala were larger than non-transplanted finch telencephala at the same developmental stages, even though the proportional sizes of telencephalic subregions and fiber tracts were similar to normal finches. There were no significant changes in the size of chimeric quail host midbrains, even though they were innervated by the physically smaller zebra finch brain, including the smaller retinae of the finch eyes. Chimeric zebra finch telencephala had a decreased cell density relative to normal finches. However, cell nucleus size differences between each species were maintained as in normal birds. These results suggest that telencephalic size development is partially cell-interdependent, and that the mechanisms controlling the size of different brain regions may be functionally independent.

  1. Transcriptional profiling of human brain endothelial cells reveals key properties crucial for predictive in vitro blood-brain barrier models.

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    Eduard Urich

    Full Text Available Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BEC constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB which forms a dynamic interface between the blood and the central nervous system (CNS. This highly specialized interface restricts paracellular diffusion of fluids and solutes including chemicals, toxins and drugs from entering the brain. In this study we compared the transcriptome profiles of the human immortalized brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and human primary BEC. We identified transcriptional differences in immune response genes which are directly related to the immortalization procedure of the hCMEC/D3 cells. Interestingly, astrocytic co-culturing reduced cell adhesion and migration molecules in both BECs, which possibly could be related to regulation of immune surveillance of the CNS controlled by astrocytic cells within the neurovascular unit. By matching the transcriptome data from these two cell lines with published transcriptional data from freshly isolated mouse BECs, we discovered striking differences that could explain some of the limitations of using cultured BECs to study BBB properties. Key protein classes such as tight junction proteins, transporters and cell surface receptors show differing expression profiles. For example, the claudin-5, occludin and JAM2 expression is dramatically reduced in the two human BEC lines, which likely explains their low transcellular electric resistance and paracellular leakiness. In addition, the human BEC lines express low levels of unique brain endothelial transporters such as Glut1 and Pgp. Cell surface receptors such as LRP1, RAGE and the insulin receptor that are involved in receptor-mediated transport are also expressed at very low levels. Taken together, these data illustrate that BECs lose their unique protein expression pattern outside of their native environment and display a more generic endothelial cell phenotype. A collection of key genes that seems to be highly regulated by the local

  2. High-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals metabolic effects of normal brain aging.

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    Harris, Janna L; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Swerdlow, Russell H; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Brooks, William M

    2014-07-01

    Altered brain metabolism is likely to be an important contributor to normal cognitive decline and brain pathology in elderly individuals. To characterize the metabolic changes associated with normal brain aging, we used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo to quantify 20 neurochemicals in the hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex of young adult and aged rats. We found significant differences in the neurochemical profile of the aged brain when compared with younger adults, including lower aspartate, ascorbate, glutamate, and macromolecules, and higher glucose, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, total choline, and glutamine. These neurochemical biomarkers point to specific cellular mechanisms that are altered in brain aging, such as bioenergetics, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell membrane turnover, and endogenous neuroprotection. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be a valuable translational approach for studying mechanisms of brain aging and pathology, and for investigating treatments to preserve or enhance cognitive function in aging.

  3. Brain network analysis reveals affected connectome structure in bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Guusje; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Abramovic, Lucija; Vreeker, Annabel; de Reus, Marcel A; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Boks, Marco P M; Ophoff, Roel A; Kahn, René S

    2016-01-01

    The notion that healthy brain function emerges from coordinated neural activity constrained by the brain's network of anatomical connections--i.e., the connectome--suggests that alterations in the connectome's wiring pattern may underlie brain disorders. Corroborating this hypothesis, studies in schizophrenia are indicative of altered connectome architecture including reduced communication efficiency, disruptions of central brain hubs, and affected "rich club" organization. Whether similar deficits are present in bipolar disorder is currently unknown. This study examines structural connectome topology in 216 bipolar I disorder patients as compared to 144 healthy controls, focusing in particular on central regions (i.e., brain hubs) and connections (i.e., rich club connections, interhemispheric connections) of the brain's network. We find that bipolar I disorder patients exhibit reduced global efficiency (-4.4%, P =0.002) and that this deficit relates (r = 0.56, P brain hub connections in general, or of connections spanning brain hubs (i.e., "rich club" connections) in particular (all P > 0.1). These findings highlight a role for aberrant brain network architecture in bipolar I disorder with reduced global efficiency in association with disruptions in interhemispheric connectivity, while the central "rich club" system appears not to be particularly affected.

  4. Spontaneous kisspeptin neuron firing in the adult mouse reveals marked sex and brain region differences but no support for a direct role in negative feedback.

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    de Croft, Simon; Piet, Richard; Mayer, Christian; Mai, Oliver; Boehm, Ulrich; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-11-01

    Kisspeptin-Gpr54 signaling is critical for the GnRH neuronal network controlling fertility. The present study reports on a kisspeptin (Kiss)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mouse model enabling brain slice electrophysiological recordings to be made from Kiss neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and rostral periventricular region of the third ventricle (RP3V). Using dual immunofluorescence, approximately 90% of GFP cells in the RP3V of females, and ARN in both sexes, are shown to be authentic Kiss-synthesizing neurons in adult mice. Cell-attached recordings of ARN Kiss-GFP cells revealed a marked sex difference in their mean firing rates; 90% of Kiss-GFP cells in males exhibited slow irregular firing (0.17 ± 0.04 Hz) whereas neurons from diestrous (0.01 ± 0.01 Hz) and ovariectomized (0 Hz) mice were mostly or completely silent. In contrast, RP3V Kiss-GFP cells were all spontaneously active, exhibiting tonic, irregular, and bursting firing patterns. Mean firing rates were significantly (P neurons at the time of the proestrous GnRH surge revealed a significant decline in firing rate after the surge. Together, these observations demonstrate unexpected sex differences in the electrical activity of ARN Kiss neurons and markedly different patterns of firing by Kiss neurons in the ARN and RP3V. Although data supported a positive influence of gonadal steroids on RP3V Kiss neuron firing, no direct evidence was found to support the previously postulated role of ARN Kiss neurons in the estrogen-negative feedback mechanism.

  5. Fossil skulls reveal that blood flow rate to the brain increased faster than brain volume during human evolution

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    Seymour, Roger S.; Bosiocic, Vanya; Snelling, Edward P.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of human cognition has been inferred from anthropological discoveries and estimates of brain size from fossil skulls. A more direct measure of cognition would be cerebral metabolic rate, which is proportional to cerebral blood flow rate (perfusion). The hominin cerebrum is supplied almost exclusively by the internal carotid arteries. The sizes of the foramina that transmitted these vessels in life can be measured in hominin fossil skulls and used to calculate cerebral perfusion rate. Perfusion in 11 species of hominin ancestors, from Australopithecus to archaic Homo sapiens, increases disproportionately when scaled against brain volume (the allometric exponent is 1.41). The high exponent indicates an increase in the metabolic intensity of cerebral tissue in later Homo species, rather than remaining constant (1.0) as expected by a linear increase in neuron number, or decreasing according to Kleiber's Law (0.75). During 3 Myr of hominin evolution, cerebral tissue perfusion increased 1.7-fold, which, when multiplied by a 3.5-fold increase in brain size, indicates a 6.0-fold increase in total cerebral blood flow rate. This is probably associated with increased interneuron connectivity, synaptic activity and cognitive function, which all ultimately depend on cerebral metabolic rate.

  6. Small-world anatomical networks in the human brain revealed by cortical thickness from MRI.

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    He, Yong; Chen, Zhang J; Evans, Alan C

    2007-10-01

    An important issue in neuroscience is the characterization for the underlying architectures of complex brain networks. However, little is known about the network of anatomical connections in the human brain. Here, we investigated large-scale anatomical connection patterns of the human cerebral cortex using cortical thickness measurements from magnetic resonance images. Two areas were considered anatomically connected if they showed statistically significant correlations in cortical thickness and we constructed the network of such connections using 124 brains from the International Consortium for Brain Mapping database. Significant short- and long-range connections were found in both intra- and interhemispheric regions, many of which were consistent with known neuroanatomical pathways measured by human diffusion imaging. More importantly, we showed that the human brain anatomical network had robust small-world properties with cohesive neighborhoods and short mean distances between regions that were insensitive to the selection of correlation thresholds. Additionally, we also found that this network and the probability of finding a connection between 2 regions for a given anatomical distance had both exponentially truncated power-law distributions. Our results demonstrated the basic organizational principles for the anatomical network in the human brain compatible with previous functional networks studies, which provides important implications of how functional brain states originate from their structural underpinnings. To our knowledge, this study provides the first report of small-world properties and degree distribution of anatomical networks in the human brain using cortical thickness measurements.

  7. Aberrant spontaneous brain activity in chronic tinnitus patients revealed by resting-state functional MRI

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    Yu-Chen Chen

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study confirms that chronic tinnitus patients have aberrant ALFF in many brain regions, which is associated with specific clinical tinnitus characteristics. ALFF disturbance in specific brain regions might be used to identify the neuro-pathophysiological mechanisms in chronic tinnitus patients.

  8. Three-dimensional mouse brain cytoarchitecture revealed by laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpperwien, Mareike; Krenkel, Martin; Vincenz, Daniel; Stöber, Franziska; Oelschlegel, Anja M.; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Salditt, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Studies of brain cytoarchitecture in mammals are routinely performed by serial sectioning of the specimen and staining of the sections. The procedure is labor-intensive and the 3D architecture can only be determined after aligning individual 2D sections, leading to a reconstructed volume with non-isotropic resolution. Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography offers a unique potential for high-resolution 3D imaging of intact biological specimen due to the high penetration depth and potential resolution. We here show that even compact laboratory CT at an optimized liquid-metal jet microfocus source combined with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms and a novel tissue preparation can provide cellular and subcellular resolution in millimeter sized samples of mouse brain. We removed water and lipids from entire mouse brains and measured the remaining dry tissue matrix in air, lowering absorption but increasing phase contrast. We present single-cell resolution images of mouse brain cytoarchitecture and show that axons can be revealed in myelinated fiber bundles. In contrast to optical 3D techniques our approach does neither require staining of cells nor tissue clearing, procedures that are increasingly difficult to apply with increasing sample and brain sizes. The approach thus opens a novel route for high-resolution high-throughput studies of brain architecture in mammals.

  9. Graph Theoretical Analysis Reveals: Women's Brains Are Better Connected than Men's.

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    Balázs Szalkai

    Full Text Available Deep graph-theoretic ideas in the context with the graph of the World Wide Web led to the definition of Google's PageRank and the subsequent rise of the most popular search engine to date. Brain graphs, or connectomes, are being widely explored today. We believe that non-trivial graph theoretic concepts, similarly as it happened in the case of the World Wide Web, will lead to discoveries enlightening the structural and also the functional details of the animal and human brains. When scientists examine large networks of tens or hundreds of millions of vertices, only fast algorithms can be applied because of the size constraints. In the case of diffusion MRI-based structural human brain imaging, the effective vertex number of the connectomes, or brain graphs derived from the data is on the scale of several hundred today. That size facilitates applying strict mathematical graph algorithms even for some hard-to-compute (or NP-hard quantities like vertex cover or balanced minimum cut. In the present work we have examined brain graphs, computed from the data of the Human Connectome Project, recorded from male and female subjects between ages 22 and 35. Significant differences were found between the male and female structural brain graphs: we show that the average female connectome has more edges, is a better expander graph, has larger minimal bisection width, and has more spanning trees than the average male connectome. Since the average female brain weighs less than the brain of males, these properties show that the female brain has better graph theoretical properties, in a sense, than the brain of males. It is known that the female brain has a smaller gray matter/white matter ratio than males, that is, a larger white matter/gray matter ratio than the brain of males; this observation is in line with our findings concerning the number of edges, since the white matter consists of myelinated axons, which, in turn, roughly correspond to the connections

  10. Brain classification reveals the right cerebellum as the best biomarker of dyslexia

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    Demonet Jean

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developmental dyslexia is a specific cognitive disorder in reading acquisition that has genetic and neurological origins. Despite histological evidence for brain differences in dyslexia, we recently demonstrated that in large cohort of subjects, no differences between control and dyslexic readers can be found at the macroscopic level (MRI voxel, because of large variances in brain local volumes. In the present study, we aimed at finding brain areas that most discriminate dyslexic from control normal readers despite the large variance across subjects. After segmenting brain grey matter, normalizing brain size and shape and modulating the voxels' content, normal readers' brains were used to build a 'typical' brain via bootstrapped confidence intervals. Each dyslexic reader's brain was then classified independently at each voxel as being within or outside the normal range. We used this simple strategy to build a brain map showing regional percentages of differences between groups. The significance of this map was then assessed using a randomization technique. Results The right cerebellar declive and the right lentiform nucleus were the two areas that significantly differed the most between groups with 100% of the dyslexic subjects (N = 38 falling outside of the control group (N = 39 95% confidence interval boundaries. The clinical relevance of this result was assessed by inquiring cognitive brain-based differences among dyslexic brain subgroups in comparison to normal readers' performances. The strongest difference between dyslexic subgroups was observed between subjects with lower cerebellar declive (LCD grey matter volumes than controls and subjects with higher cerebellar declive (HCD grey matter volumes than controls. Dyslexic subjects with LCD volumes performed worse than subjects with HCD volumes in phonologically and lexicon related tasks. Furthermore, cerebellar and lentiform grey matter volumes interacted in dyslexic

  11. Differential brain activity states during the perception and nonperception of illusory motion as revealed by magnetoencephalography.

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    Crowe, David A; Leuthold, Arthur C; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2010-12-28

    We studied visual perception using an annular random-dot motion stimulus called the racetrack. We recorded neural activity using magnetoencephalography while subjects viewed variants of this stimulus that contained no inherent motion or various degrees of embedded motion. Subjects reported seeing rotary motion during viewing of all stimuli. We found that, in the absence of any motion signals, patterns of brain activity differed between states of motion perception and nonperception. Furthermore, when subjects perceived motion, activity states within the brain did not differ across stimuli of different amounts of embedded motion. In contrast, we found that during periods of nonperception brain-activity states varied with the amount of motion signal embedded in the stimulus. Taken together, these results suggest that during perception the brain may lock into a stable state in which lower-level signals are suppressed.

  12. Stepwise Connectivity of the Modal Cortex Reveals the Multimodal Organization of the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulcre, Jorge; Sabuncu, Mert R.; Yeo, Thomas B.; Liu, Hesheng; Johnson, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    How human beings integrate information from external sources and internal cognition to produce a coherent experience is still not well understood. During the past decades, anatomical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging research in multimodal integration have stood out in the effort to understand the perceptual binding properties of the brain. Areas in the human lateral occipito-temporal, prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices have been associated with sensory multimodal processing. Even though this, rather patchy, organization of brain regions gives us a glimpse of the perceptual convergence, the articulation of the flow of information from modality-related to the more parallel cognitive processing systems remains elusive. Using a method called Stepwise Functional Connectivity analysis, the present study analyzes the functional connectome and transitions from primary sensory cortices to higher-order brain systems. We identify the large-scale multimodal integration network and essential connectivity axes for perceptual integration in the human brain. PMID:22855814

  13. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K L; Bartsch, Ronny P; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2016-05-13

    Within the framework of 'Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems.

  14. Brain damages in ketamine addicts as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging

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    Chunmei eWang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine, a known antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartic (NMDA glutamate receptors, had been used as an anesthetic particularly for pediatric or for cardiac patients. Unfortunately, ketamine has become an abusive drug in many parts of the world while chronic and prolonged usage led to damages of many organs including the brain. However, no studies on possible damages in the brains induced by chronic ketamine abuse have been documented in the human via neuroimaging. This paper described for the first time via employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI the changes in ketamine addicts of 0.5 to 12 years and illustrated the possible brain regions susceptible to ketamine abuse. Twenty-one ketamine addicts were recruited and the results showed that the lesions in the brains of ketamine addicts were located in many regions which appeared 2-4 years after ketamine addiction. Cortical atrophy was usually evident in the frontal, parietal or occipital cortices of addicts. Such study confirmed that many brain regions in the human were susceptible to chronic ketamine injury and presented a diffuse effect of ketamine on the brain which might differ from other central nervous system (CNS drugs, such as cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography Reveals Abnormal Topological Organization in Functional Brain Network in Diabetic Patients

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    Qiu eXiangzhe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated alterations in the topological organization of structural brain networks in diabetes mellitus (DM. However, the DM-related changes in the topological properties in functional brain networks are almost unexplored so far. We therefore used fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET data to construct functional brain networks of 73 DM patients and 91 sex- and age-matched normal controls (NCs, followed by a graph theoretical analysis. We found that both DM patients and NCs had a small-world topology in functional brain network. In comparison to the NC group, the DM group was found to have significantly lower small-world index, lower normalized clustering coefficients and higher normalized shortest path length. Moreover, for diabetic patients, the nodal centrality was significantly reduced in the right rectus, the right cuneus, the left middle occipital gyrus, and the left postcentral gyrus, and it was significantly increased in the orbitofrontal region of the left middle frontal gyrus, the left olfactory region, and the right paracentral lobule. Our results demonstrated that the diabetic brain was associated with disrupted topological organization in the functional PET network, thus providing the functional evidence for the abnormalities of brain networks in DM.

  16. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of `Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems.

  17. Monoamines tissue content analysis reveals restricted and site-specific correlations in brain regions involved in cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitoussi, A; Dellu-Hagedorn, F; De Deurwaerdère, P

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine (DA), noradrenalin (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) monoaminergic systems are deeply involved in cognitive processes via their influence on cortical and subcortical regions. The widespread distribution of these monoaminergic networks is one of the main difficulties in analyzing their functions and interactions. To address this complexity, we assessed whether inter-individual differences in monoamine tissue contents of various brain areas could provide information about their functional relationships. We used a sensitive biochemical approach to map endogenous monoamine tissue content in 20 rat brain areas involved in cognition, including 10 cortical areas and examined correlations within and between the monoaminergic systems. Whereas DA content and its respective metabolite largely varied across brain regions, the NA and 5-HT contents were relatively homogenous. As expected, the tissue content varied among individuals. Our analyses revealed a few specific relationships (10%) between the tissue content of each monoamine in paired brain regions and even between monoamines in paired brain regions. The tissue contents of NA, 5-HT and DA were inter-correlated with a high incidence when looking at a specific brain region. Most correlations found between cortical areas were positive while some cortico-subcortical relationships regarding the DA, NA and 5-HT tissue contents were negative, in particular for DA content. In conclusion, this work provides a useful database of the monoamine tissue content in numerous brain regions. It suggests that the regulation of these neuromodulatory systems is achieved mainly at the terminals, and that each of these systems contributes to the regulation of the other two.

  18. In vivo NAD assay reveals the intracellular NAD contents and redox state in healthy human brain and their age dependences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Ming; Lee, Byeong-Yeul; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-03

    NAD is an essential metabolite that exists in NAD(+) or NADH form in all living cells. Despite its critical roles in regulating mitochondrial energy production through the NAD(+)/NADH redox state and modulating cellular signaling processes through the activity of the NAD(+)-dependent enzymes, the method for quantifying intracellular NAD contents and redox state is limited to a few in vitro or ex vivo assays, which are not suitable for studying a living brain or organ. Here, we present a magnetic resonance (MR) -based in vivo NAD assay that uses the high-field MR scanner and is capable of noninvasively assessing NAD(+) and NADH contents and the NAD(+)/NADH redox state in intact human brain. The results of this study provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the cellular NAD concentrations and redox state in the brains of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, an age-dependent increase of intracellular NADH and age-dependent reductions in NAD(+), total NAD contents, and NAD(+)/NADH redox potential of the healthy human brain were revealed in this study. The overall findings not only provide direct evidence of declined mitochondrial functions and altered NAD homeostasis that accompany the normal aging process but also, elucidate the merits and potentials of this new NAD assay for noninvasively studying the intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in normal and diseased human brain or other organs in situ.

  19. scMRI reveals large-scale brain network abnormalities in autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon A Zielinski

    Full Text Available Autism is a complex neurological condition characterized by childhood onset of dysfunction in multiple cognitive domains including socio-emotional function, speech and language, and processing of internally versus externally directed stimuli. Although gross brain anatomic differences in autism are well established, recent studies investigating regional differences in brain structure and function have yielded divergent and seemingly contradictory results. How regional abnormalities relate to the autistic phenotype remains unclear. We hypothesized that autism exhibits distinct perturbations in network-level brain architecture, and that cognitive dysfunction may be reflected by abnormal network structure. Network-level anatomic abnormalities in autism have not been previously described. We used structural covariance MRI to investigate network-level differences in gray matter structure within two large-scale networks strongly implicated in autism, the salience network and the default mode network, in autistic subjects and age-, gender-, and IQ-matched controls. We report specific perturbations in brain network architecture in the salience and default-mode networks consistent with clinical manifestations of autism. Extent and distribution of the salience network, involved in social-emotional regulation of environmental stimuli, is restricted in autism. In contrast, posterior elements of the default mode network have increased spatial distribution, suggesting a 'posteriorization' of this network. These findings are consistent with a network-based model of autism, and suggest a unifying interpretation of previous work. Moreover, we provide evidence of specific abnormalities in brain network architecture underlying autism that are quantifiable using standard clinical MRI.

  20. Effects of anesthetic agents on brain blood oxygenation level revealed with ultra-high field MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Ciobanu

    Full Text Available During general anesthesia it is crucial to control systemic hemodynamics and oxygenation levels. However, anesthetic agents can affect cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in a drug-dependent manner, while systemic hemodynamics is stable. Brain-wide monitoring of this effect remains highly challenging. Because T(2*-weighted imaging at ultra-high magnetic field strengths benefits from a dramatic increase in contrast to noise ratio, we hypothesized that it could monitor anesthesia effects on brain blood oxygenation. We scanned rat brains at 7T and 17.2T under general anesthesia using different anesthetics (isoflurane, ketamine-xylazine, medetomidine. We showed that the brain/vessels contrast in T(2*-weighted images at 17.2T varied directly according to the applied pharmacological anesthetic agent, a phenomenon that was visible, but to a much smaller extent at 7T. This variation is in agreement with the mechanism of action of these agents. These data demonstrate that preclinical ultra-high field MRI can monitor the effects of a given drug on brain blood oxygenation level in the absence of systemic blood oxygenation changes and of any neural stimulation.

  1. Clinical study on eating disorders. Brain atrophy revealed by cranial computed tomography scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiwaki, Shinichi

    1988-06-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) scans were reviewed in 34 patients with anorexia nervosa (Group I) and 22 with bulimia (Group II) to elucidate the cause and pathological significance of morphological brain alterations. The findings were compared with those from 47 normal women. The incidence of brain atrophy was significantly higher in Group I (17/34, 50%) and Group II (11/22, 50%) than the control group (3/47, 6%). In Group I, there was a significant increase in the left septum-caudate distance, the maximum width of interhemispheric fissure, the width of the both-side Sylvian fissures adjacent to the skull, and the maximum width of the third ventricle. A significant increase in the maximum width of interhemispheric fissure and the width of the left-side Sylvian fissure adjacent to the skull were noted as well in Group II. Ventricular brain ratios were significantly higher in Groups I and II than the control group (6.76 and 7.29 vs 4.55). Brain atrophy did not correlate with age, body weight, malnutrition, eating behavior, depression, thyroid function, EEG findings, or intelligence scale. In Group I, serum cortisol levels after the administration of dexamethasone were correlated with ventricular brain ratio. (Namekawa, K) 51 refs.

  2. Tensor-based morphometry and stereology reveal brain pathology in the complexin1 knockout mouse.

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    Catherine Kielar

    Full Text Available Complexins (Cplxs are small, soluble, regulatory proteins that bind reversibly to the SNARE complex and modulate synaptic vesicle release. Cplx1 knockout mice (Cplx1(-/- have the earliest known onset of ataxia seen in a mouse model, although hitherto no histopathology has been described in these mice. Nevertheless, the profound neurological phenotype displayed by Cplx1(-/- mutants suggests that significant functional abnormalities must be present in these animals. In this study, MRI was used to automatically detect regions where structural differences were not obvious when using a traditional histological approach. Tensor-based morphometry of Cplx1(-/- mouse brains showed selective volume loss from the thalamus and cerebellum. Stereological analysis of Cplx1(-/- and Cplx1(+/+ mice brain slices confirmed the volume loss in the thalamus as well as loss in some lobules of the cerebellum. Finally, stereology was used to show that there was loss of cerebellar granule cells in Cplx1(-/- mice when compared to Cplx1(+/+ animals. Our study is the first to describe pathological changes in Cplx1(-/- mouse brain. We suggest that the ataxia in Cplx1(-/- mice is likely to be due to pathological changes in both cerebellum and thalamus. Reduced levels of Cplx proteins have been reported in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, understanding the effects of Cplx depletion in brains from Cplx1(-/- mice may also shed light on the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology in disorders in which loss of Cplx1 occurs.

  3. Unexpected Molecular Weight Effect in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Holt, Adam P; Wang, Huiqun; Fan, Fei; Bocharova, Vera; Martin, Halie; Etampawala, Thusitha; White, B Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Kang, Nam-Goo; Dadmun, Mark D; Mays, Jimmy W; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2016-01-22

    The properties of the interfacial layer between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles largely determine the macroscopic properties of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). Although the static thickness of the interfacial layer was found to increase with the molecular weight (MW), the influence of MW on segmental relaxation and the glass transition in this layer remains to be explored. In this Letter, we show an unexpected MW dependence of the interfacial properties in PNC with attractive polymer-nanoparticle interactions: the thickness of the interfacial layer with hindered segmental relaxation decreases as MW increases, in sharp contrast to theoretical predictions. Further analyses reveal a reduction in mass density of the interfacial layer with increasing MW, which can elucidate these unexpected dynamic effects. Our observations call for a significant revision of the current understandings of PNCs and suggest interesting ways to tailor their properties.

  4. Separation methods that are capable of revealing blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Alekha K; Elmquist, William F

    2003-11-25

    The objective of this review is to emphasize the application of separation science in evaluating the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to drugs and bioactive agents. Several techniques have been utilized to quantitate the BBB permeability. These methods can be classified into two major categories: in vitro or in vivo. The in vivo methods used include brain homogenization, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling, voltametry, autoradiography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, positron emission tomography (PET), intracerebral microdialysis, and brain uptake index (BUI) determination. The in vitro methods include tissue culture and immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) technology. Separation methods have always played an important role as adjunct methods to the methods outlined above for the quantitation of BBB permeability and have been utilized the most with brain homogenization, in situ brain perfusion, CSF sampling, intracerebral microdialysis, in vitro tissue culture and IAM chromatography. However, the literature published to date indicates that the separation method has been used the most in conjunction with intracerebral microdialysis and CSF sampling methods. The major advantages of microdialysis sampling in BBB permeability studies is the possibility of online separation and quantitation as well as the need for only a small sample volume for such an analysis. Separation methods are preferred over non-separation methods in BBB permeability evaluation for two main reasons. First, when the selectivity of a determination method is insufficient, interfering substances must be separated from the analyte of interest prior to determination. Secondly, when large number of analytes is to be detected and quantitated by a single analytical procedure, the mixture must be separated to each individual component prior to determination. Chiral separation in particular can be essential to evaluate the stereo-selective permeation and distribution of agents into the

  5. Boomerang returns unexpectedly

    CERN Document Server

    White, M; Pierpaoli, E; White, Martin; Scott, Douglas; Pierpaol, Elena

    2000-01-01

    Experimental study of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is gathering momentum. The eagerly awaited Boomerang results have lived up to expectations. They provide convincing evidence in favor of the standard paradigm: the Universe is close to flat and with primordial fluctuations which are redolent of inflation. Further scrutiny reveals something even more exciting however -- two hints that there may be some unforeseen physical effects. Firstly the primary acoustic peak appears at slightly larger scales than expected. Although this may be explicable through a combination of mundane effects, we suggest it is also prudent to consider the possibility that the Universe might be marginally closed. The other hint is provided by a second peak which appears less prominent than expected. This may indicate one of a number of possibilities, including increased damping length or tilted initial conditions, but also breaking of coherence or features in the initial power spectrum. Further data should tes...

  6. Event-Related Brain Potentials Reveal Anomalies in Temporal Processing of Faces in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, James; Dawson, Geraldine; Webb, Sara J.; Panagiotides, Heracles; Carver, Leslie J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Individuals with autism exhibit impairments in face recognition, and neuroimaging studies have shown that individuals with autism exhibit abnormal patterns of brain activity during face processing. The current study examined the temporal characteristics of face processing in autism and their relation to behavior. Method: High-density…

  7. Three-dimensional textural analysis of brain images reveals distributed grey-matter abnormalities in schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganeshan, Balaji [University of Sussex, Falmer, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton (United Kingdom); University of Sussex, Falmer, Department of Engineering and Design, Brighton (United Kingdom); Miles, Kenneth A.; Critchley, Hugo D. [University of Sussex, Falmer, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton (United Kingdom); Young, Rupert C.D.; Chatwin, Christopher R. [University of Sussex, Falmer, Department of Engineering and Design, Brighton (United Kingdom); Gurling, Hugh M.D. [University College London, Department of Mental Health Sciences, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Three-dimensional (3-D) selective- and relative-scale texture analysis (TA) was applied to structural magnetic resonance (MR) brain images to quantify the presence of grey-matter (GM) and white-matter (WM) textural abnormalities associated with schizophrenia. Brain TA comprised volume filtration using the Laplacian of Gaussian filter to highlight fine, medium and coarse textures within GM and WM, followed by texture quantification. Relative TA (e.g. ratio of fine to medium) was also computed. T1-weighted MR whole-brain images from 32 participants with diagnosis of schizophrenia (n = 10) and healthy controls (n = 22) were examined. Five patients possessed marker alleles (SZ8) associated with schizophrenia on chromosome 8 in the pericentriolar material 1 gene while the remaining five had not inherited any of the alleles (SZ0). Filtered fine GM texture (mean grey-level intensity; MGI) most significantly differentiated schizophrenic patients from controls (P = 0.0058; area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve = 0.809, sensitivity = 90%, specificity = 70%). WM measurements did not distinguish the two groups. Filtered GM and WM textures (MGI) correlated with total GM and WM volume respectively. Medium-to-coarse GM entropy distinguished SZ0 from controls (P = 0.0069) while measures from SZ8 were intermediate between the two. 3-D TA of brain MR enables detection of subtle distributed morphological features associated with schizophrenia, determined partly by susceptibility genes. (orig.)

  8. Intrinsic brain network abnormalities in migraines without aura revealed in resting-state fMRI.

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    Ting Xue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have defined low-frequency, spatially consistent intrinsic connectivity networks (ICN in resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data which reflect functional interactions among distinct brain areas. We sought to explore whether and how repeated migraine attacks influence intrinsic brain connectivity, as well as how activity in these networks correlates with clinical indicators of migraine. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Resting-state fMRI data in twenty-three patients with migraines without aura (MwoA and 23 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC were analyzed using independent component analysis (ICA, in combination with a "dual-regression" technique to identify the group differences of three important pain-related networks [default mode network (DMN, bilateral central executive network (CEN, salience network (SN] between the MwoA patients and HC. Compared with the HC, MwoA patients showed aberrant intrinsic connectivity within the bilateral CEN and SN, and greater connectivity between both the DMN and right CEN (rCEN and the insula cortex - a critical region involving in pain processing. Furthermore, greater connectivity between both the DMN and rCEN and the insula correlated with duration of migraine. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings may provide new insights into the characterization of migraine as a condition affecting brain activity in intrinsic connectivity networks. Moreover, the abnormalities may be the consequence of a persistent central neural system dysfunction, reflecting cumulative brain insults due to frequent ongoing migraine attacks.

  9. Brain imaging reveals neuronal circuitry underlying the crow's perception of human faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzluff, John M; Miyaoka, Robert; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2012-09-25

    Crows pay close attention to people and can remember specific faces for several years after a single encounter. In mammals, including humans, faces are evaluated by an integrated neural system involving the sensory cortex, limbic system, and striatum. Here we test the hypothesis that birds use a similar system by providing an imaging analysis of an awake, wild animal's brain as it performs an adaptive, complex cognitive task. We show that in vivo imaging of crow brain activity during exposure to familiar human faces previously associated with either capture (threatening) or caretaking (caring) activated several brain regions that allow birds to discriminate, associate, and remember visual stimuli, including the rostral hyperpallium, nidopallium, mesopallium, and lateral striatum. Perception of threatening faces activated circuitry including amygdalar, thalamic, and brainstem regions, known in humans and other vertebrates to be related to emotion, motivation, and conditioned fear learning. In contrast, perception of caring faces activated motivation and striatal regions. In our experiments and in nature, when perceiving a threatening face, crows froze and fixed their gaze (decreased blink rate), which was associated with activation of brain regions known in birds to regulate perception, attention, fear, and escape behavior. These findings indicate that, similar to humans, crows use sophisticated visual sensory systems to recognize faces and modulate behavioral responses by integrating visual information with expectation and emotion. Our approach has wide applicability and potential to improve our understanding of the neural basis for animal behavior.

  10. Perceptual Shift in Bilingualism: Brain Potentials Reveal Plasticity in Pre-Attentive Colour Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulos, Panos; Dering, Benjamin; Wiggett, Alison; Kuipers, Jan-Rouke; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    The validity of the linguistic relativity principle continues to stimulate vigorous debate and research. The debate has recently shifted from the behavioural investigation arena to a more biologically grounded field, in which tangible physiological evidence for language effects on perception can be obtained. Using brain potentials in a colour…

  11. Altered Brain Network Segregation in Fragile X Syndrome Revealed by Structural Connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Jennifer Lynn; Hosseini, S M Hadi; Saggar, Manish; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Raman, Mira Michelle; Reiss, Allan L

    2016-03-22

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder, is associated with significant behavioral, social, and neurocognitive deficits. Understanding structural brain network topology in FXS provides an important link between neurobiological and behavioral/cognitive symptoms of this disorder. We investigated the connectome via whole-brain structural networks created from group-level morphological correlations. Participants included 100 individuals: 50 with FXS and 50 with typical development, age 11-23 years. Results indicated alterations in topological properties of structural brain networks in individuals with FXS. Significantly reduced small-world index indicates a shift in the balance between network segregation and integration and significantly reduced clustering coefficient suggests that reduced local segregation shifted this balance. Caudate and amygdala were less interactive in the FXS network further highlighting the importance of subcortical region alterations in the neurobiological signature of FXS. Modularity analysis indicates that FXS and typically developing groups' networks decompose into different sets of interconnected sub networks, potentially indicative of aberrant local interconnectivity in individuals with FXS. These findings advance our understanding of the effects of fragile X mental retardation protein on large-scale brain networks and could be used to develop a connectome-level biological signature for FXS.

  12. Atypical Brain Responses to Reward Cues in Autism as Revealed by Event-Related Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohls, Gregor; Peltzer, Judith; Schulte-Ruther, Martin; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Remschmidt, Helmut; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    Social motivation deficit theories suggest that children with autism do not properly anticipate and appreciate the pleasure of social stimuli. In this study, we investigated event-related brain potentials evoked by cues that triggered social versus monetary reward anticipation in children with autism. Children with autism showed attenuated P3…

  13. Speech processing asymmetry revealed by dichotic listening and functional brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugdahl, Kenneth; Westerhausen, René

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we review research in our laboratory from the last 25 to 30 years on the neuronal basis for laterality of speech perception focusing on the upper, posterior parts of the temporal lobes, and its functional and structural connections to other brain regions. We review both behavioral and brain imaging data, with a focus on dichotic listening experiments, and using a variety of imaging modalities. The data have come in most parts from healthy individuals and from studies on normally functioning brain, although we also review a few selected clinical examples. We first review and discuss the structural model for the explanation of the right-ear advantage (REA) and left hemisphere asymmetry for auditory language processing. A common theme across many studies have been our interest in the interaction between bottom-up, stimulus-driven, and top-down, instruction-driven, aspects of hemispheric asymmetry, and how perceptual factors interact with cognitive factors to shape asymmetry of auditory language information processing. In summary, our research have shown laterality for the initial processing of consonant-vowel syllables, first observed as a behavioral REA when subjects are required to report which syllable of a dichotic syllable-pair they perceive. In subsequent work we have corroborated the REA with brain imaging, and have shown that the REA is modulated through both bottom-up manipulations of stimulus properties, like sound intensity, and top-down manipulations of cognitive properties, like attention focus.

  14. Imaging studies in congenital anophthalmia reveal preservation of brain architecture in 'visual' cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Holly; Cowey, Alan; Ragge, Nicola; Watkins, Kate

    2009-12-01

    The functional specialization of the human brain means that many regions are dedicated to processing a single sensory modality. When a modality is absent, as in congenital total blindness, 'visual' regions can be reliably activated by non-visual stimuli. The connections underlying this functional adaptation, however, remain elusive. In this study, using structural and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the structural differences in the brains of six bilaterally anophthalmic subjects compared with sighted subjects. Surprisingly, the gross structural differences in the brains were small, even in the occipital lobe where only a small region of the primary visual cortex showed a bilateral reduction in grey matter volume in the anophthalmic subjects compared with controls. Regions of increased cortical thickness were apparent on the banks of the Calcarine sulcus, but not in the fundus. Subcortically, the white matter volume around the optic tract and internal capsule in anophthalmic subjects showed a large decrease, yet the optic radiation volume did not differ significantly. However, the white matter integrity, as measured with fractional anisotropy showed an extensive reduction throughout the brain in the anophthalmic subjects, with the greatest difference in the optic radiations. In apparent contradiction to the latter finding, the connectivity between the lateral geniculate nucleus and primary visual cortex measured with diffusion tractography did not differ between the two populations. However, these findings can be reconciled by a demonstration that at least some of the reduction in fractional anisotropy in the optic radiation is due to an increase in the strength of fibres crossing the radiations. In summary, the major changes in the 'visual' brain in anophthalmic subjects may be subcortical, although the evidence of decreased fractional anisotropy and increased crossing fibres could indicate considerable re-organization.

  15. Multi-study integration of brain cancer transcriptomes reveals organ-level molecular signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyun Sung

    Full Text Available We utilized abundant transcriptomic data for the primary classes of brain cancers to study the feasibility of separating all of these diseases simultaneously based on molecular data alone. These signatures were based on a new method reported herein--Identification of Structured Signatures and Classifiers (ISSAC--that resulted in a brain cancer marker panel of 44 unique genes. Many of these genes have established relevance to the brain cancers examined herein, with others having known roles in cancer biology. Analyses on large-scale data from multiple sources must deal with significant challenges associated with heterogeneity between different published studies, for it was observed that the variation among individual studies often had a larger effect on the transcriptome than did phenotype differences, as is typical. For this reason, we restricted ourselves to studying only cases where we had at least two independent studies performed for each phenotype, and also reprocessed all the raw data from the studies using a unified pre-processing pipeline. We found that learning signatures across multiple datasets greatly enhanced reproducibility and accuracy in predictive performance on truly independent validation sets, even when keeping the size of the training set the same. This was most likely due to the meta-signature encompassing more of the heterogeneity across different sources and conditions, while amplifying signal from the repeated global characteristics of the phenotype. When molecular signatures of brain cancers were constructed from all currently available microarray data, 90% phenotype prediction accuracy, or the accuracy of identifying a particular brain cancer from the background of all phenotypes, was found. Looking forward, we discuss our approach in the context of the eventual development of organ-specific molecular signatures from peripheral fluids such as the blood.

  16. The action sites of propofol in the normal human brain revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Zhijing; Ge, Yali; Zhang, Jinsong; Yu, Daihua; Chai, Wei; Wu, Shengxi; Xu, Lixian

    2010-12-01

    Propofol has been used for many years but its functional target in the intact brain remains unclear. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to demonstrate blood oxygen level dependence signal changes in the normal human brain during propofol anesthesia and explored the possible action targets of propofol. Ten healthy subjects were enrolled in two experimental sessions. In session 1, the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale was performed to evaluate asleep to awake/alert status. In session 2, images with blood oxygen level dependence contrast were obtained with echo-planar imaging on a 1.5-T Philips Gyroscan Magnetic Resonance System and analyzed. In both sessions, subjects were intravenously administered with saline (for 3 min) and then propofol (for 1.5 min) and saline again (for 10.5 min) with a constant speed infusion pump. Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale scoring showed that the subjects experienced conscious–sedative–unconscious–analepsia, which correlated well with the signal decreases in the anesthesia states. Propofol induced significant signal decreases in hypothalamus (18.2%±3.6%), frontal lobe (68.5%±11.2%), and temporal lobe (34.7%±6.1%). Additionally, the signals at these three sites were fulminant and changed synchronously. While in the thalamus, the signal decrease was observed in 5 of 10 of the subjects and the magnitude of decrease was 3.9%±1.6%. These results suggest that there is most significant inhibition in hypothalamus, frontal lobe, and temporal in propofol anesthesia and moderate inhibition in thalamus. These brain regions might be the targets of propofol anesthesia in human brain.

  17. Genetic depletion of brain 5HT reveals a common molecular pathway mediating compulsivity and impulsivity.

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    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kane, Michael J; Briggs, Denise I; Sykes, Catherine E; Shah, Mrudang M; Francescutti, Dina M; Rosenberg, David R; Thomas, David M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2012-06-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by behavioral disinhibition, including disorders of compulsivity (e.g. obsessive-compulsive disorder; OCD) and impulse-control (e.g. impulsive aggression), are severe, highly prevalent and chronically disabling. Treatment options for these diseases are extremely limited. The pathophysiological bases of disorders of behavioral disinhibition are poorly understood but it has been suggested that serotonin dysfunction may play a role. Mice lacking the gene encoding brain tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2-/-), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of serotonin, were tested in numerous behavioral assays that are well known for their utility in modeling human neuropsychiatric diseases. Mice lacking Tph2 (and brain 5HT) show intense compulsive and impulsive behaviors to include extreme aggression. The impulsivity is motor in form and not cognitive because Tph2-/- mice show normal acquisition and reversal learning on a spatial learning task. Restoration of 5HT levels by treatment of Tph2-/- mice with its immediate precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan attenuated compulsive and impulsive-aggressive behaviors. Surprisingly, in Tph2-/- mice, the lack of 5HT was not associated with anxiety-like behaviors. The results indicate that 5HT mediates behavioral disinhibition in the mammalian brain independent of anxiogenesis.

  18. Exercise challenge in Gulf War Illness reveals two subgroups with altered brain structure and function.

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    Rakib U Rayhan

    Full Text Available Nearly 30% of the approximately 700,000 military personnel who served in Operation Desert Storm (1990-1991 have developed Gulf War Illness, a condition that presents with symptoms such as cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, debilitating fatigue and chronic widespread pain that implicate the central nervous system. A hallmark complaint of subjects with Gulf War Illness is post-exertional malaise; defined as an exacerbation of symptoms following physical and/or mental effort. To study the causal relationship between exercise, the brain, and changes in symptoms, 28 Gulf War veterans and 10 controls completed an fMRI scan before and after two exercise stress tests to investigate serial changes in pain, autonomic function, and working memory. Exercise induced two clinical Gulf War Illness subgroups. One subgroup presented with orthostatic tachycardia (n = 10. This phenotype correlated with brainstem atrophy, baseline working memory compensation in the cerebellar vermis, and subsequent loss of compensation after exercise. The other subgroup developed exercise induced hyperalgesia (n = 18 that was associated with cortical atrophy and baseline working memory compensation in the basal ganglia. Alterations in cognition, brain structure, and symptoms were absent in controls. Our novel findings may provide an understanding of the relationship between the brain and post-exertional malaise in Gulf War Illness.

  19. Exercise challenge in Gulf War Illness reveals two subgroups with altered brain structure and function.

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    Rayhan, Rakib U; Stevens, Benson W; Raksit, Megna P; Ripple, Joshua A; Timbol, Christian R; Adewuyi, Oluwatoyin; VanMeter, John W; Baraniuk, James N

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 30% of the approximately 700,000 military personnel who served in Operation Desert Storm (1990-1991) have developed Gulf War Illness, a condition that presents with symptoms such as cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, debilitating fatigue and chronic widespread pain that implicate the central nervous system. A hallmark complaint of subjects with Gulf War Illness is post-exertional malaise; defined as an exacerbation of symptoms following physical and/or mental effort. To study the causal relationship between exercise, the brain, and changes in symptoms, 28 Gulf War veterans and 10 controls completed an fMRI scan before and after two exercise stress tests to investigate serial changes in pain, autonomic function, and working memory. Exercise induced two clinical Gulf War Illness subgroups. One subgroup presented with orthostatic tachycardia (n = 10). This phenotype correlated with brainstem atrophy, baseline working memory compensation in the cerebellar vermis, and subsequent loss of compensation after exercise. The other subgroup developed exercise induced hyperalgesia (n = 18) that was associated with cortical atrophy and baseline working memory compensation in the basal ganglia. Alterations in cognition, brain structure, and symptoms were absent in controls. Our novel findings may provide an understanding of the relationship between the brain and post-exertional malaise in Gulf War Illness.

  20. Expression weighted cell type enrichments reveal genetic and cellular nature of major brain disorders

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    Nathan Gerald Skene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment (EWCE method that uses single cell transcriptomes to generate the probability distribution associated with a gene list having an average level of expression within a cell type. Following validation, we applied EWCE to human genetic data from cases of epilepsy, Schizophrenia, Autism, Intellectual Disability, Alzheimer’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis and anxiety disorders. Genetic susceptibility primarily affected microglia in Alzheimer’s and Multiple Sclerosis; was shared between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in Autism and Schizophrenia; while intellectual disabilities and epilepsy were attributable to a range of cell-types, with the strongest enrichment in interneurons. We hypothesised that the primary cell type pathology could trigger secondary changes in other cell types and these could be detected by applying EWCE to transcriptome data from diseased tissue. In Autism, Schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease we find evidence of pathological changes in all of the major brain cell types. These findings give novel insight into the cellular origins and progression in common brain disorders. The methods can be applied to any tissue and disorder and have applications in validating mouse models.

  1. Small RNA sequencing-microarray analyses in Parkinson leukocytes reveal deep brain stimulation-induced and splicing changes that classify brain region transcriptomes

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    Lilach eSoreq

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are key post transcriptional regulators of their multiple target genes. However, the detailed profile of miRNA expression in Parkinson's disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide and the first motor disorder has not been charted yet. Here, we report comprehensive miRNA profiling by next-generation small-RNA sequencing, combined with targets inspection by splice-junction and exon arrays interrogating leukocyte RNA in Parkinson’s disease patients before and after deep brain stimulation (DBS treatment and of matched healthy control volunteers (HC. RNA-Seq analysis identified 254 miRNAs and 79 passenger strand forms as expressed in blood leukocytes, 16 of which were modified in patients pre treatment as compared to HC. 11 miRNAs were modified following brain stimulation, 5 of which were changed inversely to the disease induced changes. Stimulation cessation further induced changes in 11 miRNAs. Transcript isoform abundance analysis yielded 332 changed isoforms in patients compared to HC, which classified brain transcriptomes of 47 PD and control independent microarrays. Functional enrichment analysis highlighted mitochondrion organization. DBS induced 155 splice changes, enriched in ubiquitin homeostasis. Cellular composition analysis revealed immune cell activity pre and post treatment. Overall, 217 disease and 74 treatment alternative isoforms were predictably targeted by modified miRNAs within both 3’ and 5’ untranslated ends and coding sequence sites. The stimulation-induced network sustained 4 miRNAs and 7 transcripts of the disease network. We believe that the presented dynamic networks provide a novel avenue for identifying disease and treatment-related therapeutic targets. Furthermore, the identification of these networks is a major step forward in the road for understanding the molecular basis for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases and assessment of the impact of brain stimulation

  2. Novel middle-type Kenyon cells in the honeybee brain revealed by area-preferential gene expression analysis.

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    Kaneko, Kumi; Ikeda, Tsubomi; Nagai, Mirai; Hori, Sayaka; Umatani, Chie; Tadano, Hiroto; Ugajin, Atsushi; Nakaoka, Takayoshi; Paul, Rajib Kumar; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Shirai, Kenichi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Kubo, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    The mushroom bodies (a higher center) of the honeybee (Apis mellifera L) brain were considered to comprise three types of intrinsic neurons, including large- and small-type Kenyon cells that have distinct gene expression profiles. Although previous neural activity mapping using the immediate early gene kakusei suggested that small-type Kenyon cells are mainly active in forager brains, the precise Kenyon cell types that are active in the forager brain remain to be elucidated. We searched for novel gene(s) that are expressed in an area-preferential manner in the honeybee brain. By identifying and analyzing expression of a gene that we termed mKast (middle-type Kenyon cell-preferential arrestin-related protein), we discovered novel 'middle-type Kenyon cells' that are sandwiched between large- and small-type Kenyon cells and have a gene expression profile almost complementary to those of large- and small-type Kenyon cells. Expression analysis of kakusei revealed that both small-type Kenyon cells and some middle-type Kenyon cells are active in the forager brains, suggesting their possible involvement in information processing during the foraging flight. mKast expression began after the differentiation of small- and large-type Kenyon cells during metamorphosis, suggesting that middle-type Kenyon cells differentiate by modifying some characteristics of large- and/or small-type Kenyon cells. Interestingly, CaMKII and mKast, marker genes for large- and middle-type Kenyon cells, respectively, were preferentially expressed in a distinct set of optic lobe (a visual center) neurons. Our findings suggested that it is not simply the Kenyon cell-preferential gene expression profiles, rather, a 'clustering' of neurons with similar gene expression profiles as particular Kenyon cell types that characterize the honeybee mushroom body structure.

  3. Large-scale brain network abnormalities in Huntington's disease revealed by structural covariance.

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    Minkova, Lora; Eickhoff, Simon B; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Kaller, Christoph P; Peter, Jessica; Scheller, Elisa; Lahr, Jacob; Roos, Raymund A; Durr, Alexandra; Leavitt, Blair R; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that can be diagnosed with certainty decades before symptom onset. Studies using structural MRI have identified grey matter (GM) loss predominantly in the striatum, but also involving various cortical areas. So far, voxel-based morphometric studies have examined each brain region in isolation and are thus unable to assess the changes in the interrelation of brain regions. Here, we examined the structural covariance in GM volumes in pre-specified motor, working memory, cognitive flexibility, and social-affective networks in 99 patients with manifest HD (mHD), 106 presymptomatic gene mutation carriers (pre-HD), and 108 healthy controls (HC). After correction for global differences in brain volume, we found that increased GM volume in one region was associated with increased GM volume in another. When statistically comparing the groups, no differences between HC and pre-HD were observed, but increased positive correlations were evident for mHD, relative to pre-HD and HC. These findings could be explained by a HD-related neuronal loss heterogeneously affecting the examined network at the pre-HD stage, which starts to dominate structural covariance globally at the manifest stage. Follow-up analyses identified structural connections between frontoparietal motor regions to be linearly modified by disease burden score (DBS). Moderator effects of disease load burden became significant at a DBS level typically associated with the onset of unequivocal HD motor signs. Together with existing findings from functional connectivity analyses, our data indicates a critical role of these frontoparietal regions for the onset of HD motor signs.

  4. Diurnal microstructural variations in healthy adult brain revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

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    Chunxiang Jiang

    Full Text Available Biorhythm is a fundamental property of human physiology. Changes in the extracellular space induced by cell swelling in response to the neural activity enable the in vivo characterization of cerebral microstructure by measuring the water diffusivity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. To study the diurnal microstructural alterations of human brain, fifteen right-handed healthy adult subjects were recruited for DTI studies in two repeated sessions (8∶30 AM and 8∶30 PM within a 24-hour interval. Fractional anisotropy (FA, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, axial (λ// and radial diffusivity (λ⊥ were compared pixel by pixel between the sessions for each subject. Significant increased morning measurements in FA, ADC, λ// and λ⊥ were seen in a wide range of brain areas involving frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes. Prominent evening dominant λ⊥ (18.58% was detected in the right inferior temporal and ventral fusiform gyri. AM-PM variation of λ⊥ was substantially left side hemisphere dominant (p<0.05, while no hemispheric preference was observed for the same analysis for ADC (p = 0.77, λ// (p = 0.08 or FA (p = 0.25. The percentage change of ADC, λ//, λ⊥, and FA were 1.59%, 2.15%, 1.20% and 2.84%, respectively, for brain areas without diurnal diffusivity contrast. Microstructural variations may function as the substrates of the phasic neural activities in correspondence to the environment adaptation in a light-dark cycle. This research provided a baseline for researches in neuroscience, sleep medicine, psychological and psychiatric disorders, and necessitates that diurnal effect should be taken into account in following up studies using diffusion tensor quantities.

  5. Whole-brain analytic measures of network communication reveal increased structure-function correlation in right temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Jonathan Wirsich

    2016-01-01

    In rTLE patients, we found a widespread hypercorrelated functional network. Network communication analysis revealed greater unspecific branching of the shortest path (search information in the structural connectome and a higher global correlation between the structural and functional connectivity for the patient group. We also found evidence for a preserved structural rich-club in the patient group. In sum, global augmentation of structure-function correlation might be linked to a smaller functional repertoire in rTLE patients, while sparing the central core of the brain which may represent a pathway that facilitates the spread of seizures.

  6. Proteomic analysis and functional characterization of mouse brain mitochondria during aging reveal alterations in energy metabolism.

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    Stauch, Kelly L; Purnell, Phillip R; Villeneuve, Lance M; Fox, Howard S

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondria are the main cellular source of reactive oxygen species and are recognized as key players in several age-associated disorders and neurodegeneration. Their dysfunction has also been linked to cellular aging. Additionally, mechanisms leading to the preservation of mitochondrial function promote longevity. In this study we investigated the proteomic and functional alterations in brain mitochondria isolated from mature (5 months old), old (12 months old), and aged (24 months old) mice as determinants of normal "healthy" aging. Here the global changes concomitant with aging in the mitochondrial proteome of mouse brain analyzed by quantitative mass-spectrometry based super-SILAC identified differentially expressed proteins involved in several metabolic pathways including glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. Despite these changes, the bioenergetic function of these mitochondria was preserved. Overall, this data indicates that proteomic changes during aging may compensate for functional defects aiding in preservation of mitochondrial function. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001370 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001370).

  7. Partitioning heritability analysis reveals a shared genetic basis of brain anatomy and schizophrenia

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    Lee, Phil H.; Baker, Justin T.; Holmes, Avram J.; Jahanshad, Neda; Ge, Tian; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Cruz, Yanela; Manoach, Dara S.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Faskowitz, Joshua; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicolas H.; Wright, Margaret J.; Öngür, Dost; Buckner, Randy; Roffman, Joshua; Thompson, Paul M.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex genetic etiology. Widespread cortical gray matter loss has been observed in patients and prodromal samples. However, it remains unresolved whether schizophrenia-associated cortical structure variations arise due to disease etiology or secondary to the illness. Here we address this question using a partitioning-based heritability analysis of genome-wide SNP and neuroimaging data from 1,750 healthy individuals. We find that schizophrenia-associated genetic variants explain a significantly enriched proportion of trait heritability in eight brain phenotypes (FDR=10%). In particular, intracranial volume (ICV) and left superior frontal gyrus thickness exhibit significant and robust associations with schizophrenia genetic risk under varying SNP selection conditions. Cross disorder comparison suggests that the neurogenetic architecture of schizophrenia-associated brain regions is, at least in part, shared with other psychiatric disorders. Our study highlights key neuroanatomical correlates of schizophrenia genetic risk in the general population. These may provide fundamental insights into the complex pathophysiology of the illness, and a potential link to neurocognitive deficits shaping the disorder. PMID:27725656

  8. Bilingualism at the core of the brain. Structural differences between bilinguals and monolinguals revealed by subcortical shape analysis.

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    Burgaleta, Miguel; Sanjuán, Ana; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sebastian-Galles, Núria; Ávila, César

    2016-01-15

    Naturally acquiring a language shapes the human brain through a long-lasting learning and practice process. This is supported by previous studies showing that managing more than one language from early childhood has an impact on brain structure and function. However, to what extent bilingual individuals present neuroanatomical peculiarities at the subcortical level with respect to monolinguals is yet not well understood, despite the key role of subcortical gray matter for a number of language functions, including monitoring of speech production and language control - two processes especially solicited by bilinguals. Here we addressed this issue by performing a subcortical surface-based analysis in a sample of monolinguals and simultaneous bilinguals (N=88) that only differed in their language experience from birth. This analysis allowed us to study with great anatomical precision the potential differences in morphology of key subcortical structures, namely, the caudate, accumbens, putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus. Vertexwise analyses revealed significantly expanded subcortical structures for bilinguals compared to monolinguals, localized in bilateral putamen and thalamus, as well as in the left globus pallidus and right caudate nucleus. A topographical interpretation of our results suggests that a more complex phonological system in bilinguals may lead to a greater development of a subcortical brain network involved in monitoring articulatory processes.

  9. Repeated diffusion MRI reveals earliest time point for stratification of radiotherapy response in brain metastases

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    Mahmood, Faisal; Johannesen, Helle H.; Geertsen, Poul; Hansen, Rasmus H.

    2017-04-01

    An imaging biomarker for early prediction of treatment response potentially provides a non-invasive tool for better prognostics and individualized management of the disease. Radiotherapy (RT) response is generally related to changes in gross tumor volume manifesting months later. In this prospective study we investigated the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), perfusion fraction and pseudo diffusion coefficient derived from diffusion weighted MRI as potential early biomarkers for radiotherapy response of brain metastases. It was a particular aim to assess the optimal time point for acquiring the DW-MRI scan during the course of treatment, since to our knowledge this important question has not been addressed directly in previous studies. Twenty-nine metastases (N  =  29) from twenty-one patients, treated with whole-brain fractionated external beam RT were analyzed. Patients were scanned with a 1 T MRI system to acquire DW-, T2*W-, T2W- and T1W scans, before start of RT, at each fraction and at follow up two to three months after RT. The DW-MRI parameters were derived using regions of interest based on high b-value images (b  =  800 s mm‑2). Both volumetric and RECIST criteria were applied for response evaluation. It was found that in non-responding metastases the mean ADC decreased and in responding metastases it increased. The volume based response proved to be far more consistently predictable by the ADC change found at fraction number 7 and later, compared to the linear response (RECIST). The perfusion fraction and pseudo diffusion coefficient did not show sufficient prognostic value with either response assessment criteria. In conclusion this study shows that the ADC derived using high b-values may be a reliable biomarker for early assessment of radiotherapy response for brain metastases patients. The earliest response stratification can be achieved using two DW-MRI scans, one pre-treatment and one at treatment day 7–9 (equivalent to 21

  10. [Lowe syndrome revealed by prenatal diagnosis of congenital cataract with brain abnormalities].

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    Zéphir, P; Decramer, S; Sartor, A; Vayssière, C

    2014-05-01

    Congenital cataract is a rare disease whose incidence is estimated to 0.5% of birth in France. A study of the literature shows that congenital cataract is idiopathic in 50% of cases, hereditary forms representing 25% of cases. Other causes of congenital cataract are represented by viral embryofoetopathies acquired during pregnancy, metabolic disorders and chromosomal aberrations within the scope of malformative syndromes. The authors report the case of a neonatal diagnosis of Lowe syndrome suspected by the discovery of bilateral cataract initially isolated. The morphological exploration was completed by secondary brain abnormalities (periventricular lesions). The etiological prenatal exploration was negative. Lowe syndrome is a rare cause of antenatal cataract, which so far only one case has been reported.

  11. Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Differences in Site-specific Cell Fate Determination in Mammalian Brain

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    Gokhan eErtaylan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis - the generation of new neurons - is an ongoing process that persists in the adult mammalian brain of several species, including humans. In this work we analyze two discrete brain regions: the subventricular zone (SVZ lining the walls of the lateral ventricles; and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in mice and shed light on the SVZ and SGZ specific neurogenesis. We propose a computational model that relies on the construction and analysis of region specific gene regulatory networks from the publicly available data on these two regions. Using this model a number of putative factors involved in neuronal stem cell (NSC identity and maintenance were identified. We also demonstrate potential gender and niche-derived differences based on cell surface and nuclear receptors via Ar, Hif1a and Nr3c1.We have also conducted cell fate determinant analysis for SVZ NSC populations to Olfactory Bulb interneurons and SGZ NSC populations to the granule cells of the Granular Cell Layer. We report thirty-one candidate cell fate determinant gene pairs, ready to be validated. We focus on Ar - Pax6 in SVZ and Sox2 - Ncor1 in SGZ. Both pairs are expressed and localized in the suggested anatomical structures as shown by in situ hybridization and found to physically interact.Finally, we conclude that there are fundamental differences between SGZ and SVZ neurogenesis. We argue that these regulatory mechanisms are linked to the observed differential neurogenic potential of these regions. The presence of nuclear and cell surface receptors in the region specific regulatory circuits indicate the significance of niche derived extracellular factors, hormones and region specific factors such as the oxygen sensitivity, dictating SGZ and SVZ specific neurogenesis.

  12. Motion-related artifacts in structural brain images revealed with independent estimates of in-scanner head motion.

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    Savalia, Neil K; Agres, Phillip F; Chan, Micaela Y; Feczko, Eric J; Kennedy, Kristen M; Wig, Gagan S

    2017-01-01

    Motion-contaminated T1-weighted (T1w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results in misestimates of brain structure. Because conventional T1w scans are not collected with direct measures of head motion, a practical alternative is needed to identify potential motion-induced bias in measures of brain anatomy. Head movements during functional MRI (fMRI) scanning of 266 healthy adults (20-89 years) were analyzed to reveal stable features of in-scanner head motion. The magnitude of head motion increased with age and exhibited within-participant stability across different fMRI scans. fMRI head motion was then related to measurements of both quality control (QC) and brain anatomy derived from a T1w structural image from the same scan session. A procedure was adopted to "flag" individuals exhibiting excessive head movement during fMRI or poor T1w quality rating. The flagging procedure reliably reduced the influence of head motion on estimates of gray matter thickness across the cortical surface. Moreover, T1w images from flagged participants exhibited reduced estimates of gray matter thickness and volume in comparison to age- and gender-matched samples, resulting in inflated effect sizes in the relationships between regional anatomical measures and age. Gray matter thickness differences were noted in numerous regions previously reported to undergo prominent atrophy with age. Recommendations are provided for mitigating this potential confound, and highlight how the procedure may lead to more accurate measurement and comparison of anatomical features. Hum Brain Mapp 38:472-492, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Global deprivation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the CNS reveals an area-specific requirement for dendritic growth.

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    Rauskolb, Stefanie; Zagrebelsky, Marta; Dreznjak, Anita; Deogracias, Rubén; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Wiese, Stefan; Erne, Beat; Sendtner, Michael; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Korte, Martin; Barde, Yves-Alain

    2010-02-03

    Although brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is linked with an increasing number of conditions causing brain dysfunction, its role in the postnatal CNS has remained difficult to assess. This is because the bdnf-null mutation causes the death of the animals before BDNF levels have reached adult levels. In addition, the anterograde axonal transport of BDNF complicates the interpretation of area-specific gene deletion. The present study describes the generation of a new conditional mouse mutant essentially lacking BDNF throughout the CNS. It shows that BDNF is not essential for prolonged postnatal survival, but that the behavior of such mutant animals is markedly altered. It also reveals that BDNF is not a major survival factor for most CNS neurons and for myelination of their axons. However, it is required for the postnatal growth of the striatum, and single-cell analyses revealed a marked decreased in dendritic complexity and spine density. In contrast, BDNF is dispensable for the growth of the hippocampus and only minimal changes were observed in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in mutant animals. Spine density remained unchanged, whereas the proportion of the mushroom-type spine was moderately decreased. In line with these in vivo observations, we found that BDNF markedly promotes the growth of cultured striatal neurons and of their dendrites, but not of those of hippocampal neurons, suggesting that the differential responsiveness to BDNF is part of a neuron-intrinsic program.

  14. Dissecting the social brain: Introducing the EmpaToM to reveal distinct neural networks and brain-behavior relations for empathy and Theory of Mind.

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    Kanske, Philipp; Böckler, Anne; Trautwein, Fynn-Mathis; Singer, Tania

    2015-11-15

    Successful social interactions require both affect sharing (empathy) and understanding others' mental states (Theory of Mind, ToM). As these two functions have mostly been investigated in isolation, the specificity of the underlying neural networks and the relation of these networks to the respective behavioral indices could not be tested. Here, we present a novel fMRI paradigm (EmpaToM) that independently manipulates both empathy and ToM. Experiments 1a/b (N=90) validated the task with established empathy and ToM paradigms on a behavioral and neural level. Experiment 2 (N=178) employed the EmpaToM and revealed clearly separable neural networks including anterior insula for empathy and ventral temporoparietal junction for ToM. These distinct networks could be replicated in task-free resting state functional connectivity. Importantly, brain activity in these two networks specifically predicted the respective behavioral indices, that is, inter-individual differences in ToM related brain activity predicted inter-individual differences in ToM performance, but not empathic responding, and vice versa. Taken together, the validated EmpaToM allows separation of affective and cognitive routes to understanding others. It may thus benefit future clinical, developmental, and intervention studies on identifying selective impairments and improvement in specific components of social cognition.

  15. Microarray analysis of a salamander hopeful monster reveals transcriptional signatures of paedomorphic brain development

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    Putta Srikrishna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum is considered a hopeful monster because it exhibits an adaptive and derived mode of development - paedomorphosis - that has evolved rapidly and independently among tiger salamanders. Unlike related tiger salamanders that undergo metamorphosis, axolotls retain larval morphological traits into adulthood and thus present an adult body plan that differs dramatically from the ancestral (metamorphic form. The basis of paedomorphic development was investigated by comparing temporal patterns of gene transcription between axolotl and tiger salamander larvae (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum that typically undergo a metamorphosis. Results Transcript abundances from whole brain and pituitary were estimated via microarray analysis on four different days post hatching (42, 56, 70, 84 dph and regression modeling was used to independently identify genes that were differentially expressed as a function of time in both species. Collectively, more differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified as unique to the axolotl (n = 76 and tiger salamander (n = 292 than were identified as shared (n = 108. All but two of the shared DEGs exhibited the same temporal pattern of expression and the unique genes tended to show greater changes later in the larval period when tiger salamander larvae were undergoing anatomical metamorphosis. A second, complementary analysis that directly compared the expression of 1320 genes between the species identified 409 genes that differed as a function of species or the interaction between time and species. Of these 409 DEGs, 84% exhibited higher abundances in tiger salamander larvae at all sampling times. Conclusions Many of the unique tiger salamander transcriptional responses are probably associated with metamorphic biological processes. However, the axolotl also showed unique patterns of transcription early in development. In particular, the axolotl showed a genome

  16. Differences in brain circuitry for appetitive and reactive aggression as revealed by realistic auditory scripts

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    James Kenneth Moran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive behavior is thought to divide into two motivational elements: The first being a self-defensively motivated aggression against threat and a second, hedonically motivated ‘appetitive’ aggression. Appetitive aggression is the less understood of the two, often only researched within abnormal psychology. Our approach is to understand it as a universal and adaptive response, and examine the functional neural activity of ordinary men (N=50 presented with an imaginative listening task involving a murderer describing a kill. We manipulated motivational context in a between-subjects design to evoke appetitive or reactive aggression, against a neutral control, measuring activity with Magnetoencephalography (MEG. Results show differences in left frontal regions in delta (2-5 Hz and alpha band (8-12 Hz for aggressive conditions and right parietal delta activity differentiating appetitive and reactive aggression. These results validate the distinction of reward-driven appetitive aggression from reactive aggression in ordinary populations at the level of functional neural brain circuitry.

  17. The neural bases for devaluing radical political statements revealed by penetrating traumatic brain injury.

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    Cristofori, Irene; Viola, Vanda; Chau, Aileen; Zhong, Wanting; Krueger, Frank; Zamboni, Giovanna; Grafman, Jordan

    2015-08-01

    Given the determinant role of ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in valuation, we examined whether vmPFC lesions also modulate how people scale political beliefs. Patients with penetrating traumatic brain injury (pTBI; N = 102) and healthy controls (HCs; N = 31) were tested on the political belief task, where they rated 75 statements expressing political opinions concerned with welfare, economy, political involvement, civil rights, war and security. Each statement was rated for level of agreement and scaled along three dimensions: radicalism, individualism and conservatism. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) analysis showed that diminished scores for the radicalism dimension (i.e. statements were rated as less radical than the norms) were associated with lesions in bilateral vmPFC. After dividing the pTBI patients into three groups, according to lesion location (i.e. vmPFC, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [dlPFC] and parietal cortex), we found that the vmPFC, but not the dlPFC, group had reduced radicalism scores compared with parietal and HC groups. These findings highlight the crucial role of the vmPFC in appropriately valuing political behaviors and may explain certain inappropriate social judgments observed in patients with vmPFC lesions.

  18. Quantitative Proteomics of Sleep-Deprived Mouse Brains Reveals Global Changes in Mitochondrial Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tie-Mei; Zhang, Ju-en; Lin, Rui; Chen, She; Luo, Minmin; Dong, Meng-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a ubiquitous, tightly regulated, and evolutionarily conserved behavior observed in almost all animals. Prolonged sleep deprivation can be fatal, indicating that sleep is a physiological necessity. However, little is known about its core function. To gain insight into this mystery, we used advanced quantitative proteomics technology to survey the global changes in brain protein abundance. Aiming to gain a comprehensive profile, our proteomics workflow included filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), which increased the coverage of membrane proteins; tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, for relative quantitation; and high resolution, high mass accuracy, high throughput mass spectrometry (MS). In total, we obtained the relative abundance ratios of 9888 proteins encoded by 6070 genes. Interestingly, we observed significant enrichment for mitochondrial proteins among the differentially expressed proteins. This finding suggests that sleep deprivation strongly affects signaling pathways that govern either energy metabolism or responses to mitochondrial stress. Additionally, the differentially-expressed proteins are enriched in pathways implicated in age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and Alzheimer’s, hinting at possible connections between sleep loss, mitochondrial stress, and neurodegeneration. PMID:27684481

  19. Longitudinal MRI reveals altered trajectory of brain development during childhood and adolescence in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treit, Sarah; Lebel, Catherine; Baugh, Lauren; Rasmussen, Carmen; Andrew, Gail; Beaulieu, Christian

    2013-06-12

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of brain development in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) has revealed structural abnormalities, but studies have been limited by the use of cross-sectional designs. Longitudinal scans can provide key insights into trajectories of neurodevelopment within individuals with this common developmental disorder. Here we evaluate serial DTI and T1-weighted volumetric MRI in a human sample of 17 participants with FASD and 27 controls aged 5-15 years who underwent 2-3 scans each, ∼2-4 years apart (92 scans total). Increases of fractional anisotropy and decreases of mean diffusivity (MD) were observed between scans for both groups, in keeping with changes expected of typical development, but mixed-models analysis revealed significant age-by-group interactions for three major white matter tracts: superior longitudinal fasciculus and superior and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. These findings indicate altered developmental progression in these frontal-association tracts, with the FASD group notably showing greater reduction of MD between scans. ΔMD is shown to correlate with reading and receptive vocabulary in the FASD group, with steeper decreases of MD in the superior fronto-occipital fasciculus and superior longitudinal fasciculus between scans correlating with greater improvement in language scores. Volumetric analysis revealed reduced total brain, white, cortical gray, and deep gray matter volumes and fewer significant age-related volume increases in the FASD group, although age-by-group interactions were not significant. Longitudinal DTI indicates delayed white matter development during childhood and adolescence in FASD, which may underlie persistent or worsening behavioral and cognitive deficits during this critical period.

  20. Whole brain resting-state analysis reveals decreased functional connectivity in major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya M. Veer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, both increases and decreases in resting-state functional connectivity have been found in major depression. However, these studies only assessed functional connectivity within a specific network or between a few regions of interest, while comorbidity and use of medication was not always controlled for. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate whole-brain functional connectivity, unbiased by a priori definition of regions or networks of interest, in medication-free depressive patients without comorbidity. We analyzed resting-state fMRI data of 19 medication-free patients with a recent diagnosis of major depression (within six months before inclusion and no comorbidity, and 19 age- and gender-matched controls. Independent component analysis was employed on the concatenated data sets of all participants. Thirteen functionally relevant networks were identified, describing the entire study sample. Next, individual representations of the networks were created using a dual regression method. Statistical inference was subsequently done on these spatial maps using voxelwise permutation tests. Abnormal functional connectivity was found within three resting-state networks in depression: 1 decreased bilateral amygdala and left anterior insula connectivity in an affective network, 2 reduced connectivity of the left frontal pole in a network associated with attention and working memory, and 3 decreased bilateral lingual gyrus connectivity within ventromedial visual regions. None of these effects were associated with symptom severity or grey matter density. We found abnormal resting-state functional connectivity not previously associated with major depression, which might relate to abnormal affect regulation and mild cognitive deficits, both associated with the symptomatology of the disorder.

  1. Pathway analysis reveals common pro-survival mechanisms of metyrapone and carbenoxolone after traumatic brain injury.

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    Helen L Hellmich

    Full Text Available Developing new pharmacotherapies for traumatic brain injury (TBI requires elucidation of the neuroprotective mechanisms of many structurally and functionally diverse compounds. To test our hypothesis that diverse neuroprotective drugs similarly affect common gene targets after TBI, we compared the effects of two drugs, metyrapone (MT and carbenoxolone (CB, which, though used clinically for noncognitive conditions, improved learning and memory in rats and humans. Although structurally different, both MT and CB inhibit a common molecular target, 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, which converts inactive cortisone to cortisol, thereby effectively reducing glucocorticoid levels. We examined injury-induced signaling pathways to determine how the effects of these two compounds correlate with pro-survival effects in surviving neurons of the injured rat hippocampus. We found that treatment of TBI rats with MT or CB acutely induced in hippocampal neurons transcriptional profiles that were remarkably similar (i.e., a coordinated attenuation of gene expression across multiple injury-induced cell signaling networks. We also found, to a lesser extent, a coordinated increase in cell survival signals. Analysis of injury-induced gene expression altered by MT and CB provided additional insight into the protective effects of each. Both drugs attenuated expression of genes in the apoptosis, death receptor and stress signaling pathways, as well as multiple genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway such as subunits of NADH dehydrogenase (Complex1, cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV and ATP synthase (Complex V. This suggests an overall inhibition of mitochondrial function. Complex 1 is the primary source of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway, thus linking the protective effects of these drugs to a reduction in oxidative stress. The net effect of the drug-induced transcriptional changes observed here indicates that

  2. Resting State fMRI in Mice Reveals Anesthesia Specific Signatures of Brain Functional Networks and Their Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Qasim; Schroeter, Aileen; Cole, David M; Rudin, Markus

    2017-01-01

    fMRI studies in mice typically require the use of anesthetics. Yet, it is known that anesthesia alters responses to stimuli or functional networks at rest. In this work, we have used Dual Regression analysis Network Modeling to investigate the effects of two commonly used anesthetics, isoflurane and medetomidine, on rs-fMRI derived functional networks, and in particular to what extent anesthesia affected the interaction within and between these networks. Experimental data have been used from a previous study (Grandjean et al., 2014). We applied multivariate ICA analysis and Dual Regression to infer the differences in functional connectivity between isoflurane- and medetomidine-anesthetized mice. Further network analysis was performed to investigate within- and between-network connectivity differences between these anesthetic regimens. The results revealed five major networks in the mouse brain: lateral cortical, associative cortical, default mode, subcortical, and thalamic network. The anesthesia regime had a profound effect both on within- and between-network interactions. Under isoflurane anesthesia predominantly intra- and inter-cortical interactions have been observed, with only minor interactions involving subcortical structures and in particular attenuated cortico-thalamic connectivity. In contrast, medetomidine-anesthetized mice displayed subcortical functional connectivity including interactions between cortical and thalamic ICA components. Combining the two anesthetics at low dose resulted in network interaction that constituted the superposition of the interaction observed for each anesthetic alone. The study demonstrated that network modeling is a promising tool for analyzing the brain functional architecture in mice and comparing alterations therein caused by different physiological or pathological states. Understanding the differential effects of anesthetics on brain networks and their interaction is essential when interpreting fMRI data recorded under

  3. Resting State fMRI in Mice Reveals Anesthesia Specific Signatures of Brain Functional Networks and Their Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Qasim; Schroeter, Aileen; Cole, David M.; Rudin, Markus

    2017-01-01

    fMRI studies in mice typically require the use of anesthetics. Yet, it is known that anesthesia alters responses to stimuli or functional networks at rest. In this work, we have used Dual Regression analysis Network Modeling to investigate the effects of two commonly used anesthetics, isoflurane and medetomidine, on rs-fMRI derived functional networks, and in particular to what extent anesthesia affected the interaction within and between these networks. Experimental data have been used from a previous study (Grandjean et al., 2014). We applied multivariate ICA analysis and Dual Regression to infer the differences in functional connectivity between isoflurane- and medetomidine-anesthetized mice. Further network analysis was performed to investigate within- and between-network connectivity differences between these anesthetic regimens. The results revealed five major networks in the mouse brain: lateral cortical, associative cortical, default mode, subcortical, and thalamic network. The anesthesia regime had a profound effect both on within- and between-network interactions. Under isoflurane anesthesia predominantly intra- and inter-cortical interactions have been observed, with only minor interactions involving subcortical structures and in particular attenuated cortico-thalamic connectivity. In contrast, medetomidine-anesthetized mice displayed subcortical functional connectivity including interactions between cortical and thalamic ICA components. Combining the two anesthetics at low dose resulted in network interaction that constituted the superposition of the interaction observed for each anesthetic alone. The study demonstrated that network modeling is a promising tool for analyzing the brain functional architecture in mice and comparing alterations therein caused by different physiological or pathological states. Understanding the differential effects of anesthetics on brain networks and their interaction is essential when interpreting fMRI data recorded under

  4. Exome sequence reveals mutations in CoA synthase as a cause of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusi, Sabrina; Valletta, Lorella; Haack, Tobias B; Tsuchiya, Yugo; Venco, Paola; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Goffrini, Paola; Tigano, Marco; Demchenko, Nikita; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Invernizzi, Federica; Garavaglia, Barbara; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Hamada, Jeffrey; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Chiapparini, Luisa; Zorzi, Giovanna; Kurian, Manju A; Nardocci, Nardo; Prokisch, Holger; Hayflick, Susan; Gout, Ivan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-02

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders with progressive extrapyramidal signs and neurological deterioration, characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Exome sequencing revealed the presence of recessive missense mutations in COASY, encoding coenzyme A (CoA) synthase in one NBIA-affected subject. A second unrelated individual carrying mutations in COASY was identified by Sanger sequence analysis. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the final steps of CoA biosynthesis by coupling phosphopantetheine with ATP to form dephospho-CoA and its subsequent phosphorylation to generate CoA. We demonstrate alterations in RNA and protein expression levels of CoA synthase, as well as CoA amount, in fibroblasts derived from the two clinical cases and in yeast. This is the second inborn error of coenzyme A biosynthesis to be implicated in NBIA.

  5. Unexpected bismuth concentration profiles in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy-grown Ga(As1−xBix/GaAs superlattices revealed by Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

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    A. W. Wood

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A set of GaAs1−xBix/GaAs multilayer quantum-well structures was deposited by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy at 390 °C and 420 °C. The precursor fluxes were introduced with the intent of growing discrete and compositionally uniform GaAs1−xBix well and GaAs barrier layers in the epitaxial films. High-resolution high-angle annular-dark-field (or “Z-contrast” scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed concentration profiles that were periodic in the growth direction, but far more complicated in shape than the intended square wave. The observed composition profiles could explain various reports of physical properties measurements that suggest compositional inhomogeneity in GaAs1−xBix alloys as they currently are grown.

  6. Comparative analysis of A-to-I editing in human and non-human primate brains reveals conserved patterns and context-dependent regulation of RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Richard T; Wang, Xiaojing; Morabito, Michael V; Emeson, Ronald B

    2017-04-06

    A-to-I RNA editing is an important process for generating molecular diversity in the brain through modification of transcripts encoding several proteins important for neuronal signaling. We investigated the relationships between the extent of editing at multiple substrate transcripts (5HT2C, MGLUR4, CADPS, GLUR2, GLUR4, and GABRA3) in brain tissue obtained from adult humans and rhesus macaques. Several patterns emerged from these studies revealing conservation of editing across primate species. Additionally, variability in the human population allows us to make novel inferences about the co-regulation of editing at different editing sites and even across different brain regions.

  7. Are rogue waves really unexpected?

    CERN Document Server

    Fedele, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We present a third-order nonlinear model for the statistics of unexpected waves drawing on the work of Gemmrich & Garrett (2008). The model is verified by way of Monte Carlo simulations of Gaussian seas and comparisons to oceanic measurements. In particular, the analysis of oceanic data suggests that both skewness and kurtosis effects must be accounted for to obtain accurate predictions. As a specific application, the unexpectedness of the Andrea and WACSIS rogue wave events is examined in detail. Observations indicate that the crests of these waves have nearly the same amplitude ratio $h/H_s\\sim1.6$, where $H_s$ is the significant wave height. Both waves appeared without warning and they were nearly two-times larger than the surrounding $O(10)$ waves, and thus unexpected. The model developed here predicts that the two rogue waves are stochastically similar as they occur on average once every $10^{4}$ waves. Further, the maximum crest height actually observed is nearly the same as the threshold $h_{10^{6}...

  8. Genome-wide identification of Bcl11b gene targets reveals role in brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling.

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    Bin Tang

    Full Text Available B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 11B (Bcl11b is a transcription factor showing predominant expression in the striatum. To date, there are no known gene targets of Bcl11b in the nervous system. Here, we define targets for Bcl11b in striatal cells by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq in combination with genome-wide expression profiling. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed that 694 genes were significantly altered in striatal cells over-expressing Bcl11b, including genes showing striatal-enriched expression similar to Bcl11b. ChIP-seq analysis demonstrated that Bcl11b bound a mixture of coding and non-coding sequences that were within 10 kb of the transcription start site of an annotated gene. Integrating all ChIP-seq hits with the microarray expression data, 248 direct targets of Bcl11b were identified. Functional analysis on the integrated gene target list identified several zinc-finger encoding genes as Bcl11b targets, and further revealed a significant association of Bcl11b to brain-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophin signaling. Analysis of ChIP-seq binding regions revealed significant consensus DNA binding motifs for Bcl11b. These data implicate Bcl11b as a novel regulator of the BDNF signaling pathway, which is disrupted in many neurological disorders. Specific targeting of the Bcl11b-DNA interaction could represent a novel therapeutic approach to lowering BDNF signaling specifically in striatal cells.

  9. Fournier gangrene and unexpected death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Danielle; Byard, Roger W

    2012-11-01

    Fournier gangrene represents a rare but progressive perineal infection that may result in rapid death. A 70-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and alcohol abuse is reported who was found unexpectedly dead. He had last been contacted the night before his death. At autopsy, the most striking finding was deep necrotic ulceration of the scrotum with exposure of underlying deep muscles and testicles, with blood cultures positive for Escherichia coli. Death was, therefore, attributed to necrotic ulceration/gangrene of the perineum (Fournier gangrene) that was due to E. coli sepsis with underlying contributing factors of diabetes mellitus and alcoholism. In addition there was morbid obesity (body mass index 46.9), cirrhosis of the liver, and marked focal coronary artery atherosclerosis with significant cardiomegaly. Fournier gangrene may be an extremely aggressive condition that can result in rapid death, as was demonstrated by the rapid progression in the reported case.

  10. Individual Variability and Test-Retest Reliability Revealed by Ten Repeated Resting-State Brain Scans over One Month.

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    Bing Chen

    Full Text Available Individual differences in mind and behavior are believed to reflect the functional variability of the human brain. Due to the lack of a large-scale longitudinal dataset, the full landscape of variability within and between individual functional connectomes is largely unknown. We collected 300 resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI datasets from 30 healthy participants who were scanned every three days for one month. With these data, both intra- and inter-individual variability of six common rfMRI metrics, as well as their test-retest reliability, were estimated across multiple spatial scales. Global metrics were more dynamic than local regional metrics. Cognitive components involving working memory, inhibition, attention, language and related neural networks exhibited high intra-individual variability. In contrast, inter-individual variability demonstrated a more complex picture across the multiple scales of metrics. Limbic, default, frontoparietal and visual networks and their related cognitive components were more differentiable than somatomotor and attention networks across the participants. Analyzing both intra- and inter-individual variability revealed a set of high-resolution maps on test-retest reliability of the multi-scale connectomic metrics. These findings represent the first collection of individual differences in multi-scale and multi-metric characterization of the human functional connectomes in-vivo, serving as normal references for the field to guide the use of common functional metrics in rfMRI-based applications.

  11. Phonological abilities in literacy-impaired children: Brain potentials reveal deficient phoneme discrimination, but intact prosodic processing

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    Claudia Männel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Intact phonological processing is crucial for successful literacy acquisition. While individuals with difficulties in reading and spelling (i.e., developmental dyslexia are known to experience deficient phoneme discrimination (i.e., segmental phonology, findings concerning their prosodic processing (i.e., suprasegmental phonology are controversial. Because there are no behavior-independent studies on the underlying neural correlates of prosodic processing in dyslexia, these controversial findings might be explained by different task demands. To provide an objective behavior-independent picture of segmental and suprasegmental phonological processing in impaired literacy acquisition, we investigated event-related brain potentials during passive listening in typically and poor-spelling German school children. For segmental phonology, we analyzed the Mismatch Negativity (MMN during vowel length discrimination, capturing automatic auditory deviancy detection in repetitive contexts. For suprasegmental phonology, we analyzed the Closure Positive Shift (CPS that automatically occurs in response to prosodic boundaries. Our results revealed spelling group differences for the MMN, but not for the CPS, indicating deficient segmental, but intact suprasegmental phonological processing in poor spellers. The present findings point towards a differential role of segmental and suprasegmental phonology in literacy disorders and call for interventions that invigorate impaired literacy by utilizing intact prosody in addition to training deficient phonemic awareness.

  12. Diminished social reward anticipation in the broad autism phenotype as revealed by event-related brain potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Anthony; Kohls, Gregor; Naples, Adam J; Mukerji, Cora E; Coffman, Marika C; Rutherford, Helena J V; Mayes, Linda C; McPartland, James C

    2015-10-01

    Diminished responsivity to reward incentives is a key contributor to the social-communication problems seen in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Social motivation theories suggest that individuals with ASD do not experience social interactions as rewarding, leading to negative consequences for the development of brain circuitry subserving social information. In this study, we examined neural responses to social and non-social reward anticipation in 35 typically developing young adults, examining modulation of reward sensitivity by level of autistic traits. Using an Event-related potential incentive-delay task incorporating novel, more ecologically valid forms of reward, higher expression of autistic traits was associated with an attenuated P3 response to the anticipation of social (simulated real-time video feedback from an observer), but not non-social (candy), rewards. Exploratory analyses revealed that this was unrelated to mentalizing ability. The P3 component reflects motivated attention to reward signals, suggesting attenuated motivation allocation specific to social incentives. The study extends prior findings of atypical reward anticipation in ASD, demonstrating that attenuated social reward responsiveness extends to autistic traits in the range of typical functioning. Results support the development of innovative paradigms for investigating social and non-social reward responsiveness. Insight into vulnerabilities in reward processing is critical for understanding social function in ASD.

  13. Tactile object familiarity in the blind brain reveals the supramodal perceptual-mnemonic nature of the perirhinal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eCacciamani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is the first to investigate the neural underpinnings of tactile object familiarity in the blind during both perception and memory. In the sighted, the perirhinal cortex (PRC has been implicated in the assessment of visual object familiarity—a crucial everyday task—as evidenced by reduced activation when an object becomes familiar. Here, to examine the PRC’s role in tactile object familiarity in the absence of vision, we trained blind subjects on a unique memory-guided drawing technique and measured brain activity while they perceptually explored raised-line drawings, drew them from tactile memory, and scribbled (control. FMRI before and after a week of training revealed a significant decrease in PRC activation from pre- to post-training (i.e., from unfamiliar to familiar during perceptual exploration as well as memory-guided drawing, but not scribbling. This familiarity-based reduction is the first evidence that the PRC represents tactile object familiarity in the blind. Furthermore, the finding of this effect during both tactile perception and tactile memory provides the critical link in establishing the PRC as a structure whose representations are supramodal for both perception and memory.

  14. Lazarillo expression reveals a subset of neurons contributing to the primary axon scaffold of the embryonic brain of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, S; Ludwig, P; Boyan, G

    2000-04-10

    The authors studied the contribution of seven clusters of Lazarillo-expressing cells to the primary axon scaffold of the brain in the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria from 26% to 43% of embryogenesis. Each cluster, which was numbered according to when Lazarillo expression first appeared, was uniquely identifiable on the basis of its stereotypic position in the brain and the number of Lazarillo-expressing cells it contained. At no time during embryogenesis was Lazarillo expression found in brain neuroblasts: It was found only in progeny. For ease of analysis, axogenesis was followed in a cell cluster that contained only a single Lazarillo-expressing cell (the lateral cell) in the dorsal median domain of the brain midline. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation revealed the presence of only a single midline precursor cell in this region during embryogenesis. Intracellular injection of Lucifer yellow into the lateral cell at various ages showed that there was no dye coupling to the midline precursor or to the nearby term-1-expressing primary commissure pioneers. The lateral cell is not related lineally to these cells and most likely differentiates directly from the neuroectoderm of the brain midline. Lazarillo expression appears at the onset of axogenesis as the lateral cell projects an axon laterally toward the next Lazarillo-expressing cell cluster. The cells of this target cluster direct axons into separate brain regions, thereby establishing an orthogonally organized scaffold that the lateral cell axon follows as it navigates away from the brain midline. The primary axon scaffold of the brain results from a stepwise interlinking of discrete brain regions, as exemplified by axons from neighboring Lazarillo-expressing cell clusters.

  15. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and MRI Reveal No Evidence for Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis. W. W.; Richards, Todd L.; Estes, Annette M.; Friedman, Seth D.; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A.; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ([superscript 1]HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally…

  16. Organization and evolution of brain lipidome revealed by large-scale analysis of human, chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Wei, Yuning; Yan, Zheng; Liu, Xiling; Xiong, Jieyi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tomita, Masaru; Pääbo, Svante; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Ely, John J; Li, Yan; Steinhauser, Dirk; Willmitzer, Lothar; Giavalisco, Patrick; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2015-02-18

    Lipids are prominent components of the nervous system. Here we performed a large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis of the lipid composition of three brain regions as well as kidney and skeletal muscle of humans, chimpanzees, rhesus macaques, and mice. The human brain shows the most distinct lipid composition: 76% of 5,713 lipid compounds examined in our study are either enriched or depleted in the human brain. Concentration levels of lipids enriched in the brain evolve approximately four times faster among primates compared with lipids characteristic of non-neural tissues and show further acceleration of change in human neocortical regions but not in the cerebellum. Human-specific concentration changes are supported by human-specific expression changes for corresponding enzymes. These results provide the first insights into the role of lipids in human brain evolution.

  17. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with acute spinal cord injury revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

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    Ling Zhu

    Full Text Available Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of structural and functional reorganization of brain in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI. However, it remains unknown whether the spontaneous brain activity changes in acute SCI. In this study, we investigated intrinsic brain activity in acute SCI patients using a regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.A total of 15 patients with acute SCI and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. The ReHo value was used to evaluate spontaneous brain activity, and voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to identify brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between groups. We also assessed the associations between ReHo and the clinical scores in brain regions showing changed spontaneous brain activity.Compared with the controls, the acute SCI patients showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary motor cortex/primary somatosensory cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area/dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral caudate; and increased ReHo in bilateral precuneus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left brainstem/hippocampus, the left cingulate motor area, bilateral insula, bilateral thalamus and bilateral cerebellum. The average ReHo values of the left thalamus and right insula were negatively correlated with the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury motor scores.Our findings indicate that acute distant neuronal damage has an immediate impact on spontaneous brain activity. In acute SCI patients, the ReHo was prominently altered in brain regions involved in motor execution and cognitive control, default mode network, and which are associated with sensorimotor compensatory reorganization. Abnormal ReHo values in the left thalamus and right insula could serve as potential biomarkers for

  18. Real-time in vivo imaging reveals the ability of neutrophils to remove Cryptococcus neoformans directly from the brain vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingshun; Sun, Donglei; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Hong; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-03-01

    Although neutrophils are typically the first immune cells attracted to an infection site, little is known about how neutrophils dynamically interact with invading pathogens in vivo. Here, with the use of intravital microscopy, we demonstrate that neutrophils migrate to the arrested Cryptococcus neoformans, a leading agent to cause meningoencephalitis, in the brain microvasculature. Following interactions with C. neoformans, neutrophils were seen to internalize the organism and then circulate back into the bloodstream, resulting in a direct removal of the organism from the endothelial surface before its transmigration into the brain parenchyma. C. neoformans infection led to enhanced expression of adhesion molecules macrophage 1 antigen on neutrophils and ICAM-1 on brain endothelial cells. Depletion of neutrophils enhanced the brain fungal burden. Complement C3 was critically involved in the recognition of C. neoformans by neutrophils and subsequent clearance of the organism from the brain. Together, our finding of the direct removal of C. neoformans by neutrophils from its arrested site may represent a novel mechanism of host defense in the brain, in addition to the known, direct killing of microorganisms at the infection sites. These data are the first to characterize directly the dynamic interactions of leukocytes with a microbe in the brain of a living animal.

  19. RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Interactions between Breast Cancer or Melanoma Cells and the Tissue Microenvironment during Brain Metastasis

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    Ryo Sato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the main cause of treatment failure and death in cancer patients. Metastasis of tumor cells to the brain occurs frequently in individuals with breast cancer, non–small cell lung cancer, or melanoma. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the causes and in the treatment of primary tumors, the biological and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastasis of cancer cells to the brain have remained unclear. Metastasizing cancer cells interact with their microenvironment in the brain to establish metastases. We have now developed mouse models of brain metastasis based on intracardiac injection of human breast cancer or melanoma cell lines, and we have performed RNA sequencing analysis to identify genes in mouse brain tissue and the human cancer cells whose expression is associated specifically with metastasis. We found that the expressions of the mouse genes Tph2, Sspo, Ptprq, and Pole as well as those of the human genes CXCR4, PLLP, TNFSF4, VCAM1, SLC8A2, and SLC7A11 were upregulated in brain tissue harboring metastases. Further characterization of such genes that contribute to the establishment of brain metastases may provide a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies and consequent improvement in the prognosis of cancer patients.

  20. Natural Minor Scale is More Natural to the Brain than Harmonic Minor Scale as Revealed by Magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hiromitsu; Nemoto, Iku; Oda, Shoichiro

    Minor mode is known to elicit stronger emotional responses than major mode in the brain. The present work focused on the minor scales and natural and harmonic minor scales were compared in automatic brain responses in an oddball paradigm. The standard stimulus was either the natural or harmonic minor scale, and a deviant stimulus lacked one scale tone of the corresponding complete minor scale. The brain responded to omission of every tone but omission of the tone B flat in the natural minor experiment elicited larger response than that of the other tones. In particular, the response was significantly larger than that to omission of B in the harmonic minor experiment. This result suggested that the brain felt the natural minor scale to be actually more natural than the harmonic minor scale.

  1. Our Faces in the Dog's Brain: Functional Imaging Reveals Temporal Cortex Activation during Perception of Human Faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuaya, Laura V; Hernández-Pérez, Raúl; Concha, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have a rich social relationship with humans. One fundamental aspect of it is how dogs pay close attention to human faces in order to guide their behavior, for example, by recognizing their owner and his/her emotional state using visual cues. It is well known that humans have specific brain regions for the processing of other human faces, yet it is unclear how dogs' brains process human faces. For this reason, our study focuses on describing the brain correlates of perception of human faces in dogs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We trained seven domestic dogs to remain awake, still and unrestrained inside an MRI scanner. We used a visual stimulation paradigm with block design to compare activity elicited by human faces against everyday objects. Brain activity related to the perception of faces changed significantly in several brain regions, but mainly in the bilateral temporal cortex. The opposite contrast (i.e., everyday objects against human faces) showed no significant brain activity change. The temporal cortex is part of the ventral visual pathway, and our results are consistent with reports in other species like primates and sheep, that suggest a high degree of evolutionary conservation of this pathway for face processing. This study introduces the temporal cortex as candidate to process human faces, a pillar of social cognition in dogs.

  2. Why don't you like me? Midfrontal theta power in response to unexpected peer rejection feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, M J W; Dekkers, L M S; Westenberg, P M; van der Veen, F M; van der Molen, M W

    2017-02-01

    Social connectedness theory posits that the brain processes social rejection as a threat to survival. Recent electrophysiological evidence suggests that midfrontal theta (4-8Hz) oscillations in the EEG provide a window on the processing of social rejection. Here we examined midfrontal theta dynamics (power and inter-trial phase synchrony) during the processing of social evaluative feedback. We employed the Social Judgment paradigm in which 56 undergraduate women (mean age=19.67 years) were asked to communicate their expectancies about being liked vs. disliked by unknown peers. Expectancies were followed by feedback indicating social acceptance vs. rejection. Results revealed a significant increase in EEG theta power to unexpected social rejection feedback. This EEG theta response could be source-localized to brain regions typically reported during activation of the saliency network (i.e., dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, insula, inferior frontal gyrus, frontal pole, and the supplementary motor area). Theta phase dynamics mimicked the behavior of the time-domain averaged feedback-related negativity (FRN) by showing stronger phase synchrony for feedback that was unexpected vs. expected. Theta phase, however, differed from the FRN by also displaying stronger phase synchrony in response to rejection vs. acceptance feedback. Together, this study highlights distinct roles for midfrontal theta power and phase synchrony in response to social evaluative feedback. Our findings contribute to the literature by showing that midfrontal theta oscillatory power is sensitive to social rejection but only when peer rejection is unexpected, and this theta response is governed by a widely distributed neural network implicated in saliency detection and conflict monitoring.

  3. Gene expression profiling in C57BL/6J and A/J mouse inbred strains reveals gene networks specific for brain regions independent of genetic background

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    Horvath Steve

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed gene expression profiling of the amygdala and hippocampus taken from inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J and A/J. The selected brain areas are implicated in neurobehavioral traits while these mouse strains are known to differ widely in behavior. Consequently, we hypothesized that comparing gene expression profiles for specific brain regions in these strains might provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of human neuropsychiatric traits. We performed a whole-genome gene expression experiment and applied a systems biology approach using weighted gene co-expression network analysis. Results We were able to identify modules of co-expressed genes that distinguish a strain or brain region. Analysis of the networks that are most informative for hippocampus and amygdala revealed enrichment in neurologically, genetically and psychologically related pathways. Close examination of the strain-specific gene expression profiles, however, revealed no functional relevance but a significant enrichment of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the probe sequences used for array hybridization. This artifact was not observed for the modules of co-expressed genes that distinguish amygdala and hippocampus. Conclusions The brain-region specific modules were found to be independent of genetic background and are therefore likely to represent biologically relevant molecular networks that can be studied to complement our knowledge about pathways in neuropsychiatric disease.

  4. Whole-brain, time-locked activation with simple tasks revealed using massive averaging and model-free analysis

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    Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Saad, Ziad S.; Handwerker, Daniel A.; Inati, Souheil J.; Brenowitz, Noah; Bandettini, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The brain is the body's largest energy consumer, even in the absence of demanding tasks. Electrophysiologists report on-going neuronal firing during stimulation or task in regions beyond those of primary relationship to the perturbation. Although the biological origin of consciousness remains elusive, it is argued that it emerges from complex, continuous whole-brain neuronal collaboration. Despite converging evidence suggesting the whole brain is continuously working and adapting to anticipate and actuate in response to the environment, over the last 20 y, task-based functional MRI (fMRI) have emphasized a localizationist view of brain function, with fMRI showing only a handful of activated regions in response to task/stimulation. Here, we challenge that view with evidence that under optimal noise conditions, fMRI activations extend well beyond areas of primary relationship to the task; and blood-oxygen level-dependent signal changes correlated with task-timing appear in over 95% of the brain for a simple visual stimulation plus attention control task. Moreover, we show that response shape varies substantially across regions, and that whole-brain parcellations based on those differences produce distributed clusters that are anatomically and functionally meaningful, symmetrical across hemispheres, and reproducible across subjects. These findings highlight the exquisite detail lying in fMRI signals beyond what is normally examined, and emphasize both the pervasiveness of false negatives, and how the sparseness of fMRI maps is not a result of localized brain function, but a consequence of high noise and overly strict predictive response models. PMID:22431587

  5. What can volumes reveal about human brain evolution? A framework for bridging behavioral, histometric and volumetric perspectives

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    Alexandra A de Sousa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An overall relationship between brain size and cognitive ability exists across primates. Can more specific information about neural function be gleaned from cortical area volumes? Numerous studies have found significant relationships between brain structures and behaviors. However, few studies have speculated about brain structure-function relationships from the microanatomical to the macroanatomical level. Here we address this problem in comparative neuroanatomy, where the functional relevance of overall brain size and the sizes of cortical regions have been poorly understood, by considering comparative psychology, with measures of visual acuity and the perception of visual illusions. We outline a model where the macroscopic size (volume or surface area of a cortical region (such as the primary visual cortex, V1 is related to the microstructure of discrete brain regions. The hypothesis developed here is that a larger absolute V1 can process more information with greater fidelity due to having more neurons to represent a field of space. This is the first time that the necessary comparative neuroanatomical research at the microstructural level has been brought to bear on the issue. The evidence suggests that as the size of V1 increases: the number of neurons increases, the neuron density decreases, and the density of neuronal connections increases. Thus, we describe how information about gross neuromorphology, using V1 as a model for the study of other cortical areas, may permit interpretations of cortical function.

  6. What can volumes reveal about human brain evolution? A framework for bridging behavioral, histometric, and volumetric perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Alexandra A; Proulx, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    An overall relationship between brain size and cognitive ability exists across primates. Can more specific information about neural function be gleaned from cortical area volumes? Numerous studies have found significant relationships between brain structures and behaviors. However, few studies have speculated about brain structure-function relationships from the microanatomical to the macroanatomical level. Here we address this problem in comparative neuroanatomy, where the functional relevance of overall brain size and the sizes of cortical regions have been poorly understood, by considering comparative psychology, with measures of visual acuity and the perception of visual illusions. We outline a model where the macroscopic size (volume or surface area) of a cortical region (such as the primary visual cortex, V1) is related to the microstructure of discrete brain regions. The hypothesis developed here is that an absolutely larger V1 can process more information with greater fidelity due to having more neurons to represent a field of space. This is the first time that the necessary comparative neuroanatomical research at the microstructural level has been brought to bear on the issue. The evidence suggests that as the size of V1 increases: the number of neurons increases, the neuron density decreases, and the density of neuronal connections increases. Thus, we describe how information about gross neuromorphology, using V1 as a model for the study of other cortical areas, may permit interpretations of cortical function.

  7. Small-World Brain Functional Networks in Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Revealed by EEG Synchrony.

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    Liu, Tian; Chen, Yanni; Lin, Pan; Wang, Jue

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the topologic properties of human brain attention-related functional networks associated with Multi-Source Interference Task (MSIT) performance using electroencephalography (EEG). Data were obtained from 13 children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 13 normal control children. Functional connectivity between all pairwise combinations of EEG channels was established by calculating synchronization likelihood (SL). The cluster coefficients and path lengths were computed as a function of degree K. The results showed that brain attention functional networks of normal control subjects had efficient small-world topologic properties, whereas these topologic properties were altered in ADHD. In particular, increased local characteristics combined with decreased global characteristics in ADHD led to a disorder-related shift of the network topologic structure toward ordered networks. These findings are consistent with a hypothesis of dysfunctional segregation and integration of the brain in ADHD, and enhance our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism of this illness.

  8. Mitochondrial proteome analysis reveals depression of the Ndufs3 subunit and activity of complex I in diabetic rat brain.

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    Taurino, Federica; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Trentadue, Raffaella; Papa, Sergio; Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio

    2012-04-18

    Type-1 diabetes resulting from defective insulin secretion and consequent hyperglycemia, is associated with "diabetic encephalopathy." This is characterized by brain neurophysiological and structural changes resulting in impairment of cognitive function. The present proteomic analysis of brain mitochondrial proteins from streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetic rats, shows a large decrement of the Ndufs3 protein subunit of complex I, decreased level of the mRNA and impaired catalytic activity of the complex in the diabetic rats as compared to controls. The severe depression of the expression and enzymatic activity of complex I can represent a critical contributing factor to the onset of the diabetic encephalopathy in type-1 diabetes.

  9. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals region specific metabolic responses to SIV infection in the macaque brain

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    Joo Chan-Gyu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS studies of HIV-infected humans have demonstrated significant metabolic abnormalities that vary by brain region, but the causes are poorly understood. Metabolic changes in the frontal cortex, basal ganglia and white matter in 18 SIV-infected macaques were investigated using MRS during the first month of infection. Results Changes in the N-acetylaspartate (NAA, choline (Cho, myo-inositol (MI, creatine (Cr and glutamine/glutamate (Glx resonances were quantified both in absolute terms and relative to the creatine resonance. Most abnormalities were observed at the time of peak viremia, 2 weeks post infection (wpi. At that time point, significant decreases in NAA and NAA/Cr, reflecting neuronal injury, were observed only in the frontal cortex. Cr was significantly elevated only in the white matter. Changes in Cho and Cho/Cr were similar across the brain regions, increasing at 2 wpi, and falling below baseline levels at 4 wpi. MI and MI/Cr levels were increased across all brain regions. Conclusion These data best support the hypothesis that different brain regions have variable intrinsic vulnerabilities to neuronal injury caused by the AIDS virus.

  10. Brain-based decoding of mentally imagined film clips and sounds reveals experience-based information patterns in film professionals.

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    de Borst, Aline W; Valente, Giancarlo; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Tikka, Pia

    2016-04-01

    In the perceptual domain, it has been shown that the human brain is strongly shaped through experience, leading to expertise in highly-skilled professionals. What has remained unclear is whether specialization also shapes brain networks underlying mental imagery. In our fMRI study, we aimed to uncover modality-specific mental imagery specialization of film experts. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis we decoded from brain activity of professional cinematographers and sound designers whether they were imagining sounds or images of particular film clips. In each expert group distinct multi-voxel patterns, specific for the modality of their expertise, were found during classification of imagery modality. These patterns were mainly localized in the occipito-temporal and parietal cortex for cinematographers and in the auditory cortex for sound designers. We also found generalized patterns across perception and imagery that were distinct for the two expert groups: they involved frontal cortex for the cinematographers and temporal cortex for the sound designers. Notably, the mental representations of film clips and sounds of cinematographers contained information that went beyond modality-specificity. We were able to successfully decode the implicit presence of film genre from brain activity during mental imagery in cinematographers. The results extend existing neuroimaging literature on expertise into the domain of mental imagery and show that experience in visual versus auditory imagery can alter the representation of information in modality-specific association cortices.

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals abnormal brain connectivity in EGR3 gene transfected rat model of schizophrenia.

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    Song, Tianbin; Nie, Binbin; Ma, Ensen; Che, Jing; Sun, Shilong; Wang, Yuli; Shan, Baoci; Liu, Yawu; Luo, Senlin; Ma, Guolin; Li, Kefeng

    2015-05-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by the disorder of "social brain". However, the alternation of connectivity density in brain areas of schizophrenia patients remains largely unknown. In this study, we successfully created a rat model of schizophrenia by the transfection of EGR3 gene into rat brain. We then investigated the connectivity density of schizophrenia susceptible regions in rat brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in combination with multivariate Granger causality (GC) model. We found that the average signal strength in prefrontal lobe and hippocampus of schizophrenia model group was significantly higher than the control group. Bidirectional Granger causality connection was observed between hippocampus and thalamic in schizophrenia model group. Both connectivity density and Granger causality connection were changed in prefrontal lobe, hippocampus and thalamus after risperidone treatment. Our results indicated that fMRI in combination with GC connection analysis may be used as an important method in diagnosis of schizophrenia and evaluation the effect of antipsychotic treatment. These findings support the connectivity disorder hypothesis of schizophrenia and increase our understanding of the neural mechanisms of schizophrenia.

  12. Relationship between brain network pattern and cognitive performance of children revealed by MEG signals during free viewing of video.

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    Duan, Fang; Watanabe, Katsumi; Yoshimura, Yuko; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Minabe, Yoshio; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-04-01

    Application of graph theory to analysis of functional networks in the brain is an important research trend. Extensive research on the resting state has shown a "small-world" organization of the brain network as a whole. However, the small-worldness of children's brain networks in a working state has not yet been well characterized. In this paper, we used a custom-made, child-sized magnetoencephalography (MEG) device to collect data from children while they were watching cartoon videos. Network structures were analyzed and compared with scores on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC). The results of network analysis showed that (1) the small-world scalar showed a negative correlation with the simultaneous processing raw score, a measure of visual processing (Gv) ability, and (2) the children with higher simultaneous processing raw scores possessed network structures that can be more efficient for local information processing than children with lower scores. These results were compatible with previous studies on the adult working state. Additional results obtained from further analysis of the frontal and occipital lobes indicated that high cognitive performance could represent better local efficiency in task-related sub-networks. Under free viewing of cartoon videos, brain networks were no longer confined to their strongest small-world states; connections became clustered in local areas such as the frontal and occipital lobes, which might be a more useful configuration for handling visual processing tasks.

  13. Exploratory metabolomic analyses reveal compounds correlated with lutein concentration in frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex of human infant brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with...

  14. Brain networks engaged in audiovisual integration during speech perception revealed by persistent homology-based network filtration.

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    Kim, Heejung; Hahm, Jarang; Lee, Hyekyoung; Kang, Eunjoo; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-05-01

    The human brain naturally integrates audiovisual information to improve speech perception. However, in noisy environments, understanding speech is difficult and may require much effort. Although the brain network is supposed to be engaged in speech perception, it is unclear how speech-related brain regions are connected during natural bimodal audiovisual or unimodal speech perception with counterpart irrelevant noise. To investigate the topological changes of speech-related brain networks at all possible thresholds, we used a persistent homological framework through hierarchical clustering, such as single linkage distance, to analyze the connected component of the functional network during speech perception using functional magnetic resonance imaging. For speech perception, bimodal (audio-visual speech cue) or unimodal speech cues with counterpart irrelevant noise (auditory white-noise or visual gum-chewing) were delivered to 15 subjects. In terms of positive relationship, similar connected components were observed in bimodal and unimodal speech conditions during filtration. However, during speech perception by congruent audiovisual stimuli, the tighter couplings of left anterior temporal gyrus-anterior insula component and right premotor-visual components were observed than auditory or visual speech cue conditions, respectively. Interestingly, visual speech is perceived under white noise by tight negative coupling in the left inferior frontal region-right anterior cingulate, left anterior insula, and bilateral visual regions, including right middle temporal gyrus, right fusiform components. In conclusion, the speech brain network is tightly positively or negatively connected, and can reflect efficient or effortful processes during natural audiovisual integration or lip-reading, respectively, in speech perception.

  15. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Metabolic Profiles in Brain and Liver of Mouse Revealed by a High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Approach

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    Yu, Nanyang; Wei, Si; Li, Meiying; Yang, Jingping; Li, Kan; Jin, Ling; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-04-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a perfluoroalkyl acid, can result in hepatotoxicity and neurobehavioral effects in animals. The metabolome, which serves as a connection among transcriptome, proteome and toxic effects, provides pathway-based insights into effects of PFOA. Since understanding of changes in the metabolic profile during hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were still incomplete, a high-throughput targeted metabolomics approach (278 metabolites) was used to investigate effects of exposure to PFOA for 28 d on brain and liver of male Balb/c mice. Results of multivariate statistical analysis indicated that PFOA caused alterations in metabolic pathways in exposed individuals. Pathway analysis suggested that PFOA affected metabolism of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates and energetics. Ten and 18 metabolites were identified as potential unique biomarkers of exposure to PFOA in brain and liver, respectively. In brain, PFOA affected concentrations of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and glutamate in brain, which provides novel insights into mechanisms of PFOA-induced neurobehavioral effects. In liver, profiles of lipids revealed involvement of β-oxidation and biosynthesis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity, while alterations in metabolism of arachidonic acid suggesting potential of PFOA to cause inflammation response in liver. These results provide insight into the mechanism and biomarkers for PFOA-induced effects.

  16. Violence-related content in video game may lead to functional connectivity changes in brain networks as revealed by fMRI-ICA in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvyagintsev, M; Klasen, M; Weber, R; Sarkheil, P; Esposito, F; Mathiak, K A; Schwenzer, M; Mathiak, K

    2016-04-21

    In violent video games, players engage in virtual aggressive behaviors. Exposure to virtual aggressive behavior induces short-term changes in players' behavior. In a previous study, a violence-related version of the racing game "Carmageddon TDR2000" increased aggressive affects, cognitions, and behaviors compared to its non-violence-related version. This study investigates the differences in neural network activity during the playing of both versions of the video game. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recorded ongoing brain activity of 18 young men playing the violence-related and the non-violence-related version of the video game Carmageddon. Image time series were decomposed into functional connectivity (FC) patterns using independent component analysis (ICA) and template-matching yielded a mapping to established functional brain networks. The FC patterns revealed a decrease in connectivity within 6 brain networks during the violence-related compared to the non-violence-related condition: three sensory-motor networks, the reward network, the default mode network (DMN), and the right-lateralized frontoparietal network. Playing violent racing games may change functional brain connectivity, in particular and even after controlling for event frequency, in the reward network and the DMN. These changes may underlie the short-term increase of aggressive affects, cognitions, and behaviors as observed after playing violent video games.

  17. Dynamic Analyses of PrP and PrPsc in Brain Tissues of Golden Hamsters Infected With Scraple Strain 263K Revealed Various PrP Forms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-MEI GAO; AND XIAO-PING DONG; CHEN GAO; JUN HAN; XIAO-BO ZHOU; XIN-LI XIAO; JIN ZHANG; LAN CHEN; BAO-YUN ZHANG; TAO HONG

    2004-01-01

    Objective To expatiate dynamic changes in hamsters infected with scrapie strain 263K, to observe the presence and aggravation of various forms of PrP and PrPSc during incubation period, and to probe primarily the relationship between the onset of clinic manifestations and the presence of different PrPSc forms. Methods Hamster-adapted scrapie strain 263K was intracerebrally inoculated into hamsters. Different forms of PrP and PrPSc were monitored dynamically by Western blot and immuno-histochemical assays. The presence of scrapie-associated fibril (SAF) was assayedby electron microscopy analysis (EM) and immuno-golden EM. Results PrPSc was initiallydetected in the brain tissues of the animals in 20 days post-inoculation by immunohistochemistry and 40 days with Western blot. Quantitative evaluations revealed that the amounts of PrP and PrPSc inbrain tissues increased along with the incubation. Several high and low molecular masses of PrP wereseen in the brains of the long-life span infected animals. Deglycosylation assays identified that the truncated PrP in the infected brains showed similar glycosylation patterns as the full-length PrP. The presence of short fragments was seemed to relate with the onset of clinical conditions. Conclusion These results indicate that infectious agents exist and accumulate in central nerve system prior to the onset of the illness. Various molecular patterns of PrPSc may indwell in brain tissues during the infection.

  18. A human blood-brain barrier transcytosis assay reveals antibody transcytosis influenced by pH-dependent receptor binding.

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    Hadassah Sade

    Full Text Available We have adapted an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier, the immortalized human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3, to quantitatively measure protein transcytosis. After validating the receptor-mediated transport using transferrin, the system was used to measure transcytosis rates of antibodies directed against potential brain shuttle receptors. While an antibody to the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R was exclusively recycled to the apical compartment, the fate of antibodies to the transferrin receptor (TfR was determined by their relative affinities at extracellular and endosomal pH. An antibody with reduced affinity at pH5.5 showed significant transcytosis, while pH-independent antibodies of comparable affinities at pH 7.4 remained associated with intracellular vesicular compartments and were finally targeted for degradation.

  19. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study Reveals Local Brain Structural Alterations Associated with Ambient Fine Particles in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Ramon; Wang, Xinhui; Reyes, Jeanette; Akita, Yasuyuki; Serre, Marc L.; Vizuete, William; Chui, Helena C.; Driscoll, Ira; Resnick, Susan M.; Espeland, Mark A.; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Goodwin, Mimi; DeNise, Richard; Lipton, Michael; Hannigan, James; Carpini, Anthony; Noble, David; Guzman, Wilton; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Goveas, Joseph; Kerwin, Diana; Ulmer, John; Censky, Steve; Flinton, Troy; Matusewic, Tracy; Prost, Robert; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Swope, Sue; Sawyer-Glover, Anne Marie; Hartley, Susan; Jackson, Rebecca; Hallarn, Rose; Kennedy, Bonnie; Bolognone, Jill; Casimir, Lindsay; Kochis, Amanda; Robbins, John; Zaragoza, Sophia; Carter, Cameron; Ryan, John; Macias, Denise; Sonico, Jerry; Nathan, Lauren; Voigt, Barbara; Villablanca, Pablo; Nyborg, Glen; Godinez, Sergio; Perrymann, Adele; Limacher, Marian; Anderson, Sheila; Toombs, Mary Ellen; Bennett, Jeffrey; Jones, Kevin; Brum, Sandy; Chatfield, Shane; Vantrees, Kevin; Robinson, Jennifer; Wilson, Candy; Koch, Kevin; Hart, Suzette; Carroll, Jennifer; Cherrico, Mary; Ockene, Judith; Churchill, Linda; Fellows, Douglas; Serio, Anthony; Jackson, Sharon; Spavich, Deidre; Margolis, Karen; Bjerk, Cindy; Truwitt, Chip; Peitso, Margaret; Camcrena, Alexa; Grim, Richard; Levin, Julie; Perron, Mary; Brunner, Robert; Golding, Ross; Pansky, Leslie; Arguello, Sandie; Hammons, Jane; Peterson, Nikki; Murphy, Carol; Morgan, Maggie; Castillo, Mauricio; Beckman, Thomas; Huang, Benjamin; Kuller, Lewis; McHugh, Pat; Meltzer, Carolyn; Davis, Denise; Davis, Joyce; Kost, Piera; Lucas, Kim; Potter, Tom; Tarr, Lee; Shumaker, Sally; Espeland, Mark; Coker, Laura; Williamson, Jeff; Felton, Debbie; Gleiser, LeeAnn; Rapp, Steve; Legault, Claudine; Dailey, Maggie; Casanova, Ramon; Robertson, Julia; Hogan, Patricia; Gaussoin, Sarah; Nance, Pam; Summerville, Cheryl; Peral, Ricardo; Tan, Josh; Bryan, Nick; Davatzikos, Christos; Desiderio, Lisa; Buckholtz, Neil; Molchan, Susan; Resnick, Susan; Rossouw, Jacques; Pottern, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5: PM with aerodynamic diameters voxel-wise analyses, we examined whether PM2.5 exposure also affects brain structure. Methods: Brain MRI data were obtained from 1365 women (aged 71–89) in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study and local brain volumes were estimated using RAVENS (regional analysis of volumes in normalized space). Based on geocoded residential locations and air monitoring data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, we employed a spatiotemporal model to estimate long-term (3-year average) exposure to ambient PM2.5 preceding MRI scans. Voxel-wise linear regression models were fit separately to gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) maps to analyze associations between brain structure and PM2.5 exposure, with adjustment for potential confounders. Results: Increased PM2.5 exposure was associated with smaller volumes in both cortical GM and subcortical WM areas. For GM, associations were clustered in the bilateral superior, middle, and medial frontal gyri. For WM, the largest clusters were in the frontal lobe, with smaller clusters in the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes. No statistically significant associations were observed between PM2.5 exposure and hippocampal volumes. Conclusions: Long-term PM2.5 exposures may accelerate loss of both GM and WM in older women. While our previous work linked smaller WM volumes to PM2.5, this is the first neuroimaging study reporting associations between air pollution exposure and smaller volumes of cortical GM. Our data support the hypothesized synaptic neurotoxicity of airborne particles.

  20. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study Reveals Local Brain Structural Alterations associated With Ambient Fine Particles in older women

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    Ramon Casanova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5: PM with aerodynamic diameters <2.5µm has been linked with cognitive deficits in older adults. Using fine-grained voxel-wise analyses, we examined whether PM2.5 exposure also affects brain structure.Methods: Brain MRI data were obtained from 1,365 women (aged 71-89 in the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study and local brain volumes were estimated using RAVENS (regional analysis of volumes in normalized space. Based on geocoded residential locations and air monitoring data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, we employed a spatiotemporal model to estimate long-term (3-year average exposure to ambient PM2.5 preceding MRI scans. Voxel-wise linear regression models were fit separately to gray matter (GM and white matter (WM maps to analyze associations between brain structure and PM2.5 exposure, with adjustment for potential confounders. Results: Increased PM2.5 exposure was associated with smaller volumes in both cortical GM and subcortical WM areas. For GM, associations were clustered in the bilateral superior, middle, and medial frontal gyri. For WM, the largest clusters were in the frontal lobe, with smaller clusters in the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes. No statistically significant associations were observed between PM2.5 exposure and hippocampal volumes. Conclusions: Long-term PM2.5 exposures may accelerate loss of both GM and WM in older women. While our previous work linked WM decreased volumes to PM2.5 air pollution, this is the first neuroimaging study reporting associations between air pollution exposure and smaller volumes of cortical GM. Our data support the hypothesized synaptic neurotoxicity of airborne particles.

  1. Effects of Hormone Therapy on Brain Volumes Changes of Postmenopausal Women Revealed by Optimally-Discriminative Voxel-Based Morphometry.

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    Tianhao Zhang

    Full Text Available The Women's Health Initiative Memory Study Magnetic Resonance Imaging (WHIMS-MRI provides an opportunity to evaluate how menopausal hormone therapy (HT affects the structure of older women's brains. Our earlier work based on region of interest (ROI analysis demonstrated potential structural changes underlying adverse effects of HT on cognition. However, the ROI-based analysis is limited in statistical power and precision, and cannot provide fine-grained mapping of whole-brain changes.We aimed to identify local structural differences between HT and placebo groups from WHIMS-MRI in a whole-brain refined level, by using a novel method, named Optimally-Discriminative Voxel-Based Analysis (ODVBA. ODVBA is a recently proposed imaging pattern analysis approach for group comparisons utilizing a spatially adaptive analysis scheme to accurately locate areas of group differences, thereby providing superior sensitivity and specificity to detect the structural brain changes over conventional methods.Women assigned to HT treatments had significant Gray Matter (GM losses compared to the placebo groups in the anterior cingulate and the adjacent medial frontal gyrus, and the orbitofrontal cortex, which persisted after multiple comparison corrections. There were no regions where HT was significantly associated with larger volumes compared to placebo, although a trend of marginal significance was found in the posterior cingulate cortical area. The CEE-Alone and CEE+MPA groups, although compared with different placebo controls, demonstrated similar effects according to the spatial patterns of structural changes.HT had adverse effects on GM volumes and risk for cognitive impairment and dementia in older women. These findings advanced our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of HT effects.

  2. Novel biochemical manipulation of brain serotonin reveals a role of serotonin in the circadian rhythm of sleep-wake cycles.

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    Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Miyamoto, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Kozo; Tsukada, Koji; Takai, Katsuji

    2012-06-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) neurons have been implicated in the modulation of many physiological functions, including mood regulation, feeding, and sleep. Impaired or altered 5-HT neurotransmission appears to be involved in depression and anxiety symptoms, as well as in sleep disorders. To investigate brain 5-HT functions in sleep, we induced 5-HT deficiency through acute tryptophan depletion in rats by intraperitoneally injecting a tryptophan-degrading enzyme called tryptophan side chain oxidase I (TSOI). After the administration of TSOI (20 units), plasma tryptophan levels selectively decreased to 1-2% of those of controls within 2 h, remained under 1% for 12-24 h, and then recovered between 72 and 96 h. Following plasma tryptophan levels, brain 5-HT levels decreased to ∼30% of the control level after 6 h, remained at this low level for 20-30 h, and returned to normal after 72 h. In contrast, brain norepinephreine and dopamine levels remained unchanged. After TSOI injection, the circadian rhythms of the sleep-wake cycle and locomotive activity were lost and broken into minute(s) ultradian alternations. The hourly slow-wave sleep (SWS) time significantly increased at night, but decreased during the day, whereas rapid eye movement sleep was significantly reduced during the day. However, daily total (cumulative) SWS time was retained at the normal level. As brain 5-HT levels gradually recovered 48 h after TSOI injection, the circadian rhythms of sleep-wake cycles and locomotive activity returned to normal. Our results suggest that 5-HT with a rapid turnover rate plays an important role in the circadian rhythm of sleep-wake cycles.

  3. Graph theoretical analysis reveals the reorganization of the brain network pattern in primary open angle glaucoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jieqiong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Management and Control for Complex Systems, Institute of Automation, Beijing (China); Li, Ting; Xian, Junfang [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Ningli [Capital Medical University, Department of Ophthalmology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Beijing (China); He, Huiguang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Management and Control for Complex Systems, Institute of Automation, Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Research Center for Brain-Inspired Intelligence, Institute of Automation, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Most previous glaucoma studies with resting-state fMRI have focused on the neuronal activity in the individual structure of the brain, yet ignored the functional communication of anatomically separated structures. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficiency of the functional communication change or not in glaucoma patients. We applied the resting-state fMRI data to construct the connectivity network of 25 normal controls and 25 age-gender-matched primary open angle glaucoma patients. Graph theoretical analysis was performed to assess brain network pattern differences between the two groups. No significant differences of the global network measures were found between the two groups. However, the local measures were radically reorganized in glaucoma patients. Comparing with the hub regions in normal controls' network, we found that six hub regions disappeared and nine hub regions appeared in the network of patients. In addition, the betweenness centralities of two altered hub regions, right fusiform gyrus and right lingual gyrus, were significantly correlated with the visual field mean deviation. Although the efficiency of functional communication is preserved in the brain network of the glaucoma at the global level, the efficiency of functional communication is altered in some specialized regions of the glaucoma. (orig.)

  4. Circadian variation in unexpected postoperative death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, M H; Ramsing, T

    1992-01-01

    Unexpected deaths still occur following major surgical procedures. The cause is often unknown but may be cardiac or thromboembolic in nature. Postoperative ischaemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death may be triggered by episodic or constant arterial hypoxaemia, which increases during the night....... This study examined the circadian variation of sudden unexpected death following abdominal surgery between 1985 and 1989 inclusive. Deaths were divided into those occurring during the day (08.00-16.00 hours), evening (16.00-24.00 hours) and night (24.00-08.00 hours). Twenty-three deaths were considered...... to have been totally unexpected. Of 16 such patients undergoing autopsy, pulmonary embolism was the cause of death in five. In the remaining 11 patients, death occurred at night in eight (P

  5. Discovering the Unexpected in Astronomical Survey Data

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P

    2016-01-01

    Most major discoveries in astronomy are unplanned, and result from surveying the Universe in a new way, rather than by testing a hypothesis or conducting an investigation with planned outcomes. For example, of the 10 greatest discoveries made by the Hubble Space Telescope, only one was listed in its key science goals. So a telescope that merely achieves its stated science goals is not achieving its potential scientific productivity. Several next-generation astronomical survey telescopes are currently being designed and constructed that will significantly expand the volume of observational parameter space, and should in principle discover unexpected new phenomena and new types of object. However, the complexity of the telescopes and the large data volumes mean that these discoveries are unlikely to be found by chance. Therefore, it is necessary to plan explicitly for these unexpected discoveries in the design and construction of the telescope. Two types of discovery are recognised: unexpected objects, and unex...

  6. A comparative antibody analysis of Pannexin1 expression in four rat brain regions reveals varying subcellular localizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C Cone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pannexin1 (Panx1 channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding patterns. Localizations of Panx1 in brain slices were generated using automated wide-field mosaic confocal microscopy for imaging large regions of interest while retaining maximum resolution for examining cell populations and compartments. We compared Panx1 expression over the cerebellum, hippocampus with adjacent cortex, thalamus and olfactory bulb. While Panx1 localizes to the same neuronal cell types, subcellular localizations differ. Two antibodies with epitopes against the intracellular loop and one against the carboxy terminus preferentially labeled cell bodies, while an antibody raised against an N-terminal peptide highlighted neuronal processes more than cell bodies. These labeling patterns may be a reflection of different cellular and subcellular localizations of full-length and/or modified Panx1 channels where each antibody is highlighting unique or differentially accessible Panx1 populations. However, we cannot rule out that one or more of these antibodies have specificity issues. All data associated with experiments from these four antibodies are presented in a manner that allows them to be compared and our claims thoroughly evaluated, rather than eliminating results that were questionable. Each antibody is given a unique identifier through the NIF Antibody Registry that can be used to track usage of individual antibodies across papers and all image and metadata are made available in the public repository, the Cell Centered Database, for on

  7. Heterogeneity of ductular reactions in adult rat and human liver revealed by novel expression of deleted in malignant brain tumor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hanne Cathrine; Holmskov, Uffe; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric

    2002-01-01

    DNA library screening approach, we identified 48 enriched, nonredundant gene products associated with liver injury and oval cell proliferation in the adult rat liver. Of these, only two, namely alpha-fetoprotein and a novel transcript with high homology to human DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumor 1......), were specifically associated with the emergence of ductular (oval) cell populations in injured liver. Subsequent cloning and characterization of the rat DMBT1 homologue revealed a highly inducible expression in ductular reactions composed of transit-amplifying ductular (oval) cells, but not in ductular...

  8. Anal fistula: intraoperative difficulties and unexpected findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zeid, Ahmed A

    2011-07-28

    Anal fistula surgery is a commonly performed procedure. The diverse anatomy of anal fistulae and their proximity to anal sphincters make accurate preoperative diagnosis essential to avoid recurrence and fecal incontinence. Despite the fact that proper preoperative diagnosis can be reached in the majority of patients by simple clinical examination, endoanal ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging, on many occasions, unexpected findings can be encountered during surgery that can make the operation difficult and correct decision-making crucial. In this article we discuss the difficulties and unexpected findings that can be encountered during anal fistula surgery and how to overcome them.

  9. Anal fistula: Intraoperative difficulties and unexpected findings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed A Abou-Zeid

    2011-01-01

    Anal fistula surgery is a commonly performed procedure. The diverse anatomy of anal fistulae and their proximity to anal sphincters make accurate preoperative diagnosis essential to avoid recurrence and fecal incontinence. De-spite the fact that proper preoperative diagnosis can be reached in the majority of patients by simple clinical ex-amination, endoanal ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging, on many occasions, unexpected findings can be encountered during surgery that can make the oper-ation difficult and correct decision-making crucial. In this article we discuss the difficulties and unexpected find-ings that can be encountered during anal fistula sur-gery and how to overcome them.

  10. Body representations in the human brain revealed by kinesthetic illusions and their essential contributions to motor control and corporeal awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Eiichi; Morita, Tomoyo; Amemiya, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    The human brain can generate a continuously changing postural model of our body. Somatic (proprioceptive) signals from skeletal muscles and joints contribute to the formation of the body representation. Recent neuroimaging studies of proprioceptive bodily illusions have elucidated the importance of three brain systems (motor network, specialized parietal systems, right inferior fronto-parietal network) in the formation of the human body representation. The motor network, especially the primary motor cortex, processes afferent input from skeletal muscles. Such information may contribute to the formation of kinematic/dynamic postural models of limbs, thereby enabling fast online feedback control. Distinct parietal regions appear to play specialized roles in the transformation/integration of information across different coordinate systems, which may subserve the adaptability and flexibility of the body representation. Finally, the right inferior fronto-parietal network, connected by the inferior branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus, is consistently recruited when an individual experiences various types of bodily illusions and its possible roles relate to corporeal awareness, which is likely elicited through a series of neuronal processes of monitoring and accumulating bodily information and updating the body representation. Because this network is also recruited when identifying one's own features, the network activity could be a neuronal basis for self-consciousness.

  11. Live imaging reveals a new role for the sigma-1 (σ1) receptor in allowing microglia to leave brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Christian; Berardi, Francesco; Abate, Carmen; Peri, Francesca

    2015-03-30

    Microglial cells are responsible for clearing and maintaining the central nervous system (CNS) microenvironment. Upon brain damage, they move toward injuries to clear the area by engulfing dying neurons. However, in the context of many neurological disorders chronic microglial responses are responsible for neurodegeneration. Therefore, it is important to understand how these cells can be "switched-off" and regain their ramified state. Current research suggests that microglial inflammatory responses can be inhibited by sigma (σ) receptor activation. Here, we take advantage of the optical transparency of the zebrafish embryo to study the role of σ1 receptor in microglia in an intact living brain. By combining chemical approaches with real time imaging we found that treatment with PB190, a σ1 agonist, blocks microglial migration toward injuries leaving cellular baseline motility and the engulfment of apoptotic neurons unaffected. Most importantly, by taking a reverse genetic approach, we discovered that the role of σ1in vivo is to "switch-off" microglia after they responded to an injury allowing for these cells to leave the site of damage. This indicates that pharmacological manipulation of σ1 receptor modulates microglial responses providing new approaches to reduce the devastating impact that microglia have in neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Baseline brain activity changes in patients with clinically isolated syndrome revealed by resting-state functional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Liang, Peipeng; Jia, Xiuqin; Yu, Chunshui [Dept. of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Ye, Jing [Dept. of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Butzkueven, Helmut [Dept. of Medicine, Univ. of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Dong, Huiqing [Dept. of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Li, Kuncheng [Dept. of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of MRI and Brain Informatics, Beijing (China)], E-mail: likuncheng1955@yahoo.com.cn

    2012-11-15

    Background A clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) is the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Previous task-related functional MRI studies demonstrate functional reorganization in patients with CIS. Purpose To assess baseline brain activity changes in patients with CIS by using the technique of regional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) as an index in resting-state fMRI. Material and Methods Resting-state fMRIs data acquired from 37 patients with CIS and 37 age- and sex-matched normal controls were compared to investigate ALFF differences. The relationships between ALFF in regions with significant group differences and the EDSS (Expanded Disability Status Scale), disease duration, and T2 lesion volume (T2LV) were further explored. Results Patients with CIS had significantly decreased ALFF in the right anterior cingulate cortex, right caudate, right lingual gyrus, and right cuneus (P < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons using Monte Carlo simulation) compared to normal controls, while no significantly increased ALFF were observed in CIS. No significant correlation was found between the EDSS, disease duration, T2LV, and ALFF in regions with significant group differences. Conclusion In patients with CIS, resting-state fMRI demonstrates decreased activity in several brain regions. These results are in contrast to patients with established MS, in whom ALFF demonstrates several regions of increased activity. It is possible that this shift from decreased activity in CIS to increased activity in MS could reflect the dynamics of cortical reorganization.

  13. Royal jelly-like protein localization reveals differences in hypopharyngeal glands buildup and conserved expression pattern in brains of bumblebees and honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Albert

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Royal jelly proteins (MRJPs of the honeybee bear several open questions. One of them is their expression in tissues other than the hypopharyngeal glands (HGs, the site of royal jelly production. The sole MRJP-like gene of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris (BtRJPL, represents a pre-diversification stage of the MRJP gene evolution in bees. Here we investigate the expression of BtRJPL in the HGs and the brain of bumblebees. Comparison of the HGs of bumblebees and honeybees revealed striking differences in their morphology with respect to sex- and caste-specific appearance, number of cells per acinus, and filamentous actin (F-actin rings. At the cellular level, we found a temporary F-actin-covered meshwork in the secretory cells, which suggests a role for actin in the biogenesis of the end apparatus in HGs. Using immunohistochemical localization, we show that BtRJPL is expressed in the bumblebee brain, predominantly in the Kenyon cells of the mushroom bodies, the site of sensory integration in insects, and in the optic lobes. Our data suggest that a dual gland-brain function preceded the multiplication of MRJPs in the honeybee lineage. In the course of the honeybee evolution, HGs dramatically changed their morphology in order to serve a food-producing function.

  14. Extensive Direct Subcortical Cerebellum-Basal Ganglia Connections in Human Brain as Revealed by Constrained Spherical Deconvolution Tractography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrio eMilardi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The connections between the cerebellum and basal ganglia were assumed to occur at the level of neocortex. However evidences from animal data have challenged this old perspective showing extensive subcortical pathways linking the cerebellum with the basal ganglia. Here we tested the hypothesis if these connections also exist between the cerebellum and basal ganglia in the human brain by using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and tractography. Fifteen healthy subjects were analyzed by using constrained spherical deconvolution technique obtained with a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We found extensive connections running between the subthalamic nucleus and cerebellar cortex and, as novel result, we demonstrated a direct route linking the dentate nucleus to the internal globus pallidus as well as to the substantia nigra. These findings may open a new scenario on the interpretation of basal ganglia disorders.

  15. Brain-decoding fMRI reveals how wholes relate to the sum of parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilius, Jonas; Baeck, Annelies; Wagemans, Johan; Op de Beeck, Hans P

    2015-11-01

    The human brain performs many nonlinear operations in order to extract relevant information from local inputs. How can we observe and quantify these effects within and across large patches of cortex? In this paper, we discuss the application of multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to address this issue. Specifically, we show how MVPA (i) allows to compare various possibilities of part combinations into wholes, such as taking the mean, weighted mean, or the maximum of responses to the parts; (ii) can be used to quantify the parameters of these combinations; and (iii) can be applied in various experimental paradigms. Through these procedures, fMRI helps to obtain a computational understanding of how local information is integrated into larger wholes in various cortical regions.

  16. Unexpected complications of bonded mandibular lingual retainers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsaros, C.; Livas, C.; Renkema, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The flexible spiral wire (FSW) retainer is the most frequently used type of fixed retainer bonded on all 6 anterior teeth. Our aim in this article was to demonstrate unexpected posttreatment changes in the labiolingual position of the mandibular anterior teeth associated with the use o

  17. Some Unexpected Results Using Computer Algebra Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Felix; Garcia, Alfonsa; Garcia, Francisco; Hoya, Sara; Rodriguez, Gerardo; de la Villa, Agustin

    2001-01-01

    Shows how teachers can often use unexpected outputs from Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) to reinforce concepts and to show students the importance of thinking about how they use the software and reflecting on their results. Presents different examples where DERIVE, MAPLE, or Mathematica does not work as expected and suggests how to use them as a…

  18. Naturalistic FMRI mapping reveals superior temporal sulcus as the hub for the distributed brain network for social perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahnakoski, Juha M; Glerean, Enrico; Salmi, Juha; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Sams, Mikko; Hari, Riitta; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Despite the abundant data on brain networks processing static social signals, such as pictures of faces, the neural systems supporting social perception in naturalistic conditions are still poorly understood. Here we delineated brain networks subserving social perception under naturalistic conditions in 19 healthy humans who watched, during 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a set of 137 short (approximately 16 s each, total 27 min) audiovisual movie clips depicting pre-selected social signals. Two independent raters estimated how well each clip represented eight social features (faces, human bodies, biological motion, goal-oriented actions, emotion, social interaction, pain, and speech) and six filler features (places, objects, rigid motion, people not in social interaction, non-goal-oriented action, and non-human sounds) lacking social content. These ratings were used as predictors in the fMRI analysis. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) responded to all social features but not to any non-social features, and the anterior STS responded to all social features except bodies and biological motion. We also found four partially segregated, extended networks for processing of specific social signals: (1) a fronto-temporal network responding to multiple social categories, (2) a fronto-parietal network preferentially activated to bodies, motion, and pain, (3) a temporo-amygdalar network responding to faces, social interaction, and speech, and (4) a fronto-insular network responding to pain, emotions, social interactions, and speech. Our results highlight the role of the pSTS in processing multiple aspects of social information, as well as the feasibility and efficiency of fMRI mapping under conditions that resemble the complexity of real life.

  19. Functional interactions within the parahippocampal region revealed by voltage-sensitive dye imaging in the isolated guinea pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biella, Gerardo; Spaiardi, Paolo; Toselli, Mauro; de Curtis, Marco; Gnatkovsky, Vadym

    2010-02-01

    The massive transfer of information from the neocortex to the entorhinal cortex (and vice versa) is hindered by a powerful inhibitory control generated in the perirhinal cortex. In vivo and in vitro experiments performed in rodents and cats support this conclusion, further extended in the present study to the analysis of the interaction between the entorhinal cortex and other parahippocampal areas, such as the postrhinal and the retrosplenial cortices. The experiments were performed in the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain by a combined approach based on electrophysiological recordings and fast imaging of optical signals generated by voltage-sensitive dyes applied to the entire brain by arterial perfusion. Local stimuli delivered in different portions of the perirhinal, postrhinal, and retrosplenial cortex evoked local responses that did not propagate to the entorhinal cortex. Neither high- and low-frequency-patterned stimulation nor paired associative stimuli facilitated the propagation of activity to the entorhinal region. Similar stimulations performed during cholinergic neuromodulation with carbachol were also ineffective in overcoming the inhibitory network that controls propagation to the entorhinal cortex. The pharmacological inactivation of GABAergic transmission by local application of bicuculline (1 mM) in area 36 of the perirhinal cortex facilitated the longitudinal (rostrocaudal) propagation of activity into the perirhinal/postrhinal cortices but did not cause propagation into the entorhinal cortex. Bicuculline injection in both area 35 and medial entorhinal cortex released the inhibitory control and allowed the propagation of the neural activity to the entorhinal cortex. These results demonstrate that, as for the perirhinal-entorhinal reciprocal interactions, also the connections between the postrhinal/retrosplenial cortices and the entorhinal region are subject to a powerful inhibitory control.

  20. Naturalistic fMRI mapping reveals superior temporal sulcus as the hub for the distributed brain network for social perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Marko Lahnakoski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the abundant data on brain networks processing static social signals, such as pictures of faces, the neural systems supporting social perception in naturalistic conditions are still poorly understood. Here we delineated brain networks subserving social perception under naturalistic conditions in 19 healthy humans who watched, during 3-tesla functional magnetic imaging (fMRI, a set of 137 short (~16 s each, total 27 min audiovisual movie clips depicting pre-selected social signals. Two independent raters estimated how well each clip represented eight social features (faces, human bodies, biological motion, goal-oriented actions, emotion, social interaction, pain, and speech and six filler features (places, objects, rigid motion, people not in social interaction, non-goal-oriented action and non-human sounds lacking social content. These ratings were used as predictors in the fMRI analysis. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS responded to all social features but not to any non-social features, and the anterior STS responded to all social features except bodies and biological motion. We also found four partially segregated, extended networks for processing of specific social signals: 1 a fronto-temporal network responding to multiple social categories, 2 a fronto-parietal network preferentially activated to bodies, motion and pain, 3 a temporo-amygdalar network responding to faces, social interaction and speech, and 4 a fronto-insular network responding to pain, emotions, social interactions, and speech. Our results highlight the role of the posterior STS in processing multiple aspects of social information, as well as the feasibility and efficiency of fMRI mapping under conditions that resemble the complexity of real life.

  1. Brain structural abnormalities in behavior therapy-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder revealed by voxel-based morphometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashimoto N

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nobuhiko Hashimoto,1 Shutaro Nakaaki,2 Akiko Kawaguchi,1 Junko Sato,1 Harumasa Kasai,3 Takashi Nakamae,4 Jin Narumoto,4 Jun Miyata,5 Toshi A Furukawa,6,7 Masaru Mimura2 1Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Central Radiology, Nagoya City University Hospital, Nagoya, Japan; 4Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan; 5Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; 6Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, 7Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Background: Although several functional imaging studies have demonstrated that behavior therapy (BT modifies the neural circuits involved in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, the structural abnormalities underlying BT-resistant OCD remain unknown. Methods: In this study, we examined the existence of regional structural abnormalities in both the gray matter and the white matter of patients with OCD at baseline using voxel-based morphometry in responders (n=24 and nonresponders (n=15 to subsequent BT. Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed before the completion of 12 weeks of BT. Results: Relative to the responders, the nonresponders exhibited significantly smaller gray matter volumes in the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the right orbitofrontal cortex, the right precentral gyrus, and the left anterior cingulate cortex. In addition, relative to the responders, the nonresponders exhibited significantly smaller white matter volumes in the left cingulate bundle and the left superior frontal white matter. Conclusion: These results suggest that the brain

  2. NIRS-based hyperscanning reveals inter-brain neural synchronization during cooperative Jenga game with face-to-face communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning eLiu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS is an increasingly popular technology for studying social cognition. In particular, fNIRS permits simultaneous measurement of hemodynamic activity in two or more individuals interacting in a naturalistic setting. Here, we used fNIRS hyperscanning to study social cognition and communication in human dyads engaged in cooperative and non-cooperative interaction while they played the game of Jenga™. Novel methods were developed to identify synchronized channels for each dyad and a structural node-based spatial registration approach was utilized for inter-dyad analyses. Strong inter-brain neural synchrony (INS was observed in the posterior region of the right middle and superior frontal gyrus, in particular Brodmann area 8, during cooperative and obstructive interaction. This synchrony was not observed during the parallel game play condition and the dialogue section, suggesting that BA8 was involved in goal-oriented social interaction such as complex interactive movements and social decision-making. INS was also observed in the dorsomedial prefrontal region (dmPFC, in particular Brodmann 9, during cooperative interaction only. These additional findings suggest that BA9 may be particularly engaged when theory-of-mind is required for cooperative social interaction. The new methods described here have the potential to significantly extend fNIRS applications to social cognitive research.

  3. Event-related brain potentials reveal the time-course of language change detection in early bilinguals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Jan-Rouke; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-05-01

    Using event-related brain potentials, we investigated the temporal course of language change detection in proficient bilinguals as compared to matched controls. Welsh-English bilingual participants and English controls were presented with a variant of the oddball paradigm involving picture-word pairs. The language of the spoken word was manipulated such that English was the frequent stimulus (75%) and Welsh the infrequent stimulus (25%). We also manipulated semantic relatedness between pictures and words, such that only half of the pictures were followed by a word that corresponded with the identity of the picture. The P2 wave was significantly modulated by language in the bilingual group only, suggesting that this group detected a language change as early as 200 ms after word onset. Monolinguals also reliably detected the language change, but at a later stage of semantic integration (N400 range), since Welsh words were perceived as meaningless. The early detection of a language change in bilinguals triggered stimulus re-evaluation mechanisms reflected by a significant P600 modulation by Welsh words. Furthermore, compared to English unrelated words, English words matching the picture identity elicited significantly greater P2 amplitudes in the bilingual group only, suggesting that proficient bilinguals validate an incoming word against their expectation based on the context. Overall, highly proficient bilinguals appear to detect language changes very early on during speech perception and to consciously monitor language changes when they occur.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Reveals Differential Protein Expression in Response to Enterovirus 71 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenying Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 2D DIGE technology was employed on proteins prepared from human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC, to study the differentially expressed proteins in cells at 0 h, 1 h, 16 h, and 24 h after infection. Proteins found to be differentially expressed were identified with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDITOF/TOF MS analysis. We identified 43 spots showing changes of at least 2.5 fold up- or downregulated expressions in EV71-infected cells at different time when comparing to control, and 28 proteins could be successfully identified by MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analysis. 4 proteins were significantly upregulated, and 6 proteins were downregulated, another 18 proteins were different expression at different incubation time. We identified changes in the expression of 12 cellular metabolism-related proteins, 5 molecules involved in cytoskeleton, 3 molecules involved in energy metabolism, 2 molecules involved in signal transduction, 1 molecule involved in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, 1 molecule involved in cell cycle, 1 molecule involved in apoptosis-related protein, 1 molecular chaperone, and 2 unknown proteins. These findings build up a comprehensive profile of the HBMEC proteome and provide a useful basis for further analysis of the pathogenic mechanism that underlies EV71 infections to induce severe neural complications.

  5. Brain processing of biologically relevant odors in the awake rat, as revealed by manganese-enhanced MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoist Lehallier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: So far, an overall view of olfactory structures activated by natural biologically relevant odors in the awake rat is not available. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI is appropriate for this purpose. While MEMRI has been used for anatomical labeling of olfactory pathways, functional imaging analyses have not yet been performed beyond the olfactory bulb. Here, we have used MEMRI for functional imaging of rat central olfactory structures and for comparing activation maps obtained with odors conveying different biological messages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Odors of male fox feces and of chocolate flavored cereals were used to stimulate conscious rats previously treated by intranasal instillation of manganese (Mn. MEMRI activation maps showed Mn enhancement all along the primary olfactory cortex. Mn enhancement elicited by male fox feces odor and to a lesser extent that elicited by chocolate odor, differed from that elicited by deodorized air. This result was partly confirmed by c-Fos immunohistochemistry in the piriform cortex. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: By providing an overall image of brain structures activated in awake rats by odorous stimulation, and by showing that Mn enhancement is differently sensitive to different stimulating odors, the present results demonstrate the interest of MEMRI for functional studies of olfaction in the primary olfactory cortex of laboratory small animals, under conditions close to natural perception. Finally, the factors that may cause the variability of the MEMRI signal in response to different odor are discussed.

  6. Suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) and macroarray techniques reveal differential gene expression profiles in brain of sea bream infected with nodavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dios, S; Poisa-Beiro, L; Figueras, A; Novoa, B

    2007-03-01

    Despite of the impact that viruses have on aquatic organisms, relatively little is known on how fish fight against these infections. In this work, the brain gene expression pattern of sea bream (Sparus aurata) in response to nodavirus infection was investigated. We used the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method to generate a subtracted cDNA library enriched with gene transcripts differentially expressed after 1 day post-infection. Some of the ESTs from the infected tissues fell in gene categories related to stress and immune responses. For the reverse library (ESTs expressed in controls compared with infected tissues) the most abundant transcripts were of ribosomal and mitochondrial nature. Several ESTs potentially induced by virus exposure were selected for in vivo expression studies. We observed a clear difference in expression between infected and control samples for two candidate genes, ubiquitin conjugating enzyme 7 interacting protein, which seems to play an important role in apoptosis and the interferon induced protein with helicase C domain 1 (mda-5) that contributes to apoptosis and regulates the type I IFN production, a key molecule of the antiviral innate response in most organisms.

  7. Functionally Brain Network Connected to the Retrosplenial Cortex of Rats Revealed by 7T fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjuan; Nie, Binbin; Duan, Shaofeng; Zhu, Haitao; Liu, Hua; Shan, Baoci

    2016-01-01

    Functional networks are regarded as important mechanisms for increasing our understanding of brain function in healthy and diseased states, and increased interest has been focused on extending the study of functional networks to animal models because such models provide a functional understanding of disease progression, therapy and repair. In rodents, the retrosplenial cortex (RSC) is an important cortical region because it has a large size and presents transitional patterns of lamination between the neocortex and archicortex. In addition, a number of invasive studies have highlighted the importance of the RSC for many functions. However, the network based on the RSC in rodents remains unclear. Based on the critical importance of the RSC, we defined the bilateral RSCs as two regions of interest and estimated the network based on the RSC. The results showed that the related regions include the parietal association cortex, hippocampus, thalamus nucleus, midbrain structures, and hypothalamic mammillary bodies. Our findings indicate two possible major networks: a sensory-cognitive network that has a hub in the RSCs and processes sensory information, spatial learning, and episodic memory; and a second network that is involved in the regulation of visceral functions and arousal. In addition, functional asymmetry between the bilateral RSCs was observed.

  8. Asynchronous presentation of global and local information reveals effects of attention on brain electrical activity specific to each level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Fuster, Jorge; Santos-Rodríguez, Yusniel; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell J

    2014-01-01

    The neural basis of selective attention within hierarchically organized Navon figures has been extensively studied with event related potentials (ERPs), by contrasting responses obtained when attending the global and the local echelons. The findings are inherently ambiguous because both levels are always presented together. Thus, only a mixture of the brain responses to two levels can be observed. Here, we use a method that allows unveiling of global and local letters at distinct times, enabling estimation of separate ERPs related to each level. Two interspersed oddball streams were presented, each using letters from one level and comprised of frequent distracters and rare targets. Previous work and our Experiment 1 show that it is difficult to divide attention between two such streams of stimuli. ERP recording in Experiment 2 evinced an early selection negativity (SN, with latencies to the 50% area of about 266 ms for global distracters and 276 ms for local distracters) that was larger for attended relative to unattended distracters. The SN was larger over right posterior occipito-temporal derivations for global stimuli and over left posterior occipito-temporal derivations for local stimuli (although the latter was less strongly lateralized). A discrimination negativity (DN, accompanied by a P3b) was larger for attended targets relative to attended distracters, with latencies to the 50% area of about 316 ms for global stimuli and 301 ms for local stimuli, which presented a similar distribution for both levels over left temporo-parietal electrodes. The two negativities apparently index successive stages in the processing of a selected level within a compound figure. By resolving the ambiguity of traditional designs, our method allowed us to observe the effects of attention for each hierarchical level on its own.

  9. Glutamate imaging (GluCEST) reveals lower brain GluCEST contrast in patients on the psychosis spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roalf, D R; Nanga, R P R; Rupert, P E; Hariharan, H; Quarmley, M; Calkins, M E; Dress, E; Prabhakaran, K; Elliott, M A; Moberg, P J; Gur, R C; Gur, R E; Reddy, R; Turetsky, B I

    2017-01-24

    Psychosis commonly develops in adolescence or early adulthood. Youths at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis exhibit similar, subtle symptoms to those with schizophrenia (SZ). Malfunctioning neurotransmitter systems, such as glutamate, are implicated in the disease progression of psychosis. Yet, in vivo imaging techniques for measuring glutamate across the cortex are limited. Here, we use a novel 7 Tesla MRI glutamate imaging technique (GluCEST) to estimate changes in glutamate levels across cortical and subcortical regions in young healthy individuals and ones on the psychosis spectrum. Individuals on the psychosis spectrum (PS; n=19) and healthy young individuals (HC; n=17) underwent MRI imaging at 3 and 7 T. At 7 T, a single slice GluCEST technique was used to estimate in vivo glutamate. GluCEST contrast was compared within and across the subcortex, frontal, parietal and occipital lobes. Subcortical (χ(2) (1)=4.65, P=0.031) and lobular (χ(2) (1)=5.17, P=0.023) GluCEST contrast levels were lower in PS compared with HC. Abnormal GluCEST contrast levels were evident in both CHR (n=14) and SZ (n=5) subjects, and correlated differentially, across regions, with clinical symptoms. Our findings describe a pattern of abnormal brain neurochemistry early in the course of psychosis. Specifically, CHR and young SZ exhibit diffuse abnormalities in GluCEST contrast attributable to a major contribution from glutamate. We suggest that neurochemical profiles of GluCEST contrast across cortex and subcortex may be considered markers of early psychosis. GluCEST methodology thus shows promise to further elucidate the progression of the psychosis disease state.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 24 January 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.258.

  10. Longitudinal metabolic changes in the hippocampus and thalamus of the maternal brain revealed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Iris Y; Chan, Russell W; Ho, Leon C; Wu, Ed X

    2013-10-11

    Pregnancy is accompanied by dramatic hormonal changes, which are essential for the display of maternal behaviors. Reproductive hormones have been shown to remodel the neuronal structure and function of the female brain. However, most previous studies have examined the structural and functional changes elicited by transient fluctuations in reproductive hormones. The impact of naturally elevated and more sustained hormonal alterations during pregnancy and lactation are not fully understood. Further alterations in neurochemistry, which may result in substantial changes in the structure and function of neurons that are associated with behavioral modifications in the maternal female, are difficult to capture in a longitudinal and non-invasive manner. In this study, neurobiological alterations during pregnancy and motherhood were investigated longitudinally using non-invasive proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 7T in regions related to learning and memory, such as the hippocampus, and in structures involved in alertness and attention, such as the thalamus. Pregnant primiparous rats (N=15) were studied at three days before mating, gestational day 17, lactation day 7 and post-weaning day 7. Age-matched nulliparous female rats (N=9) served as non-pregnant controls. Significantly higher N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels were observed in the hippocampus and thalamus of rats at gestational day 17. These increases may be associated with increased dendritic sprouting, synaptogenesis or neurogenesis, thereby facilitating supporting behaviors that involve spatial learning and memory and alleviating fear and stress. The (1)H MRS detection of ongoing neurochemical changes induced by pregnancy, especially in the hippocampus, can shed light on the neurochemical underpinnings of behavioral modifications, including the improvement in spatial learning and memory, during pregnancy.

  11. Sexually Dimorphic Gene Expression Associated with Growth and Reproduction of Tongue Sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis Revealed by Brain Transcriptome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome of one- and two-year-old male and female brains of Cynoglossus semilaevis by high-throughput Illumina sequencing. A total of 77,066 transcripts, corresponding to 21,475 unigenes, were obtained with a N50 value of 4349 bp. Of these unigenes, 33 genes were found to have significant differential expression and potentially associated with growth, from which 18 genes were down-regulated and 12 genes were up-regulated in two-year-old males, most of these genes had no significant differences in expression among one-year-old males and females and two-year-old females. A similar analysis was conducted to look for genes associated with reproduction; 25 genes were identified, among them, five genes were found to be down regulated and 20 genes up regulated in two-year-old males, again, most of the genes had no significant expression differences among the other three. The performance of up regulated genes in Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway enrichment analysis was significantly different between two-year-old males and females. Males had a high gene expression in genetic information processing, while female’s highly expressed genes were mainly enriched on organismal systems. Our work identified a set of sex-biased genes potentially associated with growth and reproduction that might be the candidate factors affecting sexual dimorphism of tongue sole, laying the foundation to understand the complex process of sex determination of this economic valuable species.

  12. Unexpected Translations in Urban Policy Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zapata, Patrik; Zapata Campos, Maria José

    such as prototypes in order to travel. It was made mobile via relational sites or situations providing safe and accessible connections with Chureca residents. Paradoxically, these places also allowed extraordinary connections between actors located in different scales and spaces, facilitating unexpected local...... of plans into reality, but as an uncontrollable process in which multiple translations twist policies and plans from below. The significant question is therefore not whether plans succeed, but how they succeed....

  13. Unexpected Translations in Urban Policy Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zapata, Patrik; Zapata Campos, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    such as prototypes in order to travel. It was made mobile via relational sites or situations providing safe and accessible connections with Chureca residents. Paradoxically, these places also allowed extraordinary connections between actors located in different scales and spaces, facilitating unexpected local...... of plans into reality, but as an uncontrollable process in which multiple translations twist policies and plans from below. The significant question is therefore not whether plans succeed, but how they succeed....

  14. Multivariate imaging-genetics study of MRI gray matter volume and SNPs reveals biological pathways correlated with brain structural differences in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabin Khadka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder affecting children, adolescents, and adults. Its etiology is not well-understood, but it is increasingly believed to result from diverse pathophysiologies that affect the structure and function of specific brain circuits. Although one of the best-studied neurobiological abnormalities in ADHD is reduced fronto-striatal-cerebellar gray matter volume, its specific genetic correlates are largely unknown. Methods: In this study, T1-weighted MR images of brain structure were collected from 198 adolescents (63 ADHD-diagnosed. A multivariate parallel independent component analysis technique (Para-ICA identified imaging-genetic relationships between regional gray matter volume and single nucleotide polymorphism data. Results: Para-ICA analyses extracted 14 components from genetic data and 9 from MR data. An iterative cross-validation using randomly-chosen sub-samples indicated acceptable stability of these ICA solutions. A series of partial correlation analyses controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity revealed two genotype-phenotype component pairs significantly differed between ADHD and non-ADHD groups, after a Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. The brain phenotype component not only included structures frequently found to have abnormally low volume in previous ADHD studies, but was also significantly associated with ADHD differences in symptom severity and performance on cognitive tests frequently found to be impaired in patients diagnosed with the disorder. Pathway analysis of the genotype component identified several different biological pathways linked to these structural abnormalities in ADHD. Conclusions: Some of these pathways implicate well-known dopaminergic neurotransmission and neurodevelopment hypothesized to be abnormal in ADHD. Other more recently implicated pathways included glutamatergic and GABA-eric physiological systems

  15. Cerebral complexity preceded enlarged brain size and reduced olfactory bulbs in Old World monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzales, L.; Benefit, B.; McCrossin, M.; Spoor, F.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the only complete early cercopithecoid (Old World monkey) endocast currently known, that of 15-million-year (Myr)-old Victoriapithecus, reveals an unexpectedly small endocranial volume (ECV) relative to body size and a large olfactory bulb volume relative to ECV, similar to extant lemurs and Oligocene anthropoids. However, the Victoriapithecus brain has principal and arcuate sulci of the frontal lobe not seen in the stem catarrhine Aegyptopithecus, as well as a distinctive cercopi...

  16. Comparative transcriptome analysis in induced neural stem cells reveals defined neural cell identities in vitro and after transplantation into the adult rodent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Anna-Lena; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Zerfass, Christina; Senner, Volker; Ehrlich, Marc; Psathaki, Olympia E; Han, Dong Wook; Tapia, Natalia; Zaehres, Holm; Schöler, Hans R; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Hargus, Gunnar

    2016-05-01

    Reprogramming technology enables the production of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from somatic cells by direct transdifferentiation. However, little is known on how neural programs in these induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) differ from those of alternative stem cell populations in vitro and in vivo. Here, we performed transcriptome analyses on murine iNSCs in comparison to brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and pluripotent stem cell-derived NPCs, which revealed distinct global, neural, metabolic and cell cycle-associated marks in these populations. iNSCs carried a hindbrain/posterior cell identity, which could be shifted towards caudal, partially to rostral but not towards ventral fates in vitro. iNSCs survived after transplantation into the rodent brain and exhibited in vivo-characteristics, neural and metabolic programs similar to transplanted NSCs. However, iNSCs vastly retained caudal identities demonstrating cell-autonomy of regional programs in vivo. These data could have significant implications for a variety of in vitro- and in vivo-applications using iNSCs.

  17. 'Hit & Run' model of closed-skull traumatic brain injury (TBI) reveals complex patterns of post-traumatic AQP4 dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zeguang; Iliff, Jeffrey J; Yang, Lijun; Yang, Jiankai; Chen, Xiaolin; Chen, Michael J; Giese, Rebecca N; Wang, Baozhi; Shi, Xuefang; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral edema is a major contributor to morbidity associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The methods involved in most rodent models of TBI, including head fixation, opening of the skull, and prolonged anesthesia, likely alter TBI development and reduce secondary injury. We report the development of a closed-skull model of murine TBI, which minimizes time of anesthesia, allows the monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP), and can be modulated to produce mild and moderate grade TBI. In this model, we characterized changes in aquaporin-4 (AQP4) expression and localization after mild and moderate TBI. We found that global AQP4 expression after TBI was generally increased; however, analysis of AQP4 localization revealed that the most prominent effect of TBI on AQP4 was the loss of polarized localization at endfoot processes of reactive astrocytes. This AQP4 dysregulation peaked at 7 days after injury and was largely indistinguishable between mild and moderate grade TBI for the first 2 weeks after injury. Within the same model, blood-brain barrieranalysis of variance permeability, cerebral edema, and ICP largely normalized within 7 days after moderate TBI. These findings suggest that changes in AQP4 expression and localization may not contribute to cerebral edema formation, but rather may represent a compensatory mechanism to facilitate its resolution.

  18. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated microRNA delivery into the postnatal mouse brain reveals a role for miR-134 in dendritogenesis in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Christensen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies using primary neuronal cultures have revealed important roles of the microRNA pathway in the regulation of neuronal development and morphology. For example, miR-134 is involved in dendritogenesis and spine development in hippocampal neurons by regulating local mRNA translation in dendrites. The in vivo roles of microRNAs in these processes are still uninvestigated, partly due to the lack of tools enabling stable in vivo delivery of microRNAs or microRNA inhibitors into neurons of the mammalian brain. Here we describe the construction and validation of a vector-based tool for stable delivery of microRNAs in vivo by use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV. rAAV-mediated overexpression of miR-134 in neurons of the postnatal mouse brain provided evidence for a negative role of miR-134 in dendritic arborization of cortical layer V pyramidal neurons in vivo, thereby confirming previous findings obtained with cultured neurons. Our system provides researchers with a unique tool to study the role of any candidate microRNA in vivo and can easily be adapted to microRNA loss-of-function studies. This platform should therefore greatly facilitate investigations on the role of microRNAs in synapse development, plasticity and behavior in vivo.

  19. Brain microstructural abnormalities revealed by diffusion tensor images in patients with treatment-resistant depression compared with major depressive disorder before treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Yan, E-mail: clare1475@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ren-Ji Hospital, Jiao Tong University Medical School, Shanghai 200127 (China); Qin Lingdi, E-mail: flyfool318@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ren-Ji Hospital, Jiao Tong University Medical School, Shanghai 200127 (China); Chen Jun, E-mail: doctor_cj@msn.com [Shanghai Mental Health Center, Jiao Tong University Medical School, Shanghai, 200030 (China); Qian Lijun, E-mail: dearqlj@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ren-Ji Hospital, Jiao Tong University Medical School, Shanghai 200127 (China); Tao Jing, E-mail: jing318@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ren-Ji Hospital, Jiao Tong University Medical School, Shanghai 200127 (China); Fang Yiru, E-mail: fangyr@sina.com [Shanghai Mental Health Center, Jiao Tong University Medical School, Shanghai, 200030 (China); Xu Jianrong, E-mail: xujianr@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ren-Ji Hospital, Jiao Tong University Medical School, Shanghai 200127 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is a therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Despite a growing interest in this area, an understanding of the pathophysiology of depression, particularly TRD, remains lacking. This study aims to detect the white matter abnormalities of whole brain fractional anisotropy (FA) in patients with TRD compared with major depressive disorder (MDD) before treatment by voxel-based analysis using diffusion tensor imaging. A total of 100 patients first diagnosed with untreated MDD underwent diffusion tensor imaging scans. 8 weeks after the first treatment, 54 patients showed response to the medication, whereas 46 did not. Finally, 20 patients were diagnosed with TRD after undergoing another treatment. A total of 20 patients with TRD and another 20 with MDD before treatment matched in gender, age, and education was enrolled in the research. For every subject, an FA map was generated and analyzed using SPM5. Subsequently, t-test was conducted to compare the FA values voxel to voxel between the two groups (p < 0.001 [FDR corrected], t > 7.57, voxel size > 30). Voxel-based morphometric (VBM) analysis was performed using T1W images. Significant reductions in FA were found in the white matter located in the bilateral of the hippocampus (left hippocampus: t = 7.63, voxel size = 50; right hippocampus: t = 7.82, voxel size = 48). VBM analysis revealed no morphological abnormalities between the two groups. Investigation of brain anisotropy revealed significantly decreased FA in both sides of the hippocampus. Although preliminary, our findings suggest that microstructural abnormalities in the hippocampus indicate vulnerability to treatment resistance.

  20. Orchestrating Proactive and Reactive Mechanisms for Filtering Distracting Information: Brain-Behavior Relationships Revealed by a Mixed-Design fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesco; Demeter, Elise; Roberts, Kenneth C; Chelazzi, Leonardo; Woldorff, Marty G

    2016-01-20

    Given the information overload often imparted to human cognitive-processing systems, suppression of irrelevant and distracting information is essential for successful behavior. Using a hybrid block/event-related fMRI design, we characterized proactive and reactive brain mechanisms for filtering distracting stimuli. Participants performed a flanker task, discriminating the direction of a target arrow in the presence versus absence of congruent or incongruent flanking distracting arrows during either Pure blocks (distracters always absent) or Mixed blocks (distracters on 80% of trials). Each Mixed block had either 20% or 60% incongruent trials. Activations in the dorsal frontoparietal attention network during Mixed versus Pure blocks evidenced proactive (blockwise) recruitment of a distraction-filtering mechanism. Sustained activations in right middle frontal gyrus during 60% Incongruent blocks correlated positively with behavioral indices of distraction-filtering (slowing when distracters might occur) and negatively with distraction-related behavioral costs (incongruent vs congruent trials), suggesting a role in coordinating proactive filtering of potential distracters. Event-related analyses showed that incongruent trials elicited greater reactive activations in 20% (vs 60%) Incongruent blocks for counteracting distraction and conflict, including in the insula and anterior cingulate. Context-related effects in occipitoparietal cortex consisted of greater target-evoked activations for distracter-absent trials (central-target-only) in Mixed versus Pure blocks, suggesting enhanced attentional engagement. Functional-localizer analyses in V1/V2/V3 revealed less distracter-processing activity in 60% (vs 20%) Incongruent blocks, presumably reflecting tonic suppression by proactive filtering mechanisms. These results delineate brain mechanisms underlying proactive and reactive filtering of distraction and conflict, and how they are orchestrated depending on distraction

  1. Droplets sliding down inclined planes: unexpected dynamics on elastomer plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourlier-Fargette, Aurelie; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Neukirch, Sebastien

    2016-11-01

    Droplet dynamics on an angled surface results from a competition between the weight of the droplet, capillary forces, and viscous dissipation inside the drop. The motion of droplets on stiff surfaces has been investigated for a long time, both experimentally and theoretically, while recent studies have shown the interesting physics underlying the sliding of droplets on soft surfaces. We focus on the dynamics of water-glycerol mixture droplets sliding down vertical plates of silicone elastomers, highlighting an unexpected behavior: the droplet dynamics on such a surface includes two regimes with different constant speeds. These results contrast with those found in the literature for droplets sliding on materials such as treated glass. We investigate the universality of this behavior on various elastomers, and study in detail the two regimes and the sharp transition observed between them. Different candidates can be responsible for the sudden speed change: bistability, chemical interaction with the substrate, softness of the material, etc. Our experiments to clarify the role of each of them reveal an unexpected link between microscopic phenomena at the scale of the polymer matrix and the macroscopic dynamics of a droplet.

  2. Analysis of Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Gene Expression Signature Reveals Tubulins, Nfe2l2, Nfkb, Cd44, and S100a4 as Treatment Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipponen, Anssi; Paananen, Jussi; Puhakka, Noora; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-08-17

    We aimed to define the chronically altered gene expression signature of traumatic brain injury (TBI-sig) to discover novel treatments to reverse pathologic gene expression or reinforce the expression of recovery-related genes. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing was performed at 3 months post-TBI induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in rats. We found 4964 regulated genes in the perilesional cortex and 1966 in the thalamus (FDR < 0.05). TBI-sig was used for a LINCS analysis which identified 11 compounds that showed a strong connectivity with the TBI-sig in neuronal cell lines. Of these, celecoxib and sirolimus were recently reported to have a disease-modifying effect in in vivo animal models of epilepsy. Other compounds revealed by the analysis were BRD-K91844626, BRD-A11009626, NO-ASA, BRD-K55260239, SDZ-NKT-343, STK-661558, BRD-K75971499, ionomycin, and desmethylclomipramine. Network analysis of overlapping genes revealed the effects on tubulins (Tubb2a, Tubb3, Tubb4b), Nfe2l2, S100a4, Cd44, and Nfkb2, all of which are linked to TBI-relevant outcomes, including epileptogenesis and tissue repair. Desmethylclomipramine modulated most of the gene targets considered favorable for TBI outcome. Our data demonstrate long-lasting transcriptomics changes after TBI. LINCS analysis predicted that these changes could be modulated by various compounds, some of which are already in clinical use but never tested in TBI.

  3. Spectrometric mixture analysis: An unexpected wrinkle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Robert De Levie

    2009-09-01

    The spectrometric analysis of a mixture of two chemically and spectroscopically similar compounds is illustrated for the simultaneous spectrometric determination of caffeine and theobromine, the primary stimulants in coffee and tea, based on their ultraviolet absorbances. Their analysis indicates that such measurements may need an unexpectedly high precision to yield accurate answers, because of an artifact of inverse cancellation, in which a small noise or drift signal is misinterpreted in terms of a concentration difference. The computed sum of the concentrations is not affected.

  4. Language learning and brain reorganization in a 3.5-year-old child with left perinatal stroke revealed using structural and functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Clément; Ripollés, Pablo; Bosch, Laura; Garcia-Alix, Alfredo; Muchart, Jordi; Sierpowska, Joanna; Fons, Carme; Solé, Jorgina; Rebollo, Monica; Gaitán, Helena; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    Brain imaging methods have contributed to shed light on the possible mechanisms of recovery and cortical reorganization after early brain insult. The idea that a functional left hemisphere is crucial for achieving a normalized pattern of language development after left perinatal stroke is still under debate. We report the case of a 3.5-year-old boy born at term with a perinatal ischemic stroke of the left middle cerebral artery, affecting mainly the supramarginal gyrus, superior parietal and insular cortex extending to the precentral and postcentral gyri. Neurocognitive development was assessed at 25 and 42 months of age. Language outcomes were more extensively evaluated at the latter age with measures on receptive vocabulary, phonological whole-word production and linguistic complexity in spontaneous speech. Word learning abilities were assessed using a fast-mapping task to assess immediate and delayed recall of newly mapped words. Functional and structural imaging data as well as a measure of intrinsic connectivity were also acquired. While cognitive, motor and language levels from the Bayley Scales fell within the average range at 25 months, language scores were below at 42 months. Receptive vocabulary fell within normal limits but whole word production was delayed and the child had limited spontaneous speech. Critically, the child showed clear difficulties in both the immediate and delayed recall of the novel words, significantly differing from an age-matched control group. Neuroimaging data revealed spared classical cortical language areas but an affected left dorsal white-matter pathway together with right lateralized functional activations. In the framework of the model for Social Communication and Language Development, these data confirm the important role of the left arcuate fasciculus in understanding and producing morpho-syntactic elements in sentences beyond two word combinations and, most importantly, in learning novel word-referent associations, a

  5. A Translational Murine Model of Sub-Lethal Intoxication with Shiga Toxin 2 Reveals Novel Ultrastructural Findings in the Brain Striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tironi-Farinati, Carla; Geoghegan, Patricia A.; Cangelosi, Adriana; Pinto, Alipio; Loidl, C. Fabian; Goldstein, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Infection by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli causes hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), acute renal failure, and also central nervous system complications in around 30% of the children affected. Besides, neurological deficits are one of the most unrepairable and untreatable outcomes of HUS. Study of the striatum is relevant because basal ganglia are one of the brain areas most commonly affected in patients that have suffered from HUS and since the deleterious effects of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin have never been studied in the striatum, the purpose of this study was to attempt to simulate an infection by Shiga toxin-producing E. coli in a murine model. To this end, intravenous administration of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin 2 (0.5 ηg per mouse) was used and the correlation between neurological manifestations and ultrastructural changes in striatal brain cells was studied in detail. Neurological manifestations included significant motor behavior abnormalities in spontaneous motor activity, gait, pelvic elevation and hind limb activity eight days after administration of the toxin. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the toxin caused early perivascular edema two days after administration, as well as significant damage in astrocytes four days after administration and significant damage in neurons and oligodendrocytes eight days after administration. Interrupted synapses and mast cell extravasation were also found eight days after administration of the toxin. We thus conclude that the chronological order of events observed in the striatum could explain the neurological disorders found eight days after administration of the toxin. PMID:23383285

  6. Complex interplay between brain function and structure during cerebral amyloidosis in APP transgenic mouse strains revealed by multi-parametric MRI comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Joanes; Derungs, Rebecca; Kulic, Luka; Welt, Tobias; Henkelman, Mark; Nitsch, Roger M; Rudin, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting the aging population. Neuroimaging methods, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have helped reveal alterations in the brain structure, metabolism, and function of patients and in groups at risk of developing AD, yet the nature of these alterations is poorly understood. Neuroimaging in mice is attractive for investigating mechanisms underlying functional and structural changes associated with AD pathology. Several preclinical murine models of AD have been generated based on transgenic insertion of human mutated APP genes. Depending on the specific mutations, mouse strains express different aspects of amyloid pathology, e.g. intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates, parenchymal plaques, or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We have applied multi-parametric MRI in three transgenic mouse lines to compare changes in brain function with resting-state fMRI and structure with diffusion tensor imaging and high resolution anatomical imaging. E22ΔAβ developing intracellular Aβ aggregates did not present functional or structural alterations compared to their wild-type littermates. PSAPP mice displaying parenchymal amyloid plaques displayed mild functional changes within the supplementary and barrel field cortices, and increased isocortical volume relative to controls. Extensive reduction in functional connectivity in the sensory-motor cortices and within the default mode network, as well as local volume increase in the midbrain relative to wild-type have been observed in ArcAβ mice bearing intracellular Aβ aggregates as well as parenchymal and vascular amyloid deposits. Patterns of functional and structural changes appear to be strain-specific and not directly related to amyloid deposition.

  7. A "present" for the future: the unexpected value of rediscovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Kim, Tami; Brooks, Alison Wood; Gino, Francesca; Norton, Michael I

    2014-10-01

    Although documenting everyday activities may seem trivial, four studies reveal that creating records of the present generates unexpected benefits by allowing future rediscoveries. In Study 1, we used a time-capsule paradigm to show that individuals underestimate the extent to which rediscovering experiences from the past will be curiosity provoking and interesting in the future. In Studies 2 and 3, we found that people are particularly likely to underestimate the pleasure of rediscovering ordinary, mundane experiences, as opposed to extraordinary experiences. Finally, Study 4 demonstrates that underestimating the pleasure of rediscovery leads to time-inconsistent choices: Individuals forgo opportunities to document the present but then prefer rediscovering those moments in the future to engaging in an alternative fun activity. Underestimating the value of rediscovery is linked to people's erroneous faith in their memory of everyday events. By documenting the present, people provide themselves with the opportunity to rediscover mundane moments that may otherwise have been forgotten.

  8. The Consequential Problems of Unexpected Events for Human Element and Construction Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Khosravi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Unexpected events are unpredictable or beyond the control of human. The aim of this study was to identify the consequential problems of unexpected events faced by construction managers and project managers. In undertaking this investigation, we used an exploratory semi-structured interview and a questionnaire survey method. The results of this research showed that the consequential problems of unexpected events were frequently wicked, wicked messes and messes types of problems. These wicked, wicked messes and messes problems grew rapidly by high behavioral complexity of human affected environment and high dynamic complexity of interdependent systems in construction projects. We discovered human behavioral problems as wicked kind of problems for human element could lead to noticeable effects on project manager, such as irresponsibility and making a bizarre decision. Also, we identified wicked messes and messes problems, including loss of reputation and litigation, for construction organizations could terminate the viability of organizations and projects. Furthermore, we found out that three most important factors for responding successfully to the consequential problems of unexpected events were: 1 organizations’ structure and support, 2 competent project manager and 3 immediate actions. The findings of the study revealed that leadership, communication skills and hard-working were essential attributes of the competent project manager in responding to the consequential problems of unexpected events. Lastly, this research suggests the development of managerial reactive skills and control of behavioral responses through learning practice as key components of the required approach that need further investigations in future researches.

  9. Assigning cause for sudden unexpected infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Carl E; Darnall, Robert A; McEntire, Betty L; Hyma, Bruce A

    2015-06-01

    We have reached a conundrum in assigning cause of death for sudden unexpected infant deaths. We summarize the discordant perspectives and approaches and how they have occurred, and recommend a pathway toward improved consistency. This lack of consistency affects pediatricians and other health care professionals, scientific investigators, medical examiners and coroners, law enforcement agencies, families, and support or advocacy groups. We recommend that an interdisciplinary international committee be organized to review current approaches for assigning cause of death, and to identify a consensus strategy for improving consistency. This effort will need to encompass intrinsic risk factors or infant vulnerability in addition to known environmental risk factors including unsafe sleep settings, and must be sufficiently flexible to accommodate a progressively expanding knowledge base.

  10. Sudden unexpected death in infancy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Bo Gregers; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Theilade, Juliane;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background. Incidence of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) differs among studies and non-autopsied cases are difficult to assess. Objectives. To investigate causes of sudden death in infancy in a nationwide setting. Validate the use...... of the ICD-10 code for SIDS (R95) in the Danish Cause of Death registry. Design. A retrospective analysis of all infant deaths (death certificates and autopsy reports were read. Results. We identified 192 SUDI cases (10% of total deaths, 0.42 per 1000 births......) with autopsy performed in 87% of cases. In total, 49% of autopsied SUDI cases were defined as SIDS (5% of all deaths, 0.22 per 1000 births); Cardiac cause of death was denoted in 24% of cases. The Danish Cause of Death Registry misclassified 30% of SIDS cases. Conclusions. A large proportion of infant deaths...

  11. Unexpected consequences of midwifery in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Jane

    2015-11-01

    This article presents information from the Caring for the carers conference held at George Eliot Hospital in July 2015. For many midwives, feelings of stress are an unexpected consequence of rising birth rates, low staffing levels and negative organisational cultures, so our aim was that delegates would take away skills for 'surviving' in maternity services. The conference was the catalyst to a project at George Eliot NHS Trust to improve the wellbeing of staff so that they can develop a positive outlook towards the care which they offer. As part of the project, a toolkit for survival was produced which helps to prompt maternity workers to remember their own wellbeing. This project is continuing to grow and the results will be available next year.

  12. Spontaneous brain activity in chronic smokers revealed by fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation analysis: a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chu Shuilian; Xiao Dan; Wang Shuangkun; Peng Peng; Xie Teng; He Yong; Wang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Background Nicotine is primarily rsponsible for the highly addictive properties of cigarettes.Similar to other substances,nicotine dependence is related to many important brain regions,particular in mesolimbic reward circuit.This study was to further reveal the alteration of brain function activity during resting state in chronic smokers by fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI),in order to provide the evidence of neurobiological mechanism of smoking.Methods This case control study involved twenty healthy smokers and nineteen healthy nonsmokers recruited by advertisement.Sociodemographic,smoking related characteristics and fMRI images were collected and the data analyzed.Results Compared with nonsmokers,smokers showed fALFF increased significantly in the left middle occipital gyrus,left limbic lobe and left cerebellum posterior lobe but decreases in the right middle frontal gyrus,right superior temporal gyrus,right extra nuclear,left postcentral gyrus and left cerebellum anterior lobe (cluster size >100 voxels).Compared with light smokers (pack years ≤20),heavy smokers (pack years >20) showed fALFF increased significantly in the right superior temporal gyrus,right precentral gyrus,and right occipital lobe/cuneus but decreased in the right/left limbic lobe/cingulate gyrus,right/left frontal lobe/sub gyral,right/left cerebellum posterior lobe (cluster size >50 voxels).Compared with nonsevere nicotine dependent smokers (Fagerstr(o)m test for nicotine dependence,score ≤6),severe nicotine dependent smokers (score >6) showed fALFF increased significantly in the right/left middle frontal gyrus,right superior frontal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule but decreased in the left limbic lobe/cingulate gyrus (duster size >25 voxels).Conclusions In smokers during rest,the activity of addiction related regions were increased and the activity of smoking feeling,memory,related regions were

  13. Distinct BOLD fMRI Responses of Capsaicin-Induced Thermal Sensation Reveal Pain-Related Brain Activation in Nonhuman Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Bakar Ali Asad

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of the adult population suffer from chronic pain that is not adequately treated by current therapies, highlighting a great need for improved treatment options. To develop effective analgesics, experimental human and animal models of pain are critical. Topically/intra-dermally applied capsaicin induces hyperalgesia and allodynia to thermal and tactile stimuli that mimics chronic pain and is a useful translation from preclinical research to clinical investigation. Many behavioral and self-report studies of pain have exploited the use of the capsaicin pain model, but objective biomarker correlates of the capsaicin augmented nociceptive response in nonhuman primates remains to be explored.Here we establish an aversive capsaicin-induced fMRI model using non-noxious heat stimuli in Cynomolgus monkeys (n = 8. BOLD fMRI data were collected during thermal challenge (ON:20 s/42°C; OFF:40 s/35°C, 4-cycle at baseline and 30 min post-capsaicin (0.1 mg, topical, forearm application. Tail withdrawal behavioral studies were also conducted in the same animals using 42°C or 48°C water bath pre- and post- capsaicin application (0.1 mg, subcutaneous, tail.Group comparisons between pre- and post-capsaicin application revealed significant BOLD signal increases in brain regions associated with the 'pain matrix', including somatosensory, frontal, and cingulate cortices, as well as the cerebellum (paired t-test, p<0.02, n = 8, while no significant change was found after the vehicle application. The tail withdrawal behavioral study demonstrated a significant main effect of temperature and a trend towards capsaicin induced reduction of latency at both temperatures.These findings provide insights into the specific brain regions involved with aversive, 'pain-like', responses in a nonhuman primate model. Future studies may employ both behavioral and fMRI measures as translational biomarkers to gain deeper understanding of pain processing and evaluate

  14. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Evaluation of forensic autopsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Luo; Zhang, Yang; Zielke, H Ronald; Levine, Barry; Zhang, Xiang; Chang, Lin; Fowler, David; Li, Ling

    2012-11-30

    Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by seizures. Mortality is significantly increased in patients with epilepsy. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the most common seizure-related category of death. A retrospective study of forensic autopsy cases from 2007 to 2009 at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) yielded a total of 104 sudden unexpected deaths directly or indirectly caused by an epilepsy/seizure disorder in the State of Maryland. Of these deaths, 74 cases met a general accepted definition of SUDEP. The age of SUDEP individuals ranged from 14 to 63 with the majority of subjects in the ages between 21 and 50 years (58 cases, 78.4%). Males were slightly more likely than females to die of SUDEP (male:female=1.5:1 based on the rate). The onset age of epilepsy was documented in 47.3% of cases (35/74) based on investigation and medical records. Of the 35 cases, 12 subjects had early onset epilepsy (onset ages 1-15 years) and 20 subjects had duration of epilepsy for more than 10 years. The majority of deaths (61 of the 74 cases, 82.4%) were unwitnessed. Death scene investigation showed that 71 deaths (95.9%) occurred inside their residence with 50 subjects (70.4%) found either in bed or on the bedroom floor near the bed. Forty-three out of 74 cases (58.1%) showed neuropathological lesions. Per history, 50 subjects were reported as being on anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). However, postmortem toxicological analysis revealed that only 26 subjects (35.1%) had detectable AEDs. Of the 74 cases, seizure disorder or epilepsy was listed as primary cause of death in 66 cases and the term of SUDEP as official cause of death in only 8 cases. This report focuses on the characteristics of death scene investigation and postmortem examination findings of SUDEP cases.

  15. Unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrisome abdominal mass: Pedunculated GISTs☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskiran, Adil; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin; Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Discovery of abdominal masses often poses significant diagnostic difficulties. GISTs are mesenchymal masses, with specific histological features. Dimensions may vary from millimeters to giant tumours. We would like to present our case, which had an unexpectedly easy operative course which was easily handled with a simple surgical excision with a short operative duration. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 38 years old female patient was diagnosed to have an abdominal heterogen mass of 15 cm × 12 cm × 10 cm in dimension. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the solid mass between the stomach and pancreas corpus and tail, possibly orginating from the pancreas. With the preoperative diagnosis of locally invasive distal pancreas cancer the patient underwent laparotomy, following the dissection, the mass was observed to be originating from the posterior gastric Wall, extending exophytically with a peduncle of 5 cm in width, without any visual evidence for peritoneal invasion and metastasis. The tumour and the peduncle was resected with stapler device. Total operation time was 30 min. Postoperative course was uneventful. Pathologic diagnosis was gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). DISCUSSION Pedunculated large GISTs are not frequent and they can enlarge as 15 cm in diameter and compress the neighbouring organs. When they were huge, it is difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. GISTs should be considered in differential diagnosis of giant abdominal masses. CONCLUSION When GISTs are huge and pedunculated, it can be difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. This case report presents unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrysome abdominal mass. PMID:23999120

  16. Voxel-based morphometry and fMRI revealed differences in brain gray matter in breastfed and milk formula–fed children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and Purpose: Infant diets may have significant impact on brain development in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate brain grey matter structure and function in 8-year-old children who were predominantly breastfed (BF) or fed cow’s milk formula (MF) as infants. Materials and Me...

  17. Sudden unexpected death associated with lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Vibeke; Drostrup, Dorthe Høj; Thomsen, Jørgen L

    2007-04-01

    A forensic autopsy study comprising 125 cases was carried out retrospectively in order to evaluate pathological changes in the thyroid gland in different groups of death. The five groups selected consecutively were: (i) opiate addicts who died from an overdose, (ii) alcoholics who died as a result of their alcohol abuse, (iii) cases of fatal poisoning other than opiate addicts, (iv) unknown cause of death and (v) controls without prior disease. Tissue samples from the thyroid gland were cut and stained with haematoxylin and eosin and van Gieson. Histology examinations were subsequently performed blind with semiquantitative assessment of the following six parameters: (a) height of the follicular epithelium, (b) the amount of lymphocytes, (c) the presence of plasma cells, (d) hyperplastic follicular changes, (e) oxyphilic changes, and (f) fibrosis. The most striking result was the finding of extensive lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid parenchyma in five of the 124 cases, of which four belonged in the group of 'unknown cause of death'. This discovery leads to reflections regarding lymphocytic thyroiditis as a cause of death, either by itself or in combination with other disorders. Silent (painless) thyroiditis, especially, is easily overlooked at autopsy as there are no macroscopic changes and often no prior symptoms or history of thyroid disease pointing towards this condition. Analyses of thyroid hormones are unreliable in predicting endocrine status in life. Routine microscopy of the thyroid gland is therefore advocated in cases of sudden unexpected death in order to diagnose thyroid disease, in particular silent (painless) thyroiditis.

  18. Ombud's Corner: unexpected turn in the conversation?

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    Regular informal conversations with colleagues play a very important part in weaving the fabric of team spirit. They allow us to build the working relationships that are vital to the success of our projects and to create an environment of good will that is instrumental in averting potential conflict or crises. However, sometimes they can come with unexpected surprises…   Eric and his colleagues always meet on Monday mornings to have coffee together, before starting the working week. This is a very privileged moment for the team when there are no formal barriers or professional concerns: Mary may talk about a film that she saw at the weekend, Eric often goes hiking in the Jura with his friend Stefan, Hans has always got a story about his son’s prowess on the school football team and occasionally there is a bit of special news such as Louisa’s recent marriage, Pierre’s baby’s christening or Claude’s daughter’s graduation&...

  19. A novel brain tumour model in zebrafish reveals the role of YAP activation in MAPK- and PI3K-induced malignant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Mayrhofer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations activating MAPK and PI3K signalling play a pivotal role in both tumours and brain developmental disorders. We developed a zebrafish model of brain tumours based on somatic expression of oncogenes that activate MAPK and PI3K signalling in neural progenitor cells and found that HRASV12 was the most effective in inducing both heterotopia and invasive tumours. Tumours, but not heterotopias, require persistent activation of phospho (p-ERK and express a gene signature similar to the mesenchymal glioblastoma subtype, with a strong YAP component. Application of an eight-gene signature to human brain tumours establishes that YAP activation distinguishes between mesenchymal glioblastoma and low grade glioma in a wide The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA sample set including gliomas and glioblastomas (GBMs. This suggests that the activation of YAP might be an important event in brain tumour development, promoting malignant versus benign brain lesions. Indeed, co-expression of dominant-active YAP (YAPS5A and HRASV12 abolishes the development of heterotopias and leads to the sole development of aggressive tumours. Thus, we have developed a model proving that neurodevelopmental disorders and brain tumours might originate from the same activation of oncogenes through somatic mutations, and established that YAP activation is a hallmark of malignant brain tumours.

  20. A novel brain tumour model in zebrafish reveals the role of YAP activation in MAPK- and PI3K-induced malignant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer, Marie; Gourain, Victor; Reischl, Markus; Affaticati, Pierre; Jenett, Arnim; Joly, Jean-Stephane; Benelli, Matteo; Demichelis, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Sieger, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Somatic mutations activating MAPK and PI3K signalling play a pivotal role in both tumours and brain developmental disorders. We developed a zebrafish model of brain tumours based on somatic expression of oncogenes that activate MAPK and PI3K signalling in neural progenitor cells and found that HRASV12 was the most effective in inducing both heterotopia and invasive tumours. Tumours, but not heterotopias, require persistent activation of phospho (p)-ERK and express a gene signature similar to the mesenchymal glioblastoma subtype, with a strong YAP component. Application of an eight-gene signature to human brain tumours establishes that YAP activation distinguishes between mesenchymal glioblastoma and low grade glioma in a wide The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) sample set including gliomas and glioblastomas (GBMs). This suggests that the activation of YAP might be an important event in brain tumour development, promoting malignant versus benign brain lesions. Indeed, co-expression of dominant-active YAP (YAPS5A) and HRASV12 abolishes the development of heterotopias and leads to the sole development of aggressive tumours. Thus, we have developed a model proving that neurodevelopmental disorders and brain tumours might originate from the same activation of oncogenes through somatic mutations, and established that YAP activation is a hallmark of malignant brain tumours. PMID:27935819

  1. 42 CFR 493.861 - Standard; Unexpected antibody detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. 493.861 Section 493.861 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.861 Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. (a) Failure...

  2. A Neonate with Susceptibility to Long QT Syndrome Type 6 who Presented with Ventricular Fibrillation and Sudden Unexpected Infant Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Charles W; Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L

    2016-07-28

    BACKGROUND This is a case of a neonate with susceptibility to long QT syndrome (LQTS) who presented with a sudden unexpected infant death. Experts continue to debate whether universal electrocardiogram (ECG) screening of all newborns is feasible, practical, and cost-effective. CASE REPORT A 19-day-old neonate was found unresponsive by her mother. ECG showed ventricular fibrillation and a combination of a lidocaine drip plus multiple defibrillations converted the rhythm to normal sinus. Unfortunately, MRI brain imaging showed multiple infarcts and EEG showed burst suppression pattern with frequent seizures; life supportive treatment was stopped and the infant died. Genetic testing revealed two mutations in the KCNE2 gene consistent with susceptibility to LQTS type 6. CONCLUSIONS We believe this case is the first to demonstrate both a precipitating electrocardiographic and genetic cause of death for an infant with LQTS, showing a cause-and-effect relationship between LQTS mutation, ventricular arrhythmia, and death. We wonder whether universal ECG newborn screening to prevent LQTS death could have saved this baby.

  3. Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) Function in the Brain as Revealed by the Cerebral Metabolism of (1-(13)C)-Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Laura; Rial, Eduardo; Cerdan, Sebastian; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate transporter Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12 is critically involved in brain aspartate synthesis, and AGC1 deficiency results in a drastic fall of brain aspartate levels in humans and mice. It has recently been described that the uncoupling protein UCP2 transports four carbon metabolites including aspartate. Since UCP2 is expressed in several brain cell types and AGC1 is mainly neuronal, we set to test whether UCP2 could be a mitochondrial aspartate carrier in the brain glial compartment. The study of the cerebral metabolism of (1-(13)C)-glucose in vivo in wild type and UCP2-knockout mice showed no differences in C3 or C2 labeling of aspartate, suggesting that UCP2 does not function as a mitochondrial aspartate carrier in brain. However, surprisingly, a clear decrease (of about 30-35 %) in the fractional enrichment of glutamate, glutamine and GABA was observed in the brains of UCP2-KO mice which was not associated with differences in either glucose or lactate enrichments. The results suggest that the dilution in the labeling of glutamate and its downstream metabolites could originate from the uptake of an unlabeled substrate that could not leave the matrix via UCP2 becoming trapped in the matrix. Understanding the nature of the unlabeled substrate and its precursor(s) as alternative substrates to glucose is of interest in the context of neurological diseases associated with UCP2.

  4. Comprehensive Identification of Long Non-coding RNAs in Purified Cell Types from the Brain Reveals Functional LncRNA in OPC Fate Determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Dong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs (> 200 bp play crucial roles in transcriptional regulation during numerous biological processes. However, it is challenging to comprehensively identify lncRNAs, because they are often expressed at low levels and with more cell-type specificity than are protein-coding genes. In the present study, we performed ab initio transcriptome reconstruction using eight purified cell populations from mouse cortex and detected more than 5000 lncRNAs. Predicting the functions of lncRNAs using cell-type specific data revealed their potential functional roles in Central Nervous System (CNS development. We performed motif searches in ENCODE DNase I digital footprint data and Mouse ENCODE promoters to infer transcription factor (TF occupancy. By integrating TF binding and cell-type specific transcriptomic data, we constructed a novel framework that is useful for systematically identifying lncRNAs that are potentially essential for brain cell fate determination. Based on this integrative analysis, we identified lncRNAs that are regulated during Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell (OPC differentiation from Neural Stem Cells (NSCs and that are likely to be involved in oligodendrogenesis. The top candidate, lnc-OPC, shows highly specific expression in OPCs and remarkable sequence conservation among placental mammals. Interestingly, lnc-OPC is significantly up-regulated in glial progenitors from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE mouse models compared to wild-type mice. OLIG2-binding sites in the upstream regulatory region of lnc-OPC were identified by ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation-Sequencing and validated by luciferase assays. Loss-of-function experiments confirmed that lnc-OPC plays a functional role in OPC genesis. Overall, our results substantiated the role of lncRNA in OPC fate determination and provided an unprecedented data source for future functional investigations in CNS cell types. We present our datasets and

  5. Competition can lead to unexpected patterns in tropical ant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, M. D. Farnon; Blüthgen, Nico; Fayle, Tom M.; Foster, William A.; Menzel, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Ecological communities are structured by competitive, predatory, mutualistic and parasitic interactions combined with chance events. Separating deterministic from stochastic processes is possible, but finding statistical evidence for specific biological interactions is challenging. We attempt to solve this problem for ant communities nesting in epiphytic bird's nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) in Borneo's lowland rainforest. By recording the frequencies with which each and every single ant species occurred together, we were able to test statistically for patterns associated with interspecific competition. We found evidence for competition, but the resulting co-occurrence pattern was the opposite of what we expected. Rather than detecting species segregation-the classical hallmark of competition-we found species aggregation. Moreover, our approach of testing individual pairwise interactions mostly revealed spatially positive rather than negative associations. Significant negative interactions were only detected among large ants, and among species of the subfamily Ponerinae. Remarkably, the results from this study, and from a corroborating analysis of ant communities known to be structured by competition, suggest that competition within the ants leads to species aggregation rather than segregation. We believe this unexpected result is linked with the displacement of species following asymmetric competition. We conclude that analysing co-occurrence frequencies across complete species assemblages, separately for each species, and for each unique pairwise combination of species, represents a subtle yet powerful way of detecting structure and compartmentalisation in ecological communities.

  6. Unexpected Patterns of Plastic Energy Allocation in Stochastic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Barbara; Taborsky, Barbara; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    When environmental conditions vary stochastically, individuals accrue fitness benefits by exhibiting phenotypic plasticity. Here we analyze a general dynamic-programming model describing an individual’s optimal energy allocation in a stochastic environment. After maturation, individuals repeatedly decide how to allocate incoming energy between reproduction and maintenance. We analyze the optimal fraction of energy invested in reproduction and the resultant degree of plasticity in dependence on environmental variability and predictability. Our analyses reveal unexpected patterns of optimal energy allocation. When energy availability is low, all energy is allocated to reproduction, although this implies that individuals will not survive after reproduction. Above a certain threshold of energy availability, the optimal reproductive investment decreases to a minimum and even vanishes entirely in highly variable environments. With further improving energy availability, optimal reproductive investment gradually increases again. Costs of plasticity affect this allocation pattern only quantitatively. Our results show that optimal reproductive investment does not increase monotonically with growing energy availability and that small changes in energy availability can lead to major variations in optimal energy allocation. Our results help to unify two apparently opposing predictions from life-history theory, that organisms should increase reproductive investment both with improved environmental conditions and when conditions deteriorate (“terminal investment”). PMID:19196158

  7. Unexpected relationships of substructured populations in Chinese Locusta migratoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Ya-Jie

    2009-06-01

    Uvarov in 1930s needs to be revised. The three groups of locusts probably have separate evolutionary histories that were most likely linked to Quaternary glaciations events, and derived from different ancestral refugial populations following postglacial expansions. Conclusion The migratory locust populations in China have differentiated into three genetically distinct groups despite high dispersal capability. While this clarified long-standing suspicions on the subspecific diversification of this species in China, it also revealed that the locusts in the vast area of East China are not the oriental subspecies but the Asiatic subspecies, an unexpected substructuring pattern. The distribution pattern of the three locust groups in China may be primarily defined by adaptive differentiation coupled to Quaternary glaciations events. Our results are of general significance both for locust research and for phylogeographical study of flora and fauna in China, illustrating the potential importance of phylogeographical history in shaping the divergence and distribution patterns of widespread species with strong dispersal ability.

  8. Network-based analysis reveals stronger local diffusion-based connectivity and different correlations with oral language skills in brains of children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai; Xue, Zhong; Ellmore, Timothy M; Frye, Richard E; Wong, Stephen T C

    2014-02-01

    Neuroimaging has uncovered both long-range and short-range connectivity abnormalities in the brains of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the precise connectivity abnormalities and the relationship between these abnormalities and cognition and ASD symptoms have been inconsistent across studies. Indeed, studies find both increases and decreases in connectivity, suggesting that connectivity changes in the ASD brain are not merely due to abnormalities in specific connections, but rather, due to changes in the structure of the network in which the brain areas interact (i.e., network topology). In this study, we examined the differences in the network topology between high-functioning ASD patients and age and gender matched typically developing (TD) controls. After quantitatively characterizing the whole-brain connectivity network using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data, we searched for brain regions with different connectivity between ASD and TD. A measure of oral language ability was then correlated with the connectivity changes to determine the functional significance of such changes. Whole-brain connectivity measures demonstrated greater local connectivity and shorter path length in ASD as compared to TD. Stronger local connectivity was found in ASD, especially in regions such as the left superior parietal lobule, the precuneus and angular gyrus, and the right supramarginal gyrus. The relationship between oral language ability and local connectivity within these regions was significantly different between ASD and TD. Stronger local connectivity was associated with better performance in ASD and poorer performance in TD. This study supports the notion that increased local connectivity is compensatory for supporting cognitive function in ASD.

  9. Audit of practice in sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) post mortems and neuropathological findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Zuzanna; Wright, Gabriella; Dawson, Timothy; Hilton, David; Joshi, Abhijit; Diehl, Beate; Koepp, Matthias; Lhatoo, Samden; Sander, Josemir W.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is one of the leading causes of death in people with epilepsy. For classification of definite SUDEP, a post mortem (PM), including anatomical and toxicological examination, is mandatory to exclude other causes of death. We audited PM practice as well as the value of brain examination in SUDEP. Methods We reviewed 145 PM reports in SUDEP cases from four UK neuropathology centres. Data were extracted for clinical epilepsy details, circumstances of death and neuropathological findings. Results Macroscopic brain abnormalities were identified in 52% of cases. Mild brain swelling was present in 28%, and microscopic pathologies relevant to cause or effect of seizures were seen in 89%. Examination based on whole fixed brains (76.6% of all PMs), and systematic regional sampling was associated with higher detection rates of underlying pathology (P < 0.01). Information was more frequently recorded regarding circumstances of death and body position/location than clinical epilepsy history and investigations. Conclusion Our findings support the contribution of examination of the whole fixed brain in SUDEP, with high rates of detection of relevant pathology. Availability of full clinical epilepsy‐related information at the time of PM could potentially further improve detection through targeted tissue sampling. Apart from confirmation of SUDEP, complete neuropathological examination contributes to evaluation of risk factors as well as helping to direct future research into underlying causes. PMID:26300477

  10. Gene expression profiling in C57BL/6J and A/J mouse inbred strains reveals gene networks specific for brain regions independent of genetic background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Simone; Fuller, Tova F; Janson, Esther; Strengman, Eric; Horvath, Steve; Kas, Martien J H; Ophoff, Roel A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We performed gene expression profiling of the amygdala and hippocampus taken from inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J and A/J. The selected brain areas are implicated in neurobehavioral traits while these mouse strains are known to differ widely in behavior. Consequently, we hypothesized that

  11. An optimized method for measuring hypocretin-1 peptide in the mouse brain reveals differential circadian regulation of hypocretin-1 levels rostral and caudal to the hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justinussen, Jessica; Holm, A; Kornum, B R

    2015-01-01

    as does prepro-hypocretin mRNA in the hypothalamus. However, in midbrain and brainstem tissue caudal to the hypothalamus, there was less circadian fluctuation and a tendency for higher levels during the light phase. These data suggest that regulation of the hypocretin system differs between brain areas....

  12. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza

    2015-01-01

    , the HGPS mutation results in organ-specific defects. For example, bone and skin are strongly affected by HGPS, while the brain appears to be unaffected. There are no definite explanations as to the variable sensitivity to progeria disease among different organs. In addition, low levels of progerin have...

  13. Revealing Rembrandt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Parker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Our results emphasised the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt’s portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings.

  14. Genome-wide DNA methylation analyses in the brain reveal four differentially methylated regions between humans and non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jinkai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly improved cognitive function is the most significant change in human evolutionary history. Recently, several large-scale studies reported the evolutionary roles of DNA methylation; however, the role of DNA methylation on brain evolution is largely unknown. Results To test if DNA methylation has contributed to the evolution of human brain, with the use of MeDIP-Chip and SEQUENOM MassARRAY, we conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs in the brain between humans and rhesus macaques. We first identified a total of 150 candidate DMRs by the MeDIP-Chip method, among which 4 DMRs were confirmed by the MassARRAY analysis. All 4 DMRs are within or close to the CpG islands, and a MIR3 repeat element was identified in one DMR, but no repeat sequence was observed in the other 3 DMRs. For the 4 DMR genes, their proteins tend to be conserved and two genes have neural related functions. Bisulfite sequencing and phylogenetic comparison among human, chimpanzee, rhesus macaque and rat suggested several regions of lineage specific DNA methylation, including a human specific hypomethylated region in the promoter of K6IRS2 gene. Conclusions Our study provides a new angle of studying human brain evolution and understanding the evolutionary role of DNA methylation in the central nervous system. The results suggest that the patterns of DNA methylation in the brain are in general similar between humans and non-human primates, and only a few DMRs were identified.

  15. Discovering novel microRNAs and age-related nonlinear changes in rat brains using deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lanxuan; Sun, Yubai; Wu, Jinfeng; Yan, Siyu; Deng, Zhenglu; Wang, Jun; Liao, Shenke; Yin, Dazhong; Li, Guolin

    2015-02-01

    Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of brain aging remains a significant challenge for biogerontologists. The discovery of gene regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) has added a new dimension for examining this process; however, the full complement of miRNAs involved in brain aging is still not known. In this study, miRNA profiles of young, adult, and old rats were obtained to evaluate molecular changes during aging. High-throughput deep sequencing revealed 547 known and 171 candidate novel miRNAs that were differentially expressed among groups. Unexpectedly, miRNA expression did not decline progressively with advancing age; moreover, genes targeted by age-associated miRNAs were predicted to be involved in biological processes linked to aging and neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying brain aging and a resource for future studies on age-related brain disorders.

  16. Unexpected Expectations The Curiosities of a Mathematical Crystal Ball

    CERN Document Server

    Wapner, Leonard M

    2012-01-01

    Unexpected Expectations: The Curiosities of a Mathematical Crystal Ball explores how paradoxical challenges involving mathematical expectation often necessitate a reexamination of basic premises. The author takes you through mathematical paradoxes associated with seemingly straightforward applications of mathematical expectation and shows how these unexpected contradictions may push you to reconsider the legitimacy of the applications. The book requires only an understanding of basic algebraic operations and includes supplemental mathematical background in chapter appendices. After a history o

  17. Performance of cumulant-based rank reduction estimator in presence of unexpected modeling errors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鼎

    2015-01-01

    Compared with the rank reduction estimator (RARE) based on second-order statistics (called SOS-RARE), the RARE based on fourth-order cumulants (referred to as FOC-RARE) can handle more sources and restrain the negative impacts of the Gaussian colored noise. However, the unexpected modeling errors appearing in practice are known to significantly degrade the performance of the RARE. Therefore, the direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation performance of the FOC-RARE is quantitatively derived. The explicit expression for direction-finding (DF) error is derived via the first-order perturbation analysis, and then the theoretical formula for the mean square error (MSE) is given. Simulation results demonstrate the validation of the theoretical analysis and reveal that the FOC-RARE is more robust to the unexpected modeling errors than the SOS-RARE.

  18. The Unexpected Past of a Dwarf Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-01

    New Light on Cannibalism in the Local Group of Galaxies The Local Group of Galaxies consists of a few large spiral galaxies - for instance the Milky Way galaxy in which we live, and the Andromeda galaxy that is visible to the unaided eye in the northern constellation of the same name - as well as two dozen much smaller galaxies of mostly irregular shape. Whereas the larger galaxies have extended halos of very old stars, no such halos have ever been seen around the smaller ones. Now, however, Dante Minniti and Albert Zijlstra [1], working at the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT), have found a large halo of old and metal-poor stars around one of the dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. This finding is quite unexpected. It revises our understanding of star formation in these galaxies and provides important information about the past evolution of galaxies [2]. Galaxy halos The Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by a large, roughly spherical halo of old stars. The diameter is about 100,000 light years and the stars therein, known as Population II stars, are among the oldest known, with ages of 10 billion years or even more. They also differ from the younger stars nearer to the main plane of the Milky Way (in which our 4.7 billion year old Sun is located) by being very metal-poor. Many of the halo stars consist almost solely of hydrogen and helium, reflecting the composition of matter in the young Universe. This halo is important for our understanding of the processes that led to the formation of the Milky Way galaxy. It is believed that many of the halo stars and those of the same type found in globular clusters existed already before the Milky Way had fully formed. Galaxy cannibalism Many astronomers suspect that galaxies evolve and gradually grow larger and heavier by practising cannibalism on their own kind. In this picture, when two galaxies collide in space, the stars and nebulae in the smaller one will disperse and soon be taken over by the larger one, which

  19. Unexpected difficult intubation due to subglottic ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir Atım

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Airway damages encountered during endotracheal intubationor tracheostomy may cause some complicationssuch as severe dyspnea. Upper airway diagnostic endoscopywas planned to find the etiology of effort dyspnea ina 5 years old girl who had endotracheal intubation beenperformed during newborn period. Her ASA score was 1,and Mallampati score for preoperative airway evaluationwas 1. Physical examination revealed neither dyspneanor stridor while the patient was not exerting effort. Herchest radiograms were normal. She had no history of previoussurgical or anesthetical intervention. In this reportwe presented a difficult intubation during the endoscopicexamination of upper airway in a patient who had dyspneawhile exerting effort.

  20. MaxiK channel interactome reveals its interaction with GABA transporter 3 and heat shock protein 60 in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H; Li, M; Hall, L; Chen, S; Sukur, S; Lu, R; Caputo, A; Meredith, A L; Stefani, E; Toro, L

    2016-03-11

    Large conductance voltage and calcium-activated potassium (MaxiK) channels are activated by membrane depolarization and elevated cytosolic Ca(2+). In the brain, they localize to neurons and astrocytes, where they play roles such as resetting the membrane potential during an action potential, neurotransmitter release, and neurovascular coupling. MaxiK channels are known to associate with several modulatory proteins and accessory subunits, and each of these interactions can have distinct physiological consequences. To uncover new players in MaxiK channel brain physiology, we applied a directed proteomic approach and obtained MaxiK channel pore-forming α subunit brain interactome using specific antibodies. Controls included immunoprecipitations with rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) and with anti-MaxiK antibodies in wild type and MaxiK channel knockout mice (Kcnma1(-/-)), respectively. We have found known and unreported interactive partners that localize to the plasma membrane, extracellular space, cytosol and intracellular organelles including mitochondria, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Localization of MaxiK channel to mitochondria was further confirmed using purified brain mitochondria colabeled with MitoTracker. Independent proof of MaxiK channel interaction with previously unidentified partners is given for GABA transporter 3 (GAT3) and heat shock protein 60 (HSP60). In human embryonic kidney 293 cells containing SV40 T-antigen (HEK293T) cells, both GAT3 and HSP60 coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized with MaxiK channel; colabeling was observed mainly at the cell periphery with GAT3 and intracellularly with HSP60 with protein proximity indices of ∼ 0.6 and ∼ 0.4, respectively. In rat primary hippocampal neurons, colocalization index was identical for GAT3 (∼ 0.6) and slightly higher for HSP60 (∼ 0.5) association with MaxiK channel. The results of this study provide a complete interactome of MaxiK channel the mouse brain, further establish

  1. Metabolomic Analyses of Brain Tissue in Sepsis Induced by Cecal Ligation Reveal Specific Redox Alterations-Protective Effects of the Oxygen Radical Scavenger Edaravone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hara, Naomi; Chijiiwa, Miyuki; Yara, Miki

    2015-01-01

    (Bcl-2 and Bax) were analyzed in selected brain regions. CLPE showed significant improvement in survival compared with CLPV 18 h postinduction of sepsis (P death in both parietal cortex...... at analyzing the preventive effect of the free radical scavenger edaravone on sepsis-induced brain alterations. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and the mice were divided into three groups-CLP vehicle (CLPV), CLP and edaravone (MCI-186, 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) (CLPE...... induced by cecal ligation alters cerebral redox status and supports a proapoptotic phenotype. The free radical scavenger edavarone reduces mortality of septic mice and protects against sepsis-induced neuronal cell death....

  2. Genome-wide analysis of brain and gonad transcripts reveals changes of key sex reversal-related genes expression and signaling pathways in three stages of Monopterus albus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing; Guo, Wei; Li, Dapeng

    2017-01-01

    Background The natural sex reversal severely affects the sex ratio and thus decreases the productivity of the rice field eel (Monopterus albus). How to understand and manipulate this process is one of the major issues for the rice field eel stocking. So far the genomics and transcriptomics data available for this species are still scarce. Here we provide a comprehensive study of transcriptomes of brain and gonad tissue in three sex stages (female, intersex and male) from the rice field eel to investigate changes in transcriptional level during the sex reversal process. Results Approximately 195 thousand unigenes were generated and over 44.4 thousand were functionally annotated. Comparative study between stages provided multiple differentially expressed genes in brain and gonad tissue. Overall 4668 genes were found to be of unequal abundance between gonad tissues, far more than that of the brain tissues (59 genes). These genes were enriched in several different signaling pathways. A number of 231 genes were found with different levels in gonad in each stage, with several reproduction-related genes included. A total of 19 candidate genes that could be most related to sex reversal were screened out, part of these genes’ expression patterns were validated by RT-qPCR. The expression of spef2, maats1, spag6 and dmc1 were abundant in testis, but was barely detected in females, while the 17β-hsd12, zpsbp3, gal3 and foxn5 were only expressed in ovary. Conclusion This study investigated the complexity of brain and gonad transcriptomes in three sex stages of the rice field eel. Integrated analysis of different gene expression and changes in signaling pathways, such as PI3K-Akt pathway, provided crucial data for further study of sex transformation mechanisms. PMID:28319194

  3. ‘Hit & Run' model of closed-skull traumatic brain injury (TBI) reveals complex patterns of post-traumatic AQP4 dysregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Zeguang; Iliff, Jeffrey J.; Yang, LiJun; Yang, Jiankai; Chen, Xiaolin; Chen, Michael J.; Giese, Rebecca N; Wang, Baozhi; Shi, Xuefang; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a major contributor to morbidity associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The methods involved in most rodent models of TBI, including head fixation, opening of the skull, and prolonged anesthesia, likely alter TBI development and reduce secondary injury. We report the development of a closed-skull model of murine TBI, which minimizes time of anesthesia, allows the monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP), and can be modulated to produce mild and moderate grade TBI. In...

  4. Abnormal intrinsic brain activity in amnestic mild cognitive impairment revealed by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XI Qian; ZHAO Xiao-hu; WANG Pei-jun; GUO Qi-hao; HE Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that brain functional activity in the resting state is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients.However,alterations in intrinsic brain activity patterns in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients are poorly understood.This study aimed to explore the differences in regional intrinsic activities throughout the whole brain between aMCI patients and controls.Methods In the present study,resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed on 18 amnestic MCI (aMCI) patients,18 mild AD patients and 20 healthy elderly subjects.And amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) method was used.Results Compared with healthy elderly subjects,aMCI patients showed decreased ALFF in the right hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex,left lateral temporal cortex,and right ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vMPFC) and increased ALFF in the left temporal-parietal junction (TPJ) and inferior parietal Iobule (IPL).Mild AD patients showed decreased ALFF in the left TPJ,posterior IPL (plPL),and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex compared with aMCI patients.Mild AD patients also had decreased ALFF in the right posterior cingulate cortex,right vMPFC and bilateral dorsal MPFC (dMPFC) compared with healthy elderly subjects.Conclusions Decreased intrinsic activities in brain regions closely related to episodic memory were found in aMCI and AD patients.Increased TPJ and IPL activity may indicate compensatory mechanisms for loss of memory function in aMCI patients.These findings suggest that the fMRI based on ALFF analysis may provide a useful tool in the study of aMCI patients.

  5. High-Field MRI Reveals a Drastic Increase of Hypoxia-Induced Microhemorrhages upon Tissue Reoxygenation in the Mouse Brain with Strong Predominance in the Olfactory Bulb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Human pathophysiology of high altitude hypoxic brain injury is not well understood and research on the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the lack of well-characterized animal models. In this study, we explored the evolution of brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histological methods in mice exposed to normobaric hypoxia at 8% oxygen for 48 hours followed by rapid reoxygenation and incubation for further 24 h under normoxic conditions. T2*-, diffusion-weighted and T2-relaxometry MRI was performed before exposure, immediately after 48 hours of hypoxia and 24 hours after reoxygenation. Cerebral microhemorrhages, previously described in humans suffering from severe high altitude cerebral edema, were also detected in mice upon hypoxia-reoxygenation with a strong region-specific clustering in the olfactory bulb, and to a lesser extent, in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. The number of microhemorrhages determined immediately after hypoxia was low, but strongly increased 24 hours upon onset of reoxygenation. Histologically verified microhemorrhages were exclusively located around cerebral microvessels with disrupted interendothelial tight junction protein ZO-1. In contrast, quantitative T2 and apparent-diffusion-coefficient values immediately after hypoxia and after 24 hours of reoxygenation did not show any region-specific alteration, consistent with subtle multifocal but not with regional or global brain edema.

  6. High-Field MRI Reveals a Drastic Increase of Hypoxia-Induced Microhemorrhages upon Tissue Reoxygenation in the Mouse Brain with Strong Predominance in the Olfactory Bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Angelika; Kunze, Reiner; Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko; Marti, Hugo H

    2016-01-01

    Human pathophysiology of high altitude hypoxic brain injury is not well understood and research on the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the lack of well-characterized animal models. In this study, we explored the evolution of brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological methods in mice exposed to normobaric hypoxia at 8% oxygen for 48 hours followed by rapid reoxygenation and incubation for further 24 h under normoxic conditions. T2*-, diffusion-weighted and T2-relaxometry MRI was performed before exposure, immediately after 48 hours of hypoxia and 24 hours after reoxygenation. Cerebral microhemorrhages, previously described in humans suffering from severe high altitude cerebral edema, were also detected in mice upon hypoxia-reoxygenation with a strong region-specific clustering in the olfactory bulb, and to a lesser extent, in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. The number of microhemorrhages determined immediately after hypoxia was low, but strongly increased 24 hours upon onset of reoxygenation. Histologically verified microhemorrhages were exclusively located around cerebral microvessels with disrupted interendothelial tight junction protein ZO-1. In contrast, quantitative T2 and apparent-diffusion-coefficient values immediately after hypoxia and after 24 hours of reoxygenation did not show any region-specific alteration, consistent with subtle multifocal but not with regional or global brain edema.

  7. Cerebral complexity preceded enlarged brain size and reduced olfactory bulbs in Old World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Lauren A; Benefit, Brenda R; McCrossin, Monte L; Spoor, Fred

    2015-07-03

    Analysis of the only complete early cercopithecoid (Old World monkey) endocast currently known, that of 15-million-year (Myr)-old Victoriapithecus, reveals an unexpectedly small endocranial volume (ECV) relative to body size and a large olfactory bulb volume relative to ECV, similar to extant lemurs and Oligocene anthropoids. However, the Victoriapithecus brain has principal and arcuate sulci of the frontal lobe not seen in the stem catarrhine Aegyptopithecus, as well as a distinctive cercopithecoid pattern of gyrification, indicating that cerebral complexity preceded encephalization in cercopithecoids. Since larger ECVs, expanded frontal lobes, and reduced olfactory bulbs are already present in the 17- to 18-Myr-old ape Proconsul these features evolved independently in hominoids (apes) and cercopithecoids and much earlier in the former. Moreover, the order of encephalization and brain reorganization was apparently different in hominoids and cercopithecoids, showing that brain size and cerebral organization evolve independently.

  8. Unexpectedly high burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in very young infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reilly Megan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highest incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis has generally been reported in children 6-24 months of age. Young infants are thought to be partially protected by maternal antibodies acquired transplacentally or via breast milk. The purpose of our study was to assess the age distribution of children with confirmed community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis presenting to an urban referral hospital. Methods Children presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with acute gastroenteritis have been monitored for the presence of rotavirus antigen in the stool by ELISA (followed by genotyping if ELISA-positive since the 1994-95 epidemic season. Results Over the last 12 rotavirus seasons prior to the introduction of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in 2006, stool specimens from 1646 patients tested positive for community-acquired rotavirus infection. Gender or age was not recorded in 6 and 5 cases, respectively. Overall, 58% of the cases occurred in boys. G1 was the predominant VP7 serotype, accounting for 72% of cases. The median (IQR age was 11 (5-21 months. A total of 790 (48% cases occurred in children outside the commonly quoted peak age range, with 27% in infants 24 months of age. A total of 220 (13% cases occurred during the first 3 months of life, and the highest number of episodes per month of age [97 (6%] was observed during the second month of life. Conclusions The incidence of community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis monitored over 12 seasons in the prevaccine era at a major university hospital was nearly constant for each month of age during the first year of life, revealing an unexpectedly high incidence of symptomatic rotavirus disease in infants

  9. Multi-modal analysis of functional connectivity and cerebral blood flow reveals shared and unique effects of propofol in large-scale brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Maolin; Scheinost, Dustin; Ramani, Ramachandran; Constable, R Todd

    2017-03-01

    Anesthesia-induced changes in functional connectivity and cerebral blow flow (CBF) in large-scale brain networks have emerged as key markers of reduced consciousness. However, studies of functional connectivity disagree on which large-scale networks are altered or preserved during anesthesia, making it difficult to find a consensus amount studies. Additionally, pharmacological alterations in CBF could amplify or occlude changes in connectivity due to the shared variance between CBF and connectivity. Here, we used data-driven connectivity methods and multi-modal imaging to investigate shared and unique neural correlates of reduced consciousness for connectivity in large-scale brain networks. Rs-fMRI and CBF data were collected from the same subjects during an awake and deep sedation condition induced by propofol. We measured whole-brain connectivity using the intrinsic connectivity distribution (ICD), a method not reliant on pre-defined seed regions, networks of interest, or connectivity thresholds. The shared and unique variance between connectivity and CBF were investigated. Finally, to account for shared variance, we present a novel extension to ICD that incorporates cerebral blood flow (CBF) as a scaling factor in the calculation of global connectivity, labeled CBF-adjusted ICD). We observed altered connectivity in multiple large-scale brain networks including the default mode (DMN), salience, visual, and motor networks and reduced CBF in the DMN, frontoparietal network, and thalamus. Regional connectivity and CBF were significantly correlated during both the awake and propofol condition. Nevertheless changes in connectivity and CBF between the awake and deep sedation condition were only significantly correlated in a subsystem of the DMN, suggesting that, while there is significant shared variance between the modalities, changes due to propofol are relatively unique. Similar, but less significant, results were observed in the CBF-adjusted ICD analysis, providing

  10. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza;

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental progeroid syndrome with multiple features suggestive of premature accelerated aging. Accumulation of progerin is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of HGPS. However, despite ubiquitous expression of lamin A in all differentiated cells......, the HGPS mutation results in organ-specific defects. For example, bone and skin are strongly affected by HGPS, while the brain appears to be unaffected. There are no definite explanations as to the variable sensitivity to progeria disease among different organs. In addition, low levels of progerin have...

  11. Progressive Primary Pulmonary Tuberculosis Presenting as the Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempers, Johan; Sens, Mary Ann; Wadee, Shabbir Ahmed; Kinney, Hannah C.; Odendaal, Hein J.; Wright, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    The classification of an unexpected infant death as the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) depends upon a complete autopsy and death scene investigation to exclude known causes of death. Here we report the death of a four-month-old infant in a tuberculosis endemic area that presented as a sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) with no apparent explanation based on the death scene characteristics. The autopsy, however, revealed progressive primary pulmonary tuberculosis with intrathoracic adenopathy, compression of the tracheobronchial tree and miliary lesions in the liver. This case underscores the clinical difficulties in the diagnosis of infantile tuberculosis, as well as the possibility of sudden death as part of its protean manifestations. The pathology and clinical progression of tuberculosis in infants differs from older children and adults due to the immature immune response in infants. This case dramatically highlights the need for complete autopsies in all sudden and unexpected infant deaths, as well as the public health issues in a sentinel infant tuberculosis diagnosis. PMID:20705406

  12. Metabolomic Analyses of Brain Tissue in Sepsis Induced by Cecal Ligation Reveal Specific Redox Alterations--Protective Effects of the Oxygen Radical Scavenger Edaravone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Naomi; Chijiiwa, Miyuki; Yara, Miki; Ishida, Yusuke; Ogiwara, Yukihiko; Inazu, Masato; Kuroda, Masahiko; Karlsson, Michael; Sjovall, Fredrik; Elmér, Eskil; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is complex and remains incompletely elucidated. Dysregulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial-mediated necrotic-apoptotic pathway have been proposed as part of the pathogenesis. The present study aimed at analyzing the preventive effect of the free radical scavenger edaravone on sepsis-induced brain alterations. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and the mice were divided into three groups-CLP vehicle (CLPV), CLP and edaravone (MCI-186, 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) (CLPE), and sham-operated (Sham). Mice in CLPV and CLPE were injected with saline or edaravone intraperitoneally at a dose of 10 mg/kg twice daily. The treatments were initiated 4 days prior to the surgical procedure. Mortality, histological changes, electron microscopy (EM), and expression of Bcl-2 family genes (Bcl-2 and Bax) were analyzed in selected brain regions. CLPE showed significant improvement in survival compared with CLPV 18 h postinduction of sepsis (P free radical scavenger edavarone reduces mortality of septic mice and protects against sepsis-induced neuronal cell death.

  13. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation landscape of melanoma progression to brain metastasis reveals aberrations on homeobox D cluster associated with prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzese, Diego M; Scolyer, Richard A; Huynh, Jamie L; Huang, Sharon K; Hirose, Hajime; Chong, Kelly K; Kiyohara, Eiji; Wang, Jinhua; Kawas, Neal P; Donovan, Nicholas C; Hata, Keisuke; Wilmott, James S; Murali, Rajmohan; Buckland, Michael E; Shivalingam, Brindha; Thompson, John F; Morton, Donald L; Kelly, Daniel F; Hoon, Dave S B

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma brain metastasis (MBM) represents a frequent complication of cutaneous melanoma. Despite aggressive multi-modality therapy, patients with MBM often have a survival rate of MBM. In this study, we generated a comprehensive DNA methylation landscape through the use of genome-wide copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression data integrative analysis of melanoma progression to MBM. A progressive genome-wide demethylation in low CpG density and an increase in methylation level of CpG islands according to melanoma progression were observed. MBM-specific partially methylated domains (PMDs) affecting key brain developmental processes were identified. Differentially methylated CpG sites between MBM and lymph node metastasis (LNM) from patients with good prognosis were identified. Among the most significantly affected genes were the HOX family members. DNA methylation of HOXD9 gene promoter affected transcript and protein expression and was significantly higher in MBM than that in early stages. A MBM-specific PMD was identified in this region. Low methylation level of this region was associated with active HOXD9 expression, open chromatin and histone modifications associated with active transcription. Demethylating agent induced HOXD9 expression in melanoma cell lines. The clinical relevance of this finding was verified in an independent large cohort of melanomas (n = 145). Patients with HOXD9 hypermethylation in LNM had poorer disease-free and overall survival. This epigenome-wide study identified novel methylated genes with functional and clinical implications for MBM patients.

  14. Evaluating impacts of unexpected earning on precision of profit estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Kazemi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Precision in earning report has always been a concern among investors, and when there are some negative adjustments on earning, investor may find it challenging to decide whether they should hold or sell their shares. This paper studies the impact of earning precision and unexpected earning adjustments on firms whose share are listed on Tehran Stock Exchange. The proposed study of this paper considers three hypotheses including whether earning precision has negative relationship with unexpected profit, whether it has a negative with unexpected decline in profit and finally, whether, in prediction on negative news compared with positive news, there is a negative relationship between stronger earnings forecast and precision of earning forecast. The study gathers the necessary data from official news released for some firms whose shares were active over the period 2003-2012. The study uses two regression models and the results of regression analysis have confirmed all hypotheses of this survey.

  15. Unexpected Coexisting Myocardial Infarction Detected by Delayed Enhancement MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Gerbaud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an unexpected coexisting anterior myocardial infarction detected by delayed enhancement MRI in a 41-year-old man following a presentation with a first episode of chest pain during inferior acute myocardial infarction. This second necrotic area was not initially suspected because there were no ECG changes in the anterior leads and the left descending coronary artery did not present any significant stenoses on emergency coronary angiography. Unrecognised myocardial infarction may carry important prognostic implications. CMR is currently the best imaging technique to detect unexpected infarcts.

  16. Gene expression profiling in brain of mice exposed to the marine neurotoxin ciguatoxin reveals an acute anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan James C

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ciguatoxins (CTXs are polyether marine neurotoxins and potent activators of voltage-gated sodium channels. This toxin is carried by multiple reef-fish species and human consumption of ciguatoxins can result in an explosive gastrointestinal/neurologic illness. This study characterizes the global transcriptional response in mouse brain to a symptomatic dose of the highly toxic Pacific ciguatoxin P-CTX-1 and additionally compares this data to transcriptional profiles from liver and whole blood examined previously. Adult male C57/BL6 mice were injected with 0.26 ng/g P-CTX-1 while controls received only vehicle. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 4 and 24 hrs and transcriptional profiling was performed on brain RNA with Agilent whole genome microarrays. RT-PCR was used to independently validate gene expression and the web tool DAVID was used to analyze gene ontology (GO and molecular pathway enrichment of the gene expression data. Results A pronounced 4°C hypothermic response was recorded in these mice, reaching a minimum at 1 hr and lasting for 8 hrs post toxin exposure. Ratio expression data were filtered by intensity, fold change and p-value, with the resulting data used for time course analysis, K-means clustering, ontology classification and KEGG pathway enrichment. Top GO hits for this gene set included acute phase response and mono-oxygenase activity. Molecular pathway analysis showed enrichment for complement/coagulation cascades and metabolism of xenobiotics. Many immediate early genes such as Fos, Jun and Early Growth Response isoforms were down-regulated although others associated with stress such as glucocorticoid responsive genes were up-regulated. Real time PCR confirmation was performed on 22 differentially expressed genes with a correlation of 0.9 (Spearman's Rho, p Conclusions Many of the genes differentially expressed in this study, in parallel with the hypothermia, figure prominently in protection against

  17. The labial gene is required to terminate proliferation of identified neuroblasts in postembryonic development of the Drosophila brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp A. Kuert

    2012-08-01

    The developing brain of Drosophila has become a useful model for studying the molecular genetic mechanisms that give rise to the complex neuronal arrays that characterize higher brains in other animals including mammals. Brain development in Drosophila begins during embryogenesis and continues during a subsequent postembryonic phase. During embryogenesis, the Hox gene labial is expressed in the developing tritocerebrum, and labial loss-of-function has been shown to be associated with a loss of regional neuronal identity and severe patterning defects in this part of the brain. However, nothing is known about the expression and function of labial, or any other Hox gene, during the postembryonic phase of brain development, when the majority of the neurons in the adult brain are generated. Here we report the first analysis of Hox gene action during postembryonic brain development in Drosophila. We show that labial is expressed initially in six larval brain neuroblasts, of which only four give rise to the labial expressing neuroblast lineages present in the late larval brain. Although MARCM-based clonal mutation of labial in these four neuroblast lineages does not result in an obvious phenotype, a striking and unexpected effect of clonal labial loss-of-function does occur during postembryonic brain development, namely the formation of two ectopic neuroblast lineages that are not present in wildtype brains. The same two ectopic neuroblast lineages are also observed following cell death blockage and, significantly, in this case the resulting ectopic lineages are Labial-positive. These findings imply that labial is required in two specific neuroblast lineages of the wildtype brain for the appropriate termination of proliferation through programmed cell death. Our analysis of labial function reveals a novel cell autonomous role of this Hox gene in shaping the lineage architecture of the brain during postembryonic development.

  18. Attentional gain and processing capacity limits predict the propensity to neglect unexpected visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papera, Massimiliano; Richards, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous allocation of attentional resources allows the visual system to encode and maintain representations of stimuli in visual working memory (VWM). However, limits in the processing capacity to allocate resources can prevent unexpected visual stimuli from gaining access to VWM and thereby to consciousness. Using a novel approach to create unbiased stimuli of increasing saliency, we investigated visual processing during a visual search task in individuals who show a high or low propensity to neglect unexpected stimuli. When propensity to inattention is high, ERP recordings show a diminished amplification concomitantly with a decrease in theta band power during the N1 latency, followed by a poor target enhancement during the N2 latency. Furthermore, a later modulation in the P3 latency was also found in individuals showing propensity to visual neglect, suggesting that more effort is required for conscious maintenance of visual information in VWM. Effects during early stages of processing (N80 and P1) were also observed suggesting that sensitivity to contrasts and medium-to-high spatial frequencies may be modulated by low-level saliency (albeit no statistical group differences were found). In accordance with the Global Workplace Model, our data indicate that a lack of resources in low-level processors and visual attention may be responsible for the failure to "ignite" a state of high-level activity spread across several brain areas that is necessary for stimuli to access awareness. These findings may aid in the development of diagnostic tests and intervention to detect/reduce inattention propensity to visual neglect of unexpected stimuli.

  19. Sudden unexpected nocturnal death in Chiari type 1 malformation and potential role of opioid analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereydoon Roohi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1 is a common congenital anomaly of the craniocervical junction. CM1 is reported to run a usually benign course and patients typically experience no symptoms or chronic, slowly progressive symptoms. However, recent reports indicate that a subset of patients with CM1 may present with acute deterioration and sudden unexpected death (SUD. We report a case of SUD during sleep in a young man with CM1, which we believe was related to the administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. We will clarify the pathophysiology of acute deterioration and SUD in CM1 and the possibility that the adverse effects of opiate analgesics likely were the leading cause of death in our patient. Case Description: In this review, we present a 29-year-old male with worsening headache secondary to previously diagnosed CM1. The patient died suddenly and unexpectedly after administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. Conclusion: The mechanism(s of acute neurological deterioration and sudden death in patients with CM1 remains poorly understood. We believe the rapid fatal deterioration in our patient following administration of opioids suggests that this category of medication may cause sudden unexpected "neurogenic" cardiac death in CM1 patients by inducing sleep-related breathing difficulties and associated hypercapnia. Hypercapnia by further increasing intracranial pressure can result in a sudden pressure-induced decompensation of the cardiopulmonary control centers in the brain stem and cause instantaneous cardiorespiratory arrest.

  20. Sudden unexpected nocturnal death in Chiari type 1 malformation and potential role of opioid analgesics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi, Fereydoon; Gropen, Toby; Kula, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1) is a common congenital anomaly of the craniocervical junction. CM1 is reported to run a usually benign course and patients typically experience no symptoms or chronic, slowly progressive symptoms. However, recent reports indicate that a subset of patients with CM1 may present with acute deterioration and sudden unexpected death (SUD). We report a case of SUD during sleep in a young man with CM1, which we believe was related to the administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. We will clarify the pathophysiology of acute deterioration and SUD in CM1 and the possibility that the adverse effects of opiate analgesics likely were the leading cause of death in our patient. Case Description: In this review, we present a 29-year-old male with worsening headache secondary to previously diagnosed CM1. The patient died suddenly and unexpectedly after administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. Conclusion: The mechanism(s) of acute neurological deterioration and sudden death in patients with CM1 remains poorly understood. We believe the rapid fatal deterioration in our patient following administration of opioids suggests that this category of medication may cause sudden unexpected “neurogenic” cardiac death in CM1 patients by inducing sleep-related breathing difficulties and associated hypercapnia. Hypercapnia by further increasing intracranial pressure can result in a sudden pressure-induced decompensation of the cardiopulmonary control centers in the brain stem and cause instantaneous cardiorespiratory arrest. PMID:24778905

  1. Global methylation profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines reveals epigenetic contributions to autism spectrum disorders and a novel autism candidate gene, RORA, whose protein product is reduced in autistic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, AnhThu; Rauch, Tibor A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Hu, Valerie W

    2010-08-01

    Autism is currently considered a multigene disorder with epigenetic influences. To investigate the contribution of DNA methylation to autism spectrum disorders, we have recently completed large-scale methylation profiling by CpG island microarray analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from monozygotic twins discordant for diagnosis of autism and their nonautistic siblings. Methylation profiling revealed many candidate genes differentially methylated between discordant MZ twins as well as between both twins and nonautistic siblings. Bioinformatics analysis of the differentially methylated genes demonstrated enrichment for high-level functions including gene transcription, nervous system development, cell death/survival, and other biological processes implicated in autism. The methylation status of 2 of these candidate genes, BCL-2 and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA), was further confirmed by bisulfite sequencing and methylation-specific PCR, respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses of tissue arrays containing slices of the cerebellum and frontal cortex of autistic and age- and sex-matched control subjects revealed decreased expression of RORA and BCL-2 proteins in the autistic brain. Our data thus confirm the role of epigenetic regulation of gene expression via differential DNA methylation in idiopathic autism, and furthermore link molecular changes in a peripheral cell model with brain pathobiology in autism.

  2. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated microRNA Delivery into the Postnatal Mouse Brain Reveals a Role for miR-134 in Dendritogenesis in Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette; Larsen, Lars A; Kauppinen, Sakari;

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies using primary neuronal cultures have revealed important roles of the microRNA pathway in the regulation of neuronal development and morphology. For example, miR-134 is involved in dendritogenesis and spine development in hippocampal neurons by regulating local mRNA translation...

  3. Mitochondrial DNA assessment of Phytophthora infestans isolates from potato and tomato in Ethiopia reveals unexpected diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimelash, Daniel; Hussien, Temam; Fininsa, Chemeda; Forbes, Greg; Yuen, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes were determined using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for P. infestans sampled from 513 foliar lesions of late blight found on potato and tomato in different regions of Ethiopia. Among the four reported mitochondrial haplotypes of Phytophthora infestans, Ia, Ib and IIb were detected in 93 % of the samples analyzed but the vast majority of these were Ia. The remaining 7 % represented a previously unreported haplotype. DNA sequencing of this new haplotype also confirmed a single base nucleotide substitution that resulted in loss of EcoRI restriction site and gain of two additional MspI sites in cox1 and atp1 genes, respectively. There were 28 polymorphic sites among all nucleotide sequences including five reference isolates. Sites with alignment gaps were observed in P4 with one nucleotide deletion in 11 Ethiopian isolates. None of the reference sequence produced frame-shifts, with the exception of the 3-nucleotide deletion in the P4 region by Phytophthora andina, a feature that can be used to distinguish the new Ethiopian isolates from P. andina. While a distinguishing molecular data presented here clearly separated them from P. infestans, 7 % of the isolates that share this feature formed an important component of the late blight pathogen causing disease on Solanum tuberosum in Ethiopia. Thus, these Ethiopian isolates could represent a novel Phytophthora species reported for the first time here.

  4. Whole genome sequence analysis of Cryptococcus gattii from the Pacific Northwest reveals unexpected diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Gillece

    Full Text Available A recent emergence of Cryptococcus gattii in the Pacific Northwest involves strains that fall into three primarily clonal molecular subtypes: VGIIa, VGIIb and VGIIc. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST and variable number tandem repeat analysis appear to identify little diversity within these molecular subtypes. Given the apparent expansion of these subtypes into new geographic areas and their ability to cause disease in immunocompetent individuals, differentiation of isolates belonging to these subtypes could be very important from a public health perspective. We used whole genome sequence typing (WGST to perform fine-scale phylogenetic analysis on 20 C. gattii isolates, 18 of which are from the VGII molecular type largely responsible for the Pacific Northwest emergence. Analysis both including and excluding (289,586 SNPs and 56,845 SNPs, respectively molecular types VGI and VGIII isolates resulted in phylogenetic reconstructions consistent, for the most part, with MLST analysis but with far greater resolution among isolates. The WGST analysis presented here resulted in identification of over 100 SNPs among eight VGIIc isolates as well as unique genotypes for each of the VGIIa, VGIIb and VGIIc isolates. Similar levels of genetic diversity were found within each of the molecular subtype isolates, despite the fact that the VGIIb clade is thought to have emerged much earlier. The analysis presented here is the first multi-genome WGST study to focus on the C. gattii molecular subtypes involved in the Pacific Northwest emergence and describes the tools that will further our understanding of this emerging pathogen.

  5. New Paracoccidioides brasiliensis isolate reveals unexpected genomic variability in this human pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrero, Lilia L; Niño-Vega, Gustavo; Teixeira, Marcus M; Carvalho, Maria Jose A; Soares, Célia M A; Pereira, Maristela; Jesuino, Rosália S A; McEwen, Juan G; Mendoza, Leonel; Taylor, John W; Felipe, Maria Sueli; San-Blas, Gioconda

    2008-05-01

    By means of genealogical concordance phylogenetic species recognition (GCPSR), we have investigated coding and non-coding regions from various genes and the ITS sequences of 7 new and 14 known isolates of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Such isolates grouped within the three phylogenetic groups recently reported in the genus Paracoccidioides, with one single exception, i.e., Pb01, a strain that has been the subject of intense molecular studies for many years. This isolate clearly separates from all other Paracoccidioides isolates in phylogenetic analyses and greatly increases the genomic variation known in this genus.

  6. Revealing unexpected effects of rescue robots’ team-membership in a virtual environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, C.H.G.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cuijpers, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    In urban search and rescue (USAR) situations resources are limited and workload is high. Robots that act as team players instead of tools could help in these situations. A Virtual Reality (VR) experiment was set up to test if team performance of a human-robot team increases when the robot act as suc

  7. Integrative taxonomy reveals an unexpected diversity in Geastrum section Geastrum (Geastrales, Basidiomycota)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamora, J.C.; Calonge, F.D.; Martín, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    A revision of the classification of Geastrum sect. Geastrum is presented on the basis of an integrative taxonomic approach, which involves the study of morphological, molecular, ecological, and chorological data. Four DNA regions are analysed: the ITS and LSU nrDNA, rpb1, and atp6. Phylogenetic reco

  8. Deep phenotyping of 89 xeroderma pigmentosum patients reveals unexpected heterogeneity dependent on the precise molecular defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Fassihi (H.); M. Sethi (M.); H. Fawcett (Heather); J. Wing (Jonathan); N. Chandler (Natalie); S. Mohammed (Shehla); E. Craythorne (Emma); A.M.S. Morley (Ana M.S.); R. Lim (Rongxuan); S. Turner (Sally); T. Henshaw (Tanya); I. Garrood (Isabel); P. Giunti (Paola); T. Hedderly (Tammy); A. Abiona (Adesoji); H. Naik (Harsha); G. Harrop (Gemma); D. McGibbon (D.); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); E. Botta (Elena); T. Nardo (Tiziana); M. Stefanini (Miria); A.R. Young (Antony R.); R. Sarkany (R.); A.R. Lehmann (Alan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractXeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare DNA repair disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to UV radiation (UVR)-induced skin pigmentation, skin cancers, ocular surface disease, and, in some patients, sunburn and neurological degeneration. Genetically, it is assigned to eight com

  9. The transcriptome of Euglena gracilis reveals unexpected metabolic capabilities for carbohydrate and natural product biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Ellis C; Trick, Martin; Hill, Lionel; Rejzek, Martin; Dusi, Renata G; Hamilton, Chris J; Zimba, Paul V; Henrissat, Bernard; Field, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    Euglena gracilis is a highly complex alga belonging to the green plant line that shows characteristics of both plants and animals, while in evolutionary terms it is most closely related to the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma and Leishmania. This well-studied organism has long been known as a rich source of vitamins A, C and E, as well as amino acids that are essential for the human diet. Here we present de novo transcriptome sequencing and preliminary analysis, providing a basis for the molecular and functional genomics studies that will be required to direct metabolic engineering efforts aimed at enhancing the quality and quantity of high value products from E. gracilis. The transcriptome contains over 30,000 protein-encoding genes, supporting metabolic pathways for lipids, amino acids, carbohydrates and vitamins, along with capabilities for polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide biosynthesis. The metabolic and environmental robustness of Euglena is supported by a substantial capacity for responding to biotic and abiotic stress: it has the capacity to deploy three separate pathways for vitamin C (ascorbate) production, as well as producing vitamin E (α-tocopherol) and, in addition to glutathione, the redox-active thiols nor-trypanothione and ovothiol.

  10. Unexpected substrate specificity of T4 DNA ligase revealed by in vitro selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 DNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligates about 50 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly many of the selected sequences failed to produce a match at or close to the ligation junction. None of the 20 selected oligomers that we sequenced produced a match two bases upstream from the ligation junction.

  11. Unexpected Diversity of Chloroplast Noncoding RNAs as Revealed by Deep Sequencing of the Arabidopsis Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotto, Amber M; Schmitz, Robert J; Fei, Zhangjun; Ecker, Joseph R; Stern, David B

    2011-12-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are widely expressed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Eukaryotic ncRNAs are commonly micro- and small-interfering RNAs (18-25 nt) involved in posttranscriptional gene silencing, whereas prokaryotic ncRNAs vary in size and are involved in various aspects of gene regulation. Given the prokaryotic origin of organelles, the presence of ncRNAs might be expected; however, the full spectrum of organellar ncRNAs has not been determined systematically. Here, strand-specific RNA-Seq analysis was used to identify 107 candidate ncRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts, primarily encoded opposite protein-coding and tRNA genes. Forty-eight ncRNAs were shown to accumulate by RNA gel blot as discrete transcripts in wild-type (WT) plants and/or the pnp1-1 mutant, which lacks the chloroplast ribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (cpPNPase). Ninety-eight percent of the ncRNAs detected by RNA gel blot had different transcript patterns between WT and pnp1-1, suggesting cpPNPase has a significant role in chloroplast ncRNA biogenesis and accumulation. Analysis of materials deficient for other major chloroplast ribonucleases, RNase R, RNase E, and RNase J, showed differential effects on ncRNA accumulation and/or form, suggesting specificity in RNase-ncRNA interactions. 5' end mapping demonstrates that some ncRNAs are transcribed from dedicated promoters, whereas others result from transcriptional read-through. Finally, correlations between accumulation of some ncRNAs and the symmetrically transcribed sense RNA are consistent with a role in RNA stability. Overall, our data suggest that this extensive population of ncRNAs has the potential to underpin a previously underappreciated regulatory mode in the chloroplast.

  12. Drosophila Mutant Model of Parkinson's Disease Revealed an Unexpected Olfactory Performance: Morphofunctional Evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, Francescaelena; Corda, Valentina; Belcari, Antonio; Poddighe, Simone; Marrosu, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the clinical triad: tremor, akinesia, and rigidity. Several studies have suggested that PD patients show disturbances in olfaction as one of the earliest, nonspecific nonmotor symptoms of disease onset. We sought to use the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism to explore olfactory function in LRRK loss-of-function mutants, which was previously demonstrated to be a useful model for PD. Surprisingly, our results showed that the LRRK mutant, compared to the wild flies, presents a dramatic increase in the amplitude of the electroantennogram responses and this is coupled with a higher number of olfactory sensilla. In spite of the above reported results, the behavioural response to olfactory stimuli in mutant flies is impaired compared to that obtained in wild type flies. Thus, behaviour modifications and morphofunctional changes in the olfaction of LRRK loss-of-function mutants might be used as an index to explore the progression of parkinsonism in this specific model, also with the aim of studying and developing new treatments. PMID:27648340

  13. Unexpected functional similarities between gatekeeper tumour suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes revealed by systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongzhong; Epstein, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    Familial tumor suppressor genes comprise two subgroups: caretaker genes (CTs) that repair DNA, and gatekeeper genes (GKs) that trigger cell death. Since GKs may also induce cell cycle delay and thus enhance cell survival by facilitating DNA repair, we hypothesized that the prosurvival phenotype of GKs could be selected during cancer progression, and we used a multivariable systems biology approach to test this. We performed multidimensional data analysis, non-negative matrix factorization and logistic regression to compare the features of GKs with those of their putative antagonists, the proto-oncogenes (POs), as well as with control groups of CTs and functionally unrelated congenital heart disease genes (HDs). GKs and POs closely resemble each other, but not CTs or HDs, in terms of gene structure (P<0.001), expression level and breadth (P<0.01), DNA methylation signature (P<0.001) and evolutionary rate (P<0.001). The similar selection pressures and epigenetic trajectories of GKs and POs so implied suggest a common functional attribute that is strongly negatively selected-that is, a shared phenotype that enhances cell survival. The counterintuitive finding of similar evolutionary pressures affecting GKs and POs raises an intriguing possibility: namely, that cancer microevolution is accelerated by an epistatic cascade in which upstream suppressor gene defects subvert the normal bifunctionality of wild-type GKs by constitutively shifting the phenotype away from apoptosis towards survival. If correct, this interpretation would explain the hitherto unexplained phenomenon of frequent wild-type GK (for example, p53) overexpression in tumors.

  14. Thallium-201 accumulation in cerebral candidiasis: Unexpected finding on SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonami, N.; Matsuda, H.; Ooba, H.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Ikeda, K.; Yamashita, J. (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    The authors present an unexpected finding of Tl-201 uptake in the intracerebral lesions due to candidiasis. SPECT demonstrated the extent of the lesions and a high target-to-background ratio. The regions where abnormal Tl-201 accumulation was seen were nearly consistent with CT scans of those enhanced by a contrast agent. After treatment, most of the abnormal Tl-201 accumulation disappeared.

  15. Vigilance task-related change in brain functional connectivity as revealed by wavelet phase coherence analysis of near-infrared spectroscopy signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the vigilance task-related change in connectivity in healthy adults using wavelet phase coherence (WPCO analysis of near-infrared spectroscopy signals (NIRS. NIRS is a non-invasive neuroimaging technique for assessing brain activity. Continuous recordings of the NIRS signals were obtained from the prefrontal cortex (PFC and sensorimotor cortical areas of 20 young healthy adults (24.9±3.3 years during a 10-min resting state and a 20-min vigilance task state. The vigilance task was used to simulate driving mental load by judging three random numbers (i.e., whether odd numbers. The task was divided into two sessions: the first 10 minutes (Task t1 and the second 10 minutes (Task t2. The WPCO of six channel pairs were calculated in five frequency intervals: 0.6–2 Hz (I, 0.145–0.6 Hz (II, 0.052–0.145 Hz (III, 0.021–0.052 Hz (IV, and 0.0095–0.021 Hz (V. The significant WPCO formed global connectivity (GC maps in intervals I and II and functional connectivity (FC maps in intervals III to V. Results show that the GC levels in interval I and FC levels in interval III were significantly lower in the Task t2 than in the resting state (p < 0.05, particularly between the left PFC and bilateral sensorimotor regions. Also, the reaction time shows an increase in Task t2 compared with that in Task t1. However, no significant difference in WPCO was found between Task t1 and resting state. The results showed that the change in FC at the range of 0.6-2 Hz was not attributed to the vigilance task pe se, but the interaction effect of vigilance task and time factors. The findings suggest that the decreased attention level might be partly attributed to the reduced GC levels between the left prefrontal region and sensorimotor area. The present results provide a new insight into the vigilance task-related brain activity.

  16. Brains studying brains: look before you think in vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaoping, Li

    2016-06-01

    Using our own brains to study our brains is extraordinary. For example, in vision this makes us naturally blind to our own blindness, since our impression of seeing our world clearly is consistent with our ignorance of what we do not see. Our brain employs its ‘conscious’ part to reason and make logical deductions using familiar rules and past experience. However, human vision employs many ‘subconscious’ brain parts that follow rules alien to our intuition. Our blindness to our unknown unknowns and our presumptive intuitions easily lead us astray in asking and formulating theoretical questions, as witnessed in many unexpected and counter-intuitive difficulties and failures encountered by generations of scientists. We should therefore pay a more than usual amount of attention and respect to experimental data when studying our brain. I show that this can be productive by reviewing two vision theories that have provided testable predictions and surprising insights.

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  19. Regulation of neurogenesis by neurotrophins during adulthood: expected and unexpected roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marçal eVilar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The subventricular zone (SVZ of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus are the two main regions of the adult mammalian brain in which neurogenesis is maintained throughout life. Because alterations in adult neurogenesis appear to be a common hallmark of different neurodegenerative diseases, understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling adult neurogenesis is a focus of active research. Neurotrophic factors are a family of molecules that play critical roles in the survival and differentiation of neurons during development and in the control of neural plasticity in the adult. Several neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors have been implicated in the regulation of adult neurogenesis at different levels. Here we review the current understanding of neurotrophin modulation of adult neurogenesis in both the SVZ and SGZ. We compile data supporting a variety of roles for neurotrophins/neurotrophin receptors in different scenarios, including both expected and unexpected functions.

  20. Quantitative measurements of alternating finger tapping in Parkinson's disease correlate with UPDRS motor disability and reveal the improvement in fine motor control from medication and deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor Tavares, Ana Lisa; Jefferis, Gregory S X E; Koop, Mandy; Hill, Bruce C; Hastie, Trevor; Heit, Gary; Bronte-Stewart, Helen M

    2005-10-01

    The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is the primary outcome measure in most clinical trials of Parkinson's disease (PD) therapeutics. Each subscore of the motor section (UPDRS III) compresses a wide range of motor performance into a coarse-grained scale from 0 to 4; the assessment of performance can also be subjective. Quantitative digitography (QDG) is an objective, quantitative assessment of digital motor control using a computer-interfaced musical keyboard. In this study, we show that the kinematics of a repetitive alternating finger-tapping (RAFT) task using QDG correlate with the UPDRS motor score, particularly with the bradykinesia subscore, in 33 patients with PD. We show that dopaminergic medication and an average of 9.5 months of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (B-STN DBS) significantly improve UPDRS and QDG scores but may have different effects on certain kinematic parameters. This study substantiates the use of QDG to measure motor outcome in trials of PD therapeutics and shows that medication and B-STN DBS both improve fine motor control.

  1. Analysis of neonatal brain lacking ATRX or MeCP2 reveals changes in nucleosome density, CTCF binding and chromatin looping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernohan, Kristin D; Vernimmen, Douglas; Gloor, Gregory B; Bérubé, Nathalie G

    2014-07-01

    ATRX and MeCP2 belong to an expanding group of chromatin-associated proteins implicated in human neurodevelopmental disorders, although their gene-regulatory activities are not fully resolved. Loss of ATRX prevents full repression of an imprinted gene network in the postnatal brain and in this study we address the mechanistic aspects of this regulation. We show that ATRX binds many imprinted domains individually but that transient co-localization between imprinted domains in the nuclei of neurons does not require ATRX. We demonstrate that MeCP2 is required for ATRX recruitment and that deficiency of either ATRX or MeCP2 causes decreased frequency of long-range chromatin interactions associated with altered nucleosome density at CTCF-binding sites and reduced CTCF occupancy. These findings indicate that MeCP2 and ATRX regulate gene expression at a subset of imprinted domains by maintaining a nucleosome configuration conducive to CTCF binding and to the maintenance of higher order chromatin structure.

  2. Comparison of cortical and white matter traumatic brain injury models reveals differential effects in the subventricular zone and divergent Sonic hedgehog signaling pathways in neuroblasts and oligodendrocyte progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzwa, Amanda J; Sullivan, Genevieve M; Beer, Laurel A; Ahn, Sohyun; Armstrong, Regina C

    2014-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the central nervous system must be optimized to promote repair following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may differ with the site and form of damage. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) maintains neural stem cells and promotes oligodendrogenesis. We examined whether Shh signaling contributes to neuroblast (doublecortin) or oligodendrocyte progenitor (neural/glial antigen 2 [NG2]) responses in two distinct TBI models. Shh-responsive cells were heritably labeled in vivo using Gli1-CreER(T2);R26-YFP bitransgenic mice with tamoxifen administration on Days 2 and 3 post-TBI. Injury to the cerebral cortex was produced with mild controlled cortical impact. Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) cells decreased in cortical lesions. Total YFP cells increased in the subventricular zone (SVZ), indicating Shh pathway activation in SVZ cells, including doublecortin-labeled neuroblasts. The alternate TBI model produced traumatic axonal injury in the corpus callosum. YFP cells decreased within the SVZ and were rarely double labeled as NG2 progenitors. NG2 progenitors increased in the cortex, with a similar pattern in the corpus callosum. To further test the potential of NG2 progenitors to respond through Shh signaling, Smoothened agonist was microinjected into the corpus callosum to activate Shh signaling. YFP cells and NG2 progenitors increased in the SVZ but were not double labeled. This result indicates that either direct Smoothened activation in NG2 progenitors does not signal through Gli1 or that Smoothened agonist acts indirectly to increase NG2 progenitors. Therefore, in all conditions, neuroblasts exhibited differential Shh pathway utilization compared with oligodendrocyte progenitors. Notably, cortical versus white matter damage from TBI produced opposite responses of Shh-activated cells within the SVZ.

  3. Reading the dyslexic brain: multiple dysfunctional routes revealed by a new meta-analysis of PET and fMRI activation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraldo ePaulesu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Developmental dyslexia has been the focus of much functional anatomical research. The main trust of this work is that typical developmental dyslexics have a dysfunction of the phonological and orthography to phonology conversion systems, in which the left occipito-temporal cortex has a crucial role. It remains to be seen whether there is a systematic co-occurrence of dysfunctional patterns of different functional systems perhaps converging on the same brain regions associated with the reading deficit. Such evidence would be relevant for theories like, for example, the magnocellular/attentional or the motor/cerebellar ones, which postulate a more basic and anatomically distributed disorder in dyslexia. We addressed this issue with a meta-analysis of all the imaging literature published until September 2013 using a combination of hierarchical clustering and activation likelihood estimates. The clustering analysis on 2360 peaks identified 193 clusters, 92 of which proved significant for spatial extent. Following binomial tests on the clusters, we found left hemispheric network specific for normal controls (i.d. of reduced involvement in dyslexics involving the left inferior frontal, premotor, supramarginal cortices and the left infero-temporal and fusiform region: these were specific for reading and the visual-to-phonology processes. There was also a more dorsal left fronto-parietal network: these clusters included peaks from tasks involving phonological manipulation, but also motoric or visuo-spatial perception/attention. No cluster was identified in area V5 for no task, nor in cerebellar clusters either.We conclude that the available literature demonstrates a specific lack of activation of the left occipitotemporal cortex in dyslexics that is specific for reading and reading-like behaviours and for visuo-phonological tasks. Additional deficits may be associated with altered functionality of dorsal fronto-parietal cortex.

  4. Heterogeneous intracellular trafficking dynamics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor complexes in the neuronal soma revealed by single quantum dot tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Vermehren-Schmaedick

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence underscores the importance of ligand-receptor dynamics in shaping cellular signaling. In the nervous system, growth factor-activated Trk receptor trafficking serves to convey biochemical signaling that underlies fundamental neural functions. Focus has been placed on axonal trafficking but little is known about growth factor-activated Trk dynamics in the neuronal soma, particularly at the molecular scale, due in large part to technical hurdles in observing individual growth factor-Trk complexes for long periods of time inside live cells. Quantum dots (QDs are intensely fluorescent nanoparticles that have been used to study the dynamics of ligand-receptor complexes at the plasma membrane but the value of QDs for investigating ligand-receptor intracellular dynamics has not been well exploited. The current study establishes that QD conjugated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (QD-BDNF binds to TrkB receptors with high specificity, activates TrkB downstream signaling, and allows single QD tracking capability for long recording durations deep within the soma of live neurons. QD-BDNF complexes undergo internalization, recycling, and intracellular trafficking in the neuronal soma. These trafficking events exhibit little time-synchrony and diverse heterogeneity in underlying dynamics that include phases of sustained rapid motor transport without pause as well as immobility of surprisingly long-lasting duration (several minutes. Moreover, the trajectories formed by dynamic individual BDNF complexes show no apparent end destination; BDNF complexes can be found meandering over long distances of several microns throughout the expanse of the neuronal soma in a circuitous fashion. The complex, heterogeneous nature of neuronal soma trafficking dynamics contrasts the reported linear nature of axonal transport data and calls for models that surpass our generally limited notions of nuclear-directed transport in the soma. QD-ligand probes are

  5. Comparison of Cortical and White Matter Traumatic Brain Injury Models Reveals Differential Effects in the Subventricular Zone and Divergent Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathways in Neuroblasts and Oligodendrocyte Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J. Mierzwa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The regenerative capacity of the central nervous system must be optimized to promote repair following traumatic brain injury (TBI and may differ with the site and form of damage. Sonic hedgehog (Shh maintains neural stem cells and promotes oligodendrogenesis. We examined whether Shh signaling contributes to neuroblast (doublecortin or oligodendrocyte progenitor (neural/glial antigen 2 [NG2] responses in two distinct TBI models. Shh-responsive cells were heritably labeled in vivo using Gli1-CreERT2;R26-YFP bitransgenic mice with tamoxifen administration on Days 2 and 3 post-TBI. Injury to the cerebral cortex was produced with mild controlled cortical impact. Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP cells decreased in cortical lesions. Total YFP cells increased in the subventricular zone (SVZ, indicating Shh pathway activation in SVZ cells, including doublecortin-labeled neuroblasts. The alternate TBI model produced traumatic axonal injury in the corpus callosum. YFP cells decreased within the SVZ and were rarely double labeled as NG2 progenitors. NG2 progenitors increased in the cortex, with a similar pattern in the corpus callosum. To further test the potential of NG2 progenitors to respond through Shh signaling, Smoothened agonist was microinjected into the corpus callosum to activate Shh signaling. YFP cells and NG2 progenitors increased in the SVZ but were not double labeled. This result indicates that either direct Smoothened activation in NG2 progenitors does not signal through Gli1 or that Smoothened agonist acts indirectly to increase NG2 progenitors. Therefore, in all conditions, neuroblasts exhibited differential Shh pathway utilization compared with oligodendrocyte progenitors. Notably, cortical versus white matter damage from TBI produced opposite responses of Shh-activated cells within the SVZ.

  6. Comparative Assessment of the Prognostic Value of Biomarkers in Traumatic Brain Injury Reveals an Independent Role for Serum Levels of Neurofilament Light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiez Al Nimer

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a common cause of death and disability, worldwide. Early determination of injury severity is essential to improve care. Neurofilament light (NF-L has been introduced as a marker of neuroaxonal injury in neuroinflammatory/-degenerative diseases. In this study we determined the predictive power of serum (s- and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF- NF-L levels towards outcome, and explored their potential correlation to diffuse axonal injury (DAI. A total of 182 patients suffering from TBI admitted to the neurointensive care unit at a level 1 trauma center were included. S-NF-L levels were acquired, together with S100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE. CSF-NF-L was measured in a subcohort (n = 84 with ventriculostomies. Clinical and neuro-radiological parameters, including computerized tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging, were included in the analyses. Outcome was assessed 6 to 12 months after injury using the Glasgow Outcome Score (1-5. In univariate proportional odds analyses mean s-NF-L, -S100B and -NSE levels presented a pseudo-R2 Nagelkerke of 0.062, 0.214 and 0.074 in correlation to outcome, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, in addition to a model including core parameters (pseudo-R2 0.33 towards outcome; Age, Glasgow Coma Scale, pupil response, Stockholm CT score, abbreviated injury severity score, S100B, S-NF-L yielded an extra 0.023 pseudo-R2 and a significantly better model (p = 0.006 No correlation between DAI or CT assessed-intracranial damage and NF-L was found. Our study thus demonstrates that S-NF-L correlates to TBI outcome, even if used in models with S100B, indicating an independent contribution to the prediction, perhaps by reflecting different pathophysiological processes, not possible to monitor using conventional neuroradiology. Although we did not find a predictive value of NF-L for DAI, this cannot be completely excluded. We suggest further studies, with volume quantification of axonal

  7. Difference in trafficking of brain-derived neurotrophic factor between axons and dendrites of cortical neurons, revealed by live-cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohara Keigo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is sorted into a regulated secretory pathway of neurons, is supposed to act retrogradely through dendrites on presynaptic neurons or anterogradely through axons on postsynaptic neurons. Depending on which is the case, the pattern and direction of trafficking of BDNF in dendrites and axons are expected to be different. To address this issue, we analyzed movements of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged BDNF in axons and dendrites of living cortical neurons by time-lapse imaging. In part of the experiments, the expression of BDNF tagged with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was compared with that of nerve growth factor (NGF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, to see whether fluorescent protein-tagged BDNF is expressed in a manner specific to this neurotrophin. Results We found that BDNF tagged with GFP or CFP was expressed in a punctated manner in dendrites and axons in about two-thirds of neurons into which plasmid cDNAs had been injected, while NGF tagged with GFP or YFP was diffusely expressed even in dendrites in about 70% of the plasmid-injected neurons. In neurons in which BDNF-GFP was expressed as vesicular puncta in axons, 59 and 23% of the puncta were moving rapidly in the anterograde and retrograde directions, respectively. On the other hand, 64% of BDNF-GFP puncta in dendrites did not move at all or fluttered back and forth within a short distance. The rest of the puncta in dendrites were moving relatively smoothly in either direction, but their mean velocity of transport, 0.47 ± 0.23 (SD μm/s, was slower than that of the moving puncta in axons (0.73 ± 0.26 μm/s. Conclusion The present results show that the pattern and velocity of the trafficking of fluorescence protein-tagged BDNF are different between axons and dendrites, and suggest that the anterograde transport in axons may be the dominant stream of BDNF to release sites.

  8. Icariin reverses corticosterone-induced depression-like behavior, decrease in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and metabolic network disturbances revealed by NMR-based metabonomics in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Meng-Juan; Han, Bin; Wang, Shu-mei; Liang, Sheng-wang; Zou, Zhong-jie

    2016-05-10

    Previously published reports have revealed the antidepressant-like effects of icariin in a chronic mild stress model of depression and in a social defeat stress model in mice. However, the therapeutic effect of icariin in an animal model of glucocorticoid-induced depression remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate antidepressant-like effect and the possible mechanisms of icariin in a rat model of corticosterone (CORT)-induced depression by using a combination of behavioral and biochemical assessments and NMR-based metabonomics. The depression model was established by subcutaneous injections of CORT for 21 consecutive days in rats, as evidenced by reduced sucrose intake and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, together with an increase in immobility time in a forced swim test (FST). Icariin significantly increased sucrose intake and hippocampal BDNF level and decreased the immobility time in FST in CORT-induced depressive rats, suggesting its potent antidepressant activity. Moreover, metabonomic analysis identified eight, five and three potential biomarkers associated with depression in serum, urine and brain tissue extract, respectively. These biomarkers are primarily involved in energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism and gut microbe metabolism. Icariin reversed the pathological process of CORT-induced depression, partially via regulation of the disturbed metabolic pathways. These results provide important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of icariin against CORT-induced depression and metabolic dysfunction.

  9. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Identifying risk and preventing mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhatoo, Samden; Noebels, Jeffrey; Whittemore, Vicky

    2015-11-01

    Premature death among individuals with epilepsy is higher than in the general population, and sudden unexpected death is the most common cause of this mortality. A new multisite collaborative research consortium, the Center for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) Research (CSR), has received major funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to examine the possible biologic mechanisms underlying this potentially preventable comorbidity and develop predictive biomarkers for interventions that could lower SUDEP incidence. This inaugural report describes the structure of the CSR, its priorities for human and experimental research, and the strategic collaborations and advanced tools under development to reduce this catastrophic outcome of epilepsy. The CSR Partners Program will work closely with committed volunteer agencies, industry, and academic institutions to accelerate and communicate these advances to the professional and lay community.

  10. Unexpected but Incidental Positive Outcomes Predict Real-World Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, A Ross; Fleming, Stephen M; Glimcher, Paul W

    2016-03-01

    Positive mood can affect a person's tendency to gamble, possibly because positive mood fosters unrealistic optimism. At the same time, unexpected positive outcomes, often called prediction errors, influence mood. However, a linkage between positive prediction errors-the difference between expected and obtained outcomes-and consequent risk taking has yet to be demonstrated. Using a large data set of New York City lottery gambling and a model inspired by computational accounts of reward learning, we found that people gamble more when incidental outcomes in the environment (e.g., local sporting events and sunshine) are better than expected. When local sports teams performed better than expected, or a sunny day followed a streak of cloudy days, residents gambled more. The observed relationship between prediction errors and gambling was ubiquitous across the city's socioeconomically diverse neighborhoods and was specific to sports and weather events occurring locally in New York City. Our results suggest that unexpected but incidental positive outcomes influence risk taking.

  11. Fuzzy Concepts in the Detection of Unexpected Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bíla

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes three essential classes of unexpected situations (UX1, UX2, UX3, and concentrates attention on UX3 detection. Theconcepts of a special Model of System of Situations (MSS and a Model of a System of Faults (MSF are introduced. An original method isproposed for detecting unexpected situations indicating a violation of a proper invariant of MSS (MSF. The presented approach offers apromising application for starting and ending phases of complex processes, for knowledge discoveries on data and knowledge basesdeveloped with incomplete experience, and for modeling communication processes with unknown (disguised communication subjects. Thepaper also presents a way to utilize ill-separable situations for UX3 detection. The paper deals with the conceptual background for detectingUX3 situations, recapitulates recent results in this field and opens the ways for further research.

  12. Responding to Rapid and Unexpected Retail Innovations: Planning Retail Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Fujie

    Retail areas within cities have traditionally not only satisfied the demands for various goods and services, but also promoted community sustainability and healthy lifestyles. Since the end of World War II (WWII), retail innovations have occurred rapidly and unexpectedly. In retail development, economic efficiency is highly prioritized over other functions, in opposition to sustainable development. In retail planning, a communicative approach frequently results in the public responses by "Not In My Back Yard" sentiments, contradicting the projected cooperation between different stakeholders. This research implements the resilience theory to tackle the shocks created by these rapid and unexpected retail changes, based on a comparative case of Edmonton (Alberta, Canada) and Portland (Oregon, USA). Primarily through interviews with senior planners in both cities, it is found that adaptive retail management, polycentric retail planning, a well-informed public, and the use of consensus building could better stimulates resilient retail outcomes.

  13. Study on Unexpected Cycloaddition Reactions of Imines with THF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An unexpected tricyclic compound 2,3,3a,4,5,9b-hexahydrophenylfuro[3,2-c] quinoline 4 and its aromatized product 6 were obtained when the cycloaddtion of imine 1 and substituted norbornene 2 was carried out in THF with a catalytic amount of boron trifluoride. The structures of the products were determined by spectral data, and the mechanism of reaction was substantiated by the imitation reaction.

  14. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  15. Mining unexpected temporal associations: applications in detecting adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huidong Warren; Chen, Jie; He, Hongxing; Williams, Graham J; Kelman, Chris; O'Keefe, Christine M

    2008-07-01

    In various real-world applications, it is very useful mining unanticipated episodes where certain event patterns unexpectedly lead to outcomes, e.g., taking two medicines together sometimes causing an adverse reaction. These unanticipated episodes are usually unexpected and infrequent, which makes existing data mining techniques, mainly designed to find frequent patterns, ineffective. In this paper, we propose unexpected temporal association rules (UTARs) to describe them. To handle the unexpectedness, we introduce a new interestingness measure, residual-leverage, and develop a novel case-based exclusion technique for its calculation. Combining it with an event-oriented data preparation technique to handle the infrequency, we develop a new algorithm MUTARC to find pairwise UTARs. The MUTARC is applied to generate adverse drug reaction (ADR) signals from real-world healthcare administrative databases. It reliably shortlists not only six known ADRs, but also another ADR, flucloxacillin possibly causing hepatitis, which our algorithm designers and experiment runners have not known before the experiments. The MUTARC performs much more effectively than existing techniques. This paper clearly illustrates the great potential along the new direction of ADR signal generation from healthcare administrative databases.

  16. Novel bio-spectroscopic imaging reveals disturbed protein homeostasis and thiol redox with protein aggregation prior to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron death induced by global brain ischemia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Mark J; Smith, Shari E; Caine, Sally; Nichol, Helen; George, Graham N; Pickering, Ingrid J; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2015-12-01

    Global brain ischemia resulting from cardiac arrest and cardiac surgery can lead to permanent brain damage and mental impairment. A clinical hallmark of global brain ischemia is delayed neurodegeneration, particularly within the CA1 subsector of the hippocampus. Unfortunately, the biochemical mechanisms have not been fully elucidated, hindering optimization of current therapies (i.e., therapeutic hypothermia) or development of new therapies. A major limitation to elucidating the mechanisms that contribute to neurodegeneration and understanding how these are influenced by potential therapies is the inability to relate biochemical markers to alterations in the morphology of individual neurons. Although immunocytochemistry allows imaging of numerous biochemical markers at the sub-cellular level, it is not a direct chemical imaging technique and requires successful "tagging" of the desired analyte. Consequently, important biochemical parameters, particularly those that manifest from oxidative damage to biological molecules, such as aggregated protein levels, have been notoriously difficult to image at the cellular or sub-cellular level. It has been hypothesized that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during ischemia and reperfusion facilitate protein aggregation, impairing neuronal protein homeostasis (i.e., decreasing protein synthesis) that in turn promotes neurodegeneration. Despite indirect evidence for this theory, direct measurements of morphology and ROS induced biochemical damage, such as increased protein aggregates and decreased protein synthesis, within the same neuron is lacking, due to the unavailability of a suitable imaging method. Our experimental approach has incorporated routine histology with novel wide-field synchrotron radiation Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) of the same neurons, ex vivo within brain tissue sections. The results demonstrate for the first time that increased protein aggregation and decreased levels of total protein

  17. Risk factors and consequences of unexpected trapping for ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Fukuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While clipping cerebral aneurysms at the neck is optimal, in some cases this is not possible and other strategies are necessary. The purpose of this study was to describe the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes for inability to clip reconstruct ruptured anterior communicating artery (ACoA aneurysms. Methods: Of the 70 cases of ruptured ACoA aneurysms between January 2006 and December 2013, our institutional experience revealed four cases of small ACoA aneurysms that had been considered clippable prior to operation but required trapping. When a unilateral A2 segment of anterior cerebral artery (ACA was compromised by trapping, revascularization was performed by bypass surgery. Clinical presentation, angiographic characteristics, operative approach, intraoperative findings, and treatment outcomes were assessed. Results: Very small aneurysm under 3 mm was a risk factor for unexpected trapping. The reason for unexpected trapping was laceration of the aneurysmal neck in two cases, and lack of clippaple component due to disintegration of entire aneurysmal wall at the time of rupture in the others. Aneurysms with bilateral A1 were treated with sole trapping through pterional approach in two cases. The other two cases had hypoplastic unilateral A1 segment of ACA and were treated with combination of aneurysm trapping and revascularization of A2 segment of ACA through interhemispheric approach. No patients had new cerebral infarctions of cortical ACA territory from surgery. Cognitive dysfunction was observed in three cases, but all patients became independent at 12-month follow up. Conclusions: Unexpected trapping was performed when ruptured ACoA aneurysms were unclippable. Trapping with or without bypass can result in reasonable outcomes, with acceptable risk of cognitive dysfunction.

  18. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes.

  19. Unexpected findings at imaging: Predicting frequency in various types of studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumbreras, Blanca [Public Health Department, Miguel Hernandez University (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (Spain)], E-mail: blumbreras@umh.es; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel [Radiodiagnostic Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: gonzalez_isa@gva.es; Lorente, Ma Fernanda [Radiodiagnostic Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: MARFERLORENTE@telefonica.net; Calbo, Jorge [Radiodiagnostic Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: jocalma@hotmail.com; Aranaz, Jesus [Preventive Medicine Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: aranaz_jes@gva.es; Hernandez-Aguado, Ildefonso [Public Health Department, Miguel Hernandez University (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (Spain)], E-mail: ihernandez@umh.es

    2010-04-15

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the prevalence and associated variables of unsuspected findings from imaging tests in clinical practice. Material and Methods: Cross-sectional study of patients referred for an imaging test in 2006. Two independent radiologists classified the imaging tests according to the presence or absence of an unexpected finding in relation with the causes that prompted the test (kappa = 0.95). A thorough chart review of these patients was carried out as a quality control. Results: Out of 3259 patients in the study, 488 revealed unsuspected findings (15.0%). The prevalence of abnormal findings varied according to age: from 20.4% (150/734) in the over 74-group to 9.0% (76/847) in the under 43-group. The largest prevalence was in the category of infectious diseases (14/49, 28.6%) and in CT (260/901, 28.9%) and ultrasound (138/668, 20.7%). Studies showing moderate clinical information on the referral form were less likely to show unexpected findings than those with null or minor information (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.36-0.73). Conclusion: Clinicians should expect the frequency of diseases detectable by imaging to increase in the future. Further research with follow-up of these findings is needed to estimate the effect of imaging technologies on final health outcomes.

  20. Risk, unexpected uncertainty, and estimation uncertainty: Bayesian learning in unstable settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Payzan-LeNestour

    Full Text Available Recently, evidence has emerged that humans approach learning using Bayesian updating rather than (model-free reinforcement algorithms in a six-arm restless bandit problem. Here, we investigate what this implies for human appreciation of uncertainty. In our task, a Bayesian learner distinguishes three equally salient levels of uncertainty. First, the Bayesian perceives irreducible uncertainty or risk: even knowing the payoff probabilities of a given arm, the outcome remains uncertain. Second, there is (parameter estimation uncertainty or ambiguity: payoff probabilities are unknown and need to be estimated. Third, the outcome probabilities of the arms change: the sudden jumps are referred to as unexpected uncertainty. We document how the three levels of uncertainty evolved during the course of our experiment and how it affected the learning rate. We then zoom in on estimation uncertainty, which has been suggested to be a driving force in exploration, in spite of evidence of widespread aversion to ambiguity. Our data corroborate the latter. We discuss neural evidence that foreshadowed the ability of humans to distinguish between the three levels of uncertainty. Finally, we investigate the boundaries of human capacity to implement Bayesian learning. We repeat the experiment with different instructions, reflecting varying levels of structural uncertainty. Under this fourth notion of uncertainty, choices were no better explained by Bayesian updating than by (model-free reinforcement learning. Exit questionnaires revealed that participants remained unaware of the presence of unexpected uncertainty and failed to acquire the right model with which to implement Bayesian updating.

  1. Revealing Latent Value of Clinically Acquired CTs of Traumatic Brain Injury Through Multi-Atlas Segmentation in a Retrospective Study of 1,003 with External Cross-Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Andrew J; Kelly, Patrick D; Asman, Andrew J; Kang, Hakmook; Patel, Mayur B; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-20

    Medical imaging plays a key role in guiding treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and for diagnosing intracranial hemorrhage; most commonly rapid computed tomography (CT) imaging is performed. Outcomes for patients with TBI are variable and difficult to predict upon hospital admission. Quantitative outcome scales (e.g., the Marshall classification) have been proposed to grade TBI severity on CT, but such measures have had relatively low value in staging patients by prognosis. Herein, we examine a cohort of 1,003 subjects admitted for TBI and imaged clinically to identify potential prognostic metrics using a "big data" paradigm. For all patients, a brain scan was segmented with multi-atlas labeling, and intensity/volume/texture features were computed in a localized manner. In a 10-fold cross-validation approach, the explanatory value of the image-derived features is assessed for length of hospital stay (days), discharge disposition (five point scale from death to return home), and the Rancho Los Amigos functional outcome score (Rancho Score). Image-derived features increased the predictive R(2) to 0.38 (from 0.18) for length of stay, to 0.51 (from 0.4) for discharge disposition, and to 0.31 (from 0.16) for Rancho Score (over models consisting only of non-imaging admission metrics, but including positive/negative radiological CT findings). This study demonstrates that high volume retrospective analysis of clinical imaging data can reveal imaging signatures with prognostic value. These targets are suited for follow-up validation and represent targets for future feature selection efforts. Moreover, the increase in prognostic value would improve staging for intervention assessment and provide more reliable guidance for patients.

  2. Signs of illness preceding sudden unexpected death in infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, R. E.; Fleming, P J; Azaz, Y; Rudd, P. T.

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether signs of illness reported by parents can be used to identify babies at risk from the sudden infant death syndrome. DESIGN--A two year prospective case-controlled study based in a geographically defined area. SETTING--Four health districts in Avon and north Somerset. SUBJECTS--Babies who had died suddenly and unexpectedly aged between 1 week and 2 years (index babies) and two control babies for each index baby selected from the same health visitor's list and mat...

  3. Alopecia associated with unexpected leakage from electron cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, B.C.; Pennington, E.C.; Hussey, D.H.; Jani, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    Excessive irradiation due to unexpected leakage was found on a patient receiving electron beam therapy. The cause of this leakage was analyzed and the amount of leakage was measured for different electron beam energies. The highest leakage occurred with a 6 x 6 cm cone using a 12 MeV electron beam. The leakage dose measured along the side of the cone could be as great as 40%. Until the cones are modified or redesigned, it is advised that all patient setups be carefully reviewed to assure that no significant patient areas are in the side scatter region.

  4. Unexpected death holograms: Animitas urban appeal in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lautaro Ojeda Ledesma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at performing an integral analysis of the relation between popular religiousness and urban space in Chilean animitas [little shrines] practices. In order to do this, we propose a multipurpose analysis scheme, holding the concept of "unexpected death hologram". This scheme puts forward three supplementary classifications: animita as a holographic subject, as a holographic object and as a holographic place. Finally, these three classifications supplemented by interviews and topologic analyses show almost all the sociospatial factors present in this practice, accounting for the urban importance that this type of popular practice has

  5. Reversible "brain atrophy" in patients with Cushing's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gnjidić, Živko; Sajko, Tomislav; Kudelić, Nenad; Malenica, Maša; Vizner, Branka; Vrkljan, Milan; Hat, Josip; Rumboldt, Zoran

    2008-01-01

    During the past 25 years, we came across 60 patients with corticotroph pituitary adenomas and Cushing’s disease. Neuroradiological examination showed prominent volume loss of the brain parenchyma, unexpected for the patient’s age. This »brain atrophy« appeared to regress after surgical removal of pituitary adenoma and normalization of cortisol level. Observed difference between degree of »brain atrophy« in the Cushing’s disease group and in the control group was statistically sign...

  6. Unexpected arousal modulates the influence of sensory noise on confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Micah; Frank, Darya; Schwarzkopf, D Samuel; Fardo, Francesca; Winston, Joel S; Hauser, Tobias U; Rees, Geraint

    2016-01-01

    Human perception is invariably accompanied by a graded feeling of confidence that guides metacognitive awareness and decision-making. It is often assumed that this arises solely from the feed-forward encoding of the strength or precision of sensory inputs. In contrast, interoceptive inference models suggest that confidence reflects a weighted integration of sensory precision and expectations about internal states, such as arousal. Here we test this hypothesis using a novel psychophysical paradigm, in which unseen disgust-cues induced unexpected, unconscious arousal just before participants discriminated motion signals of variable precision. Across measures of perceptual bias, uncertainty, and physiological arousal we found that arousing disgust cues modulated the encoding of sensory noise. Furthermore, the degree to which trial-by-trial pupil fluctuations encoded this nonlinear interaction correlated with trial level confidence. Our results suggest that unexpected arousal regulates perceptual precision, such that subjective confidence reflects the integration of both external sensory and internal, embodied states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18103.001 PMID:27776633

  7. Characterization of task-free and task-performance brain states via functional connectome patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Guo, Lei; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Tuo; Zhu, Dajiang; Li, Kaiming; Chen, Hanbo; Lv, Jinglei; Jin, Changfeng; Zhao, Qun; Li, Lingjiang; Liu, Tianming

    2013-12-01

    Both resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) and task-based fMRI (T-fMRI) have been widely used to study the functional activities of the human brain during task-free and task-performance periods, respectively. However, due to the difficulty in strictly controlling the participating subject's mental status and their cognitive behaviors during R-fMRI/T-fMRI scans, it has been challenging to ascertain whether or not an R-fMRI/T-fMRI scan truly reflects the participant's functional brain states during task-free/task-performance periods. This paper presents a novel computational approach to characterizing and differentiating the brain's functional status into task-free or task-performance states, by which the functional brain activities can be effectively understood and differentiated. Briefly, the brain's functional state is represented by a whole-brain quasi-stable connectome pattern (WQCP) of R-fMRI or T-fMRI data based on 358 consistent cortical landmarks across individuals, and then an effective sparse representation method was applied to learn the atomic connectome patterns (ACPs) of both task-free and task-performance states. Experimental results demonstrated that the learned ACPs for R-fMRI and T-fMRI datasets are substantially different, as expected. A certain portion of ACPs from R-fMRI and T-fMRI data were overlapped, suggesting some subjects with overlapping ACPs were not in the expected task-free/task-performance brain states. Besides, potential outliers in the T-fMRI dataset were further investigated via functional activation detections in different groups, and our results revealed unexpected task-performances of some subjects. This work offers novel insights into the functional architectures of the brain.

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  9. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalography (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain.

  10. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ravi kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalograph y (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain

  11. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  12. Brain components

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can make complex movements without thinking. The brain stem connects the brain with the spinal cord and is composed of ... structures: the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. The brain stem provides us with automatic functions that are necessary ...

  13. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  14. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  17. The Unexpected Awakening of Chaitén Volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon A.; Pallister, John S.; Lara, Luis; Ewert, John W.; Watt, Sebastian; Prata, Alfred J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Villarosa, Gustavo

    2009-06-01

    On 2 May 2008, a large eruption began unexpectedly at the inconspicuous Chaitén volcano in Chile's southern volcanic zone. Ash columns abruptly jetted from the volcano into the stratosphere, followed by lava dome effusion and continuous low-altitude ash plumes [Lara, 2009]. Apocalyptic photographs of eruption plumes suffused with lightning were circulated globally. Effects of the eruption were extensive. Floods and lahars inundated the town of Chaitén, and its 4625 residents were evacuated. Widespread ashfall and drifting ash clouds closed regional airports and cancelled hundreds of domestic flights in Argentina and Chile and numerous international flights [Guffanti et al., 2008]. Ash heavily affected the aquaculture industry in the nearby Gulf of Corcovado, curtailed ecotourism, and closed regional nature preserves. To better prepare for future eruptions, the Chilean government has boosted support for monitoring and hazard mitigation at Chaitén and at 42 other highly hazardous, active volcanoes in Chile.

  18. Unexpected fold in the circumsporozoite protein target of malaria vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doud, Michael B.; Koksal, Adem C.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Song, Gaojie; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A. (Harvard-Med)

    2012-10-09

    Circumsporozoite (CS) protein is the major surface component of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites and is essential for host cell invasion. A vaccine containing tandem repeats, region III, and thrombospondin type-I repeat (TSR) of CS is efficacious in phase III trials but gives only a 35% reduction in severe malaria in the first year postimmunization. We solved crystal structures showing that region III and TSR fold into a single unit, an '{alpha}TSR' domain. The {alpha}TSR domain possesses a hydrophobic pocket and core, missing in TSR domains. CS binds heparin, but {alpha}TSR does not. Interestingly, polymorphic T-cell epitopes map to specialized {alpha}TSR regions. The N and C termini are unexpectedly close, providing clues for sporozoite sheath organization. Elucidation of a unique structure of a domain within CS enables rational design of next-generation subunit vaccines and functional and medicinal chemical investigation of the conserved hydrophobic pocket.

  19. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy genetics: Molecular diagnostics and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Alica M; Behr, Elijah R; Semsarian, Christopher; Bagnall, Richard D; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Cooper, Paul N

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies clearly document the public health burden of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Clinical and experimental studies have uncovered dynamic cardiorespiratory dysfunction, both interictally and at the time of sudden death due to epilepsy. Genetic analyses in humans and in model systems have facilitated our current molecular understanding of SUDEP. Many discoveries have been informed by progress in the field of sudden cardiac death and sudden infant death syndrome. It is becoming apparent that SUDEP genomic complexity parallels that of sudden cardiac death, and that there is a pauci1ty of analytically useful postmortem material. Because many challenges remain, future progress in SUDEP research, molecular diagnostics, and prevention rests in international, collaborative, and transdisciplinary dialogue in human and experimental translational research of sudden death.

  20. Unexpectedly wide rf-induced synchrotron sideband depolarizing resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C. M.; Ellison, T. J.; Lee, S. Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; von Przewoski, B.; Anferov, V. A.; Blinov, B. B.; Bychkov, M. A.; Caussyn, D. D.; Courant, E. D.; Crandell, D. A.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Kaufman, W. A.; Krisch, A. D.; Lorenzon, W.; Nurushev, T. S.; Phelps, R. A.; Ratner, L. G.; Wong, V. K.; Ohmori, C.; Minty, M. G.; Martin, P. S.; Russell, A. D.; Sivers, D. W.

    1998-10-01

    Using an rf solenoid magnet, we studied the depolarization of a stored 104.1 MeV vertically polarized proton beam. The two primary rf depolarizing resonances were properly centered around the protons' circulation frequency fc, at fc(3-νs) and fc(νs-1), where νs is the spin tune; moreover, each resonance was roughly consistent with the expected width of about 720 Hz. Each primary rf resonance had two synchrotron sideband resonances at the expected frequencies. The two νs-1 sidebands were deep dips while the two 3-νs sidebands were very shallow; this was not expected. Moreover, all four sideband resonances were unexpectedly wider than the two primary resonances.

  1. FROM PIONS TO PROTON DECAY: Tales of the Unexpected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, D. H.

    2005-12-01

    This account recalls early observations of elementary particles from cosmic ray experiments, using the nuclear emulsion technique. Discoveries in this field in the 1940s and 50s led to the development of high energy particle accelerators and associated detectors, resulting eventually in the observation of the quark and lepton constituents of matter and of the fundamental interactions between them, as described in the Standard Model. The concept of unification of the fundamental interactions led to the prediction of proton decay, and although this has not been observed, the unwanted background due to atmospheric neutrino interactions led to the discovery of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass, and the first indications of new physics beyond that of the Standard Model. In all this research, unexpected developments have often played an important role.

  2. The Unexpected Awakening of Chaitén Volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon A.; Zogorski, John S.; Lara, Luis; Ewert, John W.; Watt, Sebastian; Prata, Alfred J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Villarosa, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    On 2 May 2008, a large eruption began unexpectedly at the inconspicuous Chaitén volcano in Chile's southern volcanic zone. Ash columns abruptly jetted from the volcano into the stratosphere, followed by lava dome effusion and continuous low-altitude ash plumes [Lara, 2009]. Apocalyptic photographs of eruption plumes suffused with lightning were circulated globally. Effects of the eruption were extensive. Floods and lahars inundated the town of Chaitén, and its 4625 residents were evacuated. Widespread ashfall and drifting ash clouds closed regional airports and cancelled hundreds of domestic flights in Argentina and Chile and numerous international flights [Guffanti et al., 2008]. Ash heavily affected the aquaculture industry in the nearby Gulf of Corcovado, curtailed ecotourism, and closed regional nature preserves. To better prepare for future eruptions, the Chilean government has boosted support for monitoring and hazard mitigation at Chaitén and at 42 other highly hazardous, active volcanoes in Chile.

  3. Castleman Disease: An Unexpected Cause of a Solitary Pleural Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiachra Moloney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman disease (CD is a rare benign lymphoproliferative disorder, the etiology of which is unclear. Clinically it may manifest as localized disease (unicentric or disseminated disease (multicentric. CD occurs in the thorax in 70% of cases, abdomen and pelvis in 15%, and in the neck in 10–15% of cases. We present a case of a pleural mass located posteriorly in a paraspinal location, which was discovered incidentally in a 50-year-old man and was subsequently resected followed by an unexpected diagnosis of Castleman disease on histological examination. In this report, we review the clinical and histological findings in a rare presentation of Castleman disease and discuss the findings in this case as part of an overall review of the typical radiological findings seen in Castleman disease.

  4. Cambrian stalked echinoderms show unexpected plasticity of arm construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, S; Smith, A B

    2012-01-22

    Feeding arms carrying coelomic extensions of the theca are thought to be unique to crinoids among stemmed echinoderms. However, a new two-armed echinoderm from the earliest Middle Cambrian of Spain displays a highly unexpected morphology. X-ray microtomographic analysis of its arms shows they are polyplated in their proximal part with a dorsal series of uniserial elements enclosing a large coelomic lumen. Distally, the arm transforms into the more standard biserial structure of a blastozoan brachiole. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that this taxon lies basal to rhombiferans as sister-group to pleurocystitid and glyptocystitid blastozoans, drawing those clades deep into the Cambrian. We demonstrate that Cambrian echinoderms show surprising variability in the way their appendages are constructed, and that the appendages of at least some blastozoans arose as direct outgrowths of the body in much the same way as the arms of crinoids.

  5. Detecting the unexpected: a research framework for ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Catherine A; Esbaugh, Andrew J; Frieder, Christina A; Baumann, Hannes; Bockmon, Emily E; White, Meredith M; Carter, Brendan R; Benway, Heather M; Blanchette, Carol A; Carrington, Emily; McClintock, James B; McCorkle, Daniel C; McGillis, Wade R; Mooney, T Aran; Ziveri, Patrizia

    2014-09-01

    The threat that ocean acidification (OA) poses to marine ecosystems is now recognized and U.S. funding agencies have designated specific funding for the study of OA. We present a research framework for studying OA that describes it as a biogeochemical event that impacts individual species and ecosystems in potentially unexpected ways. We draw upon specific lessons learned about ecosystem responses from research on acid rain, carbon dioxide enrichment in terrestrial plant communities, and nitrogen deposition. We further characterize the links between carbon chemistry changes and effects on individuals and ecosystems, and enumerate key hypotheses for testing. Finally, we quantify how U.S. research funding has been distributed among these linkages, concluding that there is an urgent need for research programs designed to anticipate how the effects of OA will reverberate throughout assemblages of species.

  6. The unexpected clustering of the optical afterglow luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Nardini, M; Ghirlanda, G; Tavecchio, F; Firmani, C; Lazzati, D

    2006-01-01

    We studied the behaviour of the optical afterglow lightcurves of a sample of 24 Gamma--Ray Bursts (GRBs) with known redshift and published estimates of the optical extinction in the source frame, detected before the SWIFT satellite launch. We found an unexpected clustering of the optical luminosities at 12 hours in the source frame. The distribution of the optical luminosities is narrower than the distribution of X-ray luminosities at the same time. Few (3) bursts stand apart from the main optical distribution, being fainter by a factor of about 15. We also analysed the optical luminosities of the SWIFT burst with known redshift finding that the luminosity distribution is similar to the pre SWIFT GRBs one, even if they have a different mean redshift. These results can suggest the existence of a family of intrinsically optically under--luminous dark GRBs.

  7. Sudden and unexpected death from pituitary tumor apoplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Lisa B E; Balko, M Gregory; Hunsaker, John C

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary tumor apoplexy refers to a clinical syndrome precipitated by the expansion of a pituitary adenoma by hemorrhage or infarction. Individuals may present with myriad signs, including sudden onset of severe headache, visual changes, altered mental status, cranial nerve palsies, and hormonal dysfunction. This disorder constitutes a medical emergency and warrants an expedited evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment to prevent the potential sequelae of permanent visual loss, endocrine abnormalities, or death. We report a case of sudden death from undiagnosed pituitary tumor apoplexy. The decedent was evaluated by medical personnel on three occasions in the week prior to her death for severe headache, nausea, vomiting, and photophobia. Postmortem examination demonstrated a hemorrhagic infarction of a pituitary adenoma with necrosis and expansion out of the sella turcica. The recognition of and treatment for a patient with pituitary tumor apoplexy requires a rapid multidisciplinary effort. Failure of prompt diagnosis may be fatal and require a medico-legal death investigation for sudden and unexpected death.

  8. Unexpected response of high Alpine Lake waters to climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, Hansjörg; Nickus, Ulrike; Mair, Volkmar; Tessadri, Richard; Tait, Danilo; Thaler, Bertha; Psenner, Roland

    2007-11-01

    Over the past two decades, we have observed a substantial rise in solute concentration at two remote high mountain lakes in catchments of metamorphic rocks in the European Alps. At Rasass See, the electrical conductivity increased 18-fold. Unexpectedly high nickel concentrations at Rasass See, which exceeded the limit in drinking water by more than 1 order of magnitude, cannot be related to catchment geology. We attribute these changes in lake water quality to solute release from the ice of an active rock glacier in the catchment as a response to climate warming. Similar processes occurred at the higher elevation lake Schwarzsee ob Sölden, where electrical conductivity has risen 3-fold during the past two decades.

  9. Witnessed sleep-related seizure and sudden unexpected death in infancy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kinney, Hannah C.; McDonald, Anna G.; Minter, Megan E.; Gerard T. Berry; Poduri, Annapurna; Goldstein, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Witnessed reports of sudden death are rare, but critical to deciphering its mechanism(s). We report such a death in a seemingly healthy 8-month-old boy in whom seizures and respiratory distress in the prone position were witnessed upon discovery during a sleep period. Following cardiopulmonary resuscitation, anoxic encephalopathy resulted in “brain death” and withdrawal of life support after 2 days. The autopsy did not reveal a primary anatomic cause of death. Metabolic evaluation failed to u...

  10. Illuminating odors: when optogenetics brings to light unexpected olfactory abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaud, Julien

    2016-01-01

    For hundreds of years, the sense of smell has generated great interest in the world literature, oenologists, and perfume makers but less of scientists. Only recently this sensory modality has gained new attraction in neuroscience when original tools issued from physiology, anatomy, or molecular biology were available to decipher how the brain makes sense of olfactory cues. However, this move was promptly dampened by the difficulties of developing quantitative approaches to study the relationship between the physical characteristics of stimuli and the sensations they create. An upswing of olfactory investigations occurred when genetic tools could be used in combination with devices borrowed from the physics of light (a hybrid technique called optogenetics) to scrutinize the olfactory system and to provide greater physiological precision for studying olfactory-driven behaviors. This review aims to present the most recent studies that have used light to activate components of the olfactory pathway, such as olfactory receptor neurons, or neurons located further downstream, while leaving intact others brain circuits. With the use of optogenetics to unravel the mystery of olfaction, scientists have begun to disentangle how the brain makes sense of smells. In this review, we shall discuss how the brain recognizes odors, how it memorizes them, and how animals make decisions based on odorants they are capable of sensing. Although this review deals with olfaction, the role of light will be central throughout. PMID:27194792

  11. Comprehensive regional and temporal gene expression profiling of the rat brain during the first 24 h after experimental stroke identifies dynamic ischemia-induced gene expression patterns, and reveals a biphasic activation of genes in surviving tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Wieloch, Tadeusz; Gidö, Gunilla

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify biological processes relevant for cell death and survival in the brain following stroke, the postischemic brain transcriptome was studied by a large-scale cDNA array analysis of three peri-infarct brain regions at eight time points during the first 24 h of reperfusion following......-dehydrogenase1, and Choline kinase) or cell death-regulating genes such as mitochondrial CLIC. We conclude that a biphasic transcriptional up-regulation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathways occurs in surviving...... tissue, concomitant with a progressive and persistent activation of cell proliferation signifying tissue regeneration, which provide the means for cell survival and postischemic brain plasticity....

  12. Anatomy of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors ... form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors ...

  13. Out of Mind, Out of Sight: Unexpected Scene Elements Frequently Go Unnoticed Until Primed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavich, George M; Zimbardo, Philip G

    2013-12-01

    The human visual system employs a sophisticated set of strategies for scanning the environment and directing attention to stimuli that can be expected given the context and a person's past experience. Although these strategies enable us to navigate a very complex physical and social environment, they can also cause highly salient, but unexpected stimuli to go completely unnoticed. To examine the generality of this phenomenon, we conducted eight studies that included 15 different experimental conditions and 1,577 participants in all. These studies revealed that a large majority of participants do not report having seen a woman in the center of an urban scene who was photographed in midair as she was committing suicide. Despite seeing the scene repeatedly, 46 % of all participants failed to report seeing a central figure and only 4.8 % reported seeing a falling person. Frequency of noticing the suicidal woman was highest for participants who read a narrative priming story that increased the extent to which she was schematically congruent with the scene. In contrast to this robust effect of inattentional blindness, a majority of participants reported seeing other peripheral objects in the visual scene that were equally difficult to detect, yet more consistent with the scene. Follow-up qualitative analyses revealed that participants reported seeing many elements that were not actually present, but which could have been expected given the overall context of the scene. Together, these findings demonstrate the robustness of inattentional blindness and highlight the specificity with which different visual primes may increase noticing behavior.

  14. Unexpected Convergent Evolution of Nasal Domes between Pleistocene Bovids and Cretaceous Hadrosaur Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Haley D; Faith, J Tyler; Jenkins, Kirsten E; Peppe, Daniel J; Plummer, Thomas W; Jacobs, Zenobia L; Li, Bo; Joannes-Boyau, Renaud; Price, Gilbert; Feng, Yue-Xing; Tryon, Christian A

    2016-02-22

    The fossil record provides tangible, historical evidence for the mode and operation of evolution across deep time. Striking patterns of convergence are some of the strongest examples of these operations, whereby, over time, similar environmental and/or behavioral pressures precipitate similarity in form and function between disparately related taxa. Here we present fossil evidence for an unexpected convergence between gregarious plant-eating mammals and dinosaurs. Recent excavations of Late Pleistocene deposits on Rusinga Island, Kenya, have uncovered a catastrophic assemblage of the wildebeest-like bovid Rusingoryx atopocranion. Previously known from fragmentary material, these new specimens reveal large, hollow, osseous nasal crests: a craniofacial novelty for mammals that is remarkably comparable to the nasal crests of lambeosaurine hadrosaur dinosaurs. Using adult and juvenile material from this assemblage, as well as computed tomographic imaging, we investigate this convergence from morphological, developmental, functional, and paleoenvironmental perspectives. Our detailed analyses reveal broad parallels between R. atopocranion and basal Lambeosaurinae, suggesting that osseous nasal crests may require a highly specific combination of ontogeny, evolution, and environmental pressures in order to develop.

  15. Genetics of leprosy: Expected-and unexpected-developments and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Monica E D; Salomão, Heloisa; Ramos, Geovana B; D'Espindula, Helena R S; Rodrigues, Rafael S A; Macedo, Wilian C; Sindeaux, Renata H M; Mira, Marcelo T

    2016-01-01

    A solid body of evidence produced over decades of intense research supports the hypothesis that leprosy phenotypes are largely dependent on the genetic characteristics of the host. The early evidence of a major gene effect controlling susceptibility to leprosy came from studies of familial aggregation, twins, and complex segregation analysis. Later, linkage and association analysis, first applied to the investigation of candidate genes and chromosomal regions and more recently, to genome-wide scans, have revealed several HLA and non-HLA gene variants as risk factors for leprosy phenotypes such as disease per se, its clinical forms, and leprosy reactions. In addition, powerful, hypothesis-free strategies such as genome-wide association studies have led to an exciting, unexpected development: Leprosy susceptibility genes seem to be shared with Crohn's and Parkinson's disease. Today, a major challenge is to find the exact variants causing the biological effect underlying the genetic associations. New technologies, such as Next Generation Sequencing-that allows, for the first time, the cost- and time-effective sequencing of a complete human genome-hold the promise to reveal such variants; thus, strategies can be developed to study the functional impact of these variants in the context of infection, hopefully leading to the development of new targets for leprosy treatment and prevention.

  16. In Vivo 3D Digital Atlas Database of the Adult C57BL/6J Mouse Brain by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu; Smith, David; Hof, Patrick R; Foerster, Bernd; Hamilton, Scott; Blackband, Stephen J; Yu, Mei; Benveniste, Helene

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a 3D digital atlas of the live mouse brain based on magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) is presented. C57BL/6J adult mouse brains were imaged in vivo on a 9.4 Tesla MR instrument at an isotropic spatial resolution of 100 mum. With sufficient signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), 20 brain regions were identified. Several atlases were constructed including 12 individual brain atlases, an average atlas, a probabilistic atlas and average geometrical deformation maps. We also investigated the feasibility of using lower spatial resolution images to improve time efficiency for future morphological phenotyping. All of the new in vivo data were compared to previous published in vitro C57BL/6J mouse brain atlases and the morphological differences were characterized. Our analyses revealed significant volumetric as well as unexpected geometrical differences between the in vivo and in vitro brain groups which in some instances were predictable (e.g. collapsed and smaller ventricles in vitro) but not in other instances. Based on these findings we conclude that although in vitro datasets, compared to in vivo images, offer higher spatial resolutions, superior SNR and CNR, leading to improved image segmentation, in vivo atlases are likely to be an overall better geometric match for in vivo studies, which are necessary for longitudinal examinations of the same animals and for functional brain activation studies. Thus the new in vivo mouse brain atlas dataset presented here is a valuable complement to the current mouse brain atlas collection and will be accessible to the neuroscience community on our public domain mouse brain atlas website.

  17. In vivo 3D digital atlas database of the adult C57BL/6J mouse brain by magnetic resonance microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ma

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 3D digital atlas of the live mouse brain based on magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM is presented. C57BL/6J adult mouse brains were imaged in vivo on a 9.4 Tesla MR instrument at an isotropic spatial resolution of 100 μm. With sufficient signal-to-noise (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR, 20 brain regions were identified. Several atlases were constructed including 12 individual brain atlases, an average atlas, a probabilistic atlas and average geometrical deformation maps. We also investigated the feasibility of using lower spatial resolution images to improve time efficiency for future morphological phenotyping. All of the new in vivo data were compared to previous published in vitro C57BL/6J mouse brain atlases and the morphological differences were characterized. Our analyses revealed significant volumetric as well as unexpected geometrical differences between the in vivo and in vitro brain groups which in some instances were predictable (e.g. collapsed and smaller ventricles in vitro but not in other instances. Based on these findings we conclude that although in vitro datasets, compared to in vivo images, offer higher spatial resolutions, superior SNR and CNR, leading to improved image segmentation, in vivo atlases are likely to be an overall better geometric match for in vivo studies, which are necessary for longitudinal examinations of the same animals and for functional brain activation studies. Thus the new in vivo mouse brain atlas dataset presented here is a valuable complement to the current mouse brain atlas collection and will be accessible to the neuroscience community on our public domain mouse brain atlas website.

  18. Unexpected (π , π) order in Fe1.1Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobes, David; Zaliznyak, Igor; Xu, Zhijun; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, John M.; Singh, Deepak

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the evolution of the magnetic and crystal structure in single crystalline Fe1.1Te, an iron-rich parent of the chalcogenide superconductor family. While a structural transition to a monoclinic symmetry occurs at ~ 60 K, magnetic peaks at 2 π . (0 . 48 , 0) only arise below TN ~ 58 K, and can be understood as bicollinear magnetism with discommensuration defects. [2] Unexpectedly, we have also observed resolution limited peaks at approximately (π , π) , arising at the same temperature TN, and exhibiting temperature hysteresis similar to that seen in magnetic susceptibility, perhaps indicating that these peaks are of magnetic origin. Additionally, the position of these peaks is nearly the same as in the parent compounds of the iron pnictide family of superconductors, where magnetic order is simple collinear commensurate antiferromagnetism. The origin of these new peaks near (π , π) and their relationship to the dominant bicollinear magnetic order observed in Fe1.1Te presents a puzzle. Work at BNL supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886. We acknowledge the support of NIST, US Department of Commerce, in providing the neutron research facilities used in this work.

  19. Identifying unexpected therapeutic targets via chemical-protein interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    Full Text Available Drug medications inevitably affect not only their intended protein targets but also other proteins as well. In this study we examined the hypothesis that drugs that share the same therapeutic effect also share a common therapeutic mechanism by targeting not only known drug targets, but also by interacting unexpectedly on the same cryptic targets. By constructing and mining an Alzheimer's disease (AD drug-oriented chemical-protein interactome (CPI using a matrix of 10 drug molecules known to treat AD towards 401 human protein pockets, we found that such cryptic targets exist. We recovered from CPI the only validated therapeutic target of AD, acetylcholinesterase (ACHE, and highlighted several other putative targets. For example, we discovered that estrogen receptor (ER and histone deacetylase (HDAC, which have recently been identified as two new therapeutic targets of AD, might already have been targeted by the marketed AD drugs. We further established that the CPI profile of a drug can reflect its interacting character towards multi-protein sets, and that drugs with the same therapeutic attribute will share a similar interacting profile. These findings indicate that the CPI could represent the landscape of chemical-protein interactions and uncover "behind-the-scenes" aspects of the therapeutic mechanisms of existing drugs, providing testable hypotheses of the key nodes for network pharmacology or brand new drug targets for one-target pharmacology paradigm.

  20. Unexpected Molecular Sieving Properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework-8

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chen

    2012-08-16

    We studied molecular sieving properties of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) by estimating the thermodynamically corrected diffusivities of probe molecules at 35 °C. From helium (2.6 Å) to iso-C 4H 10 (5.0 Å), the corrected diffusivity drops 14 orders of magnitude. Our results further suggest that the effective aperture size of ZIF-8 for molecular sieving is in the range of 4.0 to 4.2 Å, which is significantly larger than the XRD-derived value (3.4 Å) and between the well-known aperture size of zeolite 4A (3.8 Å) and 5A (4.3 Å). Interestingly, because of aperture flexibility, the studied C 4 hydrocarbon molecules that are larger than this effective aperture size still adsorb in the micropores of ZIF-8 with kinetic selectivities for iso-C 4H 8/iso-C 4H 10 of 180 and n-C 4H 10/iso-C 4H 10 of 2.5 × 10 6. These unexpected molecular sieving properties open up new opportunities for ZIF materials for separations that cannot be economically achieved by traditional microporous adsorbents such as synthetic zeolites. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  1. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Ekström, A.; Frömmgen, N.; Hagen, G.; Hammen, M.; Hebeler, K.; Holt, J. D.; Jansen, G. R.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Nazarewicz, W.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Papenbrock, T.; Papuga, J.; Schwenk, A.; Simonis, J.; Wendt, K. A.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-06-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain `magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-rich atomic nuclei.

  2. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Ruiz, R F; Blaum, K; Ekström, A; Frömmgen, N; Hagen, G; Hammen, M; Hebeler, K; Holt, J D; Jansen, G R; Kowalska, M; Kreim, K; Nazarewicz, W; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Papenbrock, T; Papuga, J; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Wendt, K A; Yordanov, D T

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain ‘magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-...

  3. Unexpected demography in the recovery of an endangered primate population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen B Strier

    Full Text Available Assessments of the status of endangered species have focused on population sizes, often without knowledge of demographic and behavioral processes underlying population recovery. We analyzed demographic data from a 28-year study of a critically endangered primate, the northern muriqui, to investigate possible changes in demographic rates as this population recovered from near extirpation. As the population increased from 60 to nearly 300 individuals, its growth rate declined due to increased mortality and male-biased birth sex ratios; the increased mortality was not uniform across ages and sexes, and there has been a recent increase in mortality of prime-aged males. If not for a concurrent increase in fertility rates, the population would have stabilized at 200 individuals instead of continuing to grow. The unexpected increase in fertility rates and in adult male mortality can be attributed to the muriquis' expansion of their habitat by spending more time on the ground. The demographic consequences of this behavioral shift must be incorporated into management tactics for this population and emphasize the importance of understanding demographic rates in the recovery of endangered species.

  4. Unexpected properties of interactions of high energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Dremin, I M

    2016-01-01

    Experimental data on proton-proton interactions in high energy collisions show quite a special and unexpected behaviour of the proportion of elastic scattering compared to inelastic processes with increasing energy. It decreases at the beginning (at comparatively low energies) but then starts increasing. From Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) energies of 23.5 - 62.5 GeV up to higher energies 7 - 13 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) it increases by a factor more than 1.5! According to intuitive classical ideas we would expect a stable tendency with increasing proportion of the break-down of protons compared to their survival probability. One can assume that either the asymptotic freedom or the extremely short time of flight of high energy protons through each other are in charge of such a surprising effect. The unquestionable principle of unitarity combined with the available experimental data on elastic scattering is used to get new conclusions about the shape of the interaction region of colliding proton...

  5. Olivine in an unexpected location on Vesta's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammannito, E; De Sanctis, M C; Palomba, E; Longobardo, A; Mittlefehldt, D W; McSween, H Y; Marchi, S; Capria, M T; Capaccioni, F; Frigeri, A; Pieters, C M; Ruesch, O; Tosi, F; Zambon, F; Carraro, F; Fonte, S; Hiesinger, H; Magni, G; McFadden, L A; Raymond, C A; Russell, C T; Sunshine, J M

    2013-12-05

    Olivine is a major component of the mantle of differentiated bodies, including Earth. Howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites represent regolith, basaltic-crust, lower-crust and possibly ultramafic-mantle samples of asteroid Vesta, which is the lone surviving, large, differentiated, basaltic rocky protoplanet in the Solar System. Only a few of these meteorites, the orthopyroxene-rich diogenites, contain olivine, typically with a concentration of less than 25 per cent by volume. Olivine was tentatively identified on Vesta, on the basis of spectral and colour data, but other observations did not confirm its presence. Here we report that olivine is indeed present locally on Vesta's surface but that, unexpectedly, it has not been found within the deep, south-pole basins, which are thought to be excavated mantle rocks. Instead, it occurs as near-surface materials in the northern hemisphere. Unlike the meteorites, the olivine-rich (more than 50 per cent by volume) material is not associated with diogenite but seems to be mixed with howardite, the most common surface material. Olivine is exposed in crater walls and in ejecta scattered diffusely over a broad area. The size of the olivine exposures and the absence of associated diogenite favour a mantle source, but the exposures are located far from the deep impact basins. The amount and distribution of observed olivine-rich material suggest a complex evolutionary history for Vesta.

  6. Ascaris lumbricoides: To Expect the Unexpected during a Routine Colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Kalyan; Makker, Jasbir S; Remy, Prospere

    2013-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a common nematode infecting humans worldwide with increased prevalence in tropical and subtropical areas of less developed countries. Recently, it has been estimated that over one billion individuals are infected with ascariasis worldwide with 7% in USA. Although most of these cases are due to increasing immigration and travel outside America it is worth recognizing that prevalence of ascariasis is high in southeastern parts of USA due to their temperate climate. Infections of A. lumbricoides are largely asymptomatic, and hence a large population of people carrying this worm remains undetected for years until they develop some symptoms. Due to a large group of asymptomatic individuals with intestinal ascariasis, these worms are occasionally and unexpectedly identified during routine endoscopic procedures. Here, we present a case of an intestinal ascariasis found during routine colonoscopy in an African-American man from the Bronx with perianal itching. He denied any history of travel outside USA but reported frequent visits to South Carolina. This case illustrates the fact that ascariasis should be suspected even if immigration or travel outside USA is not involved. It should be suspected even in cases of travel within USA to the south east where endemic cases are reported.

  7. Ascaris lumbricoides: To Expect the Unexpected during a Routine Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan Kanneganti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ascaris lumbricoides is a common nematode infecting humans worldwide with increased prevalence in tropical and subtropical areas of less developed countries. Recently, it has been estimated that over one billion individuals are infected with ascariasis worldwide with 7% in USA. Although most of these cases are due to increasing immigration and travel outside America it is worth recognizing that prevalence of ascariasis is high in southeastern parts of USA due to their temperate climate. Infections of A. lumbricoides are largely asymptomatic, and hence a large population of people carrying this worm remains undetected for years until they develop some symptoms. Due to a large group of asymptomatic individuals with intestinal ascariasis, these worms are occasionally and unexpectedly identified during routine endoscopic procedures. Here, we present a case of an intestinal ascariasis found during routine colonoscopy in an African-American man from the Bronx with perianal itching. He denied any history of travel outside USA but reported frequent visits to South Carolina. This case illustrates the fact that ascariasis should be suspected even if immigration or travel outside USA is not involved. It should be suspected even in cases of travel within USA to the south east where endemic cases are reported.

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Poonam; Turagam, Mohit; Laurence, Thomas; Kocheril, Abraham

    2012-03-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is a major clinical problem in epilepsy patients in the United States, especially those with chronic, uncontrolled epilepsy. Several pathophysiological events contributing to SUDEP include cardiac arrhythmias, respiratory dysfunction, and dysregulation of systemic or cerebral circulation. There is a significant body of literature suggesting the prominent role of cardiac arrhythmias in the pathogenesis of SUDEP. There is evidence to say that long-standing epilepsy can cause physiological and anatomical autonomic instability resulting in life-threatening arrhythmias. Tachyarrhythmias, bradyarrhythmias, and asystole are commonly seen during ictal, interictal, and postictal phase in epilepsy patients. It is unclear if these rhythm disturbances need attention as some of them may be just benign findings. Evidence regarding prolonged cardiovascular monitoring or the benefit of pacemaker/defibrillator implantation for primary or secondary prevention in epilepsy patients is limited. Awareness regarding pathophysiology, cardiac effects, and management options of SUDEP will become useful in guiding more individualized treatment in the near future. (PACE 2011; 1-8).

  9. An Unexpected Near Term Pregnancy in a Rudimentary Uterine Horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicornuate uterus occurs due to a complete or partial nondevelopment of one Mullerian duct; sometimes it is associated with a rudimentary horn, which can communicate or not with uterine cavity or contain functional endometrium. Pregnancy in a rudimentary horn is rare and the outcome almost always unfavorable, usually ending in rupture during the first or second trimester with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability and advances on imagiologic procedures, recognition of this ectopic pregnancy is frequently made at laparotomy after abdominal pain and collapse. The authors describe a case of a primigravida with 34 weeks of gestation admitted with a preeclampsia with severity criteria. A cesarean for fetal malpresentation was done and, unexpectedly, a rudimentary horn pregnancy was found with a live newborn. In the literature, few reports of a horn pregnancy reaching the viability with a live newborn are described, enhancing the clinical importance of this case. A review of literature concerning the epidemics, clinical presentation, and appropriate management of uterine horn pregnancies is made.

  10. Cannibalistic-morph Tiger Salamanders in unexpected ecological contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Kyle I.; Stockwell, Craig A.; Mushet, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Barred tiger salamanders [Ambystoma mavortium (Baird, 1850)] exhibit two trophic morphologies; a typical and a cannibalistic morph. Cannibalistic morphs, distinguished by enlarged vomerine teeth, wide heads, slender bodies, and cannibalistic tendencies, are often found where conspecifics occur at high density. During 2012 and 2013, 162 North Dakota wetlands and lakes were sampled for salamanders. Fifty-one contained A. mavortium populations; four of these contained cannibalistic morph individuals. Two populations with cannibalistic morphs occurred at sites with high abundances of conspecifics. However, the other two populations occurred at sites with unexpectedly low conspecific but high fathead minnow [Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820)] abundances. Further, no typical morphs were observed in either of these later two populations, contrasting with earlier research suggesting cannibalistic morphs only occur at low frequencies in salamander populations. Another anomaly of all four populations was the occurrence of cannibalistic morphs in permanent water sites, suggesting their presence was due to factors other than faster growth allowing them to occupy ephemeral habitats. Therefore, our findings suggest environmental factors inducing the cannibalistic morphism may be more complex than previously thought.

  11. Brain size, sex, and the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz; Mérillat, Susan; Liem, Franziskus; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the statistical influence of brain size on cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar compartmental volumes. This brain size influence was especially studied to delineate interactions with Sex and Age. Here, we studied 856 healthy subjects of which 533 are classified as young and 323 as old. Using an automated segmentation procedure cortical (gray and white matter [GM and WM] including the corpus callosum), cerebellar (GM and WM), and subcortical (thalamus, putamen, pallidum, caudatus, hippocampus, amygdala, and accumbens) volumes were measured and subjected to statistical analyses. These analyses revealed that brain size and age exert substantial statistical influences on nearly all compartmental volumes. Analyzing the raw compartmental volumes replicated the frequently reported Sex differences in compartmental volumes with men showing larger volumes. However, when statistically controlling for brain size Sex differences and Sex × Age interactions practically disappear. Thus, brain size is more important than Sex in explaining interindividual differences in compartmental volumes. The influence of brain size is discussed in the context of an allometric scaling of the compartmental volumes.

  12. Ambiguity Revealed

    OpenAIRE

    Subir Bose; Matthew Polisson; Ludovic Renou

    2012-01-01

    We derive necessary and suffcient conditions for data sets composed of state-contingent prices and consumption to be consistent with two prominent models of decision making under ambiguity: variational preferences and smooth ambiguity. The revealed preference conditions for the maxmin expected utility and subjective expected utility models are characterized as special cases.

  13. Ambiguity revealed

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Ralph-C; Bose, Subir; Polisson, Matthew; Renou, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for data sets composed of state-contingent prices and consumption to be consistent with two prominent models of decision making under uncertainty: variational preferences and smooth ambiguity. The revealed preference conditions for subjective expected utility, maxmin expected utility, and multiplier preferences are characterised as special cases. We implement our tests on data from a portfolio choice experiment.

  14. Separate effects of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on brain structure and function revealed by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and spatial navigation assessment of the Four Core Genotype mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corre, Christina; Friedel, Miriam; Vousden, Dulcie A; Metcalf, Ariane; Spring, Shoshana; Qiu, Lily R; Lerch, Jason P; Palmert, Mark R

    2016-03-01

    Males and females exhibit several differences in brain structure and function. To examine the basis for these sex differences, we investigated the influences of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on brain structure and function in mice. We used the Four Core Genotype (4CG) mice, which can generate both male and female mice with XX or XY sex chromosome complement, allowing the decoupling of sex chromosomes from hormonal milieu. To examine whole brain structure, high-resolution ex vivo MRI was performed, and to assess differences in cognitive function, mice were trained on a radial arm maze. Voxel-wise and volumetric analyses of MRI data uncovered a striking independence of hormonal versus chromosomal influences in 30 sexually dimorphic brain regions. For example, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the parieto-temporal lobe of the cerebral cortex displayed steroid-dependence while the cerebellar cortex, corpus callosum, and olfactory bulbs were influenced by sex chromosomes. Spatial learning and memory demonstrated strict hormone-dependency with no apparent influence of sex chromosomes. Understanding the influences of chromosomes and hormones on brain structure and function is important for understanding sex differences in brain structure and function, an endeavor that has eventual implications for understanding sex biases observed in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders.

  15. 78 FR 9569 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Relating to Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ...--Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Relating to Syria Memorandum of January 31, 2013--Delegation of... Determination No. 2013-04 of January 29, 2013 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Relating to Syria... the crisis in Syria. You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the...

  16. Communication of Unexpected and Significant Findings on Chest Radiographs With an Automated PACS Alert System.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Sara A

    2014-08-01

    An integral part of realizing the enormous potential of imaging in patient care is close communication between radiologists and referring physicians. One key element of this process is the communication of unexpected significant findings. The authors examined the performance of a PACS-based alert system in the appropriate communication of reports containing unexpected significant findings to referring physicians.

  17. 3 CFR - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to the Continuing Conflict in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs... Presidential Determination No. 2009-16 of March 11, 2009 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related... Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the “Act”), as amended (22 U.S.C. 2601), I hereby...

  18. 3 CFR - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to Gaza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs... of January 27, 2009 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to Gaza Memorandum for the..., including section 2(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the “Act”), as amended (22...

  19. Brain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    [125I]transferrin in the brain. Some of the 59Fe was detected in CSF in a fraction less than 30 kDa (III). It was estimated that the iron-binding capacity of transferrin in CSF was exceeded, suggesting that iron is transported into the brain in a quantity that exceeds that of transferrin. Accordingly, it was concluded that the paramount iron transport across the BBB is the result of receptor-mediated endocytosis of iron-containing transferrin by capillary endothelial cells, followed by recycling of transferrin to the blood and transport of non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain. It was found that retrograde axonal transport in a cranial motor nerve is age-dependent, varying from almost negligible in the neonatal brain to high in the adult brain. The principle sources of extracellular transferrin in the brain are hepatocytes, oligodendrocytes, and the choroid plexus. As the passage of liver-derived transferrin into the brain is restricted due to the BBB, other candidates for binding iron in the interstitium should be considered. In vitro studies have revealed secretion of transferrin from the choroid plexus and oligodendrocytes. The second part of the thesis encompasses the circulation of iron in the extracellular fluids of the brain, i.e. the brain interstitial fluid and the CSF. As the latter receives drainage from the interstitial fluid, the CSF of the ventricles can be considered a mixture of these fluids, which may allow for analysis of CSF in matters that relate to the brain interstitial fluid. As the choroid plexus is known to synthesize transferrin, a key question is whether transferrin of the CSF might play a role for iron homeostasis by diffusing from the ventricles and subarachnoid space to the brain interstitium. Intracerebroventricular injection of [59Fe125I]transferrin led to a higher accumulation of 59Fe than of [125I]transferrin in the brain. Except for uptake and axonal transport by certain neurons with access to the ventricular CSF, both iron and

  20. Unexpected Activity of a Novel Kunitz-type Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Jewhurst, Heather L.; Drysdale, Orla C.; Dvořák, Jan; Robinson, Mark W.; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Dalton, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Kunitz-type (KT) protease inhibitors are low molecular weight proteins classically defined as serine protease inhibitors. We identified a novel secreted KT inhibitor associated with the gut and parenchymal tissues of the infective juvenile stage of Fasciola hepatica, a helminth parasite of medical and veterinary importance. Unexpectedly, recombinant KT inhibitor (rFhKT1) exhibited no inhibitory activity toward serine proteases but was a potent inhibitor of the major secreted cathepsin L cysteine proteases of F. hepatica, FhCL1 and FhCL2, and of human cathepsins L and K (Ki = 0.4-27 nm). FhKT1 prevented the auto-catalytic activation of FhCL1 and FhCL2 and formed stable complexes with the mature enzymes. Pulldown experiments from adult parasite culture medium showed that rFhKT1 interacts specifically with native secreted FhCL1, FhCL2, and FhCL5. Substitution of the unusual P1 Leu15 within the exposed reactive loop of FhKT1 for the more commonly found Arg (FhKT1Leu15/Arg15) had modest adverse effects on the cysteine protease inhibition but conferred potent activity against the serine protease trypsin (Ki = 1.5 nm). Computational docking and sequence analysis provided hypotheses for the exclusive binding of FhKT1 to cysteine proteases, the importance of the Leu15 in anchoring the inhibitor into the S2 active site pocket, and the inhibitor's selectivity toward FhCL1, FhCL2, and human cathepsins L and K. FhKT1 represents a novel evolutionary adaptation of KT protease inhibitors by F. hepatica, with its prime purpose likely in the regulation of the major parasite-secreted proteases and/or cathepsin L-like proteases of its host. PMID:27422822

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  6. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... their final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

  10. Unexpected diversity and photoperiod dependence of the zebrafish melanopsin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Matos-Cruz

    Full Text Available Animals have evolved specialized photoreceptors in the retina and in extraocular tissues that allow them to measure light changes in their environment. In mammals, the retina is the only structure that detects light and relays this information to the brain. The classical photoreceptors, rods and cones, are responsible for vision through activation of rhodopsin and cone opsins. Melanopsin, another photopigment first discovered in Xenopus melanophores (Opn4x, is expressed in a small subset of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in the mammalian retina, where it mediates non-image forming functions such as circadian photoentrainment and sleep. While mammals have a single melanopsin gene (opn4, zebrafish show remarkable diversity with two opn4x-related and three opn4-related genes expressed in distinct patterns in multiple neuronal cell types of the developing retina, including bipolar interneurons. The intronless opn4.1 gene is transcribed in photoreceptors as well as in horizontal cells and produces functional photopigment. Four genes are also expressed in the zebrafish embryonic brain, but not in the photoreceptive pineal gland. We discovered that photoperiod length influences expression of two of the opn4-related genes in retinal layers involved in signaling light information to RGCs. Moreover, both genes are expressed in a robust diurnal rhythm but with different phases in relation to the light-dark cycle. The results suggest that melanopsin has an expanded role in modulating the retinal circuitry of fish.

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit ... final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with each other ...

  12. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  13. The Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubel, David H.

    1979-01-01

    This article on the brain is part of an entire issue about neurobiology and the question of how the human brain works. The brain as an intricate tissue composed of cells is discussed based on the current knowledge and understanding of its composition and structure. (SA)

  14. Clinical approach to the patient with unexpected bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, J M

    2000-10-01

    Bleeding can be considered unexpected if it is disproportionate to the intensity of the haemostatic stress in a patient with no known haemorrhagic disorder or if it occurs in a patient in whom a bleeding disorder has been characterized but is adequately treated. A thorough history usually allows the clinician to predict reasonably accurately whether the patient is likely to have a systemic haemostatic defect (and if so whether it is congenital or acquired), or whether the bleeding likely has a purely anatomical basis. The nature of bleeding is instructive with respect to preliminary categorization. Thus, mucocutaneous bleeding suggests defects of primary haemostasis (disordered platelet-vascular interactions). Bleeding into deeper structures is more suggestive of coagulation defects leading to impaired fibrin clot formation, and delayed bleeding after primary haemostasis is characteristic of hyperfibrinolysis. Localized bleeding suggests an anatomical cause, although an underlying haemostatic defect may coexist. Where bleeding is so acutely threatening as to require urgent intervention, diagnosis and treatment must proceed simultaneously. In the case of minor haemorrhage (not threatening to life or limb) it may be preferable to defer therapy while the nature of the bleeding disorder is methodically investigated. Initial laboratory evaluation is guided by the preliminary clinical impression. The amount of blood loss can be inferred from the haematocrit or haemoglobin concentration, and the platelet count will quickly identify cases in which thrombocytopenia is the likely cause of bleeding. In the latter instance, examination of the red cell morphology, leucocyte differential, and mean platelet volume may allow the aetiological mechanism to be presumptively identified as hypoproliferative or consumptive. With regard to coagulation testing, the activated PTT, prothrombin time, and thrombin time usually constitute an adequate battery of screening tests, unless the

  15. Malaria's contribution to World War One - the unexpected adversary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabin, Bernard J

    2014-12-16

    Malaria in the First World War was an unexpected adversary. In 1914, the scientific community had access to new knowledge on transmission of malaria parasites and their control, but the military were unprepared, and underestimated the nature, magnitude and dispersion of this enemy. In summarizing available information for allied and axis military forces, this review contextualizes the challenge posed by malaria, because although data exist across historical, medical and military documents, descriptions are fragmented, often addressing context specific issues. Military malaria surveillance statistics have, therefore, been summarized for all theatres of the War, where available. These indicated that at least 1.5 million solders were infected, with case fatality ranging from 0.2 -5.0%. As more countries became engaged in the War, the problem grew in size, leading to major epidemics in Macedonia, Palestine, Mesopotamia and Italy. Trans-continental passages of parasites and human reservoirs of infection created ideal circumstances for parasite evolution. Details of these epidemics are reviewed, including major epidemics in England and Italy, which developed following home troop evacuations, and disruption of malaria control activities in Italy. Elsewhere, in sub-Saharan Africa many casualties resulted from high malaria exposure combined with minimal control efforts for soldiers considered semi-immune. Prevention activities eventually started but were initially poorly organized and dependent on local enthusiasm and initiative. Nets had to be designed for field use and were fundamental for personal protection. Multiple prevention approaches adopted in different settings and their relative utility are described. Clinical treatment primarily depended on quinine, although efficacy was poor as relapsing Plasmodium vivax and recrudescent Plasmodium falciparum infections were not distinguished and managed appropriately. Reasons for this are discussed and the clinical trial data

  16. Unexpected temporal evolution of atomic spectral lines of aluminum in a laser induced breakdown spectroscopy experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Rawad, E-mail: rawad.saad@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SEARS, LANIE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); L' Hermite, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.lhermite@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SEARS, LANIE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bousquet, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.bousquet@u-bordeaux1.fr [LOMA, Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2014-11-01

    The temporal evolution of the laser induced breakdown (LIBS) signal of a pure aluminum sample was studied under nitrogen and air atmospheres. In addition to the usual decrease of signal due to plasma cooling, unexpected temporal evolutions were observed for a spectral lines of aluminum, which revealed the existence of collisional energy transfer effects. Furthermore, molecular bands of AlN and AlO were observed in the LIBS spectra, indicating recombination of aluminum with the ambient gas. Within the experimental conditions reported in this study, both collisional energy transfer and recombination processes occurred around 1.5 μs after the laser shot. This highlights the possible influence of collisional and chemical effects inside the plasma that can play a role on LIBS signals. - Highlights: • Persistence of two Al I lines related to the 61,844 cm{sup −1} energy level only under nitrogen atmosphere. • Collisional energy transfer effect exists between aluminum and nitrogen. • Observation of molecular band of AlN (under nitrogen) and AlO (under air) after a delay time of 1.5 µs. • 20% of oxygen in air is sufficient to annihilate both the collisional energy transfer effect and the AlN molecular formation.

  17. An unexpected N-terminal loop in PD-1 dominates binding by nivolumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shuguang; Zhang, Hao; Chai, Yan; Song, Hao; Tong, Zhou; Wang, Qihui; Qi, Jianxun; Wong, Gary; Zhu, Xiaodong; Liu, William J.; Gao, Shan; Wang, Zhongfu; Shi, Yi; Yang, Fuquan; Gao, George F.; Yan, Jinghua

    2017-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy by targeting of immune checkpoint molecules has been a research ‘hot-spot' in recent years. Nivolumab, a human monoclonal antibody targeting PD-1, has been widely used clinically since 2014. However, the binding mechanism of nivolumab to PD-1 has not yet been shown, despite a recent report describing the complex structure of pembrolizumab/PD-1. It has previously been speculated that PD-1 glycosylation is involved in nivolumab recognition. Here we report the complex structure of nivolumab with PD-1 and evaluate the effects of PD-1 N-glycosylation on the interactions with nivolumab. Structural and functional analyses unexpectedly reveal an N-terminal loop outside the IgV domain of PD-1. This loop is not involved in recognition of PD-L1 but dominates binding to nivolumab, whereas N-glycosylation is not involved in binding at all. Nivolumab binds to a completely different area than pembrolizumab. These results provide the basis for the design of future inhibitory molecules targeting PD-1. PMID:28165004

  18. Crude oil as a microbial seed bank with unexpected functional potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Man; Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Yan; Wang, Xing-Biao; Liu, Ze-Shen; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2015-11-01

    It was widely believed that oil is a harsh habitat for microbes because of its high toxicity and hydrophobicity. However, accumulating evidence has revealed the presence of live microbes in crude oil. Therefore, it’s of value to conduct an in-depth investigation on microbial communities in crude oil. To this end, microorganisms in oil and water phases were collected from four oil-well production mixtures in Qinghai Oilfield, China, and analyzed for their taxonomic and functional compositions via pyrosequencing and GeoChip, respectively. Hierarchical clustering of 16S rRNA gene sequences and functional genes clearly separated crude oil and water phases, suggestive of distinct taxonomic and functional gene compositions between crude oil and water phases. Unexpectedly, Pseudomonas dominated oil phase where diverse functional gene groups were identified, which significantly differed from those in the corresponding water phases. Meanwhile, most functional genes were significantly more abundant in oil phase, which was consistent with their important roles in facilitating survival of their host organisms in crude oil. These findings provide strong evidence that crude oil could be a “seed bank” of functional microorganisms with rich functional potentials. This offers novel insights for industrial applications of microbial-enhanced oil recovery and bioremediation of petroleum-polluted environments.

  19. New hepatitis B virus of cranes that has an unexpected broad host range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassolov, Alexej; Hohenberg, Heinz; Kalinina, Tatyana; Schneider, Carola; Cova, Lucyna; Krone, Oliver; Frölich, Kai; Will, Hans; Sirma, Hüseyin

    2003-02-01

    All hepadnaviruses known so far have a very limited host range, restricted to their natural hosts and a few closely related species. This is thought to be due mainly to sequence divergence in the large envelope protein and species-specific differences in host components essential for virus propagation. Here we report an infection of cranes with a novel hepadnavirus, designated CHBV, that has an unexpectedly broad host range and is only distantly evolutionarily related to avihepadnaviruses of related hosts. Direct DNA sequencing of amplified CHBV DNA as well a sequencing of cloned viral genomes revealed that CHBV is most closely related to, although distinct from, Ross' goose hepatitis B virus (RGHBV) and slightly less closely related to duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). Phylogenetically, cranes are very distant from geese and ducks and are most closely related to herons and storks. Naturally occurring hepadnaviruses in the last two species are highly divergent in sequence from RGHBV and DHBV and do not infect ducks or do so only marginally. In contrast, CHBV from crane sera and recombinant CHBV produced from LMH cells infected primary duck hepatocytes almost as efficiently as DHBV did. This is the first report of a rather broad host range of an avihepadnavirus. Our data imply either usage of similar or identical entry pathways and receptors by DHBV and CHBV, unusual host and virus adaptation mechanisms, or divergent evolution of the host genomes and cellular components required for virus propagation.

  20. Mammography and ultrasonography evaluation of unexpected focal 18F-FDG uptakes in breast on PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Nariya; Chang, Jung Min; Yun, Bo La; Bae, Min Sun; Moon, Woo Kyung (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)), Email: river7774@gmail.com; Kang, Keon Wook (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of))

    2012-04-15

    Background: Unexpected focal 18F-FDG breast uptakes are occasionally identified on PET/CT due to its increased use for cancer staging and follow-up. The need for their characterization has been suggested. Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic value of ultrasonography (United States) in distinguishing benign from malignant lesions for unexpected focal 18F-FDG uptakes in breast on PET/CT scans. Material and Methods: Between April 2004 and January 2010, 27 focal 18F-FDG breast uptakes in 27 patients (age range 33-62 years; mean age 46 years) among 5214 patients who had undergone PET/CT scans were retrospectively analyzed. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) final assessment categories of the US and the maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) of the lesions were compared between the benign and malignant lesions. Results: Of the 27 lesions, 15 (56%) lesions were malignant. The rate of malignancy, according to the final assessment category on the US, was 0% (0 of 6) for category 3, 60% for category 4 (9 of 15), and 100% (6 of 6) for category 5 (P = 0.001). The US evaluation revealed a sensitivity of 100% (15 of 15) and a specificity of 50% (6 of 12). The average maximum SUV of the malignant lesions was greater than that of the benign lesions (4.12 +- 1.94 vs. 1.94 +- 0.82; P = 0.001). Conclusion: US evaluation of unexpected focal 18F-FDG uptakes on PET/CT scans can accurately distinguish benign lesions from malignant lesions

  1. Robust passive dynamics of the musculoskeletal system compensate for unexpected surface changes during human hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Krogt, Marjolein M; de Graaf, Wendy W; Farley, Claire T; Moritz, Chet T; Richard Casius, L J; Bobbert, Maarten F

    2009-09-01

    When human hoppers are surprised by a change in surface stiffness, they adapt almost instantly by changing leg stiffness, implying that neural feedback is not necessary. The goal of this simulation study was first to investigate whether leg stiffness can change without neural control adjustment when landing on an unexpected hard or unexpected compliant (soft) surface, and second to determine what underlying mechanisms are responsible for this change in leg stiffness. The muscle stimulation pattern of a forward dynamic musculoskeletal model was optimized to make the model match experimental hopping kinematics on hard and soft surfaces. Next, only surface stiffness was changed to determine how the mechanical interaction of the musculoskeletal model with the unexpected surface affected leg stiffness. It was found that leg stiffness adapted passively to both unexpected surfaces. On the unexpected hard surface, leg stiffness was lower than on the soft surface, resulting in close-to-normal center of mass displacement. This reduction in leg stiffness was a result of reduced joint stiffness caused by lower effective muscle stiffness. Faster flexion of the joints due to the interaction with the hard surface led to larger changes in muscle length, while the prescribed increase in active state and resulting muscle force remained nearly constant in time. Opposite effects were found on the unexpected soft surface, demonstrating the bidirectional stabilizing properties of passive dynamics. These passive adaptations to unexpected surfaces may be critical when negotiating disturbances during locomotion across variable terrain.

  2. The TLC: a novel auditory nucleus of the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, Enrique; Viñuela, Antonio; Marshall, Allen F; Fitzpatrick, Douglas C; Aparicio, M-Auxiliadora

    2007-11-28

    We have identified a novel nucleus of the mammalian brain and termed it the tectal longitudinal column (TLC). Basic histologic stains, tract-tracing techniques and three-dimensional reconstructions reveal that the rat TLC is a narrow, elongated structure spanning the midbrain tectum longitudinally. This paired nucleus is located close to the midline, immediately dorsal to the periaqueductal gray matter. It occupies what has traditionally been considered the most medial region of the deep superior colliculus and the most medial region of the inferior colliculus. The TLC differs from the neighboring nuclei of the superior and inferior colliculi and the periaqueductal gray by its distinct connections and cytoarchitecture. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings show that TLC neurons respond to auditory stimuli with physiologic properties that differ from those of neurons in the inferior or superior colliculi. We have identified the TLC in rodents, lagomorphs, carnivores, nonhuman primates, and humans, which indicates that the nucleus is conserved across mammals. The discovery of the TLC reveals an unexpected level of longitudinal organization in the mammalian tectum and raises questions as to the participation of this mesencephalic region in essential, yet completely unexplored, aspects of multisensory and/or sensorimotor integration.

  3. Who Needs to Fit In? Who Gets to Stand Out? Communication Technologies Including Brain-Machine Interfaces Revealed from the Perspectives of Special Education School Teachers through an Ableism Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Lucy; Wolbring, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Some new and envisioned technologies such as brain machine interfaces (BMI) that are being developed initially for people with disabilities, but whose use can also be expanded to the general public have the potential to change body ability expectations of disabled and non-disabled people beyond the species-typical. The ways in which this dynamic…

  4. Urbanism and Voter Turnout: A Note on Some Unexpected Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Alan D.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of voter turnout reveals rural areas to have much higher turnout than urban. Furthermore, these rural areas have lower levels of education, income, and industrialization. Several theoretical arguments are examined. Available from: the Wayne State University Press, 5980 Cass Avenue, Detroit, Michigan 48202, $4.00 single copy. (Author/MLF)

  5. Chlamydia Pneumoniae Infections and Sudden Unexpected Deaths in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Finn

    1993-01-01

    Blood samples from 38 runners on the Danish national orienteering team revealed no ongoing chlamydia pneumoniae, although 42% had an earlier infection, similar to the incidence in the general population. However, over 2% had an ongoing lyme borreliosis infection, and 18% had an earlier infection, which is a higher incidence than in the general…

  6. Out of Mind, Out of Sight: Unexpected Scene Elements Frequently Go Unnoticed Until Primed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbardo, Philip G.

    2013-01-01

    The human visual system employs a sophisticated set of strategies for scanning the environment and directing attention to stimuli that can be expected given the context and a person’s past experience. Although these strategies enable us to navigate a very complex physical and social environment, they can also cause highly salient, but unexpected stimuli to go completely unnoticed. To examine the generality of this phenomenon, we conducted eight studies that included 15 different experimental conditions and 1,577 participants in all. These studies revealed that a large majority of participants do not report having seen a woman in the center of an urban scene who was photographed in midair as she was committing suicide. Despite seeing the scene repeatedly, 46 % of all participants failed to report seeing a central figure and only 4.8 % reported seeing a falling person. Frequency of noticing the suicidal woman was highest for participants who read a narrative priming story that increased the extent to which she was schematically congruent with the scene. In contrast to this robust effect of inattentional blindness, a majority of participants reported seeing other peripheral objects in the visual scene that were equally difficult to detect, yet more consistent with the scene. Follow-up qualitative analyses revealed that participants reported seeing many elements that were not actually present, but which could have been expected given the overall context of the scene. Together, these findings demonstrate the robustness of inattentional blindness and highlight the specificity with which different visual primes may increase noticing behavior. PMID:24363542

  7. A Pulsar and White Dwarf in an Unexpected Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    motion of the pulsar (black solid lines; current position marked with diamond) in our galaxy over the past 1.5 Gyr. This motion is typical for low-mass X-ray binary descendants, favoring a binary-evolution model over a 3-body-interaction model. [Antoniadis et al. 2016]In the first model, the eccentric binary was created via adynamic three-body formation channel. This possibility is deemed unlikely, as the white-dwarf properties and all the kinematic properties of the system point to normal binary evolution.In the secondmodel, the binary system gains its high eccentricity after mass transfer ends, when the pulsar progenitor experiences a spontaneous phase transition. The authors explore two options for this: one in which the neutron star implodes into a strange-quark star, and the other in which an over-massive white dwarf suffers a delayed collapse into a neutron star. Both cases are deemed unlikely, because the mass inferred for the pulsar progenitor is not consistent with either model.In the third model, the system forms a circumbinary disk fueled by material escaping the proto-white dwarf. After mass transfer has ended, interactions between the binary and its disk gradually increase the eccentricity of the system, pumping it up to what we observe today. All of the properties of the system measured by Antoniadis and collaborators are thus far consistent with this model.Further observations of this system and systems like it (several others have been detected, though not yet confirmed) will help determine whether binary evolution combined with interactions with a disk can indeed explain the formation of this unexpectedly eccentricsystem.CitationJohn Antoniadis et al 2016 ApJ 830 36. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/830/1/36

  8. Effects of Muscle Fatigue, Creep, and Musculoskeletal Pain on Neuromuscular Responses to Unexpected Perturbation of the Trunk: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Lardon, Arnaud; Boivin, Frédéric; Dugas, Claude; Descarreaux, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Trunk neuromuscular responses have been shown to adapt under the influence of muscle fatigue, as well as spinal tissue creep or even with the presence of low back pain (LBP). Despite a large number of studies exploring how these external perturbations affect the spinal stability, characteristics of such adaptations remains unclear. Aim: The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the quality of evidence of studies investigating trunk neuromuscular responses to unexpected trunk perturbation. More specifically, the targeted neuromuscular responses were trunk muscle activity reflex and trunk kinematics under the influence of muscle fatigue, spinal creep, and musculoskeletal pain. Methods: A research of the literature was conducted in Pubmed, Embase, and Sport-Discus databases using terms related to trunk neuromuscular reflex responses, measured by electromyography (baseline activity, reflex latency, and reflex amplitude) and/or trunk kinematic, in context of unexpected external perturbation. Moreover, independent variables must be either trunk muscle fatigue or spinal tissue creep or LBP. All included articles were scored for their electromyography methodology based on the “Surface Electromyography for the Non-Invasive Assessment of Muscles (SENIAM)” and the “International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK)” recommendations whereas overall quality of articles was scored using a specific quality checklist modified from the Quality Index. Meta-analysis was performed on reflex latency variable. Results: A final set of 29 articles underwent quality assessments. The mean quality score was 79%. No effect of muscle fatigue on erector spinae reflex latency following an unexpected perturbation, nor any other distinctive effects was found for back muscle fatigue and reflex parameters. As for spinal tissue creep effects, no alteration was found for any of the trunk reflex variables. Finally, the meta-analysis revealed an increased

  9. Asymptomatic brain tumor detected at brain check-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onizuka, Masanari; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Shibayama, Akira; Hiura, Tsuyoshi; Horie, Nobutaka; Miyazaki, Hisaya [Sankoukai Miyazaki Hospital, Isahaya, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Brain check-up was performed in 4000 healthy subjects who underwent medical and radiological examinations for possible brain diseases in our hospital from April 1996 to March 2000. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed 11 brain tumors which consisted of six meningiomas, three pituitary adenomas, one astrocytoma, and one epidermoid cyst. The detection rate of incidental brain tumor in our hospital was 0.3%. Nine patients underwent surgery, with one case of morbidity due to postoperative transient oculomotor nerve paresis. The widespread use of brain check-up may increasingly detect asymptomatic brain tumors. Surgical indications for such lesions remain unclear, and the strategy for treatment should be determined with consideration of the patient's wishes. (author)

  10. Unexpected Antitumorigenic Effect of Fenbendazole when Combined with Supplementary Vitamins

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Ping; Dang, Chi V.; Watson, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Diet containing the anthelminthic fenbendazole is used often to treat rodent pinworm infections because it is easy to use and has few reported adverse effects on research. However, during fenbendazole treatment at our institution, an established human lymphoma xenograft model in C.B-17/Icr-prkdcscid/Crl (SCID) mice failed to grow. Further investigation revealed that the fenbendazole had been incorporated into a sterilizable diet supplemented with additional vitamins to compensate for loss dur...

  11. An Unexpected Cause of Hemoptysis: Endobronchial Lipomatous Hamartoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sarioglu, Nurhan; Susur, Alev; Goksel, Tuncay; Paksoy, Serpil; Erel, Fuat

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hamartomas are the most common benign tumors of the lung. Endobnronchial hamartomas are even rarer and infrequently causes hemoptysis. We report a case of endobronchial hamartoma that was originating from a segment bronchus and invisible in chest X-ray. A 63-year-old man was admitted to hospital with hemoptysis. A CT scan revealed endobronchial mass obstructing anterior bronchus of the right lower lob of the right lung. It wasn’t radiographically presented. Flexible bronchoscopy dete...

  12. Salimabromide: unexpected chemistry from the obligate marine myxobacterium Enhygromxya salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Stephan; Dreisigacker, Sandra; Kehraus, Stefan; Neu, Edith; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Wright, Patrick R; Menche, Dirk; Schäberle, Till F; König, Gabriele M

    2013-07-08

    Marine myxobacteria (Enhygromyxa, Plesiocystis, Pseudoenhygromyxa, Haliangium) are phylogenetically distant from their terrestrial counterparts. Salimabromide is the first natural product from the Plesiocystis/Enhygromyxa clade of obligatory marine myxobacteria. Salimabromide has a new tetracyclic carbon skeleton, comprising a brominated benzene ring, a furano lactone residue, and a cyclohexane ring, bridged by a seven-membered cyclic moiety. The absolute configuration was deduced from experimental and calculated CD data. Salimabromide revealed antibiotic activity towards Arthrobacter cristallopoietes.

  13. Inhibition of HMG CoA reductase reveals an unexpected role for cholesterol during PGC migration in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewing Andrew G

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primordial germ cells (PGCs are the embryonic precursors of the sperm and eggs. Environmental or genetic defects that alter PGC development can impair fertility or cause formation of germ cell tumors. Results We demonstrate a novel role for cholesterol during germ cell migration in mice. Cholesterol was measured in living tissue dissected from mouse embryos and was found to accumulate within the developing gonads as germ cells migrate to colonize these structures. Cholesterol synthesis was blocked in culture by inhibiting the activity of HMG CoA reductase (HMGCR resulting in germ cell survival and migration defects. These defects were rescued by co-addition of isoprenoids and cholesterol, but neither compound alone was sufficient. In contrast, loss of the last or penultimate enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis did not alter PGC numbers or position in vivo. However embryos that lack these enzymes do not exhibit cholesterol defects at the stage at which PGCs are migrating. This demonstrates that during gestation, the cholesterol required for PGC migration can be supplied maternally. Conclusion In the mouse, cholesterol is required for PGC survival and motility. It may act cell-autonomously by regulating clustering of growth factor receptors within PGCs or non cell-autonomously by controlling release of growth factors required for PGC guidance and survival.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferases in opisthokonts reveals unexpected ancestral complexity and novel modern biosynthetic components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather C Smart

    Full Text Available Glycerolipid synthesis represents a central metabolic process of all forms of life. In the last decade multiple genes coding for enzymes responsible for the first step of the pathway, catalyzed by glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, have been described, and characterized primarily in model organisms like Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mice. Notoriously, the fungal enzymes share low sequence identity with their known animal counterparts, and the nature of their homology is unclear. Furthermore, two mitochondrial GPAT isoforms have been described in animal cells, while no such enzymes have been identified in Fungi. In order to determine if the yeast and mammalian GPATs are representative of the set of enzymes present in their respective groups, and to test the hypothesis that metazoan orthologues are indeed absent from the fungal clade, a comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis was performed including organisms spanning the breadth of the Opisthokonta supergroup. Surprisingly, our study unveiled the presence of 'fungal' orthologs in the basal taxa of the holozoa and 'animal' orthologues in the basal holomycetes. This includes a novel clade of fungal homologues, with putative peroxisomal targeting signals, of the mitochondrial/peroxisomal acyltransferases in Metazoa, thus potentially representing an undescribed metabolic capacity in the Fungi. The overall distribution of GPAT homologues is suggestive of high relative complexity in the ancestors of the opisthokont clade, followed by loss and sculpting of the complement in the descendent lineages. Divergence from a general versatile metabolic model, present in ancestrally deduced GPAT complements, points to distinctive contributions of each GPAT isoform to lipid metabolism and homeostasis in contemporary organisms like humans and their fungal pathogens.

  15. Second generation sequencing and morphological faecal analysis reveal unexpected foraging behaviour by Myotis nattereri (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) in winter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hope, Paul R; Bohmann, Kristine; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temperate winters produce extreme energetic challenges for small insectivorous mammals. Some bat species inhabiting locations with mild temperate winters forage during brief inter-torpor normothermic periods of activity. However, the winter diet of bats in mild temperate locations is ...

  16. Molecular phylogeny of the Astrophorida (Porifera, Demospongiae(p reveals an unexpected high level of spicule homoplasy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paco Cárdenas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Astrophorida (Porifera, Demospongiae(p is geographically and bathymetrically widely distributed. Systema Porifera currently includes five families in this order: Ancorinidae, Calthropellidae, Geodiidae, Pachastrellidae and Thrombidae. To date, molecular phylogenetic studies including Astrophorida species are scarce and offer limited sampling. Phylogenetic relationships within this order are therefore for the most part unknown and hypotheses based on morphology largely untested. Astrophorida taxa have very diverse spicule sets that make them a model of choice to investigate spicule evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With a sampling of 153 specimens (9 families, 29 genera, 89 species covering the deep- and shallow-waters worldwide, this work presents the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the Astrophorida, using a cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene partial sequence and the 5' end terminal part of the 28S rDNA gene (C1-D2 domains. The resulting tree suggested that i the Astrophorida included some lithistid families and some Alectonidae species, ii the sub-orders Euastrophorida and Streptosclerophorida were both polyphyletic, iii the Geodiidae, the Ancorinidae and the Pachastrellidae were not monophyletic, iv the Calthropellidae was part of the Geodiidae clade (Calthropella at least, and finally that v many genera were polyphyletic (Ecionemia, Erylus, Poecillastra, Penares, Rhabdastrella, Stelletta and Vulcanella. CONCLUSION: The Astrophorida is a larger order than previously considered, comprising ca. 820 species. Based on these results, we propose new classifications for the Astrophorida using both the classical rank-based nomenclature (i.e., Linnaean classification and the phylogenetic nomenclature following the PhyloCode, independent of taxonomic rank. A key to the Astrophorida families, sub-families and genera incertae sedis is also included. Incongruences between our molecular tree and the current classification can be explained by the banality of convergent evolution and secondary loss in spicule evolution. These processes have taken place many times, in all the major clades, for megascleres and microscleres.

  17. Validation of a Prediction Model for Vaginal Birth after Cesarean Delivery Reveals Unexpected Success in a Diverse American Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maykin, Melanie Mai; Mularz, Amanda J; Lee, Lydia K; Valderramos, Stephanie Gaw

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the validity of a prediction model for success of vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC) in an ethnically diverse population. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of women admitted at a single academic institution for a trial of labor after cesarean from May 2007 to January 2015. Individual predicted success rates were calculated using the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network prediction model. Participants were stratified into three probability-of-success groups: low (65%). The actual versus predicted success rates were compared. Results In total, 568 women met inclusion criteria. Successful VBAC occurred in 402 (71%), compared with a predicted success rate of 66% (p = 0.016). Actual VBAC success rates were higher than predicted by the model in the low (57 vs. 29%; p success rate was above 65%, the model was highly accurate. In contrast, for women with predicted success rates <35%, actual VBAC rates were nearly twofold higher in our population, suggesting that they should not be discouraged by a low prediction score.

  18. Novel and unexpected bacterial diversity in an arsenic-rich ecosystem revealed by culture-dependent approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delavat François

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acid Mine Drainages (AMDs are extreme environments characterized by very acid conditions and heavy metal contaminations. In these ecosystems, the bacterial diversity is considered to be low. Previous culture-independent approaches performed in the AMD of Carnoulès (France confirmed this low species richness. However, very little is known about the cultured bacteria in this ecosystem. The aims of the study were firstly to apply novel culture methods in order to access to the largest cultured bacterial diversity, and secondly to better define the robustness of the community for 3 important functions: As(III oxidation, cellulose degradation and cobalamine biosynthesis. Results Despite the oligotrophic and acidic conditions found in AMDs, the newly designed media covered a large range of nutrient concentrations and a pH range from 3.5 to 9.8, in order to target also non-acidophilic bacteria. These approaches generated 49 isolates representing 19 genera belonging to 4 different phyla. Importantly, overall diversity gained 16 extra genera never detected in Carnoulès. Among the 19 genera, 3 were previously uncultured, one of them being novel in databases. This strategy increased the overall diversity in the Carnoulès sediment by 70% when compared with previous culture-independent approaches, as specific phylogenetic groups (e.g. the subclass Actinobacteridae or the order Rhizobiales were only detected by culture. Cobalamin auxotrophy, cellulose degradation and As(III-oxidation are 3 crucial functions in this ecosystem, and a previous meta- and proteo-genomic work attributed each function to only one taxon. Here, we demonstrate that other members of this community can also assume these functions, thus increasing the overall community robustness. Conclusions This work highlights that bacterial diversity in AMDs is much higher than previously envisaged, thus pointing out that the AMD system is functionally more robust than expected. The isolated bacteria may be part of the rare biosphere which remained previously undetected due to molecular biases. No matter their current ecological relevance, the exploration of the full diversity remains crucial to decipher the function and dynamic of any community. This work also underlines the importance to associate culture-dependent and -independent approaches to gain an integrative view of the community function. Reviewers This paper was reviewed by Sándor Pongor, Eugene V. Koonin and Brett Baker (nominated by Purificacion Lopez-Garcia.

  19. Validation of a Prediction Model for Vaginal Birth after Cesarean Delivery Reveals Unexpected Success in a Diverse American Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maykin, Melanie Mai; Mularz, Amanda J.; Lee, Lydia K.; Valderramos, Stephanie Gaw

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the validity of a prediction model for success of vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC) in an ethnically diverse population. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of women admitted at a single academic institution for a trial of labor after cesarean from May 2007 to January 2015. Individual predicted success rates were calculated using the Maternal–Fetal Medicine Units Network prediction model. Participants were stratified into three probability-of-success groups: low (65%). The actual versus predicted success rates were compared. Results In total, 568 women met inclusion criteria. Successful VBAC occurred in 402 (71%), compared with a predicted success rate of 66% (p = 0.016). Actual VBAC success rates were higher than predicted by the model in the low (57 vs. 29%; p < 0.001) and moderate (61 vs. 52%; p = 0.003) groups. In the high probability group, the observed and predicted VBAC rates were the same (79%). Conclusion When the predicted success rate was above 65%, the model was highly accurate. In contrast, for women with predicted success rates <35%, actual VBAC rates were nearly twofold higher in our population, suggesting that they should not be discouraged by a low prediction score.

  20. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N), Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio García-Moyano; Andreas Erling Austnes; Anders Lanzén; Elena González-Toril; Ángeles Aguilera; Lise Øvreås

    2015-01-01

    Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD) in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharact...

  1. Honey bee diet in intensive farmland habitats reveals an unexpectedly high flower richness and a major role of weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requier, Fabrice; Odoux, Jean-François; Tamic, Thierry; Moreau, Nathalie; Henry, Mickaël; Decourtye, Axel; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2015-06-01

    In intensive farmland habitats, pollination of wild flowers and crops may be threatened by the widespread decline of pollinators. The honey bee decline, in particular, appears to result from the combination of multiple stresses, including diseases, pathogens, and pesticides. The reduction of semi-natural habitats is also suspected to entail floral resource scarcity for bees. Yet, the seasonal dynamics and composition of the honey bee diet remains poorly documented to date. In this study, we studied the seasonal contribution of mass-flowering crops (rapeseed and sunflower) vs. other floral resources, as well as the influence of nutritional quality and landscape composition on pollen diet composition over five consecutive years. From April to October, the mass of pollen and nectar collected by honey bees followed a bimodal seasonal trend, marked by a two-month period of low food supply between the two oilseed crop mass-flowerings (ending in May for rapeseed and July for sunflower). Bees collected nectar mainly from crops while pollen came from a wide diversity of herbaceous and woody plant species in semi-natural habitats or from weeds in crops. Weed species constituted the bulk of the honey bee diet between the mass flowering crop periods (up to 40%) and are therefore suspected to play a critical role at this time period. The pollen diet composition was related to the nutritional value of the collected pollen and by the local landscape composition. Our study highlights (1) a food supply depletion period of both pollen and nectar resources during late spring, contemporaneously with the demographic peak of honey bee populations, (2) a high botanical richness of pollen diet, mostly proceeding from trees and weeds, and (3) a pollen diet composition influenced by the local landscape composition. Our results therefore support the Agri-Environmental Schemes intended to promote honey bees and beekeeping sustainability through the enhancement of flower availability in agricultural landscapes.

  2. Rethinking the longitudinal stream temperature paradigm: region-wide comparison of thermal infrared imagery reveals unexpected complexity of river temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Aimee H.; Torgersen, Christian; Lawler, Joshua J.; Faux, Russell N.; Steel, E. Ashley; Beechie, Timothy J.; Ebersole, Joseph L.; Leibowitz, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Prevailing theory suggests that stream temperature warms asymptotically in a downstream direction, beginning at the temperature of the source in the headwaters and leveling off downstream as it converges to match meteorological conditions. However, there have been few empirical examples of longitudinal patterns of temperature in large rivers due to a paucity of data. We constructed longitudinal thermal profiles (temperature versus distance) for 53 rivers in the Pacific Northwest (USA) using an extensive dataset of remotely sensed summertime river temperatures and classified each profile into one of five patterns of downstream warming: asymptotic (increasing then flattening), linear (increasing steadily), uniform (not changing), parabolic (increasing then decreasing), or complex (not fitting other classes). We evaluated (1) how frequently profiles warmed asymptotically downstream as expected, and (2) whether relationships between river temperature and common hydroclimatic variables differed by profile class. We found considerable diversity in profile shape, with 47% of rivers warming asymptotically, and 53% having alternative profile shapes. Water temperature did not warm substantially over the course of the river for coastal parabolic and uniform profiles, and for some linear and complex profiles. Profile classes showed no clear geographical trends. The degree of correlation between river temperature and hydroclimatic variables differed among profile classes, but there was overlap among classes. Water temperature in rivers with asymptotic or parabolic profiles was positively correlated with August air temperature, tributary temperature and velocity, and negatively correlated with elevation, August precipitation, gradient, and distance upstream. Conversely, associations were less apparent in rivers with linear, uniform, or complex profiles. Factors contributing to the unique shape of parabolic profiles differed for coastal and inland rivers, where downstream cooling was influenced locally by climate or cool water inputs, respectively. Potential drivers of shape for complex profiles were specific to each river. These thermal patterns indicate diverse thermal habitats that may promote resilience of aquatic biota to climate change. Without this spatial context, climate change models may incorrectly estimate loss of thermally suitable habitat.

  3. Sinking Brain: Unusual Cause of Orthostatic Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raina R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case presenting with an orthostatic headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed typical pachymeningeal enhancement. CT myelography revealed leakage at the thoracic level. Patient was successfully treated by lumbar epidural blood patch (EBP.

  4. Differences in investigations of sudden unexpected deaths in young people in a nationwide setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Bo Gregers; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Theilade, Juliane;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inherited disease may be causative in many young sudden unexpected death cases. Autopsy is essential in the counselling of the bereaved, as the family of the victim may be at risk too. In a nationwide setting operating under the same set of laws, we hypothesized that regional...... investigations of young persons suffering a sudden unexpected death. This is probably not unique for Denmark although no data exist to confirm that. The results are worrying and call for a revision of the way these deaths are handled. Mandatory autopsy in sudden unexpected death in young persons is warranted...... differences exist in the investigation of young persons dying suddenly and unexpectedly. METHODS AND RESULTS: All deaths in persons aged 1-35 years in Denmark in 2000-2006 were included. Death certificates were read independently by two physicians. External examination as well as autopsy status was retrieved...

  5. The accrual anomaly - focus on changes in specific unexpected accruals results in new evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, Finn

    it is demonstrated that different specific components of earnings have significantly different earnings persistence characteristics and that these differences are not fully reflected in share prices. In the analysis presented here the earnings persistence effect of two particular unexpected accrual components...... and unexpected accruals, estimated by the extended Jones model like in both some US-analyses and some international studies of the accrual anomaly phenomenon. It is found that the persistence of earnings is decreasing in the magnitude of the unexpected accrual components of earnings and that the persistence...... of current earnings performance is particularly decreasing in the magnitude of unexpected changes in inventory. The special accrual parts are related to the perceptions of earnings persistence implicit in the market prices, and it is found that the differences in earnings persistence are not rationally...

  6. The histopathology of Candida albicans invasion in neonatal rat tissues and in the human blood-brain barrier in culture revealed by light, scanning, transmission and immunoelectron microscopy scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Lossinsky, A.S.; de Jong, A.; Fiala, M; Mukhtar, M; Buttle, K.F.; Ingram, M.

    2006-01-01

    The present studies examined the effects of Candida albicans yeast and hyphal morphologies on tissue pathologies and transmigration properties of the fungus in two experimental models: 1) an in vivo, neonatal rat model, and 2) a cell culture model of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) (BMVEC). We inoculated a hyphae-producing strain (CAI4-URA3) and a non-hyphae-producing strain (CAI4) of C. albicans into 4-10 day old rats and BMVEC cultures. ...

  7. Brain modulation of Dufour's gland ester biosynthesis in vitro in the honeybee ( Apis mellifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzav-Gozansky, Tamar; Hefetz, Abraham; Soroker, Victoria

    2007-05-01

    Caste-specific pheromone biosynthesis is a prerequisite for reproductive skew in the honeybee. Nonetheless, this process is not hardwired but plastic, in that egg-laying workers produce a queen-like pheromone. Studies with Dufour’s gland pheromone revealed that, in vivo, workers’ gland biosynthesis matches the social status of the worker, i.e., sterile workers showed a worker-like pattern whereas fertile workers showed a queen-like pattern (production of the queen-specific esters). However, when incubated in vitro, the gland spontaneously exhibits the queen-like pattern, irrespective of its original worker type, prompting the notion that ester production in workers is under inhibitory control that is queen-dependent. We tested this hypothesis by exposing queen or worker Dufour’s glands in vitro to brain extracts of queens, queenright (sterile) workers and males. Unexpectedly, worker brain extracts activated the queen-like esters biosynthesis in workers’ Dufour’s gland. This stimulation was gender-specific; queen or worker brains demonstrated a stimulatory activity, but male brains did not. Queen gland could not be further stimulated. Bioassays with heated and filtered extracts indicate that the stimulatory brain factor is below 3,000 Da. We suggest that pheromone production in Dufour’s gland is under dual, negative positive control. Under queenright conditions, the inhibitor is released and blocks ester biosynthesis, whereas under queenless conditions, the activator is released, activating ester biosynthesis in the gland. This is consistent with the hypothesis that queenright workers are unequivocally recognized as non-fertile, whereas queenless workers try to become “false queens” as part of the reproductive competition.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of sevoflurane uptake into the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M J; McCulloch, T J; Kennedy, R R; Baker, A B

    2004-12-01

    Two recent studies have examined the pharmacokinetics of sevoflurane in adults. Lu et al.(Pharmacokinetics of sevoflurane uptake into the brain and body, Anaesthesia 2003; 58: 951-6) observed that jugular bulb sevoflurane concentration initially rose unexpectedly rapidly and then approached arterial concentrations unexpectedly slowly, suggesting that a blood-brain diffusion barrier exists. They also observed a large alveolar-arterial sevoflurane gradient, suggesting that an alveolar-arterial diffusion barrier exists. Nakamura et al. (Predicted sevoflurane partial pressure in the brain with an uptake and distribution model: Comparison with the measured value in internal jugular vein blood. Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing 1999; 15: 299-305) found no diffusion barriers. We used a computer model to analyse both data sets and show that the observations of Lu et al. can be explained by contamination of jugular samples with extracerebral blood. It is possible that the alveolar-arterial gradients observed by Lu et al. are due to discrepancies in conversions between blood concentrations and gas partial pressures. Our study suggests that there is no blood-brain diffusion barrier for sevoflurane and that the data of Lu et al. must be interpreted with caution.

  9. Carcinoid of the Appendix During Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: Unexpected Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluck, Randy; Cooney, Robert N.; Minnick, Kathleen E.; Ruggiero, Francesco; Smith, J. Stanley

    1999-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors of the midgut arise from the distal duodenum, jejunum, ileum, appendix, ascending and right transverse colon. The appendix and terminal ileum are the most common location. The majority of carcinoid tumors originate from neuroendocrine cells along the gastrointestinal tract, but they are also found in the lung, ovary, and biliary tracts. We report the first case of elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy in which we found a suspicious lesion at the tip of the appendix and proceeded to perform a laparoscopic appendectomy. The lesion revealed a carcinoid tumor of the appendix. PMID:10323177

  10. Brain Autopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... why a family should consider arranging for a brain autopsy upon the death of their loved one. To get a definitive ... study of tissue removed from the body after death. Examination of the whole brain is important in understanding FTD because the patterns ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct ... comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where mental disorders begin and perhaps how to slow or stop ...

  13. Controlling large malpractice claims: the unexpected impact of damage caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronfein, W P; Kinney, E D

    1991-01-01

    Indiana's comprehensive malpractice reforms, inaugurated in 1975, include a cap on damages, a mandated medical review before trial, and a state insurance fund to pay claims equal to or greater than $100,000. We have found that the amount of compensation going to claimants with such large malpractice claims in Indiana is, on average, substantially higher than in Michigan and Ohio. Indiana's mean claim severity between 1977 and 1988 was $404,832, while the means for Michigan and Ohio were $290,022 and $303,220, respectively, with the difference between these three means being highly significant. Although data on claim and claimant characteristics reveal considerable interstate variation, the results of regression analyses show that Indiana claim payment amounts are higher than Michigan or Ohio payments, independent of the effect of factors such as sex, age, severity of injury, allegations of negligence, and year of settlement.

  14. Infant and adult pupil dilation in response to unexpected sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Nicole; Buttelmann, David; Schieler, Andy; Widmann, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surprisingly occurring sounds outside the focus of attention can involuntarily capture attention. This study focuses on the impact of deviant sounds on the pupil size as a marker of auditory involuntary attention in infants. We presented an oddball paradigm including four types of deviant sounds within a sequence of repeated standard sounds to 14-month-old infants and to adults. Environmental and noise deviant sounds elicited a strong pupil dilation response (PDR) in both age groups. In contrast, moderate frequency deviants elicited a significant PDR in adults only. Moreover, a principal component analysis revealed two components underlying the PDR. Component scores differ, depending on deviant types, between age groups. Results indicate age effects of parasympathetic inhibition and sympathetic activation of the pupil size caused by deviant sounds with a high arousing potential. Results demonstrate that the PDR is a sensitive tool for the investigation of involuntary attention to sounds in preverbal children.

  15. An unexpected side-effect of a commonly used drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández González, Francisco; Miranda, Samayra; Santiago Casiano, Mónica; Nieves, José; Adorno, Edgardo; Fernández González, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 68 year-old-female patient with clinical features of drug-induced lupus erythematosus after five years of treatment with amiodarone. She presented generalized skin rash, arthralgia on upper and lower extremities, associated with difficulty to walk. Remarkable laboratory results revealed a positive antinuclear antibody test and a skin rash biopsy showing a superficial and deep perivascular infiltrate of lymphocytes, histiocytes, and eosinophils. Once the etiology of the patient's symptoms was identified, the culprit drug was removed and she had a complete remission of all signs and symptoms. Early diagnose should be recognized for prompt intervention and avoid further complications associated with this rare side-effect.

  16. A substantial and unexpected enhancement of motion perception in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Feig, Jennifer H; Tadin, Duje; Schauder, Kimberly B; Cascio, Carissa J

    2013-05-08

    Atypical perceptual processing in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is well documented. In addition, growing evidence supports the hypothesis that an excitatory/inhibitory neurochemical imbalance might underlie ASD. Here we investigated putative behavioral consequences of the excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in the context of visual motion perception. As stimulus size increases, typical observers exhibit marked impairments in perceiving motion of high-contrast stimuli. This result, termed "spatial suppression," is believed to reflect inhibitory motion-processing mechanisms. Motion processing is also affected by gain control, an inhibitory mechanism that underlies saturation of neural responses at high contrast. Motivated by these behavioral correlates of inhibitory function, we investigated motion perception in human children with ASD (n = 20) and typical development (n = 26). At high contrast, both groups exhibited similar impairments in motion perception with increasing stimulus size, revealing no apparent differences in spatial suppression. However, there was a substantial enhancement of motion perception in ASD: children with ASD exhibited a consistent twofold improvement in perceiving motion. Hypothesizing that this enhancement might indicate abnormal weakening of response gain control, we repeated our measurements at low contrast, where the effects of gain control should be negligible. At low contrast, we indeed found no group differences in motion discrimination thresholds. These low-contrast results, however, revealed weaker spatial suppression in ASD, suggesting the possibility that gain control abnormalities in ASD might have masked spatial suppression differences at high contrast. Overall, we report a pattern of motion perception abnormalities in ASD that includes substantial enhancements at high contrast and is consistent with an underlying excitatory/inhibitory imbalance.

  17. Brain peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompier, D; Vejux, A; Zarrouk, A; Gondcaille, C; Geillon, F; Nury, T; Savary, S; Lizard, G

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are essential organelles in higher eukaryotes as they play a major role in numerous metabolic pathways and redox homeostasis. Some peroxisomal abnormalities, which are often not compatible with life or normal development, were identified in severe demyelinating and neurodegenerative brain diseases. The metabolic roles of peroxisomes, especially in the brain, are described and human brain peroxisomal disorders resulting from a peroxisome biogenesis or a single peroxisomal enzyme defect are listed. The brain abnormalities encountered in these disorders (demyelination, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell death, neuronal migration, differentiation) are described and their pathogenesis are discussed. Finally, the contribution of peroxisomal dysfunctions to the alterations of brain functions during aging and to the development of Alzheimer's disease is considered.

  18. Muerte súbita inesperada en la epilepsia (SUDEP Suden unexpected death in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Castro Vargas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available El SUDEP se refiere a la muerte súbita e inesperada con o sin testigos, no traumática, y no por ahogamientos en un paciente epiléptico, con o sin evidencia de que haya sufrido una crisis epiléptica al morir, en el que se haya descartado un estado convulsivo como causa de muerte y en el que la autopsia no proporcione evidencia alguna de una causa anatómica o tóxica de la muerte. Aunque SUDEP ha sido reconocida desde el siglo XIX, sólo en las últimas dos décadas se le ha dado la importancia que ésta requiere. La frecuencia de SUDEP depende de la severidad de la epilepsia pero en general el riesgo de muerte súbita es de 20 veces mayor que el de la población en general. El edema pulmonar neurógeno, la apnea central y la arritmia cardiaca, inducidos por una descarga α-adrenérgica de origen central, constituyen los tres mecanismos fisiopatogénicos más estrechamente relacionados con la SUDEP. Por lo anterior obliga al clínico a realizar una minuciosa autopsia la cual debería incluir un examen neuropatológico que documente los cambios cerebrales que subyacen a la epilepsia, toxicología y el examen del corazón, los pulmones y otros órganosThe SUDEP refers to the sudden and unexpected death with or without witnesses, non-traumatic, and not drowning in an epileptic patient, with or without evidence that he suffered a seizure at death, in which a state is ruled seizure as the cause of death in the autopsy did not provide evidence of a toxic or anatomic cause of death. Although SUDEP has been recognized since the nineteenth century, only in the last two decades has been given the importance it requires. SUDEP frequency depends on the severity of epilepsy but in general the risk of sudden death is 20 times higher than the general population. Neurogenic pulmonary edema, central apnea and cardiac arrhythmias induced by α-adrenergic shock of central origin, pathophysiologic mechanisms are the three most closely related to SUDEP. This

  19. Unexpected recovery from longterm renal failure in severe diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Sophia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe renal manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is not uncommon and is associated with an indeterminate prognosis. Complete remission can be obtained, however, at least in the young when chronic lesions are absent and adequate anti-inflammatory therapy is immediately initiated. Case presentation We report the unusual case of a 12-year-old girl who presented with severe oliguric renal failure, macrohematuria and skin rash. Renal biopsy revealed the diagnosis of severe diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN with cellular crescents in 15 out of 18 glomeruli and full-house pattern in immunofluorescence indicating lupus nephritis IVB according to WHO, IV-G(A according to ISN/RPS classification. The serological parameters confirmed the diagnosis of SLE and the patient was immediately treated with methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide and immunoadsorption. Initially, despite rapid amelioration of her general condition, no substantial improvement of renal function could be achieved and the patient needed hemodialysis treatment for 12 weeks. Unexpectedly, in the further follow-up at first diuresis increased and thereafter also creatinine levels substantially declined so that hemodialysis could be discontinued. Today, 6 years after the initial presentation, the patient has normal renal function and a SLEDAI score of 0 under a continuous immunosuppressive therapy with Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF and low dose steroid. Conclusion Despite the severity of the initial renal injury and the unfavourable renal prognosis the kidney apparently has a tremendous capacity to recover in young patients when the damage is acute and adequate anti-inflammatory therapy is initiated without delay.

  20. Widespread distribution and unexpected variation among science faculty with education specialties (SFES) across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Seth D; Pelaez, Nancy J; Rudd, James A; Stevens, Michael T; Tanner, Kimberly D; Williams, Kathy S

    2013-04-30

    College and university science departments are increasingly taking an active role in improving science education. Perhaps as a result, a new type of specialized science faculty position within science departments is emerging--referred to here as science faculty with education specialties (SFES)--where individual scientists focus their professional efforts on strengthening undergraduate science education, improving kindergarten-through-12th grade science education, and conducting discipline-based education research. Numerous assertions, assumptions, and questions about SFES exist, yet no national studies have been published. Here, we present findings from a large-scale study of US SFES, who are widespread and increasing in numbers. Contrary to many assumptions, SFES were indeed found across the nation, across science disciplines, and, most notably, across primarily undergraduate, master of science-granting, and PhD-granting institutions. Data also reveal unexpected variations among SFES by institution type. Among respondents, SFES at master of science-granting institutions were almost twice as likely to have formal training in science education compared with other SFES. In addition, SFES at PhD-granting institutions were much more likely to have obtained science education funding. Surprisingly, formal training in science education provided no advantage in obtaining science education funding. Our findings show that the SFES phenomenon is likely more complex and diverse than anticipated, with differences being more evident across institution types than across science disciplines. These findings raise questions about the origins of differences among SFES and are useful to science departments interested in hiring SFES, scientific trainees preparing for SFES careers, and agencies awarding science education funding.

  1. Unique Microstructural Changes in the Brain Associated with Urological Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (UCPPS) Revealed by Diffusion Tensor MRI, Super-Resolution Track Density Imaging, and Statistical Parameter Mapping: A MAPP Network Neuroimaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Davis; Mayer, Emeran; Leu, Kevin; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Naliboff, Bruce D; Labus, Jennifer S; Tillisch, Kirsten; Kutch, Jason J; Farmer, Melissa A; Apkarian, A Vania; Johnson, Kevin A; Mackey, Sean C; Ness, Timothy J; Landis, J Richard; Deutsch, Georg; Harris, Richard E; Clauw, Daniel J; Mullins, Chris; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    Studies have suggested chronic pain syndromes are associated with neural reorganization in specific regions associated with perception, processing, and integration of pain. Urological chronic pelvic pain syndrome (UCPPS) represents a collection of pain syndromes characterized by pelvic pain, namely Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) and Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC/PBS), that are both poorly understood in their pathophysiology, and treated ineffectively. We hypothesized patients with UCPPS may have microstructural differences in the brain compared with healthy control subjects (HCs), as well as patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a common gastrointestinal pain disorder. In the current study we performed population-based voxel-wise DTI and super-resolution track density imaging (TDI) in a large, two-center sample of phenotyped patients from the multicenter cohort with UCPPS (N = 45), IBS (N = 39), and HCs (N = 56) as part of the MAPP Research Network. Compared with HCs, UCPPS patients had lower fractional anisotropy (FA), lower generalized anisotropy (GA), lower track density, and higher mean diffusivity (MD) in brain regions commonly associated with perception and integration of pain information. Results also showed significant differences in specific anatomical regions in UCPPS patients when compared with IBS patients, consistent with microstructural alterations specific to UCPPS. While IBS patients showed clear sex related differences in FA, MD, GA, and track density consistent with previous reports, few such differences were observed in UCPPS patients. Heat maps illustrating the correlation between specific regions of interest and various pain and urinary symptom scores showed clustering of significant associations along the cortico-basal ganglia-thalamic-cortical loop associated with pain integration, modulation, and perception. Together, results suggest patients with UCPPS have extensive microstructural

  2. Brain scintigraphy with Tc99-pertechnetate in the evaluation of patients with cerebrovascular lesions. The diagnostic value related to age of the lesion and to the size, type and localisation revealed by CT-scan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Christensen, J; Skriver, E B

    1983-01-01

    Brain scintigraphy with Tc99-pertechnetate (Tc99-scan) was performed 4 times in 95 consecutive stroke patients: on average 5 days, 18 days, 103 days and 194 days after the stroke. The type (infarct, hematoma), size and localisation of the lesion was evaluated by CT-scan performed 3 times in all...... identified (90%) while infarcts localised deep in the hemisphere were identified in only 20% of the patients; (ii) the size of the lesion, i.e. large deep infarcts were seen with a much higher frequency than small deep infarcts. The detection rate of the CT-scan was practically not dependent upon the time...

  3. Unexpected novelty and familiarity orienting responses in lateral parietal cortex during recognition judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Antonio; Konkel, Alex; Dobbins, Ian G

    2013-05-01

    The role of lateral parietal cortex during recognition memory is heavily debated. We examined parietal activation during an Explicit Memory Cueing recognition paradigm that biases participants towards expecting novel or familiar stimuli on a trial-by-trial basis using anticipatory cues ("Likely Old", "Likely New"), compared to trials with neutral cues ("????"). Three qualitatively distinct patterns were observed in the left lateral parietal cortex. An unexpected novelty response occurred in left anterior intraparietal cortex (IPS)/post-central gyrus (PoCG) in which greater activation was observed for new vs. old materials following the "Likely Old" cue, but not following the "Likely New" cue. In contrast, anterior angular gyrus demonstrated an unexpected familiarity response with greater activation for old vs. new materials following the "Likely New" cue, but not the "Likely Old" cue. Thus these two regions demonstrated increased responses that were selective for either new or old materials respectively, but only when they were unexpected. In contrast, a mid IPS area demonstrated greater response for whichever class of memoranda was unanticipated given the cue condition (an unexpected memory response). Analogous response patterns in regions outside of parietal cortex, and the results of a resting state connectivity analysis, suggested these three response patterns were associated with visuo-spatial orienting following unexpected novelty, source monitoring operations following unexpected familiarity, and general executive control processes following violated expectations. These findings support a Memory Orienting Model of the left lateral parietal cortex in which the region is linked to the investigation of unexpected novelty or familiarity in the environment.

  4. The visual pulvinar in tree shrews I. Multiple subdivisions revealed through acetylcholinesterase and Cat-301 chemoarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, David C; Jain, Neeraj; Kaas, Jon H

    2003-12-22

    Tree shrews are highly visual mammals closely related to primates. They have a large visual pulvinar complex, but its organization and relation to visual cortex is only partly known. We processed brain sections through the pulvinar with seven different procedures in an effort to reveal histologically distinct compartments. The results revealed three major subdivisions. A dorsal subdivision, Pd, stains darkly for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and occupies the dorsoposterior one-third of the pulvinar complex. A ventral subdivision, Pv, stains darkly when processed with the Cat-301 antibody and occupies the ventroanterior fifth of the pulvinar complex along the brachium of the superior colliculus. Unexpectedly, part of Pv is ventral to the brachium. A large central subdivision, Pc, stains moderately dark for AChE and cytochrome oxidase (CO), and very light for Cat-301. Pc includes about half of the pulvinar complex, with parts on both sides of the brachium of the superior colliculus. These architectonic results demonstrate that the pulvinar complex of tree shrews is larger and has more subdivisions than previously described. The complex resembles the pulvinar of primates by having a portion ventral to the brachium and by having histochemically distinct nuclei; the number of nuclei is less than in primates, however.

  5. Predictions of the Pt(8)Ti phase in unexpected systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Richard H; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hart, Gus L W

    2010-05-19

    The binary A(8)B phase (prototype Pt(8)Ti) has been experimentally observed in 11 systems. A high-throughput search over all the binary transition intermetallics, however, reveals 59 occurrences of the A(8)B phase: Au(8)Zn(dagger), Cd(8)Sc(dagger), Cu(8)Ni(dagger), Cu(8)Zn(dagger), Hg(8)La, Ir(8)Os(dagger), Ir(8)Re, Ir(8)Ru(dagger), Ir(8)Tc, Ir(8)W(dagger), Nb(8)Os(dagger), Nb(8)Rh(dagger), Nb(8)Ru(dagger), Nb(8)Ta(dagger), Ni(8)Fe, Ni(8)Mo(dagger)*, Ni(8)Nb(dagger)*, Ni(8)Ta*, Ni(8)V*, Ni(8)W, Pd(8)Al(dagger), Pd(8)Fe, Pd(8)Hf, Pd(8)Mn, Pd(8)Mo*, Pd(8)Nb, Pd(8)Sc, Pd(8)Ta, Pd(8)Ti, Pd(8)V*, Pd(8)W*, Pd(8)Zn, Pd(8)Zr, Pt(8)Al(dagger), Pt(8)Cr*, Pt(8)Hf, Pt(8)Mn, Pt(8)Mo, Pt(8)Nb, Pt(8)Rh(dagger), Pt(8)Sc, Pt(8)Ta, Pt(8)Ti*, Pt(8)V*, Pt(8)W, Pt(8)Zr*, Rh(8)Mo, Rh(8)W, Ta(8)Pd, Ta(8)Pt, Ta(8)Rh, V(8)Cr(dagger), V(8)Fe(dagger), V(8)Ir(dagger), V(8)Ni(dagger), V(8)Pd, V(8)Pt, V(8)Rh, and V(8)Ru(dagger) ((dagger) = metastable, * = experimentally observed). This is surprising for the wealth of new occurrences that are predicted, especially in well-characterized systems (e.g., Cu-Zn). By verifying all experimental results while offering additional predictions, our study serves as a striking demonstration of the power of the high-throughput approach. The practicality of the method is demonstrated in the Rh-W system. A cluster-expansion-based Monte Carlo model reveals a relatively high order-disorder transition temperature.

  6. Unexpected antitumorigenic effect of fenbendazole when combined with supplementary vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ping; Dang, Chi V; Watson, Julie

    2008-11-01

    Diet containing the anthelminthic fenbendazole is used often to treat rodent pinworm infections because it is easy to use and has few reported adverse effects on research. However, during fenbendazole treatment at our institution, an established human lymphoma xenograft model in C.B-17/Icr-prkdcscid/Crl (SCID) mice failed to grow. Further investigation revealed that the fenbendazole had been incorporated into a sterilizable diet supplemented with additional vitamins to compensate for loss during autoclaving, but the diet had not been autoclaved. To assess the role of fenbendazole and supplementary vitamins on tumor suppression, 20 vendor-supplied 4-wk-old SCID mice were assigned to 4 treatment groups: standard diet, diet plus fenbendazole, diet plus vitamins, and diet plus both vitamins and fenbendazole. Diet treatment was initiated 2 wk before subcutaneous flank implantation with 3 x 107 lymphoma cells. Tumor size was measured by caliper at 4-d intervals until the largest tumors reached a calculated volume of 1500 mm3. Neither diet supplemented with vitamins alone nor fenbendazole alone caused altered tumor growth as compared with that of controls. However, the group supplemented with both vitamins and fenbendazole exhibited significant inhibition of tumor growth. The mechanism for this synergy is unknown and deserves further investigation. Fenbendazole should be used with caution during tumor studies because it may interact with other treatments and confound research results.

  7. The unexpected properties of alkali metal iron selenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagotto, Elbio R [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The iron-based superconductors that contain FeAs layers as the fundamental building block in the crystal structures have been rationalized in the past using ideas based on the Fermi surface nesting of hole and electron pockets when in the presence of weak Hubbard U interactions. This approach seemed appropriate considering the small values of the magnetic moments in the parent compounds and the clear evidence based on photoemission experiments of the required electron and hole pockets. However, recent results in the context of alkali metal iron selenides, with generic chemical composition AxFe2ySe2 (A alkali metal element), have challenged those previous ideas since at particular compositions y the low-temperature ground states are insulating and display antiferromagnetic order with large iron magnetic moments. Moreover, angle-resolved photoemission studies have revealed the absence of hole pockets at the Fermi level in these materials. The present status of this exciting area of research, with the potential to alter conceptually our understanding of the ironbased superconductors, is here reviewed, covering both experimental and theoretical investigations. Other recent related developments are also briefly reviewed, such as the study of selenide two-leg ladders and the discovery of superconductivity in a single layer of FeSe. The conceptual issues considered established for the alkali metal iron selenides, as well as several issues that still require further work, are discussed.

  8. Syncope with Surprise: An Unexpected Finding of Huge Gastric Diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Podda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A gastric diverticulum is a pouch protruding from the gastric wall. The vague long clinical history ranging between dyspepsia, postprandial fullness, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding makes this condition a diagnostic challenge. We present a case of large gastric diverticulum that has been diagnosed during clinical investigations for suspected cardiovascular issues in a patient admitted at the medical ward for syncope. A 51-year-old man presented to the medical department due to a syncopal episode occurring while he was resting on the beach after having his lunch, with concomitant vague epimesogastric gravative pain without any other symptom. A diagnosis of neuromediated syncopal episode was made by the cardiologist. Due to the referred epimesogastric pain, an abdominal ultrasound scan was carried out, showing perisplenic fluid. A CT scan of the abdomen was performed to exclude splenic lesions. The CT scan revealed a large diverticulum protruding from the gastric fundus. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy visualized a large diverticular neck situated in the posterior wall of the gastric fundus, partially filled by undigested food. The patient underwent surgery, with an uneventful postoperative course. Histologic examination showed a full-thickness stomach specimen, indicative of a congenital diverticulum. At the 2nd month of follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic.

  9. Lymphoreticular cells in human brain tumours and in normal brain.

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation, using various rosetting assays of cell suspensions prepared by mechanical disaggregation or collagenase digestion, demonstrated lymphoreticular cells in human normal brain (cerebral cortex and cerebellum) and in malignant brain tumours. The study revealed T and B lymphocytes and their subsets (bearing receptors for Fc(IgG) and C3) in 5/14 glioma suspensions, comprising less than 15% of the cell population. Between 20-60% of cells in tumour suspensions morphologicall...

  10. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  11. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... Higher Death Rate Among Youth with Psychosis Delayed Walking Link ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and memory. anterior cingulate cortex —Is involved in ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Some people who develop a mental illness may recover completely; others may have repeated episodes of illness ... in early detection, more tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... that contains codes to make proteins and other important body chemicals. DNA also includes information to control ... cells required for normal function and plays an important role during early brain development. It may also ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, and responds ... via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in early detection, more tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything ... can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as mood, ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Offices and Divisions Careers@NIMH Advisory Boards and Groups Staff Directories Getting to NIMH National Institutes of ... electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the outer layer of a ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into ... factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ...

  20. RAB23 mutations in Carpenter syndrome imply an unexpected role for hedgehog signaling in cranial-suture development and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Dagan; Seelow, Dominik; Jehee, Fernanda S; Perlyn, Chad A; Alonso, Luis G; Bueno, Daniela F; Donnai, Dian; Josifova, Dragana; Josifiova, Dragana; Mathijssen, Irene M J; Morton, Jenny E V; Orstavik, Karen Helene; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Wall, Steven A; Marsh, Jeffrey L; Nurnberg, Peter; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2007-06-01

    Carpenter syndrome is a pleiotropic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, the cardinal features of which include craniosynostosis, polysyndactyly, obesity, and cardiac defects. Using homozygosity mapping, we found linkage to chromosome 6p12.1-q12 and, in 15 independent families, identified five different mutations (four truncating and one missense) in RAB23, which encodes a member of the RAB guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) family of vesicle transport proteins and acts as a negative regulator of hedgehog (HH) signaling. In 10 patients, the disease was caused by homozygosity for the same nonsense mutation, L145X, that resides on a common haplotype, indicative of a founder effect in patients of northern European descent. Surprisingly, nonsense mutations of Rab23 in open brain mice cause recessive embryonic lethality with neural-tube defects, suggesting a species difference in the requirement for RAB23 during early development. The discovery of RAB23 mutations in patients with Carpenter syndrome implicates HH signaling in cranial-suture biogenesis--an unexpected finding, given that craniosynostosis is not usually associated with mutations of other HH-pathway components--and provides a new molecular target for studies of obesity.

  1. RAB23 Mutations in Carpenter Syndrome Imply an Unexpected Role for Hedgehog Signaling in Cranial-Suture Development and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Dagan ; Seelow, Dominik ; Jehee, Fernanda S. ; Perlyn, Chad A. ; Alonso, Luís G. ; Bueno, Daniela F. ; Donnai, Dian ; Josifiova, Dragana ; Mathijssen, Irene M. J. ; Morton, Jenny E. V. ; Ørstavik, Karen Helene ; Sweeney, Elizabeth ; Wall, Steven A. ; Marsh, Jeffrey L. ; Nürnberg, Peter ; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita ; Wilkie, Andrew O. M. 

    2007-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is a pleiotropic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, the cardinal features of which include craniosynostosis, polysyndactyly, obesity, and cardiac defects. Using homozygosity mapping, we found linkage to chromosome 6p12.1-q12 and, in 15 independent families, identified five different mutations (four truncating and one missense) in RAB23, which encodes a member of the RAB guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) family of vesicle transport proteins and acts as a negative regulator of hedgehog (HH) signaling. In 10 patients, the disease was caused by homozygosity for the same nonsense mutation, L145X, that resides on a common haplotype, indicative of a founder effect in patients of northern European descent. Surprisingly, nonsense mutations of Rab23 in open brain mice cause recessive embryonic lethality with neural-tube defects, suggesting a species difference in the requirement for RAB23 during early development. The discovery of RAB23 mutations in patients with Carpenter syndrome implicates HH signaling in cranial-suture biogenesis—an unexpected finding, given that craniosynostosis is not usually associated with mutations of other HH-pathway components—and provides a new molecular target for studies of obesity. PMID:17503333

  2. A Case of Unexpected Symptomatic Vasospasm after Clipping Surgery for an Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Kameda, Masahiro; Yasuhara, Takao; Date, Isao

    2016-03-01

    Delayed symptomatic vasospasm after clipping surgery for unruptured aneurysm is rarely reported. We report a case of a 62-year-old woman who presented with symptomatic vasospasm 11 days after clipping surgery for an unruptured aneurysm. We could not predict the existence of vasospasm until ischemic symptoms developed. We retrospectively found mild vasospasm in the computed tomography angiogram taken 8 days after the operation. The patient complained of a prolonged unexpected headache 1 week after the operation. We should recognize prolonged unexpected headache as a warning sign of vasospasm.

  3. Brain size and ecology in small mammals and primates.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Comparisons of brain-body size relationships within small mammal and primate families reveal intergeneric differences related to diet and foraging strategy. These same associations between relative brain size and ecology are also evident among interfamily comparisons.

  4. Recent Advances in Mechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy%癫猝死机制进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘洁; 陆钦池

    2015-01-01

    The risk of sudden death is higher in epilepsy patients than in general population, especially in patients with refractory epilepsy. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the sudden, unexpected, non-traumatic, and non-drowning death of a patient with epilepsy, excluding documented status epilepticus, and in which postmortem examination does not reveal a structural or toxicological cause of death. Researches of mechanisms of SUDEP mostly have focused on cardiac arrhythmia and respiratory suppression during and after seizures. The recent SUEDP mechanism research advances in aspects of respiratory dysfunction, cardiac dysfunction, impaired consciousness were reviewed, and genetics and cellular elements as well.%癫患者,尤其是难治性癫患者,发生猝死的风险较一般人群要高。癫猝死为癫患者突然发生非外伤、非溺死的死亡,并排除了癫持续状态,尸检未发现造成死亡的器质性或中毒性方面的确切原因。关于癫猝死机制的研究集中在癫发作可能导致的心律失常和呼吸抑制方面。文中对近年来在癫猝死机制中呼吸功能障碍、心脏功能障碍、意识障碍方面,以及分子和基因方面的研究进展进行综述。

  5. Unexpected spatial intensity distributions and onset timing of solar electron events observed by closely spaced STEREO spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, A.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Müller-Mellin, R.

    2016-09-01

    We present multi-spacecraft observations of four solar electron events using measurements from the Solar Electron Proton Telescope (SEPT) and the Electron Proton Helium INstrument (EPHIN) on board the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, respectively, occurring between 11 October 2013 and 1 August 2014, during the approaching superior conjunction period of the two STEREO spacecraft. At this time the longitudinal separation angle between STEREO-A (STA) and STEREO-B (STB) was less than 72°. The parent particle sources (flares) of the four investigated events were situated close to, in between, or to the west of the STEREO's magnetic footpoints. The STEREO measurements revealed a strong difference in electron peak intensities (factor ≤12) showing unexpected in