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Sample records for brain receptors mitogenesis

  1. Amphiregulin acts as an autocrine growth factor in two human polarizing colon cancer lines that exhibit domain selective EGF receptor mitogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Damstrup, L; Kuwada, S K; Dempsey, P. J.; Brown, C L; Hawkey, C J; Poulsen, H. S.; Wiley, H S; Coffey, R J

    1999-01-01

    Colonic enterocytes, like many epithelial cells in vivo, are polarized with functionally distinct apical and basolateral membrane domains. The aims of this study were to characterize the endogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like ligands expressed in two polarizing colon cancer cell lines, HCA-7 Colony 29 (HCA-7) and Caco-2, and to examine the effects of cell polarity on EGF receptor-mediated mitogenesis. HCA-7 and Caco-2 cells were grown on plastic, or as a polarized monolayer on Transwel...

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation induces nuclear targeting of cyclooxygenase-2, basolateral release of prostaglandins, and mitogenesis in polarizing colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, R J; Hawkey, C J; Damstrup, L; Graves-Deal, R; Daniel, V C; Dempsey, P J; Chinery, R; Kirkland, S C; DuBois, R N; Jetton, T L; Morrow, J D

    1997-01-21

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs reduce the risk of colon cancer, possibly via cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. The growth factor-inducible COX-2, which is overexpressed in neoplastic colonic tissue, is an attractive target to mediate this effect. Herein we have exploited the ability of a human colon cancer cell line, HCA-7 Colony 29, to polarize when cultured on Transwell (Costar) filters to study COX-2 production and the vectorial release of prostaglandins (PGs). Administration of type alpha transforming growth factor to the basolateral compartment, in which the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) resides, results in a marked induction of COX-2 immunoreactivity at the base of the cells and the unexpected appearance of COX-2 in the nucleus. The increase in COX-2 protein is associated with a dose- and time-dependent increase in PG levels in the basolateral, but not apical, medium. Amphiregulin is the most abundantly expressed EGFR ligand in these cells, and the protein is present at the basolateral surface. EGFR blockade reduces baseline COX-2 immunoreactivity, PG levels, and mitogenesis in a concentration-dependent manner. Two specific COX-2 inhibitors, SC-58125 and NS 398, also, in a dose-dependent manner, attenuate baseline and type alpha transforming growth factor-stimulated mitogenesis, although PG levels are decreased > 90% at all concentrations of inhibitor tested. These findings show that activation of the EGFR stimulates COX-2 production and its translocation to the nucleus, vectorial release of PGs, and mitogenesis in polarized HCA-7 Colony 29 cells.

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation induces nuclear targeting of cyclooxygenase-2, basolateral release of prostaglandins, and mitogenesis in polarizing colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Robert J.; Hawkey, Chris J.; Damstrup, Lars; Graves-Deal, Ramona; Daniel, Vincent C.; Dempsey, Peter J.; Chinery, Rebecca; Kirkland, Susan C.; DuBois, Raymond N.; Jetton, Thomas L.; Morrow, Jason D.

    1997-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs reduce the risk of colon cancer, possibly via cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. The growth factor-inducible COX-2, which is overexpressed in neoplastic colonic tissue, is an attractive target to mediate this effect. Herein we have exploited the ability of a human colon cancer cell line, HCA-7 Colony 29, to polarize when cultured on Transwell (Costar) filters to study COX-2 production and the vectorial release of prostaglandins (PGs). Administration of type α transforming growth factor to the basolateral compartment, in which the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) resides, results in a marked induction of COX-2 immunoreactivity at the base of the cells and the unexpected appearance of COX-2 in the nucleus. The increase in COX-2 protein is associated with a dose- and time-dependent increase in PG levels in the basolateral, but not apical, medium. Amphiregulin is the most abundantly expressed EGFR ligand in these cells, and the protein is present at the basolateral surface. EGFR blockade reduces baseline COX-2 immunoreactivity, PG levels, and mitogenesis in a concentration-dependent manner. Two specific COX-2 inhibitors, SC-58125 and NS 398, also, in a dose-dependent manner, attenuate baseline and type α transforming growth factor-stimulated mitogenesis, although PG levels are decreased >90% at all concentrations of inhibitor tested. These findings show that activation of the EGFR stimulates COX-2 production and its translocation to the nucleus, vectorial release of PGs, and mitogenesis in polarized HCA-7 Colony 29 cells. PMID:9012840

  4. Amphiregulin acts as an autocrine growth factor in two human polarizing colon cancer lines that exhibit domain selective EGF receptor mitogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damstrup, L; Kuwada, S K; Dempsey, P J; Brown, C L; Hawkey, C J; Poulsen, H S; Wiley, H S; Coffey, R J

    1999-06-01

    Colonic enterocytes, like many epithelial cells in vivo, are polarized with functionally distinct apical and basolateral membrane domains. The aims of this study were to characterize the endogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like ligands expressed in two polarizing colon cancer cell lines, HCA-7 Colony 29 (HCA-7) and Caco-2, and to examine the effects of cell polarity on EGF receptor-mediated mitogenesis. HCA-7 and Caco-2 cells were grown on plastic, or as a polarized monolayer on Transwell filters. Cell proliferation was measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation and EGF receptor (EGFR) binding was assessed by Scatchard analysis. EGFR ligand expression was determined by Northern blot analysis, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, metabolic labelling and confocal microscopy. We found that amphiregulin (AR) was the most abundant EGFR ligand expressed in HCA-7 and Caco-2 cells. AR was localized to the basolateral surface and detected in basolateral-conditioned medium. Basolateral administration of neutralizing AR antibodies significantly reduced basal DNA replication. A single class of high-affinity EGFRs was detected in the basolateral compartment, whereas the apical compartment of polarized cells, and cells cultured on plastic, displayed two classes of receptor affinity. Basolateral administration of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) or an EGFR neutralizing antibody also resulted in a dose-dependent stimulation or attenuation, respectively, of DNA replication. However, no mitogenic response was observed when these agents were added to the apical compartment or to confluent cells cultured on plastic. We conclude that amphiregulin acts as an autocrine growth factor in HCA-7 and Caco-2 cells, and EGFR ligand-induced proliferation is influenced by cellular polarity.

  5. A point mutation at tyrosine-809 in the human colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor impairs mitogenesis without abrogating tyrosine kinase activity, association with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, or induction of c-fos and junB genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, M.F. (Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis (USA)); Shurtleff, S.A.; Downing, J.R. (Saint Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA)); Sherr, C.J. (Univ. of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis (USA) Saint Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Substitution of phenylalanine for tyrosine-809 in the human colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) inhibited its ability to transduce ligand-dependent mitogenic signals in mouse NIH 3T3 cells. When combined with an activating mutation at codon 301 that induces constitutive CSF-1R tyrosine kinase activity, the codon 809 mutation suppressed ligand-independent cell transformation. Comparative mapping tryptic phosphopeptides from mutant and wild-type CSF-1R indicated that tyrosine-809 is a site of ligand-dependent receptor phosphorylation in vivo. The mutant receptor was active as a tyrosine kinase in vitro and in vivo, underwent CSF-1-dependent association with a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and induced expression of the protooncogenes c-fos and junB, underscoring its ability to trigger some of the known cellular responses to CSF-1. The mutant receptor is likely to be impaired in its ability to interact with critical cellular effectors whose activity is required for mitogenesis.

  6. Mutation of a Src phosphorylation site in the PDGF beta-receptor leads to increased PDGF-stimulated chemotaxis but decreased mitogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus; Johnell, M; Siegbahn, A

    1996-01-01

    is phosphorylated by Src. Cell lines expressing a beta-receptor mutant, in which Tyr934 was replaced with a phenyalanine residue, showed reduced mitogenic signaling in response to PDGF-BB. In contrast, the mutant receptor mediated increased signals for chemotaxis and actin reorganization. Whereas the motility...... responses of cells expressing wild-type beta-receptors were attenuated by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase, those of cells expressing the mutant receptor were only slightly influenced. In contrast, PDGF-BB-induced chemotaxis of the cells with the mutant receptor was attenuated by inhibition......, the characteristics of the Y934F mutant suggest that the phosphorylation of Tyr934 by Src negatively modulates a signal transduction pathway leading to motility responses which involves phospholipase C-gamma, and shifts the response to increased mitogenicity....

  7. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  8. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

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    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  9. IL-4R drives dedifferentiation, mitogenesis, and metastasis in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoyama, Tohru; Aslam, Mohammed Imran; Abraham, Jinu; Prajapati, Suresh I; Nishijo, Koichi; Michalek, Joel E; Zarzabal, Lee Ann; Nelon, Laura D; Guttridge, Denis C; Rubin, Brian P; Keller, Charles

    2011-05-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in childhood. The alveolar subtype of rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) is a paradigm for refractory and incurable solid tumors because more than half of the children at diagnosis have either regional lymph node or distant metastases. These studies follow our previous observation that Interleukin-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα) is upregulated in both human and murine ARMS, and that the IL-4R signaling pathway may be a target for abrogating tumor progression. By in vitro biochemical and cell biology studies as well as preclinical studies using a genetically engineered mouse model, we evaluated the role of IL-4 and IL-13 in IL-4R-mediated mitogenesis, myodifferentiation, and tumor progression. IL-4 and IL-13 ligands accelerated tumor cell growth and activated STAT6, Akt, or MAPK signaling pathways in the human RMS cell lines, RD and Rh30, as well as in mouse primary ARMS cell cultures. IL-4 and IL-13 treatment also decreased protein expression of myogenic differentiation factors MyoD and Myogenin, indicating a loss of muscle differentiation. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of ARMS, we have shown that inhibition of IL-4R signaling pathway with a neutralizing antibody has a profound effect on the frequency of lymph node and pulmonary metastases, resulting in significant survival extension in vivo. Our results indicate that an IL-4R-dependent signaling pathway regulates tumor cell progression in RMS, and inhibition of this pathway could be a promising adjuvant therapeutic approach. ©2011 AACR.

  10. The brain mineralocorticoid receptor and stress resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Heegde, Freija; De Rijk, Roel H.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.

    Stress exposure activates the HPA-axis and results in the release of corticosteroids which bind to two receptor types in the brain: the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While the role of the GR in stress reactivity has been extensively studied, the MR has

  11. Staphylococcus enterotoxin A modulates interleukin 15-induced signaling and mitogenesis in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerwien, J; Kaltoft, K; Nielsen, M

    1998-01-01

    the anti-mitogenic effect of SEA on cytokine-induced proliferation and the pro-mitogenic effect of PMA. In contrast, inhibitors of PP1, PP2A, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI-3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) are unable to inhibit the effects of SEA. In a SEA "non......-mediated mitogenesis correlates with an inhibition of IL-2Rbeta expression and ligand-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IL-2R. Cyclosporin A (CyA), an inhibitor of the protein phosphatase (PP2B) calcineurin, strongly inhibits the SEA-induced modulations of cytokine receptor expression. Moreover, CyA inhibits both...... is mediated via a PP2B-dependent and PP1/PP2A-, PKC-, PI-3 kinase- and mTOR-independent pathway in human T-cell lines....

  12. Brain masculinization requires androgen receptor function

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Takashi; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Kawano, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Uematsu, Yoshikatsu; Sekine, Keisuke; Fukuda, Toru; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Krust, Andrée; Yamada, Takashi; NAKAMICHI, YUKO; Yamamoto, Yoko; Nakamura, Takashi; Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Yoshizawa, Tatsuya

    2004-01-01

    Testicular testosterone produced during a critical perinatal period is thought to masculinize and defeminize the male brain from the inherent feminization program and induce male-typical behaviors in the adult. These actions of testosterone appear to be exerted not through its androgenic activity, but rather through its conversion by brain aromatase into estrogen, with the consequent activation of estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated signaling. Thus, the role of androgen receptor (AR) in perinatal...

  13. Interaction proteomics reveals brain region-specific AMPA receptor complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, N.; Pandya, N.J.; Koopmans, F.T.W.; Castelo-Szekelv, V.; van der Schors, R.C.; Smit, A.B.; Li, K.W.

    2014-01-01

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain is mediated by glutamate acting on postsynaptic AMPA receptors. Recent studies have revealed a substantial number of AMPA receptor auxiliary proteins, which potentially contribute to the regulation of AMPA receptor trafficking, subcellular receptor

  14. Sweet Taste Receptors in Normal and Pathological Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    YI, Chenju

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian sweet taste receptors (T1Rs) are G protein-coupled receptor complexes, which have recently been proposed to be associated with the brain glucose sensor. Here, we investigated the expression of sweet taste receptors T1R1 and T1R3 in normal and pathological rat brain, including tissue libraries of C6 rat glioma and rat brain of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), by immunohistological methods. The results demonstrated that neurons located in different brain regions, including...

  15. Brain nuclear receptors and body weight regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; O'Malley, Bert W; Elmquist, Joel K

    2017-04-03

    Neural pathways, especially those in the hypothalamus, integrate multiple nutritional, hormonal, and neural signals, resulting in the coordinated control of body weight balance and glucose homeostasis. Nuclear receptors (NRs) sense changing levels of nutrients and hormones, and therefore play essential roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Understanding the role and the underlying mechanisms of NRs in the context of energy balance control may facilitate the identification of novel targets to treat obesity. Notably, NRs are abundantly expressed in the brain, and emerging evidence indicates that a number of these brain NRs regulate multiple aspects of energy balance, including feeding, energy expenditure and physical activity. In this Review we summarize some of the recent literature regarding effects of brain NRs on body weight regulation and discuss mechanisms underlying these effects.

  16. Furosemide interactions with brain GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpi, Esa R; Lüddens, Hartmut

    1997-01-01

    The loop diuretic furosemide is known to antagonize the function of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. The purpose of the present study was to examine the direct interaction of furosemide with the GABAA receptors by autoradiography and ligand binding studies with native rat and human receptors and with recombinant receptors composed of rat subunits.Autoradiography with [35S]-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]-TBPS) as a ligand indicated that furosemide (0.1–1 mM) reversed the 5 μM GABA-induced inhibition of binding only in the cerebellar granule cell layer of rat brain sections. In all other regions studied, notably also in the hippocampal and thalamic areas, furosemide failed to antagonize GABA. Furosemide 1 mM decreased [35S]-TBPS binding only in a limited number of brain regions, but facilitation of the GABA-inhibition of the binding was much more widespread.In well-washed rat cerebellar, but not cerebrocortical, membranes, furosemide enhanced the [35S]-TBPS binding over basal level in the absence of added GABA. The GABAA antagonist, SR 95531, and the convulsant, Ro 5-4864, blocked this furosemide-induced increase. Both interactions with the furosemide enhancement are likely to be allosteric, since furosemide affected the binding of [3H]-SR 95531 and [3H]-Ro 5-4864 identically in the cerebellar and cerebrocortical membranes. Maximal GABA-antagonism induced by furosemide in cerebellar membranes was further increased by SR 95531 but not by Ro 5-4864, indicating additive antagonism only for SR 95531. In human cerebellar receptors, only GABA antagonism by furosemide, but not the enhancement without added GABA, was observed.In recombinant GABAA receptors, furosemide antagonism of GABA-inhibition of [35S]-TBPS binding depended only on the presence of α6 and β2/3 subunits, irrespective of the presence or absence of γ2 or δ subunits.In α6β3γ2 receptors, clozapine reversed the enhancement of [35S]-TBPS binding by furosemide in the absence

  17. The brain mineralocorticoid receptor and stress resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Heegde, Freija; De Rijk, Roel H; Vinkers, Christiaan H

    2015-02-01

    Stress exposure activates the HPA-axis and results in the release of corticosteroids which bind to two receptor types in the brain: the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While the role of the GR in stress reactivity has been extensively studied, the MR has received less attention. Nevertheless, pioneering in-depth studies over the past two decades have shown the importance of the brain MR in the processing of stressful information. Moreover, a membrane-bound MR mediating the rapid effects of cortisol was recently discovered. This review summarizes how the MR may play a role in stress resilience. Both preclinical and clinical studies suggest that the MR is an important stress modulator and influences basal as well as stress-induced HPA-axis activity, stress appraisal, and fear-related memories. These MR effects are mediated by both genomic and non-genomic MRs and appear to be at least partially sex-dependent. Moreover, the majority of studies indicate that high MR functionality or expression may confer resilience to traumatic stress. This has direct clinical implications. First, increasing activity or expression of brain MRs may prevent or reverse symptoms of stress-related depression. Second, individuals with a relatively low MR functionality may possess an increased stress susceptibility for depression. Nevertheless, the number of clinical MR studies is currently limited. In conclusion, the recent emergence of the MR as a putative stress resilience factor is important and may open up new avenues for the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Brain CB2 Receptors: Implications for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Roche

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although previously thought of as the peripheral cannabinoid receptor, it is now accepted that the CB2 receptor is expressed in the central nervous system on microglia, astrocytes and subpopulations of neurons. Expression of the CB2 receptor in the brain is significantly lower than that of the CB1 receptor. Conflicting findings have been reported on the neurological effects of pharmacological agents targeting the CB2 receptor under normal conditions. Under inflammatory conditions, CB2 receptor expression in the brain is enhanced and CB2 receptor agonists exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects. These findings have prompted research into the CB2 receptor as a possible target for the treatment of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Neuroinflammatory alterations are also associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and polymorphisms in the CB2 gene have been reported in depression, eating disorders and schizophrenia. This review will examine the evidence to date for a role of brain CB2 receptors in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  19. Extent of oxidative mitogenesis does not correlate with the degree of aldehyde formation of the T lymphocyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roffman, E.; Wilchek, M.

    1986-07-01

    Chemical oxidation of T lymphocytes with periodate or the combined action of the enzymes neuraminidase and galactose oxidase (NAGO) results in T cell activation. The latter process includes the production of interleukin 2 (IL 2) and the induction of IL 2 receptors. Because membrane-bound aldehydes act in the transmission of the oxidative mitogenic signal, the authors designed a comparative study in human thymocytes and peripheral blood leukocytes in order to determine a possible correlation between the degree of the membrane aldehydes generated chemically or enzymatically and the extent of the resulting activation. The differences between periodate- and NAGO-induced aldehydes were demonstrated by flow cytometry of cells stained with a novel fluoresceinated hydraizde and by an electrophoretic procedure performed with biocytin hydrazide and /sup 125/I-streptavidin. In both cellular systems, periodate oxidation resulted in stronger formation of aldehydes than NAGO oxidation. However, the IL 2 receptor induced by NAGO formation and the resultant activation were significantly higher than those induced by periodate. The degree of aldehyde formation on peripheral blood leukocytes was also considerably higher than that of thymocytes, yet similar patterns of (/sup 3/H)thymidine uptake were observed in the mitogenic assays of both cellular systems. The data indicate that no correlation exists between the extent of aldehyde formation and the degree of oxidative mitogenesis. It is thus suggested that relatively few (or maybe only one) membrane-bound aldehyde-containing molecules act in the transmission of the oxidative mitogenic signal.

  20. Reduced Brain Cannabinoid Receptor Availability in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Cortes-Briones, Jose; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Thurnauer, Halle; Planeta, Beata; Skosnik, Patrick; Gao, Hong; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Pittman, Brian; Surti, Toral; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2016-06-15

    Several lines of evidence suggest the presence of abnormalities in the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in schizophrenia (SCZ). However, there are limited in vivo measures of the eCB system in SCZ. Twenty five male SCZ subjects (SCZs) (18 antipsychotic treated and 7 antipsychotic free) were compared with 18 age-matched male healthy control subjects (HCs). Subjects underwent one positron emission tomography scan each with the cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1R) selective radiotracer [(11)C]OMAR on the high resolution research tomography scanner. Regional volume of distribution (VT) values were determined using kinetic modeling of positron emission tomography data as a measure of CB1R availability. Group differences in mean composite [(11)C]OMAR VT values were compared between SCZs and HCs. Exploratory comparisons of CB1R availability within 15 brain regions were also conducted. All analyses were covaried for age and body mass index. SCZs showed significantly (p = .02) lower composite [(11)C]OMAR VT relative to HCs (~12% difference, effect size d = .73). [(11)C]OMAR VT was significantly (all ps antipsychotic treated SZCs > antipsychotic free SZCs. Furthermore, composite [(11)C]OMAR VT was greater in HCs than SCZ smokers (n = 11) and SCZ nonsmokers (n = 14). CB1R availability is lower in male SCZ subjects compared with HCs. Furthermore, antipsychotics and tobacco use may increase CB1R availability in this population. The findings of the study provide further evidence supporting the hypothesis that alterations in the eCB system might contribute to the pathophysiology of SCZ. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in the SHR brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1986-11-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate brain angiotensin II is associated with the elevation of blood pressure seen in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). These include an increased pressor response to intracerebroventricularly administered angiotensin II and a reduction of blood pressure in response to centrally administered angiotensin II receptor antagonists. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography, we have detected greater angiotensin II receptor binding in a number of discrete brain nuclei of the 6-week-old SHR when compared to age-matched Wistar-Kyoto controls. Tissue sections from various brain regions were labeled with (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II according to a previously described method. Autoradiograms were generated by apposing the labeled tissue sections to LKB Ultrofilm along with brain paste standards which contained known amounts of (/sup 125/I). Quantitation of the binding, utilizing computer-assisted microdensitometry, indicated greater (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding in several brain areas implicated in cardiovascular control including the subfornical organ, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, locus coeruleus, supraoptic nucleus and the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis. Scatchard analysis of the binding in the nucleus of the solitary tract indicated an increased receptor number (Bmax) was responsible for the change while binding in two forebrain structures, the subfornical organ and supraoptic nucleus, showed alterations in receptor number and affinity (Kd). Several other brain regions, unrelated to cardiovascular control, exhibited no change in (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding.

  2. Furosemide interactions with brain GABAA receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Korpi, Esa R; Lüddens, Hartmut

    1997-01-01

    The loop diuretic furosemide is known to antagonize the function of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. The purpose of the present study was to examine the direct interaction of furosemide with the GABAA receptors by autoradiography and ligand binding studies with native rat and human receptors and with recombinant receptors composed of rat subunits.Autoradiography with [35S]-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]-TBPS) as a ligand indicated that furosemide (0.1–1 mM) reversed the 5...

  3. Sugars, Sweet Taste Receptors, and Brain Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allen A.; Owyang, Chung

    2017-01-01

    Sweet taste receptors are composed of a heterodimer of taste 1 receptor member 2 (T1R2) and taste 1 receptor member 3 (T1R3). Accumulating evidence shows that sweet taste receptors are ubiquitous throughout the body, including in the gastrointestinal tract as well as the hypothalamus. These sweet taste receptors are heavily involved in nutrient sensing, monitoring changes in energy stores, and triggering metabolic and behavioral responses to maintain energy balance. Not surprisingly, these pathways are heavily regulated by external and internal factors. Dysfunction in one or more of these pathways may be important in the pathogenesis of common diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:28672790

  4. Brain nuclear receptors and body weight regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural pathways, especially those in the hypothalamus, integrate multiple nutritional, hormonal, and neural signals, resulting in the coordinated control of body weight balance and glucose homeostasis. Nuclear receptors (NRs) sense changing levels of nutrients and hormones, and therefore play essent...

  5. Mapping the calcitonin receptor in human brain stem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, Rebekah L; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Waldvogel, Henry J

    2016-01-01

    understanding of these hormone systems by mapping CTR expression in the human brain stem, specifically the medulla oblongata. Widespread CTR-like immunoreactivity was observed throughout the medulla. Dense CTR staining was noted in several discrete nuclei, including the nucleus of the solitary tract...... receptors (AMY) are a heterodimer formed by the coexpression of CTR with receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). CTR with RAMP1 responds potently to both amylin and CGRP. The brain stem is a major site of action for circulating amylin and is a rich site of CGRP binding. This study aimed to enhance our...

  6. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Brain Delivery of Therapeutic Biologics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqing Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed.

  7. Anti-opioid receptor antibody recognition of a binding site on brain and leukocyte opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, D J; DeCosta, B R; Kim, C H; Jacobson, A E; Bost, K L; Rice, K C; Blalock, J E

    1990-05-01

    Opioid receptors reportedly exist on neuronal tissue of central and peripheral origin as well as on cells of the immune system. Previously, an opioid receptor has been purified from the neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cell line, NG108-15 cells. In an effort to compare these results with opioid receptors isolated from primary neuronal tissue, we employed a methodology based on the molecular recognition theory to develop a monoclonal antibody which was used to isolate and biochemically characterize murine brain opioid receptors. We herein report the purification of an opioid receptor from mouse brain with a molecular weight of 65,000 daltons (range was 62-70 kD under reducing conditions) using a monoclonal antibody to an (the) opioid receptor. In situ labeling experiments with the delta-class selective opioid receptor affinity ligand, cis-(+)-3-methylfentanylisothiocyanate (SUPERFIT) of brain membrane confirmed these observations. Moreover, SUPERFIT, when coupled to the binding site, could block the recognition of the receptor by the monoclonal antibody. However, the selective, mu-class opioid receptor affinity reagent, 2-(p-ethoxybenzyl)-1-N,N-diethylaminoethyl-5-isothiocyanatobenz imidazole was ineffective at masking the binding site from recognition by the monoclonal antibody. Likewise, opioid-like receptors were purified from murine leukocytes which migrated at a molecular weight of 58,000 daltons under nonreducing conditions and 70,000 daltons under reducing conditions. In addition, immunoaffinity-purified receptor is shown to specifically bind the delta-class-selective opioid ligand, cis-(+)-3-methylfentanylisothiocyanate as well as the endogenous opioid peptides, beta-endorphin and [Met]-enkephalin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  9. The vasopressin receptor of the blood-brain barrier in the rat hippocampus is linked to calcium signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, J.; Jensen, Claus V.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, vasopressin receptor, VI subtype, blood-brain barrier, cerebral endothelium, hippocampus, Fura-2......Neuropathology, vasopressin receptor, VI subtype, blood-brain barrier, cerebral endothelium, hippocampus, Fura-2...

  10. Solubilization and purification of melatonin receptors from lizard brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkees, S.A.; Conron, R.W. Jr.; Reppert, S.M. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Melatonin receptors in lizard brain were identified and characterized using {sup 125}I-labeled melatonin (({sup 125}I)MEL) after solubilization with the detergent digitonin. Saturation studies of solubilized material revealed a high affinity binding site, with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of 181 +/- 45 pM. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs, but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of solubilized material with the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog, guanosine 5'-(3-O-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gamma-S), significantly reduced receptor affinity. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized melatonin receptors revealed a high affinity, large (Mr 400,000) peak of specific binding. Pretreatment with GTP-gamma-S before solubilization resulted in elution of a lower affinity, smaller (Mr 150,000) peak of specific binding. To purify solubilized receptors, a novel affinity chromatography resin was developed by coupling 6-hydroxymelatonin with Epoxy-activated Sepharose 6B. Using this resin, melatonin receptors were purified approximately 10,000-fold. Purified material retained the pharmacologic specificity of melatonin receptors. These results show that melatonin receptors that bind ligand after detergent treatment can be solubilized and substantially purified by affinity chromatography.

  11. Delta opioid receptors in brain function and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu Sin Chung, Paul; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2013-10-01

    Evidence that the delta opioid receptor (DOR) is an attractive target for the treatment of brain disorders has strengthened in recent years. This receptor is broadly expressed in the brain, binds endogenous opioid peptides, and shows as functional profile highly distinct from those of mu and kappa opioid receptors. Our knowledge of DOR function has enormously progressed from in vivo studies using pharmacological tools and genetic approaches. The important role of this receptor in reducing chronic pain has been extensively overviewed; therefore this review focuses on facets of delta receptor activity relevant to psychiatric and other neurological disorders. Beneficial effects of DOR agonists are now well established in the context of emotional responses and mood disorders. DOR activation also regulates drug reward, inhibitory controls and learning processes, but whether delta compounds may represent useful drugs in the treatment of drug abuse remains open. Epileptogenic and locomotor-stimulating effects of delta agonists appear drug-dependent, and the possibility of biased agonism at DOR for these effects is worthwhile further investigations to increase benefit/risk ratio of delta therapies. Neuroprotective effects of DOR activity represent a forthcoming research area. Future developments in DOR research will benefit from in-depth investigations of DOR function at cellular and circuit levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Urinary and brain beta-carboline-3-carboxylates as potent inhibitors of brain benzodiazepine receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Braestrup, C; Nielsen, M; Olsen, C E

    1980-01-01

    Benzodiazepines probably exert their anxiolytic, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant effects by interacting with brain-specific high-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. In searching for possible endogenous ligands for these receptors we have purified a compound 10(7)-fold from human urine by extractions, treatment with hot ethanol, and column chromatography. The compound was identified as beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (IIc) by mass spectrometry, NMR spectrometry, and synthesis; IIc was...

  13. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  14. Modulating antibody affinity towards the transferrin receptor to increase brain uptake of anti-transferrin receptor antibody targeted gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Bak, Martin; Melander, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    . The transferrin receptor is exclusively expressed on capillaries of the brain, which makes it an interesting target for transport of drugs towards the brain. However, the current evidence on the receptor movement in brain capillaries does not suggest transcytosis, and delivering medicines or nanoparticles using......Drug delivery to the brain is hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that under physiological conditions precludes entrance of most substances contained in the systemic circulation. Thus, this barrier must be overcome to deliver medicines into the brain parenchyma...

  15. Oxytocin and Estrogen Receptor β in the Brain: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a neuropeptide synthesized primarily by neurons of the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus. These neurons have axons that project into the posterior pituitary and release oxytocin into the bloodstream to promote labor and lactation; however, oxytocin neurons also project to other brain areas where it plays a role in numerous brain functions. Oxytocin binds to the widely expressed oxytocin receptor, and, in doing so, it regulates homeostatic processes, social recognition and fear conditioning. In addition to these functions, oxytocin decreases neuroendocrine stress signaling and anxiety-related and depression-like behaviors. Steroid hormones differentially modulate stress responses and alter oxytocin receptor expression. In particular, estrogen receptor β activation has been found to both reduce anxiety-related behaviors and increase oxytocin peptide transcription, suggesting a role for oxytocin in this estrogen receptor β mediated anxiolytic effect. Further research is needed to identify modulators of oxytocin signaling and the pathways utilized and to elucidate molecular mechanisms controlling oxytocin expression to allow better therapeutic manipulations of this system in patient populations.

  16. Characterization of angiogenin receptors on bovine brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoux, M; Dehouck, M P; Fruchart, J C; Spik, G; Montreuil, J; Cecchelli, R

    1991-04-30

    The mitogenic effect of bovine milk angiogenin was studied on bovine brain capillary and aortic endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. The proliferation of only bovine brain capillary endothelial cells was detected at concentrations ranging from 10 to 1,000 ng/ml, with a maximum effect at 100 ng/ml. This mitogenic activity may be correlated with a specific binding of angiogenin which was demonstrated only to bovine brain capillary endothelial cells. [125I]-labeled angiogenin binding was time and concentration dependent and saturable. Scatchard analyses of binding data showed evidence of a single class of binding sites with an apparent dissociation constant of 5.10(-10)M. The molecular mass of the angiogenin receptor (49 kDa) was determined by ligand blotting.

  17. Abnormalities of Dopamine D Receptor Signaling in the Diseased Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Aleph Prieto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine D 3 receptors (D 3 R modulate neuronal activity in several brain regions including cortex, striatum, cerebellum, and hippocampus. A growing body of evidence suggests that aberrant D 3 R signaling contributes to multiple brain diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, schizophrenia, and addiction. In line with these findings, D 3 R has emerged as a potential target in the treatment of neurological disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying neuronal D 3 R signaling are poorly understood, either in healthy or diseased brain. Here, I review the molecular mechanisms involved in D 3 R signaling via monomeric D 3 R and heteromeric receptor complexes (e.g., D 3 R-D 1 R, D 3 R-D 2 R, D 3 R-A 2a R, and D 3 R-D 3 nf. I focus on D 3 R signaling pathways that, according to recent reports, contribute to pathological brain states. In particular, I describe evidence on both quantitative (e.g., increased number or affinity and qualitative (e.g., switched signaling changes in D 3 R that has been associated with brain dysfunction. I conclude with a description of basic mechanisms that modulate D 3 R signaling such as desensitization, as disruption of these mechanisms may underlie pathological changes in D 3 R signaling. Because several lines of evidence support the idea that imbalances in D 3 R signaling alter neural function, a better understanding of downstream D 3 R pathways is likely to reveal novel therapeutic strategies toward dopamine-related brain disorders.

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of the human brain beta-adrenergic receptor. Evolutionary relationship to rodent and avian beta-receptors and porcine muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, F Z; Lentes, K U; Gocayne, J; Fitzgerald, M; Robinson, D; Kerlavage, A R; Fraser, C M; Venter, J C

    1987-01-26

    Two cDNA clones, lambda-CLFV-108 and lambda-CLFV-119, encoding for the beta-adrenergic receptor, have been isolated from a human brain stem cDNA library. One human genomic clone, LCV-517 (20 kb), was characterized by restriction mapping and partial sequencing. The human brain beta-receptor consists of 413 amino acids with a calculated Mr of 46480. The gene contains three potential glucocorticoid receptor-binding sites. The beta-receptor expressed in human brain was homology with rodent (88%) and avian (52%) beta-receptors and with porcine muscarinic cholinergic receptors (31%), supporting our proposal [(1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 272 276] that adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are structurally related. This represents the first cloning of a neurotransmitter receptor gene from human brain.

  19. Decreased Brain Neurokinin-1 Receptor Availability in Chronic Tennis Elbow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clas Linnman

    Full Text Available Substance P is released in painful and inflammatory conditions, affecting both peripheral processes and the central nervous system neurokinin 1 (NK1 receptor. There is a paucity of data on human brain alterations in NK1 expression, how this system may be affected by treatment, and interactions between central and peripheral tissue alterations. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis were selected out of a larger (n = 120 randomized controlled trial evaluating graded exercise as a treatment for chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis. These ten subjects were examined by positron emission tomography (PET with the NK1-specific radioligand 11C-GR205171 before, and eight patients were followed up after treatment with graded exercise. Brain binding in the ten patients before treatment, reflecting NK1-receptor availability (NK1-RA, was compared to that of 18 healthy subjects and, longitudinally, to the eight of the original ten patients that agreed to a second PET examination after treatment. Before treatment, patients had significantly lower NK1-RA in the insula, vmPFC, postcentral gyrus, anterior cingulate, caudate, putamen, amygdala and the midbrain but not the thalamus and cerebellum, with the largest difference in the insula contralateral to the injured elbow. No significant correlations between brain NK1-RA and pain, functional severity, or peripheral NK1-RA in the affected limb were observed. In the eight patients examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in everyone, but there were no significant changes in NK1-RA. These findings indicate a role for the substance P (SP / NK1 receptor system in musculoskeletal pain and tissue healing. As neither clinical parameters nor successful treatment response was reflected in brain NK1-RA after treatment, this may reflect the diverse function of the SP/NK1 system in CNS and peripheral tissue, or a change too small or slow to capture over the three-month treatment.

  20. Modulation of glutamate transport and receptor binding by glutamate receptor antagonists in EAE rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Sulkowski

    Full Text Available The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS is currently unknown. However, one potential mechanism involved in the disease may be excitotoxicity. The elevation of glutamate in cerebrospinal fluid, as well as changes in the expression of glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs and excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs, have been observed in the brains of MS patients and animals subjected to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, which is the predominant animal model used to investigate the pathophysiology of MS. In the present paper, the effects of glutamatergic receptor antagonists, including amantadine, memantine, LY 367583, and MPEP, on glutamate transport, the expression of mRNA of glutamate transporters (EAATs, the kinetic parameters of ligand binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors, and the morphology of nerve endings in EAE rat brains were investigated. The extracellular level of glutamate in the brain is primarily regulated by astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1 and glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST. Excess glutamate is taken up from the synaptic space and metabolized by astrocytes. Thus, the extracellular level of glutamate decreases, which protects neurons from excitotoxicity. Our investigations showed changes in the expression of EAAT mRNA, glutamate transport (uptake and release by synaptosomal and glial plasmalemmal vesicle fractions, and ligand binding to NMDA receptors; these effects were partially reversed after the treatment of EAE rats with the NMDA antagonists amantadine and memantine. The antagonists of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs, including LY 367385 and MPEP, did not exert any effect on the examined parameters. These results suggest that disturbances in these mechanisms may play a role in the processes associated with glutamate excitotoxicity and the progressive brain damage in EAE.

  1. 30 YEARS OF THE MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR: The brain mineralocorticoid receptor: a saga in three episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joëls, Marian; de Kloet, E Ronald

    2017-07-01

    In 1968, Bruce McEwen discovered that 3H-corticosterone administered to adrenalectomised rats is retained in neurons of hippocampus rather than those of hypothalamus. This discovery signalled the expansion of endocrinology into the science of higher brain regions. With this in mind, our contribution highlights the saga of the brain mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in three episodes. First, the precloning era dominated by the conundrum of two types of corticosterone-binding receptors in the brain, which led to the identification of the high-affinity corticosterone receptor as the 'promiscuous' MR cloned in 1987 by Jeff Arriza and Ron Evans in addition to the classical glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Then, the post-cloning period aimed to disentangle the function of the brain MR from that of the closely related GR on different levels of biological complexity. Finally, the synthesis section that highlights the two faces of brain MR: Salt and Stress. 'Salt' refers to the regulation of salt appetite, and reciprocal arousal, motivation and reward, by a network of aldosterone-selective MR-expressing neurons projecting from nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and circumventricular organs. 'Stress' is about the limbic-forebrain nuclear and membrane MRs, which act as a switch in the selection of the best response to cope with a stressor. For this purpose, activation of the limbic MR promotes selective attention, memory retrieval and the appraisal process, while driving emotional expressions of fear and aggression. Subsequently, rising glucocorticoid concentrations activate GRs in limbic-forebrain circuitry underlying executive functions and memory storage, which contribute in balance with MR-mediated actions to homeostasis, excitability and behavioural adaptation. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. Protective Angiotensin Type 2 Receptors in the Brain and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, Annette D; Steckelings, Ulrike M; Sumners, Colin

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this review is to assess the evidence that activation of angiotensin type 2 receptors (AT2R) in the brain can lower blood pressure and possibly constitute an endogenous anti-hypertensive mechanism. Recent studies that detail the location of AT2R in the brain, particularly within or near cardiovascular control centers, mesh well with findings from pharmacological and gene transfer studies which demonstrate that activation of central AT2R can influence cardiovascular regulation. Collectively, these studies indicate that selective activation of brain AT2R causes moderate decreases in blood pressure in normal animals and more profound anti-hypertensive effects, along with restoration of baroreflex function, in rodent models of neurogenic hypertension. These findings have opened the door to studies that can (i) assess the role of specific AT2R neuron populations in depressing blood pressure, (ii) determine the relevance of such mechanisms, and (iii) investigate interactions between AT2R and depressor angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas mechanisms in the brain.

  3. Sex, the brain and hypertension: brain oestrogen receptors and high blood pressure risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major contributor to worldwide morbidity and mortality rates related to cardiovascular disease. There are important sex differences in the onset and rate of hypertension in humans. Compared with age-matched men, premenopausal women are less likely to develop hypertension. However, after age 60, the incidence of hypertension increases in women and even surpasses that seen in older men. It is thought that changes in levels of circulating ovarian hormones as women age may be involved in the increase in hypertension in older women. One of the key mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension in both men and women is an increase in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Brain regions important for the regulation of SNA, such as the subfornical organ, the paraventricular nucleus and the rostral ventral lateral medulla, also express specific subtypes of oestrogen receptors. Each of these brain regions has also been implicated in mechanisms underlying risk factors for hypertension such as obesity, stress and inflammation. The present review brings together evidence that links actions of oestrogen at these receptors to modulate some of the common brain mechanisms involved in the ability of hypertensive risk factors to increase SNA and blood pressure. Understanding the mechanisms by which oestrogen acts at key sites in the brain for the regulation of SNA is important for the development of novel, sex-specific therapies for treating hypertension. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  4. Distribution of CGRP and CGRP receptor components in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor, consisting of receptor activity-modifying protein 1 and calcitonin receptor-like receptor, are of considerable interest because of the role they play in migraine and recently developed migraine therapies. Methods To better understand th...... a possible role in migraine. However, currently, the presence of calcitonin gene-related peptide and the nature of its receptors throughout the brain is an enigma yet to be solved....

  5. In vivo PET imaging of brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottlaender, M.; Valette, H.; Saba, W.; Schollhorn-Peyronneau, M.A.; Dolle, F.; Syrota, A. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system where they modulate a number of CNS functions including neurotransmitter release, cognitive function, anxiety, analgesia and control of cerebral blood flow. In the brain, a major subtype is composed of the {alpha}4{beta}2 subunit combination. Density of this subtype has been shown to be decreased in patients with neuro-degenerative disease such as Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease (AD and PD), and mutated receptors has been described in some familial epilepsy. Thus, in vivo mapping of the nicotinic nAChRs by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are of great interest to monitor the evolution of these pathologies and changes in the neuronal biochemistry induced by therapeutic agents. Recently, a new compound, 3-[2(S)-2-azetidinyl-methoxy]pyridine (A-85380) has been synthesised and labelled with fluorine-18, [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 (Dolle et al., 1999). The [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 has been shown to bind with high affinity t o nAChRs in vitro (Saba et al., 2004), and its toxicity was low and compatible with it s use at tracer dose in human PET studies (Valette, 2002). PET studies in baboons showed that, after in vivo administration of [ {sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 at a tracer dose, the distribution of the radioactivity in the brain reflect the distribution of the < 4R2 nAChRs. Competition and pre-blocking studies, using nicotinic agonists, confirm that the radiotracer binds specifically to the heteromeric nAChRs in the brain (Valette et al., 1999). The in vivo, characteristics of the [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-8538 0 combined with its low toxicity make possible the imaging of the nicotinic receptor s in human by PET (Bottlaender 2003). Studies were performed in healthy non-smoker volunteers to evaluate the brain kinetics of [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 and to assess the quantification of its nAChRs binding in the human brain with PET (Gallezot et a., 2005). The [{sup 18}F

  6. GABA[subscript A] Receptor Downregulation in Brains of Subjects with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the…

  7. Subunit Composition of Neurotransmitter Receptors in the Immature and in the Epileptic Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Sánchez Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity is critical for synaptogenesis and the development of neuronal networks. In the immature brain excitation predominates over inhibition facilitating the development of normal brain circuits, but also rendering it more susceptible to seizures. In this paper, we review the evolution of the subunit composition of neurotransmitter receptors during development, how it promotes excitation in the immature brain, and how this subunit composition of neurotransmission receptors may be also present in the epileptic brain. During normal brain development, excitatory glutamate receptors peak in function and gamma-aminobutiric acid (GABA receptors are mainly excitatory rather than inhibitory. A growing body of evidence from animal models of epilepsy and status epilepticus has demonstrated that the brain exposed to repeated seizures presents a subunit composition of neurotransmitter receptors that mirrors that of the immature brain and promotes further seizures and epileptogenesis. Studies performed in samples from the epileptic human brain have also found a subunit composition pattern of neurotransmitter receptors similar to the one found in the immature brain. These findings provide a solid rationale for tailoring antiepileptic treatments to the specific subunit composition of neurotransmitter receptors and they provide potential targets for the development of antiepileptogenic treatments.

  8. Serotonin and brain function: a tale of two receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, RL; Nutt, DJ

    2017-01-01

    Previous attempts to identify a unified theory of brain serotonin function have largely failed to achieve consensus. In this present synthesis, we integrate previous perspectives with new and older data to create a novel bipartite model centred on the view that serotonin neurotransmission enhances two distinct adaptive responses to adversity, mediated in large part by its two most prevalent and researched brain receptors: the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors. We propose that passive coping (i.e. tolerating a source of stress) is mediated by postsynaptic 5-HT1AR signalling and characterised by stress moderation. Conversely, we argue that active coping (i.e. actively addressing a source of stress) is mediated by 5-HT2AR signalling and characterised by enhanced plasticity (defined as capacity for change). We propose that 5-HT1AR-mediated stress moderation may be the brain’s default response to adversity but that an improved ability to change one’s situation and/or relationship to it via 5-HT2AR-mediated plasticity may also be important – and increasingly so as the level of adversity reaches a critical point. We propose that the 5-HT1AR pathway is enhanced by conventional 5-HT reuptake blocking antidepressants such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), whereas the 5-HT2AR pathway is enhanced by 5-HT2AR-agonist psychedelics. This bipartite model purports to explain how different drugs (SSRIs and psychedelics) that modulate the serotonergic system in different ways, can achieve complementary adaptive and potentially therapeutic outcomes. PMID:28858536

  9. Adipocyte glucocorticoid receptors mediate fat-to-brain signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, Annette D; Krause, Eric G; Solomon, Matia B; Flak, Jonathan N; Scott, Karen A; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Myers, Brent; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J; Herman, James P

    2015-06-01

    Stress-related (e.g., depression) and metabolic pathologies (e.g., obesity) are important and often co-morbid public health concerns. Here we identify a connection between peripheral glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling originating in fat with the brain control of both stress and metabolism. Mice with reduced adipocyte GR hypersecrete glucocorticoids following acute psychogenic stress and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. This hypersecretion gives rise to deficits in responsiveness to exogenous glucocorticoids, consistent with reduced negative feedback via adipocytes. Increased stress reactivity occurs in the context of elevated hypothalamic expression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-excitatory neuropeptides and in the absence of altered adrenal sensitivity, consistent with a central cite of action. Our results identify a novel mechanism whereby activation of the adipocyte GR promotes peripheral energy storage while inhibiting the HPA axis, and provide functional evidence for a fat-to-brain regulatory feedback network that serves to regulate not just homeostatic energy balance but also responses to psychogenic stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Form Functional Heteromers in Brain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callén, Lucía; Moreno, Estefanía; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Moreno-Delgado, David; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lanciego, José Luis; Franco, Rafael; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I.; McCormick, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Exploring the role of cannabinoid CB2 receptors in the brain, we present evidence of CB2 receptor molecular and functional interaction with cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we discovered that CB2 receptors can form heteromers with CB1 receptors in transfected neuronal cells and in rat brain pineal gland, nucleus accumbens, and globus pallidus. Within CB1-CB2 receptor heteromers expressed in a neuronal cell model, agonist co-activation of CB1 and CB2 receptors resulted in a negative cross-talk in Akt phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth. Moreover, one specific characteristic of CB1-CB2 receptor heteromers consists of both the ability of CB1 receptor antagonists to block the effect of CB2 receptor agonists and, conversely, the ability of CB2 receptor antagonists to block the effect of CB1 receptor agonists, showing a bidirectional cross-antagonism phenomenon. Taken together, these data illuminate the mechanism by which CB2 receptors can negatively modulate CB1 receptor function. PMID:22532560

  11. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1990-11-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography.

  12. Brain-Targeted (Pro)Renin Receptor Knockdown attenuates Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wencheng; Peng, Hua; Cao, Theresa; Sato, Ryosuke; McDaniels, Sarah. J.; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L. Gabriel; Feng, Yumei

    2012-01-01

    The (pro)renin receptor is a newly discovered member of the brain renin-angiotensin system. To investigate the role of brain (pro)renin receptor in hypertension, adeno-associated virus-mediated (pro)renin receptor shRNA was used to knockdown (pro)renin receptor expression in the brain of non-transgenic normotensive and human renin-angiotensinogen double transgenic hypertensive mice. Blood pressure was monitored using implanted telemetric probes in conscious animals. Real-time PCR and immunostaining were performed to determine (pro)renin receptor, angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin mRNA levels. Plasma vasopressin levels were determined by Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay. Double transgenic mice exhibited higher blood pressure, elevated cardiac and vascular sympathetic tone, and impaired spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. Intracerebroventricular delivery of (pro)renin receptor shRNA significantly reduced blood pressure, cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic tone, and improved baroreflex sensitivity compared to the control virus treatment in double transgenic mice. (Pro)renin receptor knockdown significantly reduced angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin levels in double transgenic mice. These data indicate that (pro)renin receptor knockdown in the brain attenuates angiotensin II-dependent hypertension and is associated with a decrease insympathetic tone and an improvement of the baroreflex sensitivity. In addition, brain-targeted (pro)renin receptor knockdown is associated with down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin levels. We conclude that central (pro)renin receptor contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension in human renin-angiotensinogen transgenic mice. PMID:22526255

  13. Heteromeric α7β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Qiang; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) is highly expressed in the brain, where it maintains various neuronal functions including (but not limited to) learning and memory. In addition, the protein expression levels of α7 nAChRs are altered in various brain disorders. The classic rule...... governing α7 nAChR assembly in the mammalian brain was that it was assembled from five α7 subunits to form a homomeric receptor pentamer. However, emerging evidence demonstrates the presence of heteromeric α7 nAChRs in heterologously expressed systems and naturally in brain neurons, where α7 subunits are co...

  14. Porcine brain natriuretic peptide receptor in bovine adrenal cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, K.; Hashiguchi, T.; Ohashi, M.; Takayanagi, R.; Haji, M.; Matsuo, H.; Nawata, H.

    1989-01-01

    The action of porcine brain natriuretic peptide (pBNP) on the steroidogenesis was investigated in cultured bovine adrenocortical cells. Porcine BNP induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of both ACTH- and A II-stimulated aldosterone secretion. 10/sup /minus/8/M and 10/sup /minus/7/M pBNP also significantly inhibited ACTH-stimulated cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretions. Binding studies of (/sup 125/I)-pBNP to bovine adrenocortical membrane fractions showed that adrenal cortex had high-affinity and low-capacity pBNP binding sites, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.70 x 10/sup /minus/10/M and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 19.9 fmol/mg protein. Finally, the 135 Kd radioactive band was specially visualized in the affinity labeling of bovine adrenal cortex with disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS). These results suggest that pBNP may have receptor-mediated suppressive actions on bovine adrenal steroidogenesis, similar to that in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP).

  15. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Endothelin receptors as novel targets in tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagnato Anna

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The endotelin (ET axis, that includes ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, and the ET receptors, ETA and ETB, plays an important physiological role, as modulator of vasomotor tone, tissue differentiation and development, cell proliferation, and hormone production. Recently, investigations into the role of the ET axis in mitogenesis, apoptosis inhibition, invasiveness, angiogenesis and bone remodeling have provided evidence of the importance of the ET-1 axis in cancer. Data suggest that ET-1 participates in the growth and progression of a variety of tumors such as prostatic, ovarian, renal, pulmonary, colorectal, cervical, breast carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, brain tumors, melanoma, and bone metastases. ET-1 receptor antagonists beside providing ideal tools for dissecting the ET axis at molecular level have demonstrated their potential in developing novel therapeutic opportunity. The major relevance of ETA receptor in tumor development has led to an extensive search of highly selective antagonists. Atrasentan, one of such antagonists, is orally bioavailable, has suitable pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles for clinical use. Preliminary data from clinical trials investigating atrasentan in patients with prostate cancer are encouraging. This large body of evidence demonstrates the antitumor activity of endothelin receptor antagonists and provides a rationale for the clinical evaluation of these molecules alone and in combination with cytotoxic drugs or molecular inhibitors leading to a new generation of anticancer therapies targeting endothelin receptors.

  17. Positron Emission Tomography (PET Quantification of GABAA Receptors in the Brain of Fragile X Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte D'Hulst

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, evidence has accumulated that the GABAA receptor is compromised in animal models for fragile X syndrome (FXS, a common hereditary form of intellectual disability. In mouse and fly models, agonists of the GABAA receptor were able to rescue specific consequences of the fragile X mutation. Here, we imaged and quantified GABAA receptors in vivo in brain of fragile X patients using Positron Emission Topography (PET and [11C]flumazenil, a known high-affinity and specific ligand for the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors. We measured regional GABAA receptor availability in 10 fragile X patients and 10 control subjects. We found a significant reduction of on average 10% in GABAA receptor binding potential throughout the brain in fragile X patients. In the thalamus, the brain region showing the largest difference, the GABAA receptor availability was even reduced with 17%. This is one of the first reports of a PET study of human fragile X brain and directly demonstrates that the GABAA receptor availability is reduced in fragile X patients. The study reinforces previous hypotheses that the GABAA receptor is a potential target for rational pharmacological treatment of fragile X syndrome.

  18. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Quantification of GABAA Receptors in the Brain of Fragile X Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Aa, Nathalie; Goffin, Karolien; Koole, Michel; Porke, Kathleen; Van De Velde, Marc; Rooms, Liesbeth; Van Paesschen, Wim; Van Esch, Hilde; Van Laere, Koen; Kooy, R. Frank

    2015-01-01

    Over the last several years, evidence has accumulated that the GABAA receptor is compromised in animal models for fragile X syndrome (FXS), a common hereditary form of intellectual disability. In mouse and fly models, agonists of the GABAA receptor were able to rescue specific consequences of the fragile X mutation. Here, we imaged and quantified GABAA receptors in vivo in brain of fragile X patients using Positron Emission Topography (PET) and [11C]flumazenil, a known high-affinity and specific ligand for the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors. We measured regional GABAA receptor availability in 10 fragile X patients and 10 control subjects. We found a significant reduction of on average 10% in GABAA receptor binding potential throughout the brain in fragile X patients. In the thalamus, the brain region showing the largest difference, the GABAA receptor availability was even reduced with 17%. This is one of the first reports of a PET study of human fragile X brain and directly demonstrates that the GABAA receptor availability is reduced in fragile X patients. The study reinforces previous hypotheses that the GABAA receptor is a potential target for rational pharmacological treatment of fragile X syndrome. PMID:26222316

  19. Rising stars: modulation of brain functions by astroglial type-1 cannabinoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The type-1-cannabinoid (CB1 ) receptor is amongst the most widely expressed G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. In few decades, CB1 receptors have been shown to regulate a large array of functions from brain cell development and survival to complex cognitive processes. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions of CB1 is complex due to the heterogeneity of the brain cell types on which the receptor is expressed. Although the large majority of CB1 receptors act on neurons, early studies pointed to a direct control of CB1 receptors over astroglial functions including brain energy supply and neuroprotection. In line with the growing concept of the tripartite synapse highlighting astrocytes as direct players in synaptic plasticity, astroglial CB1 receptor signaling recently emerged as the mediator of several forms of synaptic plasticity associated to important cognitive functions. Here, we shortly review the current knowledge on CB1 receptor-mediated astroglial functions. This functional spectrum is large and most of the mechanisms by which CB1 receptors control astrocytes, as well as their consequences in vivo, are still unknown, requiring innovative approaches to improve this new cannabinoid research field. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Brain mineralocorticoid receptor function in control of salt balance and stress-adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kloet, Edo Ronald; Joels, Marian

    2017-01-01

    We will highlight in honor of Randall Sakai the peculiar characteristics of the brain mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in its response pattern to the classical mineralocorticoid aldosterone and the naturally occurring glucocorticoids corticosterone and cortisol. Neurons in the nucleus tractus

  1. Targeting c-Met receptor overcomes TRAIL-resistance in brain tumors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Du, Wanlu; Uslar, Liubov; Sevala, Sindhura; Shah, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    .... We show that the knock down c-Met protein, but not inhibition, sensitized brain tumor cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by interrupting the interaction between c-Met and TRAIL cognate death receptor (DR) 5...

  2. Targeting c-Met Receptor Overcomes TRAIL-Resistance in Brain Tumors: e95490

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wanlu Du; Liubov Uslar; Sindhura Sevala; Khalid Shah

    2014-01-01

    .... We show that the knock down c-Met protein, but not inhibition, sensitized brain tumor cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by interrupting the interaction between c-Met and TRAIL cognate death receptor (DR) 5...

  3. The 5-HT2A receptor binding pattern in the human brain is strongly genetically determined

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Arfan, Haroon; Haugbol, Steven

    2007-01-01

    With the appropriate radiolabeled tracers, positron emission tomography (PET) enables in vivo human brain imaging of markers for neurotransmission, including neurotransmitter synthesis, receptors, and transporters. Whereas structural imaging studies have provided compelling evidence that the human...... brain anatomy is largely genetically determined, it is currently unknown to what degree neuromodulatory markers are subjected to genetic and environmental influence. Changes in serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors have been reported to occur in various neuropsychiatric disorders and an association between...

  4. Bivalent Brain Shuttle Increases Antibody Uptake by Monovalent Binding to the Transferrin Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultqvist, Greta; Syvänen, Stina; Fang, Xiaotian T; Lannfelt, Lars; Sehlin, Dag

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an obstacle for antibody passage into the brain, impeding the development of immunotherapy and antibody-based diagnostics for brain disorders. In the present study, we have developed a brain shuttle for active transport of antibodies across the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis. We have thus recombinantly fused two single-chain variable fragments (scFv) of the transferrin receptor (TfR) antibody 8D3 to the light chains of mAb158, an antibody selectively binding to Aβ protofibrils, which are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite the two TfR binders, a monovalent interaction with TfR was achieved due to the short linkers that sterically hinder bivalent binding to the TfR dimer. The design enabled efficient receptor-mediated brain uptake of the fusion protein. Two hours after administration, brain concentrations were 2-3% of the injected dose per gram brain, comparable to small molecular drugs and 80-fold higher than unmodified mAb158. After three days, fusion protein concentrations in AD transgenic mouse brains were 9-fold higher than in wild type mice, demonstrating high in vivo specificity. Thus, our innovative recombinant design markedly increases mAb158 brain uptake, which makes it a strong candidate for improved Aβ immunotherapy and as a PET radioligand for early diagnosis and evaluation of treatment effect in AD. Moreover, this approach could be applied to any target within the brain. PMID:28042336

  5. [H-3]dihydroalprenolol binding to beta adrenergic receptors in multiple sclerosis brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra, E; Wilczak, N; De Keyser, J

    2000-01-01

    By using immunocytochemistry we previously reported the absence of beta(2) adrenergic receptors on astrocytes in multiple sclerosis (MS) white matter. Here, we measured beta(1) and beta(2) adrenergic receptor concentrations in postmortem brain sections of six MS patients and six controls by using

  6. Validation of antibodies for neuroanatomical localization of the P2Y11 receptor in macaque brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreisig, Karin; Degn, Matilda; Sund, Louise

    2016-01-01

    localization of P2Y11 in the brain with particular emphasis on the hypocretin neurons. In this article we used western blot, staining of blood smears, and flow cytometry to select two antibodies for immunohistochemical staining of macaque monkey brain. Staining was seen in neuron-like structures in cortical...... and hypothalamic regions. Rats do not have a gene orthologue to the P2Y11 receptor and therefore rat brain was used as negative control tissue. The chromogenic signal observed in macaque monkey brain in neurons was not considered reliable, because the antibodies stained rat brain in a similar distribution pattern....... Hence, the neuroanatomical localization of the P2Y11 receptor remains undetermined due to the lack of specific P2Y11 antibodies for brain immunohistochemistry....

  7. Small-Animal PET Study of Adenosine A(1) Receptors in Rat Brain : Blocking Receptors and Raising Extracellular Adenosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Soumen; Khanapur, Shivashankar; Rybczynska, Anna A.; Kwizera, Chantal; Sijbesma, Jurgen W. A.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; van Waarde, Aren

    2011-01-01

    Activation of adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)R) in the brain causes sedation, reduces anxiety, inhibits seizures, and promotes neuroprotection. Cerebral A(1)R can be visualized using 8-dicyclopropylmethyl-1-C-11-methyl-3-propyl-xanthine (C-11-MPDX) and PET. This study aims to test whether C-11-MPDX

  8. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [C]Cimbi-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, A.; da Cunha-Bang, S.; McMahon, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    [C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely...... than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT receptors with [C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input...... significantly decreased [C]Cimbi-36 binding in all cortical regions with no effects in cerebellum. These results confirm that [C]Cimbi-36 binding is selective for 5-HT receptors in the cerebral cortex and that cerebellum is an appropriate reference tissue for quantification of 5-HT receptors in the human brain...

  9. Effects of simvastatin and 6-hydroxydopamine on histaminergic H1 receptor binding density in rat brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chang-Hua; Deng, Chao; Mackovski, Nikolce; Long, Ling; Zhu, Cansheng; Yang, Yu; Wang, Yuge; Chen, Jiezhong; Huang, Xu-Feng; Wang, Qing

    2010-12-01

    Statins have been widely used for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions including psychoneurological disorders beyond their original use in lowering cholesterol. Histamine receptors play an important role in the regulation of neural activity, however, it is unknown whether statins act on histamine receptors, particularly for their neural regulatory effects. This study examined the effects of simvastatin and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions on histamine H1 receptors using [(3)H] pyrilamine binding autoradiography. Compared to the saline group, simvastatin (1 mg/kg/day) significantly decreased H1 receptor bindings in the primary motor cortex (M1), ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH), caudate putamen (CPu), accumbens core (AcbC) and prefrontal cortex (PfC) (all p<0.05); however 10 mg/kg/day simvastatin increased H1 receptor density only in the medial amygdaloid nucleus (Mep) (p<0.05), but had no significant effect in other regions examined. The 6-OHDA lesion did not alter H1 receptor binding density in most brain areas, except a trend decrease in the hippocampus (p=0.07) and a trend increase in the cingulate cortex (p=0.06). These results suggested that simvastatin has different effects on the H1 receptors in different rat brain regions depending on the doses. Therefore, simvastatin can modulate histaminergic neurotransmission in the brain, and support the role of H1 receptors in psychoneurological disorders. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeting transferrin receptors at the blood-brain barrier improves the uptake of immunoliposomes and subsequent cargo transport into the brain parenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper B.; Burkhart, Annette; Melander, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Drug delivery to the brain is hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which excludes most molecules from freely diffusing into the brain, and tightly regulates the active transport mechanisms that ensure sufficient delivery of nutrients to the brain parenchyma. Harnessing...... the possibility of delivering neuroactive drugs by way of receptors already present on the brain endothelium has been of interest for many years. The transferrin receptor is of special interest since its expression is limited to the endothelium of the brain as opposed to peripheral endothelium. Here, we...... investigate the possibility of delivering immunoliposomes and their encapsulated cargo to the brain via targeting of the transferrin receptor. We find that transferrin receptor-targeting increases the association between the immunoliposomes and primary endothelial cells in vitro, but that this does...

  11. Regulation of Brain Muscarinic Receptors by Protein Kinase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-21

    229, 1990. 25. Fryer, A.D., E.E. El-Fakahany and D.B. Jacoby: Parainfluenza Virus Type 1 Reduces the Affinity of Agonists for Muscarinic Receptors in...Abdallah, M. Evinger, C. Forray and E.E. El-Fakahany: The Presence of an M4 Subtype Muscarinic Receptor in the Bovine Adrenal Medulla Revealed by mRNA and

  12. Repeated stressful experiences differently affect brain dopamine receptor subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglisi-Allegra, S.; Cabib, S. (Istituto di Psicobiologia e Psicofarmacologia (CNR), Roma (Italy)); Kempf, E.; Schleef, C. (Centre de Neurochimi, Strasbourg (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    The binding of tritiated spiperone (D2 antagonist) and tritiated SCH 23390 (D1 antagonist), in vivo, was investigated in the caudatus putamen (CP) and nucleus accumbens septi (NAS) of mice submitted to ten daily restraint stress sessions. Mice sacrificed 24 hr after the last stressful experience presented a 64% decrease of D2 receptor density (Bmax) but no changes in D1 receptor density in the NAS. In the CP a much smaller (11%) reduction of D2 receptor density was accompanied by a 10% increase of D1 receptors. These results show that the two types of dopamine (DA) receptors adapt in different or even opposite ways to environmental pressure, leading to imbalance between them.

  13. Androgen receptor status predicts development of brain metastases in ovarian cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittica, Gloria; Senetta, Rebecca; Scotto, Giulia; Aglietta, Massimo; Maggiorotto, Furio; Ghisoni, Eleonora; Genta, Sofia; Boldorini, Renzo; Manini, Claudia; Morra, Isabella; Buosi, Roberta; Sapino, Anna; Cassoni, Paola; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2017-06-20

    Brain metastases are uncommon localizations in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), their reported incidence is increasing and no predictive biomarkers have been identified yet. Goals of this study were: i) to define a possible association between Estrogen Receptor (ER), Progesterone Receptor (PR), Androgen Receptor (AR),human EGF receptor 2 (HER2) and brain progression in EOC patients, and ii) to identify differences in ER, PR, AR and HER2 protein expression from primary EOC and its matched resected brain metastasis. A retrospective series of 11 EOC with matched brain metastasis surgically removed was collected. For comparison, a "Control dataset" of 22 patients, without evidence of brain involvement after an adequate follow up was matched. ER, PR, AR and HER2 status were analyzed by means of immunohistochemistry forCases (both primary and metastatic lesions) and Controls.Univariate analysis showed that AR status was significantly associated with brain localization, both considered as discrete variable (cut-off: 10%, p=0.013) and as continuous one (p=0.035). Multivariate analysis confirmed this trend (p=0.053). When considered as continuous variables, ER and AR showed greater expression in primary tumors in comparison with brain metastases (p=0.013 and p=0.032, respectively).In our series, AR predicts brain involvement, with a 9.5 times higher propensity for AR-negative EOC. Moreover, brain dissemination is probably the result of progressive dedifferentiation of primary tumor, shown by reduction of ER and AR expression in metastases. Further studies are required, in order to anticipate and improve multimodal treatment of brain metastases.

  14. P2X7 Receptor Signaling Contributes to Sepsis-Associated Brain Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio, Luiz Eduardo Baggio; Andrade, Mariana G Juste; de Andrade Mello, Paola; Santana, Patrícia Teixeira; Moreira-Souza, Aline Cristina Abreu; Kolling, Janaína; Longoni, Aline; Feldbrügge, Linda; Wu, Yan; Wyse, Angela T S; Robson, Simon C; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2017-10-01

    Sepsis results in unfettered inflammation, tissue damage, and multiple organ failure. Diffuse brain dysfunction and neurological manifestations secondary to sepsis are termed sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE). Extracellular nucleotides, proinflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress reactions are associated with delirium and brain injury, and might be linked to the pathophysiology of SAE. P2X7 receptor activation by extracellular ATP leads to maturation and release of IL-1β by immune cells, which stimulates the production of oxygen reactive species. Hence, we sought to investigate the role of purinergic signaling by P2X7 in a model of sepsis. We also determined how this process is regulated by the ectonucleotidase CD39, a scavenger of extracellular nucleotides. Wild type (WT), P2X7 receptor (P2X7-/-), or CD39 (CD39-/-) deficient mice underwent sham laparotomy or CLP induced by ligation and puncture of the cecum. We noted that genetic deletion of P2X7 receptor decreased markers of oxidative stress in murine brains 24 h after sepsis induction. The pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of the P2X7 receptor attenuated the IL-1β and IL-6 production in the brain from septic mice. Furthermore, our results suggest a crucial role for the enzyme CD39 in limiting P2X7 receptor proinflammatory responses since CD39-/- septic mice exhibited higher levels of IL-1β in the brain. We have also demonstrated that P2X7 receptor blockade diminished STAT3 activation in cerebral cortex and hippocampus from septic mice, indicating association of ATP-P2X7-STAT3 signaling axis in SAE during sepsis. Our findings suggest that P2X7 receptor might serve as a suitable therapeutic target to ameliorate brain damage in sepsis.

  15. CB2 Receptor Activation Inhibits Melanoma Cell Transmigration through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Haskó

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During parenchymal brain metastasis formation tumor cells need to migrate through cerebral endothelial cells, which form the morphological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The mechanisms of extravasation of tumor cells are highly uncharacterized, but in some aspects recapitulate the diapedesis of leukocytes. Extravasation of leukocytes through the BBB is decreased by the activation of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2; therefore, in the present study we sought to investigate the role of CB2 receptors in the interaction of melanoma cells with the brain endothelium. First, we identified the presence of CB1, CB2(A, GPR18 (transcriptional variant 1 and GPR55 receptors in brain endothelial cells, while melanoma cells expressed CB1, CB2(A, GPR18 (transcriptional variants 1 and 2, GPR55 and GPR119. We observed that activation of CB2 receptors with JWH-133 reduced the adhesion of melanoma cells to the layer of brain endothelial cells. JWH-133 decreased the transendothelial migration rate of melanoma cells as well. Our results suggest that changes induced in endothelial cells are critical in the mediation of the effect of CB2 agonists. Our data identify CB2 as a potential target in reducing the number of brain metastastes originating from melanoma.

  16. Distribution of the octopamine receptor AmOA1 in the honey bee brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Sinakevitch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Octopamine plays an important role in many behaviors in invertebrates. It acts via binding to G protein coupled receptors located on the plasma membrane of responsive cells. Several distinct subtypes of octopamine receptors have been found in invertebrates, yet little is known about the expression pattern of these different receptor subtypes and how each subtype may contribute to different behaviors. One honey bee (Apis mellifera octopamine receptor, AmOA1, was recently cloned and characterized. Here we continue to characterize the AmOA1 receptor by investigating its distribution in the honey bee brain. We used two independent antibodies produced against two distinct peptides in the carboxyl-terminus to study the distribution of the AmOA1 receptor in the honey bee brain. We found that both anti-AmOA1 antibodies revealed labeling of cell body clusters throughout the brain and within the following brain neuropils: the antennal lobes; the calyces, pedunculus, vertical (alpha, gamma and medial (beta lobes of the mushroom body; the optic lobes; the subesophageal ganglion; and the central complex. Double immunofluorescence staining using anti-GABA and anti-AmOA1 receptor antibodies revealed that a population of inhibitory GABAergic local interneurons in the antennal lobes express the AmOA1 receptor in the cell bodies, axons and their endings in the glomeruli. In the mushroom bodies, AmOA1 receptors are expressed in a subpopulation of inhibitory GABAergic feedback neurons that ends in the visual (outer half of basal ring and collar regions and olfactory (lip and inner basal ring region calyx neuropils, as well as in the collar and lip zones of the vertical and medial lobes. The data suggest that one effect of octopamine via AmOA1 in the antennal lobe and mushroom body is to modulate inhibitory neurons.

  17. Transsynaptic Tracing from Taste Receptor Cells Reveals Local Taste Receptor Gene Expression in Gustatory Ganglia and Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Anja; Bojahr, Juliane; Narukawa, Masataka; Hübner, Sandra; Boehm, Ulrich; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2015-07-01

    Taste perception begins in the oral cavity by interactions of taste stimuli with specific receptors. Specific subsets of taste receptor cells (TRCs) are activated upon tastant stimulation and transmit taste signals to afferent nerve fibers and ultimately to the brain. How specific TRCs impinge on the innervating nerves and how the activation of a subset of TRCs leads to the discrimination of tastants of different qualities and intensities is incompletely understood. To investigate the organization of taste circuits, we used gene targeting to express the transsynaptic tracer barley lectin (BL) in the gustatory system of mice. Because TRCs are not synaptically connected with the afferent nerve fibers, we first analyzed tracer production and transfer within the taste buds (TBs). Surprisingly, we found that BL is laterally transferred across all cell types in TBs of mice expressing the tracer under control of the endogenous Tas1r1 and Tas2r131 promotor, respectively. Furthermore, although we detected the BL tracer in both ganglia and brain, we also found local low-level Tas1r1 and Tas2r131 gene, and thus tracer expression in these tissues. Finally, we identified the Tas1r1 and Tas2r131-expressing cells in the peripheral and CNS using a binary genetic approach. Together, our data demonstrate that genetic transsynaptic tracing from bitter and umami receptor cells does not selectively label taste-specific neuronal circuits and reveal local taste receptor gene expression in the gustatory ganglia and the brain. Previous papers described the organization of taste pathways in mice expressing a transsynaptic tracer from transgenes in bitter or sweet/umami-sensing taste receptor cells. However, reported results differ dramatically regarding the numbers of synapses crossed and the reduction of signal intensity after each transfer step. Nevertheless, all groups claimed this approach appropriate for quality-specific visualization of taste pathways. In the present study, we

  18. Arginine-Vasopressin Receptor Blocker Conivaptan Reduces Brain Edema and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption after Experimental Stroke in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Zeynalov

    Full Text Available Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Stroke is complicated by brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption, and is often accompanied by increased release of arginine-vasopressin (AVP. AVP acts through V1a and V2 receptors to trigger hyponatremia, vasospasm, and platelet aggregation which can exacerbate brain edema. The AVP receptor blockers conivaptan (V1a and V2 and tolvaptan (V2 are used to correct hyponatremia, but their effect on post-ischemic brain edema and BBB disruption remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate if these drugs can prevent brain edema and BBB disruption in mice after stroke.Experimental mice underwent the filament model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO with reperfusion. Mice were treated with conivaptan, tolvaptan, or vehicle. Treatments were initiated immediately at reperfusion and administered IV (conivaptan or orally (tolvaptan for 48 hours. Physiological variables, neurological deficit scores (NDS, plasma and urine sodium and osmolality were recorded. Brain water content (BWC and Evans Blue (EB extravasation index were evaluated at the end point.Both conivaptan and tolvaptan produced aquaresis as indicated by changes in plasma and urine sodium levels. However plasma and urine osmolality was changed only by conivaptan. Unlike tolvaptan, conivaptan improved NDS and reduced BWC in the ipsilateral hemisphere: from 81.66 ± 0.43% (vehicle to 78.28 ± 0.48% (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05 vs vehicle. Conivaptan also attenuated the EB extravasation from 1.22 ± 0.08 (vehicle to 1.01 ± 0.02 (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05.Continuous IV infusion with conivaptan for 48 hours after experimental stroke reduces brain edema, and BBB disruption. Conivaptan but not tolvaptan may potentially be used in patients to prevent brain edema after stroke.

  19. Interaction of phencyclidine ("angel dust") with a specific receptor in rat brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J P; Kartalovski, B; Geneste, P; Kamenka, J M; Lazdunski, M

    1979-01-01

    [3H]Phencyclidine binds to synaptic membranes from rat brain in a saturable, reversible, and selective fashion, with a dissociation constant Kd of 0.25 microM and a maximal binding capacity of 2.4 pmol/mg of membrane protein--i.e., 250 pmol/g of brain. The binding activity is concentrated in synaptosomal fractions, is higher in cerebral cortex and corpus striatum than in other parts of the rat brain, and is not detectable in the spinal cord. Only molecules of the phencyclidine series and ketamine are able to bind to the phencyclidine receptor. [3H]Phencyclidine bound to its receptor is not displaced by the classical neurotransmitters or neuromodulators. There is a good correlation between the apparent affinities of a series of phencyclidine analogs for the phencyclidine receptor and the pharacological activities of these analogs as measured by the rotarod assay. PMID:41247

  20. A single amino acid substitution is sufficient to modify the mitogenic properties of the epidermal growth factor receptor to resemble that of gp185erbB-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Fiore, P P; Helin, K; Kraus, M H

    1992-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) and the erbB-2 gene product, gp185erbB-2, exhibit distinct abilities to stimulate mitogenesis in different target cells. By using chimeric molecules between these two receptors, we have previously shown that their intracellular juxtamembrane regio...

  1. Bidirectional apical-basal traffic of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor in brain endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siupka, Piotr; Hersom, Maria N. S.; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2017-01-01

    in the process. Here, we elucidate the endosomal trafficking of the retrograde transported cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR300) in primary cultures of brain endothelial cells (BECs) of porcine and bovine origin. Receptor expression and localisation of MPR300 in the endo-lysosomal system......Brain capillary endothelium mediates the exchange of nutrients between blood and brain parenchyma. This barrier function of the brain capillaries also limits passage of pharmaceuticals from blood to brain, which hinders treatment of several neurological disorders. Receptor-mediated transport has...... been suggested as a potential pharmaceutical delivery route across the brain endothelium, e.g. reports have shown that the transferrin receptor (TfR) facilitates transcytosis of TfR antibodies, but it is not known whether this recycling receptor itself traffics from apical to basal membrane...

  2. In vivo regulation of the serotonin-2 receptor in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockmeier, C.A.; Kellar, K.J.

    1986-01-13

    Serotonin-2 (5-HT-2) receptors in brain were measured using (/sup 3/H)ketanserin. The authors examined the effects of amitriptyline, an anti-depressant drug, of electroconvulsive shock (ECS) and of drug-induced alterations in presynaptic 5-HT function on (/sup 3/H)ketanserin binding to 5-HT-2 receptors in rat brain. The importance of intact 5-HT axons to the up-regulation of 5-HT-2 receptors by ECS was also investigated, and an attempt was made to relate the ECS-induced increase in this receptor to changes in 5-HT presynaptic mechanisms. Twelve days of ECS increased the number of 5-HT-2 receptors in frontal cortex. Neither the IC/sub 50/ nor the Hill coefficient of 5-HT in competing for (/sup 3/H)ketanserin binding sites was altered by ECS. Repeated injections of amitriptyline reduced the number of 5-HT-2 receptors in frontal cortex. Reserpine, administered daily for 12 days, caused a significant increase in 5-HT-2 receptors, but neither daily injections of p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) nor lesions of 5-HT axons with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) affected 5-HT-2 receptors. However, regulation of 5-HT-2 receptors by ECS was dependent on intact 5-HT axons since ECS could not increase the number of 5-HT-2 receptors in rats previously lesioned with 5,7-DHT. Repeated ECS, however, does not appear to affect either the high-affinity uptake of (/sup 3/H)5-HT or (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding, two presynaptic markers of 5-HT neuronal function. 5-HT-2 receptors appear to be under complex control. ECS or drug treatments such as reserpine or amitriptyline, which affect several monoamine neurotransmission systems including 5-HT, can alter 5-HT-2 receptors. 28 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

  3. Upregulation of the low density lipoprotein receptor at the blood-brain barrier: intercommunications between brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to the endothelial cells in large vessels where LDL receptors are downregulated, brain capillary endothelial cells in vivo express an LDL receptor. Using a cell culture model of the blood-brain barrier consisting of a coculture of brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes, we observed that the capacity of endothelial cells to bind LDL is enhanced threefold when cocultured with astrocytes. We next investigated the ability of astrocytes to modulate endothelial cell LDL recept...

  4. Distinct Second Extracellular Loop Structures of the Brain Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor: Implication in Ligand Binding and Receptor Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Rudd, James; Ding, Tomas T.

    2010-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) second extracellular loop (E2) is known to play an important role in receptor structure and function. The brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptor is unique in that it lacks the inter-loop E2 disulfide linkage to the transmembrane (TM) helical bundle, a characteristic of many GPCRs. Recent mutation studies of the CB1 receptor, however, suggest the presence of an alternative intra-loop disulfide bond between two E2 Cys residues. Considering the oxidation state of these Cys residues, we determine the molecular structures of the 17-residue E2 in the dithiol form (E2dithiol) and in the disulfide form (E2disulfide) of the CB1 receptor in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer, employing a combination of simulated annealing (SA) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approaches. We characterize the CB1 receptor models with these two E2 forms, CB1(E2dithiol) and CB1(E2disulfide), by analyzing interaction energy, contact number, core crevice and cross-correlation. The results show that the distinct E2 structures interact differently with the TM helical bundle and uniquely modify the TM helical topology, suggesting that E2 plays a critical role in stabilizing receptor structure, regulating ligand binding, and ultimately modulating receptor activation. Further studies on the role of E2 of the CB1 receptor are warranted; particularly comparisons of the ligand-bound form with the present ligand-free form. PMID:21120862

  5. Cannabinoid receptor binding and messenger RNA expression in human brain: an in vitro receptor autoradiography and in situ hybridization histochemistry study of normal aged and Alzheimer's brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, T M; Howlett, A C; Bonner, T I; Matsuda, L A; Herkenham, M

    1994-12-01

    The distribution and density of cannabinoid receptor binding and messenger RNA expression in aged human brain were examined in several forebrain and basal ganglia structures. In vitro binding of [3H]CP-55,940, a synthetic cannabinoid, was examined by autoradiography in fresh frozen brain sections from normal aged humans (n = 3), patients who died with Alzheimer's disease (n = 5) and patients who died with other forms of cortical pathology (n = 5). In the structures examined--hippocampal formation, neocortex, basal ganglia and parts of the brainstem--receptor binding showed a characteristic pattern of high densities in the dentate gyrus molecular layer, globus pallidus and substantia nigra pars reticulata, moderate densities in the hippocampus, neocortex, amygdala and striatum, and low densities in the white matter and brainstem. In situ hybridization histochemistry of human cannabinoid receptor, a ribonucleotide probe for the human cannabinoid receptor messenger RNA, showed a pattern of extremely dense transcript levels in subpopulations of cells in the hippocampus and cortex, moderate levels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and neurons of the striatum, amygdala and hypothalamus, and no signal over dentate gyrus granule cells and most of the cells of the thalamus and upper brainstem, including the substantia nigra. In Alzheimer's brains, compared to normal brains, [3H]CP-55,940 binding was reduced by 37-45% in all of the subfields of the hippocampal formation and by 49% in the caudate. Lesser reductions (20-24%) occurred in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus, internal segment. Other neocortical and basal ganglia structures were not different from control levels. Levels of messenger RNA expression did not differ between Alzheimer's and control brains, but there were regionally discrete statistically significant losses of the intensely expressing cells in the hippocampus. The reductions in binding did not correlate with or localize to areas showing

  6. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J.S.; Thanos, P K; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interactio...

  7. Cannabinoid control of brain bioenergetics: Exploring the subcellular localization of the CB1 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne; Reguero, Leire; Puente, Nagore; Lutz, Beat; Chaouloff, Francis; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo; Benard, Giovanni; Grandes, Pedro; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial activity is centrally involved in the central control of energy balance. When studying mitochondrial functions in the brain, however, discrepant results might be obtained, depending on the experimental approaches. For instance, immunostaining experiments and biochemical isolation of organelles expose investigators to risks of false positive and/or false negative results. As an example, the functional presence of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors on brain mitochondrial membranes (mtCB1) was recently reported and rapidly challenged, claiming that the original observation was likely due to artifact results. Here, we addressed this issue by directly comparing the procedures used in the two studies. Our results show that the use of appropriate controls and quantifications allows detecting mtCB1 receptor with CB1 receptor antibodies, and that, if mitochondrial fractions are enriched and purified, CB1 receptor agonists reliably decrease respiration in brain mitochondria. These data further underline the importance of adapted experimental procedures to study brain mitochondrial functions. PMID:24944910

  8. Enzymatic synthesis of anandamide, an endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptor, by brain membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Devane, W A; Axelrod, J

    1994-01-01

    Anandamide, an endogenous eicosanoid derivative (arachidonoylethanolamide), binds to the cannabinoid receptor, a member of the G protein-coupled superfamily. It also inhibits both adenylate cyclase and N-type calcium channel opening. The enzymatic synthesis of anandamide in bovine brain tissue was examined by incubating brain membranes with [14C]ethanolamine and arachidonic acid. Following incubation and extraction into toluene, a radioactive product was identified which had the same Rf value...

  9. Contribution of regional brain melanocortin receptor subtypes to elevated activity energy expenditure in lean, active rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla,Charu; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Cai, Minying; Hruby, Victor J.; Bednarek, Maria; Novak, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity and non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) are crucial factors accounting for individual differences in body weight, interacting with genetic predisposition. In the brain, a number of neuroendocrine intermediates regulate food intake and energy expenditure (EE); this includes the brain melanocortin (MC) system, consisting of melanocortin peptides as well as their receptors (MCR). MC3R and MC4R have emerged as critical modulators of EE and food intake. To determine how va...

  10. Region-selective effects of neuroinflammation and antioxidant treatment on peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and NMDA receptors in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A.; Alvarado, M.; Budinger, T.F.; Grossman, R.; Hensley, K.; West, M.S.; Kotake, Y.; Ono, M.; Floyd, R.A.

    2001-12-10

    Following induction of acute neuroinflammation by intracisternal injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) in rats, quantitative autoradiography was used to assess the regional level of microglial activation and glutamate (NMDA) receptor binding. The possible protective action of the antioxidant phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone in this model was tested by administering the drug in the drinking water for 6 days starting 24 hours after endotoxin injection. Animals were killed 7 days post-injection and consecutive cryostat brain sections labeled with [3H]PK11195 as a marker of activated microglia and [125I]iodoMK801 as a marker of the open-channel, activated state of NMDA receptors. Lipopolysaccharide increased [3H]PK11195 binding in the brain, with the largest increases (2-3 fold) in temporal and entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. A significant (>50 percent) decrease in [125I]iodoMK801 binding was found in the same brain regions. Phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone treatment resulted in a partial inhibition ({approx}25 percent decrease) of the lipopolysaccharide-induced increase in [3H]PK11195 binding but completely reversed the lipopolysaccharide-induced decrease in [125I]iodoMK80 binding in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. Loss of NMDA receptor function in cortical and hippocampal regions may contribute to the cognitive deficits observed in diseases with a neuroinflammatory component, such as meningitis or Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Risperidone treatment increases CB1 receptor binding in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Anna; Husum, Henriette; Holst, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    , the ghrelin receptor, neuropeptide Y, adiponectin and proopiomelanocortin. We investigated whether the expression of these factors was affected in rats chronically treated with the antipsychotic risperidone. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with risperidone (1.0 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (20......% hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin) for 28 days. Expression of the aforementioned factors were examined together with plasma prolactin and ghrelin levels. RESULTS: No difference in body weight gained during treatment was observed between risperidone and vehicle treated rats, but plasma risperidone levels...... positively correlated with visceral fat mass. Risperidone treatment increased CB(1) receptor binding in the arcuate nucleus (40%), hippocampus (25-30%) and amygdala (35%) without concurrent alterations in the CB(1) receptor mRNA. Risperidone treatment increased adiponectin mRNA. CONCLUSION: The present study...

  12. Oxytocin receptor dynamics in the brain across development and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Radhika; Hammock, Elizabeth A D

    2017-02-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) signaling through the OXT receptor plays a significant role in a variety of physiological processes throughout the lifespan. OXT's effects depend on the tissue distribution of the receptor. This tissue specificity is dynamic and changes across development, and also varies with sex, experience, and species. The purpose of this review is to highlight these themes with examples from several life stages and several species. Important knowledge gaps will also be emphasized. Understanding the effective sites of action for OXT via its receptor will help refine hypotheses about the roles of this important neuropeptide in the experience-dependent development and expression of species-typical social behavior. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 143-157, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors induces fos expression within restricted regions of the neonatal female rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Olesen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Steroid receptor activation in the developing brain influences a variety of cellular processes that endure into adulthood, altering both behavior and physiology. Recent data suggests that dopamine can regulate expression of progestin receptors within restricted regions of the developing rat brain by activating estrogen receptors in a ligand-independent manner. It is unclear whether changes in neuronal activity induced by dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors are also region specific. To investigate this question, we examined where the dopamine D1-like receptor agonist, SKF 38393, altered Fos expression via estrogen receptor activation. We report that dopamine D1-like receptor agonist treatment increased Fos protein expression within many regions of the developing female rat brain. More importantly, prior treatment with an estrogen receptor antagonist partially reduced D1-like receptor agonist-induced Fos expression only within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the central amygdala. These data suggest that dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors alters neuronal activity within restricted regions of the developing rat brain. This implies that ligand-independent activation of estrogen receptors by dopamine might organize a unique set of behaviors during brain development in contrast to the more wide spread ligand activation of estrogen receptors by estrogen.

  14. Dopaminergic Activation of Estrogen Receptors Induces Fos Expression within Restricted Regions of the Neonatal Female Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Kristin M.; Auger, Anthony P.

    2008-01-01

    Steroid receptor activation in the developing brain influences a variety of cellular processes that endure into adulthood, altering both behavior and physiology. Recent data suggests that dopamine can regulate expression of progestin receptors within restricted regions of the developing rat brain by activating estrogen receptors in a ligand-independent manner. It is unclear whether changes in neuronal activity induced by dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors are also region specific. To investigate this question, we examined where the dopamine D1-like receptor agonist, SKF 38393, altered Fos expression via estrogen receptor activation. We report that dopamine D1-like receptor agonist treatment increased Fos protein expression within many regions of the developing female rat brain. More importantly, prior treatment with an estrogen receptor antagonist partially reduced D1-like receptor agonist-induced Fos expression only within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the central amygdala. These data suggest that dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors alters neuronal activity within restricted regions of the developing rat brain. This implies that ligand-independent activation of estrogen receptors by dopamine might organize a unique set of behaviors during brain development in contrast to the more wide spread ligand activation of estrogen receptors by estrogen. PMID:18478050

  15. The selective estrogen receptor-alpha coactivator, RPL7, and sexual differentiation of the songbird brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kelli A; Jimenez, Pedro; Carruth, Laura L

    2009-12-01

    The brain and behavior of the Australian zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) are sexually dimorphic. Only males sing courtship songs and the regions of the brain involved in the learning and production of song are significantly larger in males than females. Therefore the zebra finch serves as an excellent model for studying the mechanisms that influence brain sexual differentiation, and the majority of past research on this system has focused on the actions of steroid hormones in the development of these sex differences. Coregulators, such as coactivators and corepressors, are proteins and RNA activators that work by enhancing or depressing the transcriptional activity of the nuclear steroid receptor with which they associate, and thereby modulating the development of sex-specific brain morphologies and behaviors. The actions of these proteins may help elucidate the hormonal mechanisms that underlie song nuclei development. Research described in this review focus on the role of estrogen receptor coactivators in the avian brain; more specifically we will focus on the role of RPL7 (ribosomal protein L7; also known as L7/SPA) on sexual differentiation of the zebra finch song system. Collectively, these studies provide information about the role of steroid receptor coactivators on development of the zebra finch song system as well as on sexual differentiation of brain.

  16. Expression of a novel D4 dopamine receptor in the lamprey brain. Evolutionary considerations about dopamine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan ePérez-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous data reported in lampreys, which belong to the phylogenetically oldest branch of vertebrates, show that the dopaminergic system was already well developed at the dawn of vertebrate evolution. The expression of dopamine in the lamprey brain is well conserved when compared to other vertebrates, and this is also true for the D2 receptor. Additionally, the key role of dopamine in the striatum, modulating the excitability in the direct and indirect pathways through the D1 and D2 receptors, has also been recently reported in these animals. The moment of divergence regarding the two whole genome duplications occurred in vertebrates suggests that additional receptors, apart from the D1 and D2 previously reported, could be present in lampreys. We used in situ hybridization to characterize the expression of a novel dopamine receptor, which we have identified as a D4 receptor according to the phylogenetic analysis. The D4 receptor shows in the sea lamprey a more restricted expression pattern than the D2 subtype, as reported in mammals. Its main expression areas are the striatum, lateral and ventral pallial sectors, several hypothalamic regions, habenula, and mesencephalic and rhombencephalic motoneurons. Some expression areas are well conserved through vertebrate evolution, as is the case of the striatum or the habenula, but the controversies regarding the D4 receptor expression in other vertebrates hampers for a complete comparison, especially in rhombencephalic regions. Our results further support that the dopaminergic system in vertebrates is well conserved and suggest that at least some functions of the D4 receptor were already present before the divergence of lampreys.

  17. Ontogenic increase in PGE2 and PGF2 alpha receptor density in brain microvessels of pigs.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, D. Y.; Varma, D. R.; Chemtob, S.

    1994-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that the relative vasoconstrictor ineffectiveness of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGF2 alpha on cerebral vessels of newborn pigs might be due to fewer receptors for these prostanoids was tested by comparing receptors for PGE2 (EP) and PGF2 alpha (FP) in cerebral microvessels from newborn and adult pigs. 2. Specific binding of [3H]-PGE2 and [3H]-PGF2 alpha to membranes prepared from brain microvessels showed that EP and FP receptor density (Bmax) in tissues from newborn animal...

  18. Toll-like receptors in brain development and homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter H; Holm, Thomas Hellesøe; Owens, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are best known as initiators of the innate immune response to pathogens. Recent reports now reveal intriguing roles for TLRs in the central nervous system (CNS). These include the regulation of neuroinflammation and of neurite outgrowth. The archetypal Toll protein in D...

  19. Targeting transferrin receptors at the blood-brain barrier improves the uptake of immunoliposomes and subsequent cargo transport into the brain parenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper B.; Burkhart, Annette; Melander, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    investigate the possibility of delivering immunoliposomes and their encapsulated cargo to the brain via targeting of the transferrin receptor. We find that transferrin receptor-targeting increases the association between the immunoliposomes and primary endothelial cells in vitro, but that this does...... not correlate with increased cargo transcytosis. Furthermore, we show that the transferrin receptor-targeted immunoliposomes accumulate along the microvessels of the brains of rats, but find no evidence for transcytosis of the immunoliposome. Conversely, the increased accumulation correlated both with increased...... cargo uptake in the brain endothelium and subsequent cargo transport into the brain. These findings suggest that transferrin receptor-targeting is a relevant strategy of increasing drug exposure to the brain....

  20. Brain mineralocorticoid receptors as resilience factor under adverse life conditions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanatsou, S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in human cohorts have underlined the importance of gene-environment interactions for brain structure and function during development and in adulthood. Such interactions can make the difference between staying healthy or succumbing to disease, e.g. depression or posttraumatic stress disorder.

  1. The Prorenin and (Prorenin Receptor: New Players in the Brain Renin-Angiotensin System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencheng Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the brain renin-angiotensin (RAS system plays an essential role in the development of hypertension, mainly through the modulation of autonomic activities and vasopressin release. However, how the brain synthesizes angiotensin (Ang II has been a debate for decades, largely due to the low renin activity. This paper first describes the expression of the vasoconstrictive arm of RAS components in the brain as well as their physiological and pathophysiological significance. It then focus on the (prorenin receptor (PRR, a newly discovered component of the RAS which has a high level in the brain. We review the role of prorenin and PRR in peripheral organs and emphasize the involvement of brain PRR in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Some future perspectives in PRR research are heighted with respect to novel therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.

  2. A novel brain receptor is expressed in a distinct population of olfactory sensory neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conzelmann, S; Levai, O; Bode, B; Eisel, U; Raming, K; Breer, H; Strotmann, J

    2000-01-01

    Three novel G-protein-coupled receptor genes related to the previously described RA1c gene have been isolated from the mouse genome. Expression of these genes has been detected in distinct areas of the brain and also in the olfactory epithelium of the nose. Developmental studies revealed a

  3. Decreased alternative splicing of estrogen receptor-α mRNA in the Alzheimer's disease brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishunina, Tatjana A.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we identified 62 estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) mRNA splice variants in different human brain areas of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and control cases and classified them into 12 groups. Forty-eight of these splice forms were identified for the first time. The distribution of alternatively

  4. Combined autoradiographic-immunocytochemical analysis of opioid receptors and opioid peptide neuronal systems in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.E.; Khachaturian, H.; Watson, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Using adjacent section autoradiography-immunocytochemistry, the distribution of (TH)naloxone binding sites was studied in relation to neuronal systems containing (Leu)enkephalin, dynorphin A, or beta-endorphin immunoreactivity in rat brain. Brain sections from formaldehyde-perfused rats show robust specific binding of (TH)naloxone, the pharmacological (mu-like) properties of which appear unaltered. In contrast, specific binding of the delta ligand (TH)D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin was virtually totally eliminated as a result of formaldehyde perfusion. Using adjacent section analysis, the authors have noted associations between (TH)naloxone binding sites and one, two, or all three opioid systems in different brain regions; however, in some areas, no apparent relationship could be observed. Within regions, the relationship was complex. The complexity of the association between (TH)naloxone binding sites and the multiple opioid systems, and previous reports of co-localization of mu and kappa receptors in rat brain, are inconsistent with a simple-one-to-one relationship between a given opioid precursor and opioid receptor subtype. Instead, since differential processing of the three precursors gives rise to peptides of varying receptor subtype potencies and selectivities, the multiple peptide-receptor relationships may point to a key role of post-translational processing in determining the physiological consequences of opioid neurotransmission.

  5. Data on overlapping brain disorders and emerging drug targets in human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avijit Podder

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intercommunication of Dopamine Receptors (DRs with their associate protein partners is crucial to maintain regular brain function in human. Majority of the brain disorders arise due to malfunctioning of such communication process. Hence, contributions of genetic factors, as well as phenotypic indications for various neurological and psychiatric disorders are often attributed as sharing in nature. In our earlier research article entitled “Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN: a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network” (Podder et al., 2014 [1], we had depicted a holistic interaction map of human Dopamine Receptors. Given emphasis on the topological parameters, we had characterized the functionality along with the vulnerable properties of the network. In support of this, we hereby provide an additional data highlighting the genetic overlapping of various brain disorders in the network. The data indicates the sharing nature of disease genes for various neurological and psychiatric disorders in dopamine receptors connecting protein-protein interactions network. The data also indicates toward an alternative approach to prioritize proteins for overlapping brain disorders as valuable drug targets in the network.

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in human subjects with function-altering melanocortin-4 receptor variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    In rodents, hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression appears to be regulated by melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity. The impact of MC4R genetic variation on circulating BDNF in humans is unknown. The objective of this study is to compare BDNF concentrations of subjects wi...

  7. The mouse brain adenosine A(1) receptor : functional expression and pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittendorp, MC; Kunzel, JVD; Ijzerman, AP; Boddeke, HWGM; Biber, K

    2004-01-01

    The adenosinergic system is involved in many important physiological functions. Adenosine exerts its extracellular effects through four types of G-protein-coupled receptors: A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3). Adenosine acts as an important regulator of metabolic processes. In the brain adenosine mediates

  8. In vitro blood-brain barrier permeability predictions for GABAA receptor modulating piperine analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigenmann, Daniela Elisabeth; Dürig, Carmen; Jähne, Evelyn Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The alkaloid piperine from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and several synthetic piperine analogs were recently identified as positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. In order to reach their target sites of action, these compounds need to enter the brain by c...

  9. Purification of the neurotensin receptor from bovine brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, A.; Demoliou-Mason, C.D.; Barnard, E.A.

    1988-01-05

    The neurotensin receptor protein, solubilized with digitonin/asolectin from bovine cerebral cortex membranes, was purified to apparent homogeneity by affinity chromatography using immobilized neurotensin. The product exhibits saturable and specific binding of (3,11-tyrosyl-3,5-/sup 3/H) neurotensin with an apparent affinity (K/sub d/ = 5.5 nM) comparable to that measured in intact membranes and crude soluble extracts. The affinity-purified material, after reduction with 100 mM dithiothreitol, in denaturing gel electrophoresis showed a single polypeptide of M/sub r/ 72,000. Under nonreducing conditions the apparent M/sub r/, however, was 50,000, suggesting the presence of intramolecular disulfide bonds. The purified neurotensin receptor was judged to be homogenous, in that (i) only a single polypeptide was detectable; and (ii) the overall purification was 30,000-50,000-fold, giving a specific neurotensin-binding activity close to the theoretical maximum.

  10. Circulating Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Regulates Its Receptor in the Brain of Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueba-Saiz, A; Fernandez, A M; Nishijima, T; Mecha, M; Santi, A; Munive, V; Aleman, I Torres

    2017-02-01

    The role of IGF-1 and its receptor (IGF-1R) in brain pathology is still unclear. Thus, either reduction of IGF-IR or treatment with IGF-1, two apparently opposite actions, has proven beneficial in brain diseases such as Alzheimer's dementia. A possible explanation of this discrepancy is that IGF-1 down-regulates brain IGF-1R levels, as previously seen in a mouse Alzheimer's dementia model. We now explored whether under normal conditions IGF-1 modulates its receptor. We first observed that in vitro, IGF-1 reduced IGF-1R mRNA levels in all types of brain cells including neurons, astrocytes, microglia, endothelial cells, and oligodendrocytes. IGF-1 also inhibited its own expression in neurons and brain endothelium. Next, we analyzed the in vivo actions of IGF-1. Because serum IGF-1 can enter the brain, we injected mice with IGF-1 ip. As soon as 1 hour after the injection, decreased hippocampal IGF-1 levels were observed, followed by increased IGF-1 and IGF-1R mRNAs 6 hours later. Because environmental enrichment (EE) stimulates the entrance of serum IGF-1 into the brain, we analyzed whether a physiological entrance of IGF-1 also produced changes in brain IGF-1R. Stimulation of IGF-1R by EE triggered a gradual decrease in hippocampal IGF-1 levels. After 6 hours of EE exposure, IGF-1 levels reached a significant decrease in parallel with increased IGF-1R expression. After longer times, IGF-1R mRNA levels returned to baseline. Thus, under nonpathological conditions, IGF-1 regulates brain IGF-1R. Because baseline IGF-1R levels are rapidly restored, a tight control of brain IGF-1R expression seems to operate under physiological conditions. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  11. Evidence that the EphA2 receptor exacerbates ischemic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Thundyil

    Full Text Available Ephrin (Eph signaling within the central nervous system is known to modulate axon guidance, synaptic plasticity, and to promote long-term potentiation. We investigated the potential involvement of EphA2 receptors in ischemic stroke-induced brain inflammation in a mouse model of focal stroke. Cerebral ischemia was induced in male C57Bl6/J wild-type (WT and EphA2-deficient (EphA2(-/- mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO; 60 min, followed by reperfusion (24 or 72 h. Brain infarction was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Neurological deficit scores and brain infarct volumes were significantly less in EphA2(-/- mice compared with WT controls. This protection by EphA2 deletion was associated with a comparative decrease in brain edema, blood-brain barrier damage, MMP-9 expression and leukocyte infiltration, and higher expression levels of the tight junction protein, zona occludens-1. Moreover, EphA2(-/- brains had significantly lower levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins, cleaved caspase-3 and BAX, and higher levels of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2 as compared to WT group. We confirmed that isolated WT cortical neurons express the EphA2 receptor and its ligands (ephrin-A1-A3. Furthermore, expression of all four proteins was increased in WT primary cortical neurons following 24 h of glucose deprivation, and in the brains of WT mice following stroke. Glucose deprivation induced less cell death in primary neurons from EphA2(-/- compared with WT mice. In conclusion, our data provide the first evidence that the EphA2 receptor directly contributes to blood-brain barrier damage and neuronal death following ischemic stroke.

  12. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, P. A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding and ANP-induced increases in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels have been observed in brain microvessels (Chabrier et al., 1987; Steardo and Nathanson, 1987), suggesting that this fluid-regulating hormone may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain. This study was initiated to characterize the ANP receptors in primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs). The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, for ANP increased from 0.25 nM to 2.5 nM, and the number of ANP binding sites as determined by Scatchard analysis increased from 7,100 to 170,000 sites/cell between 2 and 10 days of culture following monolayer formation. Time- and concentration-dependent studies on the stimulation of cGMP levels by ANP indicated that guanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptors were present in BMECs. The relative abilities of ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and a truncated analog of ANP containing amino acids 5-27 (ANP 5-27) to modulate the accumulation of cGMP was found to be ANP greater than BNP much greater than ANP 5-27. Affinity cross-linking with disuccinimidyl suberate and radiolabeled ANP followed by gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions demonstrated a single band corresponding to the 60-70 kD receptor, indicating the presence of the nonguanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptor. Radiolabeled ANP binding was examined in the presence of various concentrations of either ANP, BNP, or ANP 5-27 and suggested that a large proportion of the ANP receptors present in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells bind all of these ligands similarly. These data indicate both guanylate cyclase linked and nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors are present on BMECs and that a higher proportion of the nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors is expressed. This in vitro culture system may provide a valuable tool for the examination of ANP receptor expression and function in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

  13. Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimers Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Alricsson M (2012) Physical exercise ameliorates deficits induced by traumatic brain injury. Acta Neurol Scand 125, 293-302. [19] Qu C, Mahmood A...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0582 TITLE: Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s...COVERED 09/25/2012-09/24/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for

  14. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in brain and kidney: focus on cardiovascular implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative techniques of receptor autoradiography have been applied to localize (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in brain and kidney. High densities of autoradiographic grains, indicating the presence of angiotensin II receptors, have been localized to several rat brain nuclei including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, anterior pituitary, locus coeruleus and several hypothalamic nuclei. Cat thoracic spinal cord exhibited a high density of sites over the intermedio-lateral cell column. In sections of rat kidney, angiotensin II receptors were detected in the glomerulus, vasa recta and ureter. The cardiovascular implications of these results are apparent and relate angiotensin II to hypertensive mechanisms. Thus, angiotensin II represents an endocoid which is involved in control of blood pressure through its effects on peripheral organs as well as the central nervous system.

  15. Bidirectional apical-basal traffic of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor in brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siupka, Piotr; Hersom, Maria Ns; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin; Johnsen, Kasper B; Thomsen, Louiza B; Andresen, Thomas L; Moos, Torben; Abbott, N Joan; Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Morten S

    2017-07-01

    Brain capillary endothelium mediates the exchange of nutrients between blood and brain parenchyma. This barrier function of the brain capillaries also limits passage of pharmaceuticals from blood to brain, which hinders treatment of several neurological disorders. Receptor-mediated transport has been suggested as a potential pharmaceutical delivery route across the brain endothelium, e.g. reports have shown that the transferrin receptor (TfR) facilitates transcytosis of TfR antibodies, but it is not known whether this recycling receptor itself traffics from apical to basal membrane in the process. Here, we elucidate the endosomal trafficking of the retrograde transported cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR300) in primary cultures of brain endothelial cells (BECs) of porcine and bovine origin. Receptor expression and localisation of MPR300 in the endo-lysosomal system and trafficking of internalised receptor are analysed. We also demonstrate that MPR300 can undergo bidirectional apical-basal trafficking in primary BECs in co-culture with astrocytes. This is, to our knowledge, the first detailed study of retrograde transported receptor trafficking in BECs, and the study demonstrates that MPR300 can be transported from the luminal to abluminal membrane and reverse. Such trafficking of MPR300 suggests that retrograde transported receptors in general may provide a mechanism for transport of pharmaceuticals into the brain.

  16. Binding studies and photoaffinity labeling identify two classes of phencyclidine receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haring, R.; Kloog, Y.; Kalir, A.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1987-09-08

    Binding and photoaffinity labeling experiments were employed in order to differentiate 1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine (PCP) receptor sites in rat brain. Two classes of PCP receptors were characterized and localized: one class binds (/sup 3/H)-N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine ((/sup 3/H)TCP) with high affinity (K/sub d/ = 10-15 nM) and the other binds the ligand with a relatively low affinity (K/sub d/ = 80-100 nM). The two classes of sites have different patterns of distribution. Forebrain regions are characterized by high-affinity sites, but some parts contain low-affinity sites as well. In the cerebellum only low-affinity sites were detected. Binding sites for (/sup 3/H)PCP and for its photolabile analog (/sup 3/H)azido-PCP showed a regional distribution similar to that of the (/sup 3/H)TCP sites. The neuroleptic drug haloperidol did not block binding to either the high- or the low-affinity (/sup 3/H)TCP sites, whereas Ca/sup 2 +/ inhibited binding to both. Photoaffinity labeling of the PCP receptors with (/sup 3/H)AZ-PCP indicated that five specifically labeled polypeptides of these receptors are unevenly distributed in the rat brain. Two of the stereoselectively labeled polypeptides appear to be associated with the high- and low-affinity (/sup 3/H)TCP-binding sites; the density of the M/sub r/ 90,000 polypeptide in various brain regions correlates well with the localization of the high-affinity sites, whereas the density of the M/sub r/ 33,000 polypeptide correlates best with the distribution of the low-affinity sites. The results are compatible with the existence of two classes of PCP receptors in the rat brain, each having a distinct polypeptide that carries the ligand recognition site and has a selective localization in the brain.

  17. Aging-induced changes in brain regional serotonin receptor binding: Effect of Carnosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S; Poddar, M K

    2016-04-05

    Monoamine neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT) has its own specific receptors in both pre- and post-synapse. In the present study the role of carnosine on aging-induced changes of [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding in different brain regions in a rat model was studied. The results showed that during aging (18 and 24 months) the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding was reduced in hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD but in cerebral cortex the [(3)H]-5-HT binding was increased with the increase of its only Bmax. The aging-induced changes in [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with carnosine (2.0 μg/kg/day, intrathecally, for 21 consecutive days) attenuated in (a) 24-month-aged rats irrespective of the brain regions with the attenuation of its Bmax except hypothalamus where both Bmax and KD were significantly attenuated, (b) hippocampus and hypothalamus of 18-month-aged rats with the attenuation of its Bmax, and restored toward the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding that observed in 4-month-young rats. The decrease in pons-medullary [(3)H]-5-HT binding including its Bmax of 18-month-aged rats was promoted with carnosine without any significant change in its cerebral cortex. The [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with the same dosages of carnosine in 4-month-young rats (a) increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus with the increase in their only Bmax whereas (b) decreased in hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD. These results suggest that carnosine treatment may (a) play a preventive role in aging-induced brain region-specific changes in serotonergic activity (b) not be worthy in 4-month-young rats in relation to the brain regional serotonergic activity. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Transferrin Receptor at the Blood-Brain Barrier - exploring the possibilities for brain drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Corine

    2005-01-01

    There are many diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), like Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, depression, schizophrenia, epilepsy, migraine headache, and HIV infection in the brain. However, treatment is difficult since many drugs cannot reach the brain in sufficient quantities due to

  19. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicita Pedata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes. Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke.

  20. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  1. Estrogen provides neuroprotection against brain edema and blood brain barrier disruption through both estrogen receptors α and β following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Naderi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Estrogen (E2 has neuroprotective effects on blood-brain-barrier (BBB after traumatic brain injury (TBI. In order to investigate the roles of estrogen receptors (ERs in these effects, ER-α antagonist (MPP and, ER-β antagonist (PHTPP, or non-selective estrogen receptors antagonist (ICI 182780 were administered. Materials and Methods: Ovariectomized rats were divided into 10 groups, as follows: Sham, TBI, E2, oil, MPP+E2, PHTPP+E2, MPP+PHTPP+E2, ICI+E2, MPP, and DMSO. E2 (33.3 µg/Kg or oil were administered 30 min after TBI. 1 dose (150 µg/Kg of each of MPP, PHTPP, and (4 mg/kg ICI182780 was injected two times, 24 hr apart, before TBI and estrogen treatment. BBB disruption (Evans blue content and brain edema (brain water content evaluated 5 hr and 24 hr after the TBI were evaluated, respectively. Results: The results showed that E2 reduced brain edema after TBI compared to vehicle (P

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine kinase B receptor signalling in post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Conley, Robert R; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Dwivedi, Yogesh

    2008-12-01

    Teenage suicide is a major public health concern, but its neurobiology is not very well understood. Stress and major mental disorders are major risk factors for suicidal behaviour, and it has been shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) are not only regulated by stress but are also altered in these illnesses. We therefore examined if BDNF/TrkB signalling is altered in the post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims. Protein and mRNA expression of BDNF and of TrkB receptors were determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), Brodmann's Area 9 (BA 9), and hippocampus obtained from 29 teenage suicide victims and 25 matched normal control subjects. Protein expression was determined using the Western blot technique; mRNA levels by a quantitative RT-PCR technique. The protein expression of BDNF was significantly decreased in the PFC of teenage suicide victims compared with normal control subjects, whereas no change was observed in the hippocampus. Protein expression of TrkB full-length receptors was significantly decreased in both PFC and hippocampus of teenage suicide victims without any significant changes in the truncated form of TrkB receptors. mRNA expression of both BDNF and TrkB was significantly decreased in the PFC and hippocampus of teenage suicide victims compared with normal control subjects. These studies indicate a down-regulation of both BDNF and its receptor TrkB in the PFC and hippocampus of teenage suicide victims, which suggests that stress and altered BDNF may represent a major vulnerability factor in teenage suicidal behaviour.

  3. Increased brain histamine H3 receptor expression during hibernation in golden-mantled ground squirrels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anichtchik Oleg V

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hibernation is a state of extremely reduced physiological functions and a deep depression of CNS activity. We have previously shown that the histamine levels increase in the brain during hibernation, as does the ratio between histamine and its first metabolite, suggesting increased histamine turnover during this state. The inhibitory histamine H3 receptor has both auto- and heteroreceptor function, rendering it the most likely histamine receptor to be involved in regulating the activity of histamine as well as other neurotransmitters during hibernation. In view of accumulating evidence that there is a global depression of transcription and translation during hibernation, of all but a few proteins that are important for this physiological condition, we reasoned that an increase in histamine H3 receptor expression would clearly indicate an important hibernation-related function for the receptor. Results In this study we show, using in situ hybridization, that histamine H3 receptor mRNA increases in the cortex, caudate nucleus and putamen during hibernation, an increase that is accompanied by elevated receptor binding in the cerebral cortex, globus pallidus and substantia nigra. These results indicate that there is a hibernation-related increase in H3 receptor expression in cortical neurons and in striatopallidal and striatonigral GABAergic neurons. GTP-γ-S binding autoradiography shows that the H3 receptors in the globus pallidus and substantia nigra can be stimulated by histamine throughout the hibernation cycle, suggesting that they are functionally active during hibernation. Conclusions These results show that the histamine H3 receptor gene is one of the few with a transcript that increases during hibernation, indicating an important role for the receptor in regulating this state. Moreover, the receptor is functionally active in the basal ganglia, suggesting a function for it in regulating e.g. dopaminergic transmission

  4. Selective vulnerabilities of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors during brain aging

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    Brenna L Brim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors are present in high density within the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and play an important role in learning and memory. NMDA receptors are negatively affected by aging, but these effects are not uniform in many different ways. This review discusses the selective age-related vulnerabilities of different binding sites of the NMDA receptor complex, different subunits that comprise the complex, and the expression and functions of the receptor within different brain regions. Spatial reference, passive avoidance, and working memory, as well as place field stability and expansion all involve NMDA receptors. Aged animals show deficiencies in these functions, as compared to young, and some studies have identified an association between age-associated changes in the expression of NMDA receptors and poor memory performance. A number of diet and drug interventions have shown potential for reversing or slowing the effects of aging on the NMDA receptor. On the other hand, there is mounting evidence that the NMDA receptors that remain within aged individuals are not always associated with good cognitive functioning. This may be due to a compensatory response of neurons to the decline in NMDA receptor expression or a change in the subunit composition of the remaining receptors. These studies suggest that developing treatments that are aimed at preventing or reversing the effects of aging on the NMDA receptor may aid in ameliorating the memory declines that are associated with aging. However, we need to be mindful of the possibility that there may also be negative consequences in aged individuals.

  5. Overcoming the blood-brain barrier for delivering drugs into the brain by using adenosine receptor nanoagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xihui; Qian, Jun; Zheng, Shuyan; Changyi, Yinzhi; Zhang, Jianping; Ju, Shenghong; Zhu, Jianhua; Li, Cong

    2014-04-22

    The extremely low permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) poses the greatest impediment in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Recent work indicated that BBB permeability can be up-regulated by activating A2A adenosine receptor (AR), which temporarily increases intercellular spaces between the brain capillary endothelial cells. However, due to transient circulation lifetime of adenosine-based agonists, their capability to enhance brain delivery of drugs, especially macromolecular drugs, is limited. In this work, a series of nanoagonists (NAs) were developed by labeling different copies of A2A AR activating ligands on dendrimers. In vitro transendothelial electrical resistance measurements demonstrated that the NAs increased permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer by compromising the tightness of tight junctions, the key structure that restricts the entry of blood-borne molecules into the brain. In vivo imaging studies indicated the remarkably up-regulated brain uptake of a macromolecular model drug (45 kDa) after intravenous injection of NAs. Autoradiographic imaging showed that the BBB opening time-window can be tuned in a range of 0.5-2.0 h by the NAs labeled with different numbers of AR-activating ligands. By choosing a suitable NA, it is possible to maximize brain drug delivery and minimize the uncontrollable BBB leakage by matching the BBB opening time-window with the pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic agent. The NA-mediated brain drug delivery strategy holds promise for the treatment of CNS diseases with improved therapeutic efficiency and reduced side-effects.

  6. Region-specific differences in brain melanocortin receptors in rats of the lean phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Charu; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Novak, Colleen M

    2012-07-11

    The brain melanocortin (MC) system is one of numerous overlapping systems regulating energy balance; it consists of peptides including α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone that act through melanocortin receptors (MCRs). Mutations and polymorphisms in MC3R and MC4R have been identified as one of the most common genetic contributors to obesity in human studies. Brain MC3R and MC4R are known to modulate energy expenditure (EE) and food intake, but much less is known regarding brain MC5R. To test the hypothesis that brain MC modulates physical activity (PA) and EE, we compared brain MCR profiles in rats that consistently show high versus low levels of 'spontaneous' daily PA. Compared with low-activity rats, high-activity rats show enhanced mRNA expression of MCRs in the brain, specifically of MC3R in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and MC4R and MC5R in the perifornical lateral hypothalamus. Next, we microinjected the MCR agonist melanotan II into the PVN region and measured PA and EE. Intra-PVN melanotan II induced a dose-dependent increase in PA and this effect was greater in high-activity rats compared with low-activity rats. These results indicate region-specific brain MCR expression in the heightened PA seen in association with high endurance capacity and identify promising targets in the brain MC system that may contribute to interindividual variability in energy balance.

  7. The effects of avermectin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Jie; Sun, Bao-Hong; Cao, Ye; Yao, Hai-Dong; Qu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Ci; Xu, Shi-Wen; Li, Shu

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of avermectin (AVM) on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain. Four groups two-month-old American king pigeons (n=20/group) were fed either a commercial diet or an AVM-supplemented diet (20mg/kg·diet, 40 mg/kg·diet, or 60 mg/kg·diet) for 30, 60, or 90 days. The contents of aspartic acid (ASP), glutamate (GLU), glycine (GLY), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain tissues were determined using ultraviolet high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The expression levels of the GLU and GABA receptor genes were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicate that AVM exposure significantly enhances the contents of GABA, GLY, GLU, and ASP in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and optic lobe. In addition, AVM exposure increases the mRNA expression levels of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A), and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that the most damaged organ was the cerebrum, followed by the cerebellum, and then the optic lobe. These results show that the AVM-induced neurotoxicity may be associated with its effects on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors. The information presented in this study will help supplement the available data for future AVM toxicity studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lysergic acid diethylamide-induced Fos expression in rat brain: role of serotonin-2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresch, P J; Strickland, L V; Sanders-Bush, E

    2002-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) produces altered mood and hallucinations in humans and binds with high affinity to serotonin-2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors. Although LSD interacts with other receptors, the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors is thought to mediate the hallucinogenic properties of LSD. The goal of this study was to identify the brain sites activated by LSD and to determine the influence of 5-HT(2A) receptors in this activation. Rats were pretreated with the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist MDL 100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 min prior to LSD (500 microg/kg, i.p.) administration and killed 3 h later. Brain tissue was examined for Fos protein expression by immunohistochemistry. LSD administration produced a five- to eight-fold increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and central nucleus of amygdala. However, in dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens no increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity was observed. Pretreatment with MDL 100907 completely blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, but only partially blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in amygdala. Double-labeled immunohistochemistry revealed that LSD did not induce Fos-like immunoreactivity in cortical cells expressing 5-HT(2A) receptors, suggesting an indirect activation of cortical neurons. These results indicate that the LSD activation of medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex is mediated by 5-HT(2A) receptors, whereas in amygdala 5-HT(2A) receptor activation is a component of the response. These findings support the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and perhaps the amygdala, are important regions involved in the production of hallucinations. Copyright 2002 IBRO

  9. Analyses of variant human papillomavirus type-16 E5 proteins for their ability to induce mitogenesis of murine fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cason John

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16 E5 protein co-operates with epidermal growth factor to stimulate mitogenesis of murine fibroblasts. Currently, little is known about which viral amino acids are involved in this process. Using sequence variants of HPV-16 E5 we have investigated their effects upon E5 transcription, cell-cycling and cell-growth of murine fibroblasts. Results We demonstrate that: (i introduction of Thr64 into the reference E5 sequence of HPV-16 abrogates mitogenic activity: both were poorly transcribed in NIH-3T3 cells; (ii substitution of Leu44Val65 or, Thr37Leu44Val65 into the HPV-16 E5 reference backbone resulted in high transcription in NIH-3T3 cells, enhanced cell-cycle progression and high cell-growth; and, (iii inclusion of Tyr8 into the Leu44Val65 backbone inhibited E5 induced cell-growth and repression of p21 expression, despite high transcription levels. Conclusion The effects of HPV-16 E5 variants upon mitosis help to explain why Leu44Val65 HPV-16 E5 variants are most prevalent in 'wild' pathogenic viral populations in the UK.

  10. Prominent increase in synthesis of a nuclear protein is an early signal associated with mitogenesis of B cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuerstein, N.; Mond, J.J.

    1987-05-01

    Activation of murine splenic B lymphocytes with various mitogens was found to be associated with a prominent increase in synthesis and abundance of a 40 KDa/pI 5.0 nuclear protein (p40). Subcellular fractionation revealed that this protein is not found in the cytosol fraction and cannot be solubilized by DNAse or RNAse digestion, indication that the protein is mainly associated with the nuclear matrix. The increase in synthesis of p40 was detected at early G1 phase, 60 min following activation of the cells by the mitogen, reached a peak at 16h and declined to control level at 48h (during S phase). Activation of the cells with non mitogenic stimuli such as BSF-1, A23187, and PMA, induced an increase in synthesis of discrete nuclear proteins, but failed to affect the synthesis of p40, suggesting that the increase in synthesis of p40 is specifically associated with the signal of mitogenic stimuli but not with this of non mitogenic stimuli. Inhibition of the mitogenic effect of anti-Ig by PMA treatment of the cells was associated with specific inhibition in the synthesis of p40, while overcoming this inhibition by addition of 8-mercaptoguanosine was associated with restoration of the mitogenic effect of anti-Ig. These results suggest that p40 may have an important role in early induction of mitogenesis in B cells.

  11. Kinetics of Transferrin and Transferrin-Receptor during Iron Transport through Blood Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aminul; Liu, Jin; Dutta, Prashanta

    2017-11-01

    Transferrin and its receptors play an important role during the uptake and transcytosis of iron by blood brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells to maintain iron homeostasis in BBB endothelium and brain. In the blood side of BBB, ferric iron binds with the apo-transferrin to form holo-transferrin which enters the endothelial cell via transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Depending on the initial concentration of iron inside the cell endocytosed holo-transferrin can either be acidified in the endosome or exocytosed through the basolateral membrane. Acidification of holo-transferrin in the endosome releases ferrous irons which may either be stored and used by the cell or transported into brain side. Exocytosis of the holo-transferrin through basolateral membrane leads to transport of iron bound to transferrin into brain side. In this work, kinetics of internalization, recycling and exocytosis of transferrin and its receptors are modeled by laws of mass action during iron transport in BBB endothelial cell. Kinetic parameters for the model are determined by least square analysis. Our results suggest that the cell's initial iron content determines the extent of the two possible iron transport pathways, which will be presented in this talk Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01GM122081.

  12. The nuclear receptor PPARγ as a therapeutic target for cerebrovascular and brain dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nektaria Nicolakakis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that regulate peripheral lipid and glucose metabolism. Three subtypes make up the PPAR family (α, γ, β/δ, and synthetic ligands for PPARα (fibrates and PPARγ (Thiazolidinediones, TZDs are currently prescribed for the respective management of dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes. In contrast to the well characterized action of PPARs in the periphery, little was known about the presence or function of these receptors in the brain and cerebral vasculature, until fairly recently. Indeed, research in the last decade has uncovered these receptors in most brain cell types, and has shown that their activation, particularly that of PPARγ, is implicated in normal brain and cerebrovascular physiology, and confers protection under pathological conditions. Notably, accumulating evidence has highlighted the therapeutic potential of PPARγ ligands in the treatment of brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, leading to the testing of the TZDs pioglitazone and rosiglitazone in AD clinical trials. This review will focus on the benefits of PPARγ agonists for vascular, neuronal and glial networks, and assess the value of these compounds as future AD therapeutics in light of evidence from transgenic mouse models and recent clinical trials.

  13. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Shah, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on

  14. [Studying specific effects of nootropic drugs on glutamate receptors in the rat brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstova, Iu Iu; Vasil'eva, E V; Kovalev, G I

    2011-01-01

    The influence of nootropic drugs of different groups (piracetam, phenotropil, nooglutil, noopept, semax, meclofenoxate, pantocalcine, and dimebon) on the binding of the corresponding ligands to AMPA, NMDA, and mGlu receptors of rat brain has been studied by the method of radio-ligand binding in vitro. It is established that nooglutil exhibits pharmacologically significant competition with a selective agonist of AMPA receptors ([G-3H]Ro 48-8587) for the receptor binding sites (with IC50 = 6.4 +/- 0.2 microM), while the competition of noopept for these receptor binding sites was lower by an order of magnitude (IC50 = 80 +/- 5.6 microM). The heptapeptide drug semax was moderately competitive with [G-3H]LY 354740 for mGlu receptor sites (IC50 = 33 +/- 2.4 microM). Dimebon moderately influenced the specific binding of the ligand of NMDA receptor channel ([G-3H]MK-801) at IC50 = 59 +/- 3.6 microM. Nootropic drugs of the pyrrolidone group (piracetam, phenotropil) as well as meclofenoxate, pantocalcine (pantogam) in a broad rage of concentrations (10(-4)-10(-10) M) did not affect the binding of the corresponding ligands to glutamate receptors (IC50 100 pM). Thus, the direct neurochemical investigation was used for the first time to qualitatively characterize the specific binding sites for nooglutil and (to a lower extent) noopept on AMPA receptors, for semax on metabotropic glutamate receptors, and for dimebon on the channel region of NMDA receptors. The results are indicative of a selective action of some nootropes on the glutamate family.

  15. Glycine and GABAA Ultra-Sensitive Ethanol Receptors as Novel Tools for Alcohol and Brain Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Anna; Muchhala, Karan H.; Asatryan, Liana; Trudell, James R.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Perkins, Daya I.; Alkana, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    A critical obstacle to developing effective medications to prevent and/or treat alcohol use disorders is the lack of specific knowledge regarding the plethora of molecular targets and mechanisms underlying alcohol (ethanol) action in the brain. To identify the role of individual receptor subunits in ethanol-induced behaviors, we developed a novel class of ultra-sensitive ethanol receptors (USERs) that allow activation of a single receptor subunit population sensitized to extremely low ethanol concentrations. USERs were created by mutating as few as four residues in the extracellular loop 2 region of glycine receptors (GlyRs) or γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs), which are implicated in causing many behavioral effects linked to ethanol abuse. USERs, expressed in Xenopus oocytes and tested using two-electrode voltage clamp, demonstrated an increase in ethanol sensitivity of 100-fold over wild-type receptors by significantly decreasing the threshold and increasing the magnitude of ethanol response, without altering general receptor properties including sensitivity to the neurosteroid, allopregnanolone. These profound changes in ethanol sensitivity were observed across multiple subunits of GlyRs and GABAARs. Collectively, our studies set the stage for using USER technology in genetically engineered animals as a unique tool to increase understanding of the neurobiological basis of the behavioral effects of ethanol. PMID:25245406

  16. Effects of vitamin B-6 nutrition on benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor binding in the developing rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, J.P.; Guilarte, T.R. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1990-02-26

    A dietary deficiency of vitamin B-6 promotes seizure activity in neonatal animals and human infants. Previous studied have shown that neonatal vitamin B-6 deprivation results in reduced levels of brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and increased binding at the GABA site of the GABA/BDZ receptor complex. Since the GABA and BDZ receptors are allosterically linked, this study was undertaken to determine if vitamin B-6 deprivation had an effect on BDZ receptor binding. Benzodiazepine receptor binding isotherms using {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam as ligand were performed in the presence and absence of 10 {mu}M GABA. The results indicate a significant increase in the binding affinity (Kd) in the presence of GABA in cerebellar membranes from deficient rat pups at 14 days of age with no effect on receptor number (Bmax). By 28 days of age, the increase in Kd was no longer present. No change in Kd or Bmax was observed in cortical tissue from deficient animals at 14 or 28 days of age. Preliminary studies of GABA-enhancement of {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam binding indicate that vitamin B-6 deficiency also induces alterations in the ability of GABA to enhance BZD receptor binding. In summary, these results indicate that the effects of vitamin B-6 deprivation on BDZ receptor binding are region specific and age related.

  17. The interaction of lisuride, an ergot derivative, with serotonergic and dopaminergic receptors in rabbit brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, M R; Makman, M H

    1981-03-01

    The interaction of lisuride (Lysenyl, Spofa), an ergot derivative, with serotonergic and dopaminergic receptors and with adenylate cyclase was studied in homogenates of rabbit brain. In frontal cortex, lisuride interacts with serotonin receptors as shown by its ability to compete with [3H]serotonin, [3H]spiroperidol and [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide for their receptor binding sites, with respective IC50 values of 14, 1.0 and 3.7 nM. The IC50 for displacement of [3H]spiroperidol by lisuride in frontal cortex was increased by the GTP analog, 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate, indicating an agonist-like interaction. Lisuride is extraordinarily potent in stimulating serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase in this brain region, with maximal stimulations occurring at 0.1 nM lisuride. In caudate nucleus, lisuride interacted with both serotonergic and dopaminergic receptor sites as labeled by [3H]serotonin, [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide and [3H]2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, with IC50 values ranging from 2.0 to 7 nM. Lisuride did not stimulate adenylate cyclase in caudate nucleus. In summary, lisuride is a very potent stimulator of serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase in rabbit frontal cortex and can interact with serotonin and dopamine receptor binding sites in rabbit cortex and caudate nucleus.

  18. Influence of acetylcholine on binding of 4-[{sup 125}i]iododexetimide to muscarinic brain receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weckesser, Matthias E-mail: m.weckesser@fz-juelich.de; Fixmann, Anton; Holschbach, Marcus; Mueller-Gaertner, Hans-W

    1998-11-01

    The distribution of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the human brain in vivo has been successfully characterized using radiolabeled tracers and emission tomography. The effect of acetylcholine release into the synaptic cleft on receptor binding of these tracers has not yet been investigated. The present study examined the influence of acetylcholine on binding of 4-[{sup 125}I]iododexetimide to muscarinic cholinergic receptors of porcine brain synaptosomes in vitro. 4-Iododexetimide is a subtype-unspecific muscarinic receptor antagonist with high affinity. Acetylcholine competed with 4-[{sup 125}I]iododexetimide in a dose-dependent manner. A concentration of 500 {mu}M acetylcholine inhibited 50% of total specific 4-[{sup 125}I]iododexetimide binding to synaptosomes when both substances were given simultaneously. An 800 {mu}M acetylcholine solution reduced total specific 4-[{sup 125}I]iododexetimide binding by about 35%, when acetylcholine was given 60 min after incubation of synaptosomes with 4-[{sup 125}I]iododexetimide. Variations in the synaptic acetylcholine concentration might influence muscarinic cholinergic receptor imaging in vivo using 4-[{sup 123}I]iododexetimide. Conversely, 4-[{sup 123}I]iododexetimide might be an appropriate molecule to investigate alterations of acetylcholine release into the synaptic cleft in vivo using single photon emission computed tomography.

  19. Characterization and in vivo regulation of V sub 1 -type vasopressin receptors in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shewey, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Specific, high affinity binding sites for ({sup 3}H)-arginine{sup 8}-vasopressin (AVP) have been characterized in Long-Evans rat septal membranes. Binding displacement studies with peptide analogs of AVP indicate that this binding site is similar to the V{sub 1} (pressor)-type receptor for AVP. When added to rat brain septal slices that had been pre-labeled with ({sup 3}H)-myoinositol, AVP stimulated the accumulation of ({sup 3}H)-inositol-1-phosphate (IP{sub 1}) in the presence of lithium in a dose-dependent manner. This stimulation was completely inhibited by the specific V{sub 1} antagonists, d(CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP, indicating that AVP stimulates hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids in rat brain septum through an interaction with V{sub 1}-type AVP receptors. Binding studies of AVP receptors in the septum of heterozygous (HE) and homozygous, Brattleboro (BB) rats revealed an increased number of receptors with a lower affinity for AVP in the HO-BB rat when compared to the HE-BB rat. AVP-stimulated accumulation of ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 1} was significantly greater in the septum of the HO-BB rat than in the HE-BB rat. AVP receptor binding capacity correlated with release of ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 1} for all three groups studied.

  20. Brain imaging of serotonin 4 receptors in humans with [11C]SB207145-PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Karine

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological stimulation of the serotonin 4 (5-HT(4)) receptor has shown promise for treatment of Alzheimer's disease and major depression. A new selective radioligand, [(11)C]SB207145, for positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify brain 5-HT(4) receptors in sixteen healthy...... is expected to increase competition from endogenous serotonin. Given radiotracer administration at a range of specific activities, we were able to use the individual BP(ND) measurements for population-based estimation of the saturation binding parameters; B(max) ranged from 0.3 to 1.6 nM. B...

  1. Transferrin receptor (TfR) trafficking determines brain uptake of TfR antibody affinity variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien-Ly, Nga; Yu, Y Joy; Bumbaca, Daniela; Elstrott, Justin; Boswell, C Andrew; Zhang, Yin; Luk, Wilman; Lu, Yanmei; Dennis, Mark S; Weimer, Robby M; Chung, Inhee; Watts, Ryan J

    2014-02-10

    Antibodies to transferrin receptor (TfR) have potential use for therapeutic entry into the brain. We have shown that bispecific antibodies against TfR and β-secretase (BACE1 [β-amyloid cleaving enzyme-1]) traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and effectively reduce brain amyloid β levels. We found that optimizing anti-TfR affinity improves brain exposure and BACE1 inhibition. Here we probe the cellular basis of this improvement and explore whether TfR antibody affinity alters the intracellular trafficking of TfR. Comparing high- and low-affinity TfR bispecific antibodies in vivo, we found that high-affinity binding to TfR caused a dose-dependent reduction of brain TfR levels. In vitro live imaging and colocalization experiments revealed that high-affinity TfR bispecific antibodies facilitated the trafficking of TfR to lysosomes and thus induced the degradation of TfR, an observation which was further confirmed in vivo. Importantly, high-affinity anti-TfR dosing induced reductions in brain TfR levels, which significantly decreased brain exposure to a second dose of low-affinity anti-TfR bispecific. Thus, high-affinity anti-TfR alters TfR trafficking, which dramatically impacts the capacity for TfR to mediate BBB transcytosis.

  2. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Stengel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates—in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis—other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a broader anti-stress effect by blunting the endocrine, autonomic, behavioral (with a focus on food intake and visceral gastrointestinal motor responses through the involvement of distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  3. Lactate Receptor Sites Link Neurotransmission, Neurovascular Coupling, and Brain Energy Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Morland, Cecilie; Puchades, Maja

    2013-01-01

    by physiological concentrations of lactate and by the specific GPR81 agonist 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate to reduce cAMP. Cerebral GPR81 is concentrated on the synaptic membranes of excitatory synapses, with a postsynaptic predominance. GPR81 is also enriched at the blood-brain-barrier: the GPR81 densities at endothelial......The G-protein-coupled lactate receptor, GPR81 (HCA1), is known to promote lipid storage in adipocytes by downregulating cAMP levels. Here, we show that GPR81 is also present in the mammalian brain, including regions of the cerebral neocortex and hippocampus, where it can be activated...

  4. Effect of sabcomeline on muscarinic and dopamine receptor binding in intact mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoi, Rie; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Inoue, Osamu [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Ishida, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    2003-04-01

    Sabcomeline [(R-(Z)-(+)-{alpha}-(methoxyiamino)- 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3-acetonitrile)] is a potent and functionally selective muscarinic M{sub 1} receptor partial agonist. However, little is known of the binding properties of sabcomeline under in vivo conditions. In this study, muscarinic receptor occupancy by sabcomeline in mouse brain regions and heart was estimated using [{sup 3}H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and [{sup 3}H]N-methylpiperidyl benzilate (NMPB) as radioligands. In the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, the estimated IC{sub 50} value of sabcomeline for [{sup 3}H]NMPB binding was almost 0.2 mg/kg. Sabcomeline was not a selective ligand to M{sub 1} receptors as compared with biperiden in vivo. In the cerebral cortex, maximum receptor occupancy was observed about 1 hr after intravenous injection of sabcomeline (0.3 mg/kg), and the binding availability of mACh receptors had almost returned to the control level by 3-4 hr. These findings indicated that the binding kinetics of sabcomeline is rather rapid in mouse brain. Examination of dopamine D{sub 2} receptor binding revealed that sabcomeline affected the kinetics of both [{sup 3}H]raclopride and [{sup 3}H]N-methylspiperone (NMSP) binding in the striatum. It significantly decreased the k{sub 3} and k{sub 4} of [{sup 3}H]raclopride binding resulting in an increase in binding potential (BP=k{sub 3}/k{sub 4}=B{sub max}/K{sub d}) in sabcomeline-treated mice, and an approximately 15% decrease in k{sub 3} of [{sup 3}H]NMSP binding was also observed. Although the mechanism is still unclear, sabcomeline altered dopamine D{sub 2} receptor affinity or availability by modulations via neural networks. (author)

  5. Molecular mechanisms of the synergy between cysteinyl-leukotrienes and receptor tyrosine kinase growth factors on human bronchial fibroblast proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Yoshisue

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We have reported that cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs synergise not only with epidermal growth factor (EGF but also with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF and fibroblast growth factor (FGF to induce mitogenesis in human bronchial fibroblasts. We now describe the molecular mechanisms underlying this synergism. Mitogenesis was assessed by incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA and changes in protein phosphorylation by Western blotting. Surprisingly, no CysLT receptor antagonists (MK-571, montelukast, BAY u9773 prevented the synergistic mitogenesis. LTD4 did not cause phosphorylation of EGFR nor did it augment EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, and the synergy between LTD4 and EGF was not blocked by the metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001 or by an HB-EGF neutralising antibody. The EGFR-selective kinase inhibitor, AG1478, suppressed the synergy by LTD4 and EGF, but had no effect on the synergy with PDGF and FGF. While inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC prevented the synergy, these drugs also inhibited mitogenesis elicited by EGF alone. In contrast, pertussis toxin (PTX efficiently inhibited the potentiating effect of LTD4 on EGF-induced mitogenesis, as well as that provoked by PDGF or FGF, but had no effect on mitogenesis elicited by the growth factors alone. Whereas LTD4 alone did not augment phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk-1/2 and Akt, it increased phosphorylation of PKC in a Gi-dependent manner. Addition of LTD4 prolonged the duration of EGF-induced phosphorylation of Erk-1/2 and Akt, both of which were sensitive to PTX. The effect of cys-LTs involves a PTX-sensitive and PKC-mediated intracellular pathway leading to sustained growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of Erk-1/2 and Akt.

  6. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  7. Brain aromatase (Cyp19A2) and estrogen receptors, in larvae and adult pejerrey fish Odontesthes bonariensis: Neuroanatomical and functional relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl-Mazzulla, P. H.; Lethimonier, C.; Gueguen, M.M.; Karube, M.; Fernandino, J.I.; Yoshizaki, G.; Patino, R.; Strussmann, C.A.; Kah, O.; Somoza, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Although estrogens exert many functions on vertebrate brains, there is little information on the relationship between brain aromatase and estrogen receptors. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of two estrogen receptors, ?? and ??, in pejerrey. Both receptors' mRNAs largely overlap and were predominantly expressed in the brain, pituitary, liver, and gonads. Also brain aromatase and estrogen receptors were up-regulated in the brain of estradiol-treated males. In situ hybridization was performed to study in more detail, the distribution of the two receptors in comparison with brain aromatase mRNA in the brain of adult pejerrey. The estrogen receptors' mRNAs exhibited distinct but partially overlapping patterns of expression in the preoptic area and the mediobasal hypothalamus, as well as in the pituitary gland. Moreover, the estrogen receptor ??, but not ??, were found to be expressed in cells lining the preoptic recess, similarly as observed for brain aromatase. Finally, it was shown that the onset expression of brain aromatase and both estrogen receptors in the head of larvae preceded the morphological differentiation of the gonads. Because pejerrey sex differentiation is strongly influenced by temperature, brain aromatase expression was measured during the temperature-sensitive window and was found to be significantly higher at male-promoting temperature. Taken together these results suggest close neuroanatomical and functional relationships between brain aromatase and estrogen receptors, probably involved in the sexual differentiation of the brain and raising interesting questions on the origin (central or peripheral) of the brain aromatase substrate. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  8. Estrogen activates rapid signaling in the brain: role of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta in neurons and glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhyre, A J; Dorsa, D M

    2006-01-01

    The aging process is known to coincide with a decline in circulating sex hormone levels in both men and women. Due to an increase in the average lifespan, a growing number of post-menopausal women are now receiving hormone therapy for extended periods of time. Recent findings of the Women's Health Initiative, however, have called into question the benefits of long-term hormone therapy for treating symptoms of menopause. The results of this study are still being evaluated, but it is clear that a better understanding of the molecular effects of estradiol is needed in order to develop new estrogenic compounds that activate specific mechanisms but lack adverse side effects. Traditionally, the effects of estradiol treatment have been ascribed to changes in gene expression, namely transcription at estrogen response elements. This review focuses on emerging information that estradiol can also activate a repertoire of membrane-initiated signaling pathways and that these rapid signaling events lead to functional changes at the cellular level. The various types of cells in the brain can respond differently to estradiol treatment based on the signaling properties of the cell, as well as which receptor, estrogen receptor alpha and/or estrogen receptor beta, is expressed. Taken together, these findings suggest that the estradiol-induced activation of membrane-initiated signaling pathways occurs in a cell-type specific manner and can differentially influence how the cells respond to various insults.

  9. Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Rojas, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via intracell...

  10. Characterization of CB1 cannabinoid receptor immunoreactivity in postmortem human brain homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesús, M López; Sallés, J; Meana, J J; Callado, L F

    2006-06-30

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is the predominant type of cannabinoid receptor in the CNS, in which it displays a unique anatomical distribution and is present at higher densities than most other known seven transmembrane domain receptors. Nevertheless, as with almost all seven transmembrane domain receptors, the tertiary and quaternary structure of this receptor is still unknown. Studies of CB1 in rat cerebral tissue are scarce, and even less is known regarding the expression of CB1 in the human brain. Thus, the aim of the present work was to characterize CB1 expression in membranes from postmortem human brain using specific antisera raised against this protein. Western blot analysis of P1 and P2 fractions, and crude plasma membrane preparations from the prefrontal cortex showed that CB1 migrated as a 60 kDa monomer under reducing conditions. These data were confirmed by blotting experiments carried out with human U373MG astrocytoma cells as a positive control for CB1 expression and wild-type CHO cells as negative control. In addition, when proteins were solubilized in the absence of dithiothreitol, the anti-human CB1 antiserum detected a new band migrating at around 120 kDa corresponding in size to a putative CB1 dimer. This band was sensitive to reducing agents (50 mM dithiothreitol) and showed sodium dodecylsulphate stability, suggesting the existence of disulfide-linked CB1 dimers in the membrane preparations. Important differences in the anatomical distribution of CB1 were observed with regard to that described previously in monkey and rat; in the human brain, CB1 levels were higher in cortex and caudate than in the cerebellum.

  11. Notch receptor expression in neurogenic regions of the adult zebrafish brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Oliveira-Carlos

    Full Text Available The adult zebrash brain has a remarkable constitutive neurogenic capacity. The regulation and maintenance of its adult neurogenic niches are poorly understood. In mammals, Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance both in embryonic and adult CNS. To better understand how Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance during adult neurogenesis in zebrafish we analysed Notch receptor expression in five neurogenic zones of the adult zebrafish brain. Combining proliferation and glial markers we identified several subsets of Notch receptor expressing cells. We found that 90 [Formula: see text] of proliferating radial glia express notch1a, notch1b and notch3. In contrast, the proliferating non-glial populations of the dorsal telencephalon and hypothalamus rarely express notch3 and about half express notch1a/1b. In the non-proliferating radial glia notch3 is the predominant receptor throughout the brain. In the ventral telencephalon and in the mitotic area of the optic tectum, where cells have neuroepithelial properties, notch1a/1b/3 are expressed in most proliferating cells. However, in the cerebellar niche, although progenitors also have neuroepithelial properties, only notch1a/1b are expressed in a high number of PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. In this region notch3 expression is mostly in Bergmann glia and at low levels in few PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. Additionally, we found that in the proliferation zone of the ventral telencephalon, Notch receptors display an apical high to basal low gradient of expression. Notch receptors are also expressed in subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells. We suggest that the partial regional heterogeneity observed for Notch expression in progenitor cells might be related to the cellular diversity present in each of these neurogenic niches.

  12. Developmentally Regulated Expression of the Nerve Growth Factor Receptor Gene in the Periphery and Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, C. R.; Martinez, Humberto J.; Black, Ira B.; Chao, Moses V.

    1987-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates development and maintenance of function of peripheral sympathetic and sensory neurons. A potential role for the trophic factor in brain has been detected only recently. The ability of a cell to respond to NGF is due, in part, to expression of specific receptors on the cell surface. To study tissue-specific expression of the NGF receptor gene, we have used sensitive cRNA probes for detection of NGF receptor mRNA. Our studies indicate that the receptor gene is selectively and specifically expressed in sympathetic (superior cervical) and sensory (dorsal root) ganglia in the periphery, and by the septum-basal forebrain centrally, in the neonatal rat in vivo. Moreover, examination of tissues from neonatal and adult rats reveals a marked reduction in steady-state NGF receptor mRNA levels in sensory ganglia. In contrast, a 2- to 4-fold increase was observed in the basal forebrain and in the sympathetic ganglia over the same time period. Our observations suggest that NGF receptor mRNA expression is developmentally regulated in specific areas of the nervous system in a differential fashion.

  13. Spatial cluster analysis of nanoscopically mapped serotonin receptors for classification of fixed brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Michael; Silye, Rene; Göhring, Janett; Muresan, Leila; Schilcher, Kurt; Jacak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    We present a cluster spatial analysis method using nanoscopic dSTORM images to determine changes in protein cluster distributions within brain tissue. Such methods are suitable to investigate human brain tissue and will help to achieve a deeper understanding of brain disease along with aiding drug development. Human brain tissue samples are usually treated postmortem via standard fixation protocols, which are established in clinical laboratories. Therefore, our localization microscopy-based method was adapted to characterize protein density and protein cluster localization in samples fixed using different protocols followed by common fluorescent immunohistochemistry techniques. The localization microscopy allows nanoscopic mapping of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor groups within a two-dimensional image of a brain tissue slice. These nanoscopically mapped proteins can be confined to clusters by applying the proposed statistical spatial analysis. Selected features of such clusters were subsequently used to characterize and classify the tissue. Samples were obtained from different types of patients, fixed with different preparation methods, and finally stored in a human tissue bank. To verify the proposed method, samples of a cryopreserved healthy brain have been compared with epitope-retrieved and paraffin-fixed tissues. Furthermore, samples of healthy brain tissues were compared with data obtained from patients suffering from mental illnesses (e.g., major depressive disorder). Our work demonstrates the applicability of localization microscopy and image analysis methods for comparison and classification of human brain tissues at a nanoscopic level. Furthermore, the presented workflow marks a unique technological advance in the characterization of protein distributions in brain tissue sections.

  14. Internal receptors in insect appendages project directly into a special brain neuropile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräunig, Peter; Krumpholz, Katharina

    2013-09-10

    The great majority of afferent neurons of insect legs project into their segmental ganglion. Intersegmental projections are rare and are only formed by sense organs associated with the basal joints of the legs. Such intersegmental projections never ascend as far as the brain and they form extensive ramifications within thoracic ganglia. A few afferents of chordotonal organs of the subcoxal joints ascend as far as the suboesophageal ganglion. We describe novel afferent neurons in distal segments of locust legs that project directly into the brain without forming ramifications in other ganglia. In the brain, the fibres terminate with characteristic terminals in a small neuropile previously named the superficial ventral inferior protocerebrum. The somata of these neurons are located in the tibiae and tarsi of all legs and they are located within branches of peripheral nerves, or closely associated with such branches. They are not associated with any accessory structures such as tendons or connective tissue strands as typical for insect internal mechanoreceptors such as chordotonal organs or stretch receptors. Morphologically they show great similarity to certain insect infrared receptors.We could not observe projections into the superficial ventral inferior protocerebrum after staining mandibular or labial nerves, but we confirm previous studies that showed projections into the same brain neuropile after staining maxillary and antennal nerves, indicating that most likely similar neurons are present in these appendages also. Because of their location deep within the lumen of appendages the function of these neurons as infrared receptors is unlikely. Their projection pattern and other morphological features indicate that the neurons convey information about an internal physiological parameter directly into a special brain neuropile. We discuss their possible function as thermoreceptors.

  15. The serotonin receptor 7 and the structural plasticity of brain circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana eVolpicelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT modulates numerous physiological processes in the nervous system. Together with its function as neurotrasmitter, 5-HT regulates neurite outgrowth, dendritic spine shape and density, growth cone motility and synapse formation during development. In the mammalian brain 5-HT innervation is virtually ubiquitous and the diversity and specificity of its signaling and function arise from at least 20 different receptors, grouped in 7 classes. Here we will focus on the role 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7R in the correct establishment of neuronal cytoarchitecture during development, as also suggested by its involvement in several neurodevelopmental disorders. The emerging picture shows that this receptor is a key player contributing not only to shape brain networks during development but also to remodel neuronal wiring in the mature brain, thus controlling cognitive and emotional responses. The activation of 5-HT7R might be one of the mechanisms underlying the ability of the CNS to respond to different stimuli by modulation of its circuit configuration.

  16. [Brain dopamine receptors: structure, functional role, and modulation by psychotropic substances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raevskiĭ, K S

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular neurobiology led to a new understanding on mammalian brain dopaminergic system which plays a major role in the regulation of motor, cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine functions as well as in the pathogenesis of several pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, affective disorders, schizophrenia, drug addiction etc. Functional, biochemical and pharmacological heterogeneity of dopamine receptors, which were divided into D1-like (D1 and D5 subtypes) and D2-like (D2, D3 and D4) families of receptors has been postulated. The article reviews the recent advances including author's own results concerning the structure and function of main dopaminergic brain system, i.e. nigrostriatal and mesolimbic. The problem of autoreceptor regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission, particularly, the processes of dopamine synthesis, release and metabolism has been specially discussed. An involvement of D2 and D3 dopamine autoreceptors in the control of these processes and differences in the mode of action of typical and atypical neuroleptics demonstrating various affinities to D2 and D3 dopamine receptors are analysed in detail. Dopamine and its metabolites have been determined on freely moving rats using brain microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography. It is hypothesized that dopamine D3 autoreceptor is preferentially involved in the regulation of dopamine release while D2 one is responsible for the control of dopamine synthesis and metabolism in rat basal ganglia in vivo.

  17. Brain-specific interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein in sleep regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taishi, Ping; Davis, Christopher J; Bayomy, Omar; Zielinski, Mark R; Liao, Fan; Clinton, James M; Smith, Dirk E; Krueger, James M

    2012-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1β is involved in several brain functions, including sleep regulation. It promotes non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep via the IL-1 type I receptor. IL-1β/IL-1 receptor complex signaling requires adaptor proteins, e.g., the IL-1 receptor brain-specific accessory protein (AcPb). We have cloned and characterized rat AcPb, which shares substantial homologies with mouse AcPb and, compared with AcP, is preferentially expressed in the brain. Furthermore, rat somatosensory cortex AcPb mRNA varied across the day with sleep propensity, increased after sleep deprivation, and was induced by somnogenic doses of IL-1β. Duration of NREM sleep was slightly shorter and duration of REM sleep was slightly longer in AcPb knockout than wild-type mice. In response to lipopolysaccharide, which is used to induce IL-1β, sleep responses were exaggerated in AcPb knockout mice, suggesting that, in normal mice, inflammation-mediated sleep responses are attenuated by AcPb. We conclude that AcPb has a role in sleep responses to inflammatory stimuli and, possibly, in physiological sleep regulation.

  18. Control of metabolism by nutrient-regulated nuclear receptors acting in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Prawitt, Janne; Staels, Bart

    2012-07-01

    Today, we are witnessing a rising incidence of obesity worldwide. This increase is due to a sedentary life style, an increased caloric intake and a decrease in physical activity. Obesity contributes to the appearance of type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular complications due to atherosclerosis, and nephropathy. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic strategies may become a necessity. Given the metabolism controlling properties of nuclear receptors in peripheral organs (such as liver, adipose tissues, pancreas) and their implication in various processes underlying metabolic diseases, they constitute interesting therapeutic targets for obesity, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The recent identification of the central nervous system as a player in the control of peripheral metabolism opens new avenues to our understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes and potential novel ways to treat these diseases. While the metabolic functions of nuclear receptors in peripheral organs have been extensively investigated, little is known about their functions in the brain, in particular with respect to brain control of energy homeostasis. This review provides an overview of the relationships between nuclear receptors in the brain, mainly at the hypothalamic level, and the central regulation of energy homeostasis. In this context, we will particularly focus on the role of PPARα, PPARγ, LXR and Rev-erbα. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of visual deprivation during brain development on expression of AMPA receptor subunits in rat’s hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed Alireza Talaei

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Dark rearing of rats during critical period of brain development changes the relative expression and also arrangement of both AMPA receptor subunits, GluR1 and GluR2 in the hippocampus, age dependently.

  20. Excitatory amino acid neurotoxicity and modulation of glutamate receptor expression in organotypic brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, J; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Jakobsen, B

    2000-01-01

    -induced excitotoxicity and KA-glutamate receptor subunit mRNA expression after long-term exposure to low, non-toxic doses of KA and NBQX. We conclude that organotypic brain slice cultures, combined with standardized procedures for quantitation of cell damage and receptor subunit changes is of great potential use......Using organotypic slice cultures of hippocampus and cortex-striatum from newborn to 7 day old rats, we are currently studying the excitotoxic effects of kainic acid (KA), AMPA and NMDA and the neuroprotective effects of glutamate receptor blockers, like NBQX. For detection and quantitation......-associated protein 2, and --e) general and specific neuronal and glial cell stains. The results show good correlation between the different markers, and are in accordance with results obtained in vivo. Examples presented in this review will focus on the use of PI uptake to monitor the excitotoxic effects of --a) KA...

  1. The benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain and its interaction with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, I.L.; Doble, A.

    1983-06-01

    (3H)Ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate ((3H) beta-CCE) binds to a homogeneous population of recognition sites in rat whole brain membranes with high affinity. The (3H)beta-CCE binding is completely displaceable by low concentrations of a number of benzodiazepines with similar potencies found when using a 3H-benzodiazepine as the ligand. This suggests that the recognition sites for beta-CCE and the benzodiazepines are identical or that they are involved in a close interaction. The binding of (3H)beta-CCE does not obey simple mass-action kinetics. (3H)Flunitrazepam dissociation from its receptor population is biphasic, and different methods of initiation of this dissociation indicate that cooperative interactions take place within the receptor population. We conclude that the benzodiazepine receptor is a single entity that can exist in two conformations, the equilibrium between which may be controlled by some as yet unidentified factor.

  2. Kinetic modeling of 11C-SB207145 binding to 5-HT4 receptors in the human brain in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Gillings, Nic; Comley, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT(4) receptor) is known to be involved in learning and memory. We evaluated for the first time the quantification of a novel 5-HT(4) receptor radioligand, (11)C-SB207145, for in vivo brain imaging with PET in humans. METHODS: For evaluation of reproducibility, 6...... region devoid of specific binding, and that nonspecific binding was constant across brain regions. CONCLUSION: In vivo imaging of cerebral 5-HT(4) receptors can be determined reliably using (11)C-207145 PET with arterial input in humans. SRTM showed high reproducibility and reliability but bias...... reference tissue model (SRTM). RESULTS: (11)C-SB207145 readily entered the brain and showed a distribution consistent with the known localization of the 5-HT(4) receptor. Using plasma input models, the time-activity data were well described by the 2-tissue-compartment model in all regions and allowed...

  3. Social information changes stress hormone receptor expression in the songbird brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Jamie M; Perreau, Gillian; Bishop, Valerie R; Krause, Jesse S; Smith, Rachael; Hahn, Thomas P; Meddle, Simone L

    2018-01-01

    Social information is used by many vertebrate taxa to inform decision-making, including resource-mediated movements, yet the mechanisms whereby social information is integrated physiologically to affect such decisions remain unknown. Social information is known to influence the physiological response to food reduction in captive songbirds. Red crossbills (Loxia curvirostra) that were food reduced for several days showed significant elevations in circulating corticosterone (a "stress" hormone often responsive to food limitation) only if their neighbors were similarly food restricted. Physiological responses to glucocorticoid hormones are enacted through two receptors that may be expressed differentially in target tissues. Therefore, we investigated the influence of social information on the expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA in captive red crossbill brains. Although the role of MR and GR in the response to social information may be highly complex, we specifically predicted social information from food-restricted individuals would reduce MR and GR expression in two brain regions known to regulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity - given that reduced receptor expression may lessen the efficacy of negative feedback and release inhibitory tone on the HPA. Our results support these predictions - offering one potential mechanism whereby social cues could increase or sustain HPA-activity during stress. The data further suggest different mechanisms by which metabolic stress versus social information influence HPA activity and behavioral outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Blockage of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 inhibits brain edema in middle cerebral artery occlusion mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinghui eJie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain edema is an important pathological process during stroke. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4 causes an up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in lung tissue. MMP can digest the endothelial basal lamina to destroy blood brain barrier, leading to vasogenic brain edema. Herein, we tested whether TRPV4-blockage could inhibit brain edema through inhibiting MMPs in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO mice. We found that the brain water content and Evans blue extravasation at 48 h post-MCAO were reduced by a TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047. The increased MMP-2/9 protein in hippocampus of MCAO mice was attenuated by HC-067046, but only the increased MMP-9 activity was blocked by HC-067047. The loss of zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1 and occludin protein in MCAO mice was also attenuated by HC-067047. Moreover, MMP-2/9 protein increased in mice treated with a TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A, but only MMP-9 activity was increased by GSK1016790A. Finally, ZO-1 and occludin protein was decreased by GSK1016790A, which was reversed by an MMP-9 inhibitor. We conclude that blockage of TRPV4 may inhibit brain edema in cerebral ischemia through inhibiting MMP-9 activation and the loss of tight junction protein.

  5. A2A Adenosine Receptor Antagonism Reverts the Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Sleep Restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hurtado-Alvarado

    Full Text Available Chronic sleep restriction induces blood-brain barrier disruption and increases pro-inflammatory mediators in rodents. Those inflammatory mediators may modulate the blood-brain barrier and constitute a link between sleep loss and blood-brain barrier physiology. We propose that adenosine action on its A2A receptor may be modulating the blood-brain barrier dynamics in sleep-restricted rats. We administrated a selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist (SCH58261 in sleep-restricted rats at the 10th day of sleep restriction and evaluated the blood-brain barrier permeability to dextrans coupled to fluorescein (FITC-dextrans and Evans blue. In addition, we evaluated by western blot the expression of tight junction proteins (claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1, adherens junction protein (E-cadherin, A2A adenosine receptor, adenosine-synthesizing enzyme (CD73, and neuroinflammatory markers (Iba-1 and GFAP in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal nuclei and cerebellar vermis. Sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability to FITC-dextrans and Evans blue, and the effect was reverted by the administration of SCH58261 in almost all brain regions, excluding the cerebellum. Sleep restriction increased the expression of A2A adenosine receptor only in the hippocampus and basal nuclei without changing the expression of CD73 in all brain regions. Sleep restriction reduced the expression of tight junction proteins in all brain regions, except in the cerebellum; and SCH58261 restored the levels of tight junction proteins in the cortex, hippocampus and basal nuclei. Finally, sleep restriction induced GFAP and Iba-1 overexpression that was attenuated with the administration of SCH58261. These data suggest that the action of adenosine on its A2A receptor may have a crucial role in blood-brain barrier dysfunction during sleep loss probably by direct modulation of brain endothelial cell permeability or through a mechanism that involves gliosis with subsequent

  6. A2A Adenosine Receptor Antagonism Reverts the Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Sleep Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Domínguez-Salazar, Emilio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Gómez-González, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction induces blood-brain barrier disruption and increases pro-inflammatory mediators in rodents. Those inflammatory mediators may modulate the blood-brain barrier and constitute a link between sleep loss and blood-brain barrier physiology. We propose that adenosine action on its A2A receptor may be modulating the blood-brain barrier dynamics in sleep-restricted rats. We administrated a selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist (SCH58261) in sleep-restricted rats at the 10th day of sleep restriction and evaluated the blood-brain barrier permeability to dextrans coupled to fluorescein (FITC-dextrans) and Evans blue. In addition, we evaluated by western blot the expression of tight junction proteins (claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1), adherens junction protein (E-cadherin), A2A adenosine receptor, adenosine-synthesizing enzyme (CD73), and neuroinflammatory markers (Iba-1 and GFAP) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal nuclei and cerebellar vermis. Sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability to FITC-dextrans and Evans blue, and the effect was reverted by the administration of SCH58261 in almost all brain regions, excluding the cerebellum. Sleep restriction increased the expression of A2A adenosine receptor only in the hippocampus and basal nuclei without changing the expression of CD73 in all brain regions. Sleep restriction reduced the expression of tight junction proteins in all brain regions, except in the cerebellum; and SCH58261 restored the levels of tight junction proteins in the cortex, hippocampus and basal nuclei. Finally, sleep restriction induced GFAP and Iba-1 overexpression that was attenuated with the administration of SCH58261. These data suggest that the action of adenosine on its A2A receptor may have a crucial role in blood-brain barrier dysfunction during sleep loss probably by direct modulation of brain endothelial cell permeability or through a mechanism that involves gliosis with subsequent inflammation and

  7. A2A Adenosine Receptor Antagonism Reverts the Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Sleep Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Domínguez-Salazar, Emilio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction induces blood-brain barrier disruption and increases pro-inflammatory mediators in rodents. Those inflammatory mediators may modulate the blood-brain barrier and constitute a link between sleep loss and blood-brain barrier physiology. We propose that adenosine action on its A2A receptor may be modulating the blood-brain barrier dynamics in sleep-restricted rats. We administrated a selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist (SCH58261) in sleep-restricted rats at the 10th day of sleep restriction and evaluated the blood-brain barrier permeability to dextrans coupled to fluorescein (FITC-dextrans) and Evans blue. In addition, we evaluated by western blot the expression of tight junction proteins (claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1), adherens junction protein (E-cadherin), A2A adenosine receptor, adenosine-synthesizing enzyme (CD73), and neuroinflammatory markers (Iba-1 and GFAP) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal nuclei and cerebellar vermis. Sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability to FITC-dextrans and Evans blue, and the effect was reverted by the administration of SCH58261 in almost all brain regions, excluding the cerebellum. Sleep restriction increased the expression of A2A adenosine receptor only in the hippocampus and basal nuclei without changing the expression of CD73 in all brain regions. Sleep restriction reduced the expression of tight junction proteins in all brain regions, except in the cerebellum; and SCH58261 restored the levels of tight junction proteins in the cortex, hippocampus and basal nuclei. Finally, sleep restriction induced GFAP and Iba-1 overexpression that was attenuated with the administration of SCH58261. These data suggest that the action of adenosine on its A2A receptor may have a crucial role in blood-brain barrier dysfunction during sleep loss probably by direct modulation of brain endothelial cell permeability or through a mechanism that involves gliosis with subsequent inflammation and

  8. Implications of astrocytes in mediating the protective effects of Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators upon brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Barreto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs are steroidal or non-steroidal compounds that are already used in clinical practice for the treatment of breast cancer, osteoporosis and menopausal symptoms. While SERMs actions in the breast, bone, and uterus have been well characterized, their actions in the brain are less well understood. Previous works have demonstrated the beneficial effects of SERMs in different chronic neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer, Parkinson’s disease and Multiple sclerosis, as well as acute degeneration as stroke and traumatic brain injury. Moreover, these compounds exhibit similar protective actions as those of estradiol in the Central Nervous System, overt any secondary effect. For these reasons, in the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the neuroprotective effects exerted directly or indirectly by SERMs in the SNC. In this context, astrocytes play an important role in the maintenance of brain metabolism, and antioxidant support to neurons, thus indicating that better protection of astrocytes are an important asset targeting neuronal protection. Moreover, various clinical and experimental studies have reported that astrocytes are essential for the neuroprotective effects of SERMs during neuronal injuries, as these cells express different estrogen receptors in cell membrane, demonstrating that part of SERMs effects upon injury may be mediated by astrocytes. The present work highlights the current evidence on the protective mechanisms of SERMs, such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, in the SNC, and their modulation of astrocytic properties as promising therapeutic targets during brain damage.

  9. Transferrin Receptor 2 Dependent Alterations of Brain Iron Metabolism Affect Anxiety Circuits in the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Rosa Maria; Boda, Enrica; Montarolo, Francesca; Boero, Martina; Mezzanotte, Mariarosa; Saglio, Giuseppe; Buffo, Annalisa; Roetto, Antonella

    2016-08-01

    The Transferrin Receptor 2 (Tfr2) modulates systemic iron metabolism through the regulation of iron regulator Hepcidin (Hepc) and Tfr2 inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Based on data demonstrating Tfr2 expression in brain, we analysed Tfr2-KO mice in order to examine the molecular, histological and behavioural consequences of Tfr2 silencing in this tissue. Tfr2 abrogation caused an accumulation of iron in specific districts in the nervous tissue that was not accompanied by a brain Hepc response. Moreover, Tfr2-KO mice presented a selective overactivation of neurons in the limbic circuit and the emergence of an anxious-like behaviour. Furthermore, microglial cells showed a particular sensitivity to iron perturbation. We conclude that Tfr2 is a key regulator of brain iron homeostasis and propose a role for Tfr2 alpha in the regulation of anxiety circuits.

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression in mdx mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Beatrice; Corsi, Patrizia; Vacca, Angelo; Roncali, Luisa; Ribatti, Domenico

    2002-10-25

    Recent data have demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is expressed by subsets of neurons, coincident with angiogenesis within its developing cerebral cortex. In this study, with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of vascular involvement during brain impairment in Duchenne muscular distrophy (DMD), we have correlated the vascular density with VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) expression in the brain cortex of normal and mdx mouse, an animal model with a genetic defect in a region homologous with the human DMD gene. Results showed that in mdx mouse, tissue area occupied by microvessels positive to factor VIII related antigen and VEGFR-2 increased in parallel to the tissue area occupied by neurons positive to VEGF. Our data suggest that increased vascularity in the brain of mdx mouse may be due, at least in part, to proliferation of endothelial cells in response to VEGF secreted by neuronal cells.

  11. Orexin 1 receptors are a novel target to modulate panic responses and the panic brain network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip L; Samuels, Brian C; Fitz, Stephanie D; Federici, Lauren M; Hammes, Nathan; Early, Maureen C; Truitt, William; Lowry, Christopher A; Shekhar, Anantha

    2012-12-05

    Although the hypothalamic orexin system is known to regulate appetitive behaviors and promote wakefulness and arousal (Sakurai, 2007 [56]), this system may also be important in adaptive and pathological anxiety/stress responses (Suzuki et al., 2005 [4]). In a recent study, we demonstrated that CSF orexin levels were significantly higher in patients experiencing panic attacks compared to non-panicking depressed subjects (Johnson et al., 2010 [9]). Furthermore, genetically silencing orexin synthesis or blocking orexin 1 receptors attenuated lactate-induced panic in an animal model of panic disorder. Therefore, in the present study, we tested if orexin (ORX) modulates panic responses and brain pathways activated by two different panicogenic drugs. We conducted a series of pharmacological, behavioral, physiological and immunohistochemical experiments to study the modulation by the orexinergic inputs of anxiety behaviors, autonomic responses, and activation of brain pathways elicited by systemic injections of anxiogenic/panicogenic drugs in rats. We show that systemic injections of two different anxiogenic/panicogenic drugs (FG-7142, an inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine site of the GABA(A) receptor, and caffeine, a nonselective competitive adenosine receptor antagonist) increased c-Fos induction in a specific subset of orexin neurons located in the dorsomedial/perifornical (DMH/PeF) but not the lateral hypothalamus. Pretreating rats with an orexin 1 receptor antagonist attenuated the FG-7142-induced anxiety-like behaviors, increased heart rate, and neuronal activation in key panic pathways, including subregions of the central nucleus of the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, periaqueductal gray and in the rostroventrolateral medulla. Overall, the data here suggest that the ORX neurons in the DMH/PeF region are critical to eliciting coordinated panic responses and that ORX1 receptor antagonists constitute a potential novel treatment strategy for panic and

  12. Abnormalities of Dopamine D3 Receptor Signaling in the Diseased Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, G Aleph

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine D3 receptors (D3R) modulate neuronal activity in several brain regions including cortex, striatum, cerebellum, and hippocampus. A growing body of evidence suggests that aberrant D3R signaling contributes to multiple brain diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, schizophrenia, and addiction. In line with these findings, D3R has emerged as a potential target in the treatment of neurological disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying neuronal D3R signaling are poorly understood, either in healthy or diseased brain. Here, I review the molecular mechanisms involved in D3R signaling via monomeric D3R and heteromeric receptor complexes (e.g., D3R-D1R, D3R-D2R, D3R-A2aR, and D3R-D3nf). I focus on D3R signaling pathways that, according to recent reports, contribute to pathological brain states. In particular, I describe evidence on both quantitative (e.g., increased number or affinity) and qualitative (e.g., switched signaling) changes in D3R that has been associated with brain dysfunction. I conclude with a description of basic mechanisms that modulate D3R signaling such as desensitization, as disruption of these mechanisms may underlie pathological changes in D3R signaling. Because several lines of evidence support the idea that imbalances in D3R signaling alter neural function, a better understanding of downstream D3R pathways is likely to reveal novel therapeutic strategies toward dopamine-related brain disorders. PMID:28855798

  13. Transcriptional activity of human brain estrogen receptor-α splice variants: evidence for cell type-specific regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishunina, T. A.; Sluiter, A. A.; Swaab, D. F.; Verwer, R. W. H.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) isoforms with complex types of alternative splicing are naturally present in the human brain and may affect canonical receptor signaling. In the present study we investigated transcriptional activity of common ERα splice variants from this group with different molecular

  14. Insulin-like growth factor II receptors in human brain and their absence in astrogliotic plaques in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilczak, N; De Bleser, P; Luiten, P; Geerts, A; Teelken, A; De Keyser, J

    2000-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II receptors were studied in human adult brain by using autoradiography with [(125)I]IGF-II. Receptors were found to be widely distributed throughout all neuronal regions. The highest densities were found in plexus choroideus, granular layer of the cerebellar cortex,

  15. Interleukin-1 Receptor in Seizure Susceptibility after Traumatic Injury to the Pediatric Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Bridgette D; O'Brien, Terence J; Gimlin, Kayleen; Wright, David K; Kim, Shi Eun; Casillas-Espinosa, Pablo M; Webster, Kyria M; Petrou, Steven; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2017-08-16

    Epilepsy after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with poor quality of life. This study aimed to characterize post-traumatic epilepsy in a mouse model of pediatric brain injury, and to evaluate the role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling as a target for pharmacological intervention. Male mice received a controlled cortical impact or sham surgery at postnatal day 21, approximating a toddler-aged child. Mice were treated acutely with an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra; 100 mg/kg, s.c.) or vehicle. Spontaneous and evoked seizures were evaluated from video-EEG recordings. Behavioral assays tested for functional outcomes, postmortem analyses assessed neuropathology, and brain atrophy was detected by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging. At 2 weeks and 3 months post-injury, TBI mice showed an elevated seizure response to the convulsant pentylenetetrazol compared with sham mice, associated with abnormal hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting. A robust increase in IL-1β and IL-1 receptor were detected after TBI. IL-1Ra treatment reduced seizure susceptibility 2 weeks after TBI compared with vehicle, and a reduction in hippocampal astrogliosis. In a chronic study, IL-1Ra-TBI mice showed improved spatial memory at 4 months post-injury. At 5 months, most TBI mice exhibited spontaneous seizures during a 7 d video-EEG recording period. At 6 months, IL-1Ra-TBI mice had fewer evoked seizures compared with vehicle controls, coinciding with greater preservation of cortical tissue. Findings demonstrate this model's utility to delineate mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis after pediatric brain injury, and provide evidence of IL-1 signaling as a mediator of post-traumatic astrogliosis and seizure susceptibility. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Epilepsy is a common cause of morbidity after traumatic brain injury in early childhood. However, a limited understanding of how epilepsy develops, particularly in the immature brain, likely contributes to the lack of efficacious treatments

  16. Ontogenic increase in PGE2 and PGF2 alpha receptor density in brain microvessels of pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D. Y.; Varma, D. R.; Chemtob, S.

    1994-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that the relative vasoconstrictor ineffectiveness of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGF2 alpha on cerebral vessels of newborn pigs might be due to fewer receptors for these prostanoids was tested by comparing receptors for PGE2 (EP) and PGF2 alpha (FP) in cerebral microvessels from newborn and adult pigs. 2. Specific binding of [3H]-PGE2 and [3H]-PGF2 alpha to membranes prepared from brain microvessels showed that EP and FP receptor density (Bmax) in tissues from newborn animals was less than 50% of that determined in tissues from adults. By contrast, estimates of affinity (KD) were unchanged. 3. Specifically bound [3H]-PGE2 to brain microvessels from both the newborn and adult was displaced by AH 6809 (EP1-selective antagonist) by 80-90%, and only by approximately 30-35% by both 11-deoxy PGE1 (EP2/EP3 agonist) and M&B 28,767 (EP3 agonist); butaprost (EP2 agonist) was completely ineffective. 4. PGE2, 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 (EP1 agonist), PGF2 alpha and fenprostalene (PGF2 alpha analogue) caused significantly less increase in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) in brain microvessels from the newborn than in those from adult pigs. The stimulation of IP3 by PGE2 and 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 was almost completely inhibited by the EP1 antagonist, AH 6809. 5. PGE2, 11-deoxy PGE1 and M&B 28,767 produced small reduction of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) production in adult vessels but no effect in newborn tissues. 6. The lower density of EP and FP receptors in microvessels of newborn pigs compared to adults may explain the reduced ability of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha to stimulate production of IP3 in tissues from newborn animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8032662

  17. Neuronal and glial purinergic receptors functions in neuron development and brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puerto, Ana; Wandosell, Francisco; Garrido, Juan José

    2013-10-28

    Brain development requires the interaction of complex signaling pathways, involving different cell types and molecules. For a long time, most attention has focused on neurons in a neuronocentric conceptualization of central nervous system development, these cells fulfilling an intrinsic program that establishes the brain's morphology and function. By contrast, glia have mainly been studied as support cells, offering guidance or as the cells that react to brain injury. However, new evidence is appearing that demonstrates a more fundamental role of glial cells in the control of different aspects of neuronal development and function, events in which the influence of neurons is at best weak. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the function and organization of the nervous system depends heavily on reciprocal neuron-glia interactions. During development, neurons are often generated far from their final destination and while intrinsic mechanisms are responsible for neuronal migration and growth, they need support and regulatory influences from glial cells in order to migrate correctly. Similarly, the axons emitted by neurons often have to reach faraway targets and in this sense, glia help define the way that axons grow. Moreover, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells ultimately envelop axons, contributing to the generation of nodes of Ranvier. Finally, recent publications show that astrocytes contribute to the modulation of synaptic transmission. In this sense, purinergic receptors are expressed widely by glial cells and neurons, and recent evidence points to multiple roles of purines and purinergic receptors in neuronal development and function, from neurogenesis to axon growth and functional axonal maturation, as well as in pathological conditions in the brain. This review will focus on the role of glial and neuronal secreted purines, and on the purinergic receptors, fundamentally in the control of neuronal development and function, as well as in diseases of the nervous

  18. Brain metastasis in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer: from biology to treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Tae Ryool [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hallym University Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Ah [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is found in about 20% of breast cancer patients. With treatment using trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, systemic control is improved. Nonetheless, the incidence of brain metastasis does not be improved, rather seems to be increased in HER2-positive breast cancer. The mainstay treatment for brain metastases is radiotherapy. According to the number of metastatic lesions and performance status of patients, radiosurgery or whole brain radiotherapy can be performed. The concurrent use of a radiosensitizer further improves intracranial control. Due to its large molecular weight, trastuzumab has a limited ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. However, small tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as lapatinib, has been noted to be a promising agent that can be used as a radiosensitizer to affect HER2-positive breast cancer. This review will outline general management of brain metastases and will focus on preclinical findings regarding the radiosensitizing effect of small molecule HER2 targeting agents.

  19. Targeting c-Met receptor overcomes TRAIL-resistance in brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanlu Du

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL induced apoptosis specifically in tumor cells. However, with approximately half of all known tumor lines being resistant to TRAIL, the identification of TRAIL sensitizers and their mechanism of action become critical to broadly use TRAIL as a therapeutic agent. In this study, we explored whether c-Met protein contributes to TRAIL sensitivity. We found a direct correlation between the c-Met expression level and TRAIL resistance. We show that the knock down c-Met protein, but not inhibition, sensitized brain tumor cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by interrupting the interaction between c-Met and TRAIL cognate death receptor (DR 5. This interruption greatly induces the formation of death-inducing signaling complex (DISC and subsequent downstream apoptosis signaling. Using intracranially implanted brain tumor cells and stem cell (SC lines engineered with different combinations of fluorescent and bioluminescent proteins, we show that SC expressing a potent and secretable TRAIL (S-TRAIL have a significant anti-tumor effect in mice bearing c-Met knock down of TRAIL-resistant brain tumors. To our best knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates c-Met contributes to TRAIL sensitivity of brain tumor cells and has implications for developing effective therapies for brain tumor patients.

  20. Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    self-assessment of mood (Fig. 4D). Ectopic expression of OR TBI biomarkers in multiple brain regions outside of the olfactory bulb The brain represents...observation that the three OR biomarkers were ectopically expressed in multiple brain regions outside of the olfactory bulb suggested potential function...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0582 TITLE: Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in

  1. Phospholipase D signaling in serotonin-induced mitogenesis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Fanburg, B L

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported the participation of mitogen-activated protein, Rho, and phosphoinositide-3 (PI3) kinases in separate pathways in serotonin (5-HT)-induced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated the possible participation of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this growth process. 5-HT stimulated a time-dependent increase in [(3)H]phosphatidylbutanol and PA generation. Exposure of SMCs to 1-butanol or overexpression of an inactive mutant of human PLD1R898R blocked 5-HT-induced proliferation. Furthermore, 1-butanol inhibited 5-HT activation of S6K1 and S6 protein, downstream effectors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), by 80 and 72%, respectively, and partially blocked activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by 30% but had no effect on other associated signaling pathways. Exogenous PA caused cellular proliferation and revitalized cyclin D1 expression by 5-HT of the 1-butanol-treated cells. PA also reproduced activations by 5-HT of mTOR, S6K1, and ERK. Transfection with inactive human PLD1 reduced 5-HT-induced activation of S6K1 by approximately 50%. Inhibition of 5-HT receptor 2A (R 2A) with ketaserin blocked PLD activation by 5-HT. Inhibition with PI3-kinase inhibitor failed to block either activation of PLD by 5-HT or PA-dependent S6K1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that ligation of the 5-HTR 2A by 5-HT initiates PLD activation in SMCs, and that its product, PA, is an early signaling molecule in 5-HT-induced pulmonary artery SMC proliferation. Signaling by PA produces its downstream effects primarily through the mTOR/S6K1 pathway and to a lesser extent through the ERK pathway. Hydrolysis of cell membrane lipid may be important in vascular effects of 5-HT.

  2. Fourteen. beta. -(bromoacetamido)morphine irreversibly labels. mu. opioid receptors in rat brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidlack, J.M.; Frey, D.K.; Seyed-Mozaffari, A.; Archer, S. (Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY (USA))

    1989-05-16

    The binding properties of 14{beta}-(bromoacetamido)morphine (BAM) and the ability of BAM to irreversibly inhibit opioid binding to rat brain membranes were examined to characterize the affinity and selectivity of BAM as an irreversible affinity ligand for opioid receptors. BAM had the same receptor selectivity as morphine, with a 3-5-fold decrease in affinity for the different types of opioid receptors. When brain membranes were incubated with BAM, followed by extensive washing, opioid binding was restored to control levels. However, when membranes were incubated with dithiothreitol (DTT), followed by BAM, and subsequently washed, 90% of the 0.25 nM ({sup 3}H)(D-Ala{sup 2},(Me)Phe{sup 4},Gly(ol){sup 5})enkephalin (DAGO) binding was irreversibly inhibited as a result of the specific alkylation of a sulfhydryl group at the {mu} binding site. This inhibition was dependent on the concentrations of both DTT and BAM. The {mu} receptor specificity of BAM alkylation was demonstrated by the ability of BAM alkylated membranes to still bind the {delta}-selective peptide ({sup 3}H)(D-penicillamine{sup 2},D-penicillamine{sup 5})enkephalin (DPDPE) and (-)-({sup 3}H)bremazocine in the presence of {mu} and {delta} blockers, selective for {kappa} binding sites. Morphine and naloxone partially protected the binding site from alkylation with BAM, while ligands that did not bind to the {mu}s site did not afford protection. These studies have demonstrated that when a disulfide bond at or near {mu} opioid binding sites was reduced, BAM could then alkylate this site, resulting in the specific irreversible labeling of {mu} opioid receptors.

  3. Apo-ghrelin receptor (apo-GHSR1a Regulates Dopamine Signaling in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras eKern

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The orexigenic peptide hormone ghrelin is synthesized in the stomach and its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a is expressed mainly in the central nervous system (CNS. In this review we confine our discussion to the physiological role of GHSR1a in the brain. Paradoxically, despite broad expression of GHSR1a in the CNS, other than trace amounts in the hypothalamus, ghrelin is undetectable in the brain. In our efforts to elucidate the function of the ligand-free ghrelin receptor (apo-GHSR1a we identified subsets of neurons that co-express GHSR1a and dopamine receptors. In this review we focus on interactions between apo-GHSR1a and dopamine-2 receptor (DRD2 and formation of GHSR1a:DRD2 heteromers in hypothalamic neurons that regulate appetite, and discuss implications for the treatment of Prader-Willi syndrome. GHSR1a antagonists of distinct chemical structures, a quinazolinone and a triazole, respectively enhance and inhibit dopamine signaling through GHSR1a:DRD2 heteromers by an allosteric mechanism. This finding illustrates a potential strategy for designing the next generation of drugs for treating eating disorders as well as psychiatric disorders caused by abnormal dopamine signaling. Treatment with a GHSR1a antagonist that enhances dopamine/DRD2 activity in GHSR1a:DRD2 expressing hypothalamic neurons has the potential to inhibit the uncontrollable hyperphagia associated with Prader-Willi syndrome. DRD2 antagonists are prescribed for treating schizophrenia, but these block dopamine signaling in all DRD2 expressing neurons and are associated with adverse side effects, including enhanced appetite and excessive weight gain. A GHSR1a antagonist of structural class that allosterically blocks dopamine/DRD2 action in GHSR1a:DRD2 expressing neurons would have no effect on neurons expressing DRD2 alone; therefore, the side effects of DRD2 antagonists would potentially be reduced thereby enhancing patient compliance.

  4. Brain neuronal CB2 cannabinoid receptors in drug abuse and depression: from mice to human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel S Onaivi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Addiction and major depression are mental health problems associated with stressful events in life with high relapse and reoccurrence even after treatment. Many laboratories were not able to detect the presence of cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2-Rs in healthy brains, but there has been demonstration of CB2-R expression in rat microglial cells and other brain associated cells during inflammation. Therefore, neuronal expression of CB2-Rs had been ambiguous and controversial and its role in depression and substance abuse is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested the hypothesis that genetic variants of CB2 gene might be associated with depression in a human population and that alteration in CB2 gene expression may be involved in the effects of abused substances including opiates, cocaine and ethanol in rodents. Here we demonstrate that a high incidence of (Q63R but not (H316Y polymorphism in the CB2 gene was found in Japanese depressed subjects. CB2-Rs and their gene transcripts are expressed in the brains of naïve mice and are modulated following exposure to stressors and administration of abused drugs. Mice that developed alcohol preference had reduced CB2 gene expression and chronic treatment with JWH015 a putative CB2-R agonist, enhanced alcohol consumption in stressed but not in control mice. The direct intracerebroventricular microinjection of CB2 anti-sense oligonucleotide into the mouse brain reduced mouse aversions in the plus-maze test, indicating the functional presence of CB2-Rs in the brain that modifies behavior. We report for the using electron microscopy the sub cellular localization of CB2-Rs that are mainly on post-synaptic elements in rodent brain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate the functional expression of CB2-Rs in brain that may provide novel targets for the effects of cannabinoids in depression and substance abuse disorders beyond neuro-immunocannabinoid activity.

  5. Synthesis and in vivo brain distribution of carbon-11-labeled {delta}-opioid receptor agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichika, Rama, E-mail: rpichika@ucsd.ed [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Jewett, Douglas M.; Sherman, Philip S. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Traynor, John R. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Husbands, Stephen M. [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath (United Kingdom); Woods, James H. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kilbourn, Michael R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Three new radiolabeled compounds, [{sup 11}C]SNC80 ((+)-4-[({alpha}R)-{alpha}-{l_brace}(2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl{r_brace}-3-[{sup 11}C] methoxybenzyl-N,N-diethylbenzamide), N,N-diethyl-4-[3-methoxyphenyl-1-[{sup 11}C]methylpiperidin-4-ylidenemethyl) benzamide and N,N-diethyl-4-[(1-[{sup 11}C]methylpiperidin-4-ylidene)phenylmethyl]benzamide, were prepared as potential in vivo radiotracers for the {delta}-opioid receptor. Each compound was synthesized by alkylation of the appropriate desmethyl compounds using [{sup 11}C]methyl triflate. In vivo biodistribution studies in mice showed very low initial brain uptake of all three compounds and no regional specific binding for [{sup 11}C]SNC80. A monkey positron emission tomography study of [{sup 11}C]SNC80 confirmed low brain permeability and uniform regional distribution of this class of opioid agonists in a higher species. Opioid receptor ligands of this structural class are thus unlikely to succeed as in vivo radiotracers, likely due to efficient exclusion from the brain by the P-glycoprotein efflux transporter.

  6. Adipocyte Glucocorticoid Receptors Mediate Fat-To-Brain Signaling Short Title: Adipocyte GR Mediate Fat-To-Brain Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, Annette D.; Krause, Eric G.; Solomon, Matia B.; Flak, Jonathan N.; Scott, Karen A.; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Myers, Brent; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Stress-related (e.g., depression) and metabolic pathologies (e.g., obesity) are important and often co-morbid public health concerns. Here we identify a connection between peripheral glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling originating in fat with the brain control of both stress and metabolism. Mice with reduced adipocyte GR hypersecrete glucocorticoids following acute psychogenic stress and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. This hypersecretion gives rise to deficits in responsiveness to exogenous glucocorticoids, consistent with reduced negative feedback via adipocytes. Increased stress reactivity occurs in the context of elevated hypothalamic expression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-excitatory neuropeptides and in the absence of altered adrenal sensitivity, consistent with a central cite of action. Our results identify a novel mechanism whereby activation of the adipocyte GR promotes peripheral energy storage while inhibiting the HPA axis, and provide functional evidence for a fat-to-brain regulatory feedback network that serves to regulate not just homeostatic energy balance but also responses to psychogenic stimuli. PMID:25808702

  7. Angiotensin II receptor subtypes are coupled with distinct signal-transduction mechanisms in neurons and astrocytes from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumners, C.; Wei Tang; Zelezna, B.; Raizada, M.K. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Both neurons and astrocytes contain specific receptors for angiotensin II (AII). The authors used selective ligands for the AT{sub 1} and AT{sub 2} types of AII receptors to investigate the expression of functional receptor subtypes in astrocyte cultures and neuron cultures from 1-day-old (neonatal) rat brain. In astrocyte cultures, competition of {sup 125}I-labeled AII ({sup 125}I-AII) specific binding with AT{sub 1} (DuP753) or AT{sub 2} {l brace}PD123177, CGP42112A, (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII{r brace} selective receptor ligands revealed a potency series of AII > DuP753 > > > CGP42112A > (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII > PD123177. These results suggest a predominance of the AT{sub 1} receptor subtype in neonatal astrocytes. {sup 125}I-AII specific binding to neonate neuronal cultures was reduced 73-84% by 1 {mu} MPD123177, and the residual {sup 125}I-AII specific binding was eliminated by DuP753. The results suggest that astrocyte cultures from neonatal rat brains contain predominantly AT{sub 1} receptors that are coupled to a stimulation of inositophospholipid hydrolysis. In contrast, neuron cultures from neonatal rat brain contain mostly AT{sub 2} receptors that are coupled to a reduction in basal cGMP levels, but a smaller population of AT{sub 1} receptors is also present in these neurons.

  8. (/sup 3/H)Ethylketocyclazocine binding to mouse brain membranes: evidence for a kappa opioid receptor type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, J.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Lee, N.M.

    1984-10-01

    The binding of the putative kappa agonist ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) to synaptosomal membranes of mouse brain was studied. This benzomorphan was able to bind to different opioid receptors. A portion of this binding was not inhibited by the agonist naloxone, even at high concentrations (10 microM). This population of receptors, to which opioate alkaloids and opiod peptides display very low affinity, is probably the sigma receptor. Another class of binding sites was identified by the simultaneous addition of the selective agonists Sandoz FK-33824 and D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin, which blocked the access of EKC to mu and delta opioid receptors, respectively, leaving a portion of naloxone-displaceable benzomorphan binding still detectable. Analysis of this remaining binding revealed a small population of receptors of high affinity, the kappa receptor. Therefore, EKC binds to the mu, delta, kappa and sigma receptors in the mouse brain, with similar affinities for the mu and kappa (0.22 and 0.15 nM). These results confirm the existence of a kappa opioid receptor type in the mouse brain.

  9. Transferrin Receptor 1 Facilitates Poliovirus Permeation of Mouse Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Taketoshi; Ishizaka, Aya; Nihei, Coh-Ichi

    2016-02-05

    As a possible route for invasion of the CNS, circulating poliovirus (PV) in the blood is believed to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB), resulting in paralytic poliomyelitis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that mouse transferrin receptor 1 (mTfR1) is responsible for PV attachment to the cell surface, allowing invasion into the CNS via the BBB. PV interacts with the apical domain of mTfR1 on mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (MBEC4) in a dose-dependent manner via its capsid protein (VP1). We found that F-G, G-H, and H-I loops in VP1 are important for this binding. However, C-D, D-E, and E-F loops in VP1-fused Venus proteins efficiently penetrate MBEC4 cells. These results imply that the VP1 functional domain responsible for cell attachment is different from that involved in viral permeation of the brain capillary endothelium. We observed that co-treatment of MBEC4 cells with excess PV particles but not dextran resulted in blockage of transferrin transport into cells. Using the Transwell in vitro BBB model, transferrin co-treatment inhibited permeation of PV into MBEC4 cells and delayed further viral permeation via mTfR1 knockdown. With mTfR1 as a positive mediator of PV-host cell attachment and PV permeation of MBEC4 cells, our results indicate a novel role of TfR1 as a cellular receptor for human PV receptor/CD155-independent PV invasion of the CNS. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Contribution of regional brain melanocortin receptor subtypes to elevated activity energy expenditure in lean, active rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, C; Koch, L G; Britton, S L; Cai, M; Hruby, V J; Bednarek, M; Novak, C M

    2015-12-03

    Physical activity and non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) are crucial factors accounting for individual differences in body weight, interacting with genetic predisposition. In the brain, a number of neuroendocrine intermediates regulate food intake and energy expenditure (EE); this includes the brain melanocortin (MC) system, consisting of MC peptides as well as their receptors (MCR). MC3R and MC4R have emerged as critical modulators of EE and food intake. To determine how variance in MC signaling may underlie individual differences in physical activity levels, we examined behavioral response to MC receptor agonists and antagonists in rats that show high and low levels of physical activity and NEAT, that is, high- and low-capacity runners (HCR, LCR), developed by artificial selection for differential intrinsic aerobic running capacity. Focusing on the hypothalamus, we identified brain region-specific elevations in expression of MCR 3, 4, and also MC5R, in the highly active, lean HCR relative to the less active and obesity-prone LCR. Further, the differences in activity and associated EE as a result of MCR activation or suppression using specific agonists and antagonists were similarly region-specific and directly corresponded to the differential MCR expression patterns. The agonists and antagonists investigated here did not significantly impact food intake at the doses used, suggesting that the differential pattern of receptor expression may by more meaningful to physical activity than to other aspects of energy balance regulation. Thus, MCR-mediated physical activity may be a key neural mechanism in distinguishing the lean phenotype and a target for enhancing physical activity and NEAT. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitogenesis in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells from two rat models of hypertension in response to fetal calf serum and angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, J A; Harris, E L; Cassie, N J

    1990-01-01

    Hypertension may result from vascular hypertrophy or hyperplasia due to enhanced growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which has been demonstrated in VSMCs from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) compared to Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. To determine whether this enhanced mitogenesis is peculiar to SHRs or a general phenomenon in genetic models of hypertension, we have measured indices of cell growth [3H]-thymidine uptake in VSMCs from SHRs and New Zealand genetically hypertensive (GH) rats and controls [WKY and normal Wistar (N) rats] cultured in fetal calf serum (FCS) or angiotensin II (Ang II, 0.1 microM) in either 3% heat-treated FCS or serum-free medium. SHR cell numbers increased faster in response to both mitogens compared to WKY rats. However, GH and N rat responses to FCS were the same. Ang II caused a significant but similar increase in cell numbers in both GH and N rat cells (i.e., Ang II caused hyperplasia in all four strains) but [3H]thymidine uptake was significantly greater in GH rat cells. Ang II increased the total well protein content but not protein normalized on cell number, i.e., no hypertrophic effect of Ang II was seen in these actively dividing cells. We conclude that (a) growth properties of VSMCs from rats with genetic hypertension vary between strains; the differences in growth may reflect strain-specific variation in the activity of intracellular signalling systems subserving mitogenesis; and (b) Ang II causes VSMC hyperplasia.

  12. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H. [and others

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  13. High affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands. 1. Regional rat brain distribution of iodinated benzamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, R.M.; Ansari, M.S.; de Paulis, T.; Schmidt, D.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, H.E.; Manning, R.G.; Gillespie, D.; Ebert, M.H. (Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Five 125I-labeled substituted benzamides, which are close structural analogues of (S)-sulpiride, eticlopride, and isoremoxipride, were evaluated for their selective in vivo uptake into dopamine D2 receptor rich tissue of the rat brain. Iodopride (KD 0.88 nM), an iodine substituted benzamide structurally related to sulpiride, displayed a maximal striatum: cerebellar uptake ratio of 7.6. Demonstration of saturation of the receptor with (125I)iodopride in striatum required uptake in frontal cortex to be used, rather than cerebellar uptake, to define nonspecific binding. Two other ligands structurally related to eticlopride, iclopride (KD 0.23 nM) and itopride (KD 0.16 nM), displayed maximal striatal: cerebellar uptake ratios of 9.8 and 3.3, respectively. The most potent ligands, epidepride (KD 0.057 nM) and ioxipride (KD 0.070 nM) showed striatal:cerebellar uptake ratios of 234 and 65, respectively. The observed uptake ratios correlated poorly with the affinity constants for the dopamine D2 receptor alone, but were highly correlated (r = 0.92) with the product of the receptor dissociation constant (KD) and the apparent lipophilicity (kw), as determined by reverse-phase HPLC at pH 7.5. Total striatal uptake also appeared dependent on lipophilicity, with maximal uptake occurring for ligands having log kw 2.4-2.8.

  14. Molecular pathopharmacology of 5-HT2C receptors and the RNA editing in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohda, Michihisa; Nomura, Michio; Nomura, Yasuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Among the 14 kinds of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptor subtypes (5-HTR), 5-HT(2C) receptor (5-HT2CR) has been intensively investigated because of its physiologically and pathophysiologically important role in the brain. 5-HT2CR has been suggested to be involved in depressive disorders based on findings from pharmacological/neurochemical/behavioral studies using autopsy preparations of humans suffering from depression, animal models of depression, and animals treated with antidepressant drugs. Recently the editing of 5-HT2CR mRNA has been reported to participate in the pathogenesis of depressive disease. The RNA editing of 5-HT2CR induced by the presumable alteration of deaminase during a pathological state in depression causes changes of a base to another base (e.g., adenosine to guanosine, cytidine to uracil (thymidine)), followed by changes in amino acids constituting the second intracellular transmembrane loop that couples G proteins. Thus 5-HT2CR receptor-mediated signal transduction is changed. In the present review, the pathopharmacological significance of 5-HT2CR in special reference to RNA editing of receptors is reviewed and discussed from the aspect of development of novel therapeutics for depression.

  15. Toll-like receptor 2 signaling in response to brain injury: an innate bridge to neuroinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Holm, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    -induced expression of cytokines and chemokines. Recruitment of T cells, but not macrophages, was delayed in TLR2-deficient mice, as well as in mice lacking TNFR1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor 1). TLR2 deficiency also affected microglial proliferative expansion, whereas all of these events were unaffected in TLR4......-mutant mice. Consistent with the fact that responses in knock-out mice had all returned to wild-type levels by 8 d, there was no evidence for effects on neuronal plasticity at 20 d. These results identify a role for TLR2 signaling in the early glial response to brain injury, acting as an innate bridge...

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor controls cannabinoid CB1 receptor function in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Chiara, Valentina; Angelucci, Francesco; Rossi, Silvia; Musella, Alessandra; Cavasinni, Francesca; Cantarella, Cristina; Mataluni, Giorgia; Sacchetti, Lucia; Napolitano, Francesco; Castelli, Maura; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Maccarrone, Mauro; Usiello, Alessandro; Centonze, Diego

    2010-06-16

    The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in emotional processes suggests an interaction with the endocannabinoid system. Here, we addressed the functional interplay between BDNF and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1)Rs) in the striatum, a brain area in which both BDNF and CB(1)s play a role in the emotional consequences of stress and of rewarding experiences. BDNF potently inhibited CB(1)R function in the striatum, through a mechanism mediated by altered cholesterol metabolism and membrane lipid raft function. The effect of BDNF was restricted to CB(1)Rs controlling GABA-mediated IPSCs (CB(1)R(GABA)), whereas CB(1)Rs modulating glutamate transmission and GABA(B) receptors were not affected. The action of BDNF on CB(1)R(GABA) function was tyrosine kinase dependent and was complete even after receptor sensitization with cocaine or environmental manipulations activating the dopamine (DA)-dependent reward system. In mice lacking one copy of the BDNF gene (BDNF(+/-)), CB(1)R(GABA) responses were potentiated and were preserved from the action of haloperidol, a DA D(2) receptor (D(2)R) antagonist able to fully abolish CB(1)R(GABA) function in rewarded animals. Haloperidol also enhanced BDNF levels in the striatum, suggesting that this neurotrophin may act as a downstream effector of D(2)Rs in the modulation of cannabinoid signaling. Accordingly, 5 d cocaine exposure both reduced striatal BDNF levels and increased CB(1)R(GABA) activity, through a mechanism dependent on D(2)Rs. The present study identifies a novel mechanism of CB(1)R regulation mediated by BDNF and cholesterol metabolism and provides some evidence that DA D(2)R-dependent modulation of striatal CB(1)R activity is mediated by this neurotrophin.

  17. Increased receptor density of α2 adrenoceptors and GABAA α5 receptors in limbic brain regions in the domoic acid rat model of epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Majken; Lillethorup, Thea Pinholt; Wegener, Gregers

    was significantly increased in the dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala of the DOM rats. A trend towards an increase in the density of α2 adrenoceptors was found throughout the limbic system of the DOM rats compared to controls. Conclusion: Although preliminary, the increase in postsynaptic GABA receptor......, fresh frozen and cut into 20 µM thick slices. Autoradiography was performed using tracers of the α5 subtype of the GABAA receptor ([11C]Ro15-4513) and the α2 adrenoceptors ([3H]RX821002) to determine the binding in limbic brain regions. Results: The binding of postsynaptic GABA receptors...

  18. The Implication of the Brain Insulin Receptor in Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Folch

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by brain accumulation of the amyloid β peptide (Aβ, which form senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles (NFT and, eventually, neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. Interestingly, epidemiological studies have described a relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and this pathology, being one of the risk factors for the development of AD pathogenesis. Information as it is, it would point out that, impairment in insulin signalling and glucose metabolism, in central as well as peripheral systems, would be one of the reasons for the cognitive decline. Brain insulin resistance, also known as Type 3 diabetes, leads to the increase of Aβ production and TAU phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, protein misfolding, and cognitive impairment, which are all hallmarks of AD. Moreover, given the complexity of interlocking mechanisms found in late onset AD (LOAD pathogenesis, more data is being obtained. Recent evidence showed that Aβ42 generated in the brain would impact negatively on the hypothalamus, accelerating the “peripheral” symptomatology of AD. In this situation, Aβ42 production would induce hypothalamic dysfunction that would favour peripheral hyperglycaemia due to down regulation of the liver insulin receptor. The objective of this review is to discuss the existing evidence supporting the concept that brain insulin resistance and altered glucose metabolism play an important role in pathogenesis of LOAD. Furthermore, we discuss AD treatment approaches targeting insulin signalling using anti-diabetic drugs and mTOR inhibitors.

  19. Characterization of aromatase expression in the adult male and female mouse brain. I. Coexistence with oestrogen receptors α and β, and androgen receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Stanić

    Full Text Available Aromatase catalyses the last step of oestrogen synthesis. There is growing evidence that local oestrogens influence many brain regions to modulate brain development and behaviour. We examined, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of aromatase in the adult male and female mouse brain, using mice in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP is transcribed following the physiological activation of the Cyp19A1 gene. EGFP-immunoreactive processes were distributed in many brain regions, including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, olfactory tubercle, medial amygdaloid nucleus and medial preoptic area, with the densest distributions of EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. Differences between male and female mice were apparent, with the density of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres being lower in some brain regions of female mice, including the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus, lateral septum, medial amygdala and hypothalamus co-expressed oestrogen receptor (ER α and β, or the androgen receptor (AR, although single-labelled EGFP-positive cells were also identified. Additionally, single-labelled ERα-, ERβ- or AR-positive cell bodies often appeared to be surrounded by EGFP-immunoreactive nerve fibres/terminals. The widespread distribution of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres suggests that aromatase signalling is common in the mouse brain, and that locally synthesised brain oestrogens could mediate biological effects by activating pre- and post-synaptic oestrogen α and β receptors, and androgen receptors. The higher number of EGFP-positive cells in male mice may indicate that the autocrine and paracrine effects of oestrogens are more prominent in males than females.

  20. Characterization of aromatase expression in the adult male and female mouse brain. I. Coexistence with oestrogen receptors α and β, and androgen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanić, Davor; Dubois, Sydney; Chua, Hui Kheng; Tonge, Bruce; Rinehart, Nicole; Horne, Malcolm K; Boon, Wah Chin

    2014-01-01

    Aromatase catalyses the last step of oestrogen synthesis. There is growing evidence that local oestrogens influence many brain regions to modulate brain development and behaviour. We examined, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of aromatase in the adult male and female mouse brain, using mice in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) is transcribed following the physiological activation of the Cyp19A1 gene. EGFP-immunoreactive processes were distributed in many brain regions, including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, olfactory tubercle, medial amygdaloid nucleus and medial preoptic area, with the densest distributions of EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. Differences between male and female mice were apparent, with the density of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres being lower in some brain regions of female mice, including the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus, lateral septum, medial amygdala and hypothalamus co-expressed oestrogen receptor (ER) α and β, or the androgen receptor (AR), although single-labelled EGFP-positive cells were also identified. Additionally, single-labelled ERα-, ERβ- or AR-positive cell bodies often appeared to be surrounded by EGFP-immunoreactive nerve fibres/terminals. The widespread distribution of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres suggests that aromatase signalling is common in the mouse brain, and that locally synthesised brain oestrogens could mediate biological effects by activating pre- and post-synaptic oestrogen α and β receptors, and androgen receptors. The higher number of EGFP-positive cells in male mice may indicate that the autocrine and paracrine effects of oestrogens are more prominent in males than females.

  1. Comparative distribution of nicotinic receptor subtypes during development, adulthood and aging: an autoradiographic study in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribollet, E; Bertrand, D; Marguerat, A; Raggenbass, M

    2004-01-01

    The distribution in the rat brain of high affinity nicotinic heteromeric acetylcholine receptors and of low affinity nicotinic, alpha7-containing, homomeric receptors was studied using in vitro light microscopic autoradiography. As ligands, we used [3H]epibatidine, or [125I]epibatidine, and [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin, respectively. In adult animals, the two types of binding sites were widely distributed in many different brain structures, including the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic structures, limbic system and cortex, but their anatomical distribution differed markedly. Only in rare instances could a co-localization be observed, for example in the superficial layer of the superior colliculus. In developing animals, both types of labeling were strongly expressed during embryonic and postnatal phases. Their distributions were qualitatively similar to those observed in adult animals, with a few noticeable exceptions in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and brain stem. In aging animals, neither the distribution nor the density of nicotinic binding sites was significantly altered. Our conclusions are the following. (a) There is little overlap in the distribution of heteromeric and alpha7-containing homomeric nicotinic receptors in the rat brain. (b) The abundance of neuronal nicotinic receptors during embryonic and postnatal development suggests that they may play a role in the establishment of neuronal connectivity. (c) The expression of neuronal nicotinic receptors is unaltered in middle aged animals, suggesting that in the rat these receptors do not play any major role in aging process.

  2. A common human micro-opioid receptor genetic variant diminishes the receptor signaling efficacy in brain regions processing the sensory information of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Bruno Georg; Kettner, Mattias; Scholich, Klaus; Renné, Christoph; Roskam, Bianca; Geisslinger, Gerd; Schmidt, Peter Harald; Lötsch, Jörn

    2009-03-06

    The single nucleotide polymorphism 118A>G of the human micro-opioid receptor gene OPRM1, which leads to an exchange of the amino acid asparagine (N) to aspartic acid (D) at position 40 of the extracellular receptor region, alters the in vivo effects of opioids to different degrees in pain-processing brain regions. The most pronounced N40D effects were found in brain regions involved in the sensory processing of pain intensity. Using the mu-opioid receptor-specific agonist DAMGO, we analyzed the micro-opioid receptor signaling, expression, and binding affinity in human brain tissue sampled postmortem from the secondary somatosensory area (SII) and from the ventral posterior part of the lateral thalamus, two regions involved in the sensory processing and transmission of nociceptive information. We show that the main effect of the N40D micro-opioid receptor variant is a reduction of the agonist-induced receptor signaling efficacy. In the SII region of homo- and heterozygous carriers of the variant 118G allele (n=18), DAMGO was only 62% as efficient (p=0.002) as in homozygous carriers of the wild-type 118A allele (n=15). In contrast, the number of [3H]DAMGO binding sites was unaffected. Hence, the micro-opioid receptor G-protein coupling efficacy in SII of carriers of the 118G variant was only 58% as efficient as in homozygous carriers of the 118A allele (pG SNP. In conclusion, we provide a molecular basis for the reduced clinical effects of opioid analgesics in carriers of mu-opioid receptor variant N40D.

  3. NeuroD Factors Discriminate Mineralocorticoid From Glucocorticoid Receptor DNA Binding in the Male Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weert, Lisa T C M; Buurstede, Jacobus C; Mahfouz, Ahmed; Braakhuis, Pamela S M; Polman, J Annelies E; Sips, Hetty C M; Roozendaal, Benno; Balog, Judit; de Kloet, E Ronald; Datson, Nicole A; Meijer, Onno C

    2017-05-01

    In the limbic brain, mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) both function as receptors for the naturally occurring glucocorticoids (corticosterone/cortisol) but mediate distinct effects on cellular physiology via transcriptional mechanisms. The transcriptional basis for specificity of these MR- vs GR-mediated effects is unknown. To address this conundrum, we have identified the extent of MR/GR DNA-binding selectivity in the rat hippocampus using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing. We found 918 and 1450 nonoverlapping binding sites for MR and GR, respectively. Furthermore, 475 loci were co-occupied by MR and GR. De novo motif analysis resulted in a similar binding motif for both receptors at 100% of the target loci, which matched the known glucocorticoid response element (GRE). In addition, the Atoh/NeuroD consensus sequence was found in co-occurrence with all MR-specific binding sites but was absent for GR-specific or MR-GR overlapping sites. Basic helix-loop-helix family members Neurod1, Neurod2, and Neurod6 showed hippocampal expression and were hypothesized to bind the Atoh motif. Neurod2 was detected at rat hippocampal MR binding sites but not at GR-exclusive sites. All three NeuroD transcription factors acted as DNA-binding-dependent coactivators for both MR and GR in reporter assays in heterologous HEK293 cells, likely via indirect interactions with the receptors. In conclusion, a NeuroD family member binding to an additional motif near the GRE seems to drive specificity for MR over GR binding at hippocampal binding sites. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  4. Brain Serotonin Receptors and Transporters: Initiation vs. Termination of Escalated Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recent findings have shown a complexly regulated 5-HT system as it is linked to different kinds of aggression. Objective We focus on (1) phasic and tonic changes of 5-HT and (2) state and trait of aggression, and emphasize the different receptor subtypes, their role in specific brain regions, feed-back regulation and modulation by other amines, acids and peptides. Results New pharmacological tools differentiate the first three 5-HT receptor families and their modulation by GABA, glutamate and CRF. Activation of 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A/2C receptors in mesocorticolimbic areas, reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors. In contrast, agonists at 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area can increase aggressive behavior under specific conditions. Activation of serotonin transporters reduce mainly pathological aggression. Genetic analyses of aggressive individuals have identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or indirectly (e.g., Neuropeptide Y, αCaMKII, NOS, BDNF). Dysfunction in genes for MAOA escalates pathological aggression in rodents and humans, particularly in interaction with specific experiences. Conclusions Feedback to autoreceptors of the 5-HT1 family and modulation via heteroreceptors are important in the expression of aggressive behavior. Tonic increase of the 5-HT2 family expression may cause escalated aggression, whereas the phasic increase of 5-HT2 receptors inhibits aggressive behaviors. Polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT modulate aggression, often requiring interaction with the rearing environment. PMID:20938650

  5. The functions of estrogen receptor beta in the female brain: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Kris G; Milic, Jelena; Zaciragic, Asija; Wen, Ke-Xin; Jaspers, Loes; Nano, Jana; Dhana, Klodian; Bramer, Wichor M; Kraja, Bledar; van Beeck, Ed; Ikram, M Arfan; Muka, Taulant; Franco, Oscar H

    2016-11-01

    Females have unique and additional risk factors for neurological disorders. Among classical estrogen receptors, estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) has been suggested as a therapeutic target. However, little is known about the role of ERβ in the female brain. Six electronic databases were searched for articles evaluating the role of ERβ in the female brain and the influence of age and menopause on ERβ function. After screening 3186 titles and abstracts, 49 articles were included in the review, all of which were animal studies. Of these, 19 focused on cellular signaling, 7 on neuroendocrine pathways, 8 on neurological disorders, 4 on neuroprotection and 19 on psychological and psychiatric outcomes (6 studies evaluated two or more outcomes). Our findings showed that ERβ phosphorylated and activated intracellular second messenger proteins and regulated protein expression of genes involved in neurological functions. It also promoted neurogenesis, modulated the neuroendocrine regulation of stress response, conferred neuroprotection against ischemia and inflammation, and reduced anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. Targeting ERβ may constitute a novel treatment for menopausal symptoms, including anxiety, depression, and neurological diseases. However, to establish potential therapeutic and preventive strategies targeting ERβ, future studies should be conducted in humans to further our understanding of the importance of ERβ in women's mental and cognitive health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators regulate reactive microglia after penetrating brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Barreto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Following brain injury, microglia assume a reactive-like state and secrete pro-inflammatory molecules that can potentiate damage. A therapeutic strategy that may limit microgliosis is of potential interest. In this context, selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene and tamoxifen, are known to reduce microglia activation induced by neuroinflammatory stimuli in young animals. In the present study, we have assessed whether raloxifene and tamoxifen are able to affect microglia activation after brain injury in young and aged animals in time points relevant to clinics, which is hours after brain trauma. Volume fraction of MHC-II+ microglia was estimated according to the point-counting method of Weibel within a distance of 350 μm from the lateral border of the wound, and cellular morphology was measured by fractal analysis. Two groups of animals were studied: 1 young rats, ovariectomized at 2 months of age; and 2 aged rats, ovariectomized at 18 months of age. Fifteen days after ovariectomy animals received a stab wound brain injury and the treatment with estrogenic compounds. Our findings indicate that raloxifene and tamoxifen reduced microglia activation in both young and aged animals. Although the volume fraction of reactive microglia was found lower in aged animals, this was accompanied by important changes in cell morphology, where aged microglia assume a bushier and hyperplasic aspect when compared to young microglia. These data suggest that early regulation of microglia activation provides a mechanism by which SERMs may exert a neuroprotective effect in the setting of a brain trauma.

  7. Targeting brain α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in Alzheimer's disease: rationale and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallés, Ana Sofía; Borroni, María Virginia; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2014-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older persons. Pathognomonic hallmarks of the disease include the development of amyloid senile plaques and deposits of neurofibrillary tangles. These changes occur in the brain long before the clinical manifestations of AD (cognitive impairment in particular) become apparent. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), particularly the α7 subtype, are highly expressed in brain regions relevant to cognitive and memory functions and involved in the processing of sensory information. There is strong evidence that implicates the participation of AChRs in AD. This review briefly introduces current strategies addressing the pathophysiologic findings (amyloid-β-peptide plaques, neurofibrillary tangles) and then focuses on more recent efforts of pharmacologic intervention in AD, specifically targeted to the α7 AChR. Whereas cholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil, galantamine, or rivastigmine, together with the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine are at the forefront of present-day clinical intervention for AD, new insights into AChR molecular pharmacology are bringing other drugs, directed at AChRs, to center stage. Among these are the positive allosteric modulators that selectively target α7 AChRs and are aimed at unleashing the factors that hinder agonist-mediated, α7 AChR channel activation. This calls for more detailed knowledge of the distribution, functional properties, and involvement of AChRs in various signaling cascades-together with the corresponding abnormalities in all these properties-to be able to engineer strategies in drug design and evaluate the therapeutic possibilities of new compounds targeting this class of neurotransmitter receptors.

  8. BIASED AGONISM OF THREE DIFFERENT CANNABINOID RECEPTOR AGONISTS IN MOUSE BRAIN CORTEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Diez-Alarcia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptors are able to couple to different families of G-proteins when activated by an agonist drug. It has been suggested that different intracellular responses may be activated depending on the ligand. The goal of the present study was to characterize the pattern of G protein subunit stimulation triggered by three different cannabinoid ligands, THC, WIN55212-2 and ACEA in mouse brain cortex.Stimulation of the [35S]GTPS binding coupled to specific immunoprecipitation with antibodies against different subtypes of G proteins (Gαi1, Gαi2, Gαi3, Gαo, Gαz, Gαs, Gαq/11, and Gα12/13, in the presence of Δ9-THC, WIN55212-2 and ACEA (submaximal concentration 10 µM was determined by Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA technique in mouse cortex of wild type, CB1 knock-out, CB2 knock-out and CB1/CB2 double knock-out mice. Results show that, in mouse brain cortex, cannabinoid agonists are able to significantly stimulate not only the classical inhibitory Gαi/o subunits but also other G subunits like Gαz, Gαq/11, and Gα12/13. Moreover, the specific pattern of G protein subunit activation is different depending on the ligand. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that, in mice brain native tissue, different exogenous cannabinoid ligands are able to selectively activate different inhibitory and non-inhibitory Gα protein subtypes, through the activation of CB1 and/or CB2 receptors. Results of the present study may help to understand the specific molecular pathways involved in the pharmacological effects of cannabinoid-derived drugs.

  9. Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor as a treatment for cognitive deficits postfractionated whole-brain irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Rosi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Whole-brain irradiation (WBI is commonly used to treat primary tumors of the central nervous systems tumors as well as brain metastases. While this technique has increased survival among brain tumor patients, the side effects of including a decline in cognitive abilities that are generally progressive. In an effort to combat WBI side effects, researchers explored the treatment of colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R inhibitor. Data show that when a CSF-1R inhibitor is administered with fractionated WBI treatment, there is a decline in the number of resident and peripheral mononuclear phagocytes, a decrease in dendritic spine loss and a reduction in functional and memory deficits. CSFR-1R inhibitors have displayed promising results as an effective counter-treatment for WBI-induced deficits. Further research is required to optimize treatment strategies, establish a treatment timeline and gain a better understanding of the long-term side effects of targeting CSF-1R as a treatment strategy for WBI symptoms. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the references section. The datasets supporting the conclusions of this article are available online by searching various databases, including PubMed. Some original points in this article come from the laboratory practice in our research center and the authors' experiences.

  10. Brain IGF-1 receptors control mammalian growth and lifespan through a neuroendocrine mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Kappeler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations that decrease insulin-like growth factor (IGF and growth hormone signaling limit body size and prolong lifespan in mice. In vertebrates, these somatotropic hormones are controlled by the neuroendocrine brain. Hormone-like regulations discovered in nematodes and flies suggest that IGF signals in the nervous system can determine lifespan, but it is unknown whether this applies to higher organisms. Using conditional mutagenesis in the mouse, we show that brain IGF receptors (IGF-1R efficiently regulate somatotropic development. Partial inactivation of IGF-1R in the embryonic brain selectively inhibited GH and IGF-I pathways after birth. This caused growth retardation, smaller adult size, and metabolic alterations, and led to delayed mortality and longer mean lifespan. Thus, early changes in neuroendocrine development can durably modify the life trajectory in mammals. The underlying mechanism appears to be an adaptive plasticity of somatotropic functions allowing individuals to decelerate growth and preserve resources, and thereby improve fitness in challenging environments. Our results also suggest that tonic somatotropic signaling entails the risk of shortened lifespan.

  11. Differential role of estrogen receptor isoforms in sex-specific brain organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchev, Alexandre V; Götz, Franziska; Rohde, Wolfgang

    2004-10-01

    Transient activation of estrogen receptors (ER) in the developing brain during a limited perinatal "window of time" is recognized as a key mechanism of defeminization of neural control of reproductive function and sexual behavior. Two major ER isoforms, alpha and beta, are present in neural circuits that govern ovarian cycle and sexual behavior. Using highly selective ER agonists, this study provides the first evidence for distinct contribution of individual ER isoforms to the process of estrogen dependent defeminization. Neonatal activation of the ERalpha in female rats resulted in abrogation of cyclic ovarian activity and female sexual behavior in adulthood. These effects are associated with male-like alterations in the morphology of the anteroventral periventricular (AVPV) and sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA), as well as refractoriness to estrogen-mediated induction of sexual receptivity. Exposure to an ERbeta-selective agonist induced persistent estrus and had a strong defeminizing effect on the hypothalamic gonadotropin "surge generator" AVPV. However, neonatal ERbeta activation failed to alter female sexual behavior, responsiveness to estrogens and morphometric features of the behaviorally relevant SDN-POA. Thus, although co-present in several brain regions involved in the control of female reproductive function, ER isoforms convey different, and probably not synergistic, chemical signals in the course of neonatal sex-specific brain organization.

  12. Interactions of purified bovine brain A1-adenosine receptors with G-proteins. Reciprocal modulation of agonist and antagonist binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Freissmuth, M.; Selzer, E.; Schütz, W.

    1991-01-01

    The bovine brain A1-adenosine receptor was purified 8000-fold by affinity chromatography on xanthine-amine-congener (XAC)-Sepharose. Addition of a 120-fold molar excess of a purified bovine brain G-protein preparation (Go,i a mixture of Go and Gi, containing predominantly Go) decreases the Bmax of the binding of the antagonist radioligand [3H]XAC to the receptor. This decrease is observed not only after insertion into phospholipid vesicles but also in detergent solution, and is reversed by GT...

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates hippocampal synaptic transmission by increasing N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Eric S; Crozier, Robert A.; Black, Ira B.; Plummer, Mark R.

    1998-01-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been found to regulate synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Whole-cell and single-channel recordings from cultured hippocampal neurons revealed a mechanism responsible for enhanced synaptic strength. Specifically, brain-derived neurotrophic factor augmented glutamate-evoked, but not acetylcholine-evoked, currents 3-fold and increased N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor open probability. Activation of trkB NT receptors was critical, as glutamate curr...

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rapidly enhances phosphorylation of the postsynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 1

    OpenAIRE

    Suen, Piin-Chau; Wu, Kuo; Levine, Eric S; Mount, Howard T. J.; Xu, Jia-Ling; LIN, SIANG-YO; Black, Ira B.

    1997-01-01

    Although neurotrophins have traditionally been regarded as neuronal survival factors, recent work has suggested a role for these factors in synaptic plasticity. In particular, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) rapidly enhances synaptic transmission in hippocampal neurons through trkB receptor stimulation and postsynaptic phosphorylation mechanisms. Activation of trkB also modulates hippocampal long-term potentiation, in which postsynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptors play a...

  15. Brain glucose utilization in mice with a targeted mutation in the thyroid hormone α or β receptor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yoshiaki; Esaki, Takanori; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hideyo; Cook, Michelle; Sokoloff, Louis; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Nunez, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    Brain glucose utilization is markedly depressed in adult rats made cretinous after birth. To ascertain which subtype of thyroid hormone (TH) receptors, TRα1 or TRβ, is involved in the regulation of glucose utilization during brain development, we used the 2-[14C]deoxyglucose method in mice with a mutation in either their TRα or TRβ gene. A C insertion produced a frameshift mutation in their carboxyl terminus. These mutants lacked TH binding and transactivation activities and exhibited potent dominant negative activity. Glucose utilization in the homozygous TRβPV mutant mice and their wild-type siblings was almost identical in 19 brain regions, whereas it was markedly reduced in all brain regions of the heterozygous TRα1PV mice. These suggest that the α1 receptor mediates the TH effects in brain. Inasmuch as local cerebral glucose utilization is closely related to local synaptic activity, we also examined which thyroid hormone receptor is involved in the expression of synaptotagmin-related gene 1 (Srg1), a TH-positively regulated gene involved in the formation and function of synapses [Thompson, C. C. (1996) J. Neurosci. 16, 7832–7840]. Northern analysis showed that Srg1 expression was markedly reduced in the cerebellum of TRαPV/+ mice but not TRβPV/PV mice. These results show that the same receptor, TRα1, is involved in the regulation by TH of both glucose utilization and Srg1 expression. PMID:11481455

  16. Brain glucose utilization in mice with a targeted mutation in the thyroid hormone alpha or beta receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Y; Esaki, T; Kaneshige, M; Suzuki, H; Cook, M; Sokoloff, L; Cheng, S Y; Nunez, J

    2001-08-14

    Brain glucose utilization is markedly depressed in adult rats made cretinous after birth. To ascertain which subtype of thyroid hormone (TH) receptors, TRalpha1 or TRbeta, is involved in the regulation of glucose utilization during brain development, we used the 2-[(14)C]deoxyglucose method in mice with a mutation in either their TRalpha or TRbeta gene. A C insertion produced a frameshift mutation in their carboxyl terminus. These mutants lacked TH binding and transactivation activities and exhibited potent dominant negative activity. Glucose utilization in the homozygous TRbetaPV mutant mice and their wild-type siblings was almost identical in 19 brain regions, whereas it was markedly reduced in all brain regions of the heterozygous TRalpha1PV mice. These suggest that the alpha1 receptor mediates the TH effects in brain. Inasmuch as local cerebral glucose utilization is closely related to local synaptic activity, we also examined which thyroid hormone receptor is involved in the expression of synaptotagmin-related gene 1 (Srg1), a TH-positively regulated gene involved in the formation and function of synapses [Thompson, C. C. (1996) J. Neurosci. 16, 7832-7840]. Northern analysis showed that Srg1 expression was markedly reduced in the cerebellum of TRalpha(PV/+) mice but not TRbeta(PV/PV) mice. These results show that the same receptor, TRalpha1, is involved in the regulation by TH of both glucose utilization and Srg1 expression.

  17. Region-specific alterations in the corticotropin-releasing factor and glucocorticoid receptors in the postmortem brain of suicide victims

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanshyam N. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Rationale : Abnormalities of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis in depression and suicide are among the most consistent findings in biological psychiatry. However, the specific molecular mechanism associated with HPA axis abnormality in the brain of depressed or suicidal subjects is not clear. It is believed that abnormal HPA axis is caused by increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and decreased levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the brain of depr...

  18. Predominance of D2 Receptors in Mediating Dopamine’s Effects in Brain Metabolism: Effects of Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Telang, Frank; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Maynard, L. Jayne; Wong, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine signals through D1-like and D2-like receptors, which can stimulate or inhibit, respectively, neuronal activity. Here we assessed the balance between D1 or D2 receptor signaling in the human brain and how it is affected in alcoholism. Using PET, we measured the relationship between changes in dopamine and brain glucose metabolism induced by methylphenidate in controls and alcoholics. We show that methylphenidate induced significant DA increases in striatum, amygdala, and medial orbitofrontal cortex, whereas it decreased metabolism in these brain regions. Methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases were greater in controls than in alcoholics, whereas methylphenidate-induced metabolic decreases were greater in alcoholics. For both groups, methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases were associated with decreases in regional brain metabolism, and the correlations were strongest in subthalamic nuclei, anterior cingulate, and medial orbitofrontal cortex. These correlations were more extensive and robust and the slopes steeper in alcoholics than in controls despite their attenuated dopamine responses to methylphenidate, which suggests an impaired modulation of dopamine signals in the brain of alcoholic subjects. These findings are consistent with a predominant inhibitory effect of dopamine in the human brain that is likely mediated by the prominence of dopamine D2/D3 receptors. PMID:23467368

  19. Inhibition of type I insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling attenuates the development of breast cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldana, Sandra M; Lee, Heng-Huan; Lowery, Frank J; Khotskaya, Yekaterina B; Xia, Weiya; Zhang, Chenyu; Chang, Shih-Shin; Chou, Chao-Kai; Steeg, Patricia S; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a common cause of mortality in cancer patients, yet potential therapeutic targets remain largely unknown. The type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) is known to play a role in the progression of breast cancer and is currently being investigated in the clinical setting for various types of cancer. The present study demonstrates that IGF-IR is constitutively autophosphorylated in brain-seeking breast cancer sublines. Knockdown of IGF-IR results in a decrease of phospho-AKT and phospho-p70s6k, as well as decreased migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231Br brain-seeking cells. In addition, transient ablation of IGFBP3, which is overexpressed in brain-seeking cells, blocks IGF-IR activation. Using an in vivo experimental brain metastasis model, we show that IGF-IR knockdown brain-seeking cells have reduced potential to establish brain metastases. Finally, we demonstrate that the malignancy of brain-seeking cells is attenuated by pharmacological inhibition with picropodophyllin, an IGF-IR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Together, our data suggest that the IGF-IR is an important mediator of brain metastasis and its ablation delays the onset of brain metastases in our model system.

  20. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, L.; Veltman, D. J.; ten Kulve, J. S.; Groot, P. F. C.; Ruhe, H. G.; Barkhof, F.; Sloan, J. H.; Diamant, M.; Ijzerman, R. G.

    AimTo test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. MethodsAs part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain

  1. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, L.; Veltman, D.J.; ten Kulve, J.S.; Groot, P.F.C.; Ruhe, H.G.; Barkhof, F.; Sloan, J.H.; Diamant, M.; IJzerman, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. Methods: As part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain

  2. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, L.; Veltman, D. J.; ten Kulve, J. S.; Groot, P. F. C.; Ruhé, H. G.; Barkhof, F.; Sloan, J. H.; Diamant, M.; Ijzerman, R. G.

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. As part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain responses to

  3. Chronic sleep restriction induces long-lasting changes in adenosine and noradrenaline receptor density in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsoo; Elmenhorst, David; Weisshaupt, Angela; Wedekind, Franziska; Kroll, Tina; McCarley, Robert W; Strecker, Robert E; Bauer, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Although chronic sleep restriction frequently produces long-lasting behavioural and physiological impairments in humans, the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. Here we used a rat model of chronic sleep restriction to investigate the role of brain adenosine and noradrenaline systems, known to regulate sleep and wakefulness, respectively. The density of adenosine A1 and A2a receptors and β-adrenergic receptors before, during and following 5 days of sleep restriction was assessed with autoradiography. Rats (n = 48) were sleep-deprived for 18 h day(-1) for 5 consecutive days (SR1-SR5), followed by 3 unrestricted recovery sleep days (R1-R3). Brains were collected at the beginning of the light period, which was immediately after the end of sleep deprivation on sleep restriction days. Chronic sleep restriction increased adenosine A1 receptor density significantly in nine of the 13 brain areas analysed with elevations also observed on R3 (+18 to +32%). In contrast, chronic sleep restriction reduced adenosine A2a receptor density significantly in one of the three brain areas analysed (olfactory tubercle which declined 26-31% from SR1 to R1). A decrease in β-adrenergic receptors density was seen in substantia innominata and ventral pallidum which remained reduced on R3, but no changes were found in the anterior cingulate cortex. These data suggest that chronic sleep restriction can induce long-term changes in the brain adenosine and noradrenaline receptors, which may underlie the long-lasting neurocognitive impairments observed in chronic sleep restriction. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  4. Vasopressin and oxytocin receptor systems in the brain: sex differences and sex-specific regulation of social behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumais, Kelly M.; Veenema, Alexa H.

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptides vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) and their receptors in the brain are involved in the regulation of various social behaviors and have emerged as drug targets for the treatment of social dysfunction in several sex-biased neuropsychiatric disorders. Sex differences in the VP and OT systems may therefore be implicated in sex-specific regulation of healthy as well as impaired social behaviors. We begin this review by highlighting the sex differences, or lack of sex differences, in VP and OT synthesis in the brain. We then discuss the evidence showing the presence or absence of sex differences in VP and OT receptors in rodents and humans, as well as showing new data of sexually dimorphic V1a receptor binding in the rat brain. Importantly, we find that there is lack of comprehensive analysis of sex differences in these systems in common laboratory species, and we find that, when sex differences are present, they are highly brain region- and species- specific. Interestingly, VP system parameters (VP and V1aR) are typically higher in males, while sex differences in the OT system are not always in the same direction, often showing higher OT expression in females, but higher OT receptor expression in males. Furthermore, VP and OT receptor systems show distinct and largely non-overlapping expression in the rodent brain, which may cause these receptors to have either complementary or opposing functional roles in the sex-specific regulation of social behavior. Though still in need of further research, we close by discussing how manipulations of the VP and OT systems have given important insights into the involvement of these neuropeptide systems in the sex-specific regulation of social behavior in rodents and humans. PMID:25951955

  5. Chronic sleep restriction induces long-lasting changes in adenosine and noradrenaline receptor density in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    WEISSHAUPT, ANGELA; WEDEKIND, FRANZISKA; KROLL, TINA; MCCARLEY, ROBERT W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Although chronic sleep restriction frequently produces long-lasting behavioural and physiological impairments in humans, the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. Here we used a rat model of chronic sleep restriction to investigate the role of brain adenosine and noradrenaline systems, known to regulate sleep and wakefulness, respectively. The density of adenosine A1 and A2a receptors and β-adrenergic receptors before, during and following 5 days of sleep restriction was assessed with autoradiography. Rats (n = 48) were sleep-deprived for 18 h day–1 for 5 consecutive days (SR1–SR5), followed by 3 unrestricted recovery sleep days (R1–R3). Brains were collected at the beginning of the light period, which was immediately after the end of sleep deprivation on sleep restriction days. Chronic sleep restriction increased adenosine A1 receptor density significantly in nine of the 13 brain areas analysed with elevations also observed on R3 (+18 to +32%). In contrast, chronic sleep restriction reduced adenosine A2a receptor density significantly in one of the three brain areas analysed (olfactory tubercle which declined 26–31% from SR1 to R1). A decrease in b-adrenergic receptors density was seen in substantia innominata and ventral pallidum which remained reduced on R3, but no changes were found in the anterior cingulate cortex. These data suggest that chronic sleep restriction can induce long-term changes in the brain adenosine and noradrenaline receptors, which may underlie the long-lasting neurocognitive impairments observed in chronic sleep restriction. PMID:25900125

  6. Effect of chronic psychogenic stress on characteristics of some rat brain synaptic membrane receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikuradze, V.O.; Kozlovskaya, M.M.; Rozhanets, V.V.; Val' dman, A.V.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies characteristics of alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptors, and imipramine and bensodiazepine receptors in brain synaptic membranes of rats after exposure to combined stress for 15 days by a modified Hecht's method. Before the experiment the suspension was thawed and centrifuged. Specific binding of tritium-WB-4101 (30 Ci/mmole), tritium-dihydroalprenolol, tritium-flunitrazepam, and tritium-imipramine was carried out by known methods with certain modifications. The results suggest that pathology of behavior in rats observed in the model may be classed as a depressive-like state rather than a neurosis-like state, and the model itself may be more appropriate for the study of the mechanisms of action of compounds with marked tranquilizing activity.

  7. Pharmacological manipulation of serotonin receptors during brain embryogenesis favours stress resiliency in female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Lavanco

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Manipulations of the serotonin transmission during early development induce long-lasting changes in the serotonergic circuitry throughout the brain. However, little is known on the developmental consequences in the female progeny. Therefore, this study aimed at exploring the behavioural effects of pre- and postnatal stimulation of the serotonergic system by 5-methoxytryptamine in adolescent female rats on behavioural reactivity and anxiety- like phenotype. Our results show that perinatal 5- methoxythyptamine decreased total distance travelled and rearing frequency in the novel enviroment, and increased the preference for the centre of the arena in the open field test. Moreover, perinatal 5-methoxytryptamine increased the percentages of entries and time spent on the open arms of the elevated plus maze, with respect to perinatally vehicle-exposed rats. Thus, perinatal stimulation of serotonin receptors does not impair the functional response to the emotional challenges in female rats, favouring the occurrence of a stress-resilient phenotype.

  8. Effects of white spirits on rat brain 5-HT receptor functions and synaptic remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Henrik Rye; Plenge, P.; Jørgensen, O.S.

    2001-01-01

    , and subcellular levels. This study investigates the effects of two types of white spirit on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporters (5-HTT), 5-HT2A and 5-HT4 receptor expression in forebrain, and on neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and 25-kDa synaptosomal associated protein (SNAP-25) concentrations when......Previously, inhalation exposure to different types of white spirit (i.e. complex mixtures of aliphatic, aromatic, alkyl aromatic, and naphthenic hydrocarbons) has been shown to induce neurochemical effects in rat brains. Especially, the serotonergic system was involved at the global, regional...... applied as indices for synaptic remodeling in forebrain, hippocampus, and entorhinal cortex. Male Wistar rats were exposed to 0, 400, or 800 ppm of aromatic (20 vol.% aromatic hydrocarbons) or dearomatized white spirit (catalytically hydrogenated white spirit) in the inhaled air for 6 h/day, 7 days...

  9. Purinergic receptor P2RY12-dependent microglial closure of the injured blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Nanhong; Takano, Takahiro; Pei, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are integral functional elements of the central nervous system, but the contribution of these cells to the structural integrity of the neurovascular unit has not hitherto been assessed. We show here that following blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, P2RY12 (purinergic receptor P2Y, G......-protein coupled, 12)-mediated chemotaxis of microglia processes is required for the rapid closure of the BBB. Mice treated with the P2RY12 inhibitor clopidogrel, as well as those in which P2RY12 was genetically ablated, exhibited significantly diminished movement of juxtavascular microglial processes and failed...... and cerebrovascular disease. As such, these observations suggest the need for caution in the postincident continuation of P2RY12-targeted platelet inhibition....

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors in the brain: controlling food intake and body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, Laurie L; Drucker, Daniel J

    2014-10-01

    The peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion and inhibits both gastric emptying and glucagon secretion. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists control glycemia via glucose-dependent mechanisms of action and promote weight loss in obese and diabetic individuals. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and cellular targets transducing the weight loss effects remain unclear. Two recent studies in the JCI provide insight into the neurons responsible for this effect. Sisley et al. reveal that GLP-1R agonist-induced weight loss requires GLP-1Rs in the CNS, while Secher et al. reveal that a small peptide GLP-1R agonist penetrates the brain and activates a subset of GLP-1R-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus to produce weight loss. Together, these two studies elucidate pathways that inform strategies coupling GLP-1R signaling to control of body weight in patients with diabetes or obesity.

  11. Sustained NMDA receptor hypofunction induces compromised neural systems integration and schizophrenia-like alterations in functional brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Neil; Xiao, Xiaolin; McDonald, Martin; Higham, Desmond J; Morris, Brian J; Pratt, Judith A

    2014-02-01

    Compromised functional integration between cerebral subsystems and dysfunctional brain network organization may underlie the neurocognitive deficits seen in psychiatric disorders. Applying topological measures from network science to brain imaging data allows the quantification of complex brain network connectivity. While this approach has recently been used to further elucidate the nature of brain dysfunction in schizophrenia, the value of applying this approach in preclinical models of psychiatric disease has not been recognized. For the first time, we apply both established and recently derived algorithms from network science (graph theory) to functional brain imaging data from rats treated subchronically with the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP). We show that subchronic PCP treatment induces alterations in the global properties of functional brain networks akin to those reported in schizophrenia. Furthermore, we show that subchronic PCP treatment induces compromised functional integration between distributed neural systems, including between the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, that have established roles in cognition through, in part, the promotion of thalamic dysconnectivity. We also show that subchronic PCP treatment promotes the functional disintegration of discrete cerebral subsystems and also alters the connectivity of neurotransmitter systems strongly implicated in schizophrenia. Therefore, we propose that sustained NMDA receptor hypofunction contributes to the pathophysiology of dysfunctional brain network organization in schizophrenia.

  12. Multiple benzodiazepine receptors in the ovine brain: ontogenesis, properties, and distribution of /sup 3/H-diazepam binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villiger, J.W.; Taylor, K.M.; Gluckman, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors in the ovine frontal cortex were present at 56 days gestation and developed slowly until 96 days when the number increased rapidly, reaching adult levels by 120 days gestation. Scatchard analysis of 3H-diazepam specifically bound to cortical membranes suggested high (KD approximately equal to 2.0 nM) and low (KD approximately equal to 20.0 nM) affinity benzodiazepine receptors at all stages of development. Whereas the affinity of these receptors for 3H-diazepam did not alter during development, the number of both high and low affinity receptors increased significantly between 56 and 120 days gestation. The number of low affinity receptors were higher in late gestation and early neonatal life than in adulthood. The functional state of these receptors as determined by sensitivity to GABA did not alter during development. However, in the adult, nitrazepam, flunitrazepam, midazolam, and 1-methylisoguanosine were more potent in displacing 3H-diazepam at the low affinity than the high affinity receptor, whereas chlordiazepoxide and diazepam had greater potency at the high affinity binding site. Development of the benzodiazepine receptor in the majority of other brain regions studied occurred primarily after 68 days gestation, as was the case in frontal cortex. In contrast, hindbrain and midbrain benzodiazepine receptors had reached adult levels by 68 days gestation.

  13. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevents stress-induced modulation of multiple memory systems in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Lars; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver; Wolf, Oliver T

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that stress may orchestrate the engagement of multiple memory systems in the brain. In particular, stress is thought to favor dorsal striatum-dependent procedural over hippocampus-dependent declarative memory. However, the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying these modulatory effects of stress remain elusive, especially in humans. Here, we targeted the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the stress-induced modulation of dorsal striatal and hippocampal memory systems in the human brain using a combination of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacologic blockade of the MR. Eighty healthy participants received the MR antagonist spironolactone (300 mg) or a placebo and underwent a stressor or control manipulation before they performed, in the scanner, a classification task that can be supported by the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. Stress after placebo did not affect learning performance but reduced explicit task knowledge and led to a relative increase in the use of more procedural learning strategies. At the neural level, stress promoted striatum-based learning at the expense of hippocampus-based learning. Functional connectivity analyses showed that this shift was associated with altered coupling of the amygdala with the hippocampus and dorsal striatum. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade before stress prevented the stress-induced shift toward dorsal striatal procedural learning, same as the stress-induced alterations of amygdala connectivity with hippocampus and dorsal striatum, but resulted in significantly impaired performance. Our findings indicate that the stress-induced shift from hippocampal to dorsal striatal memory systems is mediated by the amygdala, required to preserve performance after stress, and dependent on the MR. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  14. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Grab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes.Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified.Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  15. Effects of Subchronic Finasteride Treatment and Withdrawal on Neuroactive Steroid Levels and Their Receptors in the Male Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giatti, Silvia; Foglio, Benedetta; Romano, Simone; Pesaresi, Marzia; Panzica, Giancarlo; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Caruso, Donatella; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic conversion of progesterone and testosterone by the enzyme 5alpha-reductase exerts a crucial role in the control of nervous function. The effects of finasteride in the brain, an inhibitor of this enzyme used for the treatment of human benign prostatic hyperplasia and androgenic alopecia, have been poorly explored. Therefore, the effects of a subchronic treatment with finasteride at low doses (3 mg/kg/day) and the consequences of its withdrawal on neuroactive steroid levels in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and some brain regions as well as on the expression of classical and non-classical steroid receptors have been evaluated in male rats. After subchronic treatment (i.e., for 20 days) the following effects were detected: (i) depending on the compartment considered, alteration in the levels of neuroactive steroids, not only in 5alpha-reduced metabolites but also in its precursors and in neuroactive steroids from other steroidogenic pathways and (ii) an upregulation of the androgen receptor in the cerebral cortex and beta3 subunit of the GABA-A receptor in the cerebellum. One month after the last treatment (i.e., withdrawal period), some of these effects persisted (i.e., the upregulation of the androgen receptor in the cerebral cortex, an increase of dihydroprogesterone in the cerebellum, a decrease of dihydrotestosterone in plasma). Moreover, other changes in neuroactive steroid levels, steroid receptors (i.e., an upregulation of the estrogen receptor alpha and a downregulation of the estrogen receptor beta in the cerebral cortex) and GABA-A receptor subunits (i.e., a decrease of alpha 4 and beta 3 mRNA levels in the cerebral cortex) were detected. These findings suggest that finasteride treatment may have broad consequences for brain function. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Distribution and Abundance of Glucocorticoid and Mineralocorticoid Receptors throughout the Brain of the Great Tit (Parus major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Senft

    Full Text Available The glucocorticoid stress response, regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, enables individuals to cope with stressors through transcriptional effects in cells expressing the appropriate receptors. The two receptors that bind glucocorticoids-the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR-are present in a variety of vertebrate tissues, but their expression in the brain is especially important. Neural receptor patterns have the potential to integrate multiple behavioral and physiological traits simultaneously, including self-regulation of glucocorticoid secretion through negative feedback processes. In the present work, we quantified the expression of GR and MR mRNA throughout the brain of a female great tit (Parus major, creating a distribution map encompassing 48 regions. This map, the first of its kind for P. major, demonstrated a widespread but not ubiquitous distribution of both receptor types. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN and the hippocampus (HP-the two brain regions that we sampled from a total of 25 birds, we found high GR mRNA expression in the former and, unexpectedly, low MR mRNA in the latter. We examined the covariation of MR and GR levels in these two regions and found a strong, positive relationship between MR in the PVN and MR in the HP and a similar trend for GR across these two regions. This correlation supports the idea that hormone pleiotropy may constrain an individual's behavioral and physiological phenotype. In the female song system, we found moderate GR in hyperstriatum ventrale, pars caudalis (HVC, and moderate MR in robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA. Understanding intra- and interspecific patterns of glucocorticoid receptor expression can inform us about the behavioral processes (e.g. song learning that may be sensitive to stress and stimulate future hypotheses concerning the relationships between receptor expression, circulating hormone concentrations

  17. Size-exclusion chromatographic reconstitution of the bovine brain benzodiazepine receptor : Effects of lipid environment on the binding characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viel, G.T; Yang, Q; Lundahl, P; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R.A

    1997-01-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor from calf brain was solubilized with sodium deoxycholate (2 mg/ml) in the presence of 0.5 M KCl and protease inhibitors, and bound flunitrazepam with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K-d) of 2.7+/-1.2 nM and with 0.40+/-0.04 pmol binding sites per mg protein (B-max).

  18. Pharmacoepigenetics of the role of DNA methylation in μ-opioid receptor expression in different human brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knothe, Claudia; Oertel, Bruno G; Ultsch, Alfred; Kettner, Mattias; Schmidt, Peter Harald; Wunder, Cora; Toennes, Stefan W; Geisslinger, Gerd; Lötsch, Jörn

    2016-12-01

    Exposure to opioids has been associated with epigenetic effects. Studies in rodents suggested a role of varying degrees of DNA methylation in the differential regulation of μ-opioid receptor expression across the brain. In a translational investigation, using tissue acquired postmortem from 21 brain regions of former opiate addicts, representing a human cohort with chronic opioid exposure, μ-opioid receptor expression was analyzed at the level of DNA methylation, mRNA and protein. While high or low μ-opioid receptor expression significantly correlated with local OPRM1 mRNA levels, there was no corresponding association with OPRM1 methylation status. Additional experiments in human cell lines showed that changes in DNA methylation associated with changes in μ-opioid expression were an order of magnitude greater than differences in brain. Hence, different degrees of DNA methylation associated with chronic opioid exposure are unlikely to exert a major role in the region-specificity of μ-opioid receptor expression in the human brain.

  19. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 protein (DMBT1): A pattern recognition receptor with multiple binding sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Karlsson, N.G.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2010-01-01

    Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 protein (DMBT1), salivary agglutinin (DMBT1SAG), and lung glycoprotein-340 (DMBT1GP340) are three names for glycoproteins encoded by the same DMBT1 gene. All these proteins belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily of proteins: a

  20. Emotional eating is associated with increased brain responses to food-cues and reduced sensitivity to GLP-1 receptor activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, L.; Veltman, D.J.; ten Kulve, J.S.; Drent, M.L.; Barkhof, F.; Diamant, M.; IJzerman, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The neural correlates and pathophysiology of emotional eating are insufficiently known. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a postprandial hormone, plays a role in feeding behavior by signaling satiety to the brain. GLP-1 receptor agonists, used for treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM),

  1. [STUDYING THE ROLE OF BRAIN MELANOCORTIN RECEPTORS IN THE SUPPRESSING OF FOOD INTAKE UNDER ETHER STRESS IN MICE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhan, N M; Kulikova, E V; Makarova, E N; Yakovleva, T V; Kazantseva, A Yu

    2015-12-01

    Melanocortin (MC) system regulates food intake under the rest conditions. Stress inhibits food intake. It is not clear whether brain MC system is involved in stress-induced anorexia in mice. The aim of the work was to investigate the effect of pharmacological blockade and activation of brain MC receptors on food intake under stress. C57B1/6J male mice were subjected to ether stress (0.5 minute ether anesthesia) before the administration of saline solution or synthetic non-selective blocker (SHU9119) or agonist (Melanotan II) of MC receptors into the lateral brain ventricle. Food intake was pre-stimulated with 17 hours of fasting in all mice. Ether stress decreased food intake, increased the plasma corticosterone level and hypothalamic mRNA AgRP (natural MC receptor antagonist) level at 1 hour after the stress. Pharmacological blockade of the MC receptors weakened stress-induced anorexia and decreased mRNA AgRP level in the hypothalamus. Pharmacological stimulation of the MC receptors enhanced ether stress-induced anorexia and hypercortisolism. Thus, our data demonstrated that the central MC system was involved in the development of stress-induced anorexia in mice.

  2. Acute treatment with pentobarbital alters the kinetics of in vivo receptor binding in the mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, Yojiro [Division of Clinical Research, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chibashi 263-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: yojiro.sakiyama@pfizer.com; Saito, Masao [Department of Medical Science, Institute of Medical Electronics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Department of Medical Physics, School of Allied Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The effect of pentobarbital, a sedative-hypnotic barbiturate, on the in vivo binding of benzodiazepine receptors in the mouse brain was investigated. Dose-related changes in the apparent binding of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788 ([{sup 3}H]flumazenil) in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pons-medulla were observed by pretreatment with pentobarbital. For quantification of the kinetic properties of the in vivo binding of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788, time courses of radioactivity following its injection were examined, and kinetic analysis was performed using the compartment model. The time courses of radioactivity following injection of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788 with 3 mg/kg Ro15-1788 were used as input function. In all regions studied, rate constants between input compartment and specific binding compartment were significantly decreased by pentobarbital. However, no significant alterations in the binding potential (BP=K {sub 3}/K {sub 4}) of benzodiazepine receptors by pentobarbital were observed in any of the regions. A saturation experiment indicated that the decrease in the input rate constant (K {sub 3}), which includes both the association rate constant (k {sub on}) and the number of binding sites available (B {sub max}), was mainly due to decrease in k {sub on}. These results suggest that apparent increases in binding at 20 min after tracer injection were due to the decrease in the association and dissociation rates of binding in vivo.

  3. Brain mineralocorticoid receptor function in control of salt balance and stress-adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, Edo Ronald; Joëls, Marian

    2017-09-01

    We will highlight in honor of Randall Sakai the peculiar characteristics of the brain mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in its response pattern to the classical mineralocorticoid aldosterone and the naturally occurring glucocorticoids corticosterone and cortisol. Neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and circumventricular organs express MR, which mediate selectively the action of aldosterone on salt appetite, sympathetic outflow and volume regulation. The MR-containing NTS neurons innervate limbic-forebrain circuits enabling aldosterone to also modulate reciprocally arousal, motivation, fear and reward. MR expressed in abundance in this limbic-forebrain circuitry, is target of cortisol and corticosterone in modulation of appraisal processes, memory performance and selection of coping strategy. Complementary to this role of limbic MR is the action mediated by the lower affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GR), which promote subsequently memory storage of the experience and facilitate behavioral adaptation. Current evidence supports the hypothesis that an imbalance between MR- and GR-mediated actions compromises resilience and adaptation to stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aluminum access to the brain: A role for transferrin and its receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskams, A.J.; Connor, J.R. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey (United States))

    1990-11-01

    The toxicity of aluminum in plant and animal cell biology is well established, although poorly understood. Several recent studies have identified aluminum as a potential, although highly controversial, contributory factor in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and dialysis dementia. For example, aluminum has been found in high concentrations in senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, which occur in the brains of subjects with Alzheimer's disease. However, a mechanism for the entry of aluminum (Al{sup 3+}) into the cells of the central nervous system (CNS) has yet to be found. Here the authors describe a possible route of entry for aluminum into the cells of the CNS via the same high-affinity receptor-ligand system that has been postulated for iron (Fe{sup 3}) aluminum is able to gain access to the central nervous system under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the interaction between transferrin and its receptor may function as a general metal ion regulatory system in the CNS, extending beyond its postulated role in iron regulation.

  5. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 is involved in brain development during zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yanan; Liu, Xiaochun [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Institute of Aquatic Economic Animals and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory for Aquatic Economic Animals, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Zhu, Pei; Li, Jianzhen; Sham, Kathy W.Y. [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Cheng, Shuk Han [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Li, Shuisheng; Zhang, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Institute of Aquatic Economic Animals and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory for Aquatic Economic Animals, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Cheng, Christopher H.K., E-mail: chkcheng@cuhk.edu.hk [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Lin, Haoran, E-mail: lsslhr@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Institute of Aquatic Economic Animals and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory for Aquatic Economic Animals, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); College of Ocean, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, Hainan (China)

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •The Gper expression was detected in the developing brain of zebrafish. •Gper morpholino knockdown induced apoptosis of brain cells. •Gper morpholino knockdown reduced expression in neuron markers. •Zebrafish Gper may be involved in neuronal development. -- Abstract: G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (Gper, formerly known as GPR30) is found to be a trophic and protective factor in mediating action of estrogen in adult brain, while its role in developing brain remains to be elucidated. Here we present the expression pattern of Gper and its functions during embryogenesis in zebrafish. Both the mRNA and protein of Gper were detected throughout embryogenesis. Whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) revealed a wide distribution of gper mRNAs in various regions of the developing brain. Gper knockdown by specific morpholinos resulted in growth retardation in embryos and morphological defects in the developing brain. In addition, induced apoptosis, decreased proliferation of the brain cells and maldevelopment of sensory and motor neurons were also found in the morphants. Our results provide novel insights into Gper functions in the developing brain, revealing that Gper can maintain the survival of the brain cells, and formation and/or differentiation of the sensory and motor neurons.

  6. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in the brain of cirrhosis patients with manifest hepatic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iversen, Peter; Bender, Dirk; Munk, Ole L.; Cumming, Paul [Aarhus University Hospital, PET Centre, Aarhus (Denmark); Aagaard Hansen, Dorthe; Keiding, Susanne [Aarhus University Hospital, PET Centre, Aarhus (Denmark); Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Medicine V (Hepatology), Aarhus (Denmark); Rodell, Anders [Aarhus University Hospital, Centre of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience (CFIN), Aarhus (Denmark)

    2006-07-15

    It has been suggested that ammonia-induced enhancement of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) in the brain is involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This hypothesis is based on animal experiments and studies of post-mortem human brains using radiolabelled PK11195, a specific ligand for PBR, but to our knowledge has not been tested in living patients. The aim of the present study was to test this hypothesis by measuring the number of cerebral PBRs in specific brain regions in cirrhotic patients with an acute episode of clinically manifest HE and healthy subjects using dynamic {sup 11}C-PK11195 brain PET. Eight cirrhotic patients with an acute episode of clinically manifest HE (mean arterial ammonia 81 {mu}mol/l) and five healthy subjects (22 {mu}mol/l) underwent dynamic {sup 11}C-PK11195 and {sup 15}O-H{sub 2}O PET, co-registered with MR images. Brain regions (putamen, cerebellum, cortex and thalamus) were delineated on co-registered {sup 15}O-H{sub 2} {sup 15}O and MR images and copied to the dynamic {sup 15}O-H{sub 2}O and {sup 11}C-PK11195 images. Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) ({sup 15}O-H{sub 2}O scan) and the volume of distribution of PK11195 ({sup 11}C-PK11195 scan) were calculated by kinetic analysis. There were regional differences in the CBF, with lowest values in the cortex and highest values in the putamen in both groups of subjects (p<0.05), but no significant differences between the groups. There were no significant differences in the volume of distribution of PK11195 (V{sub d}) between regions or between the two groups of subjects. Mean values of V{sub d} ranged from 1.0 to 1.1 in both groups of subjects. The results do not confirm the hypothesis of an increased number of PBRs in patients with HE. (orig.)

  7. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Svarer, Claus; McMahon, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    BPNDs measured with [(11)C]Cimbi-36 and [(18)F]altanserin (mean Pearson's r: 0.95 ± 0.04) suggesting similar cortical binding of the radioligands. Relatively higher binding with [(11)C]Cimbi-36 as compared to [(18)F]altanserin was found in the choroid plexus and hippocampus in the human brain......INTRODUCTION: [(11)C]Cimbi-36 is a recently developed serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand that has been successfully applied for human neuroimaging. Here, we investigate the test-retest variability of cerebral [(11)C]Cimbi-36 PET and compare [(11)C...... test-retest variability in [(11)C]Cimbi-36 binding measures, and another eight were scanned after a bolus plus constant infusion with [(18)F]altanserin. Regional differences in the brain distribution of [(11)C]Cimbi-36 and [(18)F]altanserin were assessed with a correlation of regional binding measures...

  8. Recovery sleep after extended wakefulness restores elevated A1 adenosine receptor availability in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmenhorst, David; Elmenhorst, Eva-Maria; Hennecke, Eva; Kroll, Tina; Matusch, Andreas; Aeschbach, Daniel; Bauer, Andreas

    2017-04-18

    Adenosine and functional A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR) availability are supposed to mediate sleep-wake regulation and cognitive performance. We hypothesized that cerebral A1AR availability after an extended wake period decreases to a well-rested state after recovery sleep. [(18)F]CPFPX positron emission tomography was used to quantify A1AR availability in 15 healthy male adults after 52 h of sleep deprivation and following 14 h of recovery sleep. Data were additionally compared with A1AR values after 8 h of baseline sleep from an earlier dataset. Polysomnography, cognitive performance, and sleepiness were monitored. Recovery from sleep deprivation was associated with a decrease in A1AR availability in several brain regions, ranging from 11% (insula) to 14% (striatum). A1AR availabilities after recovery did not differ from baseline sleep in the control group. The degree of performance impairment, sleepiness, and homeostatic sleep-pressure response to sleep deprivation correlated negatively with the decrease in A1AR availability. Sleep deprivation resulted in a higher A1AR availability in the human brain. The increase that was observed after 52 h of wakefulness was restored to control levels during a 14-h recovery sleep episode. Individuals with a large increase in A1AR availability were more resilient to sleep-loss effects than those with a subtle increase. This pattern implies that differences in endogenous adenosine and A1AR availability might be causal for individual responses to sleep loss.

  9. The Vitamin D Receptor (VDR Gene Polymorphisms in Turkish Brain Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Toptaş

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. It has been stated that brain cancers are an increasingly serious issue in many parts of the world. The aim of our study was to determine a possible relationship between Vitamin D receptor (VDR gene polymorphisms and the risk of glioma and meningioma. Methods. We investigated the VDR Taq-I and VDR Fok-I gene polymorphisms in 100 brain cancer patients (including 44 meningioma cases and 56 glioma cases and 122 age-matched healthy control subjects. This study was performed by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RF LP. Results. VDR Fok-I ff genotype was significantly increased in meningioma patients (15.9% compared with controls (2.5%, and carriers of Fok-I ff genotype had a 6.47-fold increased risk for meningioma cases. There was no significant difference between patients and controls for VDR Taq-I genotypes and alleles. Conclusions. We suggest that VDR Fok-I genotypes might affect the development of meningioma.

  10. A previously uncharacterized role for estrogen receptor beta: defeminization of male brain and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudwa, Andrea E; Bodo, Cristian; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Rissman, Emilie F

    2005-03-22

    Sex differences in brain and behavior are ubiquitous in sexually reproducing species. One cause of sexual dimorphisms is developmental differences in circulating concentrations of gonadal steroids. Neonatal testes produce androgens; thus, males are exposed to both testosterone and estradiol, whereas females are not exposed to high concentrations of either hormone until puberty. Classically, the development of neural sex differences is initiated by estradiol, which activates two processes in male neonates; masculinization, the development of male-type behaviors, and defeminization, the loss of the ability to display female-type behaviors. Here, we test the hypothesis that defeminization is regulated by estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Adult male ERbeta knockout and WT mice were gonadectomized, treated with female priming hormones, and tested for receptive behavior. Indicative of incomplete defeminization, male ERbeta knockout mice showed significantly higher levels of female receptivity as compared with WT littermates. Testes-intact males did not differ in any aspects of their male sexual behavior, regardless of genotype. In olfactory preference tests, males of both genotypes showed equivalent preferences for female-soiled bedding. Based on these results, we hypothesize that ERbeta is involved in defeminization of brain and behavior. This aspect of ERbeta function may lead to developments in our understanding of neural-based sexually dimorphic human behaviors.

  11. A previously uncharacterized role for estrogen receptor β: Defeminization of male brain and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudwa, Andrea E.; Bodo, Cristian; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Rissman, Emilie F.

    2005-01-01

    Sex differences in brain and behavior are ubiquitous in sexually reproducing species. One cause of sexual dimorphisms is developmental differences in circulating concentrations of gonadal steroids. Neonatal testes produce androgens; thus, males are exposed to both testosterone and estradiol, whereas females are not exposed to high concentrations of either hormone until puberty. Classically, the development of neural sex differences is initiated by estradiol, which activates two processes in male neonates; masculinization, the development of male-type behaviors, and defeminization, the loss of the ability to display female-type behaviors. Here, we test the hypothesis that defeminization is regulated by estrogen receptor β (ERβ). Adult male ERβ knockout and WT mice were gonadectomized, treated with female priming hormones, and tested for receptive behavior. Indicative of incomplete defeminization, male ERβ knockout mice showed significantly higher levels of female receptivity as compared with WT littermates. Testes-intact males did not differ in any aspects of their male sexual behavior, regardless of genotype. In olfactory preference tests, males of both genotypes showed equivalent preferences for female-soiled bedding. Based on these results, we hypothesize that ERβ is involved in defeminization of brain and behavior. This aspect of ERβ function may lead to developments in our understanding of neural-based sexually dimorphic human behaviors. PMID:15761056

  12. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  13. Reductions in brain 5-HT1B receptor availability in primarily cocaine-dependent humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuskey, David; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Planeta, Beata; Pittman, Brian; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Chen, Jason; Wanyiri, Jane; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Ropchan, Jim; Geha, Paul; Huang, Yiyun; Potenza, Marc N; Neumeister, Alexander; Carson, Richard E; Malison, Robert T

    2014-11-15

    Preclinical evidence implicates the serotonin receptor 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B (5-HT1B) in the effects of cocaine. This study explores 5-HT1B in humans by examining receptor availability in vivo in subjects whose primary addiction is cocaine dependence (CD) using positron emission tomography. Study participants included 14 medically healthy subjects with CD (mean age = 41 ± 6 years) who were compared with 14 age-matched healthy control subjects (mean age = 41 ± 8 years) with no past or current history of cocaine or other illicit substance abuse. Participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging followed by positron emission tomography with the highly selective 5-HT1B tracer, [(11)C]P943, for purposes of quantifying regional binding potential. Voxel-based morphometry and gray matter masking also were employed to control for potential partial volume effects. The [(11)C]P943 positron emission tomography imaging data in nine candidate regions (amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, caudate, frontal cortex, hypothalamus, pallidum, putamen, thalamus, and ventral striatum) showed significant or nearly significant reductions of regional binding potential in subjects with CD in three regions: anterior cingulate (-16%, p < .01), hypothalamus (-16%, p = .03), and frontal cortex (-7%, p = .08). Voxel-based morphometry showed significant gray matter reductions in the frontal cortex of subjects with CD. After gray matter masking, statistically significant reductions in the [(11)C]P943 regional binding potential were either retained (anterior cingulate, -14%, p = .01; hypothalamus, -20%, p < .01) or achieved (frontal cortex, -14%, p < .01). Whole-brain voxel-wise parameter estimation confirmed these results. Secondary analyses were also significant in some regions for years of cocaine and daily tobacco use. The reductions found in this study suggest that 5-HT1B receptors may contribute to the etiology or expression of CD and potentially represent a target for medication

  14. Guidance of Drosophila Mushroom Body Axons Depends upon DRL-Wnt Receptor Cleavage in the Brain Dorsomedial Lineage Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Reynaud

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In vivo axon pathfinding mechanisms in the neuron-dense brain remain relatively poorly characterized. We study the Drosophila mushroom body (MB axons, whose α and β branches connect to different brain areas. We show that the Ryk family WNT5 receptor, DRL (derailed, which is expressed in the dorsomedial lineages, brain structure precursors adjacent to the MBs, is required for MB α branch axon guidance. DRL acts to capture and present WNT5 to MB axons rather than transduce a WNT5 signal. DRL’s ectodomain must be cleaved and shed to guide α axons. DRL-2, another Ryk, is expressed within MB axons and functions as a repulsive WNT5 signaling receptor. Finally, our biochemical data support the existence of a ternary complex composed of the cleaved DRL ectodomain, WNT5, and DRL-2. Thus, the interaction of MB-extrinsic and -intrinsic Ryks via their common ligand acts to guide MB α axons.

  15. Disadvantage of Social Sensitivity: Interaction of Oxytocin Receptor Genotype and Child Maltreatment on Brain Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannlowski, Udo; Kugel, Harald; Grotegerd, Dominik; Redlich, Ronny; Opel, Nils; Dohm, Katharina; Zaremba, Dario; Grögler, Anne; Schwieren, Juliane; Suslow, Thomas; Ohrmann, Patricia; Bauer, Jochen; Krug, Axel; Kircher, Tilo; Jansen, Andreas; Domschke, Katharina; Hohoff, Christa; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Heinrichs, Markus; Arolt, Volker; Heindel, Walter; Baune, Bernhard T

    2016-09-01

    Oxytocin has received much attention as a prosocial and anxiolytic neuropeptide. In human studies, the G-allele of a common variant (rs53576) in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) has been associated with protective properties such as reduced stress response and higher receptiveness for social support. In contrast, recent studies suggest a detrimental role of the rs53576 G-allele in the context of childhood maltreatment. To further elucidate the role of OXTR, gene by maltreatment interactions on brain structure and function were investigated. Three hundred nine healthy participants genotyped for OXTR rs53576 underwent structural as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging during a common emotional face-matching task. Childhood maltreatment was assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Gray matter volumes were investigated by means of voxel-based morphometry across the entire brain. Structural magnetic resonance imaging data revealed a strong interaction of rs53576 genotype and CTQ scores, mapping specifically to the bilateral ventral striatum. GG homozygotes but not A-allele carriers showed strong gray matter reduction with increasing CTQ scores. In turn, lower ventral striatum gray matter volumes were associated with lower reward dependence, a prosocial trait. Furthermore, the G-allele was associated with increased amygdala responsiveness to emotional facial expressions. The findings suggest that the G-allele constitutes a vulnerability factor for specific alterations of limbic brain structure in individuals with adverse childhood experiences, complemented by increased limbic responsiveness to emotional interpersonal stimuli. While oxytocinergic signaling facilitates attachment and bonding in supportive social environments, this attunement for social cues may turn disadvantageous under early adverse conditions. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of cholinergic muscarinic receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain from immature rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balduini, W.; Murphy, S.D.; Costa, L.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides elicited by stimulation of cholinergic muscarinic receptors has been studied in brain from neonatal (7-day-old) rats in order to determine: (1) whether the neonatal rat could provide a good model system to study this signal-transduction pathway; and (2) whether potential differences with adult nerve tissue would explain the differential, age-related effects of cholinergic agonists. Accumulation of (3H) inositol phosphates in (3H)inositol prelabeled slices from neonatal and adult rats was measured as an index of phosphoinositide metabolism. Full (acetylcholine, methacholine, carbachol) and partial (oxotremorine, bethanechol) agonists had qualitatively similar, albeit quantitatively different, effects in neonatal and adult rats. Atropine and pirenzepine effectively blocked the carbachol-induced response with inhibition constants of 1.2 and 20.7 nM, respectively. In all brain areas, response to all agonists was higher in neonatal than adult rats, and in hippocampus and cerebral cortex the response was higher than in cerebellum or brainstem. The relative intrinsic activity of partial agonists was higher in the latter two areas (0.6-0.7) than in the former two (0.3-0.4). Carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain areas correlated well with the binding of (3H)QNB (r2 = 0.627) and, particularly, with (3H)pirenzepine (r2 = 0.911). In cerebral cortex the effect of carbachol was additive to that of norepinephrine and glutamate. The presence of calcium (250-500 microM) was necessary for maximal response to carbachol to be elicited; the EC50 value for Ca2+ was 65.4 microM. Addition of EDTA completely abolished the response. Removal of sodium ions from the incubation medium reduced the response to carbachol by 50%.

  17. In vitro blood-brain barrier permeability predictions for GABAA receptor modulating piperine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenmann, Daniela Elisabeth; Dürig, Carmen; Jähne, Evelyn Andrea; Smieško, Martin; Culot, Maxime; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Brodin, Birger; Wimmer, Laurin; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Hamburger, Matthias; Oufir, Mouhssin

    2016-06-01

    The alkaloid piperine from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and several synthetic piperine analogs were recently identified as positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. In order to reach their target sites of action, these compounds need to enter the brain by crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We here evaluated piperine and five selected analogs (SCT-66, SCT-64, SCT-29, LAU397, and LAU399) regarding their BBB permeability. Data were obtained in three in vitro BBB models, namely a recently established human model with immortalized hBMEC cells, a human brain-like endothelial cells (BLEC) model, and a primary animal (bovine endothelial/rat astrocytes co-culture) model. For each compound, quantitative UHPLC-MS/MS methods in the range of 5.00-500ng/mL in the corresponding matrix were developed, and permeability coefficients in the three BBB models were determined. In vitro predictions from the two human BBB models were in good agreement, while permeability data from the animal model differed to some extent, possibly due to protein binding of the screened compounds. In all three BBB models, piperine and SCT-64 displayed the highest BBB permeation potential. This was corroborated by data from in silico prediction. For the other piperine analogs (SCT-66, SCT-29, LAU397, and LAU399), BBB permeability was low to moderate in the two human BBB models, and moderate to high in the animal BBB model. Efflux ratios (ER) calculated from bidirectional permeability experiments indicated that the compounds were likely not substrates of active efflux transporters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Region-specific alterations in glucocorticoid receptor expression in the postmortem brain of teenage suicide victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Ren, Xinguo; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Palkovits, Miklós

    2013-11-01

    Abnormal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and suicide. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reported dysregulation of the HPA axis in suicide may be related to a disturbed feedback inhibition caused by decreased corticoid receptors in the brain. We therefore determined the protein and gene expression of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the postmortem brain of teenage suicide victims and matched normal controls. Protein and mRNA expression of GR (GR-α and GR-β) and MR and the mRNA expression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a target gene for GR were determined by immunolabeling using Western blot technique and the real-time RT-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) technique in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, subiculum, and amygdala obtained from 24 teenage suicide victims and 24 teenage control subjects. We observed that protein and gene expression of GR-α was significantly decreased in the PFC and amygdala, but not in the hippocampus or subiculum, of teenage suicide victims compared with normal control subjects. Also, the mRNA levels of GR inducible target gene GILZ was significantly decreased in PFC and amygdaloid nuclei but not in hippocampus compared with controls. In contrast, no significant differences were observed in protein or gene expression of MR in any of the areas studied between teenage suicide victims and normal control subjects. There was no difference in the expression of GR-β in the PFC between suicide victims and normal controls. These results suggested that the observed dysregulation of the HPA axis in suicide may be related to a decreased expression of GR-α and GR inducible genes in the PFC and amygdala of teenage suicide victims. The reason why GR receptors are not dysregulated in the hippocampus or subiculum, presumably two sites of stress action, are not clear at this time. Copyright

  19. Interactions of purified bovine brain A1-adenosine receptors with G-proteins. Reciprocal modulation of agonist and antagonist binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissmuth, M; Selzer, E; Schütz, W

    1991-05-01

    The bovine brain A1-adenosine receptor was purified 8000-fold by affinity chromatography on xanthine-amine-congener (XAC)-Sepharose. Addition of a 120-fold molar excess of a purified bovine brain G-protein preparation (Go,i a mixture of Go and Gi, containing predominantly Go) decreases the Bmax of the binding of the antagonist radioligand [3H]XAC to the receptor. This decrease is observed not only after insertion into phospholipid vesicles but also in detergent solution, and is reversed by GTP analogues. In the presence of Go,i, about 20 and 40% of the receptors display guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity binding of the agonist radioligand (-)-N6-3-([125I]iodo-4-hydroxyphenylisopropyl)adenosine after reconstitution into lipid vesicles and in detergent solution, respectively. The ability of Go,i to enhance agonist binding and decrease antagonist binding is concentration-dependent, with a half-maximal effect occurring at approximately 10-fold molar excess of G-proteins over A1-adenosine receptors. In the presence of the receptor, the rate of guanosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate (GTP[35S]) binding to Go,i is accelerated. This rate is further enhanced if the receptor is activated by the agonist (-)(R)-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, whereas the antagonist XAC decreases the association rate of GTP[35S] to levels observed in the absence of receptor. These results show (1) that detergent removal is not a prerequisite for the observation of coupling between the A1-adenosine receptor and Go,i, and (2) that the regulatory effect of G-proteins on antagonist binding to the A1-adenosine receptor can be reconstituted by using purified components.

  20. Chondroitin Sulfate is the Primary Receptor for a Peptide-Modified AAV That Targets Brain Vascular Endothelium In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, James C; Keiser, Nicholas W; Okulist, Anna; Martins, Inês; Wilson, Matthew S; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-10-14

    Recently, we described a peptide-modified AAV2 vector (AAV-GMN) containing a capsid-displayed peptide that directs in vivo brain vascular targeting and transduction when delivered intravenously. In this study, we sought to identify the receptor that mediates transduction by AAV-GMN. We found that AAV-GMN, but not AAV2, readily transduces the murine brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3, a result that mirrors previously observed in vivo transduction profiles of brain vasculature. Studies in vitro revealed that the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate C, acts as the primary receptor for AAV-GMN. Unlike AAV2, chondroitin sulfate expression is required for cell transduction by AAV-GMN, and soluble chondroitin sulfate C can robustly inhibit AAV-GMN transduction of brain endothelial cells. Interestingly, AAV-GMN retains heparin-binding properties, though in contrast to AAV2, it poorly transduces cells that express heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfate, indicating that the peptide insertion negatively impacts heparan-mediated transduction. Lastly, when delivered directly, this modified virus can transduce multiple brain regions, indicating that the potential of AAV-GMN as a therapeutic gene delivery vector for central nervous system disorders is not restricted to brain vascular endothelium.

  1. Chondroitin Sulfate is the Primary Receptor for a Peptide-Modified AAV That Targets Brain Vascular Endothelium In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Geoghegan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we described a peptide-modified AAV2 vector (AAV-GMN containing a capsid-displayed peptide that directs in vivo brain vascular targeting and transduction when delivered intravenously. In this study, we sought to identify the receptor that mediates transduction by AAV-GMN. We found that AAV-GMN, but not AAV2, readily transduces the murine brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3, a result that mirrors previously observed in vivo transduction profiles of brain vasculature. Studies in vitro revealed that the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate C, acts as the primary receptor for AAV-GMN. Unlike AAV2, chondroitin sulfate expression is required for cell transduction by AAV-GMN, and soluble chondroitin sulfate C can robustly inhibit AAV-GMN transduction of brain endothelial cells. Interestingly, AAV-GMN retains heparin-binding properties, though in contrast to AAV2, it poorly transduces cells that express heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfate, indicating that the peptide insertion negatively impacts heparan-mediated transduction. Lastly, when delivered directly, this modified virus can transduce multiple brain regions, indicating that the potential of AAV-GMN as a therapeutic gene delivery vector for central nervous system disorders is not restricted to brain vascular endothelium.

  2. Translational Pharmacology of the Metabotropic Glutamate 2 Receptor-Preferring Agonist LY2812223 in the Animal and Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Christian C; Schober, Douglas A; Tu, Yuan; Quets, Anne; Xiao, Hongling; Watt, Marla; Siuda, Ed; Nisenbaum, Eric; Xiang, Chuanxi; Heinz, Beverly; Prieto, Lourdes; McKinzie, David L; Monn, James A

    2017-04-01

    LY2812223 [(1 R ,2 S ,4 R ,5 R ,6 R )-2-amino-4-(1 H -1,2,4-triazol-3-ylsulfanyl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid] was identified via structure-activity studies arising from the potent metabotropic glutamate mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY354740 [(+)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0] hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid] as an mGlu2-preferring agonist. This pharmacology was determined using stably transfected cells containing either the human mGlu2 or mGlu3 receptor. We extended the pharmacological evaluation of LY2812223 to native brain tissues derived from relevant species used for preclinical drug development as well as human postmortem brain tissue. This analysis was conducted to ensure pharmacological translation from animals to human subjects in subsequent clinical studies. A guanosine 5'- O -(3-[ 35 S]thio)triphosphate (GTP γ S) functional binding assay, a method for measuring G i -coupled signaling that is inherent to the group 2 mGlu receptors, was used to evaluate LY2812223 pharmacology of native mGlu receptors in mouse, rat, nonhuman primate, and human cortical brain tissue samples. In native tissue membranes, LY2812223 unexpectedly acted as a partial agonist across all species tested. Activity of LY2812223 was lost in cortical membranes collected from mGlu2 knockout mice, but not those from mGlu3 knockout mice, providing additional support for mGlu2-preferring activity. Other signal transduction assays were used for comparison with the GTP binding assay (cAMP, calcium mobilization, and dynamic mass redistribution). In ectopic cell line-based assays, LY2812223 displayed near maximal agonist responses at the mGlu2 receptor across all assay formats, while it showed no functional agonist activity at the mGlu3 receptor except in the cAMP assay. In native brain slices or membranes that express both mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors, LY2812223 displayed unexpected partial agonist activity, which may suggest a functional interplay between these receptor subtypes in the brain

  3. Localization of CGRP, CGRP receptor, PACAP and glutamate in trigeminal ganglion. Relation to the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Salvatore, Christopher A; Johansson, Sara

    2015-01-01

    ) and related this to the expression of CGRP and its receptor in rhesus trigeminal ganglion. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and glutamate were examined and related to the CGRP system. Furthermore, we examined if the trigeminal ganglion is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB......), and the distribution of PACAP and glutamate in rhesus and rat TG. Evans blue was used to examine large molecule penetration into the rat TG. High receptor binding densities were found in rhesus TG. Immunofluorescence revealed expression of CGRP, CLR and RAMP1 in trigeminal cells. CGRP positive neurons expressed PACAP...... but not glutamate. Some neurons expressing CLR and RAMP1 co-localized with glutamate. Evans blue revealed that the TG is not protected by BBB. This study demonstrates CGRP receptor binding sites and expression of the CGRP receptor in rhesus and rat TG. The expression pattern of PACAP and glutamate suggests...

  4. Contribution of non-genetic factors to dopamine and serotonin receptor availability in the adult human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, J; Cervenka, S; Kuja-Halkola, R

    2016-01-01

    the regulation of receptor and transporter density levels. This lack of knowledge obscures interpretation of differences in protein availability reported in psychiatric patients. In this study, we used positron emission tomography (PET) in a twin design to estimate the relative contribution of genetic...... receptor. Heritability, shared environmental effects and individual-specific non-shared effects were estimated for regional D2/3 and 5-HT1A receptor availability in projection areas. We found a major contribution of genetic factors (0.67) on individual variability in striatal D2/3 receptor binding......The dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission systems are of fundamental importance for normal brain function and serve as targets for treatment of major neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite central interest for these neurotransmission systems in psychiatry research, little is known about...

  5. Immune-induced fever is mediated by IL-6 receptors on brain endothelial cells coupled to STAT3-dependent induction of brain endothelial prostaglandin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskilsson, Anna; Mirrasekhian, Elahe; Dufour, Sylvie; Schwaninger, Markus; Engblom, David; Blomqvist, Anders

    2014-11-26

    The cytokine IL-6, which is released upon peripheral immune challenge, is critical for the febrile response, but the mechanism by which IL-6 is pyrogenic has remained obscure. Here we generated mice with deletion of the membrane bound IL-6 receptor α (IL-6Rα) on neural cells, on peripheral nerves, on fine sensory afferent fibers, and on brain endothelial cells, respectively, and examined its role for the febrile response to peripherally injected lipopolysaccharide. We show that IL-6Rα on neural cells, peripheral nerves, and fine sensory afferents are dispensable for the lipopolysaccharide-induced fever, whereas IL-6Rα in the brain endothelium plays an important role. Hence deletion of IL-6Rα on brain endothelial cells strongly attenuated the febrile response, and also led to reduced induction of the prostaglandin synthesizing enzyme Cox-2 in the hypothalamus, the temperature-regulating center in the brain, as well as reduced expression of SOCS3, suggesting involvement of the STAT signaling pathway. Furthermore, deletion of STAT3 in the brain endothelium also resulted in attenuated fever. These data show that IL-6, when endogenously released during systemic inflammation, is pyrogenic by binding to IL-6Rα on brain endothelial cells to induce prostaglandin synthesis in these cells, probably in concerted action with other peripherally released cytokines. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3415957-05$15.00/0.

  6. Different spatial distributions of brain metastases from lung cancer by histological subtype and mutation status of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Koji; Kinoshita, Manabu; Takagaki, Masatoshi; Sakai, Mio; Tateishi, Souichirou; Achiha, Takamune; Hirayama, Ryuichi; Nishino, Kazumi; Uchida, Junji; Kumagai, Toru; Okami, Jiro; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naoya; Nakanishi, Katsuyuki; Imamura, Fumio; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the genetic backgrounds of lung cancers could affect the spatial distribution of brain metastases. CT or MR images of 200 patients with a total of 1033 treatment-naive brain metastases from lung cancer were retrospectively reviewed (23 by CT and 177 by MRI). All images were standardized to the human brain MRI atlas provided by the Montreal Neurological Institute 152 database. Locations, depths from the brain surface, and sizes of the lesions after image standardization were analyzed. The posterior fossa, the anatomic "watershed areas," and the gray-white matter junction were confirmed to be more commonly affected by lung cancer brain metastases, and brain metastases with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) L858R mutation occurred more often in the caudate, cerebellum, and temporal lobe than those with exon 19 deletion of EGFR. Median depths of the lesions from the brain surface were 13.7 mm (range, 8.6-21.9) for exon 19 deleted EGFR, 11.5 mm (6.6-16.8) for L858R mutated, and 15.0 mm (10.0-20.7) for wild-type EGFR. Lesions with L858R mutated EGFR were located significantly closer to the brain surface than lesions with exon 19 deleted or wild-type EGFR (P = .0032 and P < .0001, respectively). Furthermore, brain metastases of adenocarcinoma lung cancer patients with a history of chemotherapy but not molecular targeted therapy were located significantly deeper from the brain surface (P = .0002). This analysis is the first to reveal the relationship between EGFR mutation status and the spatial distribution of brain metastases of lung cancer. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 rescues mitochondrial dysfunction in female mice from two models of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; Vigli, Daniele; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Laviola, Giovanni; Vacca, Rosa Anna; De Filippis, Bianca

    2017-07-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause more than 95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. Recently we have demonstrated that neurobehavioral and brain molecular alterations can be rescued in a RTT mouse model, by pharmacological stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R). This member of the serotonin receptor family, crucially involved in the regulation of brain structural plasticity and cognitive processes, can be stimulated by systemic repeated treatment with LP-211, a brain-penetrant selective agonist. The present study extends previous findings by demonstrating that LP-211 treatment (0.25 mg/kg, once per day for 7 days) rescues mitochondrial respiratory chain impairment, oxidative phosphorylation deficiency and the reduced energy status in the brain of heterozygous female mice from two highly validated mouse models of RTT (MeCP2-308 and MeCP2-Bird mice). Moreover, LP-211 treatment completely restored the radical species overproduction by brain mitochondria in the MeCP2-308 model and partially recovered the oxidative imbalance in the more severely affected MeCP2-Bird model. These results provide the first evidence that RTT brain mitochondrial dysfunction can be rescued targeting the brain 5-HT7R and add compelling preclinical evidence of the potential therapeutic value of LP-211 as a pharmacological approach for this devastating neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Functions of the CB1 and CB 2 receptors in neuroprotection at the level of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendel, Esmée; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2014-09-01

    The cannabinoid (CB) receptors are the main targets of the cannabinoids, which include plant cannabinoids, endocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids. Over the last few years, accumulated evidence has suggested a role of the CB receptors in neuroprotection. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an important brain structure that is essential for neuroprotection. A link between the CB receptors and the BBB is thus likely, but this possible connection has only recently gained attention. Cannabinoids and the BBB share the same mechanisms of neuroprotection and both protect against excitotoxicity (CB1), cell death (CB1), inflammation (CB2) and oxidative stress (possibly CB independent)-all processes that also damage the BBB. Several examples of CB-mediated protection of the BBB have been found, such as inhibition of leukocyte influx and induction of amyloid beta efflux across the BBB. Moreover, the CB receptors were shown to improve BBB integrity, particularly by restoring the tightness of the tight junctions. This review demonstrated that both CB receptors are able to restore the BBB and neuroprotection, but much uncertainty about the underlying signaling cascades still exists and further investigation is needed.

  9. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockade abolishes brain microvascular inflammation and heat shock protein responses in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Ando, Hiromichi; Macova, Miroslava; Dou, Jingtao; Saavedra, Juan M

    2005-07-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation enhance vulnerability to hypertensive brain damage. To explore the participation of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in the mechanism of vulnerability to cerebral ischemia during hypertension, we examined the expression of inflammatory factors and the heat shock protein (HSP) response in cerebral microvessels from spontaneously hypertensive rats and their normotensive controls, Wistar Kyoto rats. We treated animals with vehicle or the Ang II AT(1) receptor antagonist candesartan, 0.3 mg/kg/day, via subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps for 4 weeks. Spontaneously hypertensive rats expressed higher Angiotensin II AT(1) receptor protein and mRNA than normotensive controls. Candesartan decreased the macrophage infiltration and reversed the enhanced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta mRNA and nuclear factor-kappaB in microvessels in hypertensive rats. The transcription of many HSP family genes, including HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90, and heat shock factor-1 was higher in hypertensive rats and was downregulated by AT(1) receptor blockade. Our results suggest a proinflammatory action of Ang II through AT(1) receptor stimulation in cerebral microvessels during hypertension, and very potent antiinflammatory effects of the Ang II AT(1) receptor antagonist. These compounds might be considered as potential therapeutic agents against ischemic and inflammatory diseases of the brain.

  10. Uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose from a brain receptor imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydogan, B.; Miller, L.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Sparks, R.B. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Stubbs, J.B. [Radiation Dosimetry Systems of Oak Ridge, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Absorbed dose estimates are known to contain uncertainties. A recent literature search indicates that prior to this study no rigorous investigation of uncertainty associated with absorbed dose has been undertaken. A method of uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose calculations has been developed and implemented for the brain receptor imaging agent {sup 123}I-IPT. The two major sources of uncertainty considered were the uncertainty associated with the determination of residence time and that associated with the determination of the S values. There are many sources of uncertainty in the determination of the S values, but only the inter-patient organ mass variation was considered in this work. The absorbed dose uncertainties were determined for lung, liver, heart and brain. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of the organ absorbed dose distributions for each patient and for a seven-patient population group were determined by the ``Latin Hypercube Sampling`` method. For an individual patient, the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose was found to be about 2.5 times larger than the estimated mean absorbed dose. For the seven-patient population the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose distribution was around 45% more than the estimated population mean. For example, the 95% confidence interval of the population liver dose distribution was found to be between 1.49E+0.7 Gy/MBq and 4.65E+07 Gy/MBq with a mean of 2.52E+07 Gy/MBq. This study concluded that patients in a population receiving {sup 123}I-IPT could receive absorbed doses as much as twice as large as the standard estimated absorbed dose due to these uncertainties.

  11. Maternal hypothyroidism decreases progesterone receptor expression in the cortical subplate of foetal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahagirdar, V; Zoeller, T R; Tighe, D P; Wagner, C K

    2012-08-01

    Steroid hormones exert profound effects on the development of brain areas controlling complex cognitive function in adulthood. One class, progestins, may contribute by acting on the progestin receptor (PR), which is transiently expressed in a critical layer of developing cortex: the subplate. PR expression in the subplate coincides with the establishment of ongoing cortical connectivity and may play an important organisational role. Identification of the factor(s) that regulate the precise timing of PR expression within subplate may help elucidate the function of PR. Thyroid hormone may interact with hormone response elements within the PR gene. The present study examined the effects of maternal hypothyroidism on levels of PR immunoreactivity (PR-IR) within the foetal subplate. Pregnant rats were made hypothyroid by the administration of methimazole and potassium perchlorate in drinking water. Maternal hypothyroidism significantly decreased PR-IR within the foetal subplate. Using the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrDU) during subplate cell neurogenesis (embryonic day 13.5) to determine subplate cell survival in hypothyroid animals, we found that decreases in PR-IR cannot be attributed to significant subplate cell loss but are more likely the result of altered PR expression. Gestational thyroxine replacement to hypothyroid dams prevented the decrease in PR-IR within the subplate. These results identify thyroid hormone as a potential factor in the regulation of PR expression in the developing brain. These results are consistent with the idea that endocrine cross-talk between progesterone and thyroid hormone may be one mechanism by which maternal hypothyroidism alters normal cortical development. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Hydrolysis of lipoproteins by sPLA2's enhances mitogenesis and eicosanoid release from vascular smooth muscle cells: Diverse activity of sPLA2's IIA, V and X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruzanski, Waldemar; Kopilov, Julia; Kuksis, Arnis

    2016-01-01

    Mitogenesis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMC) plays an important role in atherogenesis. Until recently, the effect of lipid subfractions has not been clarified. Secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2's) hydrolyse glycerophospholipids and release pro-inflammatory lyso-lipids, oxidized and non-oxidized fatty acids and isoprostanes. They localize in the vascular wall. We hypothesized that structurally similar sPLA2's may exert different impact on VSMC. The influence of sPLA2's, IIA, V, X, HDL, LDL, and hydrolysis products was tested on mitogenesis of VSMC, i.e., the early effect on the cell membrane phospholipids, and on PGE2 and LTB4 release, i.e., late effect of Cyclooxygenase and 5-lipooxygenase activity in VSMC. Mitogenesis was significantly enhanced by HDL and LDL, and by products of sPLA2 hydrolysis. Hydrolysis of HDL or LDL enhanced mitogenic activity in order V>X>IIA. The release of PGE2 was enhanced by group X sPLA2 and by HDL hydrolyzed by groups V and X. LDL and its hydrolysis products enhanced the release of PGE2 in order X>V>IIA. The release of LTB4 was markedly increased by LDL and HDL, and by hydrolytic products of group V and X, but not group IIA sPLA2. Our study demonstrates a diverse interaction of pro-inflammatory sPLA2's with HDL and LDL affecting both mitogenesis and eicosanoid release from VSMC, therefore potentially enhancing their pro-atherogenic activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducters and activators of transcription (STAT) cascade in advanced glycation end-product-induced cellular mitogenesis in NRK-49F cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J S; Guh, J Y; Hung, W C; Yang, M L; Lai, Y H; Chen, H C; Chuang, L Y

    1999-01-01

    Advanced glycation end product (AGE) is important in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, which is characterized by cellular hypertrophy/hyperplasia leading to renal fibrosis. However, the signal transduction pathways of AGE remain poorly understood. The Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) pathway has been associated with cellular proliferation in some extra-renal cells. Because interstitial fibroblast proliferation might be important in renal fibrosis, we studied the role of the JAK/STAT pathway in NRK-49F (normal rat kidney fibroblast) cells cultured in AGE/BSA and non-glycated BSA. We showed that AGE dose-dependently (10-200 microgram/ml) increased cellular mitogenesis in NRK-49F cells at 5 and 7 days. However, cellular mitogenesis was unaffected by the simultaneous presence of BSA. Regarding the JAK/STAT pathway, AGE (100 microgram/ml) induced tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 (but not JAK1, JAK3 or TYK2) at 15-60 min; it also induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 at 1-2 h and 0.5-4 h respectively. Being a transcription factor, AGE also increased the DNA-binding activities of STAT1 and STAT3 AG-490 (a specific JAK2 inhibitor) (5 microM) inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and the DNA-binding activities of STAT1 and STAT3. The same results were obtained by using specific 'decoy' oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) that prevented STAT1 and STAT3 from binding to DNA. Meanwhile, the STAT1 or STAT3 decoy ODN and AG-490 were effective in reversing AGE-induced cellular mitogenesis. We concluded that the JAK2-STAT1/STAT3 signal transduction pathway is necessary for AGE-induced cellular mitogenesis in NRK-49F cells. PMID:10432321

  14. Challenges in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer with brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minetta C; Cortés, Javier; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce

    2016-06-01

    Brain metastases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality for women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer, yet little is known about the optimal treatment of brain disease in this group of patients. Although these patients are at lower risk for brain metastases relative to those with HER2-positive and triple-negative disease, they comprise the majority of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Surgery and radiation continue to have a role in the treatment of brain metastases, but there is a dearth of effective systemic therapies due to the poor penetrability of many systemic drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Additionally, patients with brain metastases have long been excluded from clinical trials, and few studies have been conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of systemic therapies specifically for the treatment of HER2-negative breast cancer brain metastases. New approaches are on the horizon, such as nanoparticle-based cytotoxic drugs that have the potential to cross the BBB and provide clinically meaningful benefits to patients with this life-threatening consequence of HR-positive breast cancer.

  15. Higher expression of serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors in the postmortem brains of teenage suicide victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Ren, Xinguo; Pandey, Subhash C; Pesold, Christine; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Conley, Robert R; Tamminga, Carol A

    2002-03-01

    Abnormalities of serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes have been observed in the postmortem brains of adult suicide victims; however, their role in teenage suicide is unexplored. The authors examined whether 5-HT(2A) receptor subtypes are altered in the postmortem brains of teenage suicide victims. Levels of 5-HT(2A) receptors were determined through examination of [(125)I] LSD binding, protein expression (by use of Western blotting with a specific 5-HT(2A) receptor antibody), and mRNA (by means of quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens of 15 teenage suicide victims and 15 normal matched teenage subjects. The cellular localization of the 5-HT(2A) receptors was determined by means of gold immunolabeling. The authors observed significantly higher [(125)I]LSD binding in the prefrontal cortex and greater protein expression and mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus but not in the nucleus accumbens of suicide victims, compared with normal subjects. Greater protein expression was localized on pyramidal cells in cortical layer V but not in other cortical layers or in the surrounding neuropil of the prefrontal cortex of teenage suicide victims. The evidence indicates higher levels of 5-HT(2A) receptor, protein, and mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, which have been implicated in emotion, stress, and cognition. There was no higher level in the nucleus accumbens, which has been implicated in drug dependence and craving. Our findings suggest that a higher level of 5-HT(2A) receptors may be one of the neurobiological abnormalities associated with teenage suicide.

  16. Neurokinin-3 Receptor Binding in Guinea Pig, Monkey, and Human Brain: In Vitro and in Vivo Imaging Using the Novel Radioligand, [18F]Lu AF10628.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnäs, Katarina; Finnema, Sjoerd J; Stepanov, Vladimir; Takano, Akihiro; Tóth, Miklós; Svedberg, Marie; Møller Nielsen, Søren; Khanzhin, Nikolay A; Juhl, Karsten; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Previous autoradiography studies have suggested a marked interspecies variation in the neuroanatomical localization and expression levels of the neurokinin 3 receptor, with high density in the brain of rat, gerbil, and guinea pig, but at the time offered no conclusive evidence for its presence in the human brain. Hitherto available radioligands have displayed low affinity for the human neurokinin 3 receptor relative to the rodent homologue and may thus not be optimal for cross-species analyses of the expression of this protein. A novel neurokinin 3 receptor radioligand, [(18)F]Lu AF10628 ((S)-N-(cyclobutyl(3-fluorophenyl)methyl)-8-fluoro-2-((3-[(18)F]-fluoropropyl)amino)-3-methyl-1-oxo-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-4-carboxamide), was synthesized and used for autoradiography studies in cryosections from guinea pig, monkey, and human brain as well as for positron emission tomography studies in guinea pig and monkey. The results confirmed previous observations of interspecies variation in the neurokinin 3 receptor brain localization with more extensive distribution in guinea pig than in primate brain. In the human brain, specific binding to the neurokinin 3 receptor was highest in the amygdala and in the hypothalamus and very low in other regions examined. Positron emission tomography imaging showed a pattern consistent with that observed using autoradiography. The radioactivity was, however, found to accumulate in skull bone, which limits the use of this radioligand for in vivo quantification of neurokinin 3 receptor binding. Species differences in the brain distribution of neurokinin 3 receptors should be considered when using animal models for predicting human neurokinin 3 receptor pharmacology. For positron emission tomography imaging of brain neurokinin 3 receptors, additional work is required to develop a radioligand with more favorable in vivo properties. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  17. Interaction of a vasopressin antagonist with vasopressin receptors in the septum of the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorsa, D.M.; Brot, M.D.; Shewey, L.M.; Meyers, K.M.; Szot, P.; Miller, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of d(CH2)5-Tyr(Me)-arginine-8-vasopressin, an antagonist of peripheral pressoric (V1-type) vasopressin receptors, to label vasopressin binding sites in the septum of the rat brain was evaluated. Using crude membrane preparations from the septum, /sup 3/H-arginine-8-vasopressin (AVP) specifically labels a single class of binding sites with a Kd of 2.9 nM and maximum binding site concentration of 19.8 fmole/mg protein. /sup 3/H-Antag also labels a single class of membrane sites but with higher affinity (Kd = 0.47 nM) and lower capacity (10.1 fmole/mg protein) than /sup 3/H-AVP. The rank order of potency of various competitor peptides for /sup 3/H-AVP and /sup 3/H-Antag binding was similar. Oxytocin was 100-1,000 fold less potent than AVP in competing for binding with both ligands. /sup 3/H-AVP and /sup 3/H-Antag showed similar labeling patterns when incubated with septal tissue slices. Unlabeled Antag also effectively antagonized vasopressin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in septal tissue slices.

  18. Effect of Secondhand Smoke on Occupancy of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Arthur L.; Mandelkern, Mark A.; London, Edythe D.; Khan, Aliyah; Kozman, Daniel; Costello, Matthew R.; Vellios, Evan E.; Archie, Meena M.; Bascom, Rebecca; Mukhin, Alexey G.

    2012-01-01

    Context Despite progress in tobacco control, secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure remains prevalent worldwide and is implicated in the initiation and maintenance of cigarette smoking. Objective To determine whether moderate SHS exposure results in brain α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) occupancy. Design, Setting, and Participants Positron emission tomography scanning and the radiotracer 2-[18F]fluoro-3-(2(S)azetidinylmethoxy) pyridine (also known as 2-[18F]fluoro-A-85380, or 2-FA) were used to determine α4β2* nAChR occupancy from SHS exposure in 24 young adult participants (11 moderately dependent cigarette smokers and 13 nonsmokers). Participants underwent two bolus-plus-continuous-infusion 2-FA positron emission tomography scanning sessions during which they sat in the passenger’s seat of a car for 1 hour and either were exposed to moderate SHS or had no SHS exposure. The study took place at an academic positron emission tomography center. Main Outcome Measure Changes induced by SHS in 2-FA specific binding volume of distribution as a measure of α4β2* nAChR occupancy. Results An overall multivariate analysis of variance using specific binding volume of distribution values revealed a significant main effect of condition (SHS vs control) (F1,22=42.5, P cars and other enclosed spaces. PMID:21536968

  19. Soluble (Prorenin Receptor and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Oxidative Stress in Brain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Takahashi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available (Prorenin receptor ((PRR is a multi-functional molecule that is related to both the renin-angiotensin system (RAS and vacuolar H+-ATPase (v-ATPase, an ATP-dependent multi-subunit proton pump. Soluble (PRR (s(PRR, which consists of the extracellular domain of (PRR, is present in blood and urine. Elevated plasma s(PRR concentrations are reported in patients with chronic kidney disease and pregnant women with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. In addition, we have shown that plasma s(PRR concentrations are elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Interestingly, the levels are elevated in parallel with the severity of OSAS, but are not related to the presence of hypertension or the status of the circulating RAS in OSAS. It is known that v-ATPase activity protects cells from endogenous oxidative stress, and loss of v-ATPase activity results in chronic oxidative stress. We hypothesize that hypoxia and subsequent oxidative stress, perhaps in the brain, may be one of the factors that elevate plasma s(PRR levels in OSAS.

  20. Discrepancy between blood flow and muscarinic receptor distribution in rat brain after middle cerebral artery occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuji, Ichiei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Division of Radiology, National Centre Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders (NCNP), Tokyo (Japan); Sumiya, Hisashi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Taki, Junichi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Tsuji, Shiro [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Kinuya, Keiko [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Ichikawa, Akihiro [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Shiba, Kazuhiro [Radioisotope Centre, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Mori, Hirofumi [Radioisotope Centre, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Tonami, Norihisa [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan)

    1997-06-10

    To clarify whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) binding can be a viable muscarinic neuronal marker which provides therapeutic information different from perfusional information in global brain, we evaluated the discrepancy between the distribution of cerebral blood flow (CBF), mAChR and its five subtypes of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in the acute (n=9) and chronic (n=8) phases of a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model and in sham-operated controls (n=6). In the acute phase, regional CBF was markedly reduced in the MCA territory, whereas mAChR was not reduced and the mRNA was reduced only slightly. In the chronic phase, mAChR was reduced markedly in the infarcted lesion and the mRNA was also reduced. The mAChR was slightly reduced in the ipsilateral substantia nigra and pontine nucleus because of remote effects; however, regional CBF in the substantia nigra was slightly increased and did not change in the pontine nucleus. The discrepancy between CBF and mAChR was clarified, and the tendency toward a reduction in mRNA in the acute ischaemic region without a reduction in mAChR suggested the presence of cholinergic neurons which were viable but hypometabolic. It is concluded that mAChR imaging may be of value for the assessment of the viable cholinergic neuron density in vivo. (orig.). With 6 figs.

  1. AMPA receptor-induced local brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling mediates motor recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Andrew N; Overman, Justine J; Zhong, Sheng; Mueller, Rudolf; Lynch, Gary; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2011-03-09

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Recovery after stroke shares similar molecular and cellular properties with learning and memory. A main component of learning-induced plasticity involves signaling through AMPA receptors (AMPARs). We systematically tested the role of AMPAR function in motor recovery in a mouse model of focal stroke. AMPAR function controls functional recovery beginning 5 d after the stroke. Positive allosteric modulators of AMPARs enhance recovery of limb control when administered after a delay from the stroke. Conversely, AMPAR antagonists impair motor recovery. The contributions of AMPARs to recovery are mediated by release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in periinfarct cortex, as blocking local BDNF function in periinfarct cortex blocks AMPAR-mediated recovery and prevents the normal pattern of motor recovery. In contrast to a delayed AMPAR role in motor recovery, early administration of AMPAR agonists after stroke increases stroke damage. These findings indicate that the role of glutamate signaling through the AMPAR changes over time in stroke: early potentiation of AMPAR signaling worsens stroke damage, whereas later potentiation of the same signaling system improves functional recovery.

  2. A Refill for the Brain Mineralocorticoid Receptor: The Benefit of Cortisol Add-On to Dexamethasone Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Onno C; de Kloet, E Ronald

    2017-03-01

    Some serious medical conditions require life-saving treatment with high doses of synthetic glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone. A substantial number of patients subjected to this treatment develops psychosis, mood disturbances, or sleep problems. A recent clinical trial demonstrated that dexamethasone therapy for young patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia caused severe adverse psychological effects and sleep disturbances in about 30% of these patients. These side effects were ameliorated by coadministration of a low dose of the naturally occurring glucocorticoid hormone cortisol. This paradoxical finding was predicted by the idea that the synthetic glucocorticoid targets the glucocorticoid receptor, causing suppression of cortisol secretion and, thus, depletion of the brain mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) of its endogenous ligand. The refill of the unoccupied brain MR with physiological amounts of cortisol ameliorates the dexamethasone-induced psychological side effects. In the present report, we discuss the mechanistic underpinning of the MR refill concept in glucocorticoid therapy. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  3. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations.

  4. A New Pain Regulatory System via the Brain Long Chain Fatty Acid Receptor GPR40/FFA1 Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    An increasingly large number of pharmacological and physiological works on fatty acids have shown that the functional properties of fatty acids are regulated by the amount of individual fatty acid intake and the distribution of fatty acids among organs. Recently, it has been determined that G-protein-coupled receptor 40/free fatty acid receptor 1 (GPR40/FFA1) is activated by long-chain fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). GPR40/FFA1 is mainly expressed in the β cell of the pancreas, spinal cord and brain. It is reported that this receptor has a functional role in controlling blood glucose levels via the modulation of insulin secretion. However, its physiological function in the brain remains unknown. Our previous studies have shown that GPR40/FFA1 is expressed in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-positive neurons of the arcuate nucleus, serotonergic neurons in the nucleus raphe magnus, and in noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. Furthermore, the intracerebroventricular injection of DHA or GW9508, which is a selective GPR40/FFA1 agonist, attenuates formalin-induced inflammatory pain behavior through increasing β-endorphin release in the hypothalamus. It also suppresses complete Freund's adjuvant-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Our findings suggest that brain free long-chain fatty acids-GPR40/FFA1 signaling might have an important role in the modulation of endogenous pain control systems. In this review, I discuss the current status and our recent study regarding a new pain regulatory system via the brain long chain fatty acid receptor GPR40/FFA1 signal.

  5. Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor blockade prevents fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Jopson, Timothy D; Paladini, Maria Serena; Liu, Sharon; West, Brian L; Gupta, Nalin; Rosi, Susanna

    2016-08-30

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms and brain metastases are routinely treated with whole-brain radiation. Long-term survival occurs in many patients, but their quality of life is severely affected by the development of cognitive deficits, and there is no treatment to prevent these adverse effects. Neuroinflammation, associated with activation of brain-resident microglia and infiltrating monocytes, plays a pivotal role in loss of neurological function and has been shown to be associated with acute and long-term effects of brain irradiation. Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) signaling is essential for the survival and differentiation of microglia and monocytes. Here, we tested the effects of CSF-1R blockade by PLX5622 on cognitive function in mice treated with three fractions of 3.3 Gy whole-brain irradiation. Young adult C57BL/6J mice were given three fractions of 3.3 Gy whole-brain irradiation while they were on diet supplemented with PLX5622, and the effects on periphery monocyte accumulation, microglia numbers, and neuronal functions were assessed. The mice developed hippocampal-dependent cognitive deficits at 1 and 3 months after they received fractionated whole-brain irradiation. The impaired cognitive function correlated with increased number of periphery monocyte accumulation in the CNS and decreased dendritic spine density in hippocampal granule neurons. PLX5622 treatment caused temporary reduction of microglia numbers, inhibited monocyte accumulation in the brain, and prevented radiation-induced cognitive deficits. Blockade of CSF-1R by PLX5622 prevents fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced memory deficits. Therapeutic targeting of CSF-1R may provide a new avenue for protection from radiation-induced memory deficits.

  6. Distribution of the a2, a3, and a5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the chick brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrão A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are ionotropic receptors comprised of a and ß subunits. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system, and previous studies have revealed specific patterns of localization for some nAChR subunits in the vertebrate brain. In the present study we used immunohistochemical methods and monoclonal antibodies to localize the a2, a3, and a5 nAChR subunits in the chick mesencephalon and diencephalon. We observed a differential distribution of these three subunits in the chick brain, and showed that the somata and neuropil of many central structures contain the a5 nAChR subunit. The a2 and a3 subunits, on the other hand, exhibited a more restricted distribution than a5 and other subunits previously studied, namely a7, a8 and ß2. The patterns of distribution of the different nAChR subunits suggest that neurons in many brain structures may contain several subtypes of nAChRs and that in a few regions one particular subtype may determine the cholinergic nicotinic responses

  7. Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors and Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Are Selectively Overexpressed in Neuritic Plaque-Associated Glia in Alzheimer's Disease Brains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benito, Cristina; Nunez, Estefania; Tolon, Rosa M; Carrier, Erica J; Rabano, Alberto; Hillard, Cecilia J; Romero, Julian

    2003-01-01

    .... We have studied the status of some of the components of the endocannabinoid system, fatty acid amide hydrolase and cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, in postmortem brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease...

  8. Prostaglandin E2 receptor expression in the rat trigeminal-vascular system and other brain structures involved in pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myren, Maja; Olesen, Jes; Gupta, Saurabh

    2012-01-01

    receptors in both peripheral and central structures involved in pain transmission and perception in migraine: dura mater, cerebral arteries, trigeminal ganglion, trigeminal nucleus caudalis, periaqueductal grey, thalamus, hypothalamus, cortex, pituitary gland, hippocampus and cerebellum. In the trigeminal......Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is considered to be a key mediator in migraine pathophysiology. PGE(2) acts via four receptors (EP(1)-EP(4)) but their distribution in the brain districts implicated in migraine has yet to be delineated. We quantified amount of mRNA and protein expression for the EP...... than in dorsal root ganglia (peripheral control), whereas the EP(2) mRNA and protein were highly abundant in the pituitary gland. EP(3) mRNA was mainly found in thalamus and hypothalamus. The most robust mRNA and protein expression for EP(4) receptor was seen in the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion...

  9. Expression of galanin and its receptors are perturbed in a rodent model of mild, blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Lizan; Barde, Swapnali; Arborelius, Ulf P; Theodorsson, Elvar; Agoston, Denes; Risling, Mårten; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2016-05-01

    The symptomatology, mood and cognitive disturbances seen in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury (mbTBI) overlap considerably. However the pathological mechanisms underlying the two conditions are currently unknown. The neuropeptide galanin has been suggested to play a role in the development of stress and mood disorders. Here we applied bio- and histochemical methods with the aim to elucidate the nature of any changes in the expression of galanin and its receptors in a rodent model of mbTBI. In situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction studies revealed significant, injury-induced changes, in some cases lasting at least for one week, in the mRNA levels of galanin and/or its three receptors, galanin receptor 1-3 (GalR1-3). Such changes were seen in several forebrain regions, and the locus coeruleus. In the ventral periaqueductal gray GalR1 mRNA levels were increased, while GalR2 were decreased. Analysis of galanin peptide levels using radioimmunoassay demonstrated an increase in several brain regions including the locus coeruleus, dorsal hippocampal formation and amygdala. These findings suggest a role for the galanin system in the endogenous response to mbTBI, and that pharmacological studies of the effects of activation or inhibition of different galanin receptors in combination with functional assays of behavioral recovery may reveal promising targets for new therapeutic strategies in mbTBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Idol controls brain LDL receptor expression, ApoE clearance, and Aβ amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinkuk; Gao, Jie; Kim, Jaekwang; Hong, Cynthia; Kim, Jungsu; Tontonoz, Peter

    2015-11-18

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is an important modifier of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, and its abundance has been linked to the clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain. The pathways that control the clearance of ApoE in the brain are incompletely understood. We report that Idol, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) for degradation, is a critical determinant of brain ApoE metabolism and Aβ plaque biogenesis. Previous work has shown that Idol contributes minimally to the regulation of hepatic LDLR expression in mice. By contrast, we demonstrate that Idol is a primary physiological regulator of LDLR protein in the brain, controlling the clearance of both ApoE-containing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles and Aβ. We studied the consequences of loss of Idol expression in a transgenic mouse model of Aβ amyloidosis. Idol deficiency increased brain LDLR, decreased ApoE, decreased soluble and insoluble Aβ, reduced amyloid plaque burden, and ameliorated neuroinflammation. These findings identify Idol as a gatekeeper of LDLR-dependent ApoE and Aβ clearance in the brain and a potential enzyme target for therapeutic intervention in AD. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. PCB disruption of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis involves brain glucocorticoid receptor downregulation in anadromous Arctic charr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluru, N.; Jorgensen, E.H.; Maule, A.G.; Vijayan, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    We examined whether brain glucocorticoid receptor (GR) modulation by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was involved in the abnormal cortisol response to stress seen in anadromous Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). Fish treated with Aroclor 1254 (0, 1, 10, and 100 mg/kg body mass) were maintained for 5 mo without feeding in the winter to mimic their seasonal fasting cycle, whereas a fed group with 0 and 100 mg/kg Aroclor was maintained for comparison. Fasting elevated plasma cortisol levels and brain GR content but depressed heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) and interrenal cortisol production capacity. Exposure of fasted fish to Aroclor 1254 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in brain total PCB content. This accumulation in fish with high PCB dose was threefold higher in fasted fish compared with fed fish. PCBs depressed plasma cortisol levels but did not affect in vitro interrenal cortisol production capacity in fasted charr. At high PCB dose, the brain GR content was significantly lower in the fasted fish and this corresponded with a lower brain hsp70 and hsp90 content. The elevation of plasma cortisol levels and upregulation of brain GR content may be an important adaptation to extended fasting in anadromous Arctic charr, and this response was disrupted by PCBs. Taken together, the hypothalamus-pituitary- interrenal axis is a target for PCB impact during winter emaciation in anadromous Arctic charr.

  12. [Relaxin-3 and relaxin family peptide receptors--from structure to functions of a newly discovered mammalian brain system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania, Alan; Lewandowski, Marian H; Błasiak, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin-3, a member of the relaxin peptide family, was discovered in 2001 as a homologue of relaxin--a well-known reproductive hormone. However, it is the brain which turned out to be a major expression site of this newly discovered peptide. Both its molecular structure and expression pattern were shown to be very conserved among vertebrates. Extensive research carried out since the discovery of relaxin-3 contributed to the significant progress in our knowledge regarding this neuropeptide. The endogenous relaxin-3 receptor (RXFP3) was identified and the anatomy of the yet uncharacterized mammalian brain system was described, with nucleus incertus as the main center of relaxin-3 expression. Not only its diffusive projections throughout the whole brain, which reach various brain structures such as the hippocampus, septum, intergeniculate leaflet or amygdala, but also functional studies of the relaxin-3/RXFP3 signaling system, allowed this brain network to be classified as one of the ascending nonspecific brain systems. Thus far, research depicts the connection of relaxin-3 with phenomena such as feeding behavior, spatial memory, sleep/wake cycle or modulation of pituitary gland hormone secretion. Responsiveness of relaxin-3 neurons to stress factors and the strong orexigenic effect exerted by this peptide suggest its participation in modulation of feeding by stress, in particular of the chronic type. The discovery of relaxin-3 opened a new research field which will contribute to our better understanding of the neurobiological basis of feeding disorders.

  13. Stroke Increases G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor Expression in the Brain of Male but Not Female Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad R.S. Broughton

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The novel estrogen receptor, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously named GPR30, is widely distributed throughout the male and female brain and, thus, could potentially play a role in estrogen-mediated neuroprotective effects in diseases such as stroke. We hypothesized that GPER distribution and expression in the brain of male, intact female, and ovariectomized (OVX mice is increased after 0.5 h middle cerebral artery occlusion. Using immunohistochemistry, we found that ischemia reperfusion increased GPER distribution in the peri-infarct brain regions of male mice, but surprisingly not in intact females or OVX mice. Similar differences were observed in the male and female human brain after stroke. In contrast, GPER distribution was decreased in the infarct core of all mice examined. Furthermore, GPER immunofluorescence was co-localized with the endothelial cell marker, von Willebrand factor, and the neuronal marker, NeuN. Consistent with the immunohistochemical findings, Western blot analysis showed GPER expression is only elevated in the ischemic hemisphere of male mice. Moreover, GPER mRNA expression in males was elevated at 4 h but had returned to baseline by 24 h. In conclusion, these findings indicate that GPER may be a potential therapeutic target after stroke, especially in males, in whom estrogen therapy is not feasible.

  14. Origin and consequences of brain Toll-like receptor 4 pathway stimulation in an experimental model of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madrigal José LM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a pressing need to identify novel pathophysiological pathways relevant to depression that can help to reveal targets for the development of new medications. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4 has a regulatory role in the brain's response to stress. Psychological stress may compromise the intestinal barrier, and increased gastrointestinal permeability with translocation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS from Gram-negative bacteria may play a role in the pathophysiology of major depression. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to chronic mild stress (CMS or CMS+intestinal antibiotic decontamination (CMS+ATB protocols. Levels of components of the TLR-4 signaling pathway, of LPS and of different inflammatory, oxidative/nitrosative and anti-inflammatory mediators were measured by RT-PCR, western blot and/or ELISA in brain prefrontal cortex. Behavioral despair was studied using Porsolt's test. Results CMS increased levels of TLR-4 and its co-receptor MD-2 in brain as well as LPS and LPS-binding protein in plasma. In addition, CMS also increased interleukin (IL-1β, COX-2, PGE2 and lipid peroxidation levels and reduced levels of the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 in brain tissue. Intestinal decontamination reduced brain levels of the pro-inflammatory parameters and increased 15d-PGJ2, however this did not affect depressive-like behavior induced by CMS. Conclusions Our results suggest that LPS from bacterial translocation is responsible, at least in part, for the TLR-4 activation found in brain after CMS, which leads to release of inflammatory mediators in the CNS. The use of Gram-negative antibiotics offers a potential therapeutic approach for the adjuvant treatment of depression.

  15. Brain kinin B₁ receptor contributes to the onset of stereotypic nocifensive behavior in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brito Gariepy, H; Talbot, S; Sénécal, J; Couture, R

    2013-03-15

    While brain kinin B(1) receptor (B(1)R) is virtually absent in control rats, it contributes to hypertension via a midbrain dopaminergic (DA) mechanism in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension. This study aims at determining whether B(1)R can also affect stereotypic nocifensive behavior through DA and/or other neuromediators in the same models. The selective B(1)R agonist Sar[D-Phe(8)][des-Arg(9)]BK was injected i.c.v. (1 μg/site) to freely behaving SHR (16 weeks), Ang II-hypertensive rats (200 ng/kg/min × 2 weeks, s.c.) and control Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). Behavioral activity to the agonist was measured before and after treatment with receptor antagonists (10 μg/site i.c.v. or otherwise stated) for B(1) (SSR240612), tachykinin NK(1) (RP67580), glutamate NMDA (DL-AP5), DA D(1) (SCH23390, 0.2mg/kg s.c.) and D(2) (Raclopride, 0.16 mg/kg s.c.). Other studies included inhibitors (10 μg/site) of NOS (l-NNA) and iNOS (1400W). The possible desensitisation of B(1)R upon repeated intracerebral stimulation was also excluded. B(1)R expression was measured by qRT-PCR in selected areas and by immunohistochemistry in the ventral tegmental area. Results showed that the B(1)R agonist had no effect in WKY, yet it induced nocifensive behavioral manifestations in both models of hypertension (face washing, sniffing, head scratching, rearing, teeth chattering, grooming, digging, licking, wet-dog shakes). These responses were prevented by all antagonists and inhibitors tested, but 1400 W had a less inhibitory effect on most behaviors. Compared with WKY, B(1)R mRNA levels were markedly enhanced in hypothalamus, ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens of SHR and Ang II-treated rats. B(1)R was detected on DA neuron of the ventral tegmental area in SHR. Data suggest that kinin B(1)R is upregulated in midbrain DA system in hypertensive rats and its i.c.v. activation induced stereotypic nocifensive behavior that is mediated by several

  16. Progesterone treatment shows greater protection in brain vs. retina in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion: Progesterone receptor levels may play an important role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rachael S; Sayeed, Iqbal; Oumarbaeva, Yuliya; Morrison, Katherine C; Choi, Paul H; Pardue, Machelle T; Stein, Donald G

    2016-11-22

    To determine whether inflammation increases in retina as it does in brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and whether the neurosteroid progesterone, shown to have protective effects in both retina and brain after MCAO, reduces inflammation in retina as well as brain. MCAO rats treated systemically with progesterone or vehicle were compared with shams. Protein levels of cytosolic NF-κB, nuclear NF-κB, phosphorylated NF-κB, IL-6, TNF-α, CD11b, progesterone receptor A and B, and pregnane X receptor were assessed in retinas and brains at 24 and 48 h using western blots. Following MCAO, significant increases were observed in the following inflammatory markers: pNF-κB and CD11b at 24 h in both brain and retina, nuclear NF-κB at 24 h in brain and 48 h in retina, and TNF-α at 24 h in brain.Progesterone treatment in MCAO animals significantly attenuated levels of the following markers in brain: pNF-κB, nuclear NF-κB, IL-6, TNF-α, and CD11b, with significantly increased levels of cytosolic NF-κB. Retinas from progesterone-treated animals showed significantly reduced levels of nuclear NF-κB and IL-6 and increased levels of cytosolic NF-κB, with a trend for reduction in other markers. Post-MCAO, progesterone receptors A and B were upregulated in brain and downregulated in retina. Inflammatory markers increased in both brain and retina after MCAO, with greater increases observed in brain. Progesterone treatment reduced inflammation, with more dramatic reductions observed in brain than retina. This differential effect may be due to differences in the response of progesterone receptors in brain and retina after injury.

  17. Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacteremia Induces Brain Injury in Neonatal Mice via Toll-like Receptor 2-Dependent and -Independent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Dan; Qiao, Lili; Bergelson, Ilana; Ek, C Joakim; Duan, Luqi; Zhang, Xiaoli; Albertsson, Anna-Maj; Pettengill, Matthew; Kronforst, Kenny; Ninkovic, Jana; Goldmann, Donald; Janzon, Anders; Hagberg, Henrik; Wang, Xiaoyang; Mallard, Carina; Levy, Ofer

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis causes late-onset sepsis in preterm infants. Staphylococcus epidermidis activates host responses in part via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Epidemiologic studies link bacteremia and neonatal brain injury, but direct evidence is lacking. Wild-type and TLR2-deficient (TLR2-/-) mice were injected intravenously with S. epidermidis at postnatal day 1 prior to measuring plasma and brain cytokine and chemokine levels, bacterial clearance, brain caspase-3 activation, white/gray matter volume, and innate transcriptome. Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteremia spontaneously resolved over 24 hours without detectable bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). TLR2-/- mice demonstrated delayed S. epidermidis clearance from blood, spleen, and liver. Staphylococcus epidermidis increased the white blood cell count in the CSF, increased interleukin 6, interleukin 12p40, CCL2, and CXCL1 concentrations in plasma; increased the CCL2 concentration in the brain; and caused rapid (within 6 hours) TLR2-dependent brain activation of caspase-3 and TLR2-independent white matter injury. Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteremia, in the absence of bacterial entry into the CSF, impairs neonatal brain development. Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteremia induced both TLR2-dependent and -independent brain injury, with the latter occurring in the absence of TLR2, a condition associated with an increased bacterial burden. Our study indicates that the consequences of transient bacteremia in early life may be more severe than commonly appreciated, and our findings may inform novel approaches to reduce bacteremia-associated brain injury. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Synthesis of (R)- and (S)-[C-11]L-365,260 for PET studies of brain cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haradahira, T. [Research Development Corporation of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, K.; Inoue, O. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1994-05-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a recognized peptide hormone in the gut and proposed as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the central nervous system. Two distinct CCK receptors termed CCK-A and CCK-B have been characterized. CCK-A receptor is primarily distributed in the peripheral tissues including pancreas and gallbladder and also known to be distributed in a few brain regions. CCK-B receptor is widely distributed in the brain and has been proposed to be involved in anxiety, satiety and nociception. To investigate the functional roles of the CCK receptors in the brain by positron emission tomography, we have synthesized an enantiomeric pair of C-11 labeled non-peptide antagonists against the CCK receptors. L-365,260 [3R(+)-N-(2,3-dihydro-1-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1H-1,4-benzodiazepine-3-yl)-N`-(3-methylpheny lurea)] is a potent CCK-B selective non-peptide antagonist (CCK-A/CCK-B ratio of IC50, 140), whereas its (S)-enantiomer is selective toward CCK-A receptor (CCK-A/CCK-B ratio of IC50, 0.02). We have synthesized the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of [C-11]-365,260 by N-methylation (50{degrees}C for 5 min) of the racemic desmethyl precursor with [C-11]iodomethane using sodium hydride as a base and subsequent optical resolution with HPLC (column: ChiraSpher, 250 x 10 mm, Merck; eluent: n-hexane / 1,4-dioxane / 2-propanol / triethylamine = 70 / 25 / 5 / 0.1). Radiochemical yields (decay corrected) and optical purities were 34%, 99% for R-enantiomer and 36%, 99% for S-enantiomer, respectively. The total synthesis time was 40 min and specific activity was about 37 GBq/{mu}mol. In PET studies on rhesus monkey (R)-enantiomer showed a high uptake of radioactivity in the cerebral cortex, region known to have a high concentration of CCK-B receptor.

  19. The kisspeptin receptor GPR54 is required for sexual differentiation of the brain and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Alexander S; Park, Jin Ho; McPhie-Lalmansingh, Anika A; Gottsch, Michelle L; Bodo, Cristian; Hohmann, John G; Pavlova, Maria N; Rohde, Alex D; Clifton, Donald K; Steiner, Robert A; Rissman, Emilie F

    2007-08-15

    GPR54 is a G-protein-coupled receptor, which binds kisspeptins and is widely expressed throughout the brain. Kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling has been implicated in the regulation of pubertal and adulthood gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, and mutations or deletions of GPR54 cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in humans and mice. Other reproductive roles for kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling, including the regulation of developmental GnRH secretion or sexual behavior in adults, have not yet been explored. Using adult wild-type (WT) and GPR54 knock-out (KO) mice, we first tested whether kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling is necessary for male and female sexual behaviors. We found that hormone-replaced gonadectomized GPR54 KO males and females displayed appropriate gender-specific adult sexual behaviors. Next, we examined whether GPR54 signaling is required for proper display of olfactory-mediated partner preference behavior. Testosterone-treated WT males preferred stimulus females rather than males, whereas similarly treated WT females and GPR54 KO males showed no preference for either sex. Because olfactory preference is sexually dimorphic and organized during development by androgens, we assessed whether GPR54 signaling is essential for sexual differentiation of other sexually dimorphic traits. Interestingly, adult testosterone-treated GPR54 KO males displayed "female-like" numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive and Kiss1 mRNA-containing neurons in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus and likewise possessed fewer motoneurons in the spino-bulbocavernosus nucleus than did WT males. Our findings indicate that kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling is not required for male or female copulatory behavior, provided there is appropriate adulthood hormone replacement. However, GPR54 is necessary for proper male-like development of several sexually dimorphic traits, likely by regulating GnRH-mediated androgen secretion during "critical windows" in perinatal development.

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor represses brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in neuron-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Lombès, Marc; Le Menuet, Damien

    2017-04-12

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in many functions such as neuronal growth, survival, synaptic plasticity and memorization. Altered expression levels are associated with many pathological situations such as depression, epilepsy, Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is also crucial for neuron functions, via binding of glucocorticoid hormones (GCs). GR actions largely overlap those of BDNF. It has been proposed that GR could be a regulator of BDNF expression, however the molecular mechanisms involved have not been clearly defined yet. Herein, we analyzed the effect of a GC agonist dexamethasone (DEX) on BDNF expression in mouse neuronal primary cultures and in the newly characterized, mouse hippocampal BZ cell line established by targeted oncogenesis. Mouse Bdnf gene exhibits a complex genomic structure with 8 untranslated exons (I to VIII) splicing onto one common and unique coding exon IX. We found that DEX significantly downregulated total BDNF mRNA expression by around 30%. Expression of the highly expressed exon IV and VI containing transcripts was also reduced by DEX. The GR antagonist RU486 abolished this effect, which is consistent with specific GR-mediated action. Transient transfection assays allowed us to define a short 275 bp region within exon IV promoter responsible for GR-mediated Bdnf repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated GR recruitment onto this fragment, through unidentified transcription factor tethering. Altogether, GR downregulates Bdnf expression through direct binding to Bdnf regulatory sequences. These findings bring new insights into the crosstalk between GR and BDNF signaling pathways both playing a major role in physiology and pathology of the central nervous system.

  1. Protective Effects of Angiotensin II AT1 Receptors Blockade against Brain Injury in Experimental Model of Stroke in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdollah Panahpour

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Ischemic stroke remains the third leading cause of invalidism and death in industrialized countries. It is suggested that renin–angiotensin system (RAS may contribute in stroke related pathogenic mechanisms and involve in the ischemic brain damage. This study designed to investigate the role of angiotensin II (Ang II in conjunction with AT1 receptors in treatment of the brain injuries following transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats.   Methods: Forty eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied in four groups. Sham group, ischemic control group and two ischemic groups that received candesartan (0.1mg/kg, or 0.5mg/kg at the beginning of reperfusion period. Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by 60 minutes occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, followed by 24 hours reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion period, neurological deficit score (NDS was performed. Total cortical and striatal infarct volumes were determined using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC staining technique.   Results: Animals in sham operated group had normal motor function and no ischemic lesions were observed in cortical or striatal regions. Occurring ischemia in ischemic control group that received vehicle produced considerable infarction in cortex (253±15mm3 and striatum (92±7mm3, as well as these animals had sever impaired motor dysfunctions. Blocking of AT1 receptors with candesartan (0.1mg/kg or 0.5mg/kg improved neurological outcome and significantly lowered cortical and striatal infarct volumes relative to ischemic control group.   Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicated that stimulation of AT1 receptors by Ang II involved in ischemia/reperfusion injuries and blocking of AT1 receptors can decrease ischemic brain injury and improve neurological outcome.

  2. Enhanced water and salt intake in transgenic mice with brain-restricted overexpression of angiotensin (AT1) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazartigues, Eric; Sinnayah, Puspha; Augoyard, Ginette; Gharib, Claude; Johnson, Alan Kim; Davisson, Robin L

    2008-11-01

    To address the relative contribution of central and peripheral angiotensin II (ANG II) type 1A receptors (AT(1A)) to blood pressure and volume homeostasis, we generated a transgenic mouse model [neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-AT(1A)] with brain-restricted overexpression of AT(1A) receptors. These mice are normotensive at baseline but have dramatically enhanced pressor and bradycardic responses to intracerebroventricular ANG II or activation of endogenous ANG II production. Here our goal was to examine the water and sodium intake in this model under basal conditions and in response to increased ANG II levels. Baseline water and NaCl (0.3 M) intakes were significantly elevated in NSE-AT(1A) compared with nontransgenic littermates, and bolus intracerebroventricular injections of ANG II (200 ng in 200 nl) caused further enhanced water intake in NSE-AT(1A). Activation of endogenous ANG II production by sodium depletion (10 days low-sodium diet followed by furosemide, 1 mg sc) enhanced NaCl intake in NSE-AT(1A) mice compared with wild types. Fos immunohistochemistry, used to assess neuronal activation, demonstrated sodium depletion-enhanced activity in the anteroventral third ventricle region of the brain in NSE-AT(1A) mice compared with control animals. The results show that brain-selective overexpression of AT(1A) receptors results in enhanced salt appetite and altered water intake. This model provides a new tool for studying the mechanisms of brain AT(1A)-dependent water and salt consumption.

  3. Fenfluramine Reduces [11C]Cimbi-36 Binding to the 5-HT2A Receptor in the Nonhuman Primate Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Kai-Chun; Stepanov, Vladimir; Martinsson, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background: [11C]Cimbi-36 is a serotonin 2A receptor agonist positron emission tomography radioligand that has recently been examined in humans. The binding of agonist radioligand is expected to be more sensitive to endogenous neurotransmitter concentrations than antagonist radioligands. In the c......Background: [11C]Cimbi-36 is a serotonin 2A receptor agonist positron emission tomography radioligand that has recently been examined in humans. The binding of agonist radioligand is expected to be more sensitive to endogenous neurotransmitter concentrations than antagonist radioligands....... In the current study, we compared the effect of serotonin releaser fenfluramine on the binding of [11C]Cimbi-36, [11C]MDL 100907 (a serotonin 2A receptor antagonist radioligand), and [11C]AZ10419369 (a serotonin 1B receptor partial agonist radioligand with established serotonin sensitivity) in the monkey brain...... binding potential were larger than for [11C]AZ10419369 in neocortical and limbic regions (~35%) but smaller in striatum and thalamus (~40%). Decreases in [11C]Cimbi-36 binding potential were 0.9 to 2.8 times larger than for [11C]MDL 100907, and the fraction of serotonin 2A receptor in the high...

  4. Low 5-HT1B receptor binding in the migraine brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deen, Marie; Hansen, Hanne D; Hougaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of migraine may involve dysfunction of serotonergic signaling. In particular, the 5-HT1B receptor is considered a key player due to the efficacy of 5-HT1B receptor agonists for treatment of migraine attacks. Aim To examine the cerebral 5-HT1B receptor binding...... in interictal migraine patients without aura compared to controls. Methods Eighteen migraine patients, who had been migraine free for >48 hours, and 16 controls were scanned after injection of the 5-HT1B receptor specific radioligand [11C]AZ10419369 for quantification of cerebral 5-HT1B receptor binding....... Patients who reported migraine

  5. Dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer signaling pathway in the brain: emerging physiological relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasbi Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine is an important catecholamine neurotransmitter modulating many physiological functions, and is linked to psychopathology of many diseases such as schizophrenia and drug addiction. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are the most abundant dopaminergic receptors in the striatum, and although a clear segregation between the pathways expressing these two receptors has been reported in certain subregions, the presence of D1-D2 receptor heteromers within a unique subset of neurons, forming a novel signaling transducing functional entity has been shown. Recently, significant progress has been made in elucidating the signaling pathways activated by the D1-D2 receptor heteromer and their potential physiological relevance.

  6. The NR1 subunit of NMDA receptor regulates monocyte transmigration through the brain endothelial cell barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijerkerk, A.; Kooij, G.; van der Pol, S.M.A.; Leyen, T.A.; Lakeman, K.; Van Het Hof, B; Vivien, D.; de Vries, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Normal neuronal functioning is dependent on the blood-brain barrier. This barrier is confined to specialized brain endothelial cells lining the inner vessel wall, and tightly controlling transport of nutrients, efflux of potentially harmful molecules and entry of immune cells into the brain. Loss of

  7. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor function and its regulation of learning and memory in the aging brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eMénard

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal aging is generally characterized by a slow decline of cognitive abilities albeit with marked individual differences. Several animal models have been studied to explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and its receptors have been closely linked to spatial learning and hippocampus-dependent memory processes. For decades, ionotropic glutamate receptors have been known to play a critical role in synaptic plasticity, a form of adaptation regulating memory formation. Over the past 10 years, several groups have shown the importance of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR in successful cognitive aging. These G-protein-coupled receptors are enriched in the hippocampal formation and interact physically with other proteins in the membrane including glutamate ionotropic receptors. Synaptic plasticity is crucial to maintain cognitive abilities and long-term depression (LTD induced by group 1 mGluR activation, which has been linked to memory in the aging brain. The translation and synthesis of proteins by mGluR-LTD modulate ionotropic receptor trafficking and expression of immediate early genes related to cognition. Fragile X syndrome, a genetic form of autism characterized by memory deficits, has been associated to mGluR receptor malfunction and aberrant activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Dysfunction of mGluR could also be involved in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s disease. Indeed, beta-amyloid, the main component of insoluble senile plaques and one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease, occludes mGluR-dependent LTD leading to diminished functional synapses. This review highlights recent findings regarding mGluR signaling, related synaptic plasticity and their potential involvement in normal aging and neurological disorders.

  8. Quantification of human brain benzodiazepine receptors using [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylflumazenil: a first report in volunteers and epileptic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, Philippe [Unite de Tomographie par Positrons, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, CMFA/REMA, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73-40 Avenue Mounier, 1200, Bruxelles (Belgium); Sanabria-Bohorquez, Sandra [Imaging Research, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, Philadelphia (United States); Bol, Anne; Volder, Anne de; Labar, Daniel [Unite de Tomographie par Positrons, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Rijckevorsel, K. van [Service de Neurologie, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Bruxelles (Belgium); Gallez, Bernard [Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, CMFA/REMA, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73-40 Avenue Mounier, 1200, Bruxelles (Belgium); Unite de Resonance Magnetique Biomedicale, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2003-12-01

    Fluorine-18 fluoroethylflumazenil ([{sup 18}F]FEF) is a tracer for central benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors which is proposed as an alternative to carbon-11 flumazenil for in vivo imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) in humans. In this study, [{sup 18}F]FEF kinetic data were acquired using a 60-min two-injection protocol on three normal subjects and two patients suffering from mesiotemporal epilepsy as demonstrated by abnormal magnetic resonance imaging and [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. First, a tracer bolus injection was performed and [{sup 18}F]FEF rapidly distributed in the brain according to the known BZ receptor distribution. Thirty minutes later a displacement injection of 0.01 mg/kg of unlabelled flumazenil was performed. Activity was rapidly displaced from all BZ receptor regions demonstrating the specific binding of [{sup 18}F]FEF. No displacement was observed in the pons. Plasma input function was obtained from arterial blood sampling, and metabolite analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Metabolite quantification revealed a fast decrease in tracer plasma concentration, such that at 5 min post injection about 70% of the total radioactivity in plasma corresponded to [{sup 18}F]FEF, reaching 24% at 30 min post injection. The interactions between [{sup 18}F]FEF and BZ receptors were described using linear compartmental models with plasma input and reference tissue approaches. Binding potential values were in agreement with the known distribution of BZ receptors in human brain. Finally, in two patients with mesiotemporal sclerosis, reduced uptake of [{sup 18}F]FEF was clearly observed in the implicated left hippocampus. (orig.)

  9. Astrocytic Ca(2+) waves mediate activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons to aggravate brain damage during ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qi-Ping; He, Jing-Quan; Chai, Zhen

    2013-10-01

    Excitotoxicity plays a central role in the neuronal damage during ischemic stroke. Although growing evidence suggests that activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors initiates neuronal death, no direct evidence demonstrated their activation during ischemia. Using rat hippocampal slices, we detected oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) induced slow inward currents (SICs) mediated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Moreover, Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA dialysis into astrocytic network decreased the frequency of OGD induced SICs, indicating that the activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors depended on astrocytic Ca(2+) activity. To further demonstrate the importance of astrocytic Ca(2+) activity, we tested hippocampal slices from inositol triphosphate receptor type 2 (IP3R2) knock-out mice which abolished the astrocytic Ca(2+) activity. As expected, the frequency of OGD induced SICs was reduced. Using two-photon Ca(2+) imaging, we characterized the astrocytic Ca(2+) dynamics. By controlling Ca(2+) level in the individual astrocytes using targeted photolysis, we found that OGD facilitated the propagation of intercellular Ca(2+) waves, which were inhibited by gap junction blocker carbenoxolone (CBX). CBX also inhibited the Ca(2+) activity of the astrocytic network and decreased the SIC frequency during OGD. Functionally, the infarct volumes from brain ischemia were reduced in IP3R2 knock-out mice and in rat intracerebrally delivered with CBX. Our results demonstrate that enhanced Ca(2+) activity of the astrocytic network plays a key role on the activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons, which enhances brain damage during ischemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Theobromine-Induced Changes in A1 Purinergic Receptor Gene Expression and Distribution in a Rat Brain Alzheimer's Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiola-Precoma, Jesus; Padilla, Karla; Rodríguez-Cruz, Alfredo; Berumen, Laura C; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Dementia caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is mainly characterized by accumulation in the brain of extra- and intraneuronal amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau proteins, respectively, which selectively affect specific regions, particularly the neocortex and the hippocampus. Sporadic AD is mainly caused by an increase in apolipoprotein E, a component of chylomicrons, which are cholesterol transporters in the brain. Recent studies have shown that high lipid levels, especially cholesterol, are linked to AD. Adenosine is an atypical neurotransmitter that regulates a wide range of physiological functions by activating four P1 receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) and P2 purinergic receptors that are G protein-coupled. A1 receptors are involved in the inhibition of neurotransmitter release, which could be related to AD. The aim of the present work was to study the effects of a lard-enriched diet (LED) on cognitive and memory processes in adult rats (6 months of age) as well as the effect of theobromine on these processes. The results indicated that the fat-enriched diet resulted in a long-term deterioration in cognitive and memory functions. Increased levels of Aβ protein and IL-1β were also observed in the rats fed with a high-cholesterol diet, which were used to validate the AD animal model. In addition, the results of qPCR and immunohistochemistry indicated a decrease in gene expression and distribution of A1 purinegic receptor, respectively, in the hippocampus of LED-fed rats. Interestingly, theobromine, at both concentrations tested, restored A1 receptor levels and improved cognitive functions and Aβ levels for a dose of 30 mg/L drinking water.

  11. [11C]AZ10419096 - a full antagonist PET radioligand for imaging brain 5-HT1B receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Anton; Nag, Sangram; Schou, Magnus; Takano, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Junya; Amini, Nahid; Elmore, Charles S; Farde, Lars; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer

    2017-11-01

    The serotonergic system is widely present in all regions of the central nervous system (CNS) and plays a key modulatory role in many of its functions. Positron emission tomography (PET) is used to study several serotonin receptors in CNS in vivo. The G-protein coupled receptor 5-HT1B is mostly present in the occipital cortex and in midbrain and is linked to several psychiatric disorders. There is evidence that agonist PET radioligands for neuroreceptors are more sensitive to endogenous neurotransmitters than antagonists. Our previously developed 5-HT1B receptor PET radioligand, [11C]AZ10419369, is now considered a partial agonist. In this work we are aiming to develop a full antagonist PET radioligand for imaging brain 5-HT1B receptors, and evaluate its sensitivity to increased endogenous serotonin concentration. [11C]AZ10419096 was synthesized by rapid methylation of the prepared corresponding N-desmethyl precursor with [11C]methyl triflate. Five PET measurements were performed in cynomolgus monkeys, consisting of two at baseline, one after treatment of a monkey with a 5-HT1B antagonist, AR-A000002, and two in which fenfluramine was administered during scanning to induce endogenous serotonin release. [11C]AZ10419096 was synthesized in high yield and purity within 30 min, including purification, formulation and sterile filtration. The baseline PET measurements demonstrated [11C]AZ10419096 to have favorable radioligand characteristics, including high specific binding in brain regions that have high 5-HT1B density, such as occipital cortex and globus pallidus, as well as subsequent rapid elimination from brain and a minor abundance of lipophilic radiometabolites in plasma. AR-A00002 completely blocked radioligand receptor-specific binding. Fenfluramine produced a distinct displacement of radioligand consistent with an expected increase of synaptic endogenous serotonin concentration. [11C]AZ10419096, a full 5-HT1B antagonist PET radioligand, demonstrates high specific

  12. Absence of colony stimulation factor-1 receptor results in loss of microglia, disrupted brain development and olfactory deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryna Erblich

    Full Text Available The brain contains numerous mononuclear phagocytes called microglia. These cells express the transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor for the macrophage growth factor colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1R. Using a CSF-1R-GFP reporter mouse strain combined with lineage defining antibody staining we show in the postnatal mouse brain that CSF-1R is expressed only in microglia and not neurons, astrocytes or glial cells. To study CSF-1R function we used mice homozygous for a null mutation in the Csflr gene. In these mice microglia are >99% depleted at embryonic day 16 and day 1 post-partum brain. At three weeks of age this microglial depletion continues in most regions of the brain although some contain clusters of rounded microglia. Despite the loss of microglia, embryonic brain development appears normal but during the post-natal period the brain architecture becomes perturbed with enlarged ventricles and regionally compressed parenchyma, phenotypes most prominent in the olfactory bulb and cortex. In the cortex there is increased neuronal density, elevated numbers of astrocytes but reduced numbers of oligodendrocytes. Csf1r nulls rarely survive to adulthood and therefore to study the role of CSF-1R in olfaction we used the viable null mutants in the Csf1 (Csf1(op gene that encodes one of the two known CSF-1R ligands. Food-finding experiments indicate that olfactory capacity is significantly impaired in the absence of CSF-1. CSF-1R is therefore required for the development of microglia, for a fully functional olfactory system and the maintenance of normal brain structure.

  13. Absence of Colony Stimulation Factor-1 Receptor Results in Loss of Microglia, Disrupted Brain Development and Olfactory Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etgen, Anne M.; Dobrenis, Kostantin; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    The brain contains numerous mononuclear phagocytes called microglia. These cells express the transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor for the macrophage growth factor colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1R). Using a CSF-1R-GFP reporter mouse strain combined with lineage defining antibody staining we show in the postnatal mouse brain that CSF-1R is expressed only in microglia and not neurons, astrocytes or glial cells. To study CSF-1R function we used mice homozygous for a null mutation in the Csflr gene. In these mice microglia are >99% depleted at embryonic day 16 and day 1 post-partum brain. At three weeks of age this microglial depletion continues in most regions of the brain although some contain clusters of rounded microglia. Despite the loss of microglia, embryonic brain development appears normal but during the post-natal period the brain architecture becomes perturbed with enlarged ventricles and regionally compressed parenchyma, phenotypes most prominent in the olfactory bulb and cortex. In the cortex there is increased neuronal density, elevated numbers of astrocytes but reduced numbers of oligodendrocytes. Csf1r nulls rarely survive to adulthood and therefore to study the role of CSF-1R in olfaction we used the viable null mutants in the Csf1 (Csf1op) gene that encodes one of the two known CSF-1R ligands. Food-finding experiments indicate that olfactory capacity is significantly impaired in the absence of CSF-1. CSF-1R is therefore required for the development of microglia, for a fully functional olfactory system and the maintenance of normal brain structure. PMID:22046273

  14. Dopamine receptor alterations in female rats with diet-induced decreased brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): interactions with reproductive status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul F.; Ozias, Marlies K.; Carlson, Susan E.; Reed, Gregory A.; Winter, Michelle K.; McCarson, Kenneth E.; Levant, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Decreased tissue levels of n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are implicated in the etiologies of non-puerperal and postpartum depression. This study examined the effects of a diet-induced loss of brain DHA content and concurrent reproductive status on dopaminergic parameters in adult female Long–Evans rats. An α-linolenic acid-deficient diet and breeding protocols were used to produce virgin and parous female rats with cortical phospholipid DHA levels 20–22% lower than those fed a control diet containing adequate α-linolenic acid. Decreased brain DHA produced a significant main effect of decreased density of ventral striatal D2-like receptors. Virgin females with decreased DHA also exhibited higher density of D1-like receptors in the caudate nucleus than virgin females with normal DHA. These receptor alterations are similar to those found in several rodent models of depression, and are consistent with the proposed hypodopaminergic basis for anhedonia and motivational deficits in depression. PMID:20670471

  15. Reduced 5-HT(1B) receptor binding in the dorsal brain stem after cognitive behavioural therapy of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiger, Mikael; Rück, Christian; Forsberg, Anton; Varrone, Andrea; Lindefors, Nils; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars; Lundberg, Johan

    2014-08-30

    Major depression is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease, and its pathophysiology is largely unknown. The serotonin hypothesis is, however, the model with most supporting data, although the details are only worked out to some extent. Recent clinical imaging measurements indeed imply a role in major depressive disorder (MDD) for the inhibitory serotonin autoreceptor 5-hydroxytryptamine1B (5-HT1B). The aim of the current study was to examine 5-HT1B receptor binding in the brain of MDD patients before and after psychotherapy. Ten patients with an ongoing untreated moderate depressive episode were examined with positron emission tomography (PET) and the 5-HT1B receptor selective radioligand [(11)C]AZ10419369, before and after treatment with internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy. All of the patients examined responded to treatment, and 70% were in remission by the time of the second PET measurement. A statistically significant 33% reduction of binding potential (BPND) was found in the dorsal brain stem (DBS) after treatment. No other significant changes in BPND were found. The DBS contains the raphe nuclei, which regulate the serotonin system. This study gives support for the importance of serotonin and the 5-HT1B receptor in the biological response to psychological treatment of MDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Circulating Estradiol Regulates Brain-Derived Estradiol via Actions at GnRH Receptors to Impact Memory in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Britta S; Black, Katelyn L; Daniel, Jill M

    2016-01-01

    Systemic estradiol treatment enhances hippocampus-dependent memory in ovariectomized rats. Although these enhancements are traditionally thought to be due to circulating estradiol, recent data suggest these changes are brought on by hippocampus-derived estradiol, the synthesis of which depends on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) activity. The goal of the current work is to test the hypothesis that peripheral estradiol affects hippocampus-dependent memory through brain-derived estradiol regulated via hippocampal GnRH receptor activity. In the first experiment, intracerebroventricular infusion of letrozole, which prevents the synthesis of estradiol, blocked the ability of peripheral estradiol administration in ovariectomized rats to enhance hippocampus-dependent memory in a radial-maze task. In the second experiment, hippocampal infusion of antide, a long-lasting GnRH receptor antagonist, blocked the ability of peripheral estradiol administration in ovariectomized rats to enhance hippocampus-dependent memory. In the third experiment, hippocampal infusion of GnRH enhanced hippocampus-dependent memory, the effects of which were blocked by letrozole infusion. Results indicate that peripheral estradiol-induced enhancement of cognition is mediated by brain-derived estradiol via hippocampal GnRH receptor activity.

  17. PCP-induced alterations in cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain: blockade by metaphit, a PCP-receptor-acylating agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamminga, C.A.; Tanimoto, K.; Kuo, S.; Chase, T.N.; Contreras, P.C.; Rice, K.C.; Jackson, A.E.; O' Donohue, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on regional cerebral glucose utilization was determined by using quantitative autoradiography with (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose. PCP increased brain metabolism in selected areas of cortex, particularly limbic, and in the basal ganglia and thalamus, whereas the drug decreased metabolism in areas related to audition. These results are consistent with the known physiology of central PCP neurons and may help to suggest brain areas involved in PCP-mediated actions. Moreover, based on the behavioral similarities between PCP psychosis and an acute schizophrenic episode, these data may be relevant to the understanding of schizophrenia. The PCP-receptor-acylating agent, metaphit, blocked most of these PCP actions. In addition, metaphit by itself was found to diminish glucose utilization rather uniformly throughout brain. These results indicate an antagonist effect of metaphit on the PCP system and suggest a widespread action of metaphit, putatively at a PCP-related site, possibly in connection with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor.

  18. Adenosine through the A2A adenosine receptor increases IL-1β in the brain contributing to anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Gabriel S.; Darmody, Patrick T.; Walsh, John P.; Moon, Morgan L.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Bray, Julie K.; McCusker, Robert H.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most commonly reported psychiatric conditions, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Ailments associated with activation of the innate immune system, however, are increasingly linked to anxiety disorders. In adult male mice, we found that adenosine doubled caspase-1 activity in brain by a pathway reliant on ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, protein kinase A (PKA) and the A2A adenosine receptor (AR). In addition, adenosine-dependent activation of caspase-1 increased interleukin (IL)-1β in the brain by two-fold. Peripheral administration of adenosine in wild-type (WT) mice led to a 2.3-fold increase in caspase-1 activity in the amygdala and to a 33% and 42% reduction in spontaneous locomotor activity and food intake, respectively, that were not observed in caspase-1 knockout (KO), IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) KO and A2A AR KO mice or in mice administered a caspase-1 inhibitor centrally. Finally, adenosine administration increased anxiety-like behaviors in WT mice by 28% in the open field test and by 55% in the elevated zero-maze. Caspase-1 KO mice, IL-1R1 KO mice, A2A AR KO mice and WT mice treated with the KATP channel blocker, glyburide, were resistant to adenosine-induced anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, our results indicate that adenosine can act as an anxiogenic by activating caspase-1 and increasing IL-1β in the brain. PMID:24907587

  19. Quantification of GABAA receptors in the rat brain with [(123)I]Iomazenil SPECT from factor analysis-denoised images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsartsalis, Stergios; Moulin-Sallanon, Marcelle; Dumas, Noé; Tournier, Benjamin B; Ghezzi, Catherine; Charnay, Yves; Ginovart, Nathalie; Millet, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    In vivo imaging of GABAA receptors is essential for the comprehension of psychiatric disorders in which the GABAergic system is implicated. Small animal SPECT provides a modality for in vivo imaging of the GABAergic system in rodents using [(123)I]Iomazenil, an antagonist of the GABAA receptor. The goal of this work is to describe and evaluate different quantitative reference tissue methods that enable reliable binding potential (BP) estimations in the rat brain to be obtained. Five male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for [(123)I]Iomazenil brain SPECT scans. Binding parameters were obtained with a one-tissue compartment model (1TC), a constrained two-tissue compartment model (2TCc), the two-step Simplified Reference Tissue Model (SRTM2), Logan graphical analysis and analysis of delayed-activity images. In addition, we employed factor analysis (FA) to deal with noise in data. BPND obtained with SRTM2, Logan graphical analysis and delayed-activity analysis was highly correlated with BPF values obtained with 2TCc (r=0.954 and 0.945 respectively, panalysis can provide equally reliable BPND values from rat brain [(123)I]Iomazenil SPECT. Acquisitions, however, can be much less time-consuming either with analysis of delayed activity obtained from a 20-minute scan 50min after tracer injection or with FA-denoising of images. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cloning, phylogeny, and regional expression of a Y5 receptor mRNA in the brain of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fernández, Juan; Megías, Manuel; Pombal, Manuel A

    2014-04-01

    The NPY receptors known as Y receptors are classified into three subfamilies, Y1, Y2, and Y5, and are involved in different physiological functions. The Y5 receptor is the only member of the Y5 subfamily, and it is present in all vertebrate groups, except for teleosts. Both molecular and pharmacological studies show that Y5 receptor is highly conserved during vertebrate evolution. Furthermore, this receptor is widely expressed in the mammalian brain, including the hypothalamus, where it is thought to take part in feeding and homeostasis regulation. Lampreys belong to the agnathan lineage, and they are thought to have branched out between the two whole-genome duplications that occurred in vertebrates. Therefore, they are in a key position for studies on the evolution of gene families in vertebrates. Here we report the cloning, phylogeny, and brain expression pattern of the sea lamprey Y5 receptor. In phylogenetic studies, the lamprey Y5 receptor clusters in a basal position, together with Y5 receptors of other vertebrates. The mRNA of this receptor is broadly expressed in the lamprey brain, being especially abundant in hypothalamic areas. Its expression pattern is roughly similar to that reported for other vertebrates and parallels the expression pattern of the Y1 receptor subtype previously described by our group, as it occurs in mammals. Altogether, these results confirm that a Y5 receptor is present in lampreys, thus being highly conserved during the evolution of vertebrates, and suggest that it is involved in many brain functions, the only known exception being teleosts. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Ethanol, not detectably metabolized in brain, significantly reduces brain metabolism, probably via action at specific GABA(A) receptors and has measureable metabolic effects at very low concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Caroline D; Davidson, Joanne E; Maher, Anthony D; Rowlands, Benjamin D; Kashem, Mohammed A; Nasrallah, Fatima A; Rallapalli, Sundari K; Cook, James M; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2014-04-01

    Ethanol is a known neuromodulatory agent with reported actions at a range of neurotransmitter receptors. Here, we measured the effect of alcohol on metabolism of [3-¹³C]pyruvate in the adult Guinea pig brain cortical tissue slice and compared the outcomes to those from a library of ligands active in the GABAergic system as well as studying the metabolic fate of [1,2-¹³C]ethanol. Analyses of metabolic profile clusters suggest that the significant reductions in metabolism induced by ethanol (10, 30 and 60 mM) are via action at neurotransmitter receptors, particularly α4β3δ receptors, whereas very low concentrations of ethanol may produce metabolic responses owing to release of GABA via GABA transporter 1 (GAT1) and the subsequent interaction of this GABA with local α5- or α1-containing GABA(A)R. There was no measureable metabolism of [1,2-¹³C]ethanol with no significant incorporation of ¹³C from [1,2-¹³C]ethanol into any measured metabolite above natural abundance, although there were measurable effects on total metabolite sizes similar to those seen with unlabelled ethanol. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Transferrin receptor expression and role in transendothelial transport of transferrin in cultured brain endothelial monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersom, Maria; Helms, Hans Christian; Pretzer, Natasia

    2016-01-01

    receptor localization patterns in mono-cultures and co-cultures. The endothelial cells demonstrated an up-regulation of transferrin receptor mRNA after treatment with the iron chelator deferoxamine. The association of [125I]holo-transferrin and [59Fe]-transferrin to the endothelial cells was inhibited...... by an excess of unlabeled holo-transferrin, indicating receptor mediated association. However, over time the cell associated [59Fe]-label exceeded that of [125I]holo-transferrin, which could indicate release of iron in the endothelial cells and receptor recycling. Luminal-to-abluminal transport of [125I...

  3. The recently identified P2Y-like receptor GPR17 is a sensor of brain damage and a new target for brain repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lecca

    Full Text Available Deciphering the mechanisms regulating the generation of new neurons and new oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, is of paramount importance to address new strategies to replace endogenous damaged cells in the adult brain and foster repair in neurodegenerative diseases. Upon brain injury, the extracellular concentrations of nucleotides and cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysLTs, two families of endogenous signaling molecules, are markedly increased at the site of damage, suggesting that they may act as "danger signals" to alert responses to tissue damage and start repair. Here we show that, in brain telencephalon, GPR17, a recently deorphanized receptor for both uracil nucleotides and cysLTs (e.g., UDP-glucose and LTD(4, is normally present on neurons and on a subset of parenchymal quiescent oligodendrocyte precursor cells. We also show that induction of brain injury using an established focal ischemia model in the rodent induces profound spatiotemporal-dependent changes of GPR17. In the lesioned area, we observed an early and transient up-regulation of GPR17 in neurons expressing the cellular stress marker heat shock protein 70. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in living mice showed that the in vivo pharmacological or biotechnological knock down of GPR17 markedly prevents brain infarct evolution, suggesting GPR17 as a mediator of neuronal death at this early ischemic stage. At later times after ischemia, GPR17 immuno-labeling appeared on microglia/macrophages infiltrating the lesioned area to indicate that GPR17 may also acts as a player in the remodeling of brain circuitries by microglia. At this later stage, parenchymal GPR17+ oligodendrocyte progenitors started proliferating in the peri-injured area, suggesting initiation of remyelination. To confirm a specific role for GPR17 in oligodendrocyte differentiation, the in vitro exposure of cortical pre-oligodendrocytes to the GPR17 endogenous ligands UDP-glucose and LTD(4

  4. The discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol are mediated by NMDA and GABA(A) receptors in specific limbic brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, C W; Cox, A A

    1998-09-01

    This study was conducted to assess the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor systems, located in specific limbic brain regions. in the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol. Male Long-Evans rats were trained to discriminate between intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of ethanol (1 g/kg) and saline on a two-lever drug discrimination task. The rats were then implanted with bilateral injector guides aimed at the nucleus accumbens core (AcbC), prelimbic cortex (PrLC), hippocampus area CA1 (CA1), or extended amygdala (i.e., at the border of the central and basolateral nuclei). Infusions of the non-competitive NMDA antagonist MK 801 in the AcbC or CA1 resulted in dose-dependent full substitution for i.p. ethanol. MK 801 infusion in the PrLC or amygdala failed to substitute for ethanol. Injection of the competitive NMDA antagonist CPP in the AcbC also failed to substitute for ethanol. Co-infusion of MK 801 in the hippocampus potentiated the effects of MK 801 in the AcbC, whereas NMDA infusion in the hippocampus attenuated the ability of MK 801 in the AcbC to substitute for ethanol. The direct GABA(A) agonist muscimol resulted in dose-dependent full substitution for i.p. ethanol when it was injected into the AcbC or amygdala, but failed to substitute when administered in the PrLC. Co-infusion of MK 801, but not CPP, potentiated the effects of muscimol in the AcbC. These results demonstrate that ethanol's discriminative stimulus function is mediated centrally by NMDA and GABA(A) receptors located in specific limbic brain regions. The data also suggest that the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol are mediated by interactions between ionotropic GABA(A) and NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens, and by interactions among brain regions.

  5. Effects of the nootropic agents adafenoxate, meclofenoxate and the acetylcholine precursor citicholine on the brain muscarinic receptors (experiments on rats).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, V D; Popova, J S

    1987-01-01

    The effect of adafenoxate (Af), meclofenoxate (Mf) and citicholine on the brain muscarinic receptors was studied in groups of ten male Wistar rats. The compounds were administered in doses of 50 mg/kg body weight twice daily for 7 days. One hour after the last treatment the animals were killed and the frontal cerebral cortex striatum, the hypothalamus and the hippocampus were removed immediately. Af and Mf were found to diminish significantly and to an analogous extent the density (Bmax) of the muscarinic receptors in the cerebral cortex, striatum and the hippocampus. At the same time, however, the greater decrease of Kd induced by these two nootropic agents, i.e. the increased affinity of the muscarinic binding sites, exceeded considerably the decreased number of the binding sites. These differences in the effects on Bmax and Kd suggest that the functional capacity of the cerebral cholinergic system increases under the action of Mf and Af. The surprising increase in the number of muscarinic receptors in the striatum, observed in citicholine-treated animals, is assumed to be due to the great increase of the dopamine content in this structure, induced by this acetylcholine precursor, observed in other experiments. This increase would result in reduced acetylcholine production by the inhibited cholinergic neurones, with a subsequent increase in the number of the muscarinic receptors.

  6. HMGB1 Contributes to the Expression of P-Glycoprotein in Mouse Epileptic Brain through Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Huang, Xian-Jing; Yu, Nian; Xie, Yuan; Zhang, Kang; Wen, Fang; Liu, Hao; Di, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the seizure-induced P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression and the underlying mechanism. Kainic acid (KA)-induced mouse seizure model was used for in vivo experiments. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: normal saline control (NS) group, KA-induced epileptic seizure (EP) group, and EP group pretreated with HMGB1 (EP+HMGB1 group) or BoxA (HMGB1 antagonist, EP+BoxA group). Compared to the NS group, increased levels of HMGB1 and P-gp in the brain were observed in the EP group. Injection of HMGB1 before the induction of KA further increased the expression of P-gp while pre-treatment with BoxA abolished this up-regulation. Next, the regulatory role of HMGB1 and its potential involved signal pathways were investigated in mouse microvascular endothelial bEnd.3 cells in vitro. Cells were treated with HMGB1, HMGB1 plus lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS) [toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist], HMGB1 plus FPS-ZM1 [receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) inhibitor], HMGB1 plus SN50 [nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor], or vehicle. Treatment with HMGB1 increased the expression levels of P-gp, TLR4, RAGE and the activation of NF-κB in bEnd.3 cells. These effects were inhibited by the pre-treatment with either LPS-RS or FPS-ZM1, and were abolished by the pre-treatment of SN50 or a combination treatment of both LPS-RS and FPS-ZM1. Luciferase reporter assays showed that exogenous expression of NF-κB p65 increased the promoter activity of multidrug resistance 1a (P-gp-encoding gene) in endothelial cells. These data indicate that HMGB1 contributes to the overexpression of P-gp in mouse epileptic brain tissues via activation of TLR4/RAGE receptors and the downstream transcription factor NF-κB in brain microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:26485677

  7. HMGB1 Contributes to the Expression of P-Glycoprotein in Mouse Epileptic Brain through Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 in the seizure-induced P-glycoprotein (P-gp overexpression and the underlying mechanism. Kainic acid (KA-induced mouse seizure model was used for in vivo experiments. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: normal saline control (NS group, KA-induced epileptic seizure (EP group, and EP group pretreated with HMGB1 (EP+HMGB1 group or BoxA (HMGB1 antagonist, EP+BoxA group. Compared to the NS group, increased levels of HMGB1 and P-gp in the brain were observed in the EP group. Injection of HMGB1 before the induction of KA further increased the expression of P-gp while pre-treatment with BoxA abolished this up-regulation. Next, the regulatory role of HMGB1 and its potential involved signal pathways were investigated in mouse microvascular endothelial bEnd.3 cells in vitro. Cells were treated with HMGB1, HMGB1 plus lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS [toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 antagonist], HMGB1 plus FPS-ZM1 [receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE inhibitor], HMGB1 plus SN50 [nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB inhibitor], or vehicle. Treatment with HMGB1 increased the expression levels of P-gp, TLR4, RAGE and the activation of NF-κB in bEnd.3 cells. These effects were inhibited by the pre-treatment with either LPS-RS or FPS-ZM1, and were abolished by the pre-treatment of SN50 or a combination treatment of both LPS-RS and FPS-ZM1. Luciferase reporter assays showed that exogenous expression of NF-κB p65 increased the promoter activity of multidrug resistance 1a (P-gp-encoding gene in endothelial cells. These data indicate that HMGB1 contributes to the overexpression of P-gp in mouse epileptic brain tissues via activation of TLR4/RAGE receptors and the downstream transcription factor NF-κB in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

  8. Interaction of purified bovine brain A1-adenosine receptors with guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of human platelet membranes following reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, R; Linden, J

    1990-08-01

    A1-adenosine receptors and associated guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) have been co-purified from bovine cerebral cortex by agonist affinity chromatography [J. Biol. Chem. 264:14853-14859 (1989)]. In this study we have reconstituted purified bovine brain A1 receptors into human platelet membranes that contain A2- but no detectable A1-adenosine receptors. The recovery of reconstituted receptors was assessed from the binding of the antagonist radioligand [125I]3-(4-amino-3-iodo)phenethyl-1-propyl-8-cyclopentyl-xanthine and ranged from 32 to 84%. Coupling of reconstituted A1 receptors to platelet G proteins was evaluated by measurement of the high affinity binding of an agonist radioligand, 125I-aminobenzyladenosine, to receptor-G protein complexes and by stereospecific photoaffinity labeling of a 35,000-Da receptor polypeptide with the agonist photoaffinity label 125I-azidobenzyladenosine. Fifty percent of receptors reconstituted into platelet membranes bound agonists with high affinity, indicative of coupling to platelet G proteins. Reconstituted A1 receptors bound various ligands with affinities characteristic of A1 receptors of bovine brain. Although platelets contain both pertussis toxin-sensitive and -insensitive G proteins, reconstituted high affinity agonist binding was almost completely abolished by treatment of platelet membranes with guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate, pertussis toxin, N-ethylmaleimide, or heparin. Following reconstitution, A1 receptors could be resolubilized in complexes with platelet G proteins. The data suggest that marked species differences in the binding affinity of ligands to adenosine receptors result from differences in the receptors rather than membrane structure or G proteins and, further, that A1 receptors couple selectively and tightly to pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins.

  9. Role of astrocytic leptin receptor subtypes on leptin permeation across hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hsuchou, Hung; Kastin, Abba J.; Tu, Hong; Abbott, N. Joan; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Pan, Weihong

    2010-01-01

    Astrocytic leptin receptors (ObR) can be upregulated in conditions such as adult-onset obesity. To determine whether the levels and subtypes of astrocytic ObR modulate leptin transport, we co-cultured hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells and C6 astrocytoma cells in the Transwell system, and tested leptin permeation from apical to basolateral chambers. In comparison with hCMEC alone, co-culture of C6 cells reduced the permeability of paracellular markers and leptin. Unexpectedly, ObRb overex...

  10. Quantitative measurement of histamine H{sub 1} receptors in human brains by PET and [{sup 11}C]doxepin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Hideki; Kimura, Yuichi E-mail: ukimura@ieee.org; Ishii, Kenji; Oda, Keiichi; Sasaki, Toru; Tashiro, Manabu; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study is to establish a method for quantitative measurement of histamine H{sub 1} receptor (H1R) in human brain by PET and [{sup 11}C]doxepin ([{sup 11}C]DOX). The estimated parameters with a two-compartment model were stable for the initial values for parameter estimation but those with a three-compartment model were not. This finding suggests that the H1R measured by the [{sup 11}C]DOX and PET can be evaluated with a two-compartment model.

  11. Withdrawal properties of a neuroactive steroid: implications for GABA(A) receptor gene regulation in the brain and anxiety behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheryl S

    2002-05-01

    Early work in the field established that the 5 alpha-reduced metabolite of progesterone 3 alpha-OH-5 alpha-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone or 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP) is a potent positive modulator of the GABA(A) receptor (GABAR), the receptor mediating the effects of the primary inhibitory transmitter in the brain. This steroid acts in a manner similar to sedative drugs, such as the barbiturates, both in terms of potentiating GABA-induced inhibition in vitro and in behavioral assays, by reducing anxiety and seizure susceptibility. Because sedative compounds exhibit withdrawal properties that result in behavioral hyperexcitability, our laboratory has more recently investigated the effect of prolonged application and rapid removal (i.e. 'withdrawal') of this steroid, administered in vivo to female rats. Withdrawal from 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP produces a state of increased anxiety and lowered seizure threshold, similar to withdrawal from other GABA-modulatory drugs such as the benzodiazepines and alcohol. Hormone withdrawal also produced increases in the alpha 4-containing GABAR, an effect correlated with insensitivity of the GABAR to modulation by the benzodiazepine class of tranquilizers, as would normally occur under control conditions. In addition, changes in intrinsic channel properties, including a marked acceleration in the decay rate was also observed as a result of declining levels of 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP. Such a change would result in less inhibitory total current, and the resulting increase in neuronal excitability could then underlie the observed behavioral excitability following hormone withdrawal. These results suggest that actions of this steroid on a traditional transmitter receptor in the brain lead to alterations in GABAR subunit composition that result in changes in the intrinsic channel properties of the receptor and behavioral excitability. These results may have implications for endogenous fluctuations in this hormone which may accompany premenstrual

  12. Effects of chronic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration on neurotransmitter concentrations and receptor binding in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S.F.; Newport, G.D.; Scallet, A.C.; Gee, K.W.; Paule, M.G.; Brown, R.M.; Slikker, W. Jr. (National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, Arkansas (USA))

    THC is the major psychoactive constituent of marijuana and is also known as an hallucinogenic compound. Numerous reports have shown that large doses of THC produce significant alterations in various neurotransmitter systems. The present study was designed to determine whether chronic exposure to THC produces significant alterations in selected neurotransmitter systems (dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, GABAergic, benzodiazepine, and opiate) in the rat brain. In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with vehicle, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg body weight daily, 5 days/week for 90 days. Animals were killed either 24 hours or two months after the last dose. Brains were dissected into different regions for neurochemical analyses. Two months after the cessation of chronic administration, there was a significant decrease in GABA receptor binding in the hippocampus of animals in the high dose group. However, no other significant changes were found in neurotransmitter receptor binding characteristics in the hippocampus or in neurotransmitter concentrations in the caudate nucleus, hypothalamus or septum after chronic THC administration. In an attempt to replicate the GABA receptor binding changes and also to determine the (35S)TBPS binding in hippocampus, we designed Experiment 2. In this experiment, we dosed the animals by gavage with 0, 5, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg daily, 5 days/week or with 20 mg THC/kg Monday through Thursday and 60 mg/kg on Friday for 90 days. Results from this experiment failed to replicate the dose-dependent effect of THC on GABA receptor binding in hippocampus. Modulation of (35S)TBPS binding by GABA or 3 alpha-OH-DHP or inhibition by cold TBPS in frontal cortex did not show any significant dose-related effects.

  13. [{sup 11}C]DAA1106: radiosynthesis and in vivo binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Mingrong E-mail: zhang@nirs.go.jp; Kida, Takayo; Noguchi, Junko; Furutsuka, Kenji; Maeda, Jun; Suhara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2003-05-01

    DAA1106 (N-(2,5-Dimethoxybenzyl)-N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)acetamide), is a potent and selective ligand for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in mitochondrial fractions of rat (K{sub i}=0.043 nM) and monkey (K{sub i}=0.188 nM) brains. This compound was labeled by [{sup 11}C]methylation of a corresponding desmethyl precursor (DAA1123) with [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I in the presence of NaH, with a 72{+-}16% (corrected for decay) incorporation yield of radioactivity. After HPLC purification, [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 was obtained with {>=}98% radiochemical purity and specific activity of 90-156 GBq/{mu}mol at the end of synthesis. After iv injection of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 into mice, high accumulations of radioactivity were found in the olfactory bulb and cerebellum, the high PBR density regions in the brain. Coinjection of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 with unlabeled DAA1106 and PBR-selective PK11195 displayed a significant reduction of radioactivity, suggesting a high specific binding of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 to PBR. Although this tracer was rapidly metabolized in the plasma, only [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 was detected in the brain tissues, suggesting the specific binding in the brain due to the tracer itself. These findings revealed that [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 is a potential and selective positron emitting radioligand for PBR.

  14. Protease-activated receptor-2 regulates trypsin expression in the brain and protects against seizures and epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Rink-Jan; O'Brien, Terence J; Cocks, Thomas M

    2008-04-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)), primarily involved in inflammation, is highly expressed in limbic regions of the brain such as the hippocampus. Although extracellular proteolysis is involved in normal and stress-related neuronal plasticity associated with learning, memory and inflammatory disease states, little is known about the role of PAR(2) and its physiological agonist, trypsin, in the brain. We show immunohistochemically that trypsin co-localises with tissue plasminogen activator within granular-like structures in PAR(2)-positive pyramidal neurons of the rat hippocampus. Central administration of the PAR(2) peptide agonist, SLIGRL, inhibited electrical amygdala kindling-induced epileptogenesis and abolished kindling-induced over-expression of trypsin in the hippocampus. SLIGRL similarly attenuated kindling when administered subcutaneously. Non-enzymatic activation of neuronal PAR(2) using SLIGRL may thus activate feedback mechanisms to inhibit the over-production of trypsin and possibly other proteases during brain insults and thereby attenuate pathogenesis. Prophylactic systemic administration of non-proteolytic PAR(2) agonists may therefore represent a novel approach to protect against epileptogenic brain insults.

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor expression in the cortex of the neonatal rat brain with and without focal cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ben H; Wen, Tong-Chun; Rogido, Marta; Sola, Augusto

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GR) mediate cellular processes which may be neuroprotective and/or neurotoxic to the neonatal rat brain. Our aim was to describe GR ontogeny in the developing rat brain cortex and changes in GR expression after permanent neonatal focal cerebral ischemia (FCI). GR Western blots and immunohistochemical stains were performed on neonatal rat cortices on P1, P3, P7, P10, P15, and P30 and on P7 at 1 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 72 h after FCI or sham-operation (S-O), 8 per group. Nissl staining was performed on FCI or S-O P7 cortical samples. Cortical GR expression was increased by 65.2% at P7, 110.1% at P15, and 87.0% at P30, compared to P1. On P7, GR expression decreased in the ischemic cortex after 6 h and in the non-ischemic cortex after 24 h of FCI (p cortex after 6 h and in the non-ischemic cortex after 24 h of FCI. Thus, cortical GR may play important roles in normal brain development and neonatal brain injury responses.

  16. The brain 5-HT4 receptor binding is down-regulated in the Flinders Sensitive Line depression model and in response to paroxetine administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Cecilie Löe; Marcussen, Anders Bue; Wegener, Gregers

    2009-01-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT(4)) receptor may be implicated in depression and is a new potential target for antidepressant treatment. We have investigated the brain 5-HT(4) receptor [(3)H]SB207145 binding in the Flinders Sensitive Line rat depression model by quantitative receptor autoradiography...... cortices after chronic paroxetine administration, and markedly reduced in several regions after 5-HT depletion. Thus, the 5-HT(4) receptor binding was decreased in the Flinders Sensitive Line depression model and in response to chronic paroxetine administration....

  17. The glucocorticoid receptor in the limbic system of the human brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs) are important mediators of the stress response in mammals including humans. GCs are released from the adrenal in response to stress and affect numerous processes in the body and brain. Their levels are controlled via negative feedback exerted by GC binding to brain

  18. The sigma-1 receptor enhances brain plasticity and functional recovery after experimental stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruscher, Karsten; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Rickhag, Karl Mattias

    2011-01-01

    Stroke leads to brain damage with subsequent slow and incomplete recovery of lost brain functions. Enriched housing of stroke-injured rats provides multi-modal sensorimotor stimulation, which improves recovery, although the specific mechanisms involved have not been identified. In rats housed in ...

  19. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bloemendaal, L; Veltman, D J; Ten Kulve, J S; Groot, P F C; Ruhé, H G; Barkhof, F; Sloan, J H; Diamant, M; Ijzerman, R G

    2015-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. As part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain responses to anticipation and receipt of chocolate milk versus a tasteless solution, using functional MRI (fMRI). Obese subjects with type 2 diabetes, and obese and lean subjects with normoglycaemia (n = 48) underwent three fMRI sessions at separate visits with intravenous infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide, exenatide with prior GLP-1 receptor blockade by exendin-9-39 or placebo, during somatostatin pituitary-pancreatic clamps. Body mass index negatively correlated with brain responses to receipt of chocolate milk and positively correlated with anticipation of receipt of chocolate milk in brain areas regulating reward, appetite and motivation. Exenatide increased brain responses to receipt of chocolate milk and decreased anticipation of receipt of chocolate milk compared with placebo, paralleled by reductions in food intake. Exendin-9-39 largely prevented these effects. Our findings show that GLP-1 receptor activation decreases anticipatory food reward, which may reduce cravings for food and increases consummatory food reward, which may prevent overeating. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Neonatal domoic acid increases receptor density of α2 adrenoceptors and GABAA α5 receptors in limbic brain regions of adult rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Majken; Lillethorup, Thea Pinholt; Wegener, Gregers

    Background: The presymptomatic events involved in neurological disorders such as epilepsy remain elusive but represent an opportunity to understand disease development and stop the pathogenic processes leading to chronic epilepsy. Previous studies using Western blot and immunohistochemistry have...... found increased levels of α2 adrenoceptors in the hippocampal membrane of adult rats treated neonatally with low-dose domoic acid (DOM) along with decreased levels of both isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), a catalyst of the decarboxylation of glutamate to GABA, indicating a reduction......-14 with saline or low sub-convulsive doses of the glutamate agonist DOM (20µg/kg), weaned on day 22 and left undisturbed except for routine husbandry. At ~120 days of age the rats were euthanized by decapitation. The brains were removed, frozen in isopentane/dry ice and cut into 20 µM thick slices. Receptor...

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation induces nuclear targeting of cyclooxygenase-2, basolateral release of prostaglandins, and mitogenesis in polarizing colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Coffey, Robert J.; Hawkey, Chris J.; Damstrup, Lars; Graves-Deal, Ramona; Daniel, Vincent C.; Dempsey, Peter J.; Chinery, Rebecca; Kirkland, Susan C.; DuBois, Raymond N.; Jetton, Thomas L.; Morrow, Jason D.

    1997-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs reduce the risk of colon cancer, possibly via cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. The growth factor-inducible COX-2, which is overexpressed in neoplastic colonic tissue, is an attractive target to mediate this effect. Herein we have exploited the ability of a human colon cancer cell line, HCA-7 Colony 29, to polarize when cultured on Transwell (Costar) filters to study COX-2 production and the vectorial release of prostaglandins (PGs). Administration of type α...

  2. [On the role of selective silencer Freud-1 in the regulation of the brain 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, V S; Osipova, D V; Tsybko, A S

    2010-01-01

    Selective 5-HT(1A) receptor silencer (Freud-1) is known to be one of the main factors for transcriptional regulation of brain serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor. However, there is a lack of data on implication of Freud-1 in the mechanisms underlying genetically determined and experimentally altered 5-HT(1A) receptor system state in vivo. In the present study we have found a difference in the 5-HT(1A) gene expression in the midbrain of AKR and CBA inbred mouse strains. At the same time no distinction in Freud-1 expression was observed. We have revealed 90.3% of homology between mouse and rat 5-HT(1A) receptor DRE-element, whereas there was no difference in DRE-element sequence between AKR and CBA mice. This indicates the absence of differences in Freud-1 binding site in these mouse strains. In the model of 5-HT(1A) receptor desensitization produced by chronic 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist administration, a significant reduction of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression together with considerable increase of Freud-1 expression were found. These data allow us to conclude that the selective silencer of 5-HT(1A) receptor, Freud-1, is involved in the compensatory mechanisms that modulate the functional state of brain serotonin system, although it is not the only factor for 5-HT(1A) receptor transcriptional regulation.

  3. Ligands that target cannabinoid receptors in the brain: from THC to anandamide and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2008-06-01

    A major finding--that (-)-trans-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) is largely responsible for the psychotropic effects of cannabis--prompted research in the 1970s and 1980s that led to the discovery that this plant cannabinoid acts through at least two types of cannabinoid receptor, CB(1) and CB(2), and that Delta(9)-THC and other compounds that target either or both of these receptors as agonists or antagonists have important therapeutic applications. It also led to the discovery that mammalian tissues can themselves synthesize and release agonists for cannabinoid receptors, the first of these to be discovered being arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol. These 'endocannabinoids' are released onto their receptors in a manner that appears to maintain homeostasis within the central nervous system and sometimes either to oppose or to mediate or exacerbate the unwanted effects of certain disorders. This review provides an overview of the pharmacology of cannabinoid receptors and their ligands. It also describes actual and potential clinical uses both for cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists and for compounds that affect the activation of cannabinoid receptors less directly, for example by inhibiting the enzymatic hydrolysis of endocannabinoids following their release.

  4. Characterization of GABA/sub A/ receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride uptake in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luu, M.D.; Morrow, A.L.; Paul, S.M.; Schwartz, R.D.

    1987-09-07

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride (/sup 36/Cl/sup -/) uptake was measured in synaptoneurosomes from rat brain. GABA and GABA agonists stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake in a concentration-dependent manner with the following order of potency: Muscimol>GABA>piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (P4S)>4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol (THIP)=3-aminopropanesulfonic acid (3APS)>>taurine. Both P4S and 3APS behaved as partial agonists, while the GABA/sub B/ agonist, baclofen, was ineffective. The response to muscimol was inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin in a mixed competitive/non-competitive manner. Other inhibitors of GABA receptor-opened channels or non-neuronal anion channels such as penicillin, picrate, furosemide and disulfonic acid stilbenes also inhibited the response to muscimol. A regional variation in muscimol-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was observed; the largest responses were observed in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus, moderate responses were obtained in the striatum and hypothalamus and the smallest response was observed in the pons-medulla. GABA receptor-mediated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was also dependent on the anion present in the media. The muscinol response varied in media containing the following anions: Br/sup -/>Cl/sup -/greater than or equal toNO/sub 3//sup -/>I/sup -/greater than or equal toSCN/sup -/>>C/sub 3/H/sub 5/OO/sup -/greater than or equal toClO/sub 4//sup -/>F/sup -/, consistent with the relative anion permeability through GABA receptor-gated anion channels and the enhancement of convulsant binding to the GABA receptor-gated Cl/sup -/ channel. 43 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Effect of the combination of the benzodiazepine tranquilizer medazepam and the nootropic agent meclofenoxate on the activity of rat brain muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, J S; Petkov, V D

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of 7-day treatment with the benzodiazepine tranquilizer medazepam (5 mg/kg), the nootropic agent meclofenoxate (100 mg/kg) and their combination in the same doses on the binding activity of muscarinic receptors in four rat brain structures (cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus) were studied using the antagonist [3H]-1-quinuclidinyl benzylate [( 3H]-QNB) as radio-ligand. 2. Medazepam treatment caused significant decrease of muscarinic receptor binding affinity (Kd) and of the receptor binding capacity (Bmax) in the brain structures studied. The number of muscarinic binding sites was unsignificantly decreased only in the hippocampus. 3. Meclofenoxate treatment caused an increase of muscarinic receptor affinity and a decrease of the binding capacity in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus and an increase of the binding affinity in the striatum and hippocampus. 4. The combination of medazepam and meclofenoxate caused no significant changes of both muscarinic receptor characteristics in the hippocampus and of the receptor affinity in the striatum and hypothalamus in comparison with control rats. The Bmax values were decreased in the cerebral cortex, striatum and hypothalamus when compared with control animals. The differences observed were slighter than those determined after the comparison of medazepam treated rats with control rats. 5. The results obtained afford an opportunity to suggest that the nootropic agent meclofenoxate acts to moderate the effect of the benzodiazepine tranquilizer medazepam on the activity of rat brain muscarinic receptors.

  6. Immunohistochemical Localization of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptor Subtypes in the Rat Adrenal, Pituitary, and Brain with a Perspective Commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Premer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II increases blood pressure and stimulates thirst and sodium appetite in the brain. It also stimulates secretion of aldosterone from the adrenal zona glomerulosa and epinephrine from the adrenal medulla. The rat has 3 subtypes of angiotensin II receptors: AT1a, AT1b, and AT2. mRNAs for all three subtypes occur in the adrenal and brain. To immunohistochemically differentiate these receptor subtypes, rabbits were immunized with C-terminal fragments of these subtypes to generate receptor subtype-specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence revealed AT1a and AT2 receptors in adrenal zona glomerulosa and medulla. AT1b immunofluorescence was present in the zona glomerulosa, but not the medulla. Ultrastructural immunogold labeling for the AT1a receptor in glomerulosa and medullary cells localized it to plasma membrane, endocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, and the nucleus. AT1b and AT2, but not AT1a, immunofluorescence was observed in the anterior pituitary. Stellate cells were AT1b positive while ovoid cells were AT2 positive. In the brain, neurons were AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 positive, but glia was only AT1b positive. Highest levels of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 receptor immunofluorescence were in the subfornical organ, median eminence, area postrema, paraventricular nucleus, and solitary tract nucleus. These studies complement those employing different techniques to characterize Ang II receptors.

  7. Immunohistochemical Localization of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptor Subtypes in the Rat Adrenal, Pituitary, and Brain with a Perspective Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premer, Courtney; Lamondin, Courtney; Mitzey, Ann; Speth, Robert C.; Brownfield, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II increases blood pressure and stimulates thirst and sodium appetite in the brain. It also stimulates secretion of aldosterone from the adrenal zona glomerulosa and epinephrine from the adrenal medulla. The rat has 3 subtypes of angiotensin II receptors: AT1a, AT1b, and AT2. mRNAs for all three subtypes occur in the adrenal and brain. To immunohistochemically differentiate these receptor subtypes, rabbits were immunized with C-terminal fragments of these subtypes to generate receptor subtype-specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence revealed AT1a and AT2 receptors in adrenal zona glomerulosa and medulla. AT1b immunofluorescence was present in the zona glomerulosa, but not the medulla. Ultrastructural immunogold labeling for the AT1a receptor in glomerulosa and medullary cells localized it to plasma membrane, endocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, and the nucleus. AT1b and AT2, but not AT1a, immunofluorescence was observed in the anterior pituitary. Stellate cells were AT1b positive while ovoid cells were AT2 positive. In the brain, neurons were AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 positive, but glia was only AT1b positive. Highest levels of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 receptor immunofluorescence were in the subfornical organ, median eminence, area postrema, paraventricular nucleus, and solitary tract nucleus. These studies complement those employing different techniques to characterize Ang II receptors. PMID:23573410

  8. Modulation by extracellular pH of GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes injected with rat brain mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robello, M; Balduzzi, R; Cupello, A

    2000-01-01

    Rat brain poly(A)(+) mRNA was injected into Xenopus oocytes. After 72-96 hr, GABA(A) receptors expressed in this heterologous system were studied by perfusion of GABA and recording of GABA evoked chloride current under voltage-clamp conditions. The GABA activated currents were blocked by bicuculline and enhanced by flunitrazepam. Acidic (6.4) extracellular pH (pH(e) ) augmented, whereas basic pH (8.4) decreased the current evoked by 100 microM GABA in the respect of the current evoked at pH 7.4. Concentration-response curves for GABA evoked chloride currents were built at the three pHs. These data showed that acidic pH does not change the EC50 for GABA but it increases significantly I(max) in comparison to pH 7.4. At pH 8.4 there was a significant decrease of EC50 for GABA. However, there was also a very strong decrease of I(max), so that the overall effect at 100 microM GABA was a decrease of GABA activated chloride current in the respect of the one activated at neutral pH. These data may indicate that on average brain GABA(A) receptors are positively modulated by extracellular acidosis. The opposite may occur in extracellular alcalosis.

  9. Quantitative atlas of blood-brain barrier transporters, receptors, and tight junction proteins in rats and common marmoset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Yutaro; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Inoue, Takashi; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the protein amounts of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability-related transporters, receptors, and tight junction proteins in Sprague Dawley and Wistar rats and common marmoset, and also to investigate inter-species and inter-strain differences across rodents and primates. Quantification of target proteins in isolated brain capillaries was conducted by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based quantitative targeted absolute proteomics, with in silico peptide selection. Most target proteins showed inter-rodent, inter-primate species, and inter-rat strain differences of less than 2-fold. Comparison of rat and human BBB showed that P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 4, monocarboxylate transporter 1, l-type amino acid transporter, and organic anion transporter 3 exhibited differences of more than two-fold in protein abundance, whereas the amounts of breast cancer resistance protein, glucose transporter 1, and insulin receptor were similar in rat and human. In contrast, the differences between marmoset and human BBB were less than 2-fold for almost all measured proteins. Thus, the molecular basis of BBB functions may be similar in marmoset and human, whereas that of rats shows significant differences. The marmoset may be a good model to access in vivo human BBB permeability characteristics, as an alternative to rat and macaque monkey. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Traumatic brain injury causes platelet adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid receptor inhibition independent of hemorrhagic shock in humans and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Francis J; Chapman, Michael P; Donahue, Deborah L; Thomas, Scott; Moore, Ernest E; Wohlauer, Max V; Fritz, Braxton; Yount, Robert; Ploplis, Victoria; Davis, Patrick; Evans, Edward; Walsh, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Coagulopathy in traumatic brain injury (CTBI) is a well-established phenomenon, but its mechanism is poorly understood. Various studies implicate protein C activation related to the global insult of hemorrhagic shock or brain tissue factor release with resultant platelet dysfunction and depletion of coagulation factors. We hypothesized that the platelet dysfunction of CTBI is a distinct phenomenon from the coagulopathy following hemorrhagic shock. We used thrombelastography with platelet mapping as a measure of platelet function, assessing the degree of inhibition of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and arachidonic acid (AA) receptor pathways. First, we studied the early effect of TBI on platelet inhibition by performing thrombelastography with platelet mapping on rats. We then conducted an analysis of admission blood samples from trauma patients with isolated head injury (n = 70). Patients in shock or on clopidogrel or aspirin were excluded. In rats, ADP receptor inhibition at 15 minutes after injury was 77.6% ± 6.7% versus 39.0% ± 5.3% for controls (p injury in patients with isolated head trauma. This phenomenon is observed in the absence of hemorrhagic shock or multisystem injury. Thus, TBI alone is shown to be sufficient to induce a profound platelet dysfunction.

  11. Brain extracellular matrix affects AMPA receptor lateral mobility and short-term synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischknecht, Renato; Heine, Martin; Perrais, David; Seidenbecher, Constanze I; Choquet, Daniel; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2009-07-01

    Many synapses in the mature CNS are wrapped by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM). Using single-particle tracking and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we found that this net-like ECM formed surface compartments on rat primary neurons that acted as lateral diffusion barriers for AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Enzymatic removal of the ECM increased extrasynaptic receptor diffusion and the exchange of synaptic AMPA receptors. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording revealed an increased paired-pulse ratio as a functional consequence of ECM removal. These results suggest that the surface compartments formed by the ECM hinder lateral diffusion of AMPA receptors and may therefore modulate short-term synaptic plasticity.

  12. Induction of angiogenesis and modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 by simvastatin after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongtao; Jiang, Hao; Lu, Dunyue; Qu, Changsheng; Xiong, Ye; Zhou, Dong; Chopp, Michael; Mahmood, Asim

    2011-05-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that simvastatin reduced neuronal death, increased neurogenesis, and promoted functional recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI). To investigate the effect of simvastatin on angiogenesis after TBI and the related signaling pathways. Saline or simvastatin (1 mg/kg) was administered orally to rats starting at day 1 after TBI or sham surgery and then daily for 14 days. Rats were sacrificed at 3 and 14 days after treatment. Brain sections and tissues were prepared for immunohistochemical staining, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blot analysis. Cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by immunocytochemical staining with phallotoxins and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Western blot analysis was carried out to examine the simvastatin-induced activation of the v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt) signaling pathway. The expression of VEGFR-2 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Simvastatin significantly increased the length of vascular perimeter, promoted the proliferation of endothelial cells, and improved the sensorimotor function after TBI. Simvastatin stimulated endothelial cell tube formation after oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro. VEGFR-2 expression in both brain tissues and cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells was enhanced after simvastatin treatment, which may be modulated by activation of Akt. Akt-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation was also induced by simvastatin in vivo and in vitro. Simvastatin augments TBI-induced angiogenesis in the lesion boundary zone and hippocampus and improves functional recovery. Simvastatin also promotes angiogenesis in vitro. These beneficial effects on angiogenesis may be related to simvastatin-induced activation of the VEGFR-2/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway.

  13. Management of breast cancer brain metastases: Focus on human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Gao, Song-Lin

    2017-03-25

    After the introduction of trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), the overall survival (OS) among patients with HER2-positive breast cancer has been substantially improved. However, among these patients, the incidence of brain metastases (BM) has been increasing and an increased proportion of them have died of intracranial progression, which makes HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) a critical issue of concern. For local control of limited BM, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and surgical resection are available modalities with different clinical indications. Postoperative or preoperative radiation is usually delivered in conjunction with surgical resection to boost local control. Adjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) should be deferred for limited BM because of its impairment of neurocognitive function while having no benefit for OS. Although WBRT is still the standard treatment for local control of diffuse BM, SRS is a promising treatment for diffuse BM as the technique continues to improve. Although large molecules have difficulty crossing the blood brain barrier, trastuzumab-containing regimens are critical for treating HER2-positive BCBM patients because they significantly prolong OS. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are more capable of crossing into the brain and they have been shown to be beneficial for treating BM in HER2-positive patients, especially lapatinib combined with capecitabine. The antiangiogenic agent, bevacizumab, can be applied in the HER2-positive BCBM scenario as well. In this review, we also discuss several strategies for delivering drugs into the central nervous system and several microRNAs that have the potential to become biomarkers of BCBM.

  14. Estrogen-dependent changes in estrogen receptor-β mRNA expression in middle-aged female rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Naoko; Yuri, Kazunari

    2014-01-16

    During aging, estrogen production and circulating levels of estrogen are markedly decreased in females. Although several differences exist in the process of reproductive aging between women and female rats, the results of many studies suggest that the female rat, especially the middle-aged or aged ovariectomized female, is an important animal model of hormone loss in women. In target tissues including the brain, the actions of estrogen are mediated mainly via the alpha and beta subtypes of the estrogen receptor (ER-α and ER-β). Estrogen treatment is known to change the expression of ER-α mRNA and protein in specific regions of the brain in middle-aged female rodents. In contrast, we do not know if estrogen regulates the expression of ER-β in the brain at this stage of life. In the present study, we performed in situ hybridization on brain sections of ovariectomized and estrogen-treated middle-aged female rats to reveal the effects of estrogen on the expression of ER-β throughout the brain. Our results showed that estrogen treatment decreased the number of ER-β mRNA-positive cells in the mitral cell and external plexiform layers of the olfactory bulb, central amygdaloid nucleus, medial geniculate nucleus, posterior hypothalamic nucleus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and reticular part of the substantia nigra. As compared to the results of previous studies of young females, our data revealed that the regions in which expression of ER-β mRNA expression is affected by estrogen differ in middle age. These results suggest that the effects of estrogen on ER-β expression change with age. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. 5-HT4-receptors modulate induction of long-term depression but not potentiation at hippocampal output synapses in acute rat brain slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wawra

    Full Text Available The subiculum is the principal target of CA1 pyramidal cells and mediates hippocampal output to various cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. The majority of subicular pyramidal cells are burst-spiking neurons. Previous studies indicated that high frequency stimulation in subicular burst-spiking cells causes presynaptic NMDA-receptor dependent long-term potentiation (LTP whereas low frequency stimulation induces postsynaptic NMDA-receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD. In the present study, we investigate the effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 4 (5-HT4 receptor activation and blockade on both forms of synaptic plasticity in burst-spiking cells. We demonstrate that neither activation nor block of 5-HT4 receptors modulate the induction or expression of LTP. In contrast, activation of 5-HT4 receptors facilitates expression of LTD, and block of the 5-HT4 receptor prevents induction of short-term depression and LTD. As 5-HT4 receptors are positively coupled to adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1, 5-HT4 receptors might modulate PKA activity through AC1. Since LTD is blocked in the presence of 5-HT4 receptor antagonists, our data are consistent with 5-HT4 receptor activation by ambient serotonin or intrinsically active 5-HT4 receptors. Our findings provide new insight into aminergic modulation of hippocampal output.

  16. Brain serotonin 2A receptor binding: Relations to body mass index, tobacco and alcohol use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, D.; Frokjaer, V. G.; Haugbol, S.

    2009-01-01

    Manipulations of the serotonin levels in the brain can affect impulsive behavior and influence our reactivity to conditioned reinforcers. Eating, tobacco smoking, and alcohol consumption are reinforcers that are influenced by serotonergic neurotransmission; serotonergic hypofunction leads to incr...

  17. Anticholinesterase Effects on Number and Function of Brain Muscarinic Receptors and Central Cholinergic Activity: Drug Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-11

    the near future. In addition, since the entire cerebral cortex projects to many nuclei throughout the brain through excitatory fibers it appears even...Florentini, F., Forloni, G.L. and Ladinsky, H.: Frontal decortication and adaptive changes in striatal cholinergic neurons in the rat, Brain...Research, 363, 128-134, 1986. 2) Consolo, Silvana: Frontal decortication and adaptive changes in striatal cholinergic neurons: Neuropharmacological and

  18. Subacute activation of mGlu4 receptors causes the feedback inhibition of its gene expression in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershina, E V; Arkhipov, V I

    2016-05-15

    The present study aimed to understand the relationship between pharmacological activation of mGlu4 receptors and regulation of its gene in the hippocampus. The expression level of the GRM4 gene, encoding mGluR4 receptors, was studied in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of rats after pharmacological activation of the receptor with positive allosteric modulator (E)-4-(2-Phenylethenyl)-2-pyrimidinamine (TCN 238). The drug was injected subcutaneously four times at a dose of 2mg/kg. The animals were previously trained with hippocampal-dependent task and after the treatment were tested for memory retrieval. The expression level of GRM4 was determined by qRT-PCR in control and experimental groups of animals one and five days post-treatment. We found that TCN 238 did not affect the performance of the learned task. However, the expression level of GRM4 in the hippocampus was reliable down-regulated five days after treatment with TCN 238. In addition, we showed that the expression level of GABRA1, encoding GABAA α-subunit was downregulated five days after the treatment in the frontal cortex. Subacute pharmacological intervention in mGluR activity by the selective positive modulator TCN 238 has led to adaptive rearrangements of transcription processes in the hippocampus. Moreover, this regulation affected GABA system, confirming importance of the brain excitation-inhibition balance. Since the pharmacological influence on mGluR activity can be regarded as a promising tool aimed to correct brain dysfunction, the properties of mGluR modulators should be studied in more detail, including the level of gene transcription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Opioid receptor imaging and displacement studies with [6-O-[{sup 11}C]methyl]buprenorphine in baboon brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galynker, Igor; Schlyer, David J.; Dewey, Stephen L.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Gatley, S. John; MacGregor, Robert R.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Holland, M. J.; Brodie, Jonathan; Simon, Eric; Wolf, Alfred P

    1996-04-01

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is a mixed opiate agonist-antagonist used as an analgesic and in the treatment of opiate addiction. We have used [6-O-[{sup 11}C]methyl]buprenorphine ([{sup 11}C]BPN) to measure the regional distribution in baboon brain, the test-retest stability of repeated studies in the same animal, the displacement of the labeled drug by naloxone in vivo, and the tissue distribution in mice. The regional distribution of radioactivity in baboon brain determined with PET was striatum > thalamus > cingulate gyrus > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > occipital cortex > cerebellum. This distribution corresponded to opiate receptor density and to previously published data (37). The tracer uptake in adult female baboons showed no significant variation in serial scans in the same baboon with no intervention in the same scanning session. HPLC analysis of baboon plasma showed the presence of labeled metabolites with 92% {+-} 2.2% and 43% {+-} 14.4% of the intact tracer remaining at 5 and 30 min, respectively. Naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist, administered 30-40 min after tracer injection at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg i.v., reduced [{sup 11}C]BPN binding in thalamus, striatum, cingulate gyrus, and frontal cortex to values 0.25 to 0.60 of that with no intervention. There were minimal (< 15%) effects on cerebellum. Naloxone treatment significantly reduced the slope of the Patlak plot in receptor-containing regions. These results demonstrate that [{sup 11}C]BPN can be displaced by naloxone in vivo, and they affirm the feasibility of using this tracer and displacement methodology for short-term kinetics studies with PET. Mouse tissue distribution data were used to estimate the radiation dosimetry to humans. The critical organ was the small intestine, with a radiation dose estimate to humans of 117 nrad/mCi.

  20. The anabolic steroid nandrolone alters cannabinoid self-administration and brain CB1 receptor density and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struik, Dicky; Fadda, Paola; Zara, Tamara; Zamberletti, Erica; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela; Fratta, Walter; Fattore, Liana

    2017-01-01

    Clinical and pre-clinical observations indicate that anabolic-androgenic steroids can induce neurobiological changes that alter the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. In this study, we investigated the effect of the anabolic steroid nandrolone on the rewarding properties of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN) in rats. Lister Hooded male rats were treated intramuscularly with nandrolone (15mg/kg) or vehicle for 14 consecutive days, and then allowed to self-administer WIN (12.5μg/kg/infusion) intravenously. After reaching stable drug intake, self-administration behavior was extinguished to examine drug- and cue-induced reinstatement of cannabinoid-seeking behavior. Other behavioral parameters presumed to influence drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors were examined to gain more insight into the behavioral specificity of nandrolone treatment. Finally, animals were sacrificed for analysis of CB1 receptor density and function in selected brain areas. We found that nandrolone-treated rats self-administered up to 2 times more cannabinoid than vehicle-treated rats, but behaved similarly to control rats when tested for drug- and cue-induced reinstatement of cannabinoid-seeking behavior. Enhanced cannabinoid intake by nandrolone-treated rats was not accompanied by changes in locomotor activity, sensorimotor gating, or memory function. However, our molecular data show that after chronic WIN self-administration nandrolone-treated rats display altered CB1 receptor density and function in selected brain areas. We hypothesize that increased cannabinoid self-administration in nandrolone-treated rats results from a nandrolone-induced decrease in reward function, which rats seem to compensate by voluntarily increasing their cannabinoid intake. Altogether, our findings corroborate the hypothesis that chronic exposure to anabolic-androgenic steroids induces dysfunction of the reward pathway in rats and might represent a potential risk factor for abuse of

  1. Effects of treadmill exercise on the expression of netrin-1 and its receptors in rat brain after cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N; Huang, H; Lin, F; Chen, A; Zhang, Y; Chen, R; Du, H

    2011-10-27

    Recent evidence suggests that exercise improves functional outcome in animal models of cerebral ischemia. Since netrin-1 and its receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and uncoordinated gene 5B (Unc5B), act as important regulators in neural and vascular activities, we sought to determine whether netrin-1 and DCC and Unc5B are involved in the neuroprotective effects of exercise on rats with induced cerebral ischemia. A total of 108 rats were randomly distributed into three groups: sham-operated group (n = 12), middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) group (n = 48), MCAO+treadmill exercise group (n = 48). Behavioral testing indicated that treadmill exercise could significantly improve neurologic deficits of rats with cerebral ischemia at day 14 and 28 after MCAO (n = 12, Pexercise enhanced netrin-1 and DCC expression, while it suppressed Unc5B expression in rat peri-ischemic brain area, especially at day 14 and 28 after MCAO (n = 4, Pexercise-induced neural circuit remodeling in the peri-ischemic area, and exercise may promote survival of neurons in this area by regulating netrin-1-Unc5B signaling. Additionally, netrin-1 may also play a role in brain-blood barrier via DCC-immunoreactive peri-vascular astrocytes. In conclusion, we demonstrate that treadmill exercise has beneficial effects that may be attributed, at least in part, to the involvement of netrin-1 and its receptors DCC and Unc5B in the neuronal and vascular activities in brain-ischemic rats. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An insight into the ligand-receptor interactions involved in the translocation of pathogens across blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Bhide, Mangesh

    2011-12-01

    Traversal of pathogen across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an essential step for central nervous system (CNS) invasion. Pathogen traversal can occur paracellularly, transcellularly, and/or in infected phagocytes (Trojan horse mechanism). To trigger the translocation processes, mainly through paracellular and transcellular ways, interactions between protein molecules of pathogen and BBB are inevitable. Simply, it takes two to tango: both host receptors and pathogen ligands. Underlying molecular basis of BBB translocation of various pathogens has been revealed in the last decade, and a plethora of experimental data on protein-protein interactions has been created. This review compiles these data and should give insights into the ligand-receptor interactions that occur during BBB translocation. Further, it sheds light on cell signaling events triggered in response to ligand-receptor interaction. Understanding of the molecular principles of pathogen-host interactions that are involved in traversal of the BBB should contribute to develop new vaccine and drug strategies to prevent CNS infections. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetic analysis of the cannabinoid-1 receptor PET tracer [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanabria-Bohorquez, Sandra Marina; Hamill, Terence G.; Burns, H.D. [Merck Research Laboratories, Imaging, West Point, PA (United States); Goffin, Karolien; Laere, Koen van [University Hospital and K.U. Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Lepeleire, Inge de [Merck Research Laboratories, Brussels (Belgium); Bormans, Guy [K.U. Leuven, Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Quantitative imaging of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) opens perspectives for many neurological and psychiatric disorders. We characterized the kinetics and reproducibility of the CB1R tracer [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 in human brain. [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 data were analysed using reversible models and the distribution volume V{sub T} and V{sub ND} k{sub 3} (V{sub ND} k{sub 3} = K{sub 1} k{sub 2}) were estimated. Tracer binding was also evaluated using irreversible kinetics and the irreversible uptake constant K{sub i} and fractional uptake rate (FUR) were estimated. The effect of blood flow on these parameters was evaluated. Additionally, the possibility of determining the tracer plasma kinetics using a reduced number of blood samples was also examined. A reversible two-tissue compartment model using a global k{sub 4} value was necessary to describe brain kinetics. Both V{sub T} and V{sub ND} k{sub 3} were estimated satisfactorily and their test-retest variability was between 10% and 30%. Irreversible methods adequately described brain kinetics and FUR values were equivalent to K{sub i}. The linear relationship between K{sub i} and V{sub ND} k{sub 3} demonstrated that K{sub i} or FUR and thus the simple measure of tracer brain uptake provide CB1R availability information. The test-retest variability of K{sub i} and FUR was <10% and estimates were independent of blood flow. Brain uptake can be used as a receptor availability index, albeit at the expense of potential bias due to between-subject differences in tracer plasma kinetics. [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 specific binding can be accurately determined using FUR values requiring a short scan 90 to 120 min after tracer administration. Our results suggest that [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 plasma kinetics can be assessed using a few venous samples. (orig.)

  4. Brain endogenous angiotensin II receptor type 2 (AT2-R) protects against DOCA/salt-induced hypertension in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shu-Yan; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Li, Jian-Dong; Shen, Ying; Sun, Xiao-Fei

    2015-03-08

    Recent studies demonstrate that there are sex differences in the expression of angiotensin receptor type 2 (AT2-R) in the kidney and that AT2-R plays an enhanced role in regulating blood pressure (BP) in females. Also, brain AT2-R activation has been reported to negatively modulate BP and sympathetic outflow. The present study investigated whether the central blockade of endogenous AT2-R augments deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/salt-induced hypertension in both male and female rats. All rats were subcutaneously infused with DOCA combined with 1% NaCl solution as the sole drinking fluid. BP and heart rate (HR) were recorded by telemetric transmitters. To determine the effect of central AT2-R on DOCA/salt-induced hypertension, male and female rats were intracerebroventricularly (icv) infused with AT2-R antagonist, PD123,319, during DOCA/salt treatment. Subsequently, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, a key cardiovascular regulatory region of the brain, was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. DOCA/salt treatment elicited a greater increase in BP in male rats than that in females. Icv infusions of the AT2-R antagonist significantly augmented DOCA/salt pressor effects in females. However, this same treatment had no enhanced effect on DOCA/salt-induced increase in the BP in males. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis of the female brain revealed that DOCA/salt treatment enhanced the mRNA and protein expression for both antihypertensive components including AT2-R, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-2, and interleukin (IL)-10 and hypertensive components including angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1-R), ACE-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-1β, but decreased mRNA expression of renin in the PVN. The central blockade of AT2-R reversed the changes in mRNA and protein expressions of ACE-2, IL-10, and renin, further increased the expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β, and kept higher the expressions of AT1-R, ACE-1, and AT2-R

  5. Functional profile of the binary brain corticosteroid receptor system: mediating, multitasking, coordinating, integrating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, E R

    2013-11-05

    This contribution is focused on the action of the naturally occurring corticosteroids, cortisol and corticosterone, which are secreted from the adrenals in hourly pulses and after stress with the goal to maintain resilience and health. To achieve this goal the action of the corticosteroids displays an impressive diversity, because it is cell-specific and context-dependent in coordinating the individual's response to changing environments. These diverse actions of corticosterone are mediated by mineralocorticoid- and glucocorticoid-receptors that operate as a binary system in concert with neurotransmitter and neuropeptide signals to activate and inhibit stress reactions, respectively. Classically MR and GR are gene transcription factors, but recently these receptors appear to mediate also rapid non-genomic actions on excitatory neurotransmission suggesting that they integrate functions over time. Hence the balance of receptor-mediated actions is crucial for homeostasis. This balanced function of mineralo- and glucocorticoid-receptors can be altered epigenetically by a history of traumatic (early) life events and the experience of repeated stressors as well as by predisposing genetic variants in signaling pathways of these receptors. One of these variants, mineralocorticoid receptor haplotype 2, is associated with dispositional optimism in appraisal of environmental challenges. Imbalance in receptor-mediated corticosterone actions was found to leave a genomic signature highlighting the role of master switches such as cAMP response element-binding protein and mammalian target of rapamycin to compromise health, and to promote vulnerability to disease. Diabetic encephalopathy is a pathology of imbalanced corticosterone action, which can be corrected in its pre-stage by a brief treatment with the antiglucocorticoid mifepristone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Differential expression of melatonin receptor subtypes MelIa, MelIb and MelIc in relation to melatonin binding in the male songbird brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusani, Leonida; Gahr, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Previous autoradiography studies illustrated that several areas of the avian brain can bind the pineal hormone melatonin. In birds, there are three melatonin receptor (MelR) subtypes: MelIa, MelIb and MelIc. To date, their brain distribution has not been studied in any passerine bird. Therefore, we investigated mRNA distribution of MelR subtypes in adjacent sections of the brain of two songbirds, the blackcap and the zebra finch, in parallel with that of 2-[¹²⁵I]-iodomelatonin (IMEL) binding sites in the same brains. The general pattern of receptor expression shown by in situ hybridization of species-specific probes matched well with that of IMEL binding. However, the expression of the three subtypes was area specific with similar patterns in the two species. Some brain areas expressed only one receptor subtype, most brain regions co-expressed either MelIa with MelIb or MelIa with MelIc, whereas few areas expressed MelIb and MelIc or all three receptor subtypes. Since many sensory areas, most thalamic areas and subareas of the neopallium, a cortex analogue, express MelR, it is likely that most sensory motor integration functions are melatonin sensitive. Further, the area-specific expression patterns suggest that the regulatory role of melatonin differs among different brain areas. Since subareas of well-defined neural circuits, such as the visual system or the song control system, are equipped with different receptor types, we hypothesize a diversity of functions for melatonin in the control of sensory integration and behavior. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Spatiotemporal brain dynamics of emotional face processing modulations induced by the serotonin 1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Schmidt, André; Pokorny, Thomas; Kometer, Michael; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-12-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system. For instance, emotional face processing is impaired by acute psilocybin administration, a serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 2A receptor agonist. However, the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underlying these modulations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal brain dynamics underlying psilocybin-induced modulations during emotional face processing. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials in response to emotional faces, following psilocybin and placebo administration. Our results indicate a first time period of strength (i.e., Global Field Power) modulation over the 168-189 ms poststimulus interval, induced by psilocybin. A second time period of strength modulation was identified over the 211-242 ms poststimulus interval. Source estimations over these 2 time periods further revealed decreased activity in response to both neutral and fearful faces within limbic areas, including amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, and the right temporal cortex over the 168-189 ms interval, and reduced activity in response to happy faces within limbic and right temporo-occipital brain areas over the 211-242 ms interval. Our results indicate a selective and temporally dissociable effect of psilocybin on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing, consistent with a modulation of the top-down control. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Overexpression of pregnane X and glucocorticoid receptors and the regulation of cytochrome P450 in human epileptic brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Chaitali; Hossain, Mohammed; Solanki, Jesal; Najm, Imad M; Marchi, Nicola; Janigro, Damir

    2017-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests a metabolic contribution of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) to the drug-resistant phenotype in human epilepsy. However, the upstream molecular regulators of CYP in the epileptic brain remain understudied. We therefore investigated the expression and function of pregnane xenobiotic (PXR) and glucocorticoid (GR) nuclear receptors in endothelial cells established from post-epilepsy surgery brain samples. PXR/GR localization was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in specimens from subjects who underwent temporal lobe resections to relieve drug-resistant seizures. We used primary cultures of endothelial cells obtained from epileptic brain tissues (EPI-ECs; n = 8), commercially available human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs; n = 8), and human hepatocytes (n = 3). PXR/GR messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in brain ECs was initially determined by complementary DNA (cDNA) microarrays. The expression of PXR/GR proteins was quantified by Western blot. PXR and GR silencing was performed in EPI-ECs (n = 4), and the impact on downstream CYP expression was determined. PXR/GR expression was detected by immunofluorescence in ECs and neurons in the human temporal lobe samples analyzed. Elevated mRNA and protein levels of PXR and GR were found in EPI-ECs versus control HBMECs. Hepatocytes, used as a positive control, displayed the highest levels of PXR/GR expression. We confirmed expression of PXR/GR in cytoplasmic-nuclear subcellular fractions, with a significant increase of PXR/GR in EPI-ECs versus controls. CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and CYP2E1 were overexpressed in EPI-ECs versus control, whereas CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 were downregulated or absent in EPI-ECs. GR silencing in EPI-ECs led to decreased CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and PXR expression. PXR silencing in EPI-ECs resulted in the specific downregulation of CYP3A4 expression. Our results indicate increased PXR and GR in primary ECs derived from human epileptic brains. PXR or GR may be responsible for a local drug brain

  9. ITI-007 demonstrates brain occupancy at serotonin 5-HT₂A and dopamine D₂ receptors and serotonin transporters using positron emission tomography in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert E; Vanover, Kimberly E; Zhou, Yun; Brašić, James R; Guevara, Maria; Bisuna, Blanca; Ye, Weiguo; Raymont, Vanessa; Willis, William; Kumar, Anil; Gapasin, Lorena; Goldwater, D Ronald; Mates, Sharon; Wong, Dean F

    2015-08-01

    Central modulation of serotonin and dopamine underlies efficacy for a variety of psychiatric therapeutics. ITI-007 is an investigational new drug in development for treatment of schizophrenia, mood disorders, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine brain occupancy of ITI-007 at serotonin 5-HT2A receptors, dopamine D2 receptors, and serotonin transporters using positron emission tomography (PET) in 16 healthy volunteers. Carbon-11-MDL100907, carbon-11-raclopride, and carbon-11-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile) (carbon-11-DASB) were used as the radiotracers for imaging 5-HT2A receptors, D2 receptors, and serotonin transporters, respectively. Brain regions of interest were outlined using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) with cerebellum as the reference region. Binding potentials were estimated by fitting a simplified reference tissue model to the measured tissue-time activity curves. Target occupancy was expressed as percent change in the binding potentials before and after ITI-007 administration. Oral ITI-007 (10-40 mg) was safe and well tolerated. ITI-007 rapidly entered the brain with long-lasting and dose-related occupancy. ITI-007 (10 mg) demonstrated high occupancy (>80 %) of cortical 5-HT2A receptors and low occupancy of striatal D2 receptors (~12 %). D2 receptor occupancy increased with dose and significantly correlated with plasma concentrations (r (2) = 0.68, p = 0.002). ITI-007 (40 mg) resulted in peak occupancy up to 39 % of striatal D2 receptors and 33 % of striatal serotonin transporters. The results provide evidence for a central mechanism of action via dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways for ITI-007 in living human brain and valuable information to aid dose selection for future clinical trials.

  10. Changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) activity and [3H]QNB-receptor binding in rat brain subsequent to intracerebroventricular injection of bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, L; Strauss, M; Kornhuber, J; Hoyer, S; Sorbi, S; Riederer, P; Amaducci, L

    1990-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), a link between carbohydrate and acetylcholine metabolism, is a regulatory enzyme for glucose and neurotransmitter metabolism in the brain and is reduced in Alzheimer-diseased brain. To study functional consequences of an inhibition of PDHc on muscarinic receptor binding, bromopyruvate, a suicide inhibitor od PDHc, was injected intracerebroventricularly (icv) in rats. Bromopyruvate caused a reduction of PDHc activity in the 3 brain regions examined, however, reaching significance only in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus and not in the striatum, 24 h after injection. 3, 6, and 12 weeks later, there was a normalization or transiently increased activity, respectively, of PDHc in these brain regions. No changes in concentrations of energy-rich phosphates could be demonstrated in the cerebral cortex 12 weeks after brompyruvate injection. The number of muscarinic receptors was significantly reduced in the cerebral cortex 12 weeks after injection. The data indicate that a transient reduction of brain PDHc activity in vivo is associated with a long-lasting reduction in muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Because comparable changes of PDHc and muscarinic receptors are found in dementia of Alzhemier type, the model of bromopyruvate inhibition of PDHc in rats is suggested to be useful for experimental dementia research.

  11. Moderate exercise and chronic stress produce counteractive effects on different areas of the brain by acting through various neurotransmitter receptor subtypes: A hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saha Asit K

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular, "moderate", physical exercise is an established non-pharmacological form of treatment for depressive disorders. Brain lateralization has a significant role in the progress of depression. External stimuli such as various stressors or exercise influence the higher functions of the brain (cognition and affect. These effects often do not follow a linear course. Therefore, nonlinear dynamics seem best suited for modeling many of the phenomena, and putative global pathways in the brain, attributable to such external influences. Hypothesis The general hypothesis presented here considers only the nonlinear aspects of the effects produced by "moderate" exercise and "chronic" stressors, but does not preclude the possibility of linear responses. In reality, both linear and nonlinear mechanisms may be involved in the final outcomes. The well-known neurotransmitters serotonin (5-HT, dopamine (D and norepinephrine (NE all have various receptor subtypes. The article hypothesizes that 'Stress' increases the activity/concentration of some particular subtypes of receptors (designated nts for each of the known (and unknown neurotransmitters in the right anterior (RA and left posterior (LP regions (cortical and subcortical of the brain, and has the converse effects on a different set of receptor subtypes (designated nth. In contrast, 'Exercise' increases nth activity/concentration and/or reduces nts activity/concentration in the LA and RP areas of the brain. These effects may be initiated by the activation of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF (among others in exercise and its suppression in stress. Conclusion On the basis of this hypothesis, a better understanding of brain neurodynamics might be achieved by considering the oscillations caused by single neurotransmitters acting on their different receptor subtypes, and the temporal pattern of recruitment of these subtypes. Further, appropriately designed and planned experiments

  12. N-Methyl-d-aspartate Modulation of Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine Release by Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Fast Cyclic Voltammetry Studies in Rat Brain Slices in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavas, Ersin; Young, Andrew M J

    2017-02-15

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, phencyclidine, induces behavioral changes in rodents mimicking symptoms of schizophrenia, possibly mediated through dysregulation of glutamatergic control of mesolimbic dopamine release. We tested the hypothesis that NMDA receptor activation modulates accumbens dopamine release, and that phencyclidine pretreatment altered this modulation. NMDA caused a receptor-specific, dose-dependent decrease in electrically stimulated dopamine release in nucleus accumbens brain slices. This decrease was unaffected by picrotoxin, making it unlikely to be mediated through GABAergic neurones, but was decreased by the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, (RS)-α-methyl-4-sulfonophenylglycine, indicating that NMDA activates mechanisms controlled by these receptors to decrease stimulated dopamine release. The effect of NMDA was unchanged by in vivo pretreatment with phencyclidine (twice daily for 5 days), with a washout period of at least 7 days before experimentation, which supports the hypothesis that there is no enduring direct effect of PCP at NMDA receptors after this pretreatment procedure. We propose that NMDA depression of accumbal dopamine release is mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors located pre- or perisynaptically, and suggest that NMDA evoked increased extrasynaptic spillover of glutamate is sufficient to activate these receptors that, in turn, inhibit dopamine release. Furthermore, we suggest that enduring functional changes brought about by subchronic phencyclidine pretreatment, modeling deficits in schizophrenia, are downstream effects consequent on chronic blockade of NMDA receptors, rather than direct effects on NMDA receptors themselves.

  13. Correlations between the Memory-Related Behavior and the Level of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in the Mice Brain, Provoked by an Acute Administration of CB Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Slomka, Tomasz; Budzynska, Barbara; Biala, Grazyna

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid (CB) receptors, is involved in memory-related responses, as well as in processes that may affect cognition, like oxidative stress processes. The purpose of the experiments was to investigate the impact of CB1 and CB2 receptor ligands on the long-term memory stages in male Swiss mice, using the passive avoidance (PA) test, as well as the influence of these compounds on the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in the mice brain. A single injection of a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, AM 251, improved long-term memory acquisition and consolidation in the PA test in mice, while a mixed CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 impaired both stages of cognition. Additionally, JWH 133, a selective CB2 receptor agonist, and AM 630, a competitive CB2 receptor antagonist, significantly improved memory. Additionally, an acute administration of the highest used doses of JWH 133, WIN 55,212-2, and AM 630, but not AM 251, increased total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the brain. In turn, the processes of lipids peroxidation, expressed as the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), were more advanced in case of AM 251. Thus, some changes in the PA performance may be connected with the level of oxidative stress in the brain.

  14. In vivo binding of /sup 125/I-LSD to serotonin 5-HT/sub 2/ receptors in mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartig, P.R.; Scheffel, U., Frost, J.J.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-08-19

    The binding of /sup 125/I-LSD (2-(/sup 125/I)-lysergic acid diethylamide) was studied in various mouse brain regions following intravenous injection of the radioligand. The high specific activity of /sup 125/I-LSD enabled the injection of low mass doses (14ng/kg), which are well below the threshold for induction of any known physiological effect of the probe. The highest levels of /sup 125/I-LSD binding were found in the frontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, extra-frontal cortex and striatum while the lowest level was found in the cerebellum. Binding was saturable in the frontal cortex but increased linearly in the cerebellum with increasing doses of /sup 125/I-LSD. Serotonergic compounds potently inhibited /sup 125/I-LSD binding in cortical regions, olfactory tubercles, and hypothalamus but had no effect in the cerebellum. Dopaminergic compounds caused partial inhibition of binding in the striatum while adrenergic compounds were inactive. From these studies the authors conclude that /sup 125/I-LSD labels serotonin 5-HT/sub 2/ receptor sites in cortical regions with no indication that other receptor sites are labeled. In the olfactory tubercles and hypothalamus, /sup 125/I-LSD labeling occurs predominantly or entirely at serotonic 5-HT/sub 2/ sites. In the striatum, /sup 125/I-LSD labels approximately equal proportions of serotonergic and dopaminergic sites. These data indicate that /sup 125/I-LSD labels serotonin receptors in vivo and suggests that appropriate derivatives of 2I-LSD may prove useful for tomographic imaging of serotonin 5-HT/sub 2/ receptors in the mammalian cortex.

  15. Nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and their high-affinity receptors are overexpressed in extramammary Paget's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yue; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Chen, Shan-Juan; Dugu, Long; Tsuji, Gaku; Xie, Lining; Nakahara, Takeshi; Moroi, Yoichi; Tu, Ya-Ting; Furue, Masutaka

    2010-11-01

    Neurotrophin (NT) systems appear to play important roles in the pathogenesis of several tumors, but their expression in extramammary Paget's disease (EPD) has not been investigated. Thirty-four paraffin-embedded EPD specimens (32 primary EPD and 2 metastatic to lymph nodes) were subject to immunohistochemical staining for nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), NT3, NT4, their high-affinity receptors (TrkA, TrkB and TrkC) and the common low-affinity receptor, p75 NT receptor (p75). All 34 EPD specimens, including 2 metastatic to lymph nodes, showed cytoplasmic overexpression of NGF, BDNF, TrkA and TrkB. The expression (% positive cells) of NGF, BDNF, NT3, NT4, TrkA and TrkB (81.6 ± 14.9, 86.0 ± 10.4, 89.6 ± 14.9, 87.8 ± 17.9, 83 ± 14.4 and 86.2 ± 11.7%) in EPD was significantly higher than in normal skin (21.6 ± 6.5, 27.6 ± 4.5, 19.7 ± 10.1, 8.2 ± 10.0, 25.0 ± 5.3 and 25.4 ± 6.4%), and the expression of these factors in invasive EPD was significantly higher than in noninvasive EPD. Interestingly, Paget cells were negative for p75 and TrkC in all the 34 EPD specimens. These results suggest that overexpression of NGF, BDNF and their high-affinity receptors (TrkA and TrkB) might play a role in the pathogenesis of EPD. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Effects of high fat diet and perinatal dioxin exposure on development of body size and expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Amartuvshin; Nishijo, Muneko; Nishimaru, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Tran, Nghi Ngoc; Van Le, Quang; Takamura, Yusaku; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Nishijo, Hisao

    2017-01-01

    Environmental exposure to dioxins, consumption of a high fat diet, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β signaling in the brain affect feeding behavior, which is an important determinant of body growth. In the present study, we investigated the effects of prenatal exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and high fact diet after weaning on body growth and expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β in the brain in rat pups. Subjects from the control and dioxin exposure groups were assigned to 1 of 3 different diet groups: standard diet, high fat diet in the juvenile period, or high fat diet in adulthood. Body weight gain rate in the juvenile high fat diet group and the length gain rate in the adult high fat diet group were greater than the corresponding values in the standard diet group only in male offspring, although the effects of dioxin exposure on growth were not significant. Consumption of a high fat diet decreased platelet-derived growth factor receptor β levels in the amygdala and hippocampus in both sexes compared to control groups, while 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin decreased platelet-derived growth factor receptor platelet-derived growth factor receptor β levels in the amygdala and striatum only in females receiving an high fat diet. Furthermore, platelet-derived growth factor receptor β levels in the hippocampus and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β striatum were inversely correlated with increases in body length, while changes in platelet-derived growth factor receptor β in the amygdala and nucleus accumbens were significantly correlated to body weight gain or body mass index. In conclusion, these findings suggest that these 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and high fat diet-induced changes in body growth and feeding behaviors might be partially mediated by changes in brain platelet-derived growth factor receptor β levels.

  17. Oxytocin receptor polymorphism and childhood social experiences shape adult personality, brain structure and neural correlates of mentalizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Hassloff, H; Straube, B; Jansen, A; Nuscheler, B; Wemken, G; Witt, S H; Rietschel, M; Kircher, T

    2016-07-01

    The oxytocin system is involved in human social behavior and social cognition such as attachment, emotion recognition and mentalizing (i.e. the ability to represent mental states of oneself and others). It is shaped by social experiences in early life, especially by parent-infant interactions. The single nucleotid polymorphism rs53576 in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene has been linked to social behavioral phenotypes. In 195 adult healthy subjects we investigated the interaction of OXTR rs53576 and childhood attachment security (CAS) on the personality traits "adult attachment style" and "alexithymia" (i.e. emotional self-awareness), on brain structure (voxel-based morphometry) and neural activation (fMRI) during an interactive mentalizing paradigm (prisoner's dilemma game; subgroup: n=163). We found that in GG-homozygotes, but not in A-allele carriers, insecure childhood attachment is - in adulthood - associated with a) higher attachment-related anxiety and alexithymia, b) higher brain gray matter volume of left amygdala and lower volumes in right superior parietal lobule (SPL), left temporal pole (TP), and bilateral frontal regions, and c) higher mentalizing-related neural activity in bilateral TP and precunei, and right middle and superior frontal gyri. Interaction effects of genotype and CAS on brain volume and/or function were associated with individual differences in alexithymia and attachment-related anxiety. Interactive effects were in part sexually dimorphic. The interaction of OXTR genotype and CAS modulates adult personality as well as brain structure and function of areas implicated in salience processing and mentalizing. Rs53576 GG-homozygotes are partially more susceptible to childhood attachment experiences than A-allele carriers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of acute and chronic treatment with risperidone on the serotonin and dopamine receptors in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Young; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Son, Hye Kyung; Kim, Chang Yoon; Lee, Chul; Lee, Hee Kyung [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of antipsychotic drugs is generally attributed to their ability to block dopamine D{sub 2} receptors. Classical D{sub 2} antagonists are not effective to treat negative symptoms and produce extrapyramidal side effects. On the other hand, atypical antipsychotic agents ameliorate negative symptoms without producing extrapyramidal side effects, and it is reported to be associated with blockade of serotonin 5-HT{sub 2} receptors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of risperidone on neuroreceptors in the rat brain by quantitative autoradiography method. In acute treatment group, risperidone was injected into peritoneal cavity of male Wistar rats with dose of 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0mg/kg in each group (5/group), and they were decapitated after 2 hours. In chronic treatment group, risperidone was injected with dose of 0, 0.1, and 1m/kg (I.P.) for 21 ays and decapitated after 24 hours following last treatment. The effect of risperodone on the binding of [{sup 3}H) spiperone to 5-HT{sub 2} and D{sub 2} receptors were analysed in 4 discrete regions of the striatum, nucleus accumbens, and frontal cortex by quantitative autoradiography. Acute treatment with risperidone reduced cortical 5-HT{sub 2} specific [{sup 3}H]spiperone binding to 32% of vehicle-treated control. Subcortical 5-HR{sub 2} specific [{sup 3}H]spiperone binding was not affected at all dose groups whereas a significant reduction (57%) in D{sub 2} specific [{sup 3}H]spiperone binding was observed in risperidone treated group at doses of 1-2mg/kg. Chronic treatment with risperidone produced a decrease in the maximal number of cortical 5-HT{sub 2} receptors to 51% and 46% of control in 0.1mg/kg and 1mg/kg treated group respectively. In conclusion, risperidone is a cortical serotonin receptor antagonist with relatively weak antagonistic action on dopamine receptors. These effects on neuroreceptors may explain the therapeutic effect of risperidone as a atypical

  19. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  20. Azaflavones compared to flavones as ligands to the benzodiazepine binding site of brain GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard; Liljefors, Tommy

    2008-01-01

    A series of azaflavone derivatives and analogues were prepared and evaluated for their affinity to the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA(A) receptor, and compared to their flavone counterparts. Three of the compounds, the azaflavones 9 and 12 as well as the new flavone 13, were also assayed...

  1. Flavylium salts as in vitro precursors of potent ligands to brain GABA-A receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kueny-Stotz, Marie; Chassaing, Stefan; Brouillard, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of derivatized flavylium cations was undertaken and the affinity to the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA-A receptor evaluated. The observed high affinity for some derivatives (sub-muM range) was explained by an in vitro transformation of the flavylium cations...

  2. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 5 mediates the immune quiescence of the human brain endothelial barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, R.P.; Lopes Pinheiro, M.A.; Kooij, G.; Lakeman, K.; van het Hof, B.; van der Pol, S.M.A.; Geerts, D.; van Horssen, J.; van der Valk, P.; van der Kam, E.; Ronken, E.; Reijerkerk, A.; de Vries, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulator FTY720P (Gilenya®) potently reduces relapse rate and lesion activity in the neuroinflammatory disorder multiple sclerosis. Although most of its efficacy has been shown to be related to immunosuppression through the induction of

  3. Brain opioid receptor density relates to stereotypies in chronically stressed pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loijens, L.W.S.; Schouten, W.G.P.; Wiepkema, P.R.; Wiegant, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    Opioid receptor densities were measured in the hippocampus of chronically stressed (tethered) pigs to study the involvement of endogenous opioid systems in stereotypy performance. Three groups of animals were housed tethered for 2 (n = 12), 5.5 (n = 12) and 8-9 months (n = 8), respectively, and the

  4. Brain serotonin 4 receptor binding is inversely associated with verbal memory recall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbæk, Dea S; Fisher, Patrick M; Ozenne, Brice

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously identified an inverse relationship between cerebral serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT 4R) binding and nonaffective episodic memory in healthy individuals. Here, we investigate in a novel sample if the association is related to affective components of memory, by examining t...

  5. Brain penetrant liver X receptor (LXR) modulators based on a 2,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazole core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Colin M; Noto, Paul B; Fan, Kristi Yi; Zhao, Wei; Lotesta, Stephen D; Dong, Chengguo; Marcus, Andrew P; Zheng, Ya-Jun; Chen, Guozhou; Wu, Zhongren; Van Orden, Rebecca; Zhou, Jing; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Zhao, Yi; Lipinski, Kerri; Howard, Lamont; Guo, Joan; Kandpal, Geeta; Meng, Shi; Hardy, Andrew; Krosky, Paula; Gregg, Richard E; Leftheris, Katerina; McKeever, Brian M; Singh, Suresh B; Lala, Deepak; McGeehan, Gerard M; Zhuang, Linghang; Claremon, David A

    2016-10-15

    Liver X receptor (LXR) agonists have been reported to lower brain amyloid beta (Aβ) and thus to have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Structure and property based design led to the discovery of a series of orally bioavailable, brain penetrant LXR agonists. Oral administration of compound 18 to rats resulted in significant upregulation of the expression of the LXR target gene ABCA1 in brain tissue, but no significant effect on Aβ levels was detected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel muscarinic receptor ligand which penetrates the blood brain barrier and displays in vivo selectivity for the m2 subtype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitler, M.S.; Cohen, V.I.; De La Cruz, R.; Boulay, S.F.; Jin, B.; Zeeberg, B.R. (George Washington Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)); Reba, R.C. (George Washington Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States) Univ. of Chicago Hospital, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of muscarinic m2, but not m1, subtype neuroreceptors in the posterior parietal cortex of the human brain. Emission tomographic study of the loss of m2 receptors in AD is limited by the fact that there is currently no available m2-selective radioligand which can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. In our efforts to prepare such a radioligand, the authors have used competition studies against currently existing muscarinic receptor radioligands to infer the in vitro and in vivo properties of a novel muscarinic receptor ligand, 5-[[4-[4-(diisobutylamino)butyl]-1-phenyl]acetyl]-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,e][1,4]diazepin-11-one (DIBD). In vitro competition studies against [[sup 3]H](R)-3-quinuclidinylbenzilate ([[sup 3]H]QNB) and [[sup 3]H]N-methylscopolamine ([[sup 3]H]NMS), using membranes derived from transfected cells expressing only m1, m2, m3, or m4 receptor subtypes, indicate that DIBD is selective for m2/m4 over m1/m3. In vivo competition studies against (R,R)-[[sup 125]I]IQNB indicate that DIBD crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB). The relationship of the regional percentage decrease in (R,R)-[[sup 125]I]IQNB versus the percentage of each of the receptor subtypes indicates that DIBD competes more effectively in those brain regions which are known to be enriched in the m2, relative to the m1, m3, and m4, receptor subtype; however, analysis of the data using a mathematical model shows that caution is required when interpreting the in vivo results. The authors conclude that a suitably radiolabeled derivative of DIBD may be of potential use in emission tomographic study of changes in m2 receptors in the central nervous system.

  7. Autoradiographic characterization of [3H]-5-HT-moduline binding sites in rodent brain and their relationship to 5-HT1B receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloëz-Tayarani, Isabelle; Cardona, Ana; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Massot, Olivier; Edelman, Lena; Fillion, Gilles

    1997-01-01

    5-HT-moduline is an endogenous tetrapeptide [Leu-Ser-Ala-Leu (LSAL)] that was first isolated from bovine brain tissue. To understand the physiological role of this tetrapeptide, we studied the localization of 5-HT-moduline binding sites in rat and mouse brains. Quantitative data obtained with a gaseous detector of β-particles (β-imager) indicated that [3H]-5-HT-moduline bound specifically to rat brain sections with high affinity (Kd = 0.77 nM and Bmax = 0.26 dpm/mm2). Using film autoradiography in parallel, we found that 5-HT-moduline binding sites were expressed in a variety of rat and mouse brain structures. In 5-HT1B receptor knock-out mice, the specific binding of [3H]-5-HT-moduline was not different from background labeling, indicating that 5-HT-moduline targets are exclusively located on the 5-HT1B receptors. Although the distribution of 5-HT-moduline binding sites was similar to that of 5-HT1B receptors, they did not overlap totally. Differences in distribution patterns were found in regions containing either high levels of 5-HT1B receptors such as globus pallidus and subiculum that were poorly labeled or in other regions such as dentate gyrus of hippocampus and cortex where the relative density of 5-HT-moduline binding sites was higher than that of 5-HT1B receptors. In conclusion, our data, based on autoradiographic localization, indicate that 5-HT-moduline targets are located on 5-HT1B receptors present both on 5-HT afferents and postsynaptic neurons. By interacting specifically with 5-HT1B receptors, this tetrapeptide may play a pivotal role in pathological states such as stress that involves the dysfunction of 5-HT neurotransmission. PMID:9275223

  8. Local oxytocin expression and oxytocin receptor binding in the male rat brain is associated with aggressiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calcagnoli, Federica; de Boer, Sietse F.; Beiderbeck, Daniela I.; Althaus, Monika; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Neumann, Inga D.

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated in male wild-type Groningen rats that enhancing brain oxytocin (OXT) levels acutely produces marked pro-social explorative and anti-aggressive effects. Moreover, these pharmacologically-induced changes are moderated by the individual's aggressive phenotype, suggesting an

  9. [11C]CHIBA-1001 as a novel PET ligand for alpha7 nicotinic receptors in the brain: a PET study in conscious monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Hashimoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play an important role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. However, there are currently no suitable positron emission tomography (PET radioligands for imaging alpha7 nAChRs in the intact human brain. Here we report the novel PET radioligand [11C]CHIBA-1001 for in vivo imaging of alpha7 nAChRs in the non-human primate brain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A receptor binding assay showed that CHIBA-1001 was a highly selective ligand at alpha7 nAChRs. Using conscious monkeys, we found that the distribution of radioactivity in the monkey brain after intravenous administration of [11C]CHIBA-1001 was consistent with the regional distribution of alpha7 nAChRs in the monkey brain. The distribution of radioactivity in the brain regions after intravenous administration of [11C]CHIBA-1001 was blocked by pretreatment with the selective alpha7 nAChR agonist SSR180711 (5.0 mg/kg. However, the distribution of [11C]CHIBA-1001 was not altered by pretreatment with the selective alpha4beta2 nAChR agonist A85380 (1.0 mg/kg. Interestingly, the binding of [11C]CHIBA-1001 in the frontal cortex of the monkey brain was significantly decreased by subchronic administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist phencyclidine (0.3 mg/kg, twice a day for 13 days; which is a non-human primate model of schizophrenia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present findings suggest that [11C]CHIBA-1001 could be a novel useful PET ligand for in vivo study of the receptor occupancy and pathophysiology of alpha7 nAChRs in the intact brain of patients with neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Effect of Mycoplasma fermentans on brain PGE(2): role of glucocorticoids and their receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlman, A; Yirmiya, R; Gallily, R; Weidenfeld, J

    2001-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are a group of eubacteria, which cause various diseases in animals and in humans, and can contribute to diseases produced by other infectious agents, particularly HIV. We have recently reported that intracerebral administration of Mycoplasma fermentans (MF) produces both neuroendocrine and behavioral alterations. Some of these responses were mediated by MF-induced production of prostaglandin E(2 )(PGE(2)). The aim of this study was to examine the role of glucocorticoids (GC) in regulating MF-induced brain prostaglandin production. Male rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with various doses of heat-inactivated MF, LPS or IL-1 beta and the following parameters were measured: (1) ex vivo production of hippocampal PGE(2), (2) serum levels of ACTH and corticosterone, and (3) binding capacity of [(3)H]-dexamethasone (DEX) to hippocampal cytosol. MF caused a small increase in hippocampal PGE(2) production, but higher doses failed to produce a further increase. In contrast, the effects of LPS or IL-1 beta on PGE(2) were dose-dependent. Removal of circulating GC by bilateral adrenalectomy significantly enhanced MF-induced brain PGE(2) production. The three immune stimulators increased serum levels of ACTH and corticosterone to the same extent. Finally, MF, but not IL-1 beta increased the specific binding of [(3)H]-DEX to hippocampal cytosol. Brain PGE(2) induced by MF is regulated by endogenous GC. These hormones have an attenuating effect on PGE(2 )production, probably through an MF-induced increase in GC binding by brain tissue. This mechanism may be important in the pathological effect of MF within the brain of AIDS patients. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Simplified PET measurement for evaluating histamine H{sub 1} receptors in human brains using [{sup 11}C]doxepin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Hideki [Department of Pharmacology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, 980-8575 (Japan); Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan); Kimura, Yuichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan)]. E-mail: ukimura@ieee.org; Ishii, Kenji [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan); Oda, Keiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan); Sasaki, Toru [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan); Tashiro, Manabu [Department of Pharmacology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, 980-8575 (Japan); Yanai, Kazuhiko [Department of Pharmacology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, 980-8575 (Japan); Ishiwata, Kiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan)

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop simplified positron emission tomography measurement using [{sup 11}C]doxepin ([{sup 11}C]DOX) to evaluate histamine H{sub 1} receptors (H1Rs) in human brains. We evaluated the correlation between the distribution volume (DV) of [{sup 11}C]DOX, estimated quantitatively with a two-compartment model, and the [{sup 11}C]DOX uptake obtained at various time intervals and normalized using the metabolite-corrected plasma radioactivity. We found that the static 70- to 90-min images normalized using the plasma radioactivity at 10 min postinjection reflected the DV of [{sup 11}C]DOX-H1R binding.

  12. Cocaine inhibits store-operated Ca2+ entry in brain microvascular endothelial cells: critical role for sigma-1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Console-Bram, Linda M; Soboloff, Jonathan; Abood, Mary E; Unterwald, Ellen M; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an intracellular chaperone protein with many ligands, located at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Binding of cocaine to Sig-1R has previously been found to modulate endothelial functions. In the present study, we show that cocaine dramatically inhibits store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a Ca(2+) influx mechanism promoted by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Using either Sig-1R shRNA or pharmacological inhibition with the unrelated Sig-1R antagonists BD-1063 and NE-100, we show that cocaine-induced SOCE inhibition is dependent on Sig-1R. In addition to revealing new insight into fundamental mechanisms of cocaine-induced changes in endothelial function, these studies indicate an unprecedented role for Sig-1R as a SOCE inhibitor. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  13. Development of a Bifunctional Aptamer Targeting the Transferrin Receptor and Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) for the Treatment of Brain Cancer Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Joanna; Henri, Justin; Goodman, Lynda; Xiang, Dongxi; Duan, Wei; Shigdar, Sarah

    2017-04-19

    The treatment of brain disorders is greatly hindered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which restricts the overwhelming majority of small molecules from entering the brain. A novel approach by which to overcome this barrier is to target receptor mediated transport mechanisms present on the endothelial cell membranes. Therefore, we fused an aptamer that binds to epithelial cell adhesion molecule-expressing cancer cells to an aptamer targeting the transferrin receptor. This generated a proof of concept bifunctional aptamer that can overcome the blood-brain barrier and potentially specifically target brain disorders. The initial fusion of the two sequences enhanced the binding affinity of both aptamers while maintaining specificity. Additionally, mutations were introduced into both binding loops to determine their effect on aptamer specificity. The ability of the aptamer to transcytose the blood-brain barrier was then confirmed in vivo following a 1 nmol injection. This study has shown that through the fusion of two aptamer sequences, a bifunctional aptamer can be generated that has the potential to be developed for the specific treatment of brain disorders.

  14. The effect of increased NaCl intake on rat brain endogenous μ-opioid receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadam, Florencia; Zádor, Ferenc; Caeiro, Ximena; Szűcs, Edina; Erdei, Anna I; Samavati, Reza; Gáspár, Róbert; Borsodi, Anna; Vivas, Laura

    2018-02-27

    Numerous studies demonstrate the significant role of central β-endorphin and its receptor, the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), in sodium intake regulation. The present study aimed to investigate the possible relationship between chronic high-NaCl intake and brain endogenous MOR functioning. We examined whether short-term (4 days) obligatory salt intake (2% NaCl solution) in rats may induce changes in MOR mRNA expression, G-protein activity and MOR binding capacity in brain regions involved in salt intake regulation. Plasma osmolality and electrolyte concentrations after sodium overload and the initial and final body weight of the animals were also examined. After 4 days of obligatory hypertonic sodium chloride intake, there was clearly no difference in MOR mRNA expression and G-protein activity in the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO). In the brainstem, MOR binding capacity also remained unaltered, but the maximal efficacy of MOR G-protein significantly increased. Finally, no significant alterations were observed in plasma osmolality and electrolyte concentrations. Interestingly, animals which received sodium gained significantly less weight than control animals. In conclusion, we found no significant alterations in the MnPO and brainstem in the number of available cell surface MORs or de novo syntheses of MOR after hypertonic sodium intake. The increased MOR G-protein activity following acute sodium overconsumption may participate in the maintenance of normal blood pressure levels and/or in enhancing sodium taste aversion and sodium overload-induced anorexia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. In vivo labeling of phencyclidine (PCP) receptors with sup 3 H-TCP in the mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurice, T.; Vignon, J. (Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, Montpellier (France))

    1990-07-01

    The phencyclidine (PCP) derivative N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)-piperidine (3H-TCP) was used to label in vivo the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-associated ionic channel in the mouse brain. After the injection of a tracer dose of 3H-TCP, a spread labeling throughout the brain was observed, but was the highest in the cerebellum. Preadministration of unlabeled TCP (30 mg/kg) resulted in a 90% reduction of 3H-TCP binding. PCP, TCP, MK-801, dexoxadrol, ketamine, and SKF 10,047 isomers dose-dependently prevented the in vivo 3H-TCP binding. ID50 determined in the cerebrum and the cerebellum were respectively correlated with K0.5 for 3H TCP high (rat cortex) and low affinity (rat cerebellum) sites in vitro. The pharmacological specificity of the 3H-TCP binding site in the cerebellum was significantly different from that in the cerebrum. ID50 values were generally higher than in the cerebrum and, particularly, MK-801, the most potent drug in the cerebrum, was without significant effect in the cerebellum, at any time and at doses as high as 30 mg/kg. N-(1-(2-benzo(b) thiophenyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine (BTCP), desipramine, and atropine showed a more efficient prevention of 3H-TCP binding in the cerebellum than in the cerebrum. The prevention of the binding by TCP or PCP, at doses close to their ID50 values, was rapid and then decreased slowly. The effect of MK-801 was long-lasting. This study confirm previous in vitro studies: 3H-TCP is an efficient tool for the labeling of the NMDA receptor-associated ionic channel.

  16. Evaluation of MRI and cannabinoid type 1 receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL for spatial normalization of rat brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronfeld, Andrea; Müller-Forell, Wibke [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Maus, Stephan; Reuss, Stefan; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Miederer, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.miederer@unimedizin-mainz.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Lutz, Beat [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Duesbergweg 6, Mainz 55128 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Image registration is one prerequisite for the analysis of brain regions in magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) or positron-emission-tomography (PET) studies. Diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) is a nonlinear, diffeomorphic algorithm for image registration and construction of image templates. The goal of this small animal study was (1) the evaluation of a MRI and calculation of several cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL and (2) the analysis of the image registration accuracy of MR and PET images to their DARTEL templates with reference to analytical and iterative PET reconstruction algorithms. Methods: Five male Sprague Dawley rats were investigated for template construction using MRI and [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET for CB1 receptor representation. PET images were reconstructed using the algorithms filtered back-projection, ordered subset expectation maximization in 2D, and maximum a posteriori in 3D. Landmarks were defined on each MR image, and templates were constructed under different settings, i.e., based on different tissue class images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and GM + WM] and regularization forms (“linear elastic energy,” “membrane energy,” and “bending energy”). Registration accuracy for MRI and PET templates was evaluated by means of the distance between landmark coordinates. Results: The best MRI template was constructed based on gray and white matter images and the regularization form linear elastic energy. In this case, most distances between landmark coordinates were <1 mm. Accordingly, MRI-based spatial normalization was most accurate, but results of the PET-based spatial normalization were quite comparable. Conclusions: Image registration using DARTEL provides a standardized and automatic framework for small animal brain data analysis. The authors were able to show that this method works with high reliability and validity. Using DARTEL

  17. Evaluation of the binding characteristics of [{sup 18}F]fluoroproxyfan in the rat brain for in vivo visualization of histamine H{sub 3} receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funaki, Yoshihito [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)], E-mail: zen@cyric.tohoku.ac.jp; Sato, Kimihiko [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kato, Motohisa [Department of Pharmacology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Ishikawa, Yoichi; Iwata, Ren [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Yanai, Kazuhiko [Department of Pharmacology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    Histamine H{sub 3} receptors play an important role in biological functions. The aim of this research was to examine whether histamine H{sub 3} receptors can be visualized in vivo and in vitro with [{sup 18}F]3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)propyl 4-fluorobenzyl ether (fluoroproxyfan). [{sup 18}F]Fluoroproxyfan was synthesized with high specific activity using [{sup 18}F]benzyl bromide. The binding of [{sup 18}F]fluoroproxyfan to rat brain homogenates was higher in the striatum and thalamus and was lowest in the cerebellum. The in vitro autoradiographic study successfully demonstrated the specific binding of [{sup 18}F]fluoroproxyfan to the H{sub 3} receptor in the rat brain. In accordance with the in vitro bindings, the in vivo distribution of [{sup 18}F]fluoroproxyfan was heterogeneous in the rat brain. In the blocking experiments, the heterogeneous distribution disappeared in the presence of large amounts of fluoroproxyfan. These data suggest that [{sup 18}F]fluoroproxyfan can be potentially useful to image histamine H{sub 3} receptor noninvasively in the human brain by positron emission tomography.

  18. Parametric mapping of 5HT1A receptor sites in the human brain with the Hypotime method: theory and normal values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Mette; Rodell, Anders; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    The radioligand [carbonyl-(11)C]WAY-100635 ((11)C-WAY) is a PET tracer of the serotonin 5HT(1A) receptors in the human brain. It is metabolized so rapidly in the circulation that it behaves more as a chemical microsphere than as a tracer subject to continuous exchange between the circulation and ...

  19. Frightening music triggers rapid changes in brain monoamine receptors: a pilot PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Qiaozhen; Du, Fenglei; Hu, Yanni; Chao, Fangfang; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Frightening music can rapidly arouse emotions in listeners that mimic those from actual life-threatening experiences. However, studies of the underlying mechanism for perceiving danger created by music are limited. We investigated monoamine receptor changes induced by frightening music using (11)C-N-methyl-spiperone ((11)C-NMSP) PET. Ten healthy male volunteers were included, and their psychophysiologic changes were evaluated. Compared with the baseline condition, listening to frightening music caused a significant decrease in (11)C-NMSP in the right and left caudate nuclei, right limbic region, and right paralimbic region; a particularly significant decrease in the right anterior cingulate cortex; but an increase in the right frontal occipital and left temporal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Transient fright triggers rapid changes in monoamine receptors, which decrease in the limbic and paralimbic regions but increase in the cerebral cortex.

  20. Identification of B(2)-bradykinin receptors in guinea pig brain regions, spinal cord and peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, N A; Whiting, R L

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the biochemical and pharmacological properties of bradykinin receptors in the guinea pig central and peripheral tissues using radioligand binding techniques. Specific [(3)H]bradykinin ([(3)H]BK) receptor binding to homogenates of guinea pig cerebral cortex, hippocampus, spinal cord, ileum, kidney, heart, vas deferens and uterus was of high affinity, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of saturation (0.005-1 nM) data revealed the presence of a single population of non-interacting nanomolar affinity (generally 0.14-0.38 nM) binding sites in all these tissues, with the ileum having the highest affinity (K(D) = 0.02 nM) and the greatest density of sites (B(max) = 5.8 +/- 1.8 pmol/g tissue). The rank order of tissue enrichment in terms of [(3)H]BK binding sites was: ileum > uterus > kidney > heart > vas deferens > spinal cord > cerebral cortex > hippocampus. Unlabelled BK and its analogs inhibited [(3)H]BK binding in the above tissues in a concentration-dependent manner and with the same rank order of potency: BK > Lys-BK > Met-Lys-BK > [ d -Arg (0)-Hyp (3)- d -Phe (7)]BK ? [ d -Arg (0)-Hyp (3)-Thi (5,8)- d -Phe (7)]BK ? Des-Arg (9)-BK . A similar rank order of potency of agonists was observed for their ability to contract guinea pig uterine and ileal smooth muscle strips. The pharmacological profile of [(3)H]BK receptor binding, using BK agonists and antagonists, and that of functional responses was consistent with the identification of BK receptors of the B(2)-type in the guinea pig central nervous system and peripheral tissues.

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors in the brain: controlling food intake and body weight

    OpenAIRE

    Baggio, Laurie L.; Drucker, Daniel. J.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion and inhibits both gastric emptying and glucagon secretion. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists control glycemia via glucose-dependent mechanisms of action and promote weight loss in obese and diabetic individuals. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and cellular targets transducing the weight loss effects remain unclear. Two recent studies in the JCI provide insight into the neurons responsible for this effec...

  2. Immunocytochemical mapping of an RDL-like GABA receptor subunit and of GABA in brain structures related to learning and memory in the cricket Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strambi, C; Cayre, M; Sattelle, D B; Augier, R; Charpin, P; Strambi, A

    1998-01-01

    The distribution of putative RDL-like GABA receptors and of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain of the adult house cricket Acheta domesticus was studied using specific antisera. Special attention was given to brain structures known to be related to learning and memory. The main immunostaining for the RDL-like GABA receptor was observed in mushroom bodies, in particular the upper part of mushroom body peduncle and the two arms of the posterior calyx. Weaker immunostaining was detected in the distal part of the peduncle and in the alpha and beta lobes. The dorso- and ventrolateral protocerebrum neuropils appeared rich in RDL-like GABA receptors. Staining was also detected in the glomeruli of the antennal lobe, as well as in the ellipsoid body of the central complex. Many neurons clustered in groups exhibit GABA-like immunoreactivity. Tracts that were strongly immunostained innervated both the calyces and the lobes of mushroom bodies. The glomeruli of the antennal lobe, the ellipsoid body, as well as neuropils of the dorso- and ventrolateral protocerebrum were also rich in GABA-like immunoreactivity. The data demonstrated a good correlation between the distribution of the GABA-like and of the RDL-like GABA receptor immunoreactivity. The prominent distribution of RDL-like GABA receptor subunits, in particular areas of mushroom bodies and antennal lobes, underlines the importance of inhibitory signals in information processing in these major integrative centers of the insect brain.

  3. Age-related changes in receptor-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in various regions of rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundy, W.; Tandon, P.; Tilson, H. (Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)); Ali, S. (National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The effects of age on cholinergic markers and receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis was examined in the frontal cortex and striatum of male Fischer-344 rats. Choline acetyltransferase activity was decreased 27% in the striatum of aged rats compared to young controls. Muscarinic receptor density as measured by ({sup 3}H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding showed a similar 26% decrease in the striatum of aged rats. Phosphoinositide hydrolysis was measured by the release of inositol phosphate (IP) from tissue slices prelabeled with ({sup 3}H)myoinositol in response to carbachol, norepinephrine, and quisqualate. In the cortex, stimulated IP release was significantly greater in slices from aged rats compared to young rats for all three agonists. In contrast, stimulated IP release was significantly decreased in striatal slices from aged rats compared to young for all three agonists. These data indicate a differential effect of age on agonist-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the cortex and striatum. The decreased responsiveness in the latter area may result from the age-related loss of postsynaptic receptors.

  4. Development of a population pharmacokinetic model to predict brain distribution and dopamine D2 receptor occupancy of raclopride in non-anesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yin Cheong; Ilkova, Trayana; van Wijk, Rob C; Hartman, Robin; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2018-01-01

    Raclopride is a selective antagonist of the dopamine D2 receptor. It is one of the most frequently used in vivo D2 tracers (at low doses) for assessing drug-induced receptor occupancy (RO) in animals and humans. It is also commonly used as a pharmacological blocker (at high doses) to occupy the available D2 receptors and antagonize the action of dopamine or drugs on D2 in preclinical studies. The aims of this study were to comprehensively evaluate its pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in different brain compartments and to establish a PK-RO model that could predict the brain distribution and RO of raclopride in the freely moving rat using a LC-MS based approach. Rats (n=24) received a 10-min IV infusion of non-radiolabeled raclopride (1.61μmol/kg, i.e. 0.56mg/kg). Plasma and the brain tissues of striatum (with high density of D2 receptors) and cerebellum (with negligible amount of D2 receptors) were collected. Additional microdialysis experiments were performed in some rats (n=7) to measure the free drug concentration in the extracellular fluid of the striatum and cerebellum. Raclopride concentrations in all samples were analyzed by LC-MS. A population PK-RO model was constructed in NONMEM to describe the concentration-time profiles in the unbound plasma, brain extracellular fluid and brain tissue compartments and to estimate the RO based on raclopride-D2 receptor binding kinetics. In plasma raclopride showed a rapid distribution phase followed by a slower elimination phase. The striatum tissue concentrations were consistently higher than that of cerebellum tissue throughout the whole experimental period (10-h) due to higher non-specific tissue binding and D2 receptor binding in the striatum. Model-based simulations accurately predicted the literature data on rat plasma PK, brain tissue PK and D2 RO at different time points after intravenous or subcutaneous administration of raclopride at tracer dose (RO 30%). For the first time a predictive model that could describe

  5. Changes in Glutamate/NMDA Receptor Subunit 1 Expression in Rat Brain after Acute and Subacute Exposure to Methamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walailuk Kerdsan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a psychostimulant drug of abuse that produces long-term behavioral changes including behavioral sensitization, tolerance, and dependence. METH has been reported to induce neurotoxic effects in several areas of the brain via the dopaminergic system. Changes of dopamine function can induce malfunction of the glutamatergic system. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of METH administration on the expression of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 (NMDAR1 in frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampal formation after acute and subacute exposure to METH by western blotting. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of 8 mg/kg METH, 4 mg/kg/day METH for 14 days and saline in acute, subacute, and control groups, respectively. A significant increase in NMDAR1 immunoreactive protein was found in frontal cortex in the subacute group (P=.036 but not in the acute group (P=.580. Moreover, a significant increase in NMDAR1 was also observed in striatum in both acute (P=.025 and subacute groups (P=.023. However, no significant differences in NMDAR1 in hippocampal formation were observed in either acute or subacute group. The results suggest that an upregulation of NMDA receptor expression may be a consequence of glutamatergic dysfunction induced by METH.

  6. Assessment of {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor availability in juvenile pig brain with [{sup 18}F]NS10743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Funke, Uta; Brust, Peter [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmacy, Leipzig (Germany); Becker, Georg; Sabri, Osama [Univ. of Leipzig, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Cumming, Paul; Xiong, Guoming [Univ. of Munich, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Peters, Dan [NeuroSearch A/S, Ballerup (Denmark)

    2011-08-15

    To conduct a quantitative PET assessment of the specific binding sites in the brain of juvenile pigs for [{sup 18}F]NS10743, a novel diazabicyclononane derivative targeting {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors ({alpha}7 nAChRs). Dynamic PET recordings were made in isoflurane-anaesthetized juvenile pigs during 120 min after administration of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 under baseline conditions (n = 3) and after blocking of the {alpha}7 nAChR with NS6740 (3 mg.kg{sup -1} bolus + 1 mg.kg{sup -1}.h{sup -1} continuous infusion; n = 3). Arterial plasma samples were collected for determining the input function of the unmetabolized tracer. Kinetic analysis of regional brain time-radioactivity curves was performed, and parametric maps were calculated relative to arterial input. Plasma [{sup 18}F]NS10743 passed readily into the brain, with peak uptake occurring in {alpha}7 nAChR-expressing brain regions such as the colliculi, thalamus, temporal lobe and hippocampus. The highest SUV{sub max} was approximately 2.3, whereas the lowest uptake was in the olfactory bulb (SUV{sub max} 1.53 {+-} 0.32). Administration of NS6740 significantly decreased [{sup 18}F]NS10743 binding late in the emission recording throughout the brain, except in the olfactory bulb, which was therefore chosen as reference region for calculation of BP{sub ND}. The baseline BP{sub ND} ranged from 0.39 {+-} 0.08 in the cerebellum to 0.76 {+-} 0.07 in the temporal lobe. Pretreatment and constant infusion with NS6740 significantly reduced the BP{sub ND} in regions with high [{sup 18}F]NS10743 binding (temporal lobe -29%, p = 0.01; midbrain: -35%, p = 0.02), without significantly altering the BP{sub ND} in low binding regions (cerebellum: -16%, p = 0.2). This study confirms the potential of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 as a target-specific radiotracer for the molecular imaging of central {alpha}7 nAChRs by PET. (orig.)

  7. Purinergic receptor stimulation reduces cytotoxic edema and brain infarcts in mouse induced by photothrombosis by energizing glial mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zheng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatments to improve the neurological outcome of edema and cerebral ischemic stroke are severely limited. Here, we present the first in vivo single cell images of cortical mouse astrocytes documenting the impact of single vessel photothrombosis on cytotoxic edema and cerebral infarcts. The volume of astrocytes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP increased by over 600% within 3 hours of ischemia. The subsequent growth of cerebral infarcts was easily followed as the loss of GFP fluorescence as astrocytes lysed. Cytotoxic edema and the magnitude of ischemic lesions were significantly reduced by treatment with the purinergic ligand 2-methylthioladenosine 5' diphosphate (2-MeSADP, an agonist with high specificity for the purinergic receptor type 1 isoform (P2Y(1R. At 24 hours, cytotoxic edema in astrocytes was still apparent at the penumbra and preceded the cell lysis that defined the infarct. Delayed 2MeSADP treatment, 24 hours after the initial thrombosis, also significantly reduced cytotoxic edema and the continued growth of the brain infarction. Pharmacological and genetic evidence are presented indicating that 2MeSADP protection is mediated by enhanced astrocyte mitochondrial metabolism via increased inositol trisphosphate (IP(3-dependent Ca(2+ release. We suggest that mitochondria play a critical role in astrocyte energy metabolism in the penumbra of ischemic lesions, where low ATP levels are widely accepted to be responsible for cytotoxic edema. Enhancement of this energy source could have similar protective benefits for a wide range of brain injuries.

  8. Enhancing Effects of NMDA-Receptor Blockade on Extinction Learning and Related Brain Activation Are Modulated by BMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golisch, Anne; Heba, Stefanie; Glaubitz, Benjamin; Tegenthoff, Martin; Lissek, Silke

    2017-01-01

    A distributed network including prefrontal and hippocampal regions is involved in context-related extinction learning as well as in renewal. Renewal describes the recovery of an extinguished response if the context of extinction differs from the context of recall. Animal studies have demonstrated that prefrontal, but not hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonism disrupted extinction learning and processing of task context. However, human studies of NMDAR in extinction learning are lacking, while NMDAR antagonism yielded contradictory results in other learning tasks. This fMRI study investigated the role of NMDAR for human behavioral and brain activation correlates of extinction and renewal. Healthy volunteers received a single dose of the NMDAR antagonist memantine prior to extinction of previously acquired stimulus-outcome associations presented in either identical or novel contexts. We observed better, and partly faster, extinction learning in participants receiving the NMDAR antagonist compared to placebo. However, memantine did not affect renewal. In both extinction and recall, the memantine group showed a deactivation in extinction-related brain regions, particularly in the prefrontal cortex, while hippocampal activity was increased. This higher hippocampal activation was in turn associated with the participants' body mass index (BMI) and extinction errors. Our results demonstrate potentially dose-related enhancing effects of memantine and highlight involvement of hippocampal NMDAR in context-related extinction learning. PMID:28326025

  9. Activation of AMPA Receptors Mediates the Antidepressant Action of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Infralimbic Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Laura; Castañé, Anna; Pérez-Caballero, Laura; Grifoll-Escoda, Marc; López-Gil, Xavier; Campa, Leticia; Galofré, Mireia; Berrocoso, Esther; Adell, Albert

    2016-06-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used with success in treatment-resistant depression, little is known about its mechanism of action. We examined the antidepressant-like activity of short (1 h) DBS applied to the infralimbic prefrontal cortex in the forced swim test (FST) and the novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT). We also used in vivo microdialysis to evaluate the release of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex and c-Fos immunohistochemistry to determine the brain regions activated by DBS. One hour of DBS of the infralimbic prefrontal cortex has antidepressant-like effects in FST and NSFT, and increases prefrontal efflux of glutamate, which would activate AMPA receptors (AMPARs). This effect is specific of the infralimbic area since it is not observed after DBS of the prelimbic subregion. The activation of prefrontal AMPARs would result in a stimulation of prefrontal output to the brainstem, thus increasing serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex. Further, the activation of prefrontal AMPARs is necessary and sufficient condition for the antidepressant response of 1 h DBS. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  11. A previously uncharacterized role for estrogen receptor β: Defeminization of male brain and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kudwa, Andrea E.; Bodo, Cristian; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Rissman, Emilie F.

    2005-01-01

    Sex differences in brain and behavior are ubiquitous in sexually reproducing species. One cause of sexual dimorphisms is developmental differences in circulating concentrations of gonadal steroids. Neonatal testes produce androgens; thus, males are exposed to both testosterone and estradiol, whereas females are not exposed to high concentrations of either hormone until puberty. Classically, the development of neural sex differences is initiated by estradiol, which activates two processes in m...

  12. Electrophysiological and autoradiographical evidence of V1 vasopressin receptors in the lateral septum of the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raggenbass, M.; Tribollet, E.; Dreifuss, J.J.

    1987-11-01

    Extracellular recordings were obtained from single neurons located in the lateral septum, an area known to receive a vasopressinergic innervation in the rat brain. Approximately half of the neurons tested responded to 8-L-arginine vasopressin (AVP) by a marked increase in firing rate at concentrations greater than 1 nM. The effect of vasopressin was blocked by synthetic structural analogues possessing antagonistic properties on peripheral vasopressin and oxytocin receptors. Oxytocin was much less potent than vasopressin in firing septal neurons, and a selective oxytocic agonist was totally ineffective. The action of vasopressin on neuronal firing was mimicked by the vasopressor agonist (2-phenylalanine,8-ornithine)vasotocin but not by the selective antidiuretic agonist 1-deamino(8-D-arginine)vasopressin. In a parallel study, sites that bind (/sup 3/H)AVP at low concentration (1.5 nM) were found by in vitro autoradiography in the lateral septum. Adjacent sections were also incubated with 1.5 mM (/sup 3/H)AVP and, in addition, with 100 nM (2-phenylalanine,8-ornithine)vasotocin or 1-deamino(8-D-arginine)vasopressin--i.e., the same compounds as those used for the electrophysiological study. Results showed that the vasopressor agonist, but not the antidiuretic agonist, displaced (/sup 3/H)AVP, thus indicating that the vasopressin binding sites detected by autoradiography in the septum were V1 (vasopressor type) rather than V2 (antidiuretic type) receptors. Based on the electrophysiological evidence, we conclude that these receptors, when occupied, lead to increased firing of lateral septal neurons.

  13. EphrinB3 blocks EphB3 dependence receptor functions to prevent cell death following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theus, M H; Ricard, J; Glass, S J; Travieso, L G; Liebl, D J

    2014-05-08

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their membrane-bound ligands, ephrins, have a variety of roles in the developing and adult central nervous system that require direct cell-cell interactions; including regulating axon path finding, cell proliferation, migration and synaptic plasticity. Recently, we identified a novel pro-survival role for ephrins in the adult subventricular zone, where ephrinB3 blocks Eph-mediated cell death during adult neurogenesis. Here, we examined whether EphB3 mediates cell death in the adult forebrain following traumatic brain injury and whether ephrinB3 infusion could limit this effect. We show that EphB3 co-labels with microtubule-associated protein 2-positive neurons in the adult cortex and is closely associated with ephrinB3 ligand, which is reduced following controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. In the complete absence of EphB3 (EphB3(-/-)), we observed reduced terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and functional improvements in motor deficits after CCI injury as compared with wild-type and ephrinB3(-/-) mice. We also demonstrated that EphB3 exhibits dependence receptor characteristics as it is cleaved by caspases and induces cell death, which is not observed in the presence of ephrinB3. Following trauma, infusion of pre-clustered ephrinB3-Fc molecules (eB3-Fc) into the contralateral ventricle reduced cortical infarct volume and TUNEL staining in the cortex, dentate gyrus and CA3 hippocampus of wild-type and ephrinB3(-/-) mice, but not EphB3(-/-) mice. Similarly, application of eB3-Fc improved motor functions after CCI injury. We conclude that EphB3 mediates cell death in the adult cortex through a novel dependence receptor-mediated cell death mechanism in the injured adult cortex and is attenuated following ephrinB3 stimulation.

  14. Involvement of the mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor in traumatic brain injury: therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlodavsky, Eugene; Palzur, Eilam; Soustiel, Jean F

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries represent the leading cause of death and morbidity in young adults in western countries, and are responsible for a major social and economical burden. For decades, the mainstay of neurotrauma management has been represented by control of post-traumatic edema. With the emergence of a better understanding of the underlying cellular mechanisms responsible for the generation of secondary brain damage, the hope for the "magic bullet" has prompted the development of novel drugs that have repeatedly failed to significantly improve outcome of head-injured patients. During the past decade, mitochondrial functional and structural impairment has emerged as a pivotal event in the pathway of cell to secondary death. Extensive research has identified a vast range of deleterious signals that are generated and integrated at the mitochondrial level resulting in impairment of major mitochondrial functions such as calcium homeostasis, free radicals generation and detoxification, energy production and neurosteroidogenesis. Mitochondria have therefore emerged as a potential therapeutic target. Within the spectrum of major mitochondrial structural components, the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) has shown important and relevant functions such as steroid synthesis and modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition that may substantially affect the fate of injured cells. This review summarizes the potential therapeutic implications of TSPO modulation in traumatic brain injury in the view of the current knowledge on this intriguing mitochondrial complex.

  15. Immunolocalization of the short neuropeptide F receptor in queen brains and ovaries of the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrantonio Patricia V

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insect neuropeptides are involved in diverse physiological functions and can be released as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators acting within the central nervous system, and as circulating neurohormones in insect hemolymph. The insect short neuropeptide F (sNPF peptides, related to the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY peptides, have been implicated in the regulation of food intake and body size, and play a gonadotropic role in the ovaries of some insect species. Recently the sNPF peptides were localized in the brain of larval and adult Drosophila. However, the location of the sNPF receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, has not yet been investigated in brains of any adult insect. To elucidate the sites of action of the sNPF peptide(s, the sNPF receptor tissue expression and cellular localization were analyzed in queens of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera, an invasive social insect. Results In the queen brains and subesophageal ganglion about 164 cells distributed in distinctive cell clusters (C1-C9 and C12 or as individual cells (C10, C11 were immuno-positive for the sNPF receptor. Most of these neurons are located in or near important sensory neuropils including the mushroom bodies, the antennal lobes, the central complex, and in different parts of the protocerebrum, as well as in the subesophageal ganglion. The localization of the sNPF receptor broadly links the receptor signaling pathway with circuits regulating learning and feeding behaviors. In ovaries from mated queens, the detection of sNPF receptor signal at the posterior end of oocytes in mid-oogenesis stage suggests that the sNPF signaling pathway may regulate processes at the oocyte pole. Conclusions The analysis of sNPF receptor immunolocalization shows that the sNPF signaling cascade may be involved in diverse functions, and the sNPF peptide(s may act in the brain as neurotransmitter(s or neuromodulator(s, and in the ovaries

  16. Immunolocalization of the short neuropeptide F receptor in queen brains and ovaries of the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsiao-Ling; Pietrantonio, Patricia V

    2011-06-14

    Insect neuropeptides are involved in diverse physiological functions and can be released as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators acting within the central nervous system, and as circulating neurohormones in insect hemolymph. The insect short neuropeptide F (sNPF) peptides, related to the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) peptides, have been implicated in the regulation of food intake and body size, and play a gonadotropic role in the ovaries of some insect species. Recently the sNPF peptides were localized in the brain of larval and adult Drosophila. However, the location of the sNPF receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), has not yet been investigated in brains of any adult insect. To elucidate the sites of action of the sNPF peptide(s), the sNPF receptor tissue expression and cellular localization were analyzed in queens of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera), an invasive social insect. In the queen brains and subesophageal ganglion about 164 cells distributed in distinctive cell clusters (C1-C9 and C12) or as individual cells (C10, C11) were immuno-positive for the sNPF receptor. Most of these neurons are located in or near important sensory neuropils including the mushroom bodies, the antennal lobes, the central complex, and in different parts of the protocerebrum, as well as in the subesophageal ganglion. The localization of the sNPF receptor broadly links the receptor signaling pathway with circuits regulating learning and feeding behaviors. In ovaries from mated queens, the detection of sNPF receptor signal at the posterior end of oocytes in mid-oogenesis stage suggests that the sNPF signaling pathway may regulate processes at the oocyte pole. The analysis of sNPF receptor immunolocalization shows that the sNPF signaling cascade may be involved in diverse functions, and the sNPF peptide(s) may act in the brain as neurotransmitter(s) or neuromodulator(s), and in the ovaries as neurohormone(s). To our knowledge, this is the

  17. Role of NMDA receptors in the increase of glucose metabolism in the rat brain induced by fluorocitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Shinichiro; Umetani, Yukiko; Amitani, Misato; Hosoi, Rie; Momosaki, Sotaro; Hatazawa, Jun; Gee, Antony; Inoue, Osamu

    2007-03-30

    The effect of inhibition of glial metabolism by infusion of fluorocitrate (FC, 1 nmol/microl, 2 microl) into the right striatum of the rat brain on the glucose metabolism was studied. Significant increases in [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) uptake (45 min) in the right cerebral cortex and striatum were observed 4h after the infusion of FC, both as determined by the tissue dissection method and autoradiography. No significant increase in the initial uptake of [(18)F]FDG (1 min) was seen in the striatum. Pretreatment with dizocilpine (MK-801), an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, reduced [(18)F]FDG uptake in not only FC infused hemisphere but also in the contralateral hemisphere (saline-infused side). The radioactivity concentrations in plasma at 1, 5 and 45 min after the [(18)F]FDG injection were not altered by MK-801. This effect of MK-801 on glucose metabolism observed in the rat brain infused with FC was different from previous reports which indicated an increase in glucose metabolism in some areas of normal rat brain. In addition, the enhancement of glucose metabolism in the striatum induced by FC was almost completely abolished by pretreatment with MK-801. In the cerebral cortex, the relative ratio of radioactivity concentration in the right hemisphere to that in the left hemisphere still remained 1.37 (tissue dissection method) or 1.55 (autoradiography), which indicated that MK-801 partially blocked the effect of FC of enhancing glucose metabolism in this region. These results indicate an important role of NMDA-mediated signal transmission on the increase of glucose utilization induced by inhibition of glial metabolism.

  18. Prolonged androgen deprivation may influence the autoregulation of estrogen receptors in the brain and pelvic floor muscles of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Erik; Calich, Hannah J; Currie, R William; Wassersug, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Androgen deprivation in males has detrimental effects on various tissues and bodily functions, some of which can be restored by estradiol (E2) administration. We investigated how the duration of androgen deprivation affects the autoregulation of estrogen receptors (ERs) levels in core brain areas associated with sexual behavior and cognition, as well as in pelvic floor muscles (PFM). We also measured c-Fos levels in brain areas associated with sexual behavior shortly after the rats mated. Prolonged castration increases ERα levels in the preoptic area (POA) and E2 treatment reverses these effects. In the POA, c-Fos levels after mating are not affected by the duration of androgen deprivation and/or E2 treatment. ERβ levels in the POA as well as c-Fos levels in the POA and the core area of nucleus accumbens correlate with the mounting frequency for E2-treated Short-Term castrates. Additionally, ERβ levels in the medial amygdala are positively correlated with the mounting frequency of Long-Term castrates that received E2 treatment. In the hippocampus, ERs are downregulated only when E2 is administered early after castration, whereas downregulation of ERα in the prefrontal cortex only occurs with delayed E2 treatment. Early, but not delayed, E2 treatment after castration increases ERβ levels in the bulbocavernosus and ERα levels in the levator ani of male rats. Our data suggest that the duration of androgen deprivation may influence the autoregulation of ERs by E2 treatment in select brain areas and pelvic floor muscles of male rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  20. Obesity is associated with high serotonin 4 receptor availability in the brain reward circuitry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, M. E.; Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Madsen, K.

    2012-01-01

    The neurobiology underlying obesity is not fully understood. The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is established as a satiety-generating signal, but its rewarding role in feeding is less well elucidated. From animal experiments there is now evidence that the 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) is involved...... between body mass index and the 5-HT4R density bilaterally in the two reward ‘hot spots’ nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum, and additionally in the left hippocampal region and orbitofrontal cortex.These findings suggest that the 5-HT4R is critically involved in reward circuits that regulate people...

  1. Involvement of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in the transcytosis of the brain delivery vector angiopep-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeule, Michel; Currie, Jean-Christophe; Bertrand, Yanick; Ché, Christian; Nguyen, Tran; Régina, Anthony; Gabathuler, Reinhard; Castaigne, Jean-Paul; Béliveau, Richard

    2008-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the entry of proteins as well as potential drugs to cerebral tissues. We previously reported that a family of Kunitz domain-derived peptides called Angiopeps can be used as a drug delivery system for the brain. Here, we further characterize the transcytosis ability of these peptides using an in vitro model of the BBB and in situ brain perfusion. These peptides, and in particular Angiopep-2, exhibited higher transcytosis capacity and parenchymal accumulation than do transferrin, lactoferrin, and avidin. Angiopep-2 transport and accumulation in brain endothelial cells were unaffected by the P-glycoprotein inhibitor, cyclosporin A, indicating that this peptide is not a substrate for the efflux pump P-glycoprotein. However, competition studies show that activated alpha(2)-macroglobulin, a specific ligand for the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) and Angiopep-2 can share the same receptor. In addition, LRP1 was detected in glioblastomas and brain metastases from lung and skin cancers. Fluorescent microscopy also revealed that Alexa488-Angiopep-2 co-localized with LRP1 in brain endothelial cell monolayers. Overall, these results suggest that Angiopep-2 transport across the BBB is, in part, mediated by LRP1.

  2. Autoradiographical detection of cholecystokinin-A receptors in primate brain using sup 125 I-Bolton Hunter CCK-8 and 3H-MK-329

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D.R.; Shaw, T.M.; Graham, W.; Woodruff, G.N. (Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories, Harlow, Essex (England))

    1990-04-01

    In vitro autoradiography was performed in order to visualize cholecystokinin-A (CCK-A) receptors in sections of Cynomolgus monkey brain. CCK-A receptors were defined as those which displayed high affinity for the selective non-peptide antagonist MK-329 (L-364,718) and were detected in several regions by selective inhibition of 125I-Bolton Hunter CCK using MK-329 or direct labeling with 3H-MK-329. In the caudal medulla, high densities of CCK-A sites were present in the nucleus tractus solitarius, especially the caudal and medial aspects, and also the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. CCK-A sites were localized to a number of hypothalamic nuclei such as the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei, the dorsomedial and infundibular nuclei as well as the neurohypophysis. The mammillary bodies and supramammillary nuclei also contained CCK-A receptor sites. High concentrations of CCK-A receptors were present in the substantia nigra zona compacta and also the ventral tegmental area and may be associated with dopamine cell bodies. Binding of 3H-MK-329 was also detected in parts of the caudate nucleus and ventral putamen. The detection, by autoradiographical means, of CCK-A receptors throughout the Cynomolgus monkey brain contrasts with similar studies performed using rodents and suggests differences in the density and, perhaps, the importance of CCK-A receptors in the primate as opposed to the rodent. The data suggest the possibility that CCK-A receptors may be involved in a number of important brain functions as diverse as the processing of sensory information from the gut, the regulation of hormone secretion, and the activity of dopamine cell activity.

  3. Brain and Whole-Body Imaging of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Peptide Receptor in Humans Using the PET Ligand 11C-NOP-1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohith, Talakad G.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Morse, Cheryl L.; Araneta, Maria F.; Barth, Vanessa N.; Goebl, Nancy A.; Tauscher, Johannes T.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor is a new class of opioid receptor that may play a pathophysiologic role in anxiety and drug abuse and is a potential therapeutic target in these disorders. We previously developed a high-affinity PET ligand, 11C-NOP-1A, which yielded promising results in monkey brain. Here, we assessed the ability of 11C-NOP-1A to quantify NOP receptors in human brain and estimated its radiation safety profile. Methods After intravenous injection of 11C-NOP-1A, 7 healthy subjects underwent brain PET for 2 h and serial sampling of radial arterial blood to measure parent radioligand concentrations. Distribution volume (VT; a measure of receptor density) was determined by compartmental (1- and 2-tissue) and noncompartmental (Logan analysis and Ichise’s bilinear analysis [MA1]) methods. A separate group of 9 healthy subjects underwent whole-body PET to estimate whole-body radiation exposure (effective dose). Results After 11C-NOP-1A injection, the peak concentration of radioactivity in brain was high (~5–7 standardized uptake values), occurred early (~10 min), and then washed out quickly. The unconstrained 2-tissue-compartment model gave excellent VT identifiability (~1.1% SE) and fitted the data better than a 1-tissue-compartment model. Regional VT values (mL·cm−3) ranged from 10.1 in temporal cortex to 5.6 in cerebellum. VT was well identified in the initial 70 min of imaging and remained stable for the remaining 50 min, suggesting that brain radioactivity was most likely parent radioligand, as supported by the fact that all plasma radiometabolites of 11C-NOP-1A were less lipophilic than the parent radioligand. Voxel-based MA1 VT values correlated well with results from the 2-tissue-compartment model, showing that parametric methods can be used to compare populations. Whole-body scans showed radioactivity in brain and in peripheral organs expressing NOP receptors, such as heart, pancreas, and spleen. 11C-NOP-1A was significantly

  4. Development of gamma-emitting, receptor binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reba, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This progress report covers period from Nov. 1, 1989 to Aug. 31, 1990. The long term objective was to develop receptor-binding radiotracers for SPECT or PET imaging of CNS or peripheral nervous system. The specific chemistry aims, as understood on the basis of past findings, were: to synthesize and develop a more polar analogs of 4IQNB, possessing similar binding characteristics but eliminated more rapidly from the surrounding tissues and the target organ, to design a method of introducing a technetium chelating group onto a molecule or cholinergic agent without drastic lowering of its apparent affinity, to synthesize and develop radiotracers based on m-AChR antagonists selective for one of the subtypes of the receptor. The chemistry service aims were to prepare and characterize (R,R)- and (R,S)-4IQNB and derivatives, to provide the triazene intermediate to other investigators, and to provide ({sup 123}I)4IQNB for in vivo imaging. The biochemistry aims were to characterize the vitro and in vivo properties of novel compounds and to perform the pharmacokinetic studies. 3 refs., 5 tabs.

  5. STRATEGIES FOR QUANTIFYING PET IMAGING DATA FROM TRACER STUDIES OF BRAIN RECEPTORS AND ENZYMES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, J.

    2001-04-02

    A description of some of the methods used in neuroreceptor imaging to distinguish changes in receptor availability has been presented in this chapter. It is necessary to look beyond regional uptake of the tracer since uptake generally is affected by factors other than the number of receptors for which the tracer has affinity. An exception is the infusion method producing an equilibrium state. The techniques vary in complexity some requiring arterial blood measurements of unmetabolized tracer and multiple time uptake data. Others require only a few plasma and uptake measurements and those based on a reference region require no plasma measurements. We have outlined some of the limitations of the different methods. Laruelle (1999) has pointed out that test/retest studies to which various methods can be applied are crucial in determining the optimal method for a particular study. The choice of method will also depend upon the application. In a clinical setting, methods not involving arterial blood sampling are generally preferred. In the future techniques for externally measuring arterial plasma radioactivity with only a few blood samples for metabolite correction will extend the modeling options of clinical PET. Also since parametric images can provide information beyond that of ROI analysis, improved techniques for generating such images will be important, particularly for ligands requiring more than a one-compartment model. Techniques such as the wavelet transform proposed by Turkheimer et al. (2000) may prove to be important in reducing noise and improving quantitation.

  6. Interplay Between Exosomes, microRNAs and Toll-Like Receptors in Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschon, Vera; Takada, Silvia Honda; Ikebara, Juliane Midori; Sousa, Erica; Raeisossadati, Reza; Ulrich, Henning; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, participate in intercellular communication, and particularly, in paracrine and endocrine signalling. The EVs and their specific contents have been considered hallmarks of different diseases. It has been recently discovered that EVs can co-transport nucleic acids such as DNAs, ribosomal RNAs, circular RNAs (circRNAs), long noncoding RNAs (lnRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, although they may also play other roles. Recent evidence supports the hypothesis that miRNAs can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) under certain circumstances. TLRs belong to a multigene family of immune system receptors and have been recently described in the nervous system. In the immune system, TLRs are important for the recognition of the invading microorganisms, whereas in the nervous system, they recognise endogenous ligands released by undifferentiated or necrotic/injured cells. In the neuronal disease field, TLRs activity has been associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), stroke, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Herein, we reviewed the current knowledge of the relationship between miRNA release by EVs and the inflammation signalling triggered by TLRs in neighbouring cells or during long-distance cell-to-cell communication. We highlight novel aspects of this communication mechanism, offering a valuable insight into such pathways in health and disease.

  7. DPP4-inhibitor improves neuronal insulin receptor function, brain mitochondrial function and cognitive function in rats with insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipatpiboon, Noppamas; Pintana, Hiranya; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2013-03-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) consumption has been demonstrated to cause peripheral and neuronal insulin resistance, and brain mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Although the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, is known to improve peripheral insulin sensitivity, its effects on neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction caused by a HFD are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that vildagliptin prevents neuronal insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, learning and memory deficit caused by HFD. Male rats were divided into two groups to receive either a HFD or normal diet (ND) for 12 weeks, after which rats in each group were fed with either vildagliptin (3 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 21 days. The cognitive function was tested by the Morris Water Maze prior to brain removal for studying neuronal insulin receptor (IR) and brain mitochondrial function. In HFD rats, neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction were demonstrated, with impaired learning and memory. Vildagliptin prevented neuronal insulin resistance by restoring insulin-induced long-term depression and neuronal IR phosphorylation, IRS-1 phosphorylation and Akt/PKB-ser phosphorylation. It also improved brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive function. Vildagliptin effectively restored neuronal IR function, increased glucagon-like-peptide 1 levels and prevented brain mitochondrial dysfunction, thus attenuating the impaired cognitive function caused by HFD. © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Increasing brain angiotensin converting enzyme 2 activity decreases anxiety-like behavior in male mice by activating central Mas receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; de Kloet, Annette D; Pati, Dipanwita; Hiller, Helmut; Smith, Justin A; Pioquinto, David J; Ludin, Jacob A; Oh, S Paul; Katovich, Michael J; Frazier, Charles J; Raizada, Mohan K; Krause, Eric G

    2016-06-01

    Over-activation of the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) inhibits RAS activity by converting angiotensin-II, the effector peptide of RAS, to angiotensin-(1-7), which activates the Mas receptor (MasR). Whether increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety by stimulating central MasR is unknown. To test the hypothesis that increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety-like behavior via central MasR stimulation, we generated male mice overexpressing ACE2 (ACE2 KI mice) and wild type littermate controls (WT). ACE2 KI mice explored the open arms of the elevated plus maze (EPM) significantly more than WT, suggesting increasing ACE2 activity is anxiolytic. Central delivery of diminazene aceturate, an ACE2 activator, to C57BL/6 mice also reduced anxiety-like behavior in the EPM, but centrally administering ACE2 KI mice A-779, a MasR antagonist, abolished their anxiolytic phenotype, suggesting that ACE2 reduces anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR. To identify the brain circuits mediating these effects, we measured Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, subsequent to EPM exposure and found that ACE2 KI mice had decreased Fos in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis but had increased Fos in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Within the BLA, we determined that ∼62% of GABAergic neurons contained MasR mRNA and expression of MasR mRNA was upregulated by ACE2 overexpression, suggesting that ACE2 may influence GABA neurotransmission within the BLA via MasR activation. Indeed, ACE2 overexpression was associated with increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (indicative of presynaptic release of GABA) onto BLA pyramidal neurons and central infusion of A-779 eliminated this effect. Collectively, these results suggest that ACE2 may reduce anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR that facilitate GABA release onto pyramidal neurons within the

  9. Early MEK1/2 Inhibition after Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rats Reduces Brain Damage and Improves Outcome by Preventing Delayed Vasoconstrictor Receptor Upregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sara Ellinor; Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard

    2014-01-01

    and 5-HT1B receptors, previously demonstrated in cerebral arteries after experimental global ischemia, are a key mechanism behind insufficient perfusion of the post-ischemic brain, proposing blockade of this receptor upregulation as a novel target for prevention of cerebral hypoperfusion and delayed...... neuronal cell death after global cerebral ischemia. The aim was to characterize the time-course of receptor upregulation and associated neuronal damage after global ischemia and investigate whether treatment with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 can prevent cerebrovascular receptor upregulation and thereby...... improve functional outcome after global cerebral ischemia. Incomplete global cerebral ischemia was induced in Wistar rats and the time-course of enhanced contractile responses and the effect of U0126 in cerebral arteries were studied by wire myography and the neuronal cell death by TUNEL. The expression...

  10. Correlation of receptor occupancy of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1) in mouse brain with in vivo activity of allosteric mGluR1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Gentaroh; Kawagoe-Takaki, Hiroko; Inoue, Takao; Kimura, Toshifumi; Hikichi, Hirohiko; Murai, Takashi; Satow, Akio; Hata, Mikiko; Maehara, Shunsuke; Ito, Satoru; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Satoshi; Ohta, Hisashi

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between receptor occupancy and in vivo pharmacological activity of mGluR1 antagonists. The tritiated mGluR1-selective allosteric antagonist [(3)H]FTIDC (4-[1-(2-fluoropyridin-3-yl)-5-methyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl]-N-isopropyl-N-methyl-3,6-dihydropyridine-1(2H)-carboxamide) was identified as a radioligand having high affinity for mGluR1-expressing CHO cells (K(D) = 2.1 nM) and mouse cerebellum (K(D) = 3.7 nM). [(3)H]FTIDC bound to mGluR1 was displaced by structurally unrelated allosteric antagonists, suggesting there is a mutual binding pocket shared with different allosteric antagonists. The binding specificity of [(3)H]FTIDC for mGluR1 in brain sections was demonstrated by the lack of significant binding to brain sections prepared from mGluR1-knockout mice. Ex vivo receptor occupancy with [(3)H]FTIDC revealed that the receptor occupancy level by FTIDC correlated well with FTIDC dosage and plasma concentration. Intracerebroventricular administration of (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine is known to elicit face washing behavior that is mainly mediated by mGluR1. Inhibition of this behavioral change by FTIDC correlated with the receptor occupancy level of mGluR1 in the brain. A linear relationship between the receptor occupancy and in vivo activity was also demonstrated using structurally diverse mGluR1 antagonists. The receptor occupancy assays could help provide guidelines for selecting appropriate doses of allosteric mGluR1 antagonist for examining the function of mGluR1 in vivo.

  11. IL-2 induces beta2-integrin adhesion via a wortmannin/LY294002-sensitive, rapamycin-resistant pathway. Phosphorylation of a 125-kilodalton protein correlates with induction of adhesion, but not mitogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Svejgaard, A; Skov, S

    1996-01-01

    beta2-integrin-dependent, homotypic adhesion in Ag-specific, human T cell lines. The IL-2 adhesion response is blocked by wortmannin and LY294002, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase activity. In contrast, rapamycin strongly inhibits IL-2-induced proliferation without inhibiting IL-2...... on mitogenesis. IL-2R ligation rapidly (PI-3 kinase, and an as yet unidentified 125-kDa protein (p125). Wortmannin, LY294002......, and cytochalasin E almost completely inhibit cytokine-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p125, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation of PI-3 kinase, Janus kinases, Stat3, Stat5, and other proteins is unaffected. In contrast, rapamycin has little effect on IL-2-induced phosphorylation of p125. Taken together...

  12. IL-2 induces beta2-integrin adhesion via a wortmannin/LY294002-sensitive, rapamycin-resistant pathway. Phosphorylation of a 125-kilodalton protein correlates with induction of adhesion, but not mitogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Svejgaard, A; Skov, S

    1996-01-01

    Besides its function as a growth factor, IL-2 induces beta2-integrin-dependent, homotypic adhesion of IL-2R-positive T cells. In this study, we investigated how IL-2R are functionally and biochemically linked to the beta2-integrin adhesion pathway. After a lag period of 15 to 20 min, IL-2 induces...... beta2-integrin-dependent, homotypic adhesion in Ag-specific, human T cell lines. The IL-2 adhesion response is blocked by wortmannin and LY294002, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase activity. In contrast, rapamycin strongly inhibits IL-2-induced proliferation without inhibiting IL-2...... on mitogenesis. IL-2R ligation rapidly (signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) proteins, the p85 subunit of the PI-3 kinase, and an as yet unidentified 125-kDa protein (p125). Wortmannin, LY294002...

  13. Dopamine D1 receptor imaging in the rodent and primate brain using the isoquinoline (+)-[{sup 11}C]A-69024 and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besret, L.; Herard, A.S.; Guillermier, M.; Hantraye, P. [CNRS, URA 2210, F-91406 Orsay (France); Dolle, F.; Demphel, S.; Hinnen, F.; Coulon, C.; Ottaviani, M.; Bottlaender, M. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, SHFJ, Lab Imagerie Mol Expt, F-91406 Orsay (France); Herard, A.S.; Guillermier, M.; Hantraye, P. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, Mol Imaging Res Ctr, F-92265 Fontenay Aux Roses (France); Kassiou, M. [Univ Sydney, Discipline Med Radiat Sci, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kassiou, M. [Univ Sydney, Brain and Mind Res Inst, Sydney, NSW 2050 (Australia); Kassiou, M. [Univ Sydney, Sch Chem, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2008-07-01

    In vivo pharmacokinetic and brain binding characteristics of (+)-[{sup 11}C]A-69024, a high-affinity-D1-selective dopamine receptor antagonist, were assessed with micro-PET and {beta}-microprobes in the rat and PET in the baboon. The biodistribution of (+)-[{sup 11}C]A-69024 in rats and baboons showed a rapid brain uptake (reaching a maximal value at 5 and 15 min postinjection in rats and baboons, respectively), followed by a slow wash out. The region/cerebellum concentration ratio was characterized by a fourfold higher uptake in striatum and a twofold higher uptake in cortical regions, consistent with in vivo specific binding of the radiotracer in these cerebral regions. Furthermore, this specific (+)-[{sup 11}C]A-69024 binding significantly correlated with the reported in vitro distribution of dopamine D1-receptors. Finally, the specific uptake of the tracer in the striatum and cortical regions was completely prevented by either a pretreatment with large doses of nonradioactive {+-}A-69024 or of the D1-selective antagonist SCH23390, resulting in a similar uptake in the reference region (cerebellum) and in other brain regions. Thus, (+)-[{sup 11}C]A-69024 appears to be a specific and enantioselective radioligand to visualize and quantify brain dopamine D1 receptors in vivo using positron emission tomography. (authors)

  14. Sigma-1 Receptor Imaging in the Brain : Cerebral sigma-1 receptors and cognition: Small-animal PET studies using 11C-SA4503

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzhuppilly Ramakrishnan, Nisha

    2014-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor is a unique orphan receptor, strongly expressed in neurons and glia. Sigma-1 receptors are involved in several central nervous system (CNS) disorders like depression, anxiety, psychosis, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, addiction and neuropathic pain.

  15. The Effect of Glucocorticoid and Glucocorticoid Receptor Interactions on Brain, Spinal Cord, and Glial Cell Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Madalena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress, injury, and disease trigger glucocorticoid (GC elevation. Elevated GCs bind to the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid receptor (GR. While GRs are in every cell in the nervous system, the expression level varies, suggesting that diverse cell types react differently to GR activation. Stress/GCs induce structural plasticity in neurons, Schwann cells, microglia, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes as well as affect neurotransmission by changing the release and reuptake of glutamate. While general nervous system plasticity is essential for adaptation and learning and memory, stress-induced plasticity is often maladaptive and contributes to neuropsychiatric disorders and neuropathic pain. In this brief review, we describe the evidence that stress/GCs activate GR to promote cell type-specific changes in cellular plasticity throughout the nervous system.

  16. Evaluation of the brain 5-HT2A receptor binding index in dogs with anxiety disorders, measured with 123I-5I-R91150 and SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeire, Simon T; Audenaert, Kurt R; Dobbeleir, André A; De Meester, Rudy H; De Vos, Filip J; Peremans, Kathelijne Y

    2009-02-01

    The serotonergic system has been implicated in emotional and cognitive functions since early work. In particular, an important role has been attributed to the 5-HT2A receptor in schizophrenia, depression, eating disorders, and anxiety. The aim of the study was to evaluate the involvement of the brain 5-HT2A receptor in dogs with severe anxiety disorder, using 123I-5I-R91150 and SPECT. SPECT was performed with the 5-HT2A receptor-specific radioligand 123I-5I-R91150 to determine the 5-HT2A receptor binding index (BI) in the brains of dogs. Sixteen dogs with pathologic anxiety problems were compared with 22 normal-behaving reference dogs. Lower 5-HT2A receptor BI was found in the left (P=0.001) and right (P=0.002) frontal cortices in the group of dogs with anxiety disorders than in the reference group. Right (P=0.022) and left (P=0.048) temporocortical BIs were also significantly lower in the dogs with anxiety disorders. Finally, the BI was significantly lower in the right occipital cortex (P=0.038) of dogs with anxiety disorders than in the reference dogs. After correction for multiple comparisons (Panxiety disorders in dogs. The affected brain regions are in concordance with the brain regions involved in human anxiety disorders. The acquired data confirm the potential of using the dog as a natural model for investigation of the different mechanisms of anxiety disorders. In this regard, the use of dogs may contribute to the development of novel treatment approaches and new drugs for veterinary and human use.

  17. Transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin heavy and light chains in astrocytic brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosager, Ann Mari; Sørensen, Mia D; Dahlrot, Rikke H

    2017-01-01

    /macrophage morphology. Neither FTH nor FTL increased with malignancy grade, but low FTH expression by both tumor cells (p = 0.03) and microglia/macrophages (p = 0.01) correlated with shorter survival in patients anaplastic astrocytoma. FTL-positive microglia/macrophages were frequent in glioblastomas, and high FTL...... levels correlated with shorter survival in the whole cohort (p = 0.01) and in patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (p = 0.02). Double-immunofluorescence showed that TfR1, FTH, and FTL were co-expressed to a limited extent with the stem cell-related marker CD133. FTH and FTL were also co-expressed by IBA...... in anaplastic astrocytomas, while high amounts of FTL-positive microglia/macrophages had a negative prognostic value. The results suggest that regulation of the iron metabolism in astrocytic brain tumors is complex involving both autocrine and paracrine signaling....

  18. Regional distribution of the opioid receptor agonist N-(methyl- sup 11 C)pethidine in the brain of the rhesus monkey studied with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartvig, P. (Hospital Pharmacy, University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)); Eckernaes, S.Aa. (Departments of Neurology, University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)); Lindberg, B.S. (Department of Obstetrics and Gynaelogy, University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)); Lundqvist, H. (Centre for Radiation Sciences, University of Uppsala (Sweden)); Antoni, G.; Rimland, A.; Laangstroem, B. (Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Uppsala (Sweden))

    1990-01-01

    The regional distribution and kinetics in the brain of Rhesus monkeys of N-(methyl-{sup 11}C)-pethidine have been studied by positron emission tomography, PET. {sup 11}C-Pethidine reached the brain with peak radioactivities appearing within 6-10 min. after administration. Highest radioactivities were measured in areas corresponding to the thalamus, the striatal area and also the lowest transection of the temporal lobes, with an uptake of 2.7-3.1 times the homogenous dilution of the radioactive dose. Low radioactivities were seen in the cerebellum and the occipital lobes. This distribution corresponds to the regional density of opioid receptors using in vitro binding techniques. The {sup 11}C-pethidine derived radioactivity left the brain with an initial half-life of 40--60 minutes, followed by an elimination which paralleled the plasma elimination of unlabelled pethidine. After pretreatment of the monkey with a small dose of naloxone, the radioactivities decreased about 40% in areas corresponding to the thalamus, striatum and lowest section of the temporal lobes, indicating competition for the same binding sties. By the use of a three-compartment model, it was possible to get an estimate of {sup 11}C-pethidine receptor binding characteristics in the brain. The ratio of Kon/Koff, equal to Bmax.Kd, was 0.06-0.1. This indicates that pethidine is bound with low affinity to the opioid receptors and is a poor ligand for studies of opioid receptor function with PET. Brain kinetics of {sup 11}C-pethidine is mainly determined by its blood kinetics. (author).

  19. Neuroprotection against traumatic brain injury by xenon, but not argon, is mediated by inhibition at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor glycine site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Katie; Armstrong, Scott P; Campos-Pires, Rita; Kiru, Louise; Franks, Nicholas P; Dickinson, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Xenon, the inert anesthetic gas, is neuroprotective in models of brain injury. The authors investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of the inert gases such as xenon, argon, krypton, neon, and helium in an in vitro model of traumatic brain injury. The authors use an in vitro model using mouse organotypic hippocampal brain slices, subjected to a focal mechanical trauma, with injury quantified by propidium iodide fluorescence. Patch clamp electrophysiology is used to investigate the effect of the inert gases on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and TREK-1 channels, two molecular targets likely to play a role in neuroprotection. Xenon (50%) and, to a lesser extent, argon (50%) are neuroprotective against traumatic injury when applied after injury (xenon 43±1% protection at 72 h after injury [N=104]; argon 30±6% protection [N=44]; mean±SEM). Helium, neon, and krypton are devoid of neuroprotective effect. Xenon (50%) prevents development of secondary injury up to 48 h after trauma. Argon (50%) attenuates secondary injury, but is less effective than xenon (xenon 50±5% reduction in secondary injury at 72 h after injury [N=104]; argon 34±8% reduction [N=44]; mean±SEM). Glycine reverses the neuroprotective effect of xenon, but not argon, consistent with competitive inhibition at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor glycine site mediating xenon neuroprotection against traumatic brain injury. Xenon inhibits N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and activates TREK-1 channels, whereas argon, krypton, neon, and helium have no effect on these ion channels. Xenon neuroprotection against traumatic brain injury can be reversed by increasing the glycine concentration, consistent with inhibition at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor glycine site playing a significant role in xenon neuroprotection. Argon and xenon do not act via the same mechanism.

  20. Positive modulation of GABA(B) receptors decreased nicotine self-administration and counteracted nicotine-induced enhancement of brain reward function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Neil E; Vlachou, Styliani; Guery, Sebastien; Kaupmann, Klemens; Froestl, Wolfgang; Markou, Athina

    2008-07-01

    Acute administration of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-B receptor agonists decreases nicotine, cocaine, ethanol, and heroin self-administration and also decreases food-maintained responding and suppresses locomotor activity at high doses. GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators may represent potentially improved therapeutic compounds because of their fewer side effects than receptor agonists. The present study investigated the effects of administration of the GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-propyl)-phenol (CGP7930) and N-[(1R,2R,4S)-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl]-2-methyl-5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-pyrimidinamine (BHF177) and coadministration of the GABA(B) receptor-positive modulator N,N'-dicyclopentyl-2-methylsulfanyl-5-nitro-pyrimidine-4,6-diamine (GS39783) with the GABA(B) receptor agonist (3-amino-2[S]-hydroxypropyl)-methylphosphinic acid (CGP44532) on nicotine- and food-maintained responding under fixed ratio (FR) 5 and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement. Furthermore, the effects of BHF177 and CGP44532 on nicotine-induced enhancement of brain reward function were evaluated. The results indicated that administration of CGP7930 decreased nicotine self-administration under an FR5 schedule. Administration of either GS39783 or CGP44532 selectively decreased nicotine self-administration, whereas coadministration of these compounds had additive effects. BHF177 administration selectively decreased nicotine- but not food-maintained responding under FR5 and progressive ratio schedules. The nicotine-induced enhancement of brain reward function was blocked by BHF177 or CGP44532, although the highest doses of both compounds, particularly CGP44532, decreased brain reward function when administered alone, suggesting an additive, rather than interactive, effect. Overall, the present results indicate that GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators, similarly to GABA(B) receptor agonists, attenuated the reinforcing and reward

  1. Positive Modulation of GABAB Receptors Decreased Nicotine Self-administration and Counteracted Nicotine-induced Enhancement of Brain Reward Function in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Neil E.; Vlachou, Styliani; Guery, Sebastien; Kaupmann, Klemens; Froestl, Wolfgang; Markou, Athina

    2008-01-01

    Acute administration of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-B receptor agonists decreases nicotine, cocaine, ethanol, and heroin self-administration, and also decreases food-maintained responding and suppresses locomotor activity at high doses. GABAB receptor positive modulators may represent potentially improved therapeutic compounds because of their fewer side-effects than receptor agonists. The present study investigated the effects of administration of the GABAB receptor positive modulators 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-propyl)-phenol (CGP7930) and N-[(1R,2R,4S)-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl]-2-methyl-5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-pyrimidinamine (BHF177), and co-administration of the GABAB receptor positive modulator N,N'-dicyclopentyl-2-methylsulfanyl-5-nitro-pyrimidine-4,6-diamine (GS39783) with the GABAB receptor agonist (3-amino-2[S]-hydroxypropyl)-methylphosphinic acid (CGP44532) on nicotine- and food-maintained responding under fixed-ratio 5 (FR5) and progressive-ratio schedules of reinforcement. Furthermore, the effects of BHF177 and CGP44532 on nicotine-induced enhancement of brain reward function were evaluated. The results indicated that administration of CGP7930 decreased nicotine self-administration under an FR5 schedule. Administration of either GS39783 or CGP44532 selectively decreased nicotine self-administration, while co-administration of these compounds had additive effects. BHF177 administration selectively decreased nicotine-, but not food-, maintained responding under FR5 and progressive-ratio schedules. The nicotine-induced enhancement of brain reward function was blocked by BHF177 or CGP44532, although the highest doses of both compounds, particularly CGP44532, decreased brain reward function when administered alone, suggesting an additive, rather than interactive, effect. Overall, the present results indicate that GABAB receptor positive modulators, similarly to GABAB receptor agonists, attenuated the reinforcing and reward

  2. Quantitative projection of human brain penetration of the H3antagonist PF-03654746 by integrating rat-derived brain partitioning and PET receptor occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant-Basak, Aarti; Chen, Laigao; Shaffer, Christopher L; Palumbo, Donna; Schmidt, Anne; Tseng, Elaine; Spracklin, Douglas K; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Labaree, David; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E; McCarthy, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    1. Unbound brain drug concentration (C b,u ), a valid surrogate of interstitial fluid drug concentration (C ISF ), cannot be directly determined in humans, which limits accurately defining the human C b,u :C p,u of investigational molecules. 2. For the H 3 R antagonist (1R,3R)-N-ethyl-3-fluoro-3-[3-fluoro-4-(pyrrolidin-1-lmethyl)phenyl]cyclobutane-1-carboxamide (PF-03654746), we interrogated C b,u :C p,u in humans and nonhuman primate (NHP). 3. In rat, PF-03654746 achieved net blood-brain barrier (BBB) equilibrium (C b,u :C p,u of 2.11). 4. In NHP and humans, the PET receptor occupancy-based C p,u IC 50 of PF-03654746 was 0.99 nM and 0.31 nM, respectively, which were 2.1- and 7.4-fold lower than its in vitro human H 3 K i (2.3 nM). 5. In an attempt to understand this higher-than-expected potency in humans and NHP, rat-derived C b,u :C p,u of PF-03654746 was integrated with C p,u IC 50 to identify unbound (neuro) potency of PF-03654746, nIC 50 . 6. The nIC 50 of PF-03654746 was 2.1 nM in NHP and 0.66 nM in human which better correlated (1.1- and 3.49-fold lower) with in vitro human H 3 K i (2.3 nM). 7. This correlation of the nIC 50 and in vitro hH 3 K i suggested the translation of net BBB equilibrium of PF-03654746 from rat to NHP and humans, and confirmed the use of C p,u as a reliable surrogate of C b,u . 8. Thus, nIC 50 quantitatively informed the human C b,u :C p,u of PF-03654746.

  3. Astrocytic Toll-Like Receptor 3 Is Associated with Ischemic Preconditioning- Induced Protection against Brain Ischemia in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Xu, Xu-lin; Guo, Lian-jun; Lu, Qing; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral ischemic preconditioning (IPC) protects brain against ischemic injury. Activation of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) signaling can induce neuroprotective mediators, but whether astrocytic TLR3 signaling is involved in IPC-induced ischemic tolerance is not known. Methods IPC was modeled in mice with three brief episodes of bilateral carotid occlusion. In vitro, IPC was modeled in astrocytes by 1-h oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Injury and components of the TLR3 signaling pathway were measured after a subsequent protracted ischemic event. A neutralizing antibody against TLR3 was used to evaluate the role of TLR3 signaling in ischemic tolerance. Results IPC in vivo reduced brain damage from permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice and increased expression of TLR3 in cortical astrocytes. IPC also reduced damage in isolated astrocytes after 12-h OGD. In astrocytes, IPC or 12-h OGD alone increased TLR3 expression, and 12-h OGD alone increased expression of phosphorylated NFκB (pNFκB). However, IPC or 12-h OGD alone did not alter the expression of Toll/interleukin receptor domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFNβ (TRIF) or phosphorylated interferon regulatory factor 3 (pIRF3). Exposure to IPC before OGD increased TRIF and pIRF3 expression but decreased pNFκB expression. Analysis of cytokines showed that 12-h OGD alone increased IFNβ and IL-6 secretion; 12-h OGD preceded by IPC further increased IFNβ secretion but decreased IL-6 secretion. Preconditioning with TLR3 ligand Poly I:C increased pIRF3 expression and protected astrocytes against ischemic injury; however, cells treated with a neutralizing antibody against TLR3 lacked the IPC- and Poly I:C-induced ischemic protection and augmentation of IFNβ. Conclusions The results suggest that IPC-induced ischemic tolerance is mediated by astrocytic TLR3 signaling. This reprogramming of TLR3 signaling by IPC in astrocytes may play an important role in suppression of the post

  4. Allosteric Modulation of GABAA Receptors by an Anilino Enaminone in an Olfactory Center of the Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Heinbockel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In an ongoing effort to identify novel drugs that can be used as neurotherapeutic compounds, we have focused on anilino enaminones as potential anticonvulsant agents. Enaminones are organic compounds containing a conjugated system of an amine, an alkene and a ketone. Here, we review the effects of a small library of anilino enaminones on neuronal activity. Our experimental approach employs an olfactory bulb brain slice preparation using whole-cell patch-clamp recording from mitral cells in the main olfactory bulb. The main olfactory bulb is a key integrative center in the olfactory pathway. Mitral cells are the principal output neurons of the main olfactory bulb, receiving olfactory receptor neuron input at their dendrites within glomeruli, and projecting glutamatergic axons through the lateral olfactory tract to the olfactory cortex. The compounds tested are known to be effective in attenuating pentylenetetrazol (PTZ induced convulsions in rodent models. One compound in particular, KRS-5Me-4-OCF3, evokes potent inhibition of mitral cell activity. Experiments aimed at understanding the cellular mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect revealed that KRS-5Me-4-OCF3 shifts the concentration-response curve for GABA to the left. KRS-5Me-4-OCF3 enhances GABA affinity and acts as a positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors. Application of a benzodiazepine site antagonist blocks the effect of KRS-5Me-4-OCF3 indicating that KRS-5Me-4-OCF3 binds at the classical benzodiazepine site to exert its pharmacological action. This anilino enaminone KRS-5Me-4-OCF3 emerges as a candidate for clinical use as an anticonvulsant agent in the battle against epileptic seizures.

  5. Mice Lacking the β2 Adrenergic Receptor Have a Unique Genetic Profile before and after Focal Brain Ischaemia

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    Robin E White

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the β2AR (β2 adrenergic receptor after stroke is unclear as pharmacological manipulations of the β2AR have produced contradictory results. We previously showed that mice deficient in the β2AR (β2KO had smaller infarcts compared with WT (wild-type mice (FVB after MCAO (middle cerebral artery occlusion, a model of stroke. To elucidate mechanisms of this neuroprotection, we evaluated changes in gene expression using microarrays comparing differences before and after MCAO, and differences between genotypes. Genes associated with inflammation and cell deaths were enriched after MCAO in both genotypes, and we identified several genes not previously shown to increase following ischaemia (Ccl9, Gem and Prg4. In addition to networks that were similar between genotypes, one network with a central core of GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor and including biological functions such as carbohydrate metabolism, small molecule biochemistry and inflammation was identified in FVB mice but not in β2KO mice. Analysis of differences between genotypes revealed 11 genes differentially expressed by genotype both before and after ischaemia. We demonstrate greater Glo1 protein levels and lower Pmaip/Noxa mRNA levels in β2KO mice in both sham and MCAO conditions. As both genes are implicated in NF-κB (nuclear factor κB signalling, we measured p65 activity and TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α levels 24 h after MCAO. MCAO-induced p65 activation and post-ischaemic TNFα production were both greater in FVB compared with β2KO mice. These results suggest that loss of β2AR signaling results in a neuroprotective phenotype in part due to decreased NF-κB signalling, decreased inflammation and decreased apoptotic signalling in the brain.

  6. Enhanced involvement of brain vasopressin V1 receptors in cardiovascular responses to stress in rats with myocardial infarction.

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    Dobruch, Jakub; Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka; Szczepanska-Sadowska, Ewa

    2005-12-01

    Stress is one of the factors provoking cardiovascular complications. The purpose of the study was to explore the role of vasopressin (VP) in central control of arterial blood pressure and heart rate under resting conditions and during stimulation by an alarming stress (air jet stress) in myocardial infarct-induced cardiac failure. Six groups of male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were subjected either to sham surgery (sham rats) or to ligation of a left coronary artery (infarcted rats). After 5 weeks both infarcted and sham rats were subjected either to intracerebroventricular infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) (sham aCSF and infarcted aCSF), [Arg8]-VP (sham VP and infarcted VP) or VP V1a receptor antagonist (d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2Ala-]VP, sham V1ANT and infarcted V1ANT). Air jet stress elicited significantly greater increases in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and heart rate in the infarcted aCSF than in the sham aCSF rats. Intracerebroventricular infusion of V1ANT significantly reduced resting MABP and MABP and heart rate increases in response to stress in the infarcted but not in the sham rats. Intracerebroventricular infusion of VP elicited a significant increase in resting MABP in the infarcted VP but not in the sham VP rats. The results provide evidence for enhanced engagement of the brain V1 VP receptors in regulation of resting MABP and in generation of exaggerated cardiovascular responses to air jet stress during the post-infarct state.

  7. Role of astrocytic leptin receptor subtypes on leptin permeation across hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells.

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    Hsuchou, Hung; Kastin, Abba J; Tu, Hong; Joan Abbott, N; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Pan, Weihong

    2010-12-01

    Astrocytic leptin receptors (ObR) can be up-regulated in conditions such as adult-onset obesity. To determine whether the levels and subtypes of astrocytic ObR modulate leptin transport, we co-cultured hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells and C6 astrocytoma cells in the Transwell system, and tested leptin permeation from apical to basolateral chambers. In comparison with hCMEC alone, co-culture of C6 cells reduced the permeability of paracellular markers and leptin. Unexpectedly, ObRb over-expression in C6 cells increased leptin permeation whereas ObRa over-expression showed no effect when compared with the control group of pcDNA-transfected C6 cells. By contrast, the paracellular permeability to the sodium fluorescein control was unchanged by over-expression of ObR subtypes. Leptin remained intact after crossing the monolayer as shown by HPLC and acid precipitation, and this was not affected by C6 cell co-culture or the over-expression of different ObR subtypes. Thus, increased expression of ObRb (and to a lesser extent ObRe) in C6 cells specifically increased the permeation of leptin across the hCMEC monolayer. Consistent with the evidence that the most apparent regulatory changes of ObR during obesity and inflammation occur in astrocytes, the results indicate that astrocytes actively regulate leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier, a mechanism independent of reduction of paracellular permeability. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2010 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. AMPA receptor phosphorylation and recognition memory: learning-related, time-dependent changes in the chick brain following filial imprinting.

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    Solomonia, Revaz O; Meparishvili, Maia; Mikautadze, Ekaterine; Kunelauri, Nana; Apkhazava, David; McCabe, Brian J

    2013-04-01

    There is strong evidence that a restricted part of the chick forebrain, the intermediate medial mesopallium (IMM), stores information acquired through the learning process of visual imprinting. We have previously demonstrated that at 1 h but not 24 h after imprinting training, a learning-specific increase in the amount of membrane Thr286-autophosphorylated α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (αCaMKII), and in the proportion of total αCaMKII that is phosphorylated, occurs in the IMM but not in a control brain region, the posterior pole of the nidopallium (PPN). αCaMKII directly phosphorylates Ser831 in the GluA1 subunit of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor. In the present study we have inquired whether the learning-related increase in αCaMKII autophosphorylation is followed by changes in the Ser831 phosphorylation of GluA1 (P-GluA1) and in the total amount of this subunit (T-GluA1). Trained chicks together with untrained control chicks were killed either 1 or 24 h after training. Tissue was removed from the IMM together with tissue from the PPN as a control. Amounts of P-GluA1 and T-GluA1 were measured. In the left IMM of the 1 h group the P-GluA1/T-GluA1 ratio increased in a learning-specific way. No learning-related changes were observed in other brain regions at 1 h or in any region 24 h after training. The results indicate that a time- and regionally-dependent, learning-specific increase in GluA1 phosphorylation occurs early in recognition memory formation.

  9. Transcriptional profiling of Toll-like receptor 2-deficient primary murine brain cells during Toxoplasma gondii infection.

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    Kousuke Umeda

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is capable of persisting in the brain, although it is efficiently eliminated by cellular immune responses in most other sites. While Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 reportedly plays important roles in protective immunity against the parasite, the relationship between neurological disorders induced by T. gondii infection and TLR2 function in the brain remains controversial with many unknowns. In this study, primary cultured astrocytes, microglia, neurons, and peritoneal macrophages obtained from wild-type and TLR2-deficient mice were exposed to T. gondii tachyzoites. To characterize TLR2-dependent functional pathways activated in response to T. gondii infection, gene expression of different cell types was profiled by RNA sequencing.During T. gondii infection, a total of 611, 777, 385, and 1105 genes were upregulated in astrocytes, microglia, neurons, and macrophages, respectively, while 163, 1207, 158, and 1274 genes were downregulated, respectively, in a TLR2-dependent manner. Overrepresented Gene Ontology (GO terms for TLR2-dependently upregulated genes were associated with immune and stress responses in astrocytes, immune responses and developmental processes in microglia, metabolic processes and immune responses in neurons, and metabolic processes and gene expression in macrophages. Overrepresented GO terms for downregulated genes included ion transport and behavior in astrocytes, cell cycle and cell division in microglia, metabolic processes in neurons, and response to stimulus, signaling and cell motility in macrophages.To our knowledge, this is the first transcriptomic study of TLR2 function across different cell types during T. gondii infection. Results of RNA-sequencing demonstrated roles for TLR2 varied by cell type during T. gondii infection. Our findings facilitate understanding of the detailed relationship between TLR2 and T. gondii infection, and elucidate mechanisms underlying neurological changes during infection.

  10. Effects of high fat diet, ovariectomy, and physical activity on leptin receptor expression in rat brain and white fat tissue.

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    Blažetić, Senka; Labak, Irena; Viljetić, Barbara; Balog, Marta; Vari, Sandor G; Krivošíková, Zora; Gajdoš, Martin; Kramárová, Patrícia; Kebis, Anton; Vuković, Rosemary; Puljak, Livia; Has-Schön, Elizabeta; Heffer, Marija

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate in a rat animal model whether ovariect