WorldWideScience

Sample records for brain proteins cerebral

  1. Phenylketonuria : brain phenylalanine concentrations relate inversely to cerebral protein synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Martijn J.; Sijens, Paul E.; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Paans, Anne M.; van Spronsen, Francjan J.

    2015-01-01

    In phenylketonuria, elevated plasma phenylalanine concentrations may disturb blood-to-brain large neutral amino acid (LNAA) transport and cerebral protein synthesis (CPS). We investigated the associations between these processes, using data obtained by positron emission tomography with L-[1-C-11]-ty

  2. Phenylketonuria: brain phenylalanine concentrations relate inversely to cerebral protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Martijn J; Sijens, Paul E; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Paans, Anne M; van Spronsen, Francjan J

    2015-02-01

    In phenylketonuria, elevated plasma phenylalanine concentrations may disturb blood-to-brain large neutral amino acid (LNAA) transport and cerebral protein synthesis (CPS). We investigated the associations between these processes, using data obtained by positron emission tomography with l-[1-(11)C]-tyrosine ((11)C-Tyr) as a tracer. Blood-to-brain transport of non-Phe LNAAs was modeled by the rate constant for (11)C-Tyr transport from arterial plasma to brain tissue (K1), while CPS was modeled by the rate constant for (11)C-Tyr incorporation into cerebral protein (k3). Brain phenylalanine concentrations were measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in three volumes of interest (VOIs): supraventricular brain tissue (VOI 1), ventricular brain tissue (VOI 2), and fluid-containing ventricular voxels (VOI 3). The associations between k3 and each predictor variable were analyzed by multiple linear regression. The rate constant k3 was inversely associated with brain phenylalanine concentrations in VOIs 2 and 3 (adjusted R(2)=0.826, F=19.936, P=0.021). Since brain phenylalanine concentrations in these VOIs highly correlated with each other, the specific associations of each predictor with k3 could not be determined. The associations between k3 and plasma phenylalanine concentration, K1, and brain phenylalanine concentrations in VOI 1 were nonsignificant. In conclusion, our study shows an inverse association between k3 and increased brain phenylalanine concentrations.

  3. Protein kinase C inhibition attenuates vascular ETB receptor upregulation and decreases brain damage after cerebral ischemia in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikman Petter

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinase C (PKC is known to be involved in the pathophysiology of experimental cerebral ischemia. We have previously shown that after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, there is an upregulation of endothelin receptors in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery. The present study aimed to examine the effect of the PKC inhibitor Ro-32-0432 on endothelin receptor upregulation, infarct volume and neurology outcome after middle cerebral artery occlusion in rat. Results At 24 hours after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO, the contractile endothelin B receptor mediated response and the endothelin B receptor protein expression were upregulated in the ipsilateral but not the contralateral middle cerebral artery. In Ro-32-0432 treated rats, the upregulated endothelin receptor response was attenuated. Furthermore, Ro-32-0432 treatment decreased the ischemic brain damage significantly and improved neurological scores. Immunohistochemistry showed fainter staining of endothelin B receptor protein in the smooth muscle cells of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery of Ro-32-0432 treated rats compared to control. Conclusion The results suggest that treatment with Ro-32-0432 in ischemic stroke decreases the ischemic infarction area, neurological symptoms and associated endothelin B receptor upregulation. This provides a new perspective on possible mechanisms of actions of PKC inhibition in cerebral ischemia.

  4. Pentoxifylline attenuates TNF-α protein levels and brain edema following temporary focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Abedin; Mojarrad, Somye; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2011-03-04

    Cerebral edema is the most common cause of neurological deterioration and mortality during acute ischemic stroke. Despite the clinical importance of cerebral ischemia, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent studies suggest a role for TNF-α in the brain edema formation. To further investigate whether TNF-α would play a role in brain edema formation, we examined the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX, an inhibitor of TNF-α synthesis) on the brain edema and TNF-α levels in a model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. The right middle cerebral artery (MCA) of rats was occluded for 60 min using the intraluminal filament method. The animals received PTX (60 mg/kg) immediately, 1, 3, or 6h post-ischemic induction. Twenty-four hours after induction of ischemic injury, permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain edema were determined by in situ brain perfusion of Evans Blue (EB) and wet-to-dry weight ratio, respectively. TNF-α protein levels in ischemic cortex were also measured at 1, 4, and 24h after the beginning of an ischemic stroke by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The administration of PTX up to 6h after occlusion of the MCA significantly reduced the brain edema. Moreover, PTX significantly reduced the concentration of TNF-α in ischemic brain cortex up to 4h post-transient focal stroke (Pedema in a model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. The beneficial effects of PTX may be mediated, at least in part, through a decline in TNF-α production and BBB breakdown.

  5. Electron microscopic features of brain edema in rodent cerebral malaria in relation to glial fibrillary acidic protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampawong, Sumate; Chaisri, Urai; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Nontprasert, Apichart; Grau, Georges E; Pongponratn, Emsri

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to cerebral malaria (CM) are not completely understood. Brain edema has been suggested as having an important role in experimental CM. In this study, CBA/CaH mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood-stage and when typical symptoms of CM developed on day 7, brain tissues were processed for electron-microscopic and immunohistochemical studies. The study demonstrated ultrastructural hallmarks of cerebral edema by perivascular edema and astroglial dilatation confirming existing evidence of vasogenic and cytogenic edema. This correlates closely with the clinical features of CM. An adaptive response of astrocytic activity, represented by increasing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the perivascular area and increasing numbers of large astrocyte clusters were predominately found in the CM mice. The presence of multivesicular and lamellar bodies indicates the severity of cerebral damage in experimental CM. Congestion of the microvessels with occluded white blood cells (WBCs), parasitized red blood cells (PRBCs) and platelets is also a crucial covariate role for CM pathogenesis.

  6. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy.

  7. Human-derived physiological heat shock protein 27 complex protects brain after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Teramoto

    Full Text Available Although challenging, neuroprotective therapies for ischemic stroke remain an interesting strategy for countering ischemic injury and suppressing brain tissue damage. Among potential neuroprotective molecules, heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 is a strong cell death suppressor. To assess the neuroprotective effects of HSP27 in a mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, we purified a "physiological" HSP27 (hHSP27 from normal human lymphocytes. hHSP27 differed from recombinant HSP27 in that it formed dimeric, tetrameric, and multimeric complexes, was phosphorylated, and contained small amounts of αβ-crystallin and HSP20. Mice received intravenous injections of hHSP27 following focal cerebral ischemia. Infarct volume, neurological deficit scores, physiological parameters, and immunohistochemical analyses were evaluated 24 h after reperfusion. Intravenous injections of hHSP27 1 h after reperfusion significantly reduced infarct size and improved neurological deficits. Injected hHSP27 was localized in neurons on the ischemic side of the brain. hHSP27 suppressed neuronal cell death resulting from cytochrome c-mediated caspase activation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses. Recombinant HSP27 (rHSP27, which was artificially expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and dephosphorylated hHSP27 did not have brain protective effects, suggesting that the phosphorylation of hHSP27 may be important for neuroprotection after ischemic insults. The present study suggests that hHSP27 with posttranslational modifications provided neuroprotection against ischemia/reperfusion injury and that the protection was mediated through the inhibition of apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Intravenously injected human HSP27 should be explored for the treatment of acute ischemic strokes.

  8. Influence of apolipoprotein E and its receptors on cerebral amyloid precursor protein metabolism following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shuai; SUN Xiao-chuan

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of mortality and disability among young individuals in our society,and globally the incidence of TBI is rising sharply.Mounting evidence has indicated that apolipoprotein E (apoE:protein; APOE:gene) genotype influences the outcome after TBI.The proposed mechanism by which APOE affects the clinicopathological consequences of TBI is multifactorial and includes amyloid deposition,disruption of lipid distribution,dysfunction of mitochondrial energy production,oxidative stress and increases intracellular calcium in response to injury.This paper reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the influence of apoE and its receptors on cerebral amyloid betaprotein precursor metabolism following TBI.

  9. Bilobalide inhibits the expression of aquaporin 1, 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein in rat brain tissue after permanent focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiming Qin; Fulin Song; Hongguang Han; Hong Qu; Xingwen Zhai; Bin Qin; Song You

    2011-01-01

    The present results demonstrated that in an adult rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), pretreatment with bilobalide reduced brain water content and infarct area, down-regulated aquaporin 1, 4 mRNA expression in brain edema tissue, then inhibited their synthesis in the striatum, in particular at the early stage of ischemia (at 8 hours after pMCAO), inhibited glial fibrillary acidic protein expression, and lightened reactive gliosis. These data sug-gest that bilobalide attenuates brain edema formation due to reduced expression of aquaporins.

  10. Focal cerebral ischemia induces increased myelin basic protein and growth-associated protein-43 gene transcription in peri-infarct areas in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, R; Christensen, Thomas; Lehrmann, E;

    2001-01-01

    , in peri-infarct areas in adult rat brain after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and correlated it to the expression of the growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), a marker for axonal regeneration and sprouting, using non-radioactive in situ hybridization techniques. Within the infarct, MBP......, corresponding to the appearance of process-bearing MBP and occasional MOG-immunoreactive oligodendrocytes in parallel sections. Quantitative analysis revealed significant increases in the density of oligodendrocytes (up to 7.6-fold) and in the level of MBP mRNA expressed by individual cells. Parallel sections...... showed that increased expression of GAP-43 mRNA in neurons was concomitant to MBP mRNA upregulation in oligodendrocytes. While the mechanisms regulating oligodendrocyte survival and myelination signals are not clear at this point, axonal sprouting could putatively serve as a stimulus for the upregulation...

  11. Traffic jam at the blood-brain barrier promotes greater accumulation of Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β proteins in the cerebral vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyare, Edward K; Leonard, Sarah R; Curran, Geoffry L; Yu, Caroline C; Lowe, Val J; Paravastu, Anant K; Poduslo, Joseph F; Kandimalla, Karunya K

    2013-05-06

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain vasculature results in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), which occurs in about 80% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. While Aβ42 predominates parenchymal amyloid plaques in AD brain, Aβ40 is prevalent in the cerebrovascular amyloid. Dutch mutation of Aβ40 (E22Q) promotes aggressive cerebrovascular accumulation and leads to severe CAA in the mutation carriers; knowledge of how DutchAβ40 drives this process more efficiently than Aβ40 could reveal various pathophysiological events that promote CAA. In this study we have demonstrated that DutchAβ40 shows preferential accumulation in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) endothelial cells due to its inefficient blood-to-brain transcytosis. Consequently, DutchAβ40 establishes a permeation barrier in the BBB endothelium, prevents its own clearance from the brain, and promotes the formation of amyloid deposits in the cerebral microvessels. The BBB endothelial accumulation of native Aβ40 is not robust enough to exercise such a significant impact on its brain clearance. Hence, the cerebrovascular accumulation of Aβ40 is slow and may require other copathologies to precipitate into CAA. In conclusion, the magnitude of Aβ accumulation in the BBB endothelial cells is a critical factor that promotes CAA; hence, clearing vascular endothelium of Aβ proteins may halt or even reverse CAA.

  12. High mobility group box protein-1 promotes cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury via activation of toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Melissa D; Shields, Jessica S; Sukumari-Ramesh, Sangeetha; Kimbler, Donald E; Fessler, R David; Shakir, Basheer; Youssef, Patrick; Yanasak, Nathan; Vender, John R; Dhandapani, Krishnan M

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Cerebral edema, a life-threatening medical complication, contributes to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) and a poor clinical prognosis after TBI. Unfortunately, treatment options to reduce post-traumatic edema remain suboptimal, due in part, to a dearth of viable therapeutic targets. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that cerebral innate immune responses contribute to edema development after TBI. Our results demonstrate that high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) was released from necrotic neurons via a NR2B-mediated mechanism. HMGB1 was clinically associated with elevated ICP in patients and functionally promoted cerebral edema after TBI in mice. The detrimental effects of HMGB1 were mediated, at least in part, via activation of microglial toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the subsequent expression of the astrocytic water channel, aquaporin-4 (AQP4). Genetic or pharmacological (VGX-1027) TLR4 inhibition attenuated the neuroinflammatory response and limited post-traumatic edema with a delayed, clinically implementable therapeutic window. Human and rodent tissue culture studies further defined the cellular mechanisms demonstrating neuronal HMGB1 initiates the microglial release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. In turn, microglial IL-6 increased the astrocytic expression of AQP4. Taken together, these data implicate microglia as key mediators of post-traumatic brain edema and suggest HMGB1-TLR4 signaling promotes neurovascular dysfunction after TBI.

  13. Relationship of gelatinases-tight junction proteins and blood-brain barrier permeability in the early stage of cerebral ischemia and reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haolin Xin; Wenzhao Liang; Jing Mang; Lina Lin; Na Guo; Feng Zhang; Zhongxin Xu

    2012-01-01

    Gelatinases matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 have been shown to mediate claudin-5 and occludin degradation, and play an important regulatory role in blood-brain barrier permeability. This study established a rat model of 1.5-hour middle cerebral artery occlusion with reperfusion. Protein expression levels of claudin-5 and occludin gradually decreased in the early stage of reperfusion, which corresponded to the increase of the gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9. In addition, rats that received treatment with matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor N-[(2R)-2-(hydroxamidocarbonylmethyl)-4-methylpenthanoyl]-L- tryptophan methylamide (GM6001) showed a significant reduction in Evans blue leakage and an inhibition of claudin-5 and occludin protein degradation in striatal tissue. These data indicate that matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9-mediated claudin-5 and occludin degradation is an important reason for blood-brain barrier leakage in the early stage of reperfusion. The leakage of the blood-brain barrier was present due to gelatinases-mediated degradation of claudin-5 and occludin proteins. We hypothesized that the timely closure of the structural component of the blood-brain barrier (tight junction proteins) is of importance.

  14. Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) Function in the Brain as Revealed by the Cerebral Metabolism of (1-(13)C)-Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Laura; Rial, Eduardo; Cerdan, Sebastian; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate transporter Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12 is critically involved in brain aspartate synthesis, and AGC1 deficiency results in a drastic fall of brain aspartate levels in humans and mice. It has recently been described that the uncoupling protein UCP2 transports four carbon metabolites including aspartate. Since UCP2 is expressed in several brain cell types and AGC1 is mainly neuronal, we set to test whether UCP2 could be a mitochondrial aspartate carrier in the brain glial compartment. The study of the cerebral metabolism of (1-(13)C)-glucose in vivo in wild type and UCP2-knockout mice showed no differences in C3 or C2 labeling of aspartate, suggesting that UCP2 does not function as a mitochondrial aspartate carrier in brain. However, surprisingly, a clear decrease (of about 30-35 %) in the fractional enrichment of glutamate, glutamine and GABA was observed in the brains of UCP2-KO mice which was not associated with differences in either glucose or lactate enrichments. The results suggest that the dilution in the labeling of glutamate and its downstream metabolites could originate from the uptake of an unlabeled substrate that could not leave the matrix via UCP2 becoming trapped in the matrix. Understanding the nature of the unlabeled substrate and its precursor(s) as alternative substrates to glucose is of interest in the context of neurological diseases associated with UCP2.

  15. Experimental study on alteration of adrenergic receptors activity in neuronal membranes protein of cerebral cortex following brain trauma in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin-wei; XU Ru-xiang; QI Yi-long; CHEN Chang-cai

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To define the course of changes taken by α1 and β adrenergic receptors (AR) activity after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore the approach for secondary brain injury (SBI) management. Methods: The neuronal membrane protein of cortex were extracted from the rats subject to traumatic brain injury, and the changes of α1- and β-AR activities in the neuronal membranes were examined by radio ligand binding assay (RLBA). Results: α1- and β-AR activities underwent obvious changes, reaching their peak values at 24 h after TBI. α1-AR binding density (Bmax) reduced by 22.6%while the ligand affinity increased by 66.7%, and for β-AR, however, Bmax increased by 116.9% and the ligand affinity reduced by 50.7%. Their antagonists could counteract the changes ofα1- and β-AR activity. Conclusion: The patterns of changes varies between α1- and β-AR activity after TBI, suggesting their different roles in the neuronal membranes after brain trauma, and timely administration of AR antagonists is potentially beneficial in TBI management.

  16. Severe cerebral vasospasm after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehnel, Corey R; Wendell, Linda C; Potter, N Stevenson; Klinge, Petra; Thompson, Bradford B

    2014-07-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury is associated with both acute and delayed neuro- logical injury. Cerebral vasospasm is commonly associated with delayed neurological decline in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. However, the role played by vasospasm in traumatic brain injury is less clear. Vasospasm occurs earlier, for a shorter duration, and often without significant neurological consequence among traumatic brain injury patients. Detection and management strategies for vasospasm in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage are not easily transferrable to traumatic brain injury patients. We present a patient with a severe traumatic brain injury who had dramatic improvement following emergent decompressive hemicraniectomy. Two weeks after initial presentation he suffered a precipitous decline despite intensive surveillance. This case illustrates the distinct challenges of diagnosing cerebral vasospasm in the setting of severe traumatic brain injury.

  17. Minocycline upregulates cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus of cerebral ischemia rats and improves behavioral deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Xiao, Ming; He, Wenbo; Cai, Zhiyou

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays an important role in the mechanism of cognitive impairment and is also pivotal in the switch from short-term to long-term memory. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) seems a promising avenue in the treatment of cerebral ischemia injury since this neurotrophin could stimulate structural plasticity and repair cognitive impairment. Several findings have displayed that the dysregulation of the CREB-BDNF cascade has been involved in cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cerebral ischemia on learning and memory as well as on the levels of CREB, phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), and BDNF, and to determine the effect of minocycline on CREB, pCREB, BDNF, and behavioral functional recovery after cerebral ischemia. The animal model was established by permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries. Behavior was evaluated 5 days before decapitation with Morris water maze and open-field task. Four days after permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries, minocycline was administered by douche via the stomach for 4 weeks. CREB and pCREB were examined by Western blotting, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. BDNF was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The model rats after minocycline treatment swam shorter distances than control rats before finding the platform (P=0.0007). The number of times the platform position was crossed for sham-operation rats was more than that of the model groups in the corresponding platform location (P=0.0021). The number of times the platform position was crossed for minocycline treatment animals was significantly increased compared to the model groups in the corresponding platform position (P=0.0016). CREB, pCREB, and BDNF were downregulated after permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries in the model group. Minocycline increased the expression of CREB

  18. Radiosurgery for brain metastases and cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazit, Inbal; Har-Nof, Sagi; Cohen, Zvi R; Zibly, Zion; Nissim, Uzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess reduction in cerebral edema following linear accelerator radiosurgery (LINAC) as first line therapy for brain metastasis. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent LINAC radiosurgery for brain metastasis at our institution during 2010-2012, and who had not previously undergone either surgery or whole brain radiotherapy. Data were analyzed for 55 brain metastases from 46 patients (24 males), mean age 59.9 years. During the 2 months following LINAC radiosurgery, the mean steroid dose decreased from 4.8 to 2.6 mg/day, the mean metastasis volume decreased from 3.79±4.12 cc to 2.8±4.48 cc (p=0.001), and the mean edema volume decreased from 16.91±30.15 cc to 12.85±24.47 cc (p=0.23). The 17 patients with reductions of more than 50% in brain edema volume had single metastases. Edema volume in the nine patients with two brain metastases remained stable in five patients (volume change 10%, 2-14 cc). In a subanalysis of eight metastases with baseline edema volume greater than 40 cc, edema volume decreased from 77.27±37.21 cc to 24.84±35.6 cc (p=0.034). Reductions in brain edema were greater in metastases for which non-small-cell lung carcinoma and breast cancers were the primary diseases. Overall, symptoms improved in most patients. No patients who were without symptoms or who had no signs of increased intracranial pressure at baseline developed signs of intracranial pressure following LINAC radiosurgery. In this series, LINAC stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic brain lesions resulted in early reduction in brain edema volume in single metastasis patients and those with large edema volumes, and reduced the need for steroids.

  19. Brain biopsy in the diagnosis of cerebral mycosis fungoides

    OpenAIRE

    Tremblay, GF; Anderson, JM; Davidson, DLW

    1982-01-01

    A case of cerebral mycosis fungoides co-existing with progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy presented with dementia. Brain biopsy established the diagnosis of mycosis fungoides after cerebrospinal fluid examinations and computerised tomographic scanning of the brain produced non-specific abnormalities.

  20. Cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and brain angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Zhang, Le; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Insulin performs unique non-metabolic functions within the brain. Broadly speaking, two major areas of these functions are those related to brain endothelial cells and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, and those related to behavioral effects, like cognition in disease states (Alzheimer's disease, AD) and in health. Recent studies showed that both these functions are associated with brain angiogenesis. These findings raise interesting questions such as how they are linked to each other and whether modifying brain angiogenesis by targeting certain insulin signaling pathways could be an effective strategy to treat dementia as in AD, or even to help secure healthy longevity. The two canonical downstream pathways involved in mediating the insulin signaling pathway, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, in the brain are supposed to be similar to those in the periphery. PI3K and MAPK pathways play important roles in angiogenesis. Both are involved in stimulating hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in angiogenesis and could be activated by the insulin signaling pathway. This suggests that PI3K and MAPK pathways might act as cross-talk between the insulin signaling pathway and the angiogenesis pathway in brain. But the cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and the detailed mechanism in the connection of insulin signaling pathway, brain angiogenesis pathway, and healthy aging or dementias are still mostly not clear and need further studies.

  1. The bilingual brain: cerebral representation of languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, F

    2001-11-01

    The present article deals with theoretical and experimental aspects of language representation in the multilingual brain. Two general approaches were adopted in the study of the bilingual brain. The study of bilingual aphasics allows us to describe dissociations and double dissociations between the different subcomponents of the various languages. Furthermore, symptoms peculiar to bilingual aphasia were reported (pathological mixing and switching and translations disorders) which allowed the correlation of some abilities specific to bilinguals with particular neurofunctional systems. Another approach to the study of the bilingual brain is of the experimental type, such as electrophysiological investigations (electrocorticostimulation during brain surgery and event-related potentials) and functional neuroanatomy studies (positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging). Functional neuroanatomy studies investigated the brain representation of languages when processing lexical and syntactic stimuli and short stories. Neurophysiologic and neuroimaging studies evidenced a similar cerebral representation of L1 and L2 lexicons both in early and late bilinguals. The representation of grammatical aspects of languages seems to be different between the two languages if L2 is acquired after the age of 7, with automatic processes and correctness being lower than those of the native language. These results are in line with a greater representation of the two lexicons in the declarative memory systems, whereas morphosyntactic aspects may be organized in different systems according to the acquisition vs learning modality.

  2. Language Abilities Following Prematurity, Periventricular Brain Injury, and Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Heidi M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study compared language abilities in three groups of preschool children (total n=18) who were born prematurely: children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy associated with perinatal brain injury, with similar brain injury but no motor impairment, and with no brain injuries. No significant differences were observed among the groups on any…

  3. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Claire Thornton; Carina Mallard; Rajanikant Krishnamurthy; Syam Nair; Henrik Hagberg

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk) family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebr...

  4. Dynamic analysis of the human brain with complex cerebral sulci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jung-Ge; Huang, Bo-Wun; Ou, Yi-Wen; Yen, Ke-Tien; Wu, Yi-Te

    2016-07-03

    The brain is one of the most vulnerable organs inside the human body. Head accidents often appear in daily life and are easy to cause different level of brain damage inside the skull. Once the brain suffered intense locomotive impact, external injuries, falls, or other accidents, it will result in different degrees of concussion. This study employs finite element analysis to compare the dynamic characteristics between the geometric models of an assumed simple brain tissue and a brain tissue with complex cerebral sulci. It is aimed to understand the free vibration of the internal brain tissue and then to protect the brain from injury caused by external influences. Reverse engineering method is used for a Classic 5-Part Brain (C18) model produced by 3B Scientific Corporation. 3D optical scanner is employed to scan the human brain structure model with complex cerebral sulci and imported into 3D graphics software to construct a solid brain model to simulate the real complex brain tissue. Obtaining the normal mode analysis by inputting the material properties of the true human brain into finite element analysis software, and then to compare the simplified and the complex of brain models.

  5. Comparison of Cerebral Oxygen Saturation and Cerebral Perfusion Computed Tomography in Cerebral Blood Flow in Patients with Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Alexey O; Kalentiev, George; Voennov, Oleg; Grigoryeva, Vera

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between cerebral tissue oxygen saturation and cerebral blood volume in patients with traumatic brain injury. Perfusion computed tomography of the brain was performed in 25 patients with traumatic brain injury together with simultaneous SctO2 level measurement using cerebral near-infrared oxymetry. The mean age of the injured persons was 34.5±15.6 years (range 15-65); 14 men, 11 women. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) values were 44.4±9.7 (range 25-81). The Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) mean value before the study was 10.6±2.1 (range 5-13). SctO2 ranged from 51 to 89%, mean 62±8.2%. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) values were 2.1±0.67 ml/100 g (min 1.1; max 4.3 ml/100 g). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was 31.99±13.6 ml/100 g×min. Mean transit time (MTT) values were 5.7±4.5 s (min 2.8; max 34.3 s). The time to peak (TTP) was 22.2±3.1 s. A statistically significant correlation was found between SctO2 level and cerebral blood volume (CBV) level (R=0.9; pperfusion.

  6. Early biomarkers of brain injury and cerebral hypo- and hyperoxia in the SafeBoosC II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Anne M; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun

    2017-01-01

    ,4,7,14, and 35 and at term. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded at 64h. Blood-samples taken at 6 and 64 hours were analysed for the brain injury biomarkers; S100beta, brain-fatty-acid-binding-protein, and neuroketal. All analyses were conducted post hoc. RESULTS: Significantly more infants with a cerebral...... significantly associated with cerebral hyperoxia. The blood biomarkers were not significantly associated with the burden of cerebral hypo- or hyperoxia. CONCLUSIONS: The explorative analysis showed that early burden of cerebral hypoxia, but not hyperoxia was significantly associated with low brain electrical...... activity and severe intracranial haemorrhage while none of the three blood biomarkers were associated with the burden of either cerebral hypo- or hyperoxia....

  7. Cerebral autoregulation control of blood flow in the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Payne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This Brief provides a comprehensive introduction to the control of blood flow in the brain. Beginning with the basic physiology of autoregulation, the author goes on to discuss measurement techniques, mathematical models, methods of analysis, and relevant clinical conditions, all within this single volume. The author draws together this disparate field, and lays the groundwork for future research directions. The text gives an up-to-date review of the state of the art in cerebral autoregulation, which is particularly relevant as cerebral autoregulation moves from the laboratory to the bedside. Cerebral Autoregulation will be useful to researchers in the physical sciences such as mathematical biology, medical physics, and biomedical engineering whose work is concerned with the brain. Researchers in the medical sciences and clinicians dealing with the brain and blood flow, as well as industry professionals developing techniques such as ultrasound, MRI, and CT will also find this Brief of interest.

  8. Blockage of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 inhibits brain edema in middle cerebral artery occlusion mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Pinghui; Tian, Yujing; Hong, Zhiwen; Li, Lin; Zhou, Libin; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Brain edema is an important pathological process during stroke. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) causes an up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in lung tissue. MMP can digest the endothelial basal lamina to destroy blood brain barrier, leading to vasogenic brain edema. Herein, we tested whether TRPV4-blockage could inhibit brain edema through inhibiting MMPs in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) mice. We found that the brain water content and Evans blue extravasation at 48 h post-MCAO were reduced by a TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047. The increased MMP-2/9 protein expression in hippocampi of MCAO mice was attenuated by HC-067046, but only the increased MMP-9 activity was blocked by HC-067047. The loss of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin protein in MCAO mice was also attenuated by HC-067047. Moreover, MMP-2/9 protein expression increased in mice treated with a TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A, but only MMP-9 activity was increased by GSK1016790A. Finally, ZO-1 and occludin protein expression was decreased by GSK1016790A, which was reversed by an MMP-9 inhibitor. We conclude that blockage of TRPV4 may inhibit brain edema in cerebral ischemia through inhibiting MMP-9 activation and the loss of tight junction protein.

  9. MicroRNA responses to focal cerebral ischemia in male and female mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Ann Lusardi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke occurs with greater frequency in men than in women across diverse ethnic backgrounds and nationalities. Work from our lab and others have revealed a sex-specific sensitivity to cerebral ischemia whereby males exhibit a larger extent of brain damage resulting from an ischemic event compared to females. Previous studies revealed that microRNA (miRNA expression is regulated by cerebral ischemia in males; however, no studies to date have examined the effect of ischemia on miRNA responses in females. Thus, we examined miRNA responses in male and female brain in response to cerebral ischemia using miRNA arrays. These studies revealed that in male and female brains, ischemia leads to both a universal miRNA response as well as a sexually distinct response to challenge. Target prediction analysis of the miRNAs increased in male or female ischemic brain reveal sex-specific differences in gene targets and protein pathways. These data support that the mechanisms underlying sexually dimorphic responses to cerebral ischemia includes distinct changes in miRNAs in male and female brain, in addition to a miRNA signature response to ischemia that is common to both.

  10. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2010-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the ‘post-weaned/adult’ brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain’s capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation. PMID:17684514

  11. Cerebral malaria: insights from host-parasite protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulusu Gopalakrishnan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral malaria is a form of human malaria wherein Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells adhere to the blood capillaries in the brain, potentially leading to coma and death. Interactions between parasite and host proteins are important in understanding the pathogenesis of this deadly form of malaria. It is, therefore, necessary to study available protein-protein interactions to identify lesser known interactions that could throw light on key events of cerebral malaria. Methods Sequestration, haemostasis dysfunction, systemic inflammation and neuronal damage are key processes of cerebral malaria. Key events were identified from literature as being crucial to these processes. An integrated interactome was created using available experimental and predicted datasets as well as from literature. Interactions from this interactome were filtered based on Gene Ontology and tissue-specific annotations, and further analysed for relevance to the key events. Results PfEMP1 presentation, platelet activation and astrocyte dysfunction were identified as the key events influencing the disease. 48896 host-parasite along with other host-parasite, host-host and parasite-parasite protein-protein interactions obtained from a disease-specific corpus were combined to form an integrated interactome. Filtering of the interactome resulted in five host-parasite PPI, six parasite-parasite and two host-host PPI. The analysis of these interactions revealed the potential significance of apolipoproteins and temperature/Hsp expression on efficient PfEMP1 presentation; role of MSP-1 in platelet activation; effect of parasite proteins in TGF-β regulation and the role of albumin in astrocyte dysfunction. Conclusions This work links key host-parasite, parasite-parasite and host-host protein-protein interactions to key processes of cerebral malaria and generates hypotheses for disease pathogenesis based on a filtered interaction dataset. These

  12. Assessment of Cerebral Hemodynamics in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    haemorrhage, and 6 with subarach- noid hemorrhage from ruptured aneurysm . There were 4 cases of cerebral contusions and a single case of traumatic...B. Goldstein, 2003: Significance of Intracranial Pressure Pulse Morphology in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury. IEEE, 2491-2494. Anile, C., H. D

  13. Breaking down brain barrier breaches in cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens E V; Lavstsen, Thomas; Craig, Alister

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings have linked brain swelling to death in cerebral malaria (CM). These observations have prompted a number of investigations into the mechanisms of this pathology with the goal of identifying potential therapeutic targets. In this issue of the JCI, Gallego-Delgado and colleagues pres...

  14. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome due to hemorrhagic brain infarction: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Tomotaka; Uno, Hisakazu; Miyashita, Kotaro; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome is a condition featuring hyponatremia and dehydration caused by head injury, operation on the brain, subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumor and so on. However, there are a few reports of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by cerebral infarction. We describe a patient with cerebral infarction who developed cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in the course of hemorrhagic transformation. Case presentation A 79-year-old Japanese woman with hypertension and ...

  15. The effects of Tanshinone IIA on blood-brain barrier and brain edema after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chao; Xue, Hongli; Bai, Changlin; Fu, Rong; Wu, Anhua

    2010-12-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and edema formation play a key role in the development of neurological dysfunction after cerebral ischemia. In this study, the effects of Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), one of the active ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhiza root, on the BBB and brain edema after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats were examined. Our study demonstrated that Tan IIA reduced brain infarct area, water content in the ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, Tan IIA significantly decreased BBB permeability to Evans blue, suppressed the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), inhibited the degradation of tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Occludin. These results demonstrated that Tan IIA was effective for attenuating the extent of brain edema formation in response to ischemia injury in rats, partly by Tan IIA's protective effect on the BBB. Our results may have implications in the treatment of brain edema in cerebral ischemia.

  16. Minocycline upregulates cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus of cerebral ischemia rats and improves behavioral deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yu Zhao,1 Ming Xiao,2 Wenbo He,3 Zhiyou Cai3 1Department of Neurology, the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Anatomy, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Neurology, Renmin Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan Renmin Hospital, Shiyan, Hubei Province, People’s Republic of China Background and purpose: The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB plays an important role in the mechanism of cognitive impairment and is also pivotal in the switch from short-term to long-term memory. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF seems a promising avenue in the treatment of cerebral ischemia injury since this neurotrophin could stimulate structural plasticity and repair cognitive impairment. Several findings have displayed that the dysregulation of the CREB–BDNF cascade has been involved in cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cerebral ischemia on learning and memory as well as on the levels of CREB, phosphorylated CREB (pCREB, and BDNF, and to determine the effect of minocycline on CREB, pCREB, BDNF, and behavioral functional recovery after cerebral ischemia. Methods: The animal model was established by permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries. Behavior was evaluated 5 days before decapitation with Morris water maze and open-field task. Four days after permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries, minocycline was administered by douche via the stomach for 4 weeks. CREB and pCREB were examined by Western blotting, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. BDNF was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results: The model rats after minocycline treatment swam shorter distances than control rats before finding the platform (P=0.0007. The number of times the

  17. Cerebral salt wasting following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Taylor

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatraemia is the most commonly encountered electrolyte disturbance in neurological high dependency and intensive care units. Cerebral salt wasting (CSW is the most elusive and challenging of the causes of hyponatraemia, and it is vital to distinguish it from the more familiar syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH. Managing CSW requires correction of the intravascular volume depletion and hyponatraemia, as well as mitigation of on-going substantial sodium losses. Herein we describe a challenging case of CSW requiring large doses of hypertonic saline and the subsequent substantial benefit with the addition of fludrocortisone.

  18. Cerebral and brain stem Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breidahl, W.H. (Dept. of Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Nedlands (Australia)); Ives, F.J. (Dept. of Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Nedlands (Australia)); Khangure, M.S. (Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands (Australia))

    1993-05-01

    Two patients with central nervous system manifestations of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, both with brain stem involvement, are reported. The onset of symptoms was at an age when the diagnosis might not have been considered. (orig.)

  19. Telmisartan reduced cerebral edema by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome in mice with cold brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Hu, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Ya-Li; Yao, Shang-Long; Mao, Wei-Ke

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible beneficial role of telmisartan in cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the potential mechanisms related to the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation. TBI model was established by cold-induced brain injury. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h survival groups to investigate cerebral edema development with time and received 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg telmisartan by oral gavage, 1 h prior to TBI to determine the efficient anti-edemic dose. The therapeutic window was identified by post-treating 30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 4 h after TBI. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, the neurological function and histological injury were assessed, at the same time, the mRNA and protein expression levels of NLRP3 inflammasome, IL-1β and IL-18 concentrations in peri-contused brain tissue were measured 24 h post TBI. The results showed that the traumatic cerebral edema occurred from 6 h, reached the peak at 24 h and recovered to the baseline 72 h after TBI. A single oral dose of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg telmisartan could reduce cerebral edema. Post-treatment up to 2 h effectively limited the edema development. Furthermore, prophylactic administration of telmisartan markedly inhibited BBB impairment, NLRP3, apoptotic speck-containing protein (ASC) and Caspase-1 activation, as well as IL-1β and IL-18 maturation, subsequently improved the neurological outcomes. In conclusion, telmisartan can reduce traumatic cerebral edema by inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome-regulated IL-1β and IL-18 accumulation.

  20. Critical Care Management of Cerebral Edema in Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquenazi, Yoshua; Lo, Victor P; Lee, Kiwon

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral edema associated with brain tumors is extremely common and can occur in both primary and metastatic tumors. The edema surrounding brain tumors results from leakage of plasma across the vessel wall into the parenchyma secondary to disruption of the blood-brain barrier. The clinical signs of brain tumor edema depend on the location of the tumor as well as the extent of the edema, which often exceeds the mass effect induced by the tumor itself. Uncontrolled cerebral edema may result in increased intracranial pressure and acute herniation syndromes that can result in permanent neurological dysfunction and potentially fatal herniation. Treatment strategies for elevated intracranial pressure consist of general measures, medical interventions, and surgery. Alhough the definitive treatment for the edema may ultimately be surgical resection of the tumor, the impact of the critical care management cannot be underestimated and thus patients must be vigilantly monitored in the intensive care unit. In this review, we discuss the pathology, pathophysiology, and clinical features of patients presenting with cerebral edema. Imaging findings and treatment modalities used in the intensive care unit are also discussed.

  1. Cerebral Organoids Recapitulate Epigenomic Signatures of the Human Fetal Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongyuan Luo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells recapitulate the early three-dimensional organization of the human brain, but whether they establish the epigenomic and transcriptional programs essential for brain development is unknown. We compared epigenomic and regulatory features in cerebral organoids and human fetal brain, using genome-wide, base resolution DNA methylome and transcriptome sequencing. Transcriptomic dynamics in organoids faithfully modeled gene expression trajectories in early-to-mid human fetal brains. We found that early non-CG methylation accumulation at super-enhancers in both fetal brain and organoids marks forthcoming transcriptional repression in the fully developed brain. Demethylated regions (74% of 35,627 identified during organoid differentiation overlapped with fetal brain regulatory elements. Interestingly, pericentromeric repeats showed widespread demethylation in multiple types of in vitro human neural differentiation models but not in fetal brain. Our study reveals that organoids recapitulate many epigenomic features of mid-fetal human brain and also identified novel non-CG methylation signatures of brain development.

  2. Understanding entangled cerebral networks: A prerequisite for restoring brain function with brain-computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eMandonnet

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Historically, cerebral processing has been conceptualized as a framework based on statically localized functions. However, a growing amount of evidence supports a hodotopical (delocalized and flexible organization. A number of studies have reported absence of a permanent neurological deficit after massive surgical resections of eloquent brain tissue. These results highlight the tremendous plastic potential of the brain. Understanding anatomo-functional correlates underlying this cerebral reorganization is a prerequisite to restore brain functions through brain-computer interfaces (BCIs in patients with cerebral diseases, or even to potentiate brain functions in healthy individuals. Here, we review current knowledge of neural networks that could be utilized in the BCIs that enable movements and language. To this end, intraoperative electrical stimulation in awake patients provides valuable information on the cerebral functional maps, their connectomics and plasticity. Overall, these studies indicate that the complex cerebral circuitry that underpins interactions between action, cognition and behavior should be throughly investigated before progress in BCI approaches can be achieved.

  3. Hyponatremia in acute brain disease: the cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betjes, Michiel G.H.

    2002-02-01

    Hyponatremia in acute brain disease is a common occurrence, especially after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Originally, excessive natriuresis, called cerebral salt wasting, and later the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), were considered to be the causes of hyponatremia. In recent years, it has become clear that most of these patients are volume-depleted and have a negative sodium balance, consistent with the original description of cerebral salt wasting. Elevated plasma concentrations of atrial or brain natriuretic peptide have been identified as the putative natriuretic factor. Hyponatremia and volume depletion may aggravate neurological symptoms, and timely treatment with adequate replacement of water and NaCl is essential. The use of fludrocortisone to increase sodium reabsorption by the renal tubules may be an alternative approach.

  4. Correlation between synaptic plasticity, associated proteins, and rehabilitation training in a rat model of cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Yang; Qian Yu

    2008-01-01

    All motions provide sensory, motoric, and reflexive input to the central nervous system, as well as playing an important role in cerebral functional plasticity and compensation. Cerebral plasticity has become the theoretical basis of neurorehabilitation. Studies of cerebrovascular disease, in particular, demonstrate that regeneration is accompanied by multiple forms of plasticity, such as functional and structural, in different phases of stroke rehabilitation. This study was designed to measure synaptic plasticity and expression of associated proteins to analyze the effect of rehabilitation training on learning and memory in a rat model of cerebral infarction. Results suggest that rehabilitation training increases expression of nerve growth factor associated protein 43, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neural cell adhesion molecules, and also promotes cerebral functional plasticity.

  5. Cerebral Vasospasm in Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Daniel R.; Winer, Jesse L.; B. A. Matthew Pease; Arun P. Amar; Mack, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Vasospasm following traumatic brain injury (TBI) may dramatically affect the neurological and functional recovery of a vulnerable patient population. While the reported incidence of traumatic vasospasm ranges from 19%–68%, the true incidence remains unknown due to variability in protocols for its detection. Only 3.9%–16.6% of patients exhibit clinical deficits. Compared to vasospasm resulting from aneurysmal SAH (aSAH), the onset occurs earlier and the duration is shorter. Overall, the clinic...

  6. Radiological confirmation of brain death: digitised cerebral parenchymography. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huet, H. [Department of Neuroradiology and Interventional Radiology, Caen CHU, Av. de la Cote de Nacre, F-14033 Caen (France); Leroy, G. [Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Caen CHU, Av. de la Cote de Nacre, F-14033 Caen (France); Toulas, P. [Department of Neuroradiology and Interventional Radiology, Caen CHU, Av. de la Cote de Nacre, F-14033 Caen (France); Coskun, O. [Department of Neuroradiology and Interventional Radiology, Caen CHU, Av. de la Cote de Nacre, F-14033 Caen (France); Theron, J. [Department of Neuroradiology and Interventional Radiology, Caen CHU, Av. de la Cote de Nacre, F-14033 Caen (France)

    1996-05-01

    Rates of organ procurement from brain dead subjects have fallen substantially in recent years. In France, the legal definition of brain death is based on electroencephalographic criteria in patients with clinical evidence of irreversible coma. However, sedative drugs used in intensive care units usually render the electroencephalogram uninterpretable, and in our medicolegal framework, it is necessary that intracerebral circulatory arrest be demonstrated. We discuss the value of the various available techniques and report our experience with digitised intra-arterial cerebral parenchymography. This simple, fast technique does not alter physiological conditions and provides high-quality images, ensuring prompt diagnosis, which is a prerequisite for optimal organ harvesting. (orig.). With 5 figs.

  7. Volatile Anesthetics Influence Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity by Modulation of Tight Junction Protein Expression in Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Thal, Serge C.; Clara Luh; Eva-Verena Schaible; Ralph Timaru-Kast; Jana Hedrich; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Kristin Engelhard; Zehendner, Christoph M.

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) results in cerebral edema formation, which is a major cause for high mortalityrnafter traumatic brain injury (TBI). As anesthetic care is mandatory in patients suffering from severe TBI it may be importantrnto elucidate the effect of different anesthetics on cerebral edema formation. Tight junction proteins (TJ) such as zonularnoccludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5 (cl5) play a central role for BBB stability. First, the influence of the volatile anesthet...

  8. Brain injury in premature neonates: A primary cerebral dysmaturation disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Stephen A; Miller, Steven P

    2014-04-01

    With advances in neonatal care, preterm neonates are surviving with an evolving constellation of motor and cognitive disabilities that appear to be related to widespread cellular maturational disturbances that target cerebral gray and white matter. Whereas preterm infants were previously at high risk for destructive brain lesions that resulted in cystic white matter injury and secondary cortical and subcortical gray matter degeneration, contemporary cohorts of preterm survivors commonly display less severe injury that does not appear to involve pronounced glial or neuronal loss. Nevertheless, these milder forms of injury are also associated with reduced cerebral growth. Recent human and experimental studies support that impaired cerebral growth is related to disparate responses in gray and white matter. Myelination disturbances in cerebral white matter are related to aberrant regeneration and repair responses to acute death of premyelinating late oligodendrocyte progenitors (preOLs). In response to preOL death, early oligodendrocyte progenitors rapidly proliferate and differentiate, but the regenerated preOLs fail to normally mature to myelinating cells required for white matter growth. Although immature neurons appear to be more resistant to cell death from hypoxia-ischemia than glia, they display widespread disturbances in maturation of their dendritic arbors, which further contribute to impaired cerebral growth. These complex and disparate responses of neurons and preOLs thus result in large numbers of cells that fail to fully mature during a critical window in development of neural circuitry. These recently recognized forms of cerebral gray and white matter dysmaturation raise new diagnostic challenges and suggest new therapeutic directions centered on reversal of the processes that promote dysmaturation.

  9. Dimethyl fumarate attenuates cerebral edema formation by protecting the blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Reiner; Urrutia, Andrés; Hoffmann, Angelika; Liu, Hui; Helluy, Xavier; Pham, Mirko; Reischl, Stefan; Korff, Thomas; Marti, Hugo H

    2015-04-01

    Brain edema is a hallmark of various neuropathologies, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We aim to characterize how tissue hypoxia, together with oxidative stress and inflammation, leads to capillary dysfunction and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In a mouse stroke model we show that systemic treatment with dimethyl fumarate (DMF), an antioxidant drug clinically used for psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, significantly prevented edema formation in vivo. Indeed, DMF stabilized the BBB by preventing disruption of interendothelial tight junctions and gap formation, and decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity in brain tissue. In vitro, DMF directly sustained endothelial tight junctions, inhibited inflammatory cytokine expression, and attenuated leukocyte transmigration. We also demonstrate that these effects are mediated via activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). DMF activated the Nrf2 pathway as shown by up-regulation of several Nrf2 target genes in the brain in vivo, as well as in cerebral endothelial cells and astrocytes in vitro, where DMF also increased protein abundance of nuclear Nrf2. Finally, Nrf2 knockdown in endothelial cells aggravated subcellular delocalization of tight junction proteins during ischemic conditions, and attenuated the protective effect exerted by DMF. Overall, our data suggest that DMF protects from cerebral edema formation during ischemic stroke by targeting interendothelial junctions in an Nrf2-dependent manner, and provide the basis for a completely new approach to treat brain edema.

  10. Effect of Electroacupuncture on Expression of p53 Protein in Cerebral Cortex of Rats with Global Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卜渊; 耿德勤; 葛巍; 徐兴顺; 曾因明

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on expression of p53 protein in cerebral cortex of senile rats with global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury and to explore its mechanism. Methods: The cerebral IR injury rat model was established referring to Pulsinelli 4-vessel occlusion method. Thirty-six SD rats were randomly and evenly divided into the control group, the IR group and the IR plus EA (IR-EA) group. The animals in the control group were subjected to electrocauterization of vertebral arteries in bilateral flank orifice alone with the general carotid arteries unoccluded.To rats in the IR-EA group, immediately and 24h, 48h, 72h after cerebral IR, EA treatment on bilateral acupoint "Zusanli"(ST36) was applied once a day, lasting for 60 minutes. After the final treatment, all the rats were sacrificed and their brains were taken to examine p53 protein expression by the immunohistochemical method. Results: Cells with positive p53 immunoreactivity in the cerebral cortex of rats in the IR group was significantly higher than that in the control group ( P<0.05), while that in the IR-EA group was significantly lower than that in the IR group (P<0.05). Conclusion: EA could remarkably reduce expression of p53 protein in the cerebral cortex of senile rats with global cerebral IR injury, which might be one of the means for EA to inhibit neuronal apoptosis after cerebral IR injury.

  11. Progesterone increases brain-derived neuroptrophic factor expression and protects against glutamate toxicity in a mitogen-activated protein kinase- and phosphoinositide-3 kinase-dependent manner in cerebral cortical explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Paramjit; Jodhka, Parmeet K; Underwood, Wendy A; Bowles, Courtney A; de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M; Singh, Meharvan

    2007-08-15

    The higher prevalence and risk for Alzheimer's disease in women relative to men has been partially attributed to the precipitous decline in gonadal hormone levels that occurs in women following the menopause. Although considerable attention has been focused on the consequence of estrogen loss, and thus estrogen's neuroprotective potential, it is important to recognize that the menopause results in a precipitous decline in progesterone levels as well. In fact, progesterone is neuroprotective, although the precise mechanisms involved remain unclear. Based on our previous observation that progesterone elicits the phosphorylation of ERK and Akt, key effectors of the neuroprotective mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3-K) pathways, respectively, we determined whether activation of either of these pathways was necessary for progesterone-induced protection. With organotypic explants (slice culture) of the cerebral cortex, we found that progesterone protected against glutamate-induced toxicity. Furthermore, these protective effects were inhibited by either the MEK1/2 inhibitor UO126 or the PI3-K inhibitor LY294002, supporting the requirement for both the MAPK and PI3-K pathways in progesterone-induced protection. In addition, at a concentration and duration of treatment consistent with our neuroprotection data, progesterone also increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), at the level of both protein and mRNA. This induction of BDNF may be relevant to the protective effects of progesterone, in that inhibition of Trk signaling, with K252a, inhibited the protective effects of progesterone. Collectively, these data suggest that progesterone is protective via multiple and potentially related mechanisms. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Cerebral asymmetry: a quantitative, multifactorial, and plastic brain phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería, Miguel E

    2012-06-01

    The longitudinal fissure separates the human brain into two hemispheres that remain connected through the corpus callosum. The left and the right halves of the brain resemble each other, and almost every structure present in one side has an equivalent structure in the other. Despite this exceptional correspondence, the two hemispheres also display important anatomical differences and there is marked lateralization of certain cognitive and motor functions such as language and handedness. However, the mechanisms that underlie the establishment of these hemispheric specializations, as well as their physiological and behavioral implications, remain largely unknown. Thanks to recent advances in neuroimaging, a series of studies documenting variation in symmetry and asymmetry as a function of age, gender, brain region, and pathological state, have been published in the past decade. Here, we review evidence of normal and atypical cerebral asymmetry, and the factors that influence it at the macrostructural level. Given the prominent role that cerebral asymmetry plays in the organization of the brain, and its possible implication in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, further research in this area is anticipated.

  13. Effect of heat shock protein 70 on cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Yan; Xiulian Chen; Rui Chen; Shiming Xu; Lijuan Zhang; Hongjuan Wang; Chunyue Huo

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the relationship between heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and cerebral ischemia.DATA SOURCES: An online search of Medline database was undertaken to identify relevant articles published in English from January 1980 to December 2005 by using the keywords of "heat shock protein 70, ischemia". Meanwhile, Chinese relevant articles published from January 2000 to December 2005 were searched in China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database and Chinese Journal of Clinical Rehabilitation with the keywords of "heat shock protein 70, cerebral ischemia" in Chinese.STUDY SELECTION: More than 100 related articles were screened, and 29 references mainly about HSP70and cerebral ischemia were selected, including basic and clinical researches. As to the articles with similar content, those published in the authoritative journals in recent 3 years were preferential.DATA EXTRACTION : A total of 29 articles were collected and classified according to the structure, function and clinical application of HSP70. Among them, 1 article is about the structure of HSP70, 27 about the relationship between HSP70 and cerebral ischemia, and 2 about the clinical application of HSP70.DATA SYNTHESTS: HSP70 is one of the most conservative proteins during biological evolution. Experiments in cerebral ischemia revealed that HSP70 expression was time-dependent, also correlated with the injured site and severity. The cerebral ischemia induced HSP70 gene expression in hippocampus of gerbil had protection to tolerance of fatal ischemic injury for neurons. The increase of HSP70 expression may be one of the endogenous protective mechanisms during cerebral ischemia, and can effectively alleviate cerebral ischemia. Thus HSP70 protein and HSP70 mRNA have been taken as important indexes extensively applied in the basic study of cerebral ischemia by some scholars abroad.CONCLUSTON: HSP70 plays a protective role in cerebral ischemia, and a deeper research into the biological function of

  14. Brain and art: illustrations of the cerebral convolutions. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazić, D; Marinković, S; Tomić, I; Mitrović, D; Starčević, A; Milić, I; Grujičić, M; Marković, B

    2014-08-01

    Aesthetics and functional significance of the cerebral cortical relief gave us the idea to find out how often the convolutions are presented in fine art, and in which techniques, conceptual meaning and pathophysiological aspect. We examined 27,614 art works created by 2,856 authors and presented in art literature, and in Google images search. The cerebral gyri were shown in 0.85% of the art works created by 2.35% of the authors. The concept of the brain was first mentioned in ancient Egypt some 3,700 years ago. The first artistic drawing of the convolutions was made by Leonardo da Vinci, and the first colour picture by an unknown Italian author. Rembrandt van Rijn was the first to paint the gyri. Dozens of modern authors, who are professional artists, medical experts or designers, presented the cerebralc onvolutions in drawings, paintings, digital works or sculptures, with various aesthetic, symbolic and metaphorical connotation. Some artistic compositions and natural forms show a gyral pattern. The convolutions, whose cortical layers enable the cognitive functions, can be affected by various disorders. Some artists suffered from those disorders, and some others presented them in their artworks. The cerebral convolutions or gyri, thanks to their extensive cortical mantle, are the specific morphological basis for the human mind, but also the structures with their own aesthetics. Contemporary authors relatively often depictor model the cerebral convolutions, either from the aesthetic or conceptual aspect. In this way, they make a connection between the neuroscience and fineart.

  15. Brain Lesions in Children with Unilateral Spastic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzagic-Catibusic, Feriha; Avdagic, Edin; Zubcevic, Smail; Uzicanin, Sajra

    2017-02-01

    Unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (US CP) is the second most common subtype of cerebral palsy. The aim of the study was to analyze neuroimaging findings in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy. The study was hospital based, which has included 106 patients with US CP (boys 72/girls 34, term 82/preterm 24). Neuroimaging findings were classified into 5 groups: Brain maldevelopment, predominant white matter injury, predominant gray matter injury, non specific findings and normal neuroimaging findings. Predominant white matter lesions where the most frequent (48/106,45.28%; term 35/preterm 13), without statistically significant difference between term and preterm born children (x2=0.4357; p=0.490517). Predominant gray matter lesions had 32/106 children, 30.19%; (term 25/preterm 7, without statistically significant difference between term and preterm born children (x2=0.902; p=0.9862). Brain malformations had 10/106 children, 9.43%, and all of them were term born. Other finding had 2/106 children, 1.89%, both of them were term born. Normal neuroimaging findings were present in14/106 patients (13.21%). Neuroimaging may help to understand morphological background of motor impairment in children with US CP. Periventricular white matter lesions were the most frequent, then gray matter lesions.

  16. [Soluble brain proteins in autosomal trisomy syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhneva, L M; Baryshevskaia, V D

    1981-01-01

    The authors examined the soluble proteins of the brain frontal lobes in the newborn with trisomias of the 13th, 18th, and 21st chromosomes (Down's, Patau's, and Edwards' syndromes). The examinations were carried out on autopsy material (the post-mortem period not exceeding 24 hours) by the method of disc electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel. The brain tissue was taken from 17 newborn infants with Down's syndrome; 9 infants with Patau's syndrome; and 7 infants with Edwards' syndrome. For the control the brain of 21 newborn infants without defects of the CNS development (the death cause being analogous) was taken. In all the syndromes studied diversely directed but relatively specific shifts were revealed on the proteinograms. It was the albumin section which appeared to be the most sensitive to the chromosomal pathology: in cases of Down's and Patau's syndromes the protein content in it was reduced, whereas in cases of Edwards' syndrome it was increased. In the latter syndrome the relative amount of neuronines S-5 and S-6, and in Patau's syndrome the amount of neuronine S-6 were lowered, this lowering being statistically significantly. In all the trisomias a tendency to a diminution of the zone of the acidic neurospecific cerebral proteins was noted. This is, possibly, due to the lower level of the CNS functional activity in chromosomal pathologies.

  17. Electroacupuncture-attenuated ischemic brain injury increases insulin-like growth factor-1expression in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanmin Gao; Ling Wang; Yunliang Guo

    2010-01-01

    Acupuncture has recently gained popularity in many countries as an alternative and complementary therapeutic intervention.Previous studies have shown that changes in genes,proteins,and their metabolites were measureable during acupuncture for treatment of cerebral ischemia.Through the use of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry,the present study confirmed that electroacupuncture increased insulin-like growth factor-1 mRNA and protein expression in the corpus striatum following cerebral ischemia,reduced brain edema following middle cerebral artery occlusion repeffusion,and decreased infarct volume.Results suggested that electroacupuncture is effective in the relief of cerebral ischemia by increasing endogenous insulin-like growth factor-1 expression.

  18. Effects of Polysaccharide of Gastrodia Elata Blume and Electro-Acupuncture on Expressions of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Stem Cell Factor Protein in Caudate Putamen of Focal Cerebral Ischemia Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huai-Bin; Wu, Feng; Miao, Hua-Chun; Xiong, Ke-Ren

    2016-12-23

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore the neural protective effect of polysaccharide of Gastrodia elata Blume (PGB) and electro-acupuncture (EA) on focal cerebral ischemia rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 40 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (normal group, model group, PGB group, EA group and PGB+EA group). The model was prepared by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Two week after modeling, rats were given PGB, EA, or a combination of the 2 in continuous treatment for 2 successive weeks. 14 days after modeling, expressions of BDNF and SCF protein in the caudate putamen (CPu) were detected by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS Positive expression of BDNF and SCF protein was found in the right caudate putamen of each group of rats. Expressions of BDNF and SCF in the CPu of the model group were higher than normal group (P<0.05). Compared with the model group, the expressions of BDNF and SCF in the CPu of the PGB group, the EA group, and the PGB plus EA group increased significantly (P<0.05). The expressions of BDNF and SCF obviously increased in the PGB plus EA group compared to those of the EA group and the PGB group (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS PGB and EA up-regulated the expressions of BDNF and SCF protein in the CPu of focal cerebral ischemia rats, and the combination of PGB+EA has a synergistic effect on the recovery from cerebral ischemia.

  19. Cerebral white matter injury and damage to myelin sheath following whole-brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingzhu; Yi, Qiong; Liu, Gang; Shen, Xue; Xuan, Lihui; Tian, Ye

    2013-02-01

    Myelin sheath, either in white matter or in other regions of brain, is vulnerable to ischemia. The specific events involved in the progression of ischemia in white matter have not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine histopathological alterations in cerebral white matter and levels of myelin basic protein (MBP) in ischemia-injured brain tissue during the acute and subacute phases of central nervous injury following whole-brain ischemia. The whole cerebral ischemia model (four-vessel occlusion (4-VO)) was established in adult Sprague-Dawley rats and MBP gene expression and protein levels in the brain tissue were measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at 2 days, 4 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days following ischemia. Demyelination was determined by Luxol fast blue myelin staining, routine histopathological staining, and electron microscopy in injured brain tissue. Results showed that edema, vascular dilation, focal necrosis, demyelination, adjacent reactive gliosis and inflammation occurred 7 days after ischemia in HE staining and recovered to control levels at 28 days. The absence of Luxol fast blue staining and vacuolation was clearly visible at 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days. Semiquantitative analysis showed that the transparency of myelin had decreased significantly by 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days. Demyelination and ultrastructual changes were detected 7 days after ischemia. The relative levels of MBP mRNA decreased 2 days after ischemia and this trend continued throughout the remaining four points in time. The MBP levels measured using ELISA also decreased significantly at 2 days and 4 days, but they recovered by 7 days and returned to control levels by 14 days. These results suggest that the impact of ischemia on cerebral white matter is time-sensitive and that different effects may follow different courses over time.

  20. Effects of protein malnutrition on oxidative status in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feoli, Ana M; Siqueira, Ionara R; Almeida, Lúcia; Tramontina, Ana C; Vanzella, Cláudia; Sbaraini, Sabrina; Schweigert, Ingrid D; Netto, Carlos A; Perry, Marcos L S; Gonçalves, Carlos A

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of protein malnutrition on oxidative status in rat brain areas. We investigated various parameters of oxidative status, free radical content (dichlorofluorescein formation), indexes of damage to lipid (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances assay), and protein damage (tryptophan and tyrosine content) in addition to total antioxidant reactivity levels and antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in different cerebral regions (cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum) from rats subjected to prenatal and postnatal protein malnutrition (control 25% casein and protein malnutrition 7% casein). Protein malnutrition altered various parameters of oxidative stress, especially damage to macromolecules. Free radical content was unchanged by protein malnutrition. There was an increase in levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, the index of lipid peroxidation, in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex (P brain structures (P malnutrition increased oxidative damage to lipids and proteins from the studied brain areas. These results may be an indication of an important mechanism for changes in brain development that are caused by protein malnutrition.

  1. Anatomic Eponyms in Neuroradiology: Brain, Cerebral Vasculature, and Calvarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Paul M; Zamani, Amir A

    2016-06-01

    Medical eponyms are ubiquitous, numerous, and at times controversial. They are often useful for succinctly conveying complex concepts, and familiarity with eponyms is important for proper usage and appropriate communication. In this historical review, we identify 18 anatomic eponyms used to describe structures of the brain, cerebral vasculature, and calvarium. For each structure, we first offer a biographical sketch of the individual for whom the structure is named. This is followed by a description of the anatomic structure and a brief discussion of its clinical relevance.

  2. Tumor cerebral e gravidez Brain tumors and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Lynch

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O diagnóstico de um tumor cerebral durante a gravidez é um fato raro que coloca a mãe e o concepto em risco de vida. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a melhor forma de conduzir uma paciente grávida portadora de um tumor cerebral. MÉTODO: Realizamos análise retrospectiva dos prontuários e imagens de seis pacientes grávidas portadoras de tumor cerebral. RESULTADOS: Vários tipos histológicos de tumor cerebral podem estar associados à gravidez. O meningioma é o mais freqüente. Nessa série não observamos óbito cirúrgico materno. Em duas pacientes, o parto ocorreu antes da craniotomia e em outras quatro o parto foi realizado após a neurocirurgia. CONCLUSÃO: O momento mais adequado para a realização da craniotomia para remoção tumoral irá depender da gravidade do quadro neurológico, do tipo histológico presumível da lesão, e da idade gestacional do embrião.BACKGROUND: Despite not being a common fact, the occurrence of brain tumors during pregnancy poses a risk to both the mother and infant. AIM: To identify the best medical procedure to be followed for a pregnant patient harboring a brain tumor. METHOD: The records of 6 patients with brain tumors, diagnosed during pregnancy were examined. RESULTS: Several types of brain tumors have been associated with pregnancy, but the meningioma is, by far, the most frequent. It seems that pregnancy aggravates the clinical course of intracranial tumors. There were no operative mortality in these series. In 2 patients the labor occurred before the craniotomy and in others, the delivery occurred after the surgery. CONCLUSION: The best moment to recommend the craniotomy and the neurosurgical removal of the tumor will depend of the mother’s neurological condition, the tumor histological type as well as the gestational age.

  3. Alteration of water-soluble S-100 protein content in microembolized rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada,Yasuhiro

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available The amount of S-100 protein in rat brain embolized with carbon microspheres decreased in parallel with the development of cerebral edema as judged by water content, recovering to the normal range by 24h after embolization. These results suggest the participation of S-100 protein in the permeability characterisitics of nervous system capillaries known as the blood-brain barrier.

  4. Dual role of cerebral blood flow in regional brain temperature control in the healthy newborn infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Sachiko; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Takashima, Sachio; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Robertson, Nicola J; Iwata, Osuke

    2014-10-01

    Small shifts in brain temperature after hypoxia-ischaemia affect cell viability. The main determinants of brain temperature are cerebral metabolism, which contributes to local heat production, and brain perfusion, which removes heat. However, few studies have addressed the effect of cerebral metabolism and perfusion on regional brain temperature in human neonates because of the lack of non-invasive cot-side monitors. This study aimed (i) to determine non-invasive monitoring tools of cerebral metabolism and perfusion by combining near-infrared spectroscopy and echocardiography, and (ii) to investigate the dependence of brain temperature on cerebral metabolism and perfusion in unsedated newborn infants. Thirty-two healthy newborn infants were recruited. They were studied with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy, echocardiography, and a zero-heat flux tissue thermometer. A surrogate of cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using superior vena cava flow adjusted for cerebral volume (rSVC flow). The tissue oxygenation index, fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen relative to rSVC flow (CMRO₂ index) were also estimated. A greater rSVC flow was positively associated with higher brain temperatures, particularly for superficial structures. The CMRO₂ index and rSVC flow were positively coupled. However, brain temperature was independent of FOE and the CMRO₂ index. A cooler ambient temperature was associated with a greater temperature gradient between the scalp surface and the body core. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and perfusion were monitored in newborn infants without using tracers. In these healthy newborn infants, cerebral perfusion and ambient temperature were significant independent variables of brain temperature. CBF has primarily been associated with heat removal from the brain. However, our results suggest that CBF is likely to deliver heat specifically to the superficial brain. Further studies are required to assess the

  5. Pre-existing interleukin 10 in cerebral arteries attenuates subsequent brain injury caused by ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qiu-Juan; Jiang, Mei; Wang, Xin-Hong; Le, Li-Li; Xiang, Meng; Sun, Ning; Meng, Dan; Chen, Si-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent stroke is difficult to treat and life threatening. Transfer of anti-inflammatory gene is a potential gene therapy strategy for ischemic stroke. Using recombinant adeno-associated viral vector 1 (rAAV1)-mediated interleukin 10 (IL-10), we investigated whether transfer of beneficial gene into the rat cerebral vessels during interventional treatment for initial stroke could attenuate brain injury caused by recurrent stroke. Male Wistar rats were administered rAAV1-IL-10, rAAV1-YFP, or saline into the left cerebral artery. Three weeks after gene transfer, rats were subjected to occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCAO) for 45 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. IL-10 levels in serum were significantly elevated 3 weeks after rAAV1-IL-10 injection, and virus in the cerebral vessels was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Pre-existing IL-10 but not YFP decreased the neurological dysfunction scores, brain infarction volume, and the number of injured neuronal cells. AAV1-IL-10 transduction increased heme oxygenase (HO-1) mRNA and protein levels in the infarct boundary zone of the brain. Thus, transduction of the IL-10 gene in the cerebral artery prior to ischemia attenuates brain injury caused by ischemia/reperfusion in rats. This preventive approach for recurrent stroke can be achieved during interventional treatment for initial stroke.

  6. Breaking down brain barrier breaches in cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jens E V; Lavstsen, Thomas; Craig, Alister

    2016-10-03

    Recent findings have linked brain swelling to death in cerebral malaria (CM). These observations have prompted a number of investigations into the mechanisms of this pathology with the goal of identifying potential therapeutic targets. In this issue of the JCI, Gallego-Delgado and colleagues present evidence that implicates angiotensin receptors and the relocation of β-catenin to the endothelial cell nucleus in CM. This study provides a renewed focus on infected erythrocyte debris as the cause of endothelial damage and challenges previous work implicating direct effects of infected erythrocyte sequestration in the brain as the major driver of disease. While this work provides potential therapeutic avenues for CM, it leaves a number of questions unanswered.

  7. Cerebral Edema in Traumatic Brain Injury: Pathophysiology and Prospective Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Minter, Daniel; Yue, John K; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a heterogeneous disorder resulting from an external force applied to the head. The development of cerebral edema plays a central role in the evolution of injury following brain trauma and is closely associated with neurologic outcomes. Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular and cellular pathways contributing to the posttraumatic development of cerebral edema have led to the identification of multiple prospective therapeutic targets. The authors summarize the pathogenic mechanisms underlying cerebral edema and highlight the molecular pathways that may be therapeutically targeted to mitigate cerebral edema and associated sequelae following traumatic brain injury.

  8. The protective effect of HET0016 on brain edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Di; Wang, Huan; Qu, Youyang; Xiao, Xingjun; Zhu, Yulan

    2014-01-28

    N-hydroxy-N-(4-butyl-2-methylphenyl) formamidine (HET0016) is a specific 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) inhibitor which was first synthesized in 2001. It has been demonstrated that HET0016 reduces cerebral infarction volume in rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) models. However, little is known about the role of HET0016 in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The present study was designed to examine the effect of HET0016 in a MCAO and reperfusion rat model to determine whether it protects against brain edema and BBB disruption. Rats were subjected to 90 min MCAO, followed by 4, 24, 48, and 72 h reperfusion. Brain edema was measured according to the wet and dry weight method. BBB permeability based on the extravasation of Evans blue and sodium fluorescein was detected. BBB ultrastructure alterations were presented through transmission electron microscope. Superoxide production in ischemic tissue was also measured by dihydroethidium fluorescent probe. Western blot was used to analyze the expression of Claudin-5, ZO-1, MMP-9, and JNK pathway. At 24h after reperfusion, HET0016 reduced brain edema and BBB leakage. Ultrastructural damage of BBB and the increase of superoxide production were attenuated by HET0016 treatment. Western blot showed that HET0016 suppressed the activation of MMP-9 and JNK pathway but restored the expression of Claudin-5 and ZO-1. In conclusion, these results suggest that HET0016 protects BBB dysfunction after I/R by regulating the expression of MMP-9 and tight junction proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of oxidative stress and JNK pathway may be involved in this protecting effect.

  9. Lycium barbarum extracts protect the brain from blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral edema in experimental stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Ischemic stroke is a destructive cerebrovascular disease and a leading cause of death. Yet, no ideal neuroprotective agents are available, leaving prevention an attractive alternative. The extracts from the fruits of Lycium barbarum (LBP, a Chinese anti-aging medicine and food supplement, showed neuroprotective function in the retina when given prophylactically. We aim to evaluate the protective effects of LBP pre-treatment in an experimental stroke model. METHODS: C57BL/6N male mice were first fed with either vehicle (PBS or LBP (1 or 10 mg/kg daily for 7 days. Mice were then subjected to 2-hour transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO by the intraluminal method followed by 22-hour reperfusion upon filament removal. Mice were evaluated for neurological deficits just before sacrifice. Brains were harvested for infarct size estimation, water content measurement, immunohistochemical analysis, and Western blot experiments. Evans blue (EB extravasation was determined to assess blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption after MCAO. RESULTS: LBP pre-treatment significantly improved neurological deficits as well as decreased infarct size, hemispheric swelling, and water content. Fewer apoptotic cells were identified in LBP-treated brains by TUNEL assay. Reduced EB extravasation, fewer IgG-leaky vessels, and up-regulation of occludin expression were also observed in LBP-treated brains. Moreover, immunoreactivity for aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly decreased in LBP-treated brains. CONCLUSIONS: Seven-day oral LBP pre-treatment effectively improved neurological deficits, decreased infarct size and cerebral edema as well as protected the brain from BBB disruption, aquaporin-4 up-regulation, and glial activation. The present study suggests that LBP may be used as a prophylactic neuroprotectant in patients at high risk for ischemic stroke.

  10. Cerebral infarction in an HIV-infected patient with combined protein S and C deficiency and a patent foramen ovale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomomasa, Ran; Yamashiro, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ryota; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2013-11-01

    A 41-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection developed motor aphasia, dysarthria, and right hemiparesis. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain revealed a cerebral infarction in the territory of the left middle cerebral artery. The laboratory data showed decreased levels of protein S and protein C. Transesophageal contrast-enhanced echocardiography revealed a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Prothrombotic states, such as protein S and C deficiency, have been reported in HIV-infected patients. In addition, previous studies have reported prothrombotic states to be risk factors for PFO-related cerebral infarction. An association between combined protein S and C deficiency caused by HIV infection and PFO-related cerebral infarction was suggested in our patient.

  11. Cerebral Taurine Levels are Associated with Brain Edema and Delayed Cerebral Infarction in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Mario; Schiefecker, Alois; Ferger, Boris; Beer, Ronny; Sohm, Florian; Broessner, Gregor; Hackl, Werner; Rhomberg, Paul; Lackner, Peter; Pfausler, Bettina; Thomé, Claudius; Schmutzhard, Erich; Helbok, Raimund

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral edema and delayed cerebral infarction (DCI) are common complications after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and associated with poor functional outcome. Experimental data suggest that the amino acid taurine is released into the brain extracellular space secondary to cytotoxic edema and brain tissue hypoxia, and therefore may serve as a biomarker for secondary brain injury after aSAH. On the other hand, neuroprotective mechanisms of taurine treatment have been described in the experimental setting. We analyzed cerebral taurine levels using high-performance liquid chromatography in the brain extracellular fluid of 25 consecutive aSAH patients with multimodal neuromonitoring including cerebral microdialysis (CMD). Patient characteristics and clinical course were prospectively recorded. Associations with CMD-taurine levels were analyzed using generalized estimating equations with an autoregressive process to handle repeated observations within subjects. CMD-taurine levels were highest in the first days after aSAH (11.2 ± 3.2 µM/l) and significantly decreased over time (p taurine levels compared to those without (Wald = 7.3, df = 1, p taurine supplementation and brain extracellular taurine (p = 0.6). Moreover, a significant correlation with brain extracellular glutamate (r = 0.82, p taurine levels were found in patients with brain edema or DCI after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Its value as a potential biomarker deserves further investigation.

  12. Early biomarkers of brain injury and cerebral hypo- and hyperoxia in the SafeBoosC II trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomgaard, Anne M.; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon; Claris, Olivier; Dempsey, Eugene; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Hagmann, Cornelia; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Lemmers, Petra; van Oeveren, Wim; Pellicer, Adelina; Petersen, Tue H.; Pichler, Gerhard; Winkel, Per; Greisen, Gorm

    2017-01-01

    Background The randomized clinical trial, SafeBoosC II, examined the effect of monitoring of cerebral oxygenation by near-infrared spectroscopy combined with a guideline on treatment when cerebral oxygenation was out of the target range. Data on cerebral oxygenation was collected in both the intervention and the control group. The primary outcome was the reduction in the burden of cerebral hypo- and hyperoxia between the two groups. In this study we describe the associations between the burden of cerebral hypo- and hyperoxia, regardless of allocation to intervention or control group, and the biomarkers of brain injury from birth till term equivalent age that was collected as secondary and explorative outcomes in the SafeBoosC II trial. Methods Cerebral oxygenation was continuously monitored during the first 72h of life in 166 extremely preterm infants. Cranial ultrasound was performed at day 1,4,7,14, and 35 and at term. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded at 64h. Blood-samples taken at 6 and 64 hours were analysed for the brain injury biomarkers; S100beta, brain-fatty-acid-binding-protein, and neuroketal. All analyses were conducted post hoc. Results Significantly more infants with a cerebral burden of hypoxia within the 4th quartile versus infants within quartile 1–3 were diagnosed with severe intracranial haemorrhage (11/39 versus 11/117, p = 0.003), had low burst rate on EEG (12/28 versus 21/103, p = 0.015), or died (14/41 versus 18/123, p = 0.006), whereas none of these events were significantly associated with cerebral hyperoxia. The blood biomarkers were not significantly associated with the burden of cerebral hypo- or hyperoxia. Conclusions The explorative analysis showed that early burden of cerebral hypoxia, but not hyperoxia was significantly associated with low brain electrical activity and severe intracranial haemorrhage while none of the three blood biomarkers were associated with the burden of either cerebral hypo- or hyperoxia. PMID:28328980

  13. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy: pathogenesis and effects on the ageing and Alzheimer brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Roy O; Nicoll, James A

    2003-09-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a feature of ageing and Alzheimer's disease (AD); it is also associated with intracerebral hemorrhage and stroke. Here, the pathogenesis of CAA and its effects on the brain are reviewed and the possible effects of CAA on therapies for Alzheimer's disease are evaluated. Tracer experiments in animals and observations on human brains suggest that peptides such as A beta are eliminated along the peri-arterial interstitial fluid drainage pathways that are effectively the lymphatics of the brain. In CAA, A beta becomes entrapped in drainage pathways in the walls of cerebral arteries, reflecting a failure of elimination of A beta from the ageing brain. One consequence of failure in clearance of A beta is accumulation of soluble and insoluble A beta associated with cognitive decline in AD. Replacement of vascular smooth muscle cells by A beta occurs in severe CAA with weakening of artery walls and increased risk of vessel rupture and intracerebral hemorrhage. Risk factors for CAA include mutations of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene and possession of the epsilon 4 allele of apolipoprotein E. There is also evidence that cerebrovascular disease may be a factor in the failure of elimination of A beta along perivascular pathways in sporadic AD; this would link ageing in cerebral arteries with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. If therapeutic agents, including anti-A beta antibodies, are to be used to eliminate A beta in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, the effects of CAA on the treatment and the effects of the treatment on the CAA need to be considered.

  14. Clinical and neuroradiological studies of eclampsia. Cerebral vasospasm and relation to the brain edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Hisayoshi; Ando, Tetsuo; Yasuda, Takeshi; Yanagi, Tsutomu [Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Aichi (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    Clinical and neuroradiological studies involving cerebral angiography were conducted in four patients with eclampsia. In three cases (case 1, 2 and 4), neurological focal signs, abnormal low density areas on cranial CT and T{sub 2} high intensity areas on cranial MRI disappeared within a month. But in one case (case 3), cerebral infarction occurred and right hemiparesis and aphasia persisted. Cerebral angiography in the acute phase demonstrated vasospasm in all cases and arterial occlusion in the middle cerebral artery due to vasospasm in case 3. Angiography demonstrated several types of spasms, including diffuse, peripheral and multi local. Furthermore, in some cases, diffuse vasospasms were recognized at the siphon and extracranial portions of the internal carotid artery. In one case (Case 4), segmental vasospasms were detected in the bilateral vertebral arteries. Three to four weeks later, follow-up cerebral angiography was performed in three cases. Cerebral vasospasms had partially or completely recovered. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was excluded by lumbar puncture and neuroradiological findings in all cases. We concluded that eclampsia itself causes cerebral vasospasm and that the mechanism of vasospasm is different from that of SAH, since cerebral vasospasm occurred in the extracranial cerebral arteries. We suspected that cerebral vasospasm in eclampsia causes cerebral ischemia, which leads to cytotoxic edema and dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and cerebral autoregulation. With this background, brain edema, especially vasogenic edema, may easily occur and clinical symptoms of eclampsia may appear when the blood pressure rapidly increases. (author).

  15. A Stepwise Approach: Decreasing Infection in Deep Brain Stimulation for Childhood Dystonic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johans, Stephen J; Swong, Kevin N; Hofler, Ryan C; Anderson, Douglas E

    2017-09-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions, which cause twisting movements or abnormal postures. Deep brain stimulation has been used to improve the quality of life for secondary dystonia caused by cerebral palsy. Despite being a viable treatment option for childhood dystonic cerebral palsy, deep brain stimulation is associated with a high rate of infection in children. The authors present a small series of patients with dystonic cerebral palsy who underwent a stepwise approach for bilateral globus pallidus interna deep brain stimulation placement in order to decrease the rate of infection. Four children with dystonic cerebral palsy who underwent a total of 13 surgical procedures (electrode and battery placement) were identified via a retrospective review. There were zero postoperative infections. Using a multistaged surgical plan for pediatric patients with dystonic cerebral palsy undergoing deep brain stimulation may help to reduce the risk of infection.

  16. Analysis of Presenilin 1 and 2 interacting proteins in mouse cerebral cortex during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Thakur, M K

    2014-11-01

    In our previous report, we showed that Presenilin (PS)1 and 2 have differential expression profile from early embryonic stages till adulthood in mouse cerebral cortex, suggesting that both of these proteins are crucial for brain development. Genetic manipulation studies have also shown the involvement of PS1 in brain development, but PS2 remains largely unexplored. In order to understand how PS1 and 2 mediate developmental functions, we have investigated the interaction of PS1 and 2 with proteins of mouse cerebral cortex during development. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) combined with MALDI-MS/MS analysis revealed 12 interacting partners of PS1 and 11 partners of PS2. The interacting proteins were different for PS1 and 2, and involved in cell division, glycolysis, cell adhesion and protein trafficking. Densitometric analysis of protein bands visualized after SDS-PAGE separation of Co-IP proteins revealed variation in their amount and degree of interaction during different developmental stages of mice. Further, immunoblot based validation of PS1 interacting protein Notch-1 showed maximum interaction at embryonic day (E) 12.5, decline at E18.5, upregulation from postnatal day 0 (P0) to P20 and thereafter reduction at P45 and 20 weeks. In-silico analysis of PS and its interacting proteins indicated conformation based interaction through common type of secondary structures having alpha helical, extended beta strand and random coil, and CK2, PKC phosphorylation and myristoylation motifs. Taken together, our study showed that PS1 and PS2 interact to varying extent with different proteins of mouse cerebral cortex and suggests their interaction based on specific conformation and involvement in diverse functions essential for the brain development.

  17. Autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in experimental focal brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirnagl, U; Pulsinelli, W

    1990-05-01

    The relationship between systemic arterial pressure (SAP) and neocortical microcirculatory blood-flow (CBF) in areas of focal cerebral ischemia was studied in 15 spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) anesthetized with halothane (0.5%). Ischemia was induced by ipsilateral middle cerebral artery/common carotid artery occlusion and CBF was monitored continuously in the ischemic territory using laser-Doppler flowmetry during manipulation of SAP with I-norepinephrine (hypertension) or nitroprusside (hypotension). In eight SHRs not subjected to focal ischemia, we demonstrated that 0.5% halothane and the surgical manipulations did not impair autoregulation. Autoregulation was partly preserved in ischemic brain tissue with a CBF of greater than 30% of preocclusion values. In areas where ischemic CBF was less than 30% of preocclusion values, autoregulation was completely lost. Changes in SAP had a greater influence on CBF in tissue areas where CBF ranged from 15 to 30% of baseline (9% change in CBF with each 10% change in SAP) than in areas where CBF was less than 15% of baseline (6% change in CBF with each 10% change in SAP). These findings demonstrate that the relationship between CBF and SAP in areas of focal ischemia is highly dependent on the severity of ischemia. Autoregulation is lost in a gradual manner until CBF falls below 30% of normal. In areas without autoregulation, the slope of the CBF/SAP relationship is inversely related to the degree of ischemia.

  18. YiQiFuMai powder injection ameliorates blood-brain barrier dysfunction and brain edema after focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guosheng; Ye, Xinyi; Xu, Yingqiong; Yin, Mingzhu; Chen, Honglin; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang

    2016-01-01

    YiQiFuMai powder injection (YQFM) is a modern preparation derived from the traditional Chinese medicine Sheng-Mai-San. YQFM is widely used in clinical practice in the People's Republic of China, mainly for the treatment of microcirculatory disturbance-related diseases. However, little is known about its role in animals with ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of YQFM on brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent right middle cerebral artery occlusion for 1 hour with a subsequent 24-hour reperfusion to produce I/R injury. YQFM (three doses: 0.336, 0.671, and 1.342 g/kg) was then given intraperitoneally (IP). The results demonstrated that YQFM significantly decreased infarct size, improved neurological deficits, reduced brain water content, and increased cerebral blood flow after I/R injury. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose micro-positron emission tomography imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining results indicated that YQFM is able to ameliorate brain metabolism and histopathological damage after I/R. Moreover, YQFM administration reduced BBB leakage and upregulated the expression of zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin, which was confirmed by Evans Blue extravasation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence assay. Our findings suggest that YQFM provides protection against focal cerebral I/R injury in mice, possibly by improving BBB dysfunction via upregulation of the expression of tight junction proteins.

  19. Region-specific maturation of cerebral cortex in human fetal brain: diffusion tensor imaging and histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Richa; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Saksena, Sona [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Lucknow, UP (India); Husain, Nuzhat; Srivastava, Savita [CSM Medical University, Department of Pathology, Lucknow (India); Rathore, Ram K.S.; Sarma, Manoj K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Kanpur (India); Malik, Gyanendra K. [CSM Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Lucknow (India); Das, Vinita [CSM Medical University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lucknow (India); Pradhan, Mandakini [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Genetics, Lucknow (India); Pandey, Chandra M. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Biostatistics, Lucknow (India); Narayana, Ponnada A. [University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-09-15

    In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunohistochemical analysis in different cortical regions in fetal brains at different gestational age (GA) were performed. DTI was performed on 50 freshly aborted fetal brains with GA ranging from 12 to 42 weeks to compare age-related fractional anisotropy (FA) changes in different cerebral cortical regions that include frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal lobes at the level of thalami. GFAP immunostaining was performed and the percentage of GFAP-positive areas was quantified. The cortical FA values in the frontal lobe peaked at around 26 weeks of GA, occipital and temporal lobes at around 20 weeks, and parietal lobe at around 23 weeks. A significant, but modest, positive correlation (r=0.31, p=0.02) was observed between cortical FA values and percentage area of GFAP expression in cortical region around the time period during which the migrational events are at its peak, i.e., GA {<=} 28 weeks for frontal cortical region and GA{<=}22 weeks for rest of the lobes. The DTI-derived FA quantification with its GFAP immunohistologic correlation in cortical regions of the various lobes of the cerebral hemispheres supports region-specific migrational and maturational events in human fetal brain. (orig.)

  20. Salvianolate increases heat shock protein expression in a cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinnan Zhang; Wei Lu; Qiang Lei; Xi Tao; Hong You; Pinghui Xie

    2013-01-01

    Stroke remains a worldwide health problem. Salvianolate exerts a protective effect in various mi-crocirculatory disturbance-related diseases, but studies of the mechanisms underlying its protective action have mainly focused on the myocardium, whereas little research has been carried out in brain tissue fol owing ischemia-reperfusion. We assessed the neuroprotective effects of salvianolate in a rat model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury induced using the suture method. At onset and 24 and 48 hours after reperfusion, rats were intraperitoneal y injected with salvianolate (18 mg/kg) or saline. Neurological deficit scores at 72 hours showed that the neurological functions of rats that had received salvianolate were significantly better than those of the rats that had received saline. 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride was used to stain cerebral tissue to determine the extent of the infarct area. A significantly smal er infarct area and a significantly lower number of apoptotic cel s were observed after treatment with salvianolate compared with the saline treatment. Expression of heat shock protein 22 and phosphorylated protein kinase B in ischemic brain tissue was significantly greater in rats treated with salvianolate compared with rats treated with saline. Our findings suggest that salvianolate provides neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury by upregulating heat shock protein 22 and phosphorylated protein kinase B expression.

  1. Cerebral perfusion changes in traumatic diffuse brain injury. IMP SPECT studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer; Ishii, Kiyoshi; Onuma, Takehide

    1997-05-01

    Diffuse brain injury (DBI) is characterized by axonal degeneration and neuronal damage which cause diffuse brain atrophy. We have investigated the time course of abnormalities in cerebral perfusion distribution in cases of DBI by using Iodine-123-IMP SPECT, and the relationship to the appearance of diffuse brain atrophy. SPECT scans were performed on eight patients with diffuse brain injury due to closed cranial trauma in acute and chronic stages. All patients showed abnormalities in cerebral perfusion with decreases in perfusion, even in non-depicted regions on MRI, and the affected areas varied throughout the period of observation. Diffuse brain atrophy appeared in all patients. In some patients, diffuse brain atrophy was observed at or just after the time when the maximum number of lesions on SPECT were seen. The abnormalities in cerebral perfusion in cases of DBI might therefore be related to axonal degeneration and neuronal damage which causes diffuse brain atrophy. (author)

  2. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira;

    2016-01-01

    acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography...... mean velocity and estimated cerebral perfusion pressure. Patients with acquired brain injury presented an increase in mean flow index during head-up tilt indicating impaired autoregulation (P ....1 Hz spectral power in patients compared to healthy controls suggesting baroreflex dysfunction. In conclusion, patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance during head-up tilt have impaired cerebral autoregulation more than one month after brain injury....

  3. Pharmacological manipulation of brain glycogenolysis as a therapeutic approach to cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Sun, Hongbin

    2010-10-01

    Brain ischemia resulting from multiple disease states including cardiac arrest, stroke and traumatic brain injury, is a leading cause of death and disability. Despite significant resources dedicated to developing pharmacological interventions, few effective therapeutic options are currently available. The basic consequence of cerebral ischemia, characterized by energy failure and subsequent brain metabolic abnormalities, enables the protective effects by pharmacological manipulation of brain metabolism. We present here the important roles of brain glycogen metabolism and propose inhibition of glycogenolysis as a therapeutic approach to cerebral ischemia.

  4. Application of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Imaging in Global Cerebral Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanidze, J; Kallas, O N; Gupta, A; Weidman, E; Baradaran, H; Mir, D; Giambrone, A; Segal, A Z; Claassen, J; Sanelli, P C

    2016-09-01

    Blood-brain barrier permeability is not routinely evaluated in the clinical setting. Global cerebral edema occurs after SAH and is associated with BBB disruption. Detection of global cerebral edema using current imaging techniques is challenging. Our purpose was to apply blood-brain barrier permeability imaging in patients with global cerebral edema by using extended CT perfusion. Patients with SAH underwent CTP in the early phase after aneurysmal rupture (days 0-3) and were classified as having global cerebral edema or nonglobal cerebral edema using established noncontrast CT criteria. CTP data were postprocessed into blood-brain barrier permeability quantitative maps of PS (permeability surface-area product), K(trans) (volume transfer constant from blood plasma to extravascular extracellular space), Kep (washout rate constant of the contrast agent from extravascular extracellular space to intravascular space), VE (extravascular extracellular space volume per unit of tissue volume), VP (plasmatic volume per unit of tissue volume), and F (plasma flow) by using Olea Sphere software. Mean values were compared using t tests. Twenty-two patients were included in the analysis. Kep (1.32 versus 1.52, P brain barrier permeability in patients with SAH with and without global cerebral edema. Kep is an important indicator of altered blood-brain barrier permeability in patients with decreased blood flow, as Kep is flow-independent. Further study of blood-brain barrier permeability is needed to improve diagnosis and monitoring of global cerebral edema. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Thornton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  6. Death associated protein kinases: molecular structure and brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Syam; Hagberg, Henrik; Krishnamurthy, Rajanikant; Thornton, Claire; Mallard, Carina

    2013-07-04

    Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk) family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  7. Regional protein synthesis in rat brain following acute hemispheric ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, G A; Pulsinelli, W A; Duffy, T E

    1980-11-01

    Regional protein synthesis was measured in rat brain at intervals up to 48 h following occlusion of the four major arteries to the brain for either 10 or 30 min. Four-vessel occlusions produces ischemia in the cerebral hemispheres and oligemia in the midbrain-diencephalon and brainstem. During the hour following 10 min of ischemia, protein synthesis, measured by incorporation of [14C]valine into protein, was inhibited in the cerebral cortex by 67%. Normal rates of protein synthesis were attained within 4 h of recirculation. In rats subjected to 30 min of ischemia, protein synthesis was inhibited by 83% during the first hour of recirculation in the cortex, caudate-putamen, and hippocampus. Recovery of protein synthesis in these regions was slow (25-48 h). The midbrain-diencephalon showed less inhibition, 67%, and faster recovery (by 12 h). Protein synthesis was unaffected in the brainstem. [14C]Autoradiography revealed that the pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus and areas of the caudate and cortex failed to recover normal rates of protein synthesis even after 48 h. The accumulation of TCA-soluble [14C]valine was enhanced (55-65%) in the cortex, caudate, and hippocampus after 30 min of ischemia; the increase persisted for 12 h. A smaller rise in [14C]valine content (30%) and more rapid normalization of valine accumulation (by 7 h) were observed in the midbrain-diencephalon; no changes were found in the brainstem. In the cortex, recovery was more rapid when the duration of ischemia was reduced. Thus, the degree of inhibition of protein synthesis, the accumulation of valine in the tissue, and the length of time required to reestablish normal values for these processes were dependent on both the severity and the duration of the ischemic insult. Restoration of normal rates of protein synthesis after ischemia was slow compared with the normalization of cerebral energy metabolites.

  8. Preventive administration of cromakalim reduces aquaporin-4 expression and blood-brain barrier permeability in a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shilei Wang; Yanting Wang; Yan Jiang; Qingxian Chang; Peng Wang; Shiduan Wang

    2011-01-01

    Cromakalim, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, exhibits protective effects on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, there is controversy as to whether this effect is associated with aquaporin-4 and blood-brain barrier permeability. Immunohistochemistry results show that preventive administration of cromakalim decreased aquaporin-4 and IgG protein expression in rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury; it also reduced blood-brain barrier permeability, and alleviated brain edema, ultimately providing neuroprotection.

  9. Brain Structure and Executive Functions in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weierink, Lonneke; Vermeulen, R. Jeroen; Boyd, Roslyn N.

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to establish the current knowledge about brain structure and executive function (EF) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Five databases were searched (up till July 2012). Six articles met the inclusion criteria, all included structural brain imaging though no functional brain imaging. Study quality was assessed using…

  10. Brain Structure and Executive Functions in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weierink, Lonneke; Vermeulen, R. Jeroen; Boyd, Roslyn N.

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to establish the current knowledge about brain structure and executive function (EF) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Five databases were searched (up till July 2012). Six articles met the inclusion criteria, all included structural brain imaging though no functional brain imaging. Study quality was assessed using…

  11. Differences in fatty acid composition between cerebral brain lobes in juvenile pigs after fish oil feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullemeijer, C.; Zock, P.L.; Coronel, R.; Ruijter, den H.M.; Katan, M.B.; Brummer, R.J.; Kok, F.J.; Beekman, J.; Brouwer, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    Very long-chain n-3 PUFA from fish are suggested to play a role in the development of the brain. Fish oil feeding results in higher proportions of n-3 PUFA in the brains of newborn piglets. However, the effect of fish oil on the fatty acid composition of specific cerebral brain lobes in juvenile

  12. Methylophiopogonanone A Protects against Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Attenuates Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingbao Lin

    Full Text Available Methylophiopogonanone A (MO-A, an active homoisoflavonoid of the Chinese herb Ophiopogon japonicus which has been shown to have protective effects on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. However, little is known about its role in cerebral I/R injury. Therefore, in this study, by using a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and reperfusion rat model, the effect of MO-A on cerebral I/R injury was examined. The results showed that MO-A treatment reduced infarct volume and brain edema, improved neurological deficit scores, reversed animal body weight decreases, and increased animal survival time in the stroke groups. Western blotting showed that MO-A suppressed MMP-9, but restored the expression of claudin-3 and claudin-5. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy were monitored to determine the blood-brain barrier (BBB alterations in vitro. The results showed that MO-A markedly attenuated BBB damage in vitro. Additionally, MO-A inhibited ROS production in ECs and MMP-9 release in differentiated THP-1 cells in vitro, and suppressed ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in ECs and leukocyte/EC adhesion. In conclusion, our data indicate that MO-A has therapeutic potential against cerebral I/R injury through its ability to attenuate BBB disruption by regulating the expression of MMP-9 and tight junction proteins.

  13. Rapamycin alleviates brain edema after focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Feng, Guoying; Miao, Yanying; Liu, Guixiang; Xu, Chunsheng

    2014-06-01

    Brain edema is a major consequence of cerebral ischemia reperfusion. However, few effective therapeutic options are available for retarding the brain edema progression after cerebral ischemia. Recently, rapamycin has been shown to produce neuroprotective effects in rats after cerebral ischemia reperfusion. Whether rapamycin could alleviate this brain edema injury is still unclear. In this study, the rat stroke model was induced by a 1-h left transient middle cerebral artery occlusion using an intraluminal filament, followed by 48 h of reperfusion. The effects of rapamycin (250 μg/kg body weight, intraperitoneal; i.p.) on brain edema progression were evaluated. The results showed that rapamycin treatment significantly reduced the infarct volume, the water content of the brain tissue and the Evans blue extravasation through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Rapamycin treatment could improve histological appearance of the brain tissue, increased the capillary lumen space and maintain the integrity of BBB. Rapamycin also inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression. These data imply that rapamycin could improve brain edema progression after reperfusion injury through maintaining BBB integrity and inhibiting MMP9 and AQP4 expression. The data of this study provide a new possible approach for improving brain edema after cerebral ischemia reperfusion by administration of rapamycin.

  14. Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Brain and Cerebellum in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciorkowska, Elżbieta; Gościk, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are rarely used in the diagnosis of patients with cerebral palsy. The aim of present study was to assess the relationships between the volumetric MRI and clinical findings in children with cerebral palsy compared to control subjects. Materials and Methods. Eighty-two children with cerebral palsy and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were collected. Results. The dominant changes identified on MRI scans in children with cerebral palsy were periventricular leukomalacia (42%) and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (21%). The total brain and cerebellum volumes in children with cerebral palsy were significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Significant grey matter volume reduction was found in the total brain in children with cerebral palsy compared with the control subjects. Positive correlations between the age of the children of both groups and the grey matter volumes in the total brain were found. Negative relationship between width of third ventricle and speech development was found in the patients. Positive correlations were noted between the ventricles enlargement and motor dysfunction and mental retardation in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusions. By using the voxel-based morphometry, the total brain, cerebellum, and grey matter volumes were significantly reduced in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27579318

  15. Persistent resetting of the cerebral oxygen/glucose uptake ratio by brain activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Hasselbalch, S G; Hagemann, L P;

    1995-01-01

    fraction of the activation-induced excess glucose uptake. These data confirm earlier reports that brain activation can induce resetting of the cerebral oxygen/glucose consumption ratio, and indicate that the resetting persists for a long period after cerebral activation has been terminated and physiologic...

  16. Protective effect of grifolin against brain injury in an acute cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protective effect of grifolin against brain injury in an acute ... Sent for review: 24 January 2017 ... levels in tissue homogenates of the cerebral ischemic rats compared with those in the negative ... Stroke is a major cause of death worldwide [1].

  17. Aquaporin 4 expression and ultrastructure of the blood-brain barrier following cerebral contusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinjun Li; Yangyun Han; Hong Xu; Zhongshu Sun; Zengjun Zhou; Xiaodong Long; Yumin Yang; Linbo Zou

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate aquaporin 4 expression and the ultrastructure of the blood-brain barrier at 2–72 hours following cerebral contusion injury, and correlate these changes to the formation of brain edema. Results revealed that at 2 hours after cerebral contusion and laceration injury, aquaporin 4 expression significantly increased, brain water content and blood-brain barrier permeability increased, and the number of pinocytotic vesicles in cerebral microvascular endothelial cells increased. In addition, the mitochondrial accumulation was observed. As contusion and laceration injury became aggravated, aquaporin 4 expression continued to increase, brain water content and blood-brain barrier permeability gradually increased, brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes swelled, and capillary basement membrane injury gradually increased. The above changes were most apparent at 12 hours after injury, after which they gradually attenuated. Aquaporin 4 expression positively correlated with brain water content and the blood-brain barrier index. Our experimental findings indicate that increasing aquaporin 4 expression and blood-brain barrier permeability after cerebral contusion and laceration injury in humans is involved in the formation of brain edema.

  18. Effects of prenatal protein malnutrition on the electrical cerebral activity during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Frías, V; Varela, O; Oropeza, J J; Bisiacchi, B; Alvarez, A

    2010-10-04

    Early protein restriction during the prenatal period has significant repercussions on the ontogeny and development of the central nervous system. The present study investigates whether early prenatal protein malnutrition could alter the electrical cerebral activity of the progeny. We used Sprague-Dawley female rats of 200 g randomly divided into three groups: a control group that received a diet with 25% of the protein content (lactalbumin), the experimental group, that received a diet with 6% of the protein content and the rehabilitated group that initially received a diet with 6% of the protein content, then switched to a diet with 25% of the protein content after the weaning period (P20D) up to 60 days of life (P60D). Reduction of the protein content from 25% to 6% of lactalbumin in the diet of pregnant rats produces impairment in the electrical cerebral activity in the progeny at P20D and at P60D. The power spectral analysis for each one of the electroencephalograms revealed that prenatal protein malnutrition in rats produced a significant reduction of the alpha (8-13 Hz) and the beta bands (13-30 Hz) and a significant increase of the theta (4-8 Hz), and delta bands (1-4 Hz), at two different stages of life (P20D and P60D). Similar results were obtained for the rehabilitated group. These results indicate that early malnutrition in life affects the ontogeny of the electrical cerebral activity. This insult probably disrupts the establishment of cortical neural circuits during the critical period of brain development. The rehabilitation period did not revert the impairment in the electrical cerebral activity produced by malnutrition. We used one-way ANOVA analysis, followed by Tukey test (*p<0.001). (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase attenuates cerebral ischemic injury in Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangyu Zou; Haiyan Qin; Yitao He; Heming Huang; Yi Lu; Xiaofan Chu

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia was induced using photothrombosis 1 hour after intraperitoneal injection of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor SB239063 into Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP/SWE) transgenic and non-transgenic mice. The number of surviving neurons in the penumbra was quantified using Nissl staining, and the activity of p38 MAPKs was measured by western blotting. The number of surviving neurons in the penumbra was significantly reduced in APP/SWE transgenic mice compared with non-transgenic controls 7 days after cerebral ischemia, but the activity of p38 MAPKs was significantly elevated compared with the non-ischemic hemisphere in the APP/SWE transgenic mice. SB239063 prevented these changes. The APP/SWE mutation exacerbated ischemic brain injury, and this could be alleviated by inhibiting p38 MAPK activity.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the course of experimental cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, María; Marín-García, Patricia; Pérez-Benavente, Susana; Sánchez-Nogueiro, Jesús; Puyet, Antonio; Bautista, José M; Diez, Amalia

    2013-01-15

    The role of neurotrophic factors on the integrity of the central nervous system (CNS) during cerebral malaria (CM) infection remains obscure, but the long-standing neurocognitive sequelae often observed in rescued children can be attributed in part to the modulation of neuronal survival and synaptic plasticity. To discriminate the contribution of key responses in the time-sequence of the pathogenic events that trigger the development of neurocognitive malaria syndrome we defined four stages (I-IV) of the neurological progression of CM in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Upregulation of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, e-selectin and p-selectin expression was detected in all cerebral regions before parasitized red blood cells (pRBC) accumulation. As the severity of symptoms increased, BDNF mRNA progressively diminished in several brain regions, earliest in the thalamus-hypothalamus, cerebellum, brainstem and cortex, and correlated with a four-stage disease sequence. Immunohistochemical confocal microscopy revealed changes in the BDNF distribution pattern, suggesting altered axonal transport. During CM progression, molecular markers of neurological infection and inflammation in the parasite and the host, respectively, were accompanied by a switch in the brain constitutive proteasome to the immunoproteasome, which could impede normal protein turnover. In parallel with BDNF downregulation, NCAM expression also diminished with increased CM severity. Together, these data suggest that changes in BDNF availability could be involved in the pathogenesis of CM.

  1. Effect of propofol on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine kinase receptor B in the hippocampus of aged rats with chronic cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Chen; Qiang Fu; Jiangbei Cao; Weidong Mi

    2012-01-01

    We intraperitoneally injected 10 and 50 mg/kg of propofol for 7 consecutive days to treat a rat model of chronic cerebral ischemia. A low-dose of propofol promoted the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tyrosine kinase receptor B, phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein, and cAMP in the hippocampus of aged rats with chronic cerebral ischemia, but a high-dose of propofol inhibited their expression. Results indicated that the protective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia in aged rats is related to changes in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine kinase receptor B in the hippocampus, and that the cAMP-cAMP responsive element binding protein pathway is involved in the regulatory effect of propofol on brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression.

  2. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gunge Riberholt

    Full Text Available Early mobilization is of importance for improving long-term outcome for patients after severe acquired brain injury. A limiting factor for early mobilization by head-up tilt is orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of the present study was to examine cerebral autoregulation in patients with severe acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography, middle cerebral artery velocity was evaluated by transcranial Doppler, and near-infrared spectroscopy determined frontal lobe oxygenation in the supine position and during head-up tilt. Cerebral autoregulation was evaluated as the mean flow index calculated as the ratio between middle cerebral artery mean velocity and estimated cerebral perfusion pressure. Patients with acquired brain injury presented an increase in mean flow index during head-up tilt indicating impaired autoregulation (P < 0.001. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability in the frequency domain revealed lower magnitudes of ~0.1 Hz spectral power in patients compared to healthy controls suggesting baroreflex dysfunction. In conclusion, patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance during head-up tilt have impaired cerebral autoregulation more than one month after brain injury.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells transplantation suppresses inflammatory responses in global cerebral ischemia:contribution of TNF-α-induced protein 6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-ming LIN; Shen ZHAO; Li-li ZHOU; Xiang-shao FANG; Yue FU; Zi-tong HUANG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation on rat global cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanisms.Methods:Adult male SD rats underwent asphxial cardiac arrest to induce global cerebral ischemia,then received intravenous injection of 5x106 cultured MSCs of SD rats at 2 h after resuscitation.In another group of cardiac arrest rats,tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 6 (TSG-6,6 μg) was injected into the right lateral ventricle.Functional outcome was assessed at 1,3,and 7 d after resuscitation.Donor MSCs in the brains were detected at 3 d after resuscitation.The level of serum S-1OOB and proinflammatory cytokines in cerebral cortex were assayed using ELISA.The expression of TSG-6 and proinflammatory cytokines in cerebral cortex was assayed using RT-PCR.Western blot was performed to determine the levels of TSG-6 and neutrophil elastase in cerebral cortex.Results:MSCs transplantation significantly reduced serum S-1OOB level,and improved neurological function after global cerebral ischemia compared to the PBS-treated group.The MSCs injected migrated into the ischemic brains,and were observed mainly in the cerebral cortex.Furthermore,MSCs transplantation significantly increased the expression of TSG-6,and reduced the expression of neutrophil elastase and proinflammatory cytokines in the cerebral cortex.Intracerebroventricular injection of TSG-6 reproduced the beneficial effects of MSCs transplantation in rats with global cerebral ischemia.Conclusion:MSCs transplantation improves functional recovery and reduces inflammatory responses in rats with global cerebral ischemia,maybe via upregulation of TSG-6 expression.

  4. Subtype activation and interaction of protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase controlling receptor expression in cerebral arteries and microvessels after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) still remains elusive. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase C (PKC) subtypes in the pathophysiology of cerebral...... enhanced phosphorylation only at 48 hours after SAH. The pattern was identical in large cerebral arteries and in intracerebral microvessels. Treatment with either the PKC (RO-31-7549) or the raf (SB386023-b) inhibitor prevented the kinase activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that specific subtypes...... ischemia after SAH in cerebral arteries and microvessels and to examine temporal activation of the kinases. We hypothesize that treatment with a MAPK or PKC inhibitor will prevent the SAH-induced kinase activation in brain vessels. METHODS: SAH was induced by injecting 250 microL blood...

  5. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira;

    2016-01-01

    acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography......, middle cerebral artery velocity was evaluated by transcranial Doppler, and near-infrared spectroscopy determined frontal lobe oxygenation in the supine position and during head-up tilt. Cerebral autoregulation was evaluated as the mean flow index calculated as the ratio between middle cerebral artery...

  6. Cerebral infarction mimicking brain tumor on Tc-99m tetrofosmin brain SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soon [College of Medicine, Dongguk Univ., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Zeon, Seok Kil; Won, Kyoung Sook [School of Medicine, Keimyung Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-01

    A 43-year-old man was presented with persistent headache for two weeks. T2 weighted MR imaging showed high signal intensity with surrounding edema in the left frontal lobe. These findings were considered with intracranial tumor such as glioma or metastasis. Tc-99m tetrofosmin SPECT showed focal radiotracer accumulation in the left frontal lobe. The operative specimen contained cerebral infarction with organizing leptomeningeal hematoma by pathologist. Another 73-year-old man was hospitalized for chronic headache. Initial CT showed ill-defined hypodensity with mass effect in the right parietal lobe. Tc-99m tetrofosmin SPECT showed focal radiotracer uptake in the right parietal lobe. These findings were considered with low-grade glioma or infarction. Follow-up CT after 5 months showed slightly decreased in size of low density in the right parietal lobe, and cerebral infarction is more likely than others. Tc-99m tetrofosmin has been proposed as a cardiotracer of myocardial perfusion imaging and an oncotropic radiotracer. Tc-99 tetrofosmin SPECT image provides a better attractive alternative agent than TI-201 as a tumor-imaging agent, with characteristics such as high-energy flux, short half-life, favorable biodistribution, dosimetry and lower background radioactivity. We have keep in mind on the analysis of Tc-99m tetrofosmin imaging when cerebral infarction is being differentiated from brain tumor.

  7. Study of Posterior Cerebral Artery in Human Cadaveric Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Gunnal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Basilar artery (BA terminates in right and left posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs. Each PCA supplies respective occipital lobe of the cerebrum. The present study is designed to know the morphology, morphometry, branching pattern, and symmetry of PCA. Methods. The study included 340 PCAs dissected from 170 human cadaveric brains. Results. Morphological variations of P1 segment included, aplasia (2.35%, hypoplasia (5.29%, duplication (2.35%, fenestration (1.17%, and common trunk shared with SCA (1.76%. Morphological variations of origin of P2 segment included direct origin of it from BA (1.17% and ICA (2.35%. Unusually, two P2 segments, each arising separately from BA and ICA, were observed in 1.17%. Unilateral two P2 segments from CW were found in 0.58%. Morphological variations of course of P2 were duplication (0.58%, fenestration (0.58%, and aneurysm (1.76%. Unilateral P2 either adult or fetal was seen in 4.71%. The group II branching pattern was found to be most common. Asymmetry of P2 was 40%. Morphometry of P2 revealed mean length of 52 mm and mean diameter of 2.7 mm. Conclusion. The present study provides the complete anatomical description of PCA regarding morphology, morphometry, symmetry, and its branching pattern. Awareness of these variations is likely to be useful in cerebrovascular procedures.

  8. Neuroprotective mechanisms of puerarin in middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced brain infarction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Puerarin, a major isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medical herb Radix puerariae (kudzu root, has been reported to be useful in the treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we examined the detailed mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of puerarin on inflammatory and apoptotic responses induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in rats. Treatment of puerarin (25 and 50 mg/kg; intraperitoneally 10 min before MCAO dose-dependently attenuated focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Administration of puerarin at 50 mg/kg, showed marked reduction in infarct size compared with that of control rats. MCAO-induced focal cerebral ischemia was associated with increases in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, and active caspase-3 protein expressions as well as the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in ischemic regions. These expressions were markedly inhibited by the treatment of puerarin (50 mg/kg. In addition, puerarin (10~50 μM concentration-dependently inhibited respiratory bursts in human neutrophils stimulated by formyl-Met-Leu-Phe. On the other hand, puerarin (20~500 μM did not significantly inhibit the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance reaction in rat brain homogenates. An electron spin resonance (ESR method was conducted on the scavenging activity of puerarin on the free radicals formed. Puerarin (200 and 500 μM did not reduce the ESR signal intensity of hydroxyl radical formation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that puerarin is a potent neuroprotective agent on MCAO-induced focal cerebral ischemia in vivo. This effect may be mediated, at least in part, by the inhibition of both HIF-1α and TNF-α activation, followed by the inhibition of inflammatory responses (i.e., iNOS expression, apoptosis formation (active caspase-3, and neutrophil activation, resulting in a reduction in the infarct volume in ischemia-reperfusion brain injury. Thus

  9. Incidental Diagnosis of Cerebral Cortical Venous Thrombosis in Postdural Puncture Headache on Brain Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbertjean, Lisa; Ducrocq, Xavier; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Mione, Gioia; Richard, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of cerebral cortical venous thrombosis in patients with postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is usually secondary to changes in headache pattern or cerebral infarctions. Nevertheless, incidental discovery of asymptomatic forms on brain imaging has never been reported before and its management thus remains ill-defined. We describe 2 cases of patients with asymptomatic cortical vein thrombosis in the context of PDPH. In both cases, brain computed tomography (CT) scans showed an isolated cortical vein thrombosis without cerebral damage. Neurological examination revealed the typical orthostatic feature of PDPH, independently of cortical vein thrombosis which was considered as a radiological incidental finding. Clinical and radiological signs resolved after bed rest, oral caffeine, and anticoagulation therapy. Asymptomatic cortical vein thrombosis may be found on radiological exploration, even basic like brain CT scan without contrast, of PDPH. Utility of anticoagulation therapy, which could increase the risk of cerebral hemorrhagic complications in this specific context, has to be assessed.

  10. Imaging experimental cerebral malaria in vivo: significant role of ischemic brain edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Viola, Angèle; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Le Fur, Yann; Duhamel, Guillaume; Kober, Frank; Ibarrola, Danielle; Izquierdo, Marguerite; Coltel, Nicolas; Gharib, Bouchra; Grau, Georges E; Cozzone, Patrick J

    2005-08-10

    The first in vivo magnetic resonance study of experimental cerebral malaria is presented. Cerebral involvement is a lethal complication of malaria. To explore the brain of susceptible mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, multimodal magnetic resonance techniques were applied (imaging, diffusion, perfusion, angiography, spectroscopy). They reveal vascular damage including blood-brain barrier disruption and hemorrhages attributable to inflammatory processes. We provide the first in vivo demonstration for blood-brain barrier breakdown in cerebral malaria. Major edema formation as well as reduced brain perfusion was detected and is accompanied by an ischemic metabolic profile with reduction of high-energy phosphates and elevated brain lactate. In addition, angiography supplies compelling evidence for major hemodynamics dysfunction. Actually, edema further worsens ischemia by compressing cerebral arteries, which subsequently leads to a collapse of the blood flow that ultimately represents the cause of death. These findings demonstrate the coexistence of inflammatory and ischemic lesions and prove the preponderant role of edema in the fatal outcome of experimental cerebral malaria. They improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria and may provide the necessary noninvasive surrogate markers for quantitative monitoring of treatment.

  11. A study of the spatial protein organization of the postsynaptic density isolated from porcine cerebral cortex and cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun-Hong, Yen; Chih-Fan, Chuang; Chia-Wei, Chang; Yen-Chung, Chang

    2011-10-01

    Postsynaptic density (PSD) is a protein supramolecule lying underneath the postsynaptic membrane of excitatory synapses and has been implicated to play important roles in synaptic structure and function in mammalian central nervous system. Here, PSDs were isolated from two distinct regions of porcine brain, cerebral cortex and cerebellum. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analyses indicated that cerebral and cerebellar PSDs consisted of a similar set of proteins with noticeable differences in the abundance of various proteins between these samples. Subsequently, protein localization in these PSDs was analyzed by using the Nano-Depth-Tagging method. This method involved the use of three synthetic reagents, as agarose beads whose surface was covalently linked with a fluorescent, photoactivable, and cleavable chemical crosslinker by spacers of varied lengths. After its application was verified by using a synthetic complex consisting of four layers of different proteins, the Nano-Depth-Tagging method was used here to yield information concerning the depth distribution of various proteins in the PSD. The results indicated that in both cerebral and cerebellar PSDs, glutamate receptors, actin, and actin binding proteins resided in the peripheral regions within ∼ 10 nm deep from the surface and that scaffold proteins, tubulin subunits, microtubule-binding proteins, and membrane cytoskeleton proteins found in mammalian erythrocytes resided in the interiors deeper than 10 nm from the surface in the PSD. Finally, by using the immunoabsorption method, binding partner proteins of two proteins residing in the interiors, PSD-95 and α-tubulin, and those of two proteins residing in the peripheral regions, elongation factor-1α and calcium, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α subunit, of cerebral and cerebellar PSDs were identified. Overall, the results indicate a striking similarity in protein organization between the PSDs isolated from porcine cerebral cortex and cerebellum

  12. YiQiFuMai powder injection ameliorates blood–brain barrier dysfunction and brain edema after focal cerebral ischemia–reperfusion injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao GS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Guosheng Cao, Xinyi Ye, Yingqiong Xu, Mingzhu Yin, Honglin Chen, Junping Kou, Boyang Yu Jiangsu Key Laboratory of TCM Evaluation and Translational Research, Department of Complex Prescription of TCM, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: YiQiFuMai powder injection (YQFM is a modern preparation derived from the traditional Chinese medicine Sheng-Mai-San. YQFM is widely used in clinical practice in the People’s Republic of China, mainly for the treatment of microcirculatory disturbance-related diseases. However, little is known about its role in animals with ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of YQFM on brain edema and blood–brain barrier (BBB dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia–reperfusion (I/R injury. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent right middle cerebral artery occlusion for 1 hour with a subsequent 24-hour reperfusion to produce I/R injury. YQFM (three doses: 0.336, 0.671, and 1.342 g/kg was then given intraperitoneally (IP. The results demonstrated that YQFM significantly decreased infarct size, improved neurological deficits, reduced brain water content, and increased cerebral blood flow after I/R injury. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose micro-positron emission tomography imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining results indicated that YQFM is able to ameliorate brain metabolism and histopathological damage after I/R. Moreover, YQFM administration reduced BBB leakage and upregulated the expression of zona occludens-1 (ZO-1 and occludin, which was confirmed by Evans Blue extravasation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence assay. Our findings suggest that YQFM provides protection against focal cerebral I/R injury in mice, possibly by improving BBB dysfunction via upregulation of the expression of tight junction proteins. Keywords: YiQiFuMai powder injection, YQFM, ischemic stroke, blood–brain barrier, microvascular permeability, tight junctions

  13. SHORT-TERM MEMORY IS INDEPENDENT OF BRAIN PROTEIN SYNTHESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Hasker P.; Rosenzweig, Mark R.; Jones, Oliver W.

    1980-09-01

    Male Swiss albino CD-1 mice given a single injection of a cerebral protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin (ANI) (1 mg/animal), 20 min prior to single trial passive avoidance training demonstrated impaired retention at tests given 3 hr, 6 hr, 1 day, and 7 days after training. Retention was not significantly different from saline controls when tests were given 0.5 or 1.5 hr after training. Prolonging inhibition of brain protein synthesis by giving either 1 or 2 additional injections of ANI 2 or 2 and 4 hr after training did not prolong short-term retention performance. The temporal development of impaired retention in ANI treated mice could not be accounted for by drug dosage, duration of protein synthesis inhibition, or nonspecific sickness at test. In contrast to the suggestion that protein synthesis inhibition prolongs short-term memory (Quinton, 1978), the results of this experiment indicate that short-term memory is not prolonged by antibiotic drugs that inhibit cerebral protein synthesis. All evidence seems consistent with the hypothesis that short-term memory is protein synthesis independent and that the establishment of long-term memory depends upon protein synthesis during or shortly after training. Evidence for a role of protein synthesis in memory maintenance is discussed.

  14. Inhibitory Effect on Cerebral Inflammatory Response following Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats: A Potential Neuroprotective Mechanism of N-Acetylcysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although N-acetylcysteine (NAC has been shown to be neuroprotective for traumatic brain injury (TBI, the mechanisms for this beneficial effect are still poorly understood. Cerebral inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury after TBI. However, it has not been investigated whether NAC modulates TBI-induced cerebral inflammatory response. In this work, we investigated the effect of NAC administration on cortical expressions of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and inflammatory proteins such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 after TBI. As a result, we found that NF-κB, proinflammatory cytokines, and ICAM-1 were increased in all injured animals. In animals given NAC post-TBI, NF-κB, IL-1β, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 were decreased in comparison to vehicle-treated animals. Measures of IL-6 showed no change after NAC treatment. NAC administration reduced brain edema, BBB permeability, and apoptotic index in the injured brain. The results suggest that post-TBI NAC administration may attenuate inflammatory response in the injured rat brain, and this may be one mechanism by which NAC ameliorates secondary brain damage following TBI.

  15. Expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha and ischemic erythropoietin tolerance in the brain of cerebral ischemic tolerance model rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renliang Zhao; Ruijian Dong; Zhongling Sun

    2006-01-01

    ,the preischemia was substituted by sham-operation(only common carotid artery and crotch were exposed, and MCAO by suture was omitted), and the other procedures were the same as those in the IPC group. In the control group, rats were given sham-operation twice at an interval of one day, and they were sacrificed 24 hours after the second sham-operation. ② Brain tissue was taken from the rats in each group. Cerebral infarction area of each layer was measured with TTC staining, and total cerebral infarction volume (The total cerebral infarction area of each layer×interspace ) was calculated. After brain tissue was stained by haematoxylin-esoin (HE), the form of nerve cells was observed under an optical microscope, and the expressions of HIF-1αand EPO protein in the brain tissue were detected with immunohistochemical method.MAIN OUTCOM E MEASURES: ①Cerebral infarction volume;②form of nerve cell; ③ the expression of HIF-1αand EPO protein in the brain tissue.RESULTS:Totally 84 rats were enrolled in the experiment. The dead rats were randomly supplied during the experiment, and finally 84 rats entered the stage of result analysis. ① Detection of cerebral infarction volume of rats in each group: Cerebral infarction volume in the IPC group was significantly smaller than that in the sham-operation group on the 1st, 3rd and 7th days after reperfusion respectively [(161.2±6.9) mm3 vs (219.9±11.2) mm3, (134.9±9.0) mm3 vs (218.6±13.0) mm3, (142.9±13.7) mm3 vs (221.3±14.2) mm3, t=-8.924,10.587,7.947, P< 0.01]. ② Observation of nerve cell form of brain tissue: HE staining showed that the ischemic degree, range and cerebral edema degree of IPC group were significantly milder than those of sham-operation group. ③ The expressions of HIF-1α and EPO protein in cerebral cortex and hippocampus:The expression of HIF-1αof IPC group was significantly higher than that of sham-operation group on the 1st,3rd and 7th days after reperfusion respectively (125.93±3.79 vs 117.65±5

  16. Intrathecal baclofen therapy for spasticity of cerebral origin: cerebral palsy and brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttin, B; Ivanhoe, C; Albright, L; Dimitrijevic, M; Saltuari, L

    1999-04-01

    Spasticity affects approximately 66% of individuals with cerebral palsy and 14% of the 100,000 individuals who, each year, experience brain injury in the US. This spasticity interferes with motor function and limits range of motion. It may cause pain and impede mobility, transfers, activities of daily living, sitting posture, and sleep. In addition, spasticity can contribute to the formation of pressure sores and joint contractures and make nursing or caregiving difficult. Several treatment options are available for intractable spasticity. For some diagnoses, oral medications are still the treatment of choice, while in other settings injection therapy may be more appropriate. If, however, they are ineffective or cause too many side effects, intrathecal baclofen therapy (ITB) may be a valuable alternative. ITB is effective, nondestructive, titratable, and reversible. In addition, it is associated with fewer CNS-related side effects than oral Lioresal (Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland). Intrathecal baclofen therapy may improve range of motion, facilitate movement, reduce the patient's expenditure of energy, facilitate nursing, reduce the risk of developing contractures, and, in some cases, diminish pain resulting from spasticity and/or spasms. It also may improve speech, gait, upper extremity function, and activities of daily living, including communication, eating, dressing, hygiene, and other aspects of self-care. A recent study shows that treatment with intrathecal baclofen reduces the need for corrective orthopedic surgeries. Patient selection should be done in a multidisciplinary spasticity setting, where the expertise for different treatment modalities is available. Patients must be screened for response to the drug prior to implantation of the drug delivery pump. Maintenance doses for intrathecal baclofen range from 22 to 1400 μg/day, with most patients adequately maintained on 90-703 μg/day. Complications, while rare, are most often related to the

  17. Perforin expression by CD8 T cells is sufficient to cause fatal brain edema during experimental cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Matthew; Johnson, Holly L; Jin, Fang; N'Songo, Aurelie; Hanson, Lisa M; LaFrance, Stephanie J; Butler, Noah S; Harty, John T; Johnson, Aaron J

    2017-03-06

    Human cerebral malaria (HCM) is a serious complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. The most severe outcomes for patients include coma, permanent neurological deficits, and death. Recently, a large-scale magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study in humans identified brain swelling as the most prominent predictor of fatal HCM. Therefore, in this study we sought to define the mechanism controlling brain edema through the use of the murine experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) model. Specifically, we investigated the ability of CD8 T cells to initiate brain edema during ECM. We determined that areas of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability colocalized with a reduction of the cerebral endothelial cell tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin. Furthermore, through small animal MRI we analyzed edema and vascular leakage. Using gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted MRI we determined that vascular permeability is not homogeneous, but rather confined to specific regions of the brain. Our findings show that BBB permeability was localized within the brainstem, olfactory bulb, and lateral ventricle. Concurrently with the initiation of vascular permeability, T2-weighted MRI revealed edema and brain swelling. Importantly, ablation of the cytolytic effector molecule perforin fully protected against vascular permeability and edema. Furthermore, perforin production specifically by CD8 T cells was required to cause fatal edema during ECM. We propose that CD8 T cells initiate BBB breakdown through perforin mediated disruption of tight junctions. In turn, leakage from the vasculature into the parenchyma causes brain swelling and edema. This results in a breakdown of homeostatic maintenance that likely contributes to ECM pathology.

  18. Blood-brain barrier and cerebral blood flow: Age differences in hemorrhagic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya Oxana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal stroke is similar to the stroke that occurs in adults and produces a significant morbidity and long-term neurologic and cognitive deficits. There are important differences in the factors, clinical events and outcomes associated with the stroke in infants and adults. However, mechanisms underlying age differences in the stroke development remain largely unknown. Therefore, treatment guidelines for neonatal stroke must extrapolate from the adult data that is often not suitable for children. The new information about differences between neonatal and adult stroke is essential for identification of significant areas for future treatment and effective prevention of neonatal stroke. Here, we studied the development of stress-induced hemorrhagic stroke and possible mechanisms underlying these processes in newborn and adult rats. Using histological methods and magnetic resonance imaging, we found age differences in the type of intracranial hemorrhages. Newborn rats demonstrated small superficial bleedings in the cortex while adult rats had more severe deep bleedings in the cerebellum. Using Doppler optical coherent tomography, we found higher stress-reactivity of the sagittal sinus to deleterious effects of stress in newborn vs. adult rats suggesting that the cerebral veins are more vulnerable to negative stress factors in neonatal vs. adult brain in rats. However, adult but not newborn rats demonstrated the stroke-induced breakdown of blood brain barrier (BBB permeability. The one of possible mechanisms underlying the higher resistance to stress-related stroke injures of cerebral vessels in newborn rats compared with adult animals is the greater expression of two main tight junction proteins of BBB (occludin and claudin-5 in neonatal vs. mature brain in rats.

  19. Zingiber officinale Mitigates Brain Damage and Improves Memory Impairment in Focal Cerebral Ischemic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintanaporn Wattanathorn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia is known to produce brain damage and related behavioral deficits including memory. Recently, accumulating lines of evidence showed that dietary enrichment with nutritional antioxidants could reduce brain damage and improve cognitive function. In this study, possible protective effect of Zingiber officinale, a medicinal plant reputed for neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-related brain damage, on brain damage and memory deficit induced by focal cerebral ischemia was elucidated. Male adult Wistar rats were administrated an alcoholic extract of ginger rhizome orally 14 days before and 21 days after the permanent occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCAO. Cognitive function assessment was performed at 7, 14, and 21 days after MCAO using the Morris water maze test. The brain infarct volume and density of neurons in hippocampus were also determined. Furthermore, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px in cerebral cortex, striatum, and hippocampus was also quantified at the end of experiment. The results showed that cognitive function and neurons density in hippocampus of rats receiving ginger rhizome extract were improved while the brain infarct volume was decreased. The cognitive enhancing effect and neuroprotective effect occurred partly via the antioxidant activity of the extract. In conclusion, our study demonstrated the beneficial effect of ginger rhizome to protect against focal cerebral ischemia.

  20. Study on the relationship of cytochrome C expression and cerebral edema in perihematomal brain tissue in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Heng; LIU Guixiang; XU Chunsheng; LIU Qingxin; XU Xiaobo

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of cytochrome C in perihematomal brain tissue and its relationship with the histopathological change and formation of cerebral edema in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. Methods Thirty four patients (23 male, 11 female) of hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage in hospital from Sep. 2001 to Sep. 2002 were selected with a mean age 55.6± 10.2 years (from 35 to 75 years). The mean volume of hemorrhagic blood was 50.4±11.6 ml (from 25 to 85 ml). The perihematomal brain tissue was obtained from the minimally invasive surgery. Histopathological change and expressions of cytochrome C in perihematomal brain tissue was detected by histopathological and immunohistochemical techniques. The volume of perihematomal cerebral edema was determined by computed tomographic scan before operation. The results of staining and the volume of perihematomal cerebral edema were analyzed with double blind fashion. Results Perihematomal cerebral edema were found 12-72h after cerebral hemorrhage. Myelin sheath degeneration, condensation of nucleus and typical apopototic body were observed in perihematomal brain tissue. Expression of cytochrome C in perihematomal brain tissue was observed at 4 h and reached peak around 48-72 h after cerebral hemorrhage. Cytochrome C expressed higher positively in 16 patients and lower positively in 13 patients. Cytochrome C expression was not detected only in 5 patints. There were significant differences in volume of perihematomal cerebral edema with different expression of cytochrome C in perihematomal brain tissue (P<0.01). Conclusions Cytochrome C expression was upregulated in perihematomal brain tissue in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. Cytochrome C might involve in the histopathological change and the formation of perihematomal cerebral edema.

  1. Brain Size and Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate in Nonspecific Retardation and Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Brain size and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were determined for 10 individuals with mild mental retardation (MR), 7 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and 10 matched controls. MR and DS groups both had brain volumes of about 80% compared to controls, with variance greatest within the MR group. (SLD)

  2. Language Development and Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characteristics in Preschool Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ja Young; Choi, Yoon Seong; Park, Eun Sook

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate characteristics of language development in relation to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and the other contributing factors to language development in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: The study included 172 children with CP who underwent brain MRI and language…

  3. Cerebral microglia recruit monocytes into the brain in response to tumor necrosis factoralpha signaling during peripheral organ inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Charlotte; Le, Tai; Swain, Mark G

    2009-02-18

    In inflammatory diseases occurring outside the CNS, communication between the periphery and the brain via humoral and/or neural routes results in central neural changes and associated behavioral alterations. We have recently identified another immune-to-CNS communication pathway in the setting of organ-centered peripheral inflammation: namely, the entrance of immune cells into the brain. In our current study, using a mouse model of inflammatory liver injury, we have confirmed the significant infiltration of activated monocytes into the brain in mice with hepatic inflammation and have defined the mechanism that mediates this trafficking of monocytes. Specifically, we show that in the presence of hepatic inflammation, mice demonstrate elevated cerebral monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 levels, as well as increased numbers of circulating CCR2-expressing monocytes. Cerebral recruitment of monocytes was abolished in inflamed mice that lacked MCP-1/CCL2 or CCR2. Furthermore, in mice with hepatic inflammation, microglia were activated and produced MCP-1/CCL2 before cerebral monocyte infiltration. Moreover, peripheral tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha signaling was required to stimulate microglia to produce MCP-1/CCL2. TNFalpha signaling via TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) is required for these observed effects since in TNFR1 deficient mice with hepatic inflammation, microglial expression of MCP-1/CCL2 and cerebral monocyte recruitment were both markedly inhibited, whereas there was no inhibition in TNFR2 deficient mice. Our results identify the existence of a novel immune-to-CNS communication pathway occurring in the setting of peripheral organ-centered inflammation which may have specific implications for the development of alterations in cerebral neurotransmission commonly encountered in numerous inflammatory diseases occurring outside the CNS.

  4. Amino acid incorporation into the protein of mitochondrial preparations from cerebral cortex and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H S

    1966-07-01

    1. Washed guinea-pig cerebral-cortex mitochondria incorporate [(14)C]leucine into their protein at a rate comparable with the rates reported for liver or heart mitochondria only if the mitochondria are separated from myelin and nerve endings by density-gradient centrifugation. 2. The non-mitochondrial components (myelin and nerve endings) of brain mitochondrial preparations incorporated [(14)C]leucine at a negligible rate. 3. The mitochondria do not require an exogenous supply of energy or a full supply of amino acids to support the process. 4. The incorporation rate was linear up to 2hr. aerobic incubation at 30 degrees and was inhibited by chloramphenicol, only slightly by actinomycin D and not by penicillin or pretreatment with ribonuclease. The observed incorporation is considered to be unlikely to be due to contaminating cytoplasmic ribosomes or bacteria. 5. The process was also studied in mitochondrial preparations from rabbit cerebral cortex and spinal cord.

  5. Restoration of brain protein synthesis in mature and aged rats by a DA agonist, piribedil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustany, P; Trenque, T; Crambes, O; Moulin, M

    1995-01-01

    Brain ageing affects numerous cerebral metabolic pathways such as cerebral glucose consumption or protein synthesis rate. The pharmacological effect of a mixed D1-D2 dopaminergic agonist, piribedil, on this last metabolism is reported. Cerebral Protein Synthesis Rate (CPSR) was measured by the [35S]L-methionine autoradiographic procedure in 38 main brain regions of 11 and 26-month-old Wistar rats after a 2-month treatment per os at 9 and 30 mg/kg/day with piribedil. Mean decrease of CPSR was -21% during the 15-month ageing we followed, with important local variations. Mean CPSR increased with the two treatments, +25% in mature and +35% in aged rats. Treatments restored CPSR of aged rats to the exact mature subjects levels in quite all the brain regions. No dose-effect or asymetrical modification was statistically revealed for the two treatments. Metabolic increases involved particularly central brain gray structures, especially some DA-targeted brain nuclei concerned with behaviour and learning. This effect argued for a general metabotrophic effect of D1-D2 dopamine stimulation of the brain. The original pattern of local ageing of brain protein synthesis in rat was also incidentally reported. This was the first direct report of a wide and effective metabolic activation of CPSR in the brain during ageing by a curative dopaminergic agonist treatment.

  6. Elevated global SUMOylation in Ubc9 transgenic mice protects their brains against focal cerebral ischemic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Ja Lee

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that a massive increase in global SUMOylation occurs during torpor in ground squirrels, and that overexpression of Ubc9 and/or SUMO-1 in cell lines and cortical neurons protects against oxygen and glucose deprivation. To examine whether increased global SUMOylation protects against ischemic brain damage, we have generated transgenic mice in which Ubc9 is expressed strongly in all tissues under the chicken β-actin promoter. Ubc9 expression levels in 10 founder lines ranged from 2 to 30 times the endogenous level, and lines that expressed Ubc9 at modestly increased levels showed robust resistance to brain ischemia compared to wild type mice. The infarction size was inversely correlated with the Ubc9 expression levels for up to five times the endogenous level. Although further increases showed no additional benefit, the Ubc9 expression level was highly correlated with global SUMO-1 conjugation levels (and SUMO-2,3 levels to a lesser extent up to a five-fold Ubc9 increase. Most importantly, there were striking reciprocal relationships between SUMO-1 (and SUMO-2,3 conjugation levels and cerebral infarction volumes among all tested animals, suggesting that the limit in cytoprotection by global SUMOylation remains undefined. These results support efforts to further augment global protein SUMOylation in brain ischemia.

  7. Protein kinase C-theta is required for development of experimental cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauconnier, Mathilde; Bourigault, Marie-Laure; Meme, Sandra; Szeremeta, Frederic; Palomo, Jennifer; Danneels, Adeline; Charron, Sabine; Fick, Lizette; Jacobs, Muazzam; Beloeil, Jean-Claude; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valerie F J

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is the most severe neurologic complication in children and young adults infected with Plasmodium falciparum. T-cell activation is required for development of Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA)-induced experimental cerebral malaria (CM). To characterize the T-cell activation pathway involved, the role of protein kinase C-theta (PKC-θ) in experimental CM development was examined. PKC-θ-deficient mice are resistant to CM development. In the absence of PKC-θ, no neurologic sign of CM developed after blood stage PbA infection. Resistance of PKC-θ-deficient mice correlated with unaltered cerebral microcirculation and absence of ischemia, as documented by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography, whereas wild-type mice developed distinct microvascular pathology. Recruitment and activation of CD8(+) T cells, and ICAM-1 and CD69 expression were reduced in the brain of resistant mice; however, the pulmonary inflammation and edema associated with PbA infection were still present in the absence of functional PKC-θ. Resistant PKC-θ-deficient mice developed high parasitemia, and died at 3 weeks with severe anemia. Therefore, PKC-θ signaling is crucial for recruitment of CD8(+) T cells and development of brain microvascular pathology resulting in fatal experimental CM, and may represent a novel therapeutic target of CM. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Imaging Observation of Scalp Acupuncture on Brain Gray Matter Injury in Stroke Patients with Cerebral Infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Yi; Cui, Fang-yuan; Li, Kuang-shi; Tan, Zhong-jian; Zou, Yi-huai

    2016-03-01

    To study features of brain gray matter injury in cerebral infarction patients and intervention of scalp acupuncture by using voxel-based morphology. A total of 16 cerebral infarction patients were recruited in this study, and assigned to the scalp acupuncture group and the control group, 8 in each group. Another 16 healthy volunteers were recruited as a normal group. All patients received scanning of T1 structure. Images were managed using VBM8 Software package. Difference of the gray matter structure was compared among the scalp acupuncture group, the control group, and the healthy volunteers. Compared with healthy volunteers, gray matter injury of cerebral infarction patients mainly occurred in 14 brain regions such as cingulate gyrus, precuneus, cuneus, anterior central gyrus, insular lobe, and so on. They were mainly distributed in affected side. Two weeks after treatment when compared with healthy volunteers, gray matter injury of cerebral infarction patients in the scalp acupuncture group still existed in 8 brain regions such as bilateral lingual gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, left cuneus, right precuneus, and so on. New gray matter injury occurred in lingual gyrus and posterior cingulate gyrus. Two weeks after treatment when compared with healthy volunteers, gray matter injury of cerebral infarction patients in the control group existed in 23 brain regions: bilateral anterior cingulum, caudate nucleus, cuneate lobe, insular lobe, inferior frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, precuneus, paracentral lobule, superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, right postcentral gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, precentral gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, and so on. New gray matter injury still existed in 9 cerebral regions such as lingual gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, postcentral gyrus, and so on. Brain gray matter structure is widely injured after cerebral infarction. Brain gray matter volume gradually decreased as time went by. Combined use of

  9. Clinical and Physiological Events That Contribute to the Success Rate of Finding "Optimal" Cerebral Perfusion Pressure in Severe Brain Trauma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersink, Corien S. A.; Aries, Marcel J. H.; Dias, Celeste; Liu, Mary X.; Kolias, Angelos G.; Donnelly, Joseph; Czosnyka, Marek; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Regtien, Joost; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Smielewski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Recently, a concept of an individually targeted level of cerebral perfusion pressure that aims to restore impaired cerebral vasoreactivity has been advocated after traumatic brain injury. The relationship between cerebral perfusion pressure and pressure reactivity index normally is suppos

  10. Fluid Intake Related to Brain Edema in Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmasaroja, Pornpatr A

    2016-02-01

    Evidence of the appropriate amount of fluid intake during the first few days after acute stroke was scarce. Concerns were raised in patients with acute malignant middle cerebral infarction, who tended to have malignant brain edema later. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of fluid intake on the occurrence of malignant brain edema in patients with acute middle cerebral artery infarction. Patients with acute middle cerebral artery infarction who had National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of at least 15 were included. Baseline characteristics and amount of fluid intake during the first few days were compared in patients with and without malignant brain edema. One hundred ninety-three patients were studied. Mean NIHSS score was 20. Malignant brain edema occurred in 69 patients (36%). Higher amount of fluid intake (>1650 ml or >28 ml/kg/day or >93% of daily maintenance fluid) showed a significant association with malignant brain edema (OR = 13.86, 95% CI 5.11-37.60, p value edema, 39 patients (39/65, 60%) died and only 11% (7/65 patients) had favorable outcome. High amount of fluid intake in the first few days of acute middle cerebral infarction was related to the occurrence of malignant brain edema.

  11. Widening the differential for brain masses in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients: syphilitic cerebral gummata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Andrew M; Nelson, George A; Bell, Stephen G; Denby, Kara J; Estrada, Carlos A; Willett, Lisa L

    2013-09-01

    A 39-year-old man with newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was admitted with right-sided weakness, right-sided vision loss and slurred speech, which worsened over several weeks. Brain imaging revealed bilateral intraparenchymal ring-enhancing lesions and enhancement of the right optic nerve. Serological findings were positive for venereal disease research laboratory test, whereas the cerebrospinal fluid venereal disease research laboratory test was nonreactive. Brain biopsy suggested a diagnosis of syphilitic cerebral gummata, and the patient's improvement with penicillin and dexamethasone further supported this etiology. Syphilitic cerebral gummata have rarely been reported in patients with HIV infection. This patient demonstrates that cerebral gummata should be considered in the differential diagnosis in immunocompromised patients with characteristic brain masses, that HIV and syphilis often coexist with early neurosyphilis appearing more frequently in this patient population and that normal cerebrospinal fluid studies may not represent a true lack of syphilitic activity in HIV patients.

  12. Hemimegalencephaly misdiagnosed as a congenital brain tumor by fetal cerebral ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimaki, Shigeru; Endo, Masaya; Seki, Kazuo; Yokota, Shumpei

    2004-04-01

    To describe a case of hemimegalencephaly misdiagnosed prenatally. We presented a neonate with hemimegalencephaly, who was thought to have a congenital brain tumor by fetal cerebral ultrasonography. Postnatal MRI findings showed hemimegalencephaly characterized by mild enlargement of the affected hemisphere with a predominantly abnormal signal in the frontal lobe. The appearance of an echogenic round-shaped mass may have resulted from predominant hypermyelination and/or dysplastic neural/glial tissue in the frontal white matter. In prenatal diagnosis with fetal cerebral ultrasonography, it is difficult to distinguish between congenital brain tumor and hemimegalencephaly in which enlargement of the hemisphere is mild and the affected area of the brain is localized or predominantly in part of a cerebral hemisphere. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The effect of butylphthalide on the brain edema, blood-brain barrier of rats after focal cerebral infarction and the expression of Rho A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinyang; Wen, Qingping; Wu, Yue; Li, Baozhu; Gao, Peng

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect of butylphthalide on the brain edema, blood-brain barrier of rats of rats after focal cerebral infarction and the expression of Rho A. A total of 195 sprague-dawley male rats were randomly divided into control group, model group, and butylphthalide group (40 mg/kg, once a day, by gavage). The model was made by photochemical method. After surgery 3, 12, 24, 72, and 144 h, brain water content was done to see the effect of butylphthalide for the cerebral edema. Evans blue extravasation method was done to see the changes in blood-brain barrier immunohistochemistry, and Western blot was done to see the expression of Rho A around the infarction. Compared with the control group, the brain water content of model group and butylphthalide group rats was increased, the permeability of blood-brain barrier of model group and butylphthalide group rats was increased, and the Rho A protein of model group and butylphthalide group rats was increased. Compared with the model group, the brain water content of butylphthalide group rats was induced (73.67 ± 0.67 vs 74.14 ± 0.46; 74.89 ± 0.57 vs 75.61 ± 0.52; 77.49 ± 0.34 vs 79.33 ± 0.49; 76.31 ± 0.56 vs 78.01 ± 0.48; 72.36 ± 0.44 vs 73.12 ± 0.73; P edema, protect the blood-brain barrier, and decrease the expression of Rho A around the infarction.

  14. Melatonin reduces traumatic brain injury-induced oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex and blood of rats

    OpenAIRE

    Şenol, Nilgün; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals induced by traumatic brain injury have deleterious effects on the function and antioxidant vitamin levels of several organ systems including the brain. Melatonin possesses antioxidant effect on the brain by maintaining antioxidant enzyme and vitamin levels. We investigated the effects of melatonin on antioxidant ability in the cerebral cortex and blood of traumatic brain injury rats. Results showed that the cerebral cortex β-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, reduced glutathione, a...

  15. A study of cerebral perfusion using single photon emission computed tomography in neonates with brain lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, J.; Contantinesco, A.; Brunot, B.; Messer, J. (Hospital Universitaire de Strasbourg (France))

    1994-03-01

    In this study the authors used a single photon emission computed tomography technique (SPECT) with radiolabelled [sup 99m]Tc HMPAO to assess cerebral perfusion in newborn infants with documented cerebral lesions and to determine to what extent brain SPECT might be useful in the neonatal period. A total of 15 newborn infants with the following cerebral pathologies were enrolled: severe parietal bilateral periventricular leucomalacia; moderate parietal bilateral PVL; intraventricular haemorrhage grade II with unilateral parietal parenchymal extension; cerebral infarction in the zone of middle cerebral artery; and post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus. Follow-up was available in all infants. Alterations in cerebral perfusion were seen in only 12 of 15 infants and at the location of severe PVL, PE and CI. It was noted that the regions of diminished perfusion extended beyond the apparent extent of cerebral pathology delineated by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. Markedly diminished perfusion was seen in one infant with hydrocephalus, which recovered following placement of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Regarding outcome, SPECT data failed to provide additional information than that of neuroradiological investigations. It is concluded that the use of SPECT, under these conditions, to assess alteration of cerebral perfusion in the neonatal period will not provide any additional information than that of neuroradiological investigations. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Clinical studies of cerebral arteriosclerosis in diabetic subjects. Analysis with brain MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Makoto; Tanahashi, Hideo (Osaka Rosai Hospital, Sakai (Japan)); Nomura, Makoto; Yamada, Yoshio; Abe, Hiroshi

    1994-11-01

    In order to investigate the clinical characteristics of cerebral arteriosclerosis in diabetic subjects, brain MRI studies were conducted in diabetic patients and healthy subjects. The subjects were 93 diabetic patients without symptoms and signs of cerebral infarction (49 males and 44 females) with a mean age of 59 years and 73 healthy subjects (43 males and 30 females) with a mean age of 57 years. The MRI studies were performed on a General Electric 1.5-T signa system. The spin-echo technique (T2-weighted image) was used with a pulse repetition time (TR) of 2,500 msec and echo time (TE) of 80 msec. The quantitative evaluation of cerebral infarction was assessed using personal computer and image-scanner. By MRI, the incidence of cerebral infarction in diabetic patients was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (30.1% vs. 13.7%, respectively, p<0.05). The mean age of the diabetic patients with cerebral infarctions was higher than that of those without cerebral infarctions. Hypertension and diabetic nephropathy were present more frequently in the subjects with cerebral infarctions. These data suggest that it is important to delay the onset and slow the progression of cerebral infarction in diabetic patients by strict blood glucose control and management of blood pressure. (author).

  17. Regional distribution of serotonin transporter protein in postmortem human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kish, Stephen J. [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada)]. E-mail: Stephen_Kish@CAMH.net; Furukawa, Yoshiaki [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Chang Lijan [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Tong Junchao [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Ginovart, Nathalie [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Wilson, Alan [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Houle, Sylvain [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Meyer, Jeffrey H. [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada)

    2005-02-01

    Introduction: The primary approach in assessing the status of brain serotonin neurons in human conditions such as major depression and exposure to the illicit drug ecstasy has been the use of neuroimaging procedures involving radiotracers that bind to the serotonin transporter (SERT). However, there has been no consistency in the selection of a 'SERT-free' reference region for the estimation of free and nonspecific binding, as occipital cortex, cerebellum and white matter have all been employed. Objective and Methods: To identify areas of human brain that might have very low SERT levels, we measured, by a semiquantitative Western blotting procedure, SERT protein immunoreactivity throughout the postmortem brain of seven normal adult subjects. Results: Serotonin transporter could be quantitated in all examined brain areas. However, the SERT concentration in cerebellar cortex and white matter were only at trace values, being approximately 20% of average cerebral cortex and 5% of average striatum values. Conclusion: Although none of the examined brain areas are completely free of SERT, human cerebellar cortex has low SERT binding as compared to other examined brain regions, with the exception of white matter. Since the cerebellar cortical SERT binding is not zero, this region will not be a suitable reference region for SERT radioligands with very low free and nonspecific binding. For SERT radioligands with reasonably high free and nonspecific binding, the cerebellar cortex should be a useful reference region, provided other necessary radioligand assumptions are met.

  18. Impaired cerebral autoregulation during upright tilt in patients with severe brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Riberholt; Olesen, Niels; Thing, Mira

    Objectives: Upright tilt is an important tool for early mobilization of patients after severe acquired brain injury (ABI). Early mobilization is considered to be of importance for increasing awareness, in the prevention of contractures and pulmonary infections and to improve long-term outcome....... A challenge for early mobilization is orthostatic instability that is often observed during heap-up tilt, which could lead to decreased cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and decreased long-term outcome. We examined cerebral blood flow autoregulation in patients with severe brain injury and impaired...

  19. Molecular mechanisms of increased cerebral vulnerability after repeated mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Kamnaksh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of a mild traumatic brain injury can be especially severe if it is repeated within the period of increased cerebral vulnerability (ICV that follows the initial insult. To better understand the molecular mechanisms that contribute to ICV, we exposed rats to different levels of mild blast overpressure (5 exposures; total pressure range: 15.54–19.41 psi or 107.14–133.83 kPa at a rate of 1 per 30 min, monitored select physiological parameters, and assessed behavior. Two days post-injury or sham, we determined changes in protein biomarkers related to various pathologies in behaviorally relevant brain regions and in plasma. We found that oxygen saturation and heart rate were transiently depressed following mild blast exposure and that injured rats exhibited significantly increased anxiety- and depression-related behaviors. Proteomic analyses of the selected brain regions showed evidence of substantial oxidative stress and vascular changes, altered cell adhesion, and inflammation predominantly in the prefrontal cortex. Importantly, these pathological changes as well as indications of neuronal and glial cell loss/damage were also detected in the plasma of injured rats. Our findings illustrate some of the complex molecular changes that contribute to the period of ICV in repeated mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury. Further studies are needed to determine the functional and temporal relationship between the various pathomechanisms. The validation of these and other markers can help to diagnose individuals with ICV using a minimally invasive procedure and to develop evidence-based treatments for chronic neuropsychiatric conditions.

  20. Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf inhibits neuronal apoptosis in brain tissue of rat models of chronic cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Rong-fang; Xia Ai-hua; Wu Xiao-guang; Cao Na-na; Li Meng-meng; Zhang Tian-ge; Wang Yi-ru; Yue Zhi-ling

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebrovascular disease often causes dysfunction of the brain nerve, and nerve cel apoptosis is the important factor of cerebral nerve dysfunction. The excessive expression of c-fos can block the transduction of intracelular signal so that producing some apoptosis-promoting factors, which involve in nerve cel apoptosis process after ischemia injury of brain. Bcl-2 is an inhibited factor. It might to be the key to treat ischemic cerebrovascular disease by inhibiting or reducing the apoptosis of nerve cels after ischemia injury. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf on chronic cerebral ischemia rats. METHODS: A total of 72 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham surgery group, model group, Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf group and ginkgo leaf group. Permanent bilateral carotid artery ligation was used to prepare chronic cerebral ischemia model in the model group, Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf group and ginkgo leaf group. Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf group and ginkgo leaf group respectively received 140 mg/kg Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf and 12.3 mg/kg ginkgo leaf intragastricaly for 36 days from 36 days after model induction. Model group and sham surgery group received 3.5 mL/kg physiological saline intragastricaly. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Compared with the model group, the expression of c-fos protein significantly deceased in the Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf group (P 0.05). These data indicated that the protective effect of Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf on chronic cerebral ischemia was associated with its inhibition of neuronal apoptosis. Its mechanism of anti-apoptosis might be associated with up-regulating expression of Bcl-2, down-regulating expression of c-fos and decreasing Ca2+ content in brain.

  1. Acupuncture inhibits Notch1 and Hes1 protein expression in the basal ganglia of rats with cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Notch pathway activation maintains neural stem cells in a proliferating state and increases nerve repair capacity. To date, studies have rarely focused on changes or damage to signal transduction pathways during cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we examined the effect of acupuncture in a rat model of cerebral hemorrhage. We examined four groups: in the control group, rats received no treatment. In the model group, cerebral hemorrhage models were established by infusing non-heparinized blood into the brain. In the acupuncture group, modeled rats had Baihui (DU20 and Qubin (GB7 acupoints treated once a day for 30 minutes. In the DAPT group, modeled rats had 0.15 μg/mL DAPT solution (10 mL infused into the brain. Immunohistochemistry and western blot results showed that acupuncture effectively inhibits Notch1 and Hes1 protein expression in rat basal ganglia. These inhibitory effects were identical to DAPT, a Notch signaling pathway inhibitor. Our results suggest that acupuncture has a neuroprotective effect on cerebral hemorrhage by inhibiting Notch-Hes signaling pathway transduction in rat basal ganglia after cerebral hemorrhage.

  2. Experimental cerebral malaria pathogenesis--hemodynamics at the blood brain barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adéla Nacer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria claims the lives of over 600,000 African children every year. To better understand the pathogenesis of this devastating disease, we compared the cellular dynamics in the cortical microvasculature between two infection models, Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA infected CBA/CaJ mice, which develop experimental cerebral malaria (ECM, and P. yoelii 17XL (PyXL infected mice, which succumb to malarial hyperparasitemia without neurological impairment. Using a combination of intravital imaging and flow cytometry, we show that significantly more CD8(+ T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages are recruited to postcapillary venules during ECM compared to hyperparasitemia. ECM correlated with ICAM-1 upregulation on macrophages, while vascular endothelia upregulated ICAM-1 during ECM and hyperparasitemia. The arrest of large numbers of leukocytes in postcapillary and larger venules caused microrheological alterations that significantly restricted the venous blood flow. Treatment with FTY720, which inhibits vascular leakage, neurological signs, and death from ECM, prevented the recruitment of a subpopulation of CD45(hi CD8(+ T cells, ICAM-1(+ macrophages, and neutrophils to postcapillary venules. FTY720 had no effect on the ECM-associated expression of the pattern recognition receptor CD14 in postcapillary venules suggesting that endothelial activation is insufficient to cause vascular pathology. Expression of the endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1 in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of PbA-infected mice with ECM was unaltered compared to FTY720-treated PbA-infected mice or PyXL-infected mice with hyperparasitemia. Thus, blood brain barrier opening does not involve endothelial injury and is likely reversible, consistent with the rapid recovery of many patients with CM. We conclude that the ECM-associated recruitment of large numbers of activated leukocytes, in particular CD8(+ T cells and ICAM(+ macrophages, causes a

  3. Sulforaphane preconditioning of the Nrf2/HO-1 defense pathway protects the cerebral vasculature against blood-brain barrier disruption and neurological deficits in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Alessio; Srivastava, Salil; Siow, Richard C M; Cash, Diana; Modo, Michel; Duchen, Michael R; Fraser, Paul A; Williams, Steven C R; Mann, Giovanni E

    2013-12-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and cerebral edema are the major pathogenic mechanisms leading to neurological dysfunction and death after ischemic stroke. The brain protects itself against infarction via activation of endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms, and we here report the first evidence that sulforaphane-mediated preactivation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its downstream target heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the cerebral vasculature protects the brain against stroke. To induce ischemic stroke, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 70 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) followed by 4, 24, or 72 h reperfusion. Nrf2 and HO-1 protein expression was upregulated in cerebral microvessels of peri-infarct regions after 4-72 h, with HO-1 preferentially associated with perivascular astrocytes rather than the cerebrovascular endothelium. In naïve rats, treatment with sulforaphane increased Nrf2 expression in cerebral microvessels after 24h. Upregulation of Nrf2 by sulforaphane treatment prior to transient MCAo (1h) was associated with increased HO-1 expression in perivascular astrocytes in peri-infarct regions and cerebral endothelium in the infarct core. BBB disruption, lesion progression, as analyzed by MRI, and neurological deficits were reduced by sulforaphane pretreatment. As sulforaphane pretreatment led to a moderate increase in peroxynitrite generation, we suggest that hormetic preconditioning underlies sulforaphane-mediated protection against stroke. In conclusion, we propose that pharmacological or dietary interventions aimed to precondition the brain via activation of the Nrf2 defense pathway in the cerebral microvasculature provide a novel therapeutic approach for preventing BBB breakdown and neurological dysfunction in stroke. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Analyses of cerebral microdialysis in patients with traumatic brain injury: relations to intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure and catheter placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanecek Michael

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral microdialysis (MD is used to monitor local brain chemistry of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Despite an extensive literature on cerebral MD in the clinical setting, it remains unclear how individual levels of real-time MD data are to be interpreted. Intracranial pressure (ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP are important continuous brain monitors in neurointensive care. They are used as surrogate monitors of cerebral blood flow and have an established relation to outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relations between MD parameters and ICP and/or CPP in patients with TBI. Methods Cerebral MD, ICP and CPP were monitored in 90 patients with TBI. Data were extensively analyzed, using over 7,350 samples of complete (hourly MD data sets (glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol to seek representations of ICP, CPP and MD that were best correlated. MD catheter positions were located on computed tomography scans as pericontusional or nonpericontusional. MD markers were analyzed for correlations to ICP and CPP using time series regression analysis, mixed effects models and nonlinear (artificial neural networks computer-based pattern recognition methods. Results Despite much data indicating highly perturbed metabolism, MD shows weak correlations to ICP and CPP. In contrast, the autocorrelation of MD is high for all markers, even at up to 30 future hours. Consequently, subject identity alone explains 52% to 75% of MD marker variance. This indicates that the dominant metabolic processes monitored with MD are long-term, spanning days or longer. In comparison, short-term (differenced or Δ changes of MD vs. CPP are significantly correlated in pericontusional locations, but with less than 1% explained variance. Moreover, CPP and ICP were significantly related to outcome based on Glasgow Outcome Scale scores, while no significant relations were found between outcome and MD. Conclusions The

  5. Effect of intracarotid injection of iopamidol on local cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Avella, D; Cicciarello, R; Albiero, F; Piscitelli, G; Fiori, M G; Mesiti, M; Princi, P; d'Aquino, S

    1989-01-01

    We assessed, by means of the [14C]-2-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiography method, the effect of intracarotid injection of a nonionic, low-osmolar contrast medium (iopamidol) on local cerebral glucose utilization in the rat brain. Contrast medium was injected at 20 degrees C and at 37 degrees C, and the relative changes in local cerebral glucose utilization were measured. At 20 degrees C the viscosity of the contrast agent was about twice that of the same solution at 37 degrees C, and resulted in a statistically significant increase in local cerebral glucose utilization in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the side of intracarotid infusion. Saline control studies showed that the metabolic change was not related to either the solution temperature or the osmolality. These findings suggest that increased viscosity of a contrast medium may contribute to its neurotoxic effects during cerebral angiography, hence emphasizing the importance of preheating contrast material to avoid adverse reactions.

  6. Relation of cerebral small-vessel disease and brain atrophy to mild Parkinsonism in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Christiane; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Kretzschmar, Konrad; Roesler, Andreas; V Eckardstein, Arnold; Berger, Klaus

    2006-11-01

    The association between cerebral small-vessel disease, brain atrophy, and the risk and severity of mild parkinsonian signs (MPS) remains unclear. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of lacunar brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs), and cortical atrophy on the risk and severity of MPS. This study is a cross-sectional community-based cohort study comprising 268 subjects, 65 to 83 years of age, residing in the Augsburg region of southern Germany, and without contraindications for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Main outcome measures. Subcortical and periventricular WMLs, lacunar brain infarcts, and cortical atrophy determined using a standardized MRI protocol developed for the Rotterdam Scan Study and an established rating scale. MPS, assessed in a standardized neurological examination and based on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scale. Lacunar brain infarcts and large subcortical white matter lesions were associated with an elevated risk of resting tremor. More severe cortical atrophy was related to an increased risk of rigidity and bradykinesia. In a linear regression analysis relating each individual MRI measurement with the severity of MPS, the number of lacunar brain infarcts and the degree of brain atrophy were correlated with the severity of resting tremor, whereas the size of subcortical and periventricular WMLs was correlated with the severity of rigidity. A higher degree of brain atrophy was associated with increased severity of either cardinal sign. In our study, presence and volume of lacunar brain infarcts, cerebral WMLs, and cortical atrophy were associated with the risk as well as severity of MPS. Determining the presence of these brain changes using brain imaging might contribute to identify persons at risk for MPS.

  7. The epithelial membrane protein 1 is a novel tight junction protein of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsow, Thorsten; Baumann, Ewa; Bangsow, Carmen; Jaeger, Martina H; Pelzer, Bernhard; Gruhn, Petra; Wolf, Sabine; von Melchner, Harald; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2008-06-01

    In the central nervous system, a constant microenvironment required for neuronal cell activity is maintained by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is formed by the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC), which are sealed by tight junctions (TJ). To identify genes that are differentially expressed in BMEC compared with peripheral endothelial cells, we constructed a subtractive cDNA library from porcine BMEC (pBMEC) and aortic endothelial cells (AOEC). Screening the library for differentially expressed genes yielded 26 BMEC-specific transcripts, such as solute carrier family 35 member F2 (SLC35F2), ADP-ribosylation factor-like 5B (ARL5B), TSC22 domain family member 1 (TSC22D1), integral membrane protein 2A (ITM2A), and epithelial membrane protein 1 (EMP1). In this study, we show that EMP1 transcript is enriched in pBMEC compared with brain tissue and that EMP1 protein colocalizes with the TJ protein occludin in mouse BMEC by coimmunoprecipitation and in rat brain vessels by immunohistochemistry. Epithelial membrane protein 1 expression was transiently induced in laser-capture microdissected rat brain vessels after a 20-min global cerebral ischemia, in parallel with the loss of occludin immunoreactivity. The study identifies EMP1 as a novel TJ-associated protein of the BBB and suggests its potential role in the regulation of the BBB function in cerebral ischemia.

  8. Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi D Freeman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum infection causes a wide spectrum of diseases, including cerebral malaria, a potentially life-threatening encephalopathy. Vasculopathy is thought to contribute to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. The vasoactive compound endothelin-1, a key participant in many inflammatory processes, likely mediates vascular and cognitive dysfunctions in cerebral malaria. We previously demonstrated that C57BL6 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA, our fatal experimental cerebral malaria model, sustained memory loss. Herein, we demonstrate that an endothelin type A receptor (ETA antagonist prevented experimental cerebral malaria-induced neurocognitive impairments and improved survival. ETA antagonism prevented blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral vasoconstriction during experimental cerebral malaria, and reduced brain endothelial activation, diminishing brain microvascular congestion. Furthermore, exogenous endothelin-1 administration to P. berghei NK65-infected mice, a model generally regarded as a non-cerebral malaria negative control for P. berghei ANKA infection, led to experimental cerebral malaria-like memory deficits. Our data indicate that endothelin-1 is critical in the development of cerebrovascular and cognitive impairments with experimental cerebral malaria. This vasoactive peptide may thus serve as a potential target for adjunctive therapy in the management of cerebral malaria.

  9. Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi D Freeman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum infection causes a wide spectrum of diseases, including cerebral malaria, a potentially life-threatening encephalopathy. Vasculopathy is thought to contribute to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. The vasoactive compound endothelin-1, a key participant in many inflammatory processes, likely mediates vascular and cognitive dysfunctions in cerebral malaria. We previously demonstrated that C57BL6 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA, our fatal experimental cerebral malaria model, sustained memory loss. Herein, we demonstrate that an endothelin type A receptor (ETA antagonist prevented experimental cerebral malaria-induced neurocognitive impairments and improved survival. ETA antagonism prevented blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral vasoconstriction during experimental cerebral malaria, and reduced brain endothelial activation, diminishing brain microvascular congestion. Furthermore, exogenous endothelin-1 administration to P. berghei NK65-infected mice, a model generally regarded as a non-cerebral malaria negative control for P. berghei ANKA infection, led to experimental cerebral malaria-like memory deficits. Our data indicate that endothelin-1 is critical in the development of cerebrovascular and cognitive impairments with experimental cerebral malaria. This vasoactive peptide may thus serve as a potential target for adjunctive therapy in the management of cerebral malaria.

  10. A Computer Aided Detection System for Cerebral Microbleeds in Brain MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Asl, Babak Ghafary

    2012-01-01

    Advances in MR technology have improved the potential for visualization of small lesions in brain images. This has resulted in the opportunity to detect cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), small hemorrhages in the brain that are known to be associated with risk of ischemic stroke and intracerebral bleeding. Currently, no computerized method is available for fully- or semi-automated detection of CMBs. In this paper, we propose a CAD system for the detection of CMBs to speed up visual analysis in popu...

  11. Volatile anesthetics influence blood-brain barrier integrity by modulation of tight junction protein expression in traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge C Thal

    Full Text Available Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB results in cerebral edema formation, which is a major cause for high mortality after traumatic brain injury (TBI. As anesthetic care is mandatory in patients suffering from severe TBI it may be important to elucidate the effect of different anesthetics on cerebral edema formation. Tight junction proteins (TJ such as zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1 and claudin-5 (cl5 play a central role for BBB stability. First, the influence of the volatile anesthetics sevoflurane and isoflurane on in-vitro BBB integrity was investigated by quantification of the electrical resistance (TEER in murine brain endothelial monolayers and neurovascular co-cultures of the BBB. Secondly brain edema and TJ expression of ZO-1 and cl5 were measured in-vivo after exposure towards volatile anesthetics in native mice and after controlled cortical impact (CCI. In in-vitro endothelial monocultures, both anesthetics significantly reduced TEER within 24 hours after exposure. In BBB co-cultures mimicking the neurovascular unit (NVU volatile anesthetics had no impact on TEER. In healthy mice, anesthesia did not influence brain water content and TJ expression, while 24 hours after CCI brain water content increased significantly stronger with isoflurane compared to sevoflurane. In line with the brain edema data, ZO-1 expression was significantly higher in sevoflurane compared to isoflurane exposed CCI animals. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed disruption of ZO-1 at the cerebrovascular level, while cl5 was less affected in the pericontusional area. The study demonstrates that anesthetics influence brain edema formation after experimental TBI. This effect may be attributed to modulation of BBB permeability by differential TJ protein expression. Therefore, selection of anesthetics may influence the barrier function and introduce a strong bias in experimental research on pathophysiology of BBB dysfunction. Future research is required to investigate

  12. Moringa Oleifera Lam Mitigates Oxidative Damage and Brain Infarct Volume in Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woranan Kirisattayakul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: At present, the therapeutic outcome of cerebral ischemia is still not in the satisfaction level. Therefore, the preventive strategy is considered. Based on the protective effect against oxidative damage of Moringa oleifera Lam. Leaves extract, we hypothesized that this plant extract might protect against cerebral ischemia, one of the challenge problems nowadays. In order to test this hypothesis, we aimed to determine the protective effect of M.oleifera leaves extract in animal model of focal cerebral ischemia induced by permanent occlusion of right middle cerebral artery. Approach: Male Wistar rats, weighing 300-350 g, were orally given the extract once daily at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg kg-1 BW at a period of 2 weeks, then, they were permanently occluded the right Middle Cerebral Artery (MCAO. The animals were assessed the cerebral infarction volume and oxidative damage markers including MDA level and the activities of SOD, CAT and GSHPx enzymes at 24 h after occlusion. Results: Rats subjected to M.oleifera extract at all doses used in this study significantly decreased brain infarct volume both at cortical and subcortical structures in accompany with the elevation of SOD activity in both hippocampus and striatum while only the rats exposed to the extract at doses of 100 and 400 mg kg-1 BW showed the increased GSHPx activity in hippocampus. No the changes were observed. Therefore, our results demonstrates the potential benefit of M.oleifera leaves to decrease oxidative stress damage and brain infarct volume. Conclusion: This study is the first study to demonstrate the neuroprotective effect against focal cerebral ischemia of M.oleifera leaves. It suggests that M.oleifera may be served as natural resource for developing neuroprotectant against focal cerebral ischemia. However, the precise underlying mechanism and possible active ingredient are still required further study.

  13. Unbiasing the Brain: The Effects of Meditation upon The Cerebral Hemispheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, John; Pirot, Michael

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the effects of Transcendental Meditation on the perceptual efficiency of the cerebral hemispheres in 20 right-handed men who underwent reaction time trials to an auditory stimulus. Results suggested Transcedental Meditation is an attentional strategy that disrupts the usual biases of the brain. (JAC)

  14. Mycotic brain aneurysm and cerebral hemorrhagic stroke: a pediatric case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Lisboa, Lurdes; Sarmento, António; Almeida, Jorge; Mota, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    Endocarditis due to Abiotrophia spp. is rare and often associated with negative blood cultures, infection relapse, and high rates of treatment failure and mortality (Lainscak et al., J Heart Valve Dis 14(1):33-36, 2005). The authors describe a case of an adolescent with cerebral hemorrhagic stroke due to mycotic brain aneurysm rupture.

  15. Changes in cerebral hemodynamics in patients with posttraumatic diffuse brain swelling after external intraventricular drainage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kefei Chen; Jirong Dong; Tian Xia; Chunlei Zhang; Wei Zhao; Qinyi Xu; Xuejian Cai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the changes of cerebral hemodynamics pre-and post-ventricular drainage in patients with posttraumatic acute diffuse brain swelling.Methods: Twenty-four cases of traumatic diffuse brain swelling were analyzed retrospectively.Patients in nonsurgical group were treated by medicine therapy.Patients in surgical group were treated by external ventricular drainage plus medicine therapy.The first CT perfusion scan was completed within 4 -5 h after trauma and scanned again after 7 days.The changes of perfusion parameters in area-of-interest in two groups were analyzed and compared before and after treatment.Result: Compared with the nonsurgical group, the value of cerebral blood volume, cerebral blood flow and mean transit time in bilateral frontal temporopadetal grey matter, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and brain stem at pre-and post-therapy were increased significantly (p < 0.05) in surgical group, and consequently the prognosis of patients undergoing surgery was also better than that of nonsurgical group.Conclusion: External ventricular drainage can improve cerebral perfusion and increase survival quality for the patients with posttraumatic acute diffuse brain swelling.

  16. Regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with and without brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaia, Z; Zhao, Q; Kokaia, M; Elmér, E; Metsis, M; Smith, M L; Siesjö, B K; Lindvall, O

    1995-11-01

    Levels of mRNA for c-fos, nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), TrkB, and TrkC were studied using in situ hybridization in the rat brain at different reperfusion times after unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Short-term (15 min) MCAO, which does not cause neuronal death, induced elevated BDNF mRNA expression confined to ipsilateral frontal and cingulate cortices outside the ischemic area. With a longer duration of MCAO (2 h), which leads to cortical infarction, the increase was more marked and elevated BDNF mRNA levels were also detected bilaterally in dentate granule cells and CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons. Maximum expression was found after 2 h of reperfusion. At 24 h BDNF mRNA expression had returned to control values. In the ischemic core of the parietal cortex only scattered neurons were expressing high levels of BDNF mRNA after 15 min and 2 h of MCAO. Analysis of different BDNF transcripts showed that MCAO induced a marked increase of exon III mRNA but only small increases of exon I and II mRNAs in cortex and hippocampus. In contrast to BDNF mRNA, elevated expression of c-fos mRNA was observed in the entire ipsilateral cerebral cortex, including the ischemic core, after both 15 min and 2 h of MCAO. Two hours of MCAO also induced transient, bilateral increases of NGF and TrkB mRNA levels and a decrease of NT-3 mRNA expression, confined to dentate granule cells. The upregulation of BDNF mRNA expression in cortical neurons after MCAO is probably triggered by glutamate through a spreading depression-like mechanism. The lack of response of the BDNF gene in the ischemic core may be due to suppression of signal transduction or transcription factor synthesis caused by the ischemia. The observed pattern of gene expression after MCAO agrees well with a neuroprotective role of BDNF in cortical neurons. However, elevated levels of NGF and BDNF protein could also increase synaptic efficacy in the

  17. Effect of propofol post-treatment on blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebral edema after transient cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Cui, Hui Song; Shin, Seo Kyung; Kim, Jeong Min; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Jong Eun; Koo, Bon-Nyeo

    2013-11-01

    Although propofol has been reported to offer neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia injury, its impact on cerebral edema following ischemia is not clear. The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the effects of propofol post-treatment on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and cerebral edema after transient cerebral ischemia and its mechanism of action, focusing on modulation of aquaporins (AQPs), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α. Cerebral ischemia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 78) by occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery for 1 h. For post-treatment with propofol, 1 mg kg(-1) min(-1) of propofol was administered for 1 h from the start of reperfusion. Nineteen rats undergoing sham surgery were also included in the investigation. Edema and BBB integrity were assessed by quantification of cerebral water content and extravasation of Evans blue, respectively, following 24 h of reperfusion. In addition, the expression of AQP-1, AQP-4, MMP-2, and MMP-9 was determined 24 h after reperfusion and the expression of HIF-1α was determined 8 h after reperfusion. Propofol post-treatment significantly reduced cerebral edema (P cerebral edema after transient cerebral ischemia, in association with reduced expression of AQP-1, AQP-4, MMP-2, and MMP-9. The decreased expression of AQPs and MMPs after propofol post-treatment might result from suppression of HIF-1α expression.

  18. Correlation of glucose metabolism in brain cells and brain morphological changes with clinical typing in children with cerebral palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiongxiang Zhai; Huixian Qiao; Jiqing Liu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It is widely known that fluorino-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography(18F-FDG PET)is commonly used to evaluate and diagnose epilepsy;however,whether it is beneficial to understand functional metabolism of bra in cells so as to reflect injured site and degree of brain cells or not should be studied further.OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the correlation between glucose metabolism and clinical typling as well as the conelation between active function of brain cells and degree of brain injury among children with cerbral palsy with 18F-FDG PET and MRI and compare the results of them.DESIGN:Case analysis.SETTING:Department of Pediatrics,People's Hospital of Guangdong Province.PARTICIPANTS:A total of 31 children with cerebral palsy were selected from Out-patient Clinic and In-patient Department of People's Hospital of Guangdong Province from July 2001 to August 2004.Based on clinical criteria of cerebral palsy,patients were classified into spasm(n=10),gradual movement(n=4),mixed type(n =13)and ataxia(n=4).There were 18 boys and 13 girls aged from 10 months to 4 years.All of them were met the diagnostic criteria of cerebral palsy and all parents of them were told the facts.Exclusion cdteria:Patients who had cerebral palsy caused by genetic metabolism disease were excluded.METHODS:①All children accepted MRI examination after hospitalization with Philips Acs NT 15T superconductling magnetic resonance scanner.②All children were fasted for 4 hours.And then,PET image of brain was collected based on T+EID type.If obvious hypermetabolism or hypometabolism region successively occurred on two layers, the image was regarded as abnormality. ③Different correlations of various abnormal greups of MRI and vadous types of cerebral palsy with PET image were compared and analyzed with Erusal-Willas rank sum test.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:①Results of 18F-FDG PET;②Results of MRI examination;③Correlation of variously abnormal groups of MRI and various types of cerebral

  19. Brain banks as key part of biochemical and molecular studies on cerebral cortex involvement in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravid, Rivka; Ferrer, Isidro

    2012-04-01

    Exciting developments in basic and clinical neuroscience and recent progress in the field of Parkinson's disease (PD) are partly a result of the availability of human specimens obtained through brain banks. These banks have optimized the methodological, managerial and organizational procedures; standard operating procedures; and ethical, legal and social issues, including the code of conduct for 21st Century brain banking and novel protocols. The present minireview focuses on current brain banking organization and management, as well as the likely future direction of the brain banking field. We emphasize the potentials and pitfalls when using high-quality specimens of the human central nervous system for advancing PD research. PD is a generalized disease in which α-synuclein is not a unique component but, instead, is only one of the players accounting for the complex impairment of biochemical/molecular processes involved in metabolic pathways. This is particularly important in the cerebral cortex, where altered cognition has a complex neurochemical substrate. Mitochondria and energy metabolism impairment, abnormal RNA, microRNA, protein synthesis, post-translational protein modifications and alterations in the lipid composition of membranes and lipid rafts are part of these complementary factors. We have to be alert to the possible pitfalls of each specimen and its suitability for a particular study. Not all samples qualify for the study of DNA, RNA, proteins, post-translational modifications, lipids and metabolomes, although the use of carefully selected samples and appropriate methods minimizes pitfalls and errors and guarantees high-quality reserach.

  20. Nimodipine pretreatment improves cerebral blood flow and reduces brain edema in conscious rats subjected to focal cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, M; Brint, S; Tanabe, J; Wang, X J; Pulsinelli, W A

    1990-11-01

    The effect of nimodipine pretreatment on CBF and brain edema was studied in conscious rats subjected to 2.5 h of focal cortical ischemia. An infusion of nimodipine (2 micrograms/kg/min i.v.) or its vehicle, polyethylene glycol 400, was begun 2 h before the ischemic interval and was continued throughout the survival period. Under brief halothane anesthesia, the animals' right middle cerebral and common carotid arteries were permanently occluded, and 2.5 h later, they underwent a quantitative CBF study ([14C]iodoantipyrine autoradiography followed by Quantimet 970 image analysis). Nimodipine treatment improved blood flow to the middle cerebral artery territory without evidence of a "vascular steal" and reduced the volume of the ischemic core (cortex with CBF of less than 25 ml/100 g/min) and accompanying edema by approximately 50% when compared with controls (p = 0.006 and 0.0004, respectively). Mild hypotension induced by nimodipine did not aggravate the ischemic insult. The ischemic core volumes, however, were 50-75% smaller than the 24-h infarct volumes generated in a similar paradigm that demonstrated 20-30% infarct reduction with continuous nimodipine treatment. These results suggest that nimodipine pretreatment attenuates the severity of early focal cerebral ischemia, but that with persistent ischemia, cortex surrounding the ischemic core undergoes progressive infarction and the early benefit of nimodipine treatment is only partly preserved.

  1. Reduction of cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury using an osmotic transport device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Szu, Jenny I; Hale, Chris; Hsu, Mike S; Rodgers, Victor G J; Binder, Devin K

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is significant, from a public health standpoint, because it is a major cause of the morbidity and mortality of young people. Cerebral edema after a TBI, if untreated, can lead to devastating damage of the remaining tissue. The current therapies of severe TBI (sTBI), as outlined by the Brain Trauma Foundation, are often ineffective, thus a new method for the treatment of sTBI is necessary. Herein, the reduction of cerebral edema, after TBI, using an osmotic transport device (OTD) was evaluated. Controlled cortical impact (CCI) was performed on adult female CD-1 mice, and cerebral edema was allowed to form for 3 h, followed by 2 h of treatment. The treatment groups were craniectomy only, craniectomy with a hydrogel, OTD without bovine serum albumin (BSA), and OTD. After CCI, brain water content was significantly higher for animals treated with a craniectomy only, craniectomy with a hydrogel, and OTD without BSA, compared to that of control animals. However, when TBI animals were treated with an OTD, brain water content was not significantly higher than that of controls. Further, brain water content of TBI animals treated with an OTD was significantly reduced, compared to that of untreated TBI animals, TBI animals treated with a craniectomy and a hydrogel, and TBI animals treated with an OTD without BSA. Here, we demonstrate the successful reduction of cerebral edema, as determined by brain water content, after TBI using an OTD. These results demonstrate proof of principle for direct water extraction from edematous brain tissue by direct osmotherapy using an OTD.

  2. Typical Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Neurodegenerative Brain Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, Laura K.; Bartels, Anna L.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.; Eshuis, Silvia A.; de Vries, Jeroen J.; van Oostrom, Joost C. H.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2010-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative brain diseases on clinical grounds is difficult, especially at an early disease stage. Several studies have found specific regional differences of brain metabolism applying [F-18]-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), suggesting t

  3. Npas4, a novel helix-loop-helix PAS domain protein, is regulated in response to cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamloo, Mehrdad; Soriano, Liza; von Schack, David

    2006-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix PAS domain proteins form a growing family of transcription factors. These proteins are involved in the process of adaptation to cellular stresses and environmental factors such as a change in oxygen concentration. We describe the identification and characterization of a rec......Basic helix-loop-helix PAS domain proteins form a growing family of transcription factors. These proteins are involved in the process of adaptation to cellular stresses and environmental factors such as a change in oxygen concentration. We describe the identification and characterization...... of a recently cloned PAS domain protein termed Npas4 in ischemic rat brain. Using gene expression profiling following middle cerebral artery occlusion, we showed that the Npas4 mRNA is differentially expressed in ischemic tissue. The full-length gene was cloned from rat brain and its spatial and temporal...... expression characterized with in situ hybridization and Northern blotting. The Npas4 mRNA is specifically expressed in the brain and is highly up-regulated in ischemic tissues following both focal and global cerebral ischemic insults. Immunohistochemistry revealed a strong expression in the limbic system...

  4. Cerebral complexity preceded enlarged brain size and reduced olfactory bulbs in Old World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Lauren A; Benefit, Brenda R; McCrossin, Monte L; Spoor, Fred

    2015-07-03

    Analysis of the only complete early cercopithecoid (Old World monkey) endocast currently known, that of 15-million-year (Myr)-old Victoriapithecus, reveals an unexpectedly small endocranial volume (ECV) relative to body size and a large olfactory bulb volume relative to ECV, similar to extant lemurs and Oligocene anthropoids. However, the Victoriapithecus brain has principal and arcuate sulci of the frontal lobe not seen in the stem catarrhine Aegyptopithecus, as well as a distinctive cercopithecoid pattern of gyrification, indicating that cerebral complexity preceded encephalization in cercopithecoids. Since larger ECVs, expanded frontal lobes, and reduced olfactory bulbs are already present in the 17- to 18-Myr-old ape Proconsul these features evolved independently in hominoids (apes) and cercopithecoids and much earlier in the former. Moreover, the order of encephalization and brain reorganization was apparently different in hominoids and cercopithecoids, showing that brain size and cerebral organization evolve independently.

  5. Functional recovery after transplantation of neural stem cells modified by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in rats with cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J M; Zhao, Y Y; Chen, S D; Zhang, W H; Lou, L; Jin, X

    2011-01-01

    Functional recovery after transplantation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-modified neural stem cells (NSCs) was evaluated in a rat model of cerebral ischaemia damage induced by temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated upregulated BDNF protein expression by rat embryonic NSCs transfected with the human BDNF gene (BDNF-NSCs). BDNF-NSCs stimulated neurite outgrowth in cocultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, suggesting that BDNF increased neurogenesis in vitro. In vivo, BDNF promoted recovery of tMCAO. Phosphate-buffered saline, untransformed NSCs or BDNF-NSCs were introduced into the penumbra zone of the right striatum of tMCAO rats and neurological function deficit was assessed for up to 12 weeks using the neurological severity score (NSS). The NSS was significantly lower in the BDNF-NSC transfected transplant group than in all the other groups from week 10. BDNF-NSCs recovered 1 week after transplantation expressed BDNF protein. Transplanted NSCs had differentiated into mature neurons 12 weeks after transplantation. Transgenic NSCs have potential as a therapeutic agent for brain ischaemia.

  6. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in rat hippocampus following focal cerebral ischemic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingping Li; Ruifang Guo; Kaifeng Lu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The functional role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is enhanced following cerebral ischemic injury providing neurons with an important self-protection mechanism in early stage ischemia/hypoxia.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the expression pattern of BDNF in different rat hippocampal regions following focal cerebral ischemic injury.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: We performed a comparative and neurobiological study of animals in the Department of Histology and Embryology and the Central Laboratory, Hebei Medical University from March to December 2003.MATERIALS: Forty healthy Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into a cerebral ischemla group and a sham operation group, with 20 rats per group.METHODS: In the cerebral ischemia group, we occluded the right middle cerebral artery with a suture,threading it to a depth of 17-19 mm. In the sham operation group, the threading depth was approximately 10 mm.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We analyzed the expression of BDNF in different hippocampal regions by immunohistochemical staining of brain sections taken on post-operative days 7, 14, 21 and 30.RESULTS: Sham operation group: We observed a number of a few BDNF-positive cells with light staining in the hippocampal CAI CA4 regions and dentate gyrus. Cerebral ischemia group: compared with the sham operation group, BDNF increased on day 7, significantly increased on day 14, and reached a peak on day 21 (P < 0.05). Furthermore, immunologically reactive products were darkly stained, and neurons had long axons.BDNF was particularly highly expressed in the hippocampal CA3 and CA4 regions and dentate gyrus.CONCLUSION: Cerebral ischemic injury can damage hippocampal neurons. Neurons can increase their anti-ischemic capacity by increasing BDNF expression in the hippocampal CA3 and CA4 regions and dentate gyrus.

  7. Cerebral microdialysis for protein biomarker monitoring in the neurointensive care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Tomas Hillered

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral microdialysis (MD was introduced as a neurochemical monitoring tool in the early 1990s and is currently well established for the sampling of low molecular weight biomarkers of energy metabolic perturbation and cellular distress in the neurointensive care (NIC setting. There is now a growing interest in MD for intracerebral sampling of protein biomarkers of secondary injury mechanisms in acute traumatic and neurovascular brain injury in the NIC community. The initial enthusiasm over the opportunity to sample protein biomarkers with high molecular weight cut-off (MWCO MD catheters has dampened somewhat with the emerging realization of inherent problems with this methodology including protein adhesion, protein-protein interaction and biofouling, leading to unstable MD catheter performance (i.e. fluid recovery and extraction efficiency. This review will focus on the results of a multidisciplinary collaborative effort, within the Uppsala Berzelii Centre for Neurodiagnostics during the past several years, to study the features of the complex process of high MWCO MD for protein biomarkers. This research has led to new methodology showing robust in vivo performance with optimized fluid recovery and improved extraction efficiency, allowing for more accurate biomarker monitoring. In combination with evolving analytical methodology allowing for multiplex biomarker analysis in ultra-small MD samples a new opportunity opens up for high-resolution temporal mapping of secondary injury cascades, such as neuroinflammation and other cell injury reactions directly in the injured human brain. Such data may provide an important basis for improved characterization of complex injuries, e.g. traumatic and neurovascular brain injury, and help in defining targets and treatment windows for neuroprotective drug development

  8. Caffeic acid ameliorates early and delayed brain injuries after focal cerebral ischemia in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu ZHOU; San-hua FANG; Yi-lu YE; Li-sheng CHU; Wei-ping ZHANG; Meng-ling WANG; Er-qing WEI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of caffeic acid on early and delayed injuries after focal cerebral ischemia in rats, and the possible relation to 5-lipoxygenase inhibition. Methods: Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in Sprague-Dawley rats. Caffeic acid (10 and 50 mg/kg) was ip injected for 5 d after ischemia. The brain injuries were observed, and the levels of cysteinyl leukotrienes and leukotriene B4 in the brain tissue were measured. Results: Caffeic acid (50 mg/kg) ameliorated neurological dysfunction and neuron loss, and decreased infarct volume 24 h after ischemia; it attenuated brain atrophy, infarct volume, and particularly astrocyte proliferation 14 d after ischemia. In addition, it reduced the production of leukotrienes (5-lipoxygenase metabolites) in the ischemic hemispheres 3 h and 7 d after ischemia. Conclusion: Caffeic acid has protective effect on both early and delayed injuries after focal cerebral ischemia in rats; and this effect may partly relate to 5-lipoxygenase inhibition.

  9. Basal ganglia germinoma in children with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozelame, Rodrigo V.; Shroff, Manohar; Wood, Bradley; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Drake, James M.; Hawkins, Cynthia; Blaser, Susan [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-04-15

    Germinoma is the most common and least-malignant intracranial germ cell tumor, usually found in the midline. Germinoma that arises in the basal ganglia, called ectopic germinoma, is a rare and well-documented entity representing 5% to 10% of all intracranial germinomas. The association of cerebral and/or brain stem atrophy with basal ganglia germinoma on CT and MRI is found in 33% of the cases. To review the literature and describe the CT and MRI findings of basal ganglia germinoma in children, known as ectopic germinoma, with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy. Three brain CT and six brain MRI studies performed in four children at two institutions were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were male (case 1, 14 years; case 2, 13 years; case 3, 9 years; case 4, 13 years), with pathologically proved germinoma arising in the basal ganglia, and associated ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy on the first imaging study. It is important to note that three of these children presented with cognitive decline, psychosis and slowly progressive hemiparesis as their indication for imaging. Imaging results on initial scans were varied. In all patients, the initial study showed ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy, representing Wallerian degeneration. All patients who underwent CT imaging presented with a hyperdense or calcified lesion in the basal ganglia on unenhanced scans. Only one of these lesions had a mass effect on the surrounding structures. In one of these patients a large, complex, heterogeneous mass appeared 15 months later. Initial MR showed focal or diffusely increased T2 signal in two cases and heterogeneous signal in the other two. (orig.)

  10. Erythropoietin can promote survival of cerebral cells by downregulating Bax gene after traumatic brain injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Z

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an important cause of adult mortality and morbidity. Erythropoietin (Epo has been shown to promote the viability of cerebral cells by upregulating Bcl-2 gene; however, Epo may exert its antiapoptotic effect via the differential regulation of the expression of genes involved in the apoptotic process. Aim : The present study examined the neuroprotective effect of Epo as a survival factor through the regulation of the Bax. Materials and Methods : Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: Recombinant human EPO treated (rhEPO TBI, vehicle-treated TBI, and sham-operated. Traumatic brain injury was induced by the Feeney free-falling model. Rats were killed 5, 12, 24, 72, 120, or 168 h after TBI. Regulation of Bcl-2 was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence. Results : Bax mRNA and protein levels were lower in the rhEPO-treated rat brains than in the vehicle-treated rat brains. Induction of Bax expression peaked at 24 h and remained stable for 72-120 h in vehicle-treated rat brains, whereas induction of Bax expression was only slightly elevated in rhEPO-treated rat brains. The number of TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling(TUNEL-positive cells in the rhEPO-treated rat brains was far fewer than in the vehicle-treated rat brains. Conclusions : Epo exerts neuroprotective effect against traumatic brain injury via reducing Bax gene expression involved in inhibiting TBI-induced neuronal cell death.

  11. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  12. Use of Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Brain Death in Patients with Severe Cerebral Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuequn; Liu, Shangwei; Xun, Fangfang; Liu, Zhan; Huang, Xiuying

    2016-06-06

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the use of transcranial Doppler (TCD) for diagnosis of brain death in patients with severe cerebral injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective study enrolled 42 patients based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. All patients were divided into either the brain death group or the survival group according to prognosis. Blood flow of the brain was examined by TCD and analyzed for spectrum changes. The average blood flow velocity (Vm), pulse index (PI), and diastolic blood flow in reverse (RDF) were recorded and compared. RESULTS The data demonstrated that the average speed of bilateral middle cerebral artery blood flow in the brain death group was significantly reduced (Pbrain death group increased significantly. Moreover, RDF spectrum and nail-like sharp peak spectrum of the brain death group was higher than in the survival group. CONCLUSIONS Due to its simplicity, high repeatability, and specificity, TCD combined with other methods is highly valuable for diagnosis of brain death in patients with severe brain injury.

  13. Review on Histological and Functional Effect of Aluminium Chloride on Cerebral Cortex of the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birhane Alem Berihu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Various findings are give emphasis to Aluminium has more and more obvious disturbance of the brain other body organs. The purpose of this review is to give a comprehensive report of the existing data on Aluminium induced brain toxicity in different animal models. Along with, we also have made an attempt to present the possible mechanism related to aluminium induced brain toxicity suggested by various researchers. We used 62 different published materials for the compilation of this review article. Google search engine was used for accessing published materials from databases like google scholar, pubmed and hinari. The focus is on Al levels in brain, region-specific and subcellular distribution, mechanism of aluminium on neurotoxicity, histological change and neurobehavioral alternations. The present analysis indicated that AlCl3 showed to be neurotoxin chemical by affecting the biochemical content of brain, histological alternation of cerebral cortex of the brain, disrupting behavioral activities. However, whether aluminium is a sole factor in neurodegeneration, histological alternation of cerebral cortex of the brain still needs to be understood.

  14. Analysis of structure-function network decoupling in the brain systems of spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongha; Pae, Chongwon; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Eun Sook; Cho, Sung-Rae; Um, Min-Hee; Lee, Seung-Koo; Oh, Maeng-Keun; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2017-10-01

    Manifestation of the functionalities from the structural brain network is becoming increasingly important to understand a brain disease. With the aim of investigating the differential structure-function couplings according to network systems, we investigated the structural and functional brain networks of patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy with periventricular leukomalacia compared to healthy controls. The structural and functional networks of the whole brain and motor system, constructed using deterministic and probabilistic tractography of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images and Pearson and partial correlation analyses of resting-state functional magnetic resonance images, showed differential embedding of functional networks in the structural networks in patients. In the whole-brain network of patients, significantly reduced global network efficiency compared to healthy controls were found in the structural networks but not in the functional networks, resulting in reduced structural-functional coupling. On the contrary, the motor network of patients had a significantly lower functional network efficiency over the intact structural network and a lower structure-function coupling than the control group. This reduced coupling but reverse directionality in the whole-brain and motor networks of patients was prominent particularly between the probabilistic structural and partial correlation-based functional networks. Intact (or less deficient) functional network over impaired structural networks of the whole brain and highly impaired functional network topology over the intact structural motor network might subserve relatively preserved cognitions and impaired motor functions in cerebral palsy. This study suggests that the structure-function relationship, evaluated specifically using sparse functional connectivity, may reveal important clues to functional reorganization in cerebral palsy. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5292-5306, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals

  15. Tyrosine administration decreases glutathione and stimulates lipid and protein oxidation in rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgaravatti, Angela M; Magnusson, Alessandra S; de Oliveira, Amanda S; Rosa, Andréa P; Mescka, Caroline Paula; Zanin, Fernanda R; Pederzolli, Carolina D; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Wajner, Moacir; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo

    2009-09-01

    Tyrosine levels are abnormally elevated in tissues and physiological fluids of patients with inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism especially in tyrosinemia type II which is caused by deficiency of tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) and provokes eyes, skin and central nervous system disturbances. We have recently reported that tyrosine promoted oxidative stress in vitro but the exact mechanisms of brain damage in these disorder are poorly known. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo effect of L-tyrosine (500 mg/Kg) on oxidative stress indices in cerebral cortex homogenates of 14-day-old Wistar rats. A single injection of L-tyrosine decreased glutathione (GSH) and thiol-disulfide redox state (SH/SS ratio) while thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyl content and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity were enhanced. In contrast, the treatment did not affect ascorbic acid content, and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. These results indicate that acute administration of L-tyrosine may impair antioxidant defenses and stimulate oxidative damage to lipids and proteins in cerebral cortex of young rats in vivo. This suggests that oxidative stress may represent a pathophysiological mechanism in hypetyrosinemic patients.

  16. Oligodendrogenesis after Cerebral Ischaemia and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gang Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI damage white and grey matter. Loss of oligodendrocytes and their myelin, impairs axonal function. Remyelination involves oligodendrogenesis during which new myelinating oligodendrocytes are generated by differentiated oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. This article briefly reviews the processes of oligodendrogenesis in adult rodent brains, and promising experimental therapies targeting the neurovascular unit that reduce oligodendrocyte damage and amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis after stroke and TBI.

  17. Effects of ganglioside GM1 on reduction of brain edema and amelioration of cerebral metabolism after traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志刚; 卢亦成; 朱诚; 张光霁; 丁学华; 江基尧

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of ganglioside GM1 on reduction of brain edema and amelioration of cerebral metabolism after traumatic brain injury (TBI).Methods: An acute experimental closed TBI model in rats was induced by a fluid-percussion brain injury model. At five and sixty minutes after TBI, the animals were intraperitoneally injected by ganglioside GM1 (30 mg/kg) or the same volume of saline. At the 6th hour after TBI, effects of ganglioside GM1 or saline on changes of mean arterial pressure (MAP), contents of water, lactic acid (LA) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the injured cerebral tissues were observed.Results: After TBI, MAP decreased and contents of water, LA and LPO increased in brain injury group; however, MAP was back to normal levels and contents of water, LA and LPO decreased in ganglioside GM1 treated group, compared with those in brain injury group (P0.05) was observed.Conclusions: Ganglioside GM1 does have obvious neuroprotective effect on early TBI.

  18. Energy metabolisme and brain damage : Investigations by positron emission tomography (PET); the role of ketone bodies in cerebral protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prenen, Gerardus Hyacinthus Maria

    1992-01-01

    In a general sense this thesis comprises three subjects: a) the changes in energy metabolism of the brain during cerebral pathology, b) the effect of alterations in energy metabolism on the extent of brain damage, and c) measures to prevent or limit brain damage. In this context the formation of

  19. Intrathoracic Pressure Regulation Improves Cerebral Perfusion and Cerebral Blood Flow in a Porcine Model of Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Anja; Rees, Jennifer; Kwon, Young; Matsuura, Timothy; McKnite, Scott; Lurie, Keith G

    2015-08-01

    Brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability in children and adults in their most productive years. Use of intrathoracic pressure regulation (IPR) to generate negative intrathoracic pressure during the expiratory phase of positive pressure ventilation improves mean arterial pressure and 24-h survival in porcine models of hemorrhagic shock and cardiac arrest and has been demonstrated to decrease intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in these models. Application of IPR for 240 min in a porcine model of intracranial hypertension (ICH) will increase CPP when compared with controls. Twenty-three female pigs were subjected to focal brain injury by insertion of an epidural Foley catheter inflated with 3 mL of saline. Animals were randomized to treatment for 240 min with IPR set to a negative expiratory phase pressure of -12 cmH2O or no IPR therapy. Intracranial pressure, mean arterial pressure, CPP, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were evaluated. Intrathoracic pressure regulation significantly improved mean CPP and CBF. Specifically, mean CPP after 90, 120, 180, and 240 min of IPR use was 43.7 ± 2.8 mmHg, 44.0 ± 2.7 mmHg, 44.5 ± 2.8 mmHg, and 43.1 ± 1.9 mmHg, respectively; a significant increase from ICH study baseline (39.5 ± 1.7 mmHg) compared with control animals in which mean CPP was 36.7 ± 1.4 mmHg (ICH study baseline) and then 35.9 ± 2.1 mmHg, 33.7 ± 2.8 mmHg, 33.9 ± 3.0 mmHg, and 36.0 ± 2.7 mmHg at 90, 120, 180, and 240 min, respectively (P blood flow, as measured by an invasive CBF probe, increased in the IPR group (34 ± 4 mL/100 g-min to 49 ± 7 mL/100 g-min at 90 min) but not in controls (27 ± 1 mL/100 g-min to 25 ± 5 mL/100 g-min at 90 min) (P = 0.01). Arterial pH remained unchanged during the entire period of IPR compared with baseline values and control values. In this anesthetized pig model of ICH, treatment with IPR significantly improved CPP and CBF. This therapy may be of clinical value by noninvasively

  20. Transcriptomics and proteomics analyses of the PACAP38 influenced ischemic brain in permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion model mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori Motohide

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP is considered to be a potential therapeutic agent for prevention of cerebral ischemia. Ischemia is a most common cause of death after heart attack and cancer causing major negative social and economic consequences. This study was designed to investigate the effect of PACAP38 injection intracerebroventrically in a mouse model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (PMCAO along with corresponding SHAM control that used 0.9% saline injection. Methods Ischemic and non-ischemic brain tissues were sampled at 6 and 24 hours post-treatment. Following behavioral analyses to confirm whether the ischemia has occurred, we investigated the genome-wide changes in gene and protein expression using DNA microarray chip (4x44K, Agilent and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS, respectively. Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining were also used to further examine the identified protein factor. Results Our results revealed numerous changes in the transcriptome of ischemic hemisphere (ipsilateral treated with PACAP38 compared to the saline-injected SHAM control hemisphere (contralateral. Previously known (such as the interleukin family and novel (Gabra6, Crtam genes were identified under PACAP influence. In parallel, 2-DGE analysis revealed a highly expressed protein spot in the ischemic hemisphere that was identified as dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2 (DPYL2. The DPYL2, also known as Crmp2, is a marker for the axonal growth and nerve development. Interestingly, PACAP treatment slightly increased its abundance (by 2-DGE and immunostaining at 6 h but not at 24 h in the ischemic hemisphere, suggesting PACAP activates neuronal defense mechanism early on. Conclusions This study provides a detailed inventory of PACAP influenced gene expressions

  1. Regulation of cerebral CYP2D alters tramadol metabolism in the brain: interactions of tramadol with propranolol and nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaoli; Han, Xiaotong; Li, Jian; Gao, Xinghui; Wang, Yan; Liu, Mingzhou; Dong, Guicheng; Yue, Jiang

    2015-04-01

    1. Cytochrome P450 2D (CYP2D) protein is widely expressed across brain regions in human and rodents. We investigated the interactions between tramadol, a clinically used analgesic, and brain CYP2D regulators, by establishing concentration-time curves of tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol (M1) in rat cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma, as well as by analyzing the analgesia-time course of tramadol. 2. Propranolol (20 μg, intracerebroventricular injection), CYP2D inhibitor, prolonged the elimination t1/2 of tramadol (40 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) in the CSF; meanwhile, lower Cmax and AUC0-∞ values of M1 were observed. Nicotine (1 mg base/kg, subcutaneous injection, seven days), brain CYP2D inducer, induced a shorter Tmax and elevated Cmax of M1 in CSF. No differences in the peripheral metabolism of tramadol were observed following propranolol and nicotine pretreatment. Nicotine increased areas under the analgesia-time curve (AUC) for 0-45 min and 0-90 min of tramadol, which was attenuated by propranolol administration. The analgesic actions of tramadol positively correlated with cerebral M1 concentration. 3. The results suggest that the regulation of brain CYP2D by xenobiotics may cause drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of tramadol. Brain CYPs may play an important role in DDIs of centrally active substances.

  2. The collective therapeutic potential of cerebral ketone metabolism in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Mayumi L; Matsumoto, Joyce H

    2014-12-01

    The postinjury period of glucose metabolic depression is accompanied by adenosine triphosphate decreases, increased flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway, free radical production, activation of poly-ADP ribose polymerase via DNA damage, and inhibition of glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase (a key glycolytic enzyme) via depletion of the cytosolic NAD pool. Under these post-brain injury conditions of impaired glycolytic metabolism, glucose becomes a less favorable energy substrate. Ketone bodies are the only known natural alternative substrate to glucose for cerebral energy metabolism. While it has been demonstrated that other fuels (pyruvate, lactate, and acetyl-L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the brain, ketones are the only endogenous fuel that can contribute significantly to cerebral metabolism. Preclinical studies employing both pre- and postinjury implementation of the ketogenic diet have demonstrated improved structural and functional outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI) models, mild TBI/concussion models, and spinal cord injury. Further clinical studies are required to determine the optimal method to induce cerebral ketone metabolism in the postinjury brain, and to validate the neuroprotective benefits of ketogenic therapy in humans. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Cerebral arterial pulsation drives paravascular CSF-interstitial fluid exchange in the murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliff, Jeffrey J; Wang, Minghuan; Zeppenfeld, Douglas M; Venkataraman, Arun; Plog, Benjamin A; Liao, Yonghong; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-11-13

    CSF from the subarachnoid space moves rapidly into the brain along paravascular routes surrounding penetrating cerebral arteries, exchanging with brain interstitial fluid (ISF) and facilitating the clearance of interstitial solutes, such as amyloid β, in a pathway that we have termed the "glymphatic" system. Prior reports have suggested that paravascular bulk flow of CSF or ISF may be driven by arterial pulsation. However, cerebral arterial pulsation could not be directly assessed. In the present study, we use in vivo two-photon microscopy in mice to visualize vascular wall pulsatility in penetrating intracortical arteries. We observed that unilateral ligation of the internal carotid artery significantly reduced arterial pulsatility by ~50%, while systemic administration of the adrenergic agonist dobutamine increased pulsatility of penetrating arteries by ~60%. When paravascular CSF-ISF exchange was evaluated in real time using in vivo two-photon and ex vivo fluorescence imaging, we observed that internal carotid artery ligation slowed the rate of paravascular CSF-ISF exchange, while dobutamine increased the rate of paravascular CSF-ISF exchange. These findings demonstrate that cerebral arterial pulsatility is a key driver of paravascular CSF influx into and through the brain parenchyma, and suggest that changes in arterial pulsatility may contribute to accumulation and deposition of toxic solutes, including amyloid β, in the aging brain.

  4. Acute high-altitude hypoxic brain injury Identification of ten differential proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianyu Li; Yuting Qi; Hui Liu; Ying Cui; Li Zhang; Haiying Gong; Yaxiao Li; Lingzhi Li; Yongliang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia can cause severe brain damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, and is involved in hypoxic brain injury. However, little is currently known about the mechanisms responsible for mi-tochondrial dysfunction in hypobaric hypoxic brain damage. In this study, a rat model of hypobaric hypoxic brain injury was established to investigate the molecular mechanisms associated with mi-tochondrial dysfunction. As revealed by two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis, 16, 21, and 36 differential protein spots in cerebral mitochondria were observed at 6, 12, and 24 hours post-hypobaric hypoxia, respectively. Furthermore, ten protein spots selected from each hypobaric hypoxia subgroup were similarly regulated and were identified by mass spectrometry. These de-tected proteins included dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, creatine kinase B-type, isova-leryl-CoA dehydrogenase, elongation factor Ts, ATP synthase beta-subunit, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase, electron transfer flavoprotein alpha-subunit, Chain A of 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase, NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein 8 and tropomyosin beta chain. These ten proteins are al involved in the electron transport chain and the function of ATP synthase. Our findings indicate that hypobaric hypoxia can induce the differential expression of several cerebral mitochondrial proteins, which are involved in the regulation of mitochondrial energy production.

  5. Changes in the permeability of blood brain barrier and endothelial cell damage after cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Liu; Jiansheng Li

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of endothelial cells on the permeability of blood brain barrier (BBB) after brain injury and its effect mechanism.DATA SOURCES: We searched for the articles of permeability of BBB and endothelial cell injury after brain ischemia, which were published between January 1982 and December 2005, with the key words of "cerebral ischemia damage,blood brain barrier ( BBB),permeability,effect of endothelial cell (EC) and its variation mechanism"in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were primarily selected. The articles related to the changes in the permeability of BBB and the effect of endothelial cells as well as the change mechanism after cerebral ischemia damage were chosen. Repetitive studies or review articles were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 55 related articles were collected, and 35 were excluded due to repetitive or review articles, finally 20 articles were involved.DATA SYNTHESIS: The content or viewpoints of involved literatures were analyzed. Cerebral ischemia had damage for endothelial cells, such as the inflow of a lot of Ca2+, the production of nitrogen monoxide and oxygen free radical, and aggravated destruction of BBB. After acceptors of inflammatory mediators on cerebrovascular endothelial cell membrane, such as histamine, bradykinin , 5-hydroxytryptamine and so on are activated, endothelial cells shrink and the permeability of BBB increases. Its mechanism involves in the inflow of extracellular Ca2+and the release of intracellular Ca2+ in the cells. Glycocalyx molecule on the surface of endothelial cell, having structural polytropy, is the determinative factor of the permeability of BBB. VEGF, intensively increasing the vasopermeability and mainly effecting on postcapillary vein and veinlet, is the strongest known blood vessel permeation reagent. Its chronic overexpression in the brain can lead the destruction of BBB.CONCLUSION: The injury of endothelial cell participants in the pathological mechanism of BBB

  6. Cerebral microdialysis in traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Oliveira, Marcelo; Kairalla, Ana Carolina; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Martinez, Raquel Chacon Ruiz; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2014-08-01

    Cerebral microdialysis (CMD) is a laboratory tool that provides on-line analysis of brain biochemistry via a thin, fenestrated, double-lumen dialysis catheter that is inserted into the interstitium of the brain. A solute is slowly infused into the catheter at a constant velocity. The fenestrated membranes at the tip of the catheter permit free diffusion of molecules between the brain interstitium and the perfusate, which is subsequently collected for laboratory analysis. The major molecules studied using this method are glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, and glycerol. The collected substances provide insight into the neurochemical features of secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and valuable information about changes in brain metabolism within a short time frame. In this review, the authors detail the CMD technique and its associated markers and then describe pertinent findings from the literature about the clinical application of CMD in TBI and SAH.

  7. Increased apoptosis and hypomyelination in cerebral white matter of macular mutant mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichi Takikita

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypomyelination in developing brain is often accompanied by congenital metabolic disorders. Menkes kinky hair disease is an X-linked neurodegenerative disease of impaired copper transport, resulting from a mutation of the Menkes disease gene, a transmembrane copper-transporting p-type ATPase gene (ATP7A. In a macular mutant mouse model, the murine ortholog of Menkes gene (mottled gene is mutated, and widespread neurodegeneration and subsequent death are observed. Although some biochemical analysis of myelin protein in macular mouse has been reported, detailed histological study of myelination in this mouse model is currently lacking. Since myelin abnormality is one of the neuropathologic findings of human Menkes disease, in this study early myelination in macular mouse brain was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Two-week-old macular mice and normal littermates were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded and vibratome sections was performed using antibodies against either CNPase, cleaved caspase-3 or O4 (marker of immature oligodendrocytes. This staining showed that cerebral myelination in macular mouse was generally hypoplastic and that hypomyelination was remarkable in internal capsule, corpus callosum, and cingulate cortex. In addition, an increased number of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells were observed in corpus callosum and internal capsule. Copper deficiency induced by low copper diet has been reported to induce oligodendrocyte dysfunction and leads to hypomyelination in this mouse model. Taken together, hypomyelination observed in this study in a mouse model of Menkes disease is assumed to be induced by increased apoptosis of immature oligodendrocytes in developing cerebrum, through deficient intracellular copper metabolism.

  8. Increased apoptosis and hypomyelination in cerebral white matter of macular mutant mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takikita, Shoichi; Takano, Tomoyuki; Narita, Tsutomu; Maruo, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-01

    Hypomyelination in developing brain is often accompanied by congenital metabolic disorders. Menkes kinky hair disease is an X-linked neurodegenerative disease of impaired copper transport, resulting from a mutation of the Menkes disease gene, a transmembrane copper-transporting p-type ATPase gene (ATP7A). In a macular mutant mouse model, the murine ortholog of Menkes gene (mottled gene) is mutated, and widespread neurodegeneration and subsequent death are observed. Although some biochemical analysis of myelin protein in macular mouse has been reported, detailed histological study of myelination in this mouse model is currently lacking. Since myelin abnormality is one of the neuropathologic findings of human Menkes disease, in this study early myelination in macular mouse brain was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Two-week-old macular mice and normal littermates were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded and vibratome sections was performed using antibodies against either CNPase, cleaved caspase-3 or O4 (marker of immature oligodendrocytes). This staining showed that cerebral myelination in macular mouse was generally hypoplastic and that hypomyelination was remarkable in internal capsule, corpus callosum, and cingulate cortex. In addition, an increased number of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells were observed in corpus callosum and internal capsule. Copper deficiency induced by low copper diet has been reported to induce oligodendrocyte dysfunction and leads to hypomyelination in this mouse model. Taken together, hypomyelination observed in this study in a mouse model of Menkes disease is assumed to be induced by increased apoptosis of immature oligodendrocytes in developing cerebrum, through deficient intracellular copper metabolism.

  9. Porcine Brain Extract Attenuates Memory Impairments Induced by Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinatta Jittiwat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Stroke or cerebral ischemia has been recognized as one important problem worldwide. To date, the effectiveness of protective and therapeutic strategies against stroke is still very limited. Therefore, the development of novel strategy is required. Porcine brain is traditional believed to improve brain functions. Recent studies showed that the extract of porcine brain could protect against brain damage related to the oxidative stress, therefore, we hypothesized that it could protect against brain damage in stroke. Approach: To test the potential of porcine brain extract as the novel protective supplement against stroke, various doses of porcine brain extract at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg kg-1 b.w. were orally given to male Wistar rats, weighing 300-350 g, at the period of 14 days before and 21 days after the occlusion of right middle cerebral artery. Then, all rats were determined the neurological score, motor performance, cognitive function and brain infarct volume. Moreover, the possible neuroprotective mechanisms of the extract were also determined via the alteration of Malondialdehyde (MDA or lipid peroxidation product and via the activities of scavenger enzymes including Superoxide Dismutase (SOD, Catalase (CAT and Glutathione Peroxides (GPx. Results: The results showed that the low dose of porcine extract decreased the infarct volume and improved brain functions including neurological score, motor performance and memory deficit. In addition, it also decreased MDA but increased the activities of SOD, CAT and GPx. Conclusion: Our results suggested the potential role of porcine brain extract as neuroprotectant. The possible underlying mechanism appeared to be related to the enhanced activities of SOD, CAT and GPx which in turn resulted in the decrease MDA. Moreover, our findings may shed light on the pharmacologic basis for the clinical application of traditional Chinese medicine to protect against stroke.

  10. Melatonin reduces traumatic brain injur y-induced oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex and blood of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nilgnenol; Mustafa Nazrolu

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals induced by traumatic brain injury have deleterious effects on the function and antioxidant vitamin levels of several organ systems including the brain. Melatonin possesses antioxidant effect on the brain by maintaining antioxidant enzyme and vitamin levels. We in-vestigated the effects of melatonin on antioxidant ability in the cerebral cortex and blood of traumatic brain injury rats. Results showed that the cerebral cortex β-carotene, vitamin C, vita-min E, reduced glutathione, and erythrocyte reduced glutathione levels, and plasma vitamin C level were decreased by traumatic brain injury whereas they were increased following melatonin treatment. In conclusion, melatonin seems to have protective effects on traumatic brain inju-ry-induced cerebral cortex and blood toxicity by inhibiting free radical formation and supporting antioxidant vitamin redox system.

  11. Animal Models of Cerebral Palsy: Hypoxic Brain Injury in the Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Daniel WILSON

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Wilson MD. Animal Models of Cerebral Palsy: Hypoxic Brain Injury in the Newborn. Iran J Child Neurol. Spring2015; 9(2:9-16.AbstractObjectiveHypoxic insults are implicated in the spectrum of fetal disorders, including cerebral palsy (CP. In view of the major contribution of intrapartum risk factors and prematurity to subsequent neurological morbidity and mortality in humans, this study aimed to clarify the pathophysiology of brain injury, especially periventricular white matter damage (WMD, that occur in utero to the immature and near-term fetal CNS.Materials & MethodsAn evaluation of the resulting neurological and behavioural phenotype in the newborn was performed by utilising a battery of neurobehavioural tests, including the Morris water-maze and the open-field test, followed by cerebral MRI and histopathology.ResultsThis study used a murine model to examine the deleterious effects of WMD brought about by cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI and the characteristic features of CP in mice. Murine models have proven themselves valuable in the area of experimental neuroscience.Conclusion Hypoxia-treated mice were observed to demonstrate a significant neurofunctional deficit compared with sham mice on two behavioral measures. Indeed, different brain regions, including the sensorimotor cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus were noticeably damaged after HI insult, as determined by both MRI and histopathology. These results, albeit qualitative in nature, appear to support the pre-existing finding that the long-term neurofunctional outcome in animal subjects with CP is strongly associated with the anatomical extent and pattern of cerebral damage as determined by both delayed neuroimaging and histopathology.

  12. Impaired cerebral autoregulation is associated with brain atrophy and worse functional status in chronic ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikio C Aoi

    Full Text Available Dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA is impaired following stroke. However, the relationship between dCA, brain atrophy, and functional outcomes following stroke remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine whether impairment of dCA is associated with atrophy in specific regions or globally, thereby affecting daily functions in stroke patients.We performed a retrospective analysis of 33 subjects with chronic infarctions in the middle cerebral artery territory, and 109 age-matched non-stroke subjects. dCA was assessed via the phase relationship between arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity. Brain tissue volumes were quantified from MRI. Functional status was assessed by gait speed, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL, modified Rankin Scale, and NIH Stroke Score.Compared to the non-stroke group, stroke subjects showed degraded dCA bilaterally, and showed gray matter atrophy in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes ipsilateral to infarct. In stroke subjects, better dCA was associated with less temporal lobe gray matter atrophy on the infracted side ([Formula: see text] = 0.029, faster gait speed ([Formula: see text] = 0.018 and lower IADL score ([Formula: see text]0.002. Our results indicate that better dynamic cerebral perfusion regulation is associated with less atrophy and better long-term functional status in older adults with chronic ischemic infarctions.

  13. Lactate storm marks cerebral metabolism following brain trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Sanju; Auer, Roland N; Tyson, Randy; Gallagher, Clare N; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2014-07-18

    Brain metabolism is thought to be maintained by neuronal-glial metabolic coupling. Glia take up glutamate from the synaptic cleft for conversion into glutamine, triggering glial glycolysis and lactate production. This lactate is shuttled into neurons and further metabolized. The origin and role of lactate in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains controversial. Using a modified weight drop model of severe TBI and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy with infusion of (13)C-labeled glucose, lactate, and acetate, the present study investigated the possibility that neuronal-glial metabolism is uncoupled following severe TBI. Histopathology of the model showed severe brain injury with subarachnoid and hemorrhage together with glial cell activation and positive staining for Tau at 90 min post-trauma. High resolution MR spectroscopy of brain metabolites revealed significant labeling of lactate at C-3 and C-2 irrespective of the infused substrates. Increased (13)C-labeled lactate in all study groups in the absence of ischemia implied activated astrocytic glycolysis and production of lactate with failure of neuronal uptake (i.e. a loss of glial sensing for glutamate). The early increase in extracellular lactate in severe TBI with the injured neurons rendered unable to pick it up probably contributes to a rapid progression toward irreversible injury and pan-necrosis. Hence, a method to detect and scavenge the excess extracellular lactate on site or early following severe TBI may be a potential primary therapeutic measure.

  14. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  15. Topographic organization of the cerebral cortex and brain cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickhoff, Simon B; Constable, R Todd; Yeo, B T Thomas

    2017-02-20

    One of the most specific but also challenging properties of the brain is its topographic organization into distinct modules or cortical areas. In this paper, we first review the concept of topographic organization and its historical development. Next, we provide a critical discussion of the current definition of what constitutes a cortical area, why the concept has been so central to the field of neuroimaging and the challenges that arise from this view. A key aspect in this discussion is the issue of spatial scale and hierarchy in the brain. Focusing on in-vivo brain parcellation as a rapidly expanding field of research, we highlight potential limitations of the classical concept of cortical areas in the context of multi-modal parcellation and propose a revised interpretation of cortical areas building on the concept of neurobiological atoms that may be aggregated into larger units within and across modalities. We conclude by presenting an outlook on the implication of this revised concept for future mapping studies and raise some open questions in the context of brain parcellation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Coriocarcinoma manifestando-se inicialmente como um tumor cerebral Metastatic cerebral chorioncarcinoma simulating a primary brain tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto G. da Silva

    1971-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem um caso de coriocarcinoma cerebral metastático, removido cirurgicamente, ocorrendo numa paciente de 19 anos e localizado na porção posterior do lobo frontal esquerdo. Um estudo retrospectivo da paciente revelou apenas discreta perda sangüínea pelos genitais, iniciada algumas semanas após o delivramento de uma criança normal, ocorrido quatro meses antes. O exame colpocitológico da secreção cérvico-vaginal revelou uma classe V de Papanicolau (positivo para células neoplásicas malignas, tendo ulteriormente a paciente sido submetida à histerectomia total com anexectomia bilateral. Um pequeno tumor de aspecto hemorrágico-necrótico foi encontrado na cavidade uterina, tendo o exame histológico mostrado tratar-se de coriocarcinoma. Os autores tecem considerações clínico-patológicas sobre o coriocarcinoma. com especial referência às lesões metastáticas cerebrais.A case of a metastatic cerebral chorioncarcinoma in the posterior aspect of the left frontal lobe of a 19-years-old woman is reported. After neurosurgical excision of the brain tumor a retrospective study of the patient was carried out as far as the gynecologic complaints were concerned. The patient complained only of little blood loss through the genitals started some weeks after the birth of a normal child four months ago. A smear vaginal preparation showed the presence of atypical epithelial cells (class V of Papanicolau. A total hysterectomy associated with bilateral anexectomy was performed. A small hemorrhagic tumor was detected within the uterus and a histological examination showed a chorioncarcinoma invading the miometrium. The clinico-pathological aspects of the chorioncarcinoma with special emphasis to cerebral metastases are discussed.

  17. CD38 exacerbates focal cytokine production, postischemic inflammation and brain injury after focal cerebral ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-un Choe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Converging evidence suggests that inflammatory processes significantly influence brain injury and clinical impairment in ischemic stroke. Although early studies suggested a key role of lymphocytes, recent data has emphasized the orchestrating function of innate immunity, i.e., macrophages and microglia. The bifunctional receptor and ectoenzyme CD38 synthesizes calcium-mobilizing second messengers (e.g., cyclic ADP-ribose, which have been shown to be necessary for activation and migration of myeloid immune cells. Therefore, we investigated the dynamics of CD38 in stroke and the impact of CD38-deficiency on cytokine production, inflammation and cerebral damage in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that the local expression of the chemokine MCP-1 was attenuated in CD38-deficient mice compared with wildtype mice after focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. In contrast, no significant induction of MCP-1 expression was observed in peripheral blood after 6 hours. Flow cytometry analysis revealed less infiltrating macrophages and lymphocytes in the ischemic hemisphere of CD38-deficient mice, whereas the amount of resident microglia was unaltered. An up-regulation of CD38 expression was observed in macrophages and CD8(+ cells after focal cerebral ischemia in wildtype mice, whereas CD38 expression was unchanged in microglia. Finally, we demonstrate that CD38-deficiency decreases the cerebral ischemic injury and the persistent neurological deficit after three days of reperfusion in this murine temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO model. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: CD38 is differentially regulated following stroke and its deficiency attenuates the postischemic chemokine production, the immune cell infiltration and the cerebral injury after temporary ischemia and reperfusion. Therefore CD38 might prove a therapeutic target in ischemic stroke.

  18. Activation of P2X7 promotes cerebral edema and neurological injury after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald E Kimbler

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Cerebral edema, the abnormal accumulation of fluid within the brain parenchyma, contributes to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP and is a common life-threatening neurological complication following TBI. Unfortunately, neurosurgical approaches to alleviate increased ICP remain controversial and medical therapies are lacking due in part to the absence of viable drug targets. In the present study, genetic inhibition (P2X7-/- mice of the purinergic P2x7 receptor attenuated the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β and reduced cerebral edema following controlled cortical impact, as compared to wild-type mice. Similarly, brilliant blue G (BBG, a clinically non-toxic P2X7 inhibitor, inhibited IL-1β expression, limited edemic development, and improved neurobehavioral outcomes after TBI. The beneficial effects of BBG followed either prophylactic administration via the drinking water for one week prior to injury or via an intravenous bolus administration up to four hours after TBI, suggesting a clinically-implementable therapeutic window. Notably, P2X7 localized within astrocytic end feet and administration of BBG decreased the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a reactive astrocyte marker, and attenuated the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4, an astrocytic water channel that promotes cellular edema. Together, these data implicate P2X7 as a novel therapeutic target to prevent secondary neurological injury after TBI, a finding that warrants further investigation.

  19. Activation of P2X7 promotes cerebral edema and neurological injury after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbler, Donald E; Shields, Jessica; Yanasak, Nathan; Vender, John R; Dhandapani, Krishnan M

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Cerebral edema, the abnormal accumulation of fluid within the brain parenchyma, contributes to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) and is a common life-threatening neurological complication following TBI. Unfortunately, neurosurgical approaches to alleviate increased ICP remain controversial and medical therapies are lacking due in part to the absence of viable drug targets. In the present study, genetic inhibition (P2X7-/- mice) of the purinergic P2x7 receptor attenuated the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and reduced cerebral edema following controlled cortical impact, as compared to wild-type mice. Similarly, brilliant blue G (BBG), a clinically non-toxic P2X7 inhibitor, inhibited IL-1β expression, limited edemic development, and improved neurobehavioral outcomes after TBI. The beneficial effects of BBG followed either prophylactic administration via the drinking water for one week prior to injury or via an intravenous bolus administration up to four hours after TBI, suggesting a clinically-implementable therapeutic window. Notably, P2X7 localized within astrocytic end feet and administration of BBG decreased the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a reactive astrocyte marker, and attenuated the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), an astrocytic water channel that promotes cellular edema. Together, these data implicate P2X7 as a novel therapeutic target to prevent secondary neurological injury after TBI, a finding that warrants further investigation.

  20. Functional electrical stimulation-facilitated proliferation and regeneration of neural precursor cells in the brains of rats with cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Xiang; Huihua Liu; Tiebin Yan; Zhiqiang Zhuang; Dongmei Jin; Yuan Peng

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that proliferation of endogenous neural precursor cells cannot alone compensate for the damage to neurons and axons. From the perspective of neural plastici-ty, we observed the effects of functional electrical stimulation treatment on endogenous neural precursor cell proliferation and expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor in the rat brain on the infarct side. Functional electrical stimulation was performed in rat models of acute middle cerebral artery occlusion. Simultaneously, we set up a placebo stimulation group and a sham-operated group. Immunohistochemical staining showed that, at 7 and 14 days, compared with the placebo group, the numbers of nestin (a neural precursor cell marker)-positive cells in the subgranular zone and subventricular zone were increased in the functional electrical stimulation treatment group. Western blot assays and reverse-transcription PCR showed that total protein levels and gene expression of epidermal growth factor and basic ifbroblast growth factor were also upregulated on the infarct side. Prehensile traction test results showed that, at 14 days, prehension function of rats in the functional electrical stimulation group was signiifcantly better than in the placebo group. These results suggest that functional electrical stimulation can promote endogenous neural precursor cell proliferation in the brains of acute cerebral infarction rats, enhance expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor, and improve the motor function of rats.

  1. Perivascular iron deposits are associated with protein nitration in cerebral experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Scott A; Williams, Rachel; Marshall, Sylvester; LeVine, Steven M

    2014-10-17

    Nitration of proteins, which is thought to be mediated by peroxynitrite, is a mechanism of tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, protein nitration can also be catalyzed by iron, heme or heme-associated molecules independent of peroxynitrite. Since microhemorrhages and perivascular iron deposits are present in the CNS of MS patients, we sought to determine if iron is associated with protein nitration. A cerebral model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (cEAE) was utilized since this model has been shown to have perivascular iron deposits similar to those present in MS. Histochemical staining for iron was used together with immunohistochemistry for nitrotyrosine, eNOS, or iNOS on cerebral sections. Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was studied by albumin immunohistochemistry. Iron deposits were colocalized with nitrotyrosine staining around vessels in cEAE mice while control animals revealed minimal staining. This finding supports the likelihood that nitrotyrosine formation was catalyzed by iron or iron containing molecules. Examples of iron deposits were also observed in association with eNOS and iNOS, which could be one source of substrates for this reaction. Extravasation of albumin was present in cEAE mice, but not in control animals. Extravasated albumin may act to limit tissue injury by binding iron and/or heme as well as being a target of nitration, but the protection is incomplete. In summary, iron-catalyzed nitration of proteins is a likely mechanism of tissue damage in MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Massive cerebral fat embolism leading to brain death: A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Aggarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fat embolism syndrome (FES typically consists of a triad of neurological, pulmonary, and cutaneous symptoms. There exist few case reports of FES involving central nervous system (CNS only without pulmonary involvement. In most of such cases, CNS involvement is partial, and patients recover fully neurologically within days. We report a rare and unusual case of massive cerebral fat embolism that led to brain death in trauma patient.

  3. New insights into coupling and uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The brain has high metabolic and energy needs and requires continuous cerebral blood flow (CBF), which is facilitated by a tight coupling between neuronal activity, CBF, and metabolism. Upon neuronal activation, there is an increase in energy demand, which is then met by a hemodynamic response that increases CBF. Such regional CBF increase in response to neuronal activation is observed using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography...

  4. Light scattering change precedes loss of cerebral adenosine triphosphate in a rat global ischemic brain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2009-08-14

    Measurement of intrinsic optical signals (IOSs) is an attractive technique for monitoring tissue viability in brains since it enables noninvasive, real-time monitoring of morphological characteristics as well as physiological and biochemical characteristics of tissue. We previously showed that light scattering signals reflecting cellular morphological characteristics were closely related to the IOSs associated with the redox states of cytochrome c oxidase in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In the present study, we examined the relationship between light scattering and energy metabolism. Light scattering signals were transcranially measured in rat brains after oxygen and glucose deprivation, and the results were compared with concentrations of cerebral adenosine triphosphate (ATP) measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay. Electrophysiological signal was also recorded simultaneously. After starting saline infusion, EEG activity ceased at 108+/-17s, even after which both the light scattering signal and ATP concentration remained at initial levels. However, light scattering started to change in three phases at 236+/-15s and then cerebral ATP concentration started to decrease at about 260s. ATP concentration significantly decreased during the triphasic scattering change, indicating that the start of scattering change preceded the loss of cerebral ATP. The mean time difference between the start of triphasic scattering change and the onset of ATP loss was about 24s in the present model. DC potential measurement showed that the triphasic scattering change was associated with anoxic depolarization. These findings suggest that light scattering signal can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue viability in brains.

  5. Deep brain stimulation in cerebral palsy: Challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, Anne; Timmermann, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause for acquired dystonia in childhood. Pharmacological treatment is often unsatisfactory and side effects are frequently dose-limiting. Data on outcome of DBS in paediatric patients with dyskinetic CP is very limited and heterogeneous. Reasons for the variability in responses are not entirely known yet. Interestingly, some CP-patients seem to improve subjectively on pallidal stimulation but without measurable changes in impairment scales. Besides dystonia scales, the use of sensitive age-dependent assessments tools is therefore reasonable to capture the full effect. As the course of disease duration as well as the age at operation seem to correlate with DBS outcome in patients with dystonia, DBS at an early stage of development might be beneficial for some of these patients. For the future, well-conducted trials as well as data collection in the international registry is of major importance to increase knowledge about DBS in CP patients, especially those implanted at a young age. Furthermore, selection criteria and guidelines or treatment standards are needed to improve the service for children with dyskinetic CP - especially in light of unsatisfactory medical treatment options. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Histochemical characterization of cytotoxic brain edema. Potassium concentrations after cerebral ischemia and during the postmortem interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M; Ochs, U; Meissner, C

    2000-08-01

    Cytotoxic edema is a phenomenon of the ischemically damaged brain. In the present study we tested a histochemical method that detects this phenomenon based on potassium (K+) levels in the brain. In a first series focal cerebral ischemia was induced by arterial occlusion in 23 gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). After survival times of 30, 60 and 120 min, the animals were killed and brain section histochemically stained for potassium and quantitatively evaluated with a morphometric method. The results were compared with those using physicochemical techniques. A distinct K+ depletion could be demonstrated in the area of the focal ischemia within a survival time of 30 min, the depletion growing thereafter with increasing survival time. In a second series histochemical and chemical methods were used to study the stability of K+ levels in undamaged brains of 15 healthy rats during postmortem intervals of 2.5 and 5 h. Within these intervals K+ levels were clearly depleted, apparently as a result of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) diffusion. Even if neuronal injury can be demonstrated histochemically after very brief survival times of about 30 min, postmortem storage of the cadavers rendered detection impossible due to electrolyte and water diffusion. In autoptic human cases, therefore, this technique is of no practical utility in detecting cytotoxic brain edema in postmortem tissue.

  7. Value of serum phosphopyruvate hydratase protein for the diagnosis of cerebral injuries in patients with brain malignant tumor%血清磷酸丙酮酸水合酶检测在颅内恶性肿瘤患者放射性脑损伤诊断中的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜丽莉; 韩存芝; 荆结线; 赵先文; 田保国

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the value of serum phosphopyruvate hydratase PH protein for the diagnosis of cerebral injuries in patients with brain malignant tumor.Methods Serum PH protein levels were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 56 patients with brain malignant tumor. Compare the differences among the status of cerebral injuries.And compare the differences among the patients with general with different radiotherapy methods 32 cases,three dimensional conformal radiothrapy 24 cases,and different peritumoral brain edema levels (cmild 18 cases, moderate ao cases severe 30 cases). Results Before radiotherapy the levels of serum PH protein in patients and the health control were (4.12±0.56),(4.66±0.62)μg/L,no significant differece(P>0.05).And there was also no significant difference between the before and after radiotherapy for the cerebroma,the levels were(7.84±0.72) μg/L,(t=3.89,P=0.001 ).The PH levels of general radiation therapy and three dimensional comformal radiotherapy were (13.59±0.92),(6.14±0.52)μg/L.There was cignificant difference(P=0.002) After radiotherapy,The levels of serum PH protein of the different dropsical degree,mild,moderate and severe were(4.47:±0.55),(6.17±0.62),(15.21±0.86) μg/L, respectively,showing significant difference (F=15.61,P=0.0001). The therapies influenced the serum PH levels (P<0.05)Conclusion High levels of serum PH protein are associated with severe cerebral injuries in brain malignant tumor.So high serum PH level may serve as an progressive predictor of the injury.%目的 研究血清磷酸丙酮酸水合酶(PH)在颅内恶性肿瘤患者放射性脑损伤早期诊断中的作用.方法 采用酶联免疫吸附试验检测56例颅内恶性肿瘤患者(脑转移瘤26例,脑肿瘤30例)在接受放射性治疗前、后的血清PH水平,比较其差异.同时比较颅内恶性肿瘤患者不同放疗方案(普通放疗组32例,三维适形放疗组24例)、瘤周水肿程度(轻度18例,中度20例,重度18

  8. Development of regional cerebral oedema after lateral fluid-percussion brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, T K; Soares, H; Thomas, M; Cloherty, K

    1990-01-01

    Most studies attempting to characterize post-traumatic oedema formation have focused on the acute postinjury period. We have recently developed a new model of lateral (parasagittal) fluidpercussion (FP) brain injury in the rat. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the temporal course of oedema formation and resolution in this experimental model of brain injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 67) were anaesthetized and subjected to FP brain injury of moderate severity. Animals were sacrified at 1 hour, 6 hours, 24 hours, 2 days, 3 days, 5 days and 7 days after brain injury, brains removed and assayed for water content using either specific gravitimetric or wet weight/dry weight techniques. In the injured left parietal cortex, a significant increase in water content was observed by 6 hours postinjury (p less than 0.05) that persisted up to 5 days postinjury. A prolonged and significant increase in water content was also observed in the left (ipsilateral) hippocampus which began at 1 hour postinjury (p less than 0.05) and continued up to 3 days. Other regions examined showed no significant regional oedema after brain injury. These results suggest that lateral FP brain injury produces an early focus oedema that persists for a prolonged period after trauma. This model may be useful in the evaluation of novel pharmacological therapies designed to reduce cerebral oedema after brain injury.

  9. Protein metabolism in the rat cerebral cortex in vivo and in vitro as affected by the acquisition enhancing drug piracetam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nickolson, V.J.; Wolthuis, O.L.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of Piracetam on rat cerebral protein metabolism in vivo and in vitro was studied. It was found that the drug stimulates the uptake of labelled leucine by cerebral cortex slices, has no effect on the incorporation of leucine into cerebral protein, neither in slices nor in vivo, but

  10. Voxel-based statistical analysis of cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with permanent vegetative state after acquired brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Wook Kim; Hyoung Seop Kim; Young-Sil An; Sang Hee Im

    2010-01-01

    Background Permanent vegetative state is defined as the impaired level of consciousness longer than 12 months after traumatic causes and 3 months after non-traumatic causes of brain injury. Although many studies assessed the cerebral metabolism in patients with acute and persistent vegetative state after brain injury, few studies investigated the cerebral metabolism in patients with permanent vegetative state. In this study, we performed the voxel-based analysis of cerebral glucose metabolism and investigated the relationship between regional cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of impaired consciousness in patients with permanent vegetative state after acquired brain injury.Methods We compared the regional cerebral glucose metabolism as demonstrated by F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography from 12 patients with permanent vegetative state after acquired brain injury with those from 12 control subjects. Additionally, covariance analysis was performed to identify regions where decreased changes in regional cerebral glucose metabolism significantly correlated with a decrease of level of consciousness measured by JFK-coma recovery scare. Statistical analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping.Results Compared with controls, patients with permanent vegetative state demonstrated decreased cerebral glucose metabolism in the left precuneus, both posterior cingulate cortices, the left superior parietal lobule (Pcorrected <0.001), and increased cerebral glucose metabolism in the both cerebellum and the right supramarginal cortices (Pcorrected <0.001). In the covariance analysis, a decrease in the level of consciousness was significantly correlated with decreased cerebral glucose metabolism in the both posterior cingulate cortices (Puncorrected <0.005).Conclusion Our findings suggest that the posteromedial parietal cortex, which are part of neural network for consciousness, may be relevant structure for pathophysiological mechanism

  11. Endogenous neurogenesis in the human brain following cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minger, Stephen L; Ekonomou, Antigoni; Carta, Eloisa M; Chinoy, Amish; Perry, Robert H; Ballard, Clive G

    2007-01-01

    Increased endogenous neurogenesis has a significant regenerative role in many experimental models of cerebrovascular diseases, but there have been very few studies in humans. We therefore examined whether there was evidence of altered endogenous neurogenesis in an 84-year-old patient who suffered a cerebrovascular accident 1 week prior to death. Using antibodies that specifically label neural stem/neural progenitor cells, we examined the presence of immunopositive cells around and distant from the infarcted area, and compared this with a control, age-matched individual. Interestingly, a large number of neural stem cells, vascular endothelial growth factor-immunopositive cells and new blood vessels were observed only around the region of infarction, and none in the corresponding brain areas of the healthy control. In addition, an increased number of neural stem cells was observed in the neurogenic region of the lateral ventricle wall. Our results suggest increased endogenous neurogenesis associated with neovascularization and migration of newly-formed cells towards a region of cerebrovascular damage in the adult human brain and highlight possible mechanisms underlying this process.

  12. Distinct proteins in cortex of rats with closed traumatic brain injury detected by a WCX-2 protein chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhan; Lin Liang; Qingming Shu; Shuwang Yang; Yongliang Zhang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanical injury can cause the changes of polygene expression spectrum in rat cerebral cortical nerve cells, and then result in the changes of intracellular protein expression. At present, dielectrophoresis is combined with mass spectrum technique to detect the expression of different proteins in rat cortex after brain injury, but the protein chip technique requires further investigation. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the differences of protein expression spectrum in rat cerebral cortex before and after closed traumatic brain injury using WCX-2 protein chip technique. DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Training Division of the Medical College of Chinese People's Armed Police Force. MATERIALS: Seventy-two male SD rats of clean degree, 350 - 450 g, were provided by the Experimental Animal Center, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of Chinese PLA. Urea, trifluoroacetic acid, CHAPS and Tris (Sigma, USA); WCX-2 (Ciphergen, USA). Ultra-high speed hypothermia centrifuger (Bechman, USA); Rotary tissue microtome (Keuca, Germany); Biochip processor and PBS II-C protein chip reader (Ciphergen, USA).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Institute of Molecular Pathology, Central Laboratory, and Department of Pathology, Medical College of Chinese People's Armed Police Force from June 2005 to March 2006.①Grouping and treatment: The experiments were completed in molecular pathological institute, central laboratory and pathological department.①The rats were randomly divided into control group (n =12) and brain injury group (n =60). Marmarou's weight-dropping models were duplicated at different time points in the brain injury group. In the control group, the rats were only treated by incising the skin of head top, without fixing the stainless steel hitting backup plate at the vault of skull, and obtain brain cortex for pathological and protein chip research, and they were killed after 24 hours. The rats in the brain injury group were

  13. Tissue transglutaminase colocalizes with extracellular matrix proteins in cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Mieke; van der Wildt, Berend; Schul, Emma; Bol, John G J M; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Drukarch, Benjamin; Wilhelmus, Micha M M

    2013-04-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a key histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch type (HCHWA-D). CAA is characterized by amyloid-beta (Aβ) depositions and remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in brain vessels and plays an important role in the development and progression of both AD and HCHWA-D. Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) modulates the ECM by molecular cross-linking of ECM proteins. Here, we investigated the distribution pattern, cellular source, and activity of tTG in CAA in control, AD, and HCHWA-D cases. We observed increased tTG immunoreactivity and colocalization with Aβ in the vessel wall in early stage CAA, whereas in later CAA stages, tTG and its cross-links were present in halos enclosing the Aβ deposition. In CAA, tTG and its cross-links at the abluminal side of the vessel were demonstrated to be either of astrocytic origin in parenchymal vessels, of fibroblastic origin in leptomeningeal vessels, and of endothelial origin at the luminal side of the deposited Aβ. Furthermore, the ECM proteins fibronectin and laminin colocalized with the tTG-positive halos surrounding the deposited Aβ in CAA. However, we observed that in situ tTG activity was present throughout the vessel wall in late stage CAA. Together, our data suggest that tTG and its activity might play a differential role in the development and progression of CAA, possibly evolving from direct modulation of Aβ aggregation to cross-linking of ECM proteins resulting in ECM restructuring.

  14. Excitatory amino acid changes in the brains of rhesus monkeys following selective cerebral deep hypothermia and blood flow occlusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Pu; Xiaoqun Niu; Jizong Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Selective cerebral deep hypothermia and blood flow occlusion can enhance brain tolerance to ischemia and hypoxia and reduce cardiopulmonary complications in monkeys. Excitotoxicity induced by the release of a large amount of excitatory amino acids after cerebral ischemia is the major mechanism underlying ischemic brain injury and nerve cell death. In the present study, we used selective cerebral deep hypothermia and blood flow occlusion to block the bilateral common carotid arteries and/or bilateral vertebral arteries in rhesus monkey, followed by reperfusion using Ringer's solution at 4°C. Microdialysis and transmission electron microscope results showed that selective cerebral deep hypothermia and blood flow occlusion inhibited the release of glutamic acid into the extracellular fluid in the brain frontal lobe and relieved pathological injury in terms of the ultrastructure of brain tissues after severe cerebral ischemia. These findings indicate that cerebral deep hypothermia and blood flow occlusion can inhibit cytotoxic effects and attenuate ischemic/ hypoxic brain injury through decreasing the release of excitatory amino acids, such as glutamic acid.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and blood brain barrier permeability in the rat brain after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lifang Lei; Xiaohong Zi; Qiuyun Tu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in the patho-physiological process of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. It has been recently observed that metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is closely related to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injuryOBJECTIVE: This study was designed to observe MMP-9 expression in the rat brain after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and to investigate its correlation to BBB permeability.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This study, a randomized controlled animal experiment, was performed at the Institute of Neurobiology, Central South University between September 2005 and March 2006.MATERIALS: Ninety healthy male SD rats, aged 3-4 months, weighing 200-280g, were used in the present study. Rabbit anti-rat MMP-9 polyclonal antibody (Boster, Wuhan, China) and Evans blue (Sigma, USA) were also used.METHODS: All rats were randomly divided into 9 groups with 10 rats in each group: normal control group, sham-operated group, and ischemia for 2 hours followed by reperfusion for 3,6,12 hours, 1,2,4 and 7 days groups. In the ischemia/reperfusion groups, rats were subjected to ischemia/reperfusion injury by suture occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. In the sham-operated group, rats were merely subjected to vessel dissociation. In the normal control group, rats were not modeled.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: BBB permeability was assessed by determining the level of effusion of Evans blue. MMP-9 expression was detected by an immunohistochemical method.RESULTS: All 90 rats were included in the final analysis. BBB permeability alteration was closely correlated to ischemia/reperfusion time. BBB permeability began to increase at ischemia/reperfusion for 3 hours, then it gradually reached a peak level at ischemia/reperfusion for 1 day, and thereafter it gradually decreased. MMP-9 expression began to increase at ischemia/reperfusion for 3 hours, then gradually reached its peak level 2 days after perfusion, and thereafter

  16. Challenges in understanding the impact of blood pressure management on cerebral oxygenation in the preterm brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminath eAzhan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Systemic hypotension in preterm infants has been related to increased mortality, cerebrovascular lesions and neurodevelopmental morbidity. Treatment of hypotension with inotropic medications aims at preservation of end organ perfusion and oxygen delivery, especially the brain. The common inotropic medications in preterm infants include dopamine, dobutamine, adrenalin, with adjunctive use of corticosteroids in cases of refractory hypotension. Whether maintenance of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP by use of inotropic medication is neuroprotective or not remains unclear. This review explores the different inotropic agents and their effects on perfusion and oxygenation in the preterm brain, in clinical studies as well as in animal models. Dopamine and adrenalin, because of their -adrenergic vasoconstrictor actions, have raised concerns of reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF. Several studies in hypotensive preterm infants have shown that dopamine elevates CBF together with increased MAP, in keeping with limited cerebro-autoregulation. Adrenaline is also effective in raising cerebral perfusion together with MAP in preterm infants. Experimental studies in immature animals show no cerebro-vasoconstrictive effects of dopamine or adrenaline, but demonstrate the consistent findings of increased cerebral perfusion and oxygenation with the use of dopamine, dobutamine and adrenaline, alongside with raised MAP. Both clinical and animal studies report the transitory effects of adrenaline in increasing plasma lactate, and blood glucose, which might render its use as a 2nd line therapy. To investigate the cerebral effects of inotropic agents in long-term outcome in hypotensive preterm infants, carefully designed prospective research possibly including preterm infants with permissive hypotension is required. Preterm animal models would be useful in investigating the relationship between the physiological effects of inotropes and histopathology outcomes in

  17. Brain hyaluronan binding protein inhibits tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锋; 曹曼林; 王蕾

    2004-01-01

    Background Great efforts have been made to search for the angiogenic inhibitors in avascular tissues. Several proteins isolated from cartilage have been proved to have anti-angiogenic or anti-tumour effects. Because cartilage contains a great amount of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligosaccharides and abundant HA binding proteins (HABP), therefore, we speculated that HABP might be one of the factors regulating vascularization in cartilage or anti-angiogenesis in tumours. The purpose of this research was to evaluale the effects of hyaluronan binding protein on inhibiting tumour growth both in vivo and vitro. Methods A unique protein termed human brain hyaluronan (HA) binding protein (b-HABP) was cloned from human brain cDNA library. MDA-435 human breast cancer cell line was chosen as a transfectant. The in vitro underlying mechanisms were investigated by determining the possibilities of MDA-435/b-HABP colony formation on soft agar, the effects of the transfectant on the proliferation of endothelial cells and the expression levels of caspase 3 and FasL from MDA-435/b-HABP. The in vivo study included tumour growth on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and nude mice. Results Colony formation assay revealed that the colonies formed by MDA-435/b-HABP were greatly reduced compared to mock transfectants. The conditioned media from MDA-435/b-HABP inhibited the growth of endothelial cells in culture. Caspase 3 and FasL expressions were induced by MDA-435/b-HABP. The size of tumours of MDA-435/b-HABP in both CAM and nude mice was much smaller than that of MDA-435 alone. Conclusions Human brain hyaluronan binding protein (b-HABP) may represent a new kind of naturally existing anti-tumour substance. This brain-derived glycoprotein may block tumour growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells or by decreasing angiogenesis in tumour tissue via inhibiting proliferation of endothelial cells.

  18. Phosphorylation of brain proteins in generalized convulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horan, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphorylation of neuronal proteins is being proposed as a modulating influence on several aspects of neuronal function. By labeling proteins with radioactive phosphorus (/sup 32/P) and then separating these proteins by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the author can determine what factors change the phosphorylation of these proteins. They have used such a system to analyze the effects of generalized convulsions on protein phosphorylation. Electroshock (ES) and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) were utilized to produce generalized convulsions. Brain membranes, taken from rats immediately after a convulsion, exhibited an increase in protein phosphorylation in vitro. The most noticeable change took place in proteins in the 18,000-20,000 MW range. They have designated these proteins as the low molecular weight (LMW) proteins. The change in phosphorylation was basically the same after one convulsions as after six daily convulsions. Twenty-four hours after a single convulsion no change in phosphorylation was observed. When rat membranes are exposed to PTZ in vitro, phosphorylation is increased at 20 sec but has returned to control level at 90 sec of incubation. This effect is produced without a convulsion. In general, as the concentration of magnesium is increased from 5 mM to 10 mM phosphorylation is increased. Increasing the incubation time from 20 sec to 90 sec and increasing the calcium concentration to 10 mM both decrease phosphorylation of the LMW proteins. Human temporal cortex samples present with phosphorylated proteins having patterns very similar to those in rat membranes.

  19. Difficulties in assessing brain death in a case of benzodiazepine poisoning with persistent cerebral blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrache, Frédéric; Mégarbane, Bruno; Pirnay, Stéphane; Rhaoui, Abdel; Thuong, Marie

    2004-10-01

    Assessing brain death may sometimes be difficult, with isoelectric EEG following psychotrope overdoses or normal cerebral blood flow (CBF) persisting despite brain death in the case of ventricular drainage or craniotomy. A 42-year-old man, resuscitated after cardiac arrest following a suicidal ingestion of ethanol, bromazepam and zopiclone, was admitted in deep coma. On day 4, his brainstem reflexes and EEG activity disappeared. On day 5, his serum bromazepam concentration was 817 ng/ml (therapeutic: 80-150). The patient was unresponsive to 1 mg of flumazenil. MRI showed diffuse cerebral swelling. CBF assessed by angiography and Doppler remained normal and EEG isoelectric until he died on day 8 with multiorgan failure. There was a discrepancy between the clinically and EEG-assessed brain death, and CBF persistence. We hypothesized that brain death, resulting from diffuse anoxic injury, may lead, in the absence of major intracranial hypertension, to angiographic misdiagnoses. Therefore, EEG remains useful to assess diagnosis in such unusual cases.

  20. Reduced brain edema and infarct volume in aquaporin-4 deficient mice after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaoming; Derugin, Nikita; Manley, Geoffrey T; Verkman, A S

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a water channel expressed in astrocyte end-feet lining the blood-brain barrier. AQP4 deletion in mice is associated with improved outcomes in global cerebral ischemia produced by transient carotid artery occlusion, and focal cerebral ischemia produced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Here, we investigated the consequences of 1-h transient MCAO produced by intraluminal suture blockade followed by 23 h of reperfusion. In nine AQP4(+/+) and nine AQP4(-/-) mice, infarct volume was significantly reduced by an average of 39 ± 4% at 24h in AQP4(-/-) mice, cerebral hemispheric edema was reduced by 23 ± 3%, and Evans Blue extravasation was reduced by 31 ± 2% (mean ± SEM). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed greatest reduction in apparent diffusion coefficient around the occlusion site after reperfusion, with remarkably lesser reduction in AQP4(-/-) mice. The reduced infarct volume in AQP4(-/-) mice following transient MCAO supports the potential utility of therapeutic AQP4 inhibition in stroke.

  1. Brain metabolic markers reflect susceptibility status in cytokine gene knockout mice with murine cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Sapan B; Bubb, William A; Hunt, Nicholas H; Rae, Caroline

    2006-11-01

    Treatment of cerebral malaria, a complication of the world's most significant parasitic disease, remains problematic due to lack of understanding of its pathogenesis. Metabolic changes, along with cytokine expression alterations and blood cell sequestration in the brain, have previously been reported during severe disease in human infection and mouse models leading to the "cytopathic hypoxia" and "sequestration" theories of pathogenesis. Here, to determine the robustness of the metabolic changes and their relationship to disease development, we investigated changes in cerebral metabolic markers in a mouse model of cerebral malaria (CM) in wildtype (C57BL/6) and cytokine knockout (TNF(-/-), IFNgamma(-/-) and LTalpha(-/-)) mice using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mice susceptible to CM (wildtype, TNF(-/-)) showed decreased cerebral glucose use, decreased Krebs cycle metabolism and decreased high-energy phosphates. Conversely, mice resistant to CM (IFNgamma(-/-), LTalpha(-/-)) showed little sign of these effects, despite identical levels of parasitemia. Previously reported changes in lactate were shown to be strain dependent. Elevated glutamine and decreased phosphorylation potential emerged as robust metabolic markers of susceptibility, further implicating the trytophan/NAD(+) pathway in disease development. Thus these metabolic changes are firmly linked both to the immune system response to malaria and to the occurrence of pathogenic changes in experimental CM.

  2. Effects of ketamine, midazolam, thiopental, and propofol on brain ischemia injury in rat cerebral cortical slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-shengXUE; Bu-weiYU; Ze-jianWANG; Hong-zhuanCHEN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effects of ketamine, midazolam, thiopental, and propofol on brain ischemia by the model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in rat cerebral cortical slices. METHODS: Cerebral cortical slices were incu-bated in 2 % 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) solution after OGD, the damages and effects of ketamine,midazolam, thiopental, and propofol were quantitativlye evaluated by ELISA reader of absorbance (A) at 490 nm,which indicated the red formazan extracted from slices, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) releases in the incubated supernate were also measured. RESULTS: Progressive prolongation of OGD resulted in decreases of TTC staining.The percentage of tissue injury had a positive correlation with LDH releases, r=0.9609, P<0.01. Two hours of reincubation aggravated the decrease of TTC staining compared with those slices stained immediately after OGD(P<0.01). These four anesthetics had no effects on the TTC staining of slices. Ketamine completely inhibited thedecrease of A value induced by 10 min of OGD injury. High concentrations of midazolam (10 μmol/L) and thiopental (400μmol/L) partly attenuated this decrease. Propofol at high concentration (100 μmol/L) enhanced the decrease of A value induced by 10 min of OGD injury (P<0.01). CONCLUSION; Ketamine, high concentration of midazolam and thiopental have neuroprotective effects against OGD injury in rat cerebral cortical slices, while high concentration of propofol augments OGD injury in rat cerebral cortical slices.

  3. Racking the brain: Detection of cerebral edema on postmortem computed tomography compared with forensic autopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Nicole [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Schweitzer, Wolf; Ross, Steffen G.; Gascho, Dominic [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Ruder, Thomas D. [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital of Bern, Freiburgstrasse, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Thali, Michael J. [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Flach, Patricia M., E-mail: patricia.flach@irm.uzh.ch [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Postmortem swelling of the brain is a typical finding on PMCT and occurs concomitant with potential antemortem or agonal brain edema. •Cerebral edema despite normal postmortem swelling is indicated by narrowed temporal horns and symmetrical herniation of the cerebral tonsils on PMCT. •Cases with intoxication or asphyxia demonstrated higher deviations of the attenuation between white and gray matter (>20 Hounsfield Units) and a ratio >1.58 between the gray and white matter. •The Hounsfield measurements of the white and gray matter help to determine the cause of death in cases of intoxication or asphyxia. -- Abstract: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare postmortem computed tomography with forensic autopsy regarding their diagnostic reliability of differentiating between pre-existing cerebral edema and physiological postmortem brain swelling. Materials and methods: The study collective included a total of 109 cases (n = 109/200, 83 male, 26 female, mean age: 53.2 years) and were retrospectively evaluated for the following parameters (as related to the distinct age groups and causes of death): tonsillar herniation, the width of the outer and inner cerebrospinal fluid spaces and the radiodensity measurements (in Hounsfield Units) of the gray and white matter. The results were compared with the findings of subsequent autopsies as the gold standard for diagnosing cerebral edema. p-Values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Cerebellar edema (despite normal postmortem swelling) can be reliably assessed using postmortem computed tomography and is indicated by narrowed temporal horns and symmetrical herniation of the cerebellar tonsils (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference (p < 0.001) between intoxication (or asphyxia) and all other causes of death; the former causes demonstrated higher deviations of the attenuation between white and gray matter (>20 Hounsfield Units), and the gray to

  4. Limb Ischemic Perconditioning Attenuates Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption by Inhibiting Activity of MMP-9 and Occludin Degradation after Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Changhong; Li, Ning; Wang, Brian; Yang, Yong; Gao, Jinhuan; Li, Sijie; Ding, Yuchuan; Jin, Kunlin; Ji, Xunming

    2015-01-01

    Remote ischemic perconditioning (PerC) has been proved to have neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia, however, the effect of PerC on the BBB disruption and underlying mechanisms remains largely unknown. To address these issues, total 90 adult male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were used. The rats underwent 90-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and the limb remote ischemic PerC was immediately applied after the onset of MCAO. We found that limb remote PerC protected BBB breakdown and brain edema, in parallel with reduced infarct volume and improved neurological deficits, after MCAO. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that MCAO resulted in disrupted continuity of claudin-5 staining in the cerebral endothelial cells with significant gap formation, which was significantly improved after PerC. Western blot analysis demonstrated that expression of tight junction (TJ) protein occludin was significantly increased, but other elements of TJ proteins, claudin-5 and ZO-1, in the BBB endothelial cells were not altered at 48 h after PerC, compared to MCAO group. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9), which was involved in TJ protein degradation, was decreased after PerC. Interestingly, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2), an upstream of MMP-9 signaling, was significantly reduced in the PerC group. Our data suggest that PerC inhibits MMP-9-mediated occludin degradation, which could lead to decreased BBB disruption and brain edema after ischemic stroke. PMID:26618042

  5. Induction of complement proteins in a mouse model for cerebral microvascular Aβ deposition

    OpenAIRE

    DeFilippis Kelly; Fan Rong; Van Nostrand William E

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in cerebral vasculature, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), is a common pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. In familial forms of CAA single mutations in the Aβ peptide have been linked to the increase of vascular Aβ deposits accompanied by a strong localized activation of glial cells and elevated expression of neuroinflammatory mediators including complement proteins. We have developed human amyloid-β pr...

  6. New insights into coupling and uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2016-06-30

    The brain has high metabolic and energy needs and requires continuous cerebral blood flow (CBF), which is facilitated by a tight coupling between neuronal activity, CBF, and metabolism. Upon neuronal activation, there is an increase in energy demand, which is then met by a hemodynamic response that increases CBF. Such regional CBF increase in response to neuronal activation is observed using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. The mechanisms and mediators (eg, nitric oxide, astrocytes, and ion channels) that regulate CBF-metabolism coupling have been extensively studied. The neurovascular unit is a conceptual model encompassing the anatomical and metabolic interactions between the neurons, vascular components, and glial cells in the brain. It is compromised under disease states such as stroke, diabetes, hypertension, dementias, and with aging, all of which trigger a cascade of inflammatory responses that exacerbate brain damage. Hence, tight regulation and maintenance of neurovascular coupling is central for brain homeostasis. This review article also discusses the waste clearance pathways in the brain such as the glymphatic system. The glymphatic system is a functional waste clearance pathway that removes metabolic wastes and neurotoxins from the brain along paravascular channels. Disruption of the glymphatic system burdens the brain with accumulating waste and has been reported in aging as well as several neurological diseases.

  7. Increased expression of neurotrophin 4 following focal cerebral ischemia in adult rat brain with treadmill exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Young Chung

    Full Text Available Neurotrophin 4 (NT-4 belongs to the family of neurotrophic factors, and it interacts with the tyrosine kinase B (trkB receptor. NT-4 has neuroprotective effects following cerebral ischemia. Its role might be similar to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, because both interact with trkB. Exercise also improves neural function by increasing neurotrophic factors. However, expression profiles of NT-4 in the brain during exercise are unknown. Here, we assessed the expressions of NT-4 and its receptor, trkB, following cerebral ischemia and hypothesized that exercise changes the expressions of NT-4 and trkB. Results showed that in a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion rat model, ischemia decreased NT-4 and trkB expression. Immunohistochemistry showed their immunoreactivities around the region of the ischemic area. Treadmill exercise changed the expression of NT-4, which increased in the contralateral hemisphere in rats with ischemic injury. TrkB also showed similar patterns to its neurotophins. The change in NT-4 suggested that exercise might have primed NT4 production so that further injury causes slightly greater increases in NT4 compared with non-exercise controls.

  8. Cerebral blood flow modulation insufficiency in brain networks in multiple sclerosis: A hypercapnia MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Olga; Chawla, Sanjeev; Lu, Hanzhang; Pape, Louise; Ge, Yulin

    2016-12-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity measures vascular regulation of cerebral blood flow and is responsible for maintaining healthy neurovascular coupling. Multiple sclerosis exhibits progressive neurodegeneration and global cerebrovascular reactivity deficits. This study investigates varied degrees of cerebrovascular reactivity impairment in different brain networks, which may be an underlying cause for functional changes in the brain, affecting long-distance projection integrity and cognitive function; 28 multiple sclerosis and 28 control subjects underwent pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI to measure cerebral blood flow under normocapnia (room air) and hypercapnia (5% carbon dioxide gas mixture) breathing. Cerebrovascular reactivity, measured as normocapnic to hypercapnic cerebral blood flow percent increase normalized by end-tidal carbon dioxide change, was determined from seven functional networks (default mode, frontoparietal, somatomotor, visual, limbic, dorsal, and ventral attention networks). Group analysis showed significantly decreased cerebrovascular reactivity in patients compared to controls within the default mode, frontoparietal, somatomotor, and ventral attention networks after multiple comparison correction. Regression analysis showed a significant correlation of cerebrovascular reactivity with lesion load in the default mode and ventral attention networks and with gray matter atrophy in the default mode network. Functional networks in multiple sclerosis patients exhibit varied amounts of cerebrovascular reactivity deficits. Such blood flow regulation abnormalities may contribute to functional communication disruption in multiple sclerosis.

  9. A Microarray Study of Middle Cerebral Occlusion Rat Brain with Acupuncture Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray analysis was used to investigate the changes of gene expression of ischemic stroke and acupuncture intervention in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo rat brain. Results showed that acupuncture intervention had a remarkable improvement in neural deficit score, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral infarction volume of MCAo rats. Microarray analysis showed that a total of 627 different expression genes were regulated in ischemic stroke. 417 genes were upregulated and 210 genes were downregulated. A total of 361 different expression genes were regulated after acupuncture intervention. Three genes were upregulated and 358 genes were downregulated. The expression of novel genes after acupuncture intervention, including Tph1 and Olr883, was further analyzed by Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR. Upregulation of Tph1 and downregulation of Olr883 indicated that the therapeutic effect of acupuncture for ischemic stroke may be closely related to the suppression of poststroke depression and regulation of olfactory transduction. In conclusion, the present study may enrich our understanding of the multiple pathological process of ischemic brain injury and indicate possible mechanisms of acupuncture on ischemic stroke.

  10. Changes in cerebral oxidative metabolism during neonatal seizures following hypoxic ischemic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhabrata Mitra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Seizures are common following hypoxic ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain, however the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO] and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude integrated electro-encephalogram (aEEG. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean EEG voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.

  11. Ischemic Postconditioning Alleviates Brain Edema After Focal Cerebral Ischemia Reperfusion in Rats Through Down-Regulation of Aquaporin-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong; Sun, Miao; He, Ping-Ping; Wen, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Hong; Feng, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral edema is a serious complication associated with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) plays a role in generating postischemic edema after reperfusion. Recently, ischemic postconditioning (Postcond) has been shown to produce neuroprotective effects and reduce brain edema in rats after cerebral I/R. It is unclear if ischemic Postcond alleviates brain edema injury through regulation of AQP4. In this study, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was induced in rats by filament insertion for 2 h following 24-h reperfusion: ischemic Postcond treatment was performed before reperfusion in the experimental group. We used the wet-dry weight ratio and transmission electron microscopy to evaluate brain edema after 24 h of reperfusion. We used immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses to evaluate the distribution and expression of AQP4. Ischemic Postcond significantly reduced the water content of the brain tissue and swelling of the astrocytic foot processes. AQP4 expression increased in the I/R and Postcond groups compared to the sham group, but it decreased in the Postcond group compared to the I/R group. The results of our study suggest that ischemic Postcond effectively reduces brain edema after reperfusion by inhibiting AQP4 expression. The data in this study support the use of ischemic Postcond for alleviating brain edema after cerebral I/R.

  12. The cerebral imaging using vessel-around method in the perfusion CT of the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Choong-Il; Choi, Seung-Wook; Park, Seung-Chul; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Kim, Jae-Hyoung; Chong, Gi-Bong

    2005-04-01

    Perfusion CT has been successfully used as a functional imaging technique for diagnosis of patients with hyperacute stroke. However, the commonly used methods based on curve-fitting are time consuming. Numerous researchers have investigated to what extent Perfusion CT can be used for the quantitative assessment of cerebral ischemia and to rapidly obtain comprehensive information regarding the extent of ischemic damage in acute stroke patients. The aim of this study is to propose an alternative approach to rapidly obtain the brain perfusion mapping and to show the proposed cerebral flow imaging of the vessel and tissue in human brain be reliable and useful. Our main design concern was algorithmic speed, robustness and automation in order to allow its potential use in the emergency situation of acute stroke. To obtain a more effective mapping, we analyzed the signal characteristics of Perfusion CT and defined the vessel-around model which includes the vessel and tissue. We proposed a nonparametric vessel-around approach which automatically discriminates the vessel and tissue around vessel from non-interested brain matter stratifying the level of maximum enhancement of pixel-based TAC. The stratification of pixel-based TAC was executed using the mean and standard deviation of the signal intensity of each pixel and mapped to the cerebral flow imaging. The defined vessel-around model was used to show the cerebral flow imaging and to specify the area of markedly reduced perfusion with loss of function of still viable neurons. Perfusion CT is a fast and practical technique for routine clinical application. It provides substantial and important additional information for the selection of the optimal treatment strategy for patients with hyperacute stroke. The vessel-around approach reduces the computation time significantly when compared with the perfusion imaging using the GVF. The proposed cerebral imaging shows reliable results which are validated by physicians and

  13. Pharmacologic modulation of cerebral metabolic derangement and excitotoxicity in a porcine model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwabejire, John O; Jin, Guang; Imam, Ayesha M;

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic derangement and excitotoxicity play critical roles in the evolution of traumatic brain injury (TBI). We have shown previously that treatment with large doses of valproic acid (VPA) decreases the size of brain lesion. The goal of this experiment was to determine whether this eff...

  14. Influence of mild hypothermia on vascular endothelial growth factor and infarct volume in brain tissues after cerebral ischemia in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Ye; Gangming Xi; Biyong Qin; Shifeng Wang; Chengyan Li

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been demonstrated that mild hypothermia has obvious protective effect on both whole and local cerebral ischemia. However, the definite mechanism is still unclear for the brain protection of mild hypothermia on cerebral edema, inhibiting inflammatory reaction, stabilizing blood brain barrier, etc.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of mild hypothermia on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the infarct volume after cerebral ischemia in rats, and analyze the brain protective mechanism of mild hypothermia.DESIGN: A randomized grouping and controlled animal trial.SETTING: Department of Neurology, People's Hospital of Yunyang Medical College.MATERIALS: Twenty adult male SD rats of clean degree, weighing (250±30) g, were provided by the animal experimental center, School of Medicine, Wuhan University. The kits for SP immunohistochemistry were purchased from Beijing Zhongshan Golden Bridge Biotechnology Co., Ltd.METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the laboratory of Department of Neurology, Renmen Hospital of Wuhan University from May to July 2005. ① The 20 rats were divided randomly into normal temperature group (n =10) and mild hypothermia group (n =10). Models of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion were established with modified nylon suture embolization. The rats were assessed with the Longa standards: O point for without nerve dysfunction; 1 for mild neurological deficit (fore claws could no extend completely); 2 for moderate neurological deficit (circling towards the affected side); 3 for severe neurological deficit (tilting towards the affected side); 4 for coma and unconscious; 1 -3 points represented that models were successfully established. The rats of the normal temperature group were fed at room temperature, and those in the mild hypothermia group were induced by hypothermia from 2 hours postoperatively, and the rectal temperature was kept at 34-35 ℃ for 72 hours. ② Measurement of infarct volume

  15. [Assessment of motor and sensory pathways of the brain using diffusion-tensor tractography in children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memedyarov, A M; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Ermolina, Y V; Anikin, A V; Maslova, O I; Karkashadze, M Z; Klochkova, O A

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor tractography--a new method of magnetic resonance imaging, that allows to visualize the pathways of the brain and to study their structural-functional state. The authors investigated the changes in motor and sensory pathways of brain in children with cerebral palsy using routine magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-tensor tractography. The main group consisted of 26 patients with various forms of cerebral palsy and the comparison group was 25 people with normal psychomotor development (aged 2 to 6 years) and MR-picture of the brain. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on the scanner with the induction of a magnetic field of 1,5 Tesla. Coefficients of fractional anisotropy and average diffusion coefficient estimated in regions of the brain containing the motor and sensory pathways: precentral gyrus, posterior limb of the internal capsule, thalamus, posterior thalamic radiation and corpus callosum. Statistically significant differences (p cerebral palsy in relation to the comparison group. All investigated regions, the coefficients of fractional anisotropy in children with cerebral palsy were significantly lower, and the average diffusion coefficient, respectively, higher. These changes indicate a lower degree of ordering of the white matter tracts associated with damage and subsequent development of gliosis of varying severity in children with cerebral palsy. It is shown that microstructural damage localized in both motor and sensory tracts that plays a leading role in the development of the clinical picture of cerebral palsy.

  16. Integrating mind and brain: Warren S. McCulloch, cerebral localization, and experimental epistemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Tara H

    2003-03-01

    Recently, historians have focused on Warren S. McCulloch's role in the cybernetics movement during the 1940s and 1950s, and his contributions to the development of computer science and communication theory. What has received less attention is McCulloch's early work in neurophysiology, and its relationship to his philosophical quest for an 'experimental epistemology' - a physiological theory of knowledge. McCulloch's early laboratory work during the 1930s addressed the problem of cerebral localization: localizing aspects of behaviour in the cerebral cortex of the brain. Most of this research was done with the Dutch neurophysiologist J.G. Dusser de Barenne at Yale University. The connection between McCulloch's philosophical interests and his experimental work can be expressed as a search for a physiological a priori, an integrated mechanism of sensation.

  17. Giant aneurysm of the distal anterior cerebral artery simulating brain tumor on CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigemori, Minoru; Kawaba, Tomoyuki; Kuramoto, Shinken (Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine); Ogata, Takeyuki; Yoshimura, Kyoko

    1982-08-01

    A successfully treated case with a giant aneurysm of the distal anterior cerebral artery which simulated brain tumor on computerized tomography (CT) is reported. In a 69-year-old woman suffering with a mild headache and a weakness in the left leg, a plain skull film revealed a ballooning of the sella turcica and an erosion of the dorsum. A CT scan showed a round or oval high-density area at the medial site of the right frontal lobe which was associated with an extensive low-density area. Curviliner calcification was also noted. A marked attenuation of the medial site of the mass lesion was demonstrated with contrast enhancement. A left-carotid angiogram demonstrated a large aneurysm at the distal-branching point of the anterior cerebral artery. Radical treatment for the aneurysm was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the low-density area around the aneurysm disappeared within 6 weeks after the operation.

  18. Proteomic analysis of cPKCβII-interacting proteins involved in HPC-induced neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xiangning; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Xuan; Liu, Yanyan; Du, Jianli; Liang, Jing; Xu, Qunyuan; Li, Junfa

    2011-04-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) initiates intracellular signaling pathway to provide protection against subsequent cerebral ischemic injuries, and its mechanism may provide molecular targets for therapy in stroke. According to our study of conventional protein kinase C βII (cPKCβII) activation in HPC, the role of cPKCβII in HPC-induced neuroprotection and its interacting proteins were determined in this study. The autohypoxia-induced HPC and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced cerebral ischemia mouse models were prepared as reported. We found that HPC reduced 6 h MCAO-induced neurological deficits, infarct volume, edema ratio and cell apoptosis in peri-infarct region (penumbra), but cPKCβII inhibitors Go6983 and LY333531 blocked HPC-induced neuroprotection. Proteomic analysis revealed that the expression of four proteins in cytosol and eight proteins in particulate fraction changed significantly among 49 identified cPKCβII-interacting proteins in cortex of HPC mice. In addition, HPC could inhibit the decrease of phosphorylated collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP-2) level and increase of CRMP-2 breakdown product. TAT-CRMP-2 peptide, which prevents the cleavage of endogenous CRMP-2, could inhibit CRMP-2 dephosphorylation and proteolysis as well as the infarct volume of 6 h MCAO mice. This study is the first to report multiple cPKCβII-interacting proteins in HPC mouse brain and the role of cPKCβII-CRMP-2 in HPC-induced neuroprotection against early stages of ischemic injuries in mice.

  19. Differences in functional brain connectivity alterations associated with cerebral amyloid deposition in amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahyun eYi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite potential implications for the early detection of impending AD, very little is known about the differences of large scale brain networks between amnestic MCI (aMCI with high cerebral amyloid beta protein (Aβ deposition (i.e., aMCI+ and aMCI with no or very little Aβ deposition (i.e., aMCI-. We first aimed to extend the current literature on altering intrinsic functional connectivity (FC of the default mode network (DMN and salience network (SN from CN to AD dementia. Second, we further examined the differences of the DMN and the SN between aMCI-, aMCI+, and CN. Forty-three older adult (12 CN, 10 aMCI+, 10 aMCI-, and 11 AD dementia subjects were included. All participants received clinical and neuropsychological assessment, resting state functional MRI, structural MRI, and Pittsburgh compound-B-PET scans. FC data were preprocessed using Multivariate Exploratory Linear Optimized Decomposition into Independent Components of FSL. Group comparisons were carried out using the dual-regression approach. In addition, to verify presence of grey matter (GM volume changes with intrinsic functional network alterations, Voxel Based Morphometry was performed on the acquired T1-weighted data. As expected, AD dementia participants exhibited decreased FC in the DMN compared to CN (in precuneus and cingulate gyrus. The degree of alteration in the DMN in aMCI+ compared to CN was intermediate to that of AD. In contrast, aMCI- exhibited increased FC in the DMN compared to CN (in precuneus as well as aMCI+. In terms of the SN, aMCI- exhibited decreased FC compared to both CN and aMCI+ particularly in the inferior frontal gyrus. FC within the SN in aMCI+ and AD did not differ from CN. Compared to CN, aMCI- showed atrophy in bilateral superior temporal gyri whereas aMCI+ showed atrophy in right precuneus. The results indicate that despite of the similarity in cross-sectional cognitive features aMCI- has quite different functional brain connectivity compared to

  20. The impact of early aerobic exercise on brain microvascular alterations induced by cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leardini-Tristão, Marina; Borges, Juliana Pereira; Freitas, Felipe; Rangel, Raquel; Daliry, Anissa; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Estato, Vanessa

    2017-02-15

    The therapeutic potential of early exercise training following cerebral hypoperfusion was investigated on brain perfusion and inflammation in rats with permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (2VO). Wistar rats were subjected to 2VO or sham surgery and each group was then subdivided randomly into sedentary or exercise groups. Early exercise training was initiated after three days of 2VO or sham surgery and consisted of seven days of treadmill training (30min/day at ∼60% of maximal exercise test), composing four groups: 1) Sham sedentary (Sham-Sed), 2) Sham exercised (Sham-Ex), 3) 2VO sedentary (2VO-Sed) and 4) 2VO exercised (2VO-Ex). Microvascular cerebral blood flow (MCBF) and NADPH oxidase and eNOS gene expression were evaluated by laser speckle contrast imaging and RT-PCR, respectively, and brain functional capillary density and endothelial-leukocyte interactions were evaluated by fluorescence intravital video-microscopy. The 2VO-Sed group presented a decrease in MCBF (Sham-Sed: 230.9±12.2 vs. 2VO-Sed: 183.6±10.6 arbitrary perfusion units, Pexercise was able to prevent the cerebral microvascular inflammation by decreasing endothelial-leukocyte interactions (2VO-Ex: 0.9±0.3 vs. 2VO-Sed: 5±0.6cells/min/100μm, Pbrain NADPH oxidase gene expression (2VO-Ex: 1.7±0.1 arbitrary units, Pexercise may represent a means of preventing the microvascular alterations induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

  1. Dexamethasone exacerbates cerebral edema and brain injury following lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, B A; Chun, K P; Ma, D; Lythgoe, M F; Scott, R C

    2014-03-01

    Anti-inflammatory therapies are the current most plausible drug candidates for anti-epileptogenesis and neuroprotection following prolonged seizures. Given that vasogenic edema is widely considered to be detrimental for outcome following status epilepticus, the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone is sometimes used in clinic for alleviating cerebral edema. In this study we perform longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging in order to assess the contribution of dexamethasone on cerebral edema and subsequent neuroprotection following status epilepticus. Lithium-pilocarpine was used to induce status epilepticus in rats. Following status epilepticus, rats were either post-treated with saline or with dexamethasone sodium phosphate (10mg/kg or 2mg/kg). Brain edema was assessed by means of magnetic resonance imaging (T2 relaxometry) and hippocampal volumetry was used as a marker of neuronal injury. T2 relaxometry was performed prior to, 48 h and 96 h following status epilepticus. Volume measurements were performed between 18 and 21 days after status epilepticus. Unexpectedly, cerebral edema was worse in rats that were treated with dexamethasone compared to controls. Furthermore, dexamethasone treated rats had lower hippocampal volumes compared to controls 3 weeks after the initial insult. The T2 measurements at 2 days and 4 days in the hippocampus correlated with hippocampal volumes at 3 weeks. Finally, the mortality rate in the first week following status epilepticus increased from 14% in untreated rats to 33% and 46% in rats treated with 2mg/kg and 10mg/kg dexamethasone respectively. These findings suggest that dexamethasone can exacerbate the acute cerebral edema and brain injury associated with status epilepticus.

  2. Brain immune cell composition and functional outcome after cerebral ischemia: Comparison of two mouse strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ah eKim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory cells may contribute to secondary brain injury following cerebral ischemia. The C57Bl/6 mouse strain is known to exhibit a T helper 1-prone, pro-inflammatory type response to injury, whereas the FVB strain is relatively T helper 2-prone, or anti-inflammatory, in its immune response. We tested whether stroke outcome is more severe in C57Bl/6 than FVB mice. Male mice of each strain underwent sham surgery or 1 h occlusion of the middle cerebral artery followed by 23 h of reperfusion. Despite no difference in infarct size, C57Bl/6 mice displayed markedly greater functional deficits than FVB mice after stroke, as assessed by neurological scoring and hanging wire test. Total numbers of CD45+ leukocytes tended to be larger in the brains of C57Bl/6 than FVB mice after stroke, but there were marked differences in leukocyte composition between the two mouse strains. The inflammatory response in C57Bl/6 mice primarily involved T and B lymphocytes, whereas neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages were more prominent in FVB mice. Our data are consistent with the concept that functional outcome after stroke is dependent on the immune cell composition which develops following ischemic brain injury.

  3. Diffuse brain calcification after radiation therapy in infantile cerebral malignant glioma. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hondo, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Yamada, Nobuhisa; Takeda, Norio

    1987-10-01

    We reported a case of infantile cerebral malignant glioma, which showed extensive intracranial calcification following radiation therapy, and reviewed the literature. A 4-month-old female infant was admitted to our hospital because of vomiting, enlargement of the head and convulsive seizures. Computerized tomography (CT) scans demonstrated a heterogeneously contrast-enhanced mass in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region and marked obstructive hydrocephalus. Subsequent to ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, biopsy was performed. The surgical specimen revealed anaplastic glioma. She then underwent whole brain irradiation with 1800 rads before subtotal removal and 3000 rads postoperatively. Calcification was first identified in the right frontal region and left basal ganglia 2.5 months after radiation therapy. At the age of 14 months, CT scans demonstrated extensive intracranial calcification in the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglias, thalami, pons and cerebellum. A biopsy specimen of the frontal lobe revealed calcospherites of various sizes within and beside the walls of small vessels, but no tumor cells were observed. Cranial radiation therapy is a standard modality for treatment of children with neoplasm in the central nervous system. Since, however this therapy possibly causes long-term complications on the developing brain, it is important to plan radiation therapy for the brain tumor carefully.

  4. Hemodynamic effects of combined focal cerebral ischemia and amyloid protein toxicity in a rat model: a functional CT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Clinical evidence indicates that cerebral ischemia (CI and a pathological factor of Alzheimer's disease, the β-amyloid (Aβ protein, can increase the rate of cognitive impairment in the ageing population. Using the CT Perfusion (CTP functional imaging, we sought to investigate the interaction between CI and the Aβ protein on cerebral hemodynamics. METHODS: A previously established rat model of CI and Aβ was used for the CTP study. Iodinated contrast was given intravenously, while serial CT images of sixteen axial slices were acquired. Cerebral blood flow (CBF and blood volume (CBV parametric maps were co-registered to a rat brain atlas and regions of interest were drawn on the maps. Microvascular alteration was investigated with histopathology. RESULTS: CTP results revealed that ipsilateral striatum of Aβ+CI and CI groups showed significantly lower CBF and CBV than control at the acute phase. Striatal CBF and CBV increased significantly at week 1 in the CI and Aβ+CI groups, but not in the Aβ alone or control group. Histopathology showed that average density of dilated microvessels in the ipsilateral striatum in CI and Aβ+CI groups was significantly higher than control at week 1, indicating this could be associated with hyperperfusion and hypervolemia observed from CTP results. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that CTP can quantitatively measure the hemodynamic disturbance on CBF and CBV functional maps in a rat model of CI interacting with Aβ.

  5. Analysis of Potential Amino Acid Biomarkers in Brain Tissue and the Effect of Galangin on Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruocong Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Galangin, a potent scavenger of free radicals, has been used as an herbal medicine for various ailments for centuries in Asia. With complex pathophysiology, ischemic stroke is one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. We have reported that galangin provides direct protection against ischemic injury as a potential neuroprotective agent and has potential therapeutic effects on the changes of serum amino acids in ischemic stroke; however, the mechanism of the changes of amino acids in the ischemic brain tissue has not yet been clarified. In this paper, we explored brain tissue amino acid biomarkers in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia and the effect of galangin on those potential biomarkers. Finally, we identified that glutamic acid, alanine and aspartic acid showed significant changes (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01 in galangin-treated groups compared with vehicle-treated rats and the four enzymes associated with these three AAs’ metabolic pathways; GLUD1, SLC16A10, SLC1A1 and GPT were identified by multiplex interactions with the three amino acids. By metabolite-protein network analysis and molecular docking, six of 28 proteins were identified and might become potential galangin biomarkers for acute ischemic stroke. The data in our study provides thoughts for exploring the mechanism of disease, discovering new targets for drug candidates and elucidating the related regulatory signal network.

  6. Purinergic 2Y1 receptor stimulation decreases cerebral edema and reactive gliosis in a traumatic brain injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley Watts, Lora; Sprague, Shane; Zheng, Wei; Garling, R Justin; Jimenez, David; Digicaylioglu, Murat; Lechleiter, James

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children and young adults. Neuroprotective agents that may promote repair or counteract damage after injury do not currently exist. We recently reported that stimulation of the purinergic receptor subtype P2Y(1)R using 2-methylthioladenosine 5' diphosphate (2MeSADP) significantly reduced cytotoxic edema induced by photothrombosis. Here, we tested whether P2Y(1)R stimulation was neuroprotective after TBI. A controlled closed head injury model was established for mice using a pneumatic impact device. Brains were harvested at 1, 3, or 7 days post-injury and assayed for morphological changes by immunocytochemistry, Western blot analysis, and wet/dry weight. Cerebral edema and expression of both aquaporin type 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were increased at all time points examined. Immunocytochemical measurements in both cortical and hippocampal slices also revealed significant neuronal swelling and reactive gliosis. Treatment of mice with 2MeSADP (100 μM) or MRS2365 (100 μM) 30 min after trauma significantly reduced all post-injury symptoms of TBI including edema, neuronal swelling, reactive gliosis, and AQ4 expression. The neuroprotective effect was lost in IP(3)R2-/- mice treated with 2MeSADP. Immunocytochemical labeling of brain slices confirmed that P2Y(1)R expression was defined to cortical and hippocampal astrocytes, but not neurons. Taken together, the data show that stimulation of astrocytic P2Y(1)Rs significantly reduces brain injury after acute trauma and is mediated by the IP(3)-signaling pathway. We suggest that enhancing astrocyte mitochondrial metabolism offers a promising neuroprotective strategy for a broad range of brain injuries.

  7. Exploring the role of MKK7 in excitotoxicity and cerebral ischemia: a novel pharmacological strategy against brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercelli, A; Biggi, S; Sclip, A; Repetto, I E; Cimini, S; Falleroni, F; Tomasi, S; Monti, R; Tonna, N; Morelli, F; Grande, V; Stravalaci, M; Biasini, E; Marin, O; Bianco, F; di Marino, D; Borsello, T

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity following cerebral ischemia elicits a molecular cascade, which leads to neuronal death. c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) has a key role in excitotoxic cell death. We have previously shown that JNK inhibition by a specific cell-permeable peptide significantly reduces infarct size and neuronal death in an in vivo model of cerebral ischemia. However, systemic inhibition of JNK may have detrimental side effects, owing to blockade of its physiological function. Here we designed a new inhibitor peptide (growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45β (GADD45β-I)) targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 7 (MKK7), an upstream activator of JNK, which exclusively mediates JNK's pathological activation. GADD45β-I was engineered by optimizing the domain of the GADD45β, able to bind to MKK7, and by linking it to the TAT peptide sequence, to allow penetration of biological membranes. Our data clearly indicate that GADD45β-I significantly reduces neuronal death in excitotoxicity induced by either N-methyl-D-aspartate exposure or by oxygen–glucose deprivation in vitro. Moreover, GADD45β-I exerted neuroprotection in vivo in two models of ischemia, obtained by electrocoagulation and by thromboembolic occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAo). Indeed, GADD45β-I reduced the infarct size when injected 30 min before the lesion in both models. The peptide was also effective when administrated 6 h after lesion, as demonstrated in the electrocoagulation model. The neuroprotective effect of GADD45β-I is long lasting; in fact, 1 week after MCAo the infarct volume was still reduced by 49%. Targeting MKK7 could represent a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of ischemia and other pathologies involving MKK7/JNK activation. Moreover, this new inhibitor can be useful to further dissect the physiological and pathological role of the JNK pathway in the brain. PMID:26270349

  8. Gradients in the Brain: The Control of the Development of Form and Function in the Cerebral Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Sansom, Stephen N; Frederick J Livesey

    2009-01-01

    In the developing brain, gradients are commonly used to divide neurogenic regions into distinct functional domains. In this article, we discuss the functions of morphogen and gene expression gradients in the assembly of the nervous system in the context of the development of the cerebral cortex. The cerebral cortex is a mammal-specific region of the forebrain that functions at the top of the neural hierarchy to process and interpret sensory information, plan and organize tasks, and to control...

  9. Cerebral function estimation using electro-encephalography for the patients with brain tumor managed by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariya, Yasushi [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine; Saito, Fumio; Kimura, Tamaki (and others)

    1999-10-01

    Cerebral function of 12 patients accompanied with brain tumor, managed by radiotherapy, were serially estimated using electroencephalography (EEG), and the results were compared with tumor responses, analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical courses. After radiotherapy, EEG findings were improved in 7 patients, unchanged in 3, and worsened in 1. Clinical courses were generally correlated with serial changes in EEG findings and tumor responses. However, in 3 patients, clinical courses were explained better with EEG findings than tumor responses. It is suggested that the combination of EEG and image analysis is clinically useful for comprehensive estimation of radiotherapeutic effects. (author)

  10. Anencefalia e morte cerebral (neurológica Anencephaly and brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Fernandes Penna

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Vem-se discutindo no país a ética da interrupção da gravidez no caso de fetos anencéfalos. Os opositores ao aborto nesses casos apontam, entre outros argumentos, que não se trata de morte cerebral devido à presença de tronco encefálico. Neste artigo discutimos o conceito de morte cerebral e sua aplicação no que tange à anencefalia. Apontamos alguns aspectos históricos do desenvolvimento desse conceito e a importância de ser considerada a diferença entre conceito e critérios. A morte neurológica é a perda definitiva e total da consciência, enquanto a presença do tronco cerebral é apenas um critério a ser usado nos casos de lesão encefálica em encéfalos antes perfeitos. O conceito de morte cerebral se aplica completamente à ausência de córtex dos anencéfalos, o que sem dúvida permite sua retirada do útero materno. Manter juridicamente a criminalização desse procedimento é uma interferência religiosa no Estado laico e democrático, que impede o exercício de escolha pelos indivíduos segundo seu credo.Brazilian society has recently discussed the ethics of interrupting pregnancy in the case of an anencephalic fetus. In such cases, anti-abortionists contend that anencephaly is not the same as brain death, since a brainstem is present. This article discusses the concept of brain death and its application to the issue of anencephaly. We point to key historical aspects in the development of this concept and the importance of considering the difference between concept and criteria. Neurological death is the definitive and complete loss of consciousness, while the presence of a brainstem is merely a criterion to be used in cases of head injury in previously intact brains. The concept of brain death is totally applicable to the absence of cortex in a fetus with anencephaly, which without a doubt allows such a fetus to be removed from the uterus. To maintain the criminalization of this procedure by legal means represents

  11. Differences in the molecular structure of the blood-brain barrier in the cerebral cortex and white matter: an in silico, in vitro, and ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyúl-Tóth, Ádám; Suciu, Maria; Molnár, Judit; Fazakas, Csilla; Haskó, János; Herman, Hildegard; Farkas, Attila E; Kaszaki, József; Hermenean, Anca; Wilhelm, Imola; Krizbai, István A

    2016-06-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main interface controlling molecular and cellular traffic between the central nervous system (CNS) and the periphery. It consists of cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) interconnected by continuous tight junctions, and closely associated pericytes and astrocytes. Different parts of the CNS have diverse functions and structures and may be subject of different pathologies, in which the BBB is actively involved. It is largely unknown, however, what are the cellular and molecular differences of the BBB in different regions of the brain. Using in silico, in vitro, and ex vivo techniques we compared the expression of BBB-associated genes and proteins (i.e., markers of CECs, brain pericytes, and astrocytes) in the cortical grey matter and white matter. In silico human database analysis (obtained from recalculated data of the Allen Brain Atlas), qPCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence studies on porcine and mouse brain tissue indicated an increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes in the white matter compared with the grey matter. We have also found increased expression of genes of the junctional complex of CECs (occludin, claudin-5, and α-catenin) in the white matter compared with the cerebral cortex. Accordingly, occludin, claudin-5, and α-catenin proteins showed increased expression in CECs of the white matter compared with endothelial cells of the cortical grey matter. In parallel, barrier properties of white matter CECs were superior as well. These differences might be important in the pathogenesis of diseases differently affecting distinct regions of the brain.

  12. Synthesis of heat shock proteins in rat brain cortex after transient ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, G A; Kiessling, M; Jacewicz, M; Pulsinelli, W A

    1986-08-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis and two-dimensional gel autoradiography were used to characterize early postischemic protein synthesis in rat neocortex. Severe forebrain ischemia was induced for 30 min (four-vessel occlusion model) and followed by 3 h of recirculation. Polysomes were isolated from the cerebral cortex, translated in vitro in a reticulocyte system, and analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The translation products of postischemic polysomes included a major new protein family (70 kDa) with multiple isoelectric variants that was found to comigrate with the 68- to 70-kDa "heat shock" protein synthesized from polysomes of hyperthermic rats. Two other stress proteins (93 and 110 kDa) also appeared to be synthesized in increased amounts after ischemia. A complement of proteins that was indistinguishable from that of controls was also synthesized after ischemia, indicating that messenger ribonucleic acid coding for most brain proteins is preserved after ischemia and is bound to polysomes.

  13. Distribution of protein I in mammalian brain as determined by a detergent-based radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goelz, S.E.; Nestler, E.J.; Chehrazi, B.; Greengard, P.

    1981-04-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for measuring protein I, a basic, neuron-specific protein associated with nerve terminals. The procedure utilizes the detergents NaDodSO/sub 4/ and Nonidet P-40 to prevent nonspecific adsorption of this highly charged protein to various surfaces. By use of this procedure, it has been possible to show that protein I comprises approximately 0.4% of the total protein in cerebral cortex of several mammalian species. In addition, the amount of protein I was determined in about 40 regions of cat brain. The results suggest that measurement of protein I may provide a quantitative method for estimating the density of nerve terminals in various regions of the mammalian nervous system.

  14. Effects of RSM and astragus on expression of Fos and Jun proteins in rat brains after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion%丹参、黄芪合用对脑缺血再灌注后脑组织Fos,Jun蛋白表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲友直; 高国栋; 赵燕玲

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of Fos and Jun proteins in rat brainsafter focal cerebral ischemia followed by reperfusion and effects of RSMand astragus. METHODS: 30 SD adult male rats were divided into 5groups at random . Group A: sham-operated group; Group B: model group;Group C: treated with RSM; Group D: treated with astragus; Group E:treated with RSM and astragus. The immunohistochemistry and medicalimage processing system(MIPS) were used to measure the numbers andmean grey levels of Fos and Jun protein positive cells in rat cerebralcortex of 5 groups. RESULTS: ( 1 ) In cerebral cortex of group B , C , D, E, the numbers of Fos and Jun positive cells were more than those ingroup A and mean grey levels of Fos and Jun positive cells were lower thanthose in group A(P < 0.01); (2) In cerebral cortex of ischemic sidesin group C, D, E,the numbers of Fos and Jun positive cells were less thanthose in group B and mean grey levels of Fos and Jun positive cells werehigher than those in group B(P < 0.01) ; (3) Group E had more sig-nificant effects than group C or group D ( P < 0. 01 ). CONCLUSION:The expression of Fos protein and Jun protein in model group increasedsignificantly, compared with sham-operated group; RSM , astragus , RSMand astragus all could inhibit partly the expression of Fos protein and Junprotein after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion; Prescription of RSM andastragus had stronger inhibiting effects than RSM or astragus. It may be oneof mechanisms that ischemic stoke is treated by reinforcing Qi and acti-vating blood circulation therapy in TCM clinic.

  15. Effect of Xingnaojing injection on cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier in rats following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Miao; SU Wei; XU Qiu-ping; HUANG Wei-dong

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effects of Xingnaojing injection on cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) in rats following traumatic brain injury (TBI).Methods: A total of 108 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used as subjects and randomly assigned to three groups:sham-operation,TBI and Xingnaojing injection was set up by the improved device of Feeney's weightcontent and BBB permeability expressed as Evans blue content were measured at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after surgery.Results: In sham-operation group, brain water content and Evans blue content in brain tissue were 78.97%±1.22%and 5.13μg±0.71μg. Following TBI, water content in brain tissue was increased significantly at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days (83.49%±0.54%, 82.74%±0.72%, 80.22%±0.68%, 79.21%±0.60%), being significantly higher than that in sham operation group (P<0.05). Evans blue content was increased in TBI group (16.54 μg±0.60 μg, 14.92μg±0.71μg, 12.44 μg ±0.92μg, 10.14μg±0.52 μg) as compared with sham-operation group(P<0.05). After treatment with Xingnaojing injection, brain water content decreased as compared with TBI group (81.91%±1.04%, 80.38%±0.72%, 79.54%±0.58%,78.60%±0.77%, P<0.05). Xingnaojing injection also reduced the leakage of BBB as compared with TBI group (15.11 μg± 0.63 μg, 13.62 μg±0.85μg, 10.06 μg±0.67 μg, 9.54 μg±0.41 μg,P<0.05).Conclusion: Xingnaojing injection could alleviate cerebral edema following TBI via reducing permeability ofBBB.

  16. Electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy side promotes brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in the ischemic cerebral cortex of a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zongjun; Wang, Lumin

    2012-07-25

    A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion was established by suture occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery. In situ hybridization results showed that the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic rat cerebral cortex increased after cerebral ischemia/ reperfusion injury. Low frequency continuous wave electroacupuncture (frequency 2-6 Hz, current intensity 2 mA) stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side increased the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic cerebral cortex 14 days after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. At the same time, electroacupuncture stimulation of the healthy brachial plexus truck significantly decreased neurological function scores and alleviated neurological function deficits. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side can greatly increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression and improve neurological function.

  17. Electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy side promotes brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in the ischemic cerebral cortex of a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongjun Guo; Lumin Wang

    2012-01-01

    A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion was established by suture occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery. In situ hybridization results showed that the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic rat cerebral cortex increased after cerebral ischemia/ reperfusion injury. Low frequency continuous wave electroacupuncture (frequency 2-6 Hz, current intensity 2 mA) stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side increased the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic cerebral cortex 14 days after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. At the same time, electroacupuncture stimulation of the healthy brachial plexus truck significantly decreased neurological function scores and alleviated neurological function deficits. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side can greatly increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression and improve neurological function.

  18. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

  19. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  20. HTLV-I associated myelopathy with multiple spotty areas in cerebral white matter and brain stem by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Yasuo; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Yorifuji, Shirou; Tarui, Seiichiro

    1988-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman was admitted with complaints of urinary incontinence and gait disturbance, both of which had progressed slowly without any sign of remission. Family history was not contributory. Neurologically, extreme spasticity was recoginized in the lower limbs. Babinski sign was positive bilaterally. Flower-like atypical lymphocytes were seen in blood. Positive anti-HTLV-I antibody was confirmed in serum and spinal fluid by western blot. She was diagnosed as having HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM). CT reveald calcification in bilateral globus pallidus, and MRI revealed multiple spotty areas in cerebral white matter and brain stem, but no spinal cord lesion was detectable. Electrophysiologically, brain stem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) suggested the presence of bilateral brain stem lesions. Neither median nor posterior tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials were evoked, a finding suggesting the existence of spinal cord lesion. In this case, the lesion was not confined to spinal cord, it was also observed in brain stem and cerebral white matter. Such distinct lesions in cerebral white matter and brain stem have not been reported in patients with HAM. It is suggested that HTLV-I is probably associated with cerebral white matter and brain stem.

  1. A Simplified Workflow for Protein Quantitation of Rat Brain Tissues Using Label-Free Proteomics and Spectral Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutté, Angela M; Grant, Shonnette F; Dave, Jitendra R

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is an increasingly valuable tool for determining relative or quantitative protein abundance in brain tissues. A plethora of technical and analytical methods are available, but straightforward and practical approaches are often needed to facilitate reproducibility. This aspect is particularly important as an increasing number of studies focus on models of traumatic brain injury or brain trauma, for which brain tissue proteomes have not yet been fully described. This text provides suggested techniques for robust identification and quantitation of brain proteins by using molecular weight fractionation prior to mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Detailed sample preparation and generalized protocols for chromatography, mass spectrometry, spectral counting, and normalization are described. The rat cerebral cortex isolated from a model of blast-overpressure was used as an exemplary source of brain tissue. However, these techniques may be adapted for lysates generated from several types of cells or tissues and adapted by the end user.

  2. The effects of perinatal protein malnutrition on spatial learning and memory behaviour and brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration in the brain tissue in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Xu, Ruo-Jun

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of perinatal protein malnutrition on brain derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration in brain tissue and spatial learning and memory performance in young rats. Nine pregnant Wistar rats were assigned into three groups. Rats in one group were fed with a control diet containing 20% protein. Rats in remaining two groups were fed with a diet containing 6% protein from gestation day eight and day 15 respectively till four weeks after birth. At four weeks of age, the rat pups were evaluated for spatial learning ability using Morris Water Maze (MWM) task. At the end of the behaviour tests, rat pups were sacrificed and the brain tissue samples were collected for measurement of total protein and BDNF concentrations. It was found that rat pups fed the low protein diet had lower body weight and slightly lighter brain compared to the control pups. Total protein levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex were significantly lower in malnourished pups than the controls. The concentration of BDNF in the hippocampus was also significantly lower in rat pups suffered protein malnutrition from early pregnancy than in the controls. MWM tests showed that perinatal protein deprivation, particularly from early pregnancy, significantly impaired learning and memory ability. The results of the present study indicate that perinatal protein malnutrition had adverse influence on spatial navigation and brain BDNF levels in rats. The decreased hippocampal BDNF concentration might partially contribute to the poor learning memory performance in the protein deprived rats.

  3. Cerebral microdialysis and PtiO2 to decide unilateral decompressive craniectomy after brain gunshot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boret Henry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Decompressive craniectomy (DC following brain injury can induce complications (hemorrhage, infection, and hygroma. It is then considered as a last-tier therapy, and can be deleteriously delayed. Focal neuromonitoring (microdialysis and PtiO2 can help clinicians to decide bedside to perform DC in case of intracranial pressure (ICP around 20 to 25 mmHg despite maximal medical treatment. This was the case of a hunter, brain injured by gunshot. DC was performed at day 6, because of unstable ICP, ischemic trend of PtiO2, and decreased cerebral glucose but normal lactate/pyruvate ratio. His evolution was good despite left hemiplegia due to initial injury.

  4. On cerebral celebrity and reality TV: subjectivity in times of brain scans and psychotainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The philosopher Daniel Dennett developed a theory of consciousness in which he replaces the so-called Cartesian theater with conceptions such as "fame in the brain" and "cerebral celebrity." The paradox of this is that Dennett unwittingly reintroduces the metaphors of the stage and the screen. The use of this trope is pursued in this essay in order to juxtapose Dennett's theory with reality TV and celebrity culture. This will allow us to sketch out late-modern subjectivity in times of brains scans and "psychotainment." Drawing on Walter Benjamin, Giorgi Agamben, Slavoj Žižek, and others, a plea is made for a materialism of the zero-level of subjectivity.

  5. Motricidade reflexa na morte cerebral The reflex activity in the brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson L. Sanvito

    1972-03-01

    Full Text Available O diagnóstico de morte cerebral está baseado em critérios clínicos, eletrencefalográficos e angiográficos. Do ponto de vista clínico deve ser evidenciado o seguinte quadro: coma profundo, midríase paralítica bilateral, ausência de reação a qualquer estímulo externo, apnéia, arreflexia superficial e profunda. Do ponto de vista eletrencefalográfico são necessários dois registros, separados por um intervalo de 24 horas, evidenciando traçados iselétricos. No presente trabalho são estudados 15 pacientes com morte cerebral comprovada do ponto de vista clínico e eletrencefalográfico. Em 8 pacientes havia persistência de atividade reflexa durante a fase de morte cerebral (reflexos profundos e/ou superficiais. Fenômenos de automatismos medulares também foram verificados em 3 pacientes.The diagnosis of brain death is based in clinical, electroencephalographic and angiographic data. The criteria for diagnosis of brain death are: deep coma with unreceptivity and unresponsiveness, no movements or breathing (the patient's respiration must be maintained artificially, bilateral dilated and fixed pupils, absence of corneal reflexes, no response to caloric test, absence of deep tendon reflexes and of the superficial abdominal and plantar reflexes, isoelectric EEG maintained for twenty-four hours. The purpose of this study was to observe the natural clinical courses of 15 patients with brain death, specially the data concerning the deep and superficial reflexes. From 15 patients fulfilling the criteria of brain death, 8 maintained spinal reflexes up to the time of cardiac arrest; in five of these patients the superficial abdominal reflexes were present and the reflexes of spinal automatism could be elicited. These results show that the absence of deep and superficial reflexes can't be considered as essencial for the diagnosis of brain death.

  6. Dynamic mislocalizations of nuclear pore complex proteins after focal cerebral ischemia in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Toru; Shang, Jingwei; Deguchi, Kentaro; Feng, Tian; Sato, Kota; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Nakano, Yumiko; Abe, Koji

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) play an important role in coordinating the transport of proteins and nucleic acids between the nucleus and cytoplasm, and are therefore essential for maintaining normal cellular function and liability. In the present study, we investigated the temporal immunohistochemical distribution of five representative components of NPCs-Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGap1), glycoprotein-210 (Gp210), nucleoporin 205 (Nup205), nucleoporin 107 (Nup107), and nucleoporin 50 (Nup50)-after 90 min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) up to 28 days after the reperfusion in rat brains. Single immunohistochemical analyses showed ring-like stainings along the periphery of the nucleus in sham control brains. After tMCAO, Gp210 and Nup107 immunoreactivity continuously increased from 1 day, and RanGap1, Nup205, and Nup50 increased from 2 days until 28 days, which also displayed progressive precipitations within the nucleus in the peri-ischemic area, while the ischemic core showed scarce expression with collapsed structure. Double immunofluorescent analyses revealed nuclear retention and apparent colocalization of RanGap1 with Nup205, Gp210 with Nup205, and partial colocalization of Nup205 with Nup107; most of the ischemic changes above were similar to those observed in patients with C9orf72-genetic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Taken together, these observations suggest that the mislocalization of these nucleoporins may be a common pathogenesis of both ischemic and neurodegenerative disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effect of Acupuncture Signal after Brachial Plexus Blockade on Cerebral Blood Perfusion and Brain Cell Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任永功; 郭长春; 贾少微

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to observe the influence of the up-transmitting of acupuncture signal into the brain in health volunteers whose nerve trunk was blocked by anesthetics. Methods: Thirty-one healthy volunteers were divided into two groups, the control group of 20 cases, and the brachial plexus blockade (BPB) group of 11 cases, with supraclavicular BPB route adopted. With the control group 2 acupoints were randomly selected (Hegu and Quchi of both sides), while with the BPB group Hegu and Quchi of anesthetic arm side were selected. Siemens ECAM/ICON SPECT system was used to conduct brain imaging using double imaging assay before acupuncture and 99mTc-ECD imaging agent during acupuncture for cerebral perfusion. The data were quantitatively analyzed by blood functional changing rate (BFCR%) mathematics model. Results: Before acupuncture, the control and BPB groups showed insignificant change by SPECT, but after electro-acupuncture (EA), the control group displayed improved motor and sensory cortex excitability in basal nuclei, contra-lateral thalamus, parietal and frontal lobe; while BPB group was characterized with reduction of the blood perfusion and cell function of contra-lateral thalamus of anesthetized arm. The difference between the two groups was significant (P<0.01). Conclusion: (1) After BPB, the up-transmitting of the acupuncture signal via upper limb into the brain, and its strength was impaired or blocked; (2) After BPB, the effect of acupuncture on cerebral perfusion and brain cell function of contra-lateral thalamus was impaired or blocked.

  8. Cytochrome c oxidase response to changes in cerebral oxygen delivery in the adult brain shows higher brain-specificity than haemoglobin ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Kolyva, Christina; Ghosh, Arnab; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Highton, David; Chris E Cooper; Smith, Martin; Elwell, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    The redox state of cerebral mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (Δ[oxCCO]) is a signal with strong potential as a non-invasive, bedside biomarker of cerebral metabolic status. We hypothesised that the higher mitochondrial density of brain compared to skin and skull would lead to evidence of brain-specificity of the Δ[oxCCO] signal when measured with a multi-distance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. Measurements of Δ[oxCCO] as well as of concen...

  9. Microstructure and Cerebral Blood Flow within White Matter of the Human Brain: A TBSS Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Giezendanner

    Full Text Available White matter (WM fibers connect different brain regions and are critical for proper brain function. However, little is known about the cerebral blood flow in WM and its relation to WM microstructure. Recent improvements in measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF by means of arterial spin labeling (ASL suggest that the signal in white matter may be detected. Its implications for physiology needs to be extensively explored. For this purpose, CBF and its relation to anisotropic diffusion was analyzed across subjects on a voxel-wise basis with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS and also across white matter tracts within subjects.Diffusion tensor imaging and ASL were acquired in 43 healthy subjects (mean age = 26.3 years.CBF in WM was observed to correlate positively with fractional anisotropy across subjects in parts of the splenium of corpus callosum, the right posterior thalamic radiation (including the optic radiation, the forceps major, the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. Furthermore, radial diffusivity correlated negatively with CBF across subjects in similar regions. Moreover, CBF and FA correlated positively across white matter tracts within subjects.The currently observed findings on a macroscopic level might reflect the metabolic demand of white matter on a microscopic level involving myelination processes or axonal function. However, the exact underlying physiological mechanism of this relationship needs further evaluation.

  10. Transcriptomic Modification in the Cerebral Cortex following Noninvasive Brain Stimulation: RNA-Sequencing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Holmes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has been shown to modulate neuroplasticity. Beneficial effects are observed in patients with psychiatric disorders and enhancement of brain performance in healthy individuals has been observed following tDCS. However, few studies have attempted to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of tDCS in the brain. This study was conducted to assess the impact of tDCS on gene expression within the rat cerebral cortex. Anodal tDCS was applied at 3 different intensities followed by RNA-sequencing and analysis. In each current intensity, approximately 1,000 genes demonstrated statistically significant differences compared to the sham group. A variety of functional pathways, biological processes, and molecular categories were found to be modified by tDCS. The impact of tDCS on gene expression was dependent on current intensity. Results show that inflammatory pathways, antidepressant-related pathways (GTP signaling, calcium ion binding, and transmembrane/signal peptide pathways, and receptor signaling pathways (serotonergic, adrenergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, and glutamate were most affected. Of the gene expression profiles induced by tDCS, some changes were observed across multiple current intensities while other changes were unique to a single stimulation intensity. This study demonstrates that tDCS can modify the expression profile of various genes in the cerebral cortex and that these tDCS-induced alterations are dependent on the current intensity applied.

  11. Minocycline inhibits 5-lipoxygenase activation and brain inflammation after focal cerebral ischemia in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-sheng CHU; San-hua FANG; Yu ZHOU; Guo-hang YU; Meng-ling WANG; Wei-ping ZHANG; Er-qing WEI

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether the anti-inflanunatory effect of minocycline on postis-chemic brain injury is mediated by the inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) expression and enzymatic activation in rats.Methods: Focal cerebral ischemia was induced for 30 min with middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion. The ischemic injuries, endogenous IgG exudation, the accumulation of neutrophils and macrophage/microglia, and 5-LOX mRNA expression were determined 72 h after reperfusion. 5-LOX metabolites (leukotriene B4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes) were measured 3 h after reperfusion.Results: Minocycline (22.5 and 45 mg/kg, ip, for 3 d) attenuated ischemic injuries, IgG exudation, and the accumulation of neutrophils and macrophage/microglia 72 h after reperfusion. It also inhibited 5-LOX expression 72 h after reperfusion and the production of leukotrienes 3 h after reperfusion.Conclusion: Minocycline inhibited postis-chemic brain inflammation, which might be partly mediated by the inhibition of 5-LOX expression and enzymatic activation.

  12. Relationship between brain lesion characteristics and communication in preschool children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Andrea; Fiori, Simona; Weir, Kelly A; Ware, Robert S; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2016-11-01

    MRI shows promise as a prognostic tool for clinical findings such as gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy(CP), however the relationship with communication skills requires exploration. To examine the relationship between the type and severity of brain lesion on MRI and communication skills in children with CP. 131 children with CP (73 males(56%)), mean corrected age(SD) 28(5) months, Gross Motor Functional Classification System distribution: I=57(44%), II=14(11%), III=19(14%), IV=17(13%), V=24(18%). Children were assessed on the Communication and Symbolic Behavioral Scales Developmental Profile (CSBS-DP) Infant-Toddler Checklist. Structural MRI was analysed with reference to type and semi-quantitative assessment of the severity of brain lesion. Children were classified for motor type, distribution and GMFCS. The relationships between type/severity of brain lesion and communication ability were analysed using multivariable tobit regression. Children with periventricular white matter lesions had better speech than children with cortical/deep grey matter lesions (β=-2.6, 95%CI=-5.0, -0.2, p=0.04). Brain lesion severity on the semi-quantitative scale was related to overall communication skills (β=-0.9, 95%CI=-1.4, -0.5, p1 SD below children with periventricular white matter lesions. Children with more severe brain lesions on MRI had poorer overall communication skills. Children with CP born at term had poorer communication than those born prematurely and were more likely to have cortical and deep grey matter lesions. Gross motor function better accounted for overall communication skills than the type of brain lesion or brain lesion severity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Macrostructural and Microstructural Brain Lesions Relate to Gait Pathology in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyns, Pieter; Van Gestel, Leen; Leunissen, Inge; De Cock, Paul; Sunaert, Stefan; Feys, Hilde; Duysens, Jacques; Desloovere, Kaat; Ortibus, Els

    2016-10-01

    Background Even though lower-limb motor disorders are core features of spastic cerebral palsy (sCP), the relationship with brain lesions remains unclear. Unraveling the relation between gait pathology, lower-limb function, and brain lesions in sCP is complex for several reasons; wide heterogeneity in brain lesions, ongoing brain maturation, and gait depends on a number of primary motor functions/deficits (eg, muscle strength, spasticity). Objective To use a comprehensive approach combining conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in children with sCP above 3 years old to relate quantitative parameters of brain lesions in multiple brain areas to gait performance. Methods A total of 50 children with sCP (25 bilateral, 25 unilateral involvement) were enrolled. The investigated neuroradiological parameters included the following: (1) volumetric measures of the corpus callosum (CC) and lateral ventricles (LVs), and (2) DTI parameters of the corticospinal tract (CST). Gait pathology and primary motor deficits, including muscle strength and spasticity, were evaluated by 3D gait analysis and clinical examination. Results In bilateral sCP (n = 25), volume of the LV and the subparts of the CC connecting frontal, (pre)motor, and sensory areas were most related to lower-limb functioning and gait pathology. DTI measures of the CST revealed additional relations with the primary motor deficits (n = 13). In contrast, in unilateral sCP, volumetric (n = 25) and diffusion measures (n = 14) were only correlated to lower-limb strength. Conclusions These results indicate that the combined influence of multiple brain lesions and their impact on the primary motor deficits might explain a large part of the gait pathology in sCP.

  14. Cerebral hemodynamic changes of mild traumatic brain injury at the acute stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik Doshi

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL. We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively. We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both. mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation.

  15. Advanced fiber tracking in early acquired brain injury causing cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, F; Holmström, L; Eliasson, A-C; Flodmark, O; Forssberg, H; Tournier, J-D; Vollmer, B

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and fiber tractography can be used to investigate alterations in white matter tracts in patients with early acquired brain lesions and cerebral palsy. Most existing studies have used diffusion tensor tractography, which is limited in areas of complex fiber structures or pathologic processes. We explored a combined normalization and probabilistic fiber-tracking method for more realistic fiber tractography in this patient group. This cross-sectional study included 17 children with unilateral cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing controls. DWI data were collected at 1.5T (45 directions, b=1000 s/mm(2)). Regions of interest were defined on a study-specific fractional anisotropy template and mapped onto subjects for fiber tracking. Probabilistic fiber tracking of the corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex was performed by using constrained spherical deconvolution. Tracts were qualitatively assessed, and DTI parameters were extracted close to and distant from lesions and compared between groups. The corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex were realistically reconstructed in both groups. Structural changes to tracts were seen in the cerebral palsy group and included splits, dislocations, compaction of the tracts, or failure to delineate the tract and were associated with underlying pathology seen on conventional MR imaging. Comparisons of DTI parameters indicated primary and secondary neurodegeneration along the corticospinal tract. Corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex showed dissimilarities in both structural changes and DTI parameters. Our proposed method offers a sensitive means to explore alterations in WM tracts to further understand pathophysiologic changes following early acquired brain injury. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Effect of siRNA‑induced inhibition of IL‑6 expression in rat cerebral gliocytes on cerebral edema following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Yu, Dong-Ming; Liu, Fu-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of RNA interference (RNAi) on the inhibition of interleukin (IL)‑6 expression in rat cerebral gliocytes in vitro and rat cerebral traumatic tissues in vivo, as well as the effect of RNAi on cerebral edema. pSUPER vectors containing IL‑6 small hairpin RNA (pSUPER‑IL‑6 1‑5) were designed, constructed and transfected into C6 rat glioma cells using cationic liposomes. ELISA was used to select the plasmid with the strongest interference effect. A freefall method was used to generate a rat brain injury model and rats were randomly divided into treatment, empty plasmid and control groups (n=14/group). IL‑6 levels, water content and sodium content were determined in the brain tissues at 24 and 72 h post‑injury. pSUPER‑IL‑6 was effectively transfected into C6 cells and was found to inhibit the expression of IL‑6 rather than IL‑8. The pSUPER‑IL‑6 1 vector was most effective in inducing RNAi. In vivo, IL‑6 levels were observed to be lowest in the interference group and there were statistically significant differences in water and sodium content among the experimental groups (Pcerebral gliocytes, and the reduction of the IL‑6 levels was found to reduce post‑traumatic cerebral edema.

  17. Effect of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on the Expression of c-Fos and Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor of the Cerebral Cortex in Rats with Cerebral Infarct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaoqiao; MEI Yuanwu; LIU Chuanyu; YU Shanchun

    2007-01-01

    The effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on the neurological functional recovery and expression of c-Fos and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) of the cerebral cortex in rats with cerebral infarction was investigated. Cerebral infarction models were established by using left middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and were randomly divided into a model group (n=40) and a TMS group (n=40). TMS treatment (2 times per day, 30 pulses per time) with a frequency of 0.5 Hz and magnetic field intensity of 1.33 Tesla was carried out in TMS group after MCAO. Modified neurological severity score (NSS) were recorded before and 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 day(s) after MCAO. The expression of c-Fos and BDNF was immunohistochemically detected 1, 7,14, 21, and 28 day(s) after infarction respectively. Our results showed that a significant recovery of NSS (P<0.05) was found in animals treated by TMS on day 7, 14, 21, and 28 as compared with the animals in the model group. The positive expression of c-Fos and BDNF was detected in the cortex surrounding the infarction areas, while the expression of c-Fos and BDNF increased significantly in TMS treatment group in comparison with those in model group 7, 14, 21, and 28 days (P<0.05) and 7,14, 21 days (P<0.01) after infarction, respectively. It is concluded that TMS has therapeutic effect on cerebral infarction and this may have something to do with TMS's ability to promote the expression of c-Fos and BDNF of the cerebral cortex in rats with cerebral infarction.

  18. Cerebral microvascular amyloid beta protein deposition induces vascular degeneration and neuroinflammation in transgenic mice expressing human vasculotropic mutant amyloid beta precursor protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, J.; Xu, F.; Davis, J.; Otte-Holler, I.; Verbeek, M.M.; Nostrand, W.E. van

    2005-01-01

    Cerebral vascular amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) deposition, also known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy, is a common pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. Additionally, several familial forms of cerebral amyloid angiopathy exist including the Dutch (E22Q) and Iowa (D23N) mutations of Abeta. Incr

  19. Neuroprotection by Methylene Blue in Cerebral Global Ischemic Injury Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Brain Pathology: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund, Lars; Sharma, Aruna; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2016-01-01

    Transient global ischemic cerebral injury is a consequence of cardiac arrest and accounts for approximately 450,000 annual deaths with a mortality of approximately 90%. Serious morbidity follows for many of the survivors and up to 16% of patients achieving restoration of spontaneous circulation develop brain death. Other survivors are left with persistent cognitive impairment such as memory and sensimotor deficits, reducing quality of life and resulting in heavy costs on society. Many studies over the years have been devoted to improving outcome after cardiac arrest and have, to a certain degree succeeded, especially locally in areas where improvement of ambulance organizations have been effective. In spite of this serious problems remain and the chances of cerebral survival need to increase if over-all results, i.e. survival as well as cognitive function, are to improve. Methylene blue, a textile dye synthesized in the late 19th century has also been used in medicine for different purposes. One of its effects is to increase systemic blood pressure, but other effects have been documented, among which are its neuroprotective effects well-noted during the last few years. In this review we have appraised these findings in relation to global ischemic injury.

  20. The Deubiquitinating Enzyme Cylindromatosis Dampens CD8+ T Cell Responses and Is a Critical Factor for Experimental Cerebral Malaria and Blood–Brain Barrier Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Ursula; Stenzel, Werner; Koschel, Josephin; Raptaki, Maria; Wang, Xu; Naumann, Michael; Matuschewski, Kai; Schlüter, Dirk; Nishanth, Gopala

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a severe complication of human malaria and may lead to death of Plasmodium falciparum-infected individuals. Cerebral malaria is associated with sequestration of parasitized red blood cells within the cerebral microvasculature resulting in damage of the blood–brain barrier and brain pathology. Although CD8+ T cells have been implicated in the development of murine experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), several other studies have shown that CD8+ T cells confer protection against blood-stage infections. Since the role of host deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) in malaria is yet unknown, we investigated how the DUB cylindromatosis (CYLD), an important inhibitor of several cellular signaling pathways, influences the outcome of ECM. Upon infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) sporozoites or PbA-infected red blood cells, at least 90% of Cyld−/− mice survived the infection, whereas all congenic C57BL/6 mice displayed signatures of ECM, impaired parasite control, and disruption of the blood–brain barrier integrity. Cyld deficiency prevented brain pathology, including hemorrhagic lesions, enhanced activation of astrocytes and microglia, infiltration of CD8+ T cells, and apoptosis of endothelial cells. Furthermore, PbA-specific CD8+ T cell responses were augmented in the blood of Cyld−/− mice with increased production of interferon-γ and granzyme B and elevated activation of protein kinase C-θ and nuclear factor “kappa light-chain enhancer” of activated B cells. Importantly, accumulation of CD8+ T cells in the brain of Cyld−/− mice was significantly reduced compared to C57BL/6 mice. Bone marrow chimera experiments showed that the absence of ECM signatures in infected Cyld−/− mice could be attributed to hematopoietic and radioresistant parenchymal cells, most likely endothelial cells that did not undergo apoptosis. Together, we were able to show that host deubiqutinating enzymes play an important role in ECM and that CYLD promotes

  1. Yes-associated protein 1 is widely expressed in human brain tumors and promotes glioblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Brent A; Bai, Haibo; Odia, Yazmin; Jain, Deepali; Anders, Robert A; Eberhart, Charles G

    2011-07-01

    The hippo pathway and its downstream mediator yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) regulate mammalian organ size in part through modulating progenitor cell numbers. YAP1 has also been implicated as an oncogene in multiple human cancers. Currently, little is known about the expression of YAP1 either in normal human brain tissue or in central nervous system neoplasms. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate nuclear YAP1 expression in the fetal and normal adult human brains and in 264 brain tumors. YAP1 was expressed in fetal and adult brain regions known to harbor neural progenitor cells, but there was little YAP1 immunoreactivity in the adult cerebral cortex. YAP1 protein was also readily detected in the nuclei of human brain tumors. In medulloblastoma, the expression varied between histologic subtypes and was most prominent in nodular/desmoplastic tumors. In gliomas, it was frequently expressed in infiltrating astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas but rarely in pilocytic astrocytomas. Using a loss-of-function approach, we show that YAP1 promoted growth of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. High levels of YAP1 messenger RNA expression were associated with aggressive molecular subsets of glioblastoma and with a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean survival in human astrocytoma patients. These findings suggest that YAP1 may play an important role in normal human brain development and that it could represent a new target in human brain tumors.

  2. Exposure to brominated flame retardant PBDE-99 affects cytoskeletal protein expression in the neonatal mouse cerebral cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Henrik; Kultima, Kim; Scholz, Birger

    2008-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are environmental contaminants found in human and animal tissues worldwide. Neonatal exposure to the flame retardant 2,2', 4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE-99) disrupts normal brain development in mice, and results in disturbed spontaneous behavior...... in the adult. The mechanisms underlying the late effects of early exposure are not clear. To gain insight into the initial neurodevelopmental damage inflicted by PBDE-99, we investigated the short-term effects of PBDE-99 on protein expression in the developing cerebral cortex of neonatal mice...... are known to be cytoskeleton-related. Similar to previous findings in the striatum, we found elevated levels of the neuron growth-associated protein Gap43 in the cortex. In cultured cortical cells, a high concentration of PBDE-99 (30 microM) induced cell death without any apparent increase in caspase-3...

  3. Age-dependent NOC/oFQ contribution to impaired hypotensive cerebral hemodynamics after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstead, William M

    2002-10-01

    Previous studies have observed that the newly described opioid, nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOC/oFQ), contributed to age dependent reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and pial artery diameter after fluid percussion brain injury (FPI). Unrelated studies have noted a similar age dependency in impaired hypotensive cerebral autoregulation after FPI. This study was designed to compare the role of NOC/oFQ in impaired hypotensive cerebral autoregulation after FPI in newborn and juvenile pigs equipped with a closed cranial window. Ten minutes of hemorrhagic hypotension (10-15 mL blood/kg) decreased mean arterial blood pressure uniformly in both groups ( approximately 44%). In the newborn, hypotensive pial artery dilation was blunted within 1 h of FPI but partially protected by pretreatment with the NOC/oFQ antagonist, [F/G] NOC/oFQ (1-13) NH(2) (1 mg/kg, i.v.) (34 +/- 1 vs. 8 +/- 1 vs. 20 +/- 2% for sham control, FPI, and FPI-[F/G] NOC/oFQ (1-13) NH(2), respectively). CBF was reduced during normotension by FPI, further reduced by hypotension, but both were partially protected by this antagonist in the newborn (63 +/- 4, 34 +/- 2, and 20 +/- 2 vs. 65 +/- 4, 47 +/- 2, and 29 +/- 2 mL/min.100 g for normotension, normotension-FPI and hypotension-FPI in the absence and presence of [F/G] NOC/oFQ (1-13) NH(2), respectively). In contrast, blunted hypotensive pial artery dilation was protected significantly less by this NOC/oFQ antagonist in the juvenile (32 +/- 2 vs. 7 +/- 2 vs. 13 +/- 2% for sham control, FPI and FPI-NOC/oFQ antagonist, respectively). Similarly, [F/G] NOC/oFQ (1-13) NH(2) had less protective effect on normotensive and hypotensive CBF values post FPI in the juvenile. These data indicate that NOC/oFQ contributes to impaired hypotensive cerebral hemodynamics following brain injury in an age-dependent manner.

  4. Protein Kinase C Epsilon Promotes Cerebral Ischemic Tolerance Via Modulation of Mitochondrial Sirt5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris-Blanco, Kahlilia C.; Dave, Kunjan R.; Saul, Isabel; Koronowski, Kevin B.; Stradecki, Holly M.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin 5 (SIRT5) is a mitochondrial-localized NAD+-dependent lysine desuccinylase and a major regulator of the mitochondrial succinylome. We wanted to determine whether SIRT5 is activated by protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε)-mediated increases in mitochondrial Nampt and whether SIRT5 regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics and neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia. In isolated mitochondria from rat cortical cultures, PKCε activation increased SIRT5 levels and desuccinylation activity in a Nampt-dependent manner. PKCε activation did not lead to significant modifications in SIRT3 activity, the major mitochondrial lysine deacetylase. Assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the cortex of wild type (WT) and SIRT5−/− mice revealed that SIRT5 regulates oxygen consumption in the presence of complex I, complex II, and complex IV substrates. To explore the potential role of SIRT5 in PKCε-mediated protection, we compared WT and SIRT5−/− mice by employing both in vitro and in vivo ischemia paradigms. PKCε-mediated decreases in cell death following oxygen-glucose deprivation were abolished in cortical cultures harvested from SIRT5−/− mice. Furthermore, PKCε failed to prevent cortical degeneration following MCAO in SIRT5−/− mice. Collectively this demonstrates that SIRT5 is an important mitochondrial enzyme for protection against metabolic and ischemic stress following PKCε activation in the brain. PMID:27435822

  5. Cerebral gumma mimicking a brain tumor in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Woo Jin [Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Syphilis has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, and the cerebral gumma is a kind of neurosyphilis which is rare and can be cured by appropriate antibiotic treatments. However, in clinical practices, diagnosis of cerebral syphilitic gumma is often difficult because imaging and laboratory findings revealed elusive results. Herein, we present a rare case of neurosyphilis presenting as cerebral gumma confirmed by histopathological examination, and positive serologic and cerebrospinal fluid analyses. This case report suggests that cerebral gumma should be considered as possible diagnosis for human immunodeficiency virus-negative patients with space-occupying lesion of the brain. And this case also provides importance of clinical suspicions in diagnosing neurosyphilis because syphilis serology is not routinely tested on patients with neurologic symptoms.

  6. Changes in synapse quantity and growth associated protein 43 expression in the motor cortex of focal cerebral ischemic rats following catalpol treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Wan; Huifeng Zhu; Yong Luo; Peng Xie

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of catalpol, the main constituent of the Chinese herb Rehmannia root, on neurons following brain ischemia. A rat model of focal permanent brain ischemia was established using electrocoagulation. The rats were intraperitoneally injected with catalpol, at a dose of 5 mg/kg, daily for 1 week. Results showed that the number of neuronal synapses in the motor cortex and growth associated protein 43 expression were increased following catalpol treatment, indicating that catalpol might contribute to neuroplasticity and ameliorate functional neurological deficits induced by cerebral ischemia.

  7. Existence of vimentin and GFAP protein expressions as a result of 2-Methoxyethanol administration in cerebral cortex tissue of Swiss Webster mice (Mus musculus): an immunohistochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irnidayanti, Yulia

    2014-07-01

    Une of the plastic-based materials widely used in the plastics industry in various countries is ester phthalate. This compound will be oxidized in the body into 2-methoxyethanol (2-ME). The effect of 2-ME on human health and environment depends on the number, duration and the frequency of exposure. Recently, the incidence of brain damage tends to increase. In the last decade, it has been widely reported the negative effects of chemical pollutants to the environment. The aim of this study were to know the existence of the expression of Vimentin and GFAP proteins caused by 2-ME on the histological structure of the cerebral cortex of mice fetal during the prenatal period on gestation day 14 (GD 14) and day 18 (GD 18). The 2-ME compound was injected intraperitoneally with a dose of 7.5 mmol kg(-1) of body weight at GD-10. The result showed that there is a change in existence Vimentin protein in the cerebral cortex fetal of treated mice at GD 14, which is very conspicuous. Meanwhile, a change in existence of GFAP protein in cerebral cortex fetal of treated mice at GD 14, have relatively no difference from controls and no impact on histological structure changes of the cerebral corteks at GD 14. The change in existence of Vimentin protein in the cerebral cortex fetal of treated mice at GD 14 have an impact on histological structure of the cerebral cortex of mice treated at GD 18. It is believed that the impact is due to the effects of 2-methoxyethanol.

  8. Cerebral control and survival after stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases; Zerebrale Kontrolle und Ueberleben nach stereotaktischer Strahlentherapie von Hirnmetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Elmar Till

    2014-06-04

    This retrospective study, including 275 patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy due to brain metastases between 2003 and 2008, investigates influencing factors regarding cerebral control and survival, symptomatic effects and a potential benefit for patients older than 70 years. We were able to identify risk factors for remote brain failure which leads to a therapeutic recommendation. Furthermore we confirm a positive symptomatic effect and a benefit of stereotactic readiotherapy for patients over 70 years.

  9. Puerarin protects brain tissue against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injur y by inhibiting the inlfammator y response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Zhou; Liang Wang; Panpan Liu; Weiwei Hu; Xiangdong Zhu; Hong Shen; Yuanyuan Yao

    2014-01-01

    Puerarin, a traditional Chinese medicine, exerts a powerful neuroprotective effect in cerebral isch-emia/reperfusion injury, but its mechanism is unknown. Here, we established rat models of middle cerebral artery ischemia/reperfusion injury using the suture method. Puerarin (100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 30 minutes before middle cerebral artery occlusion and 8 hours after reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, we found that puerarin signiifcantly im-proved neurological deifcit, reduced infarct size and brain water content, and notably diminished the expression of Toll-like receptor-4, myeloid differentiation factor 88, nuclear factor kappa B and tumor necrosis factor-αin the ischemic region. These data indicate that puerarin exerts an anti-inlfammatory protective effect on brain tissue with ischemia/reperfusion damage by down-regulating the expression of multiple inlfammatory factors.

  10. Visual Field Function in School-Aged Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy Related to Different Patterns of Brain Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Lena; Rydberg, Agneta; Eliasson, Ann-Christin; Kits, Annika; Flodmark, Olof

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To relate visual field function to brain morphology in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Visual field function was assessed using the confrontation technique and Goldmann perimetry in 29 children (15 males, 14 females; age range 7-17y, median age 11y) with unilateral CP classified at Gross Motor Function Classification…

  11. Visual Field Function in School-Aged Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy Related to Different Patterns of Brain Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Lena; Rydberg, Agneta; Eliasson, Ann-Christin; Kits, Annika; Flodmark, Olof

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To relate visual field function to brain morphology in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Visual field function was assessed using the confrontation technique and Goldmann perimetry in 29 children (15 males, 14 females; age range 7-17y, median age 11y) with unilateral CP classified at Gross Motor Function Classification…

  12. Collateralization of the pathways descending from the cerebral cortex to brain stem and spinal cord in cat and monkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Keizer (Koos)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe present study deals with the collateralization of the descending pathways from the cerebral cortex to the brain stem and the spinal cord in cat and monkey. The distributions of the branching cortical neurons were studied using retrograde fluorescent tracers. In addition, a new retrog

  13. Changes in cerebral blood flow and psychometric indicators in veterans with early forms of chronic brain ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilenko Т.М.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal is to study the cerebral blood flow and psychometric characteristics in veterans of Afghanistan with early forms of chronic brain ischemia. Material and Methods. The study included 74 veterans of the Afghan war aged from 45 to 55 years: group 1, 28 people with NPNKM; Group 2-28 patients with circulatory encephalopathy stage 1; group 3-18 healthy persons. Doppler examination of cerebral vessels was carried out on the unit «Smart-lite». Reactive and personal anxiety of patients was assessed using the scale of Spielberger, evaluation of the quality of life through the test SAN. Determining the level of neuroticism and psychoticism was conducted by the scale of neuroticism and psy-choticism. Results: The study of cerebral blood flow in the Afghan war veterans showed signs of insolvency of carotid and carotid-basilar anastomoses, hypoperfusion phenomenon with the depletion of autoregulation, violation of the outflow of venous blood at the level of the microvasculature, accompanied by cerebral arteries spasm. More than 40% of patients with early forms of chronic brain ischemia had high personal anxiety, low levels of well-being and activity, with maximum expression of dyscirculatory hypoxia. Conclusion. Readaptation of veterans of Afghanistan is accompanied by the changes in psychometric performance and the formation of the earliest forms of brain chronic ischemia associated with inadequate hemodynamics providing increased functional activity of the brain and the inefficiency of compensatory-adaptive reactions.

  14. Hand Function in Relation to Brain Lesions and Corticomotor-Projection Pattern in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Linda; Vollmer, Brigitte; Tedroff, Kristina; Islam, Mominul; Persson, Jonas Ke; Kits, Annika; Forssberg, Hans; Eliasson, Ann-Christin

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate relationships between hand function, brain lesions, and corticomotor projections in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). Method: The study included 17 children (nine males, eight females; mean age 11.4 [SD 2.4] range 7-16y), with unilateral CP at Gross Motor Function Classification System level I and Manual Ability…

  15. Presence of cerebral microbleeds is associated with worse executive function in pediatric brain tumor survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Erika; Sear, Katherine; Felton, Erin; Tamrazi, Benita; Gauvain, Karen; Torkildson, Joseph; Buono, Benedict Del; Samuel, David; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A; Chen, Josephine; Goldsby, Robert E; Banerjee, Anuradha; Lupo, Janine M; Molinaro, Annette M; Fullerton, Heather J; Mueller, Sabine

    2016-11-01

    A specific form of small-vessel vasculopathy-cerebral microbleeds (CMBs)-has been linked to various types of dementia in adults. We assessed the incidence of CMBs and their association with neurocognitive function in pediatric brain tumor survivors. In a multi-institutional cohort of 149 pediatric brain tumor patients who received cranial radiation therapy (CRT) between 1987 and 2014 at age CMBs on brain MRIs. Neurocognitive function was assessed using a computerized testing program (CogState). We used survival analysis to determine cumulative incidence of CMBs and Poisson regression to examine risk factors for CMBs. Linear regression models were used to assess effect of CMBs on neurocognitive function. The cumulative incidence of CMBs was 48.8% (95% CI: 38.3-60.5) at 5 years. Children who had whole brain irradiation developed CMBs at a rate 4 times greater than those treated with focal irradiation (P CMBs performed worse on the Groton Maze Learning test (GML) compared with those without CMBs (Z-score -1.9; 95% CI: -2.7, -1.1; P CMBs are present. CMBs in the frontal lobe were associated with worse performance on the GML (Z-score -2.4; 95% CI: -2.9, -1.8; P CMBs in the temporal lobes affected verbal memory (Z-score -2.0; 95% CI: -3.3, -0.7; P = .005). CMBs are common and associated with neurocognitive dysfunction in pediatric brain tumor survivors treated with radiation. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. A nuclear localized protein ZCCHC9 is expressed in cerebral cortex and suppresses the MAPK signal pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The CCHC-type zinc finger motif has numerous biological activities (such as DNA binding and RNA binding) and can also mediate protein-protein interaction. This article gives a primary report about the human ZCCHC9 gene. Protein ZCCHC9 contains four CCHC motifs and is highly conserved in humans, mice, and rats. The whole cDNA sequence of the ZCCHC9 gene has been amplified by PCR and a number of plasmids have been constructed for further study. The results show that ZCCHC9 is localized in the nucleus, and especially concentrated in the nucleolus. It is highly expressed in the brain and testicles of the mouse. This has been confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In situ hybridization of the mouse brain indicates that ZCCHC9 is mainly expressed in the cerebral cortex. Reporter gene assay shows that ZCCHC9 suppresses the transcription activities of NF-kappa B and SRE,and may play roles in the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling transduction pathway.

  17. Changes in brain activity following intensive voice treatment in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari, Reyhaneh; Cummine, Jacqueline; Reed, Alesha; Fox, Cynthia M; Chouinard, Brea; Cribben, Ivor; Boliek, Carol A

    2017-09-01

    Eight children (3 females; 8-16 years) with motor speech disorders secondary to cerebral palsy underwent 4 weeks of an intensive neuroplasticity-principled voice treatment protocol, LSVT LOUD(®) , followed by a structured 12-week maintenance program. Children were asked to overtly produce phonation (ah) at conversational loudness, cued-phonation at perceived twice-conversational loudness, a series of single words, and a prosodic imitation task while being scanned using fMRI, immediately pre- and post-treatment and 12 weeks following a maintenance program. Eight age- and sex-matched controls were scanned at each of the same three time points. Based on the speech and language literature, 16 bilateral regions of interest were selected a priori to detect potential neural changes following treatment. Reduced neural activity in the motor areas (decreased motor system effort) before and immediately after treatment, and increased activity in the anterior cingulate gyrus after treatment (increased contribution of decision making processes) were observed in the group with cerebral palsy compared to the control group. Using graphical models, post-treatment changes in connectivity were observed between the left supramarginal gyrus and the right supramarginal gyrus and the left precentral gyrus for the children with cerebral palsy, suggesting LSVT LOUD enhanced contributions of the feedback system in the speech production network instead of high reliance on feedforward control system and the somatosensory target map for regulating vocal effort. Network pruning indicates greater processing efficiency and the recruitment of the auditory and somatosensory feedback control systems following intensive treatment. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4413-4429, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Disentangling How the Brain is "Wired" in Cortical (Cerebral) Visual Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Lotfi B; Mayer, D Luisa; Bauer, Corinna M; Wright, Darick; Kran, Barry S

    2017-05-01

    Cortical (cerebral) visual impairment (CVI) results from perinatal injury to visual processing structures and pathways of the brain and is the most common cause of severe visual impairment or blindness in children in developed countries. Children with CVI display a wide range of visual deficits including decreased visual acuity, impaired visual field function, as well as impairments in higher-order visual processing and attention. Together, these visual impairments can dramatically influence a child's development and well-being. Given the complex neurologic underpinnings of this condition, CVI is often undiagnosed by eye care practitioners. Furthermore, the neurophysiological basis of CVI in relation to observed visual processing deficits remains poorly understood. Here, we present some of the challenges associated with the clinical assessment and management of individuals with CVI. We discuss how advances in brain imaging are likely to help uncover the underlying neurophysiology of this condition. In particular, we demonstrate how structural and functional neuroimaging approaches can help gain insight into abnormalities of white matter connectivity and cortical activation patterns, respectively. Establishing a connection between how changes within the brain relate to visual impairments in CVI will be important for developing effective rehabilitative and education strategies for individuals living with this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of cerebral amyloid angiopathy on brain iron, copper, and zinc in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Matthew; Crofton, Andrew; Zabel, Matthew; Jiffry, Arshad; Kirsch, David; Dickson, April; Mao, Xiao Wen; Vinters, Harry V; Domaille, Dylan W; Chang, Christopher J; Kirsch, Wolff

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a vascular lesion associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) present in up to 95% of AD patients and produces MRI-detectable microbleeds in many of these patients. It is possible that CAA-related microbleeding is a source of pathological iron in the AD brain. Because the homeostasis of copper, iron, and zinc are so intimately linked, we determined whether CAA contributes to changes in the brain levels of these metals. We obtained brain tissue from AD patients with severe CAA to compare to AD patients without evidence of vascular amyloid-β. Patients with severe CAA had significantly higher non-heme iron levels. Histologically, iron was deposited in the walls of large CAA-affected vessels. Zinc levels were significantly elevated in grey matter in both the CAA and non-CAA AD tissue, but no vascular staining was noted in CAA cases. Copper levels were decreased in both CAA and non-CAA AD tissues and copper was found to be prominently deposited on the vasculature in CAA. Together, these findings demonstrate that CAA is a significant variable affecting transition metals in AD.

  20. Human Development XI: The Structure of the Cerebral Cortex. Are There Really Modules in the Brain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyge Dahl Hermansen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of human consciousness is thought to be closely connected to the structure of cerebral cortex. One of the most appreciated concepts in this regard is the Szanthagothei model of a modular building of neo-cortex. The modules are believed to organize brain activity pretty much like a computer. We looked at examples in the literature and argue that there is no significant evidence that supports Szanthagothei's model. We discuss the use of the limited genetic information, the corticocortical afferents termination and the columns in primary sensory cortex as arguments for the existence of the cortex-module. Further, we discuss the results of experiments with Luminization Microscopy (LM colouration of myalinized fibres, in which vertical bundles of afferent/efferent fibres that could support the cortex module are identified. We conclude that sensory maps seem not to be an expression for simple specific connectivity, but rather to be functional defined. We also conclude that evidence for the existence of the postulated module or column does not exist in the discussed material. This opens up for an important discussion of the brain as functionally directed by biological information (information-directed self-organisation, and for consciousness being closely linked to the structure of the universe at large. Consciousness is thus not a local phenomena limited to the brain, but a much more global phenomena connected to the wholeness of the world.

  1. Assessment of variability in cerebral vasculature for neuro-anatomical surgery planning in rodent brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, J. R.; Van Kuyck, K.; Himmelreich, U.; Nuttin, B.; Maes, F.; Suetens, P.

    2011-03-01

    Clinical and pre-clinical studies show that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of targeted brain regions by neurosurgical techniques ameliorate psychiatric disorder such as anorexia nervosa. Neurosurgical interventions in preclinical rodent brain are mostly accomplished manually with a 2D atlas. Considering both the large number of animals subjected to stereotactic surgical experiments and the associated imaging cost, feasibility of sophisticated pre-operative imaging based surgical path planning and/or robotic guidance is limited. Here, we spatially normalize vasculature information and assess the intra-strain variability in cerebral vasculature for a neurosurgery planning. By co-registering and subsequently building a probabilistic vasculature template in a standard space, we evaluate the risk of a user defined electrode trajectory damaging a blood vessel on its path. The use of such a method may not only be confined to DBS therapy in small animals, but also could be readily applicable to a wide range of stereotactic small animal surgeries like targeted injection of contrast agents and cell labeling applications.

  2. Protective effects of taurine in traumatic brain injury via mitochondria and cerebral blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Fan, Weijia; Cai, Ying; Wu, Qiaoli; Mo, Lidong; Huang, Zhenwu; Huang, Huiling

    2016-09-01

    In mammalian tissues, taurine is an important natural component and the most abundant free amino acid in the heart, retina, skeletal muscle, brain, and leukocytes. This study is to examine the taurine's protective effects on neuronal ultrastructure, the function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex, and on cerebral blood flow (CBF). The model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) was made for SD rats by a fluid percussion device, with taurine (200 mg/kg) administered by tail intravenous injection once daily for 7 days after TBI. It was found that CBF was improved for both left and right brain at 30 min and 7 days post-injury by taurine. Reaction time was prolonged relative to the TBI-only group. Neuronal damage was prevented by 7 days taurine. Mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes I and II showed greater activity with the taurine group. The improvement by taurine of CBF may alleviate edema and elevation in intracranial pressure. Importantly taurine improved the hypercoagulable state.

  3. Systematization, distribution and territory of the caudal cerebral artery on the brain's surface of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarílis Díaz de Carvalho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty Meleagris gallopavo heads with their neck segments were used. Animals were contained and euthanized with the association of mebezonium iodide, embutramide and tetracaine hydrochloride (T 61, Intervet by intravenous injection. The arterial system was rinsed with cold saline solution (15°C, with 5000IU heparin and filled with red-colored latex. The samples were fixed in 20% formaldehyde for seven days. The brains were removed with a segment of cervical spinal cord and after, the dura-mater was removed and the arteries dissected. The cerebral carotid arteries, after the intercarotid anastomosis, were projected around the hypophysis, until they reached the tuber cinereum and divided into their terminal branches, the caudal branch and the rostral branch. The rostral branch was projected rostrolateralwards and gave off, in sequence, two collateral branches, the caudal cerebral and the middle cerebral arteries and the terminal branch was as cerebroethmoidal artery. The caudal cerebral artery of one antimere formed the interhemispheric artery, which gave off dorsal hemispheric branches to the convex surface of both antimeres. Its dorsal tectal mesencephalic branch, of only one antimere, originated the dorsal cerebellar artery. In the interior of the cerebral transverse fissure, after the origin of the dorsal tectal mesencephalic artery, the caudal cerebral artery emitted occipital hemispheric branches, pineal branches and medial hemispheric branches, on both antimeres. The caudal cerebral artery's territory comprehended the entire surface of the dorsal hemioptic lobe, the rostral surface of the cerebellum, the diencephalic structures, the caudal pole and the medial surface of the cerebral hemisphere and in the convex surface, the sagittal eminence except for its most rostral third. Due to the asymmetry found in the caudal cerebral arteries' ramifications, the models were classified into three types and their respective subtypes.

  4. Outcomes of intrathecal baclofen therapy in patients with cerebral palsy and acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Kwon; Lee, Kil Chan; Cho, Han Eol; Chae, Minji; Chang, Jin Woo; Chang, Won Seok; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2017-08-01

    Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) has been known to reduce spasticity which did not respond to oral medications and botulinum toxin treatment. However, few results have been reported comparing the effects of ITB therapy in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) and acquired brain injury. This study aimed to investigate beneficial and adverse effects of ITB bolus injection and pump therapy in patients with CP and to compare outcomes to patients with acquired brain injury such as traumatic brain injury and hypoxic brain injury. ITB test trials were performed in 37 patients (19 CP and 18 acquired brain injury). Based on ambulatory function, CP patients were divided into 2 groups: 11 patients with nonambulatory CP and 8 patients with ambulatory CP. Change of spasticity was evaluated using the Modified Ashworth Scale. Additional positive or negative effects were also evaluated after ITB bolus injection. In patients who received ITB pump implantation, outcomes of spasticity, subjective satisfaction and adverse events were evaluated until 12 months post-treatment. After ITB bolus injection, 32 patients (86.5%) (CP 84.2% versus acquired brain injury 88.9%) showed a positive response of reducing spasticity. However, 8 patients with CP had negative adverse effects. Particularly, 3 ambulatory CP patients showed standing impairment and 1 ambulatory CP patient showed impaired gait pattern such as foot drop because of excessive reduction of lower extremity muscle tone. Ambulatory CP patients received ITB pump implantation less than patients with acquired brain injury after ITB test trials (P = .003 by a chi-squared test). After the pump implantation, spasticity was significantly reduced within 1 month and the effect maintained for 12 months. Seventeen patients or their caregivers (73.9%) were very satisfied, whereas 5 patients (21.7%) suffered from adverse events showed no subjective satisfaction. In conclusion, ITB therapy was effective in reducing spasticity in patients with CP and

  5. Measurement of cerebral blood flow rate and its relationship with brain function using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Yuqian; Dou, Shidan; Ma, Yushu; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-03-01

    Activity of brain neurons will lead to changes in local blood flow rate (BFR). Thus, it is important to measure the local BFR of cerebral cortex on research of neuron activity in vivo, such as rehabilitation evaluation after stroke, etc. Currently, laser Doppler flowmetry is commonly used for blood flow measurement, however, relatively low resolution limits its application. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful noninvasive 3D imaging modality with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Furthermore, OCT can provide flow distribution image by calculating Doppler frequency shift which makes it possible for blood flow rate measurement. In this paper, we applied OCT to measure the blood flow rate of the primary motor cortex in rats. The animal was immobilized and anesthetized with isoflurane, an incision was made along the sagittal suture, and bone was exposed. A skull window was opened on the primary motor cortex. Then, blood flow rate changes in the primary motor cortex were monitored by our homemade spectral domain OCT with a stimulation of the passive movement of the front legs. Finally, we established the relationship between blood flow rate and the test design. The aim is to demonstrate the potential of OCT in the evaluation of cerebral cortex function.

  6. Effect of RhoA/Rho associated coiled coil forming protein kinase signal pathway on blood brain barrier at early stage of cerebral hemorrhage after intracerebral hemoglobin injection%RhoA/Rho激酶信号通路在脑出血后血红蛋白影响血脑屏障通透性中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付正浩; 陈祎招; 杨硕; 邓心情; 张润; 丁锐; 冯亮; 张世忠; 柯以铨

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨脑出血后血红蛋白是否通过激活RhoA/Rho激酶(ROCK)信号通路导致血脑屏障通透性增加. 方法 70只雄性SD大鼠按随机数字表法分为正常对照组(10只)、假手术组(30只)和血红蛋白组(30只),后2组再按照观察时间点的不同分为6h、12h和24h3个亚组(每个亚组10只).血红蛋白组采用颅内注入血红蛋白法建立大鼠脑出血模型.采用伊文思蓝浓度检测评估各组大鼠血脑屏障的通透性,采用干湿法测定各组大鼠血肿周围脑组织的水含量,采用免疫组化染色检测RhoA和ROCK2蛋白在各组大鼠血脑屏障的表达分布情况,采用荧光定量PCR测定各组大鼠脑中RhoA和ROCK2 mRNA的表达情况. 结果 与假手术组和正常对照组相比,血红蛋白组6h、12h和24 h伊文思蓝渗透量和脑组织含水量均明显升高,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).免疫组化染色结果显示:正常对照组血脑屏障内皮细胞RhoA和ROCK2未见明显表达,血红蛋白组血肿侧血脑屏障内皮细胞中RhoA和ROCK2呈棕黄色表达,主要表达于胶质细胞的细胞质;实时荧光定量PCR结果显示:与正常对照组和假手术组相比,血红蛋白组RhoA mRNA表达在6h、12h和24 h时均明显增高,血红蛋白组ROCK2 mRNA表达在6h和12 h均明显增高,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05). 结论 脑出血后血红蛋白可能通过激活RhoA/ROCK信号通路引起血脑屏障通透性增加,进而参与脑水肿的发生发展.%Objective To reveal whether increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability induced by hemoglobin is attributed to RhoA/Rho associated coiled coil forming protein kinase (ROCK) signal pathway activation.Methods Seventy male SD rats were randomized into normal control group (n=10),sham-operated group (n=30) and intracerebral hemoglobin injection group (Hb group,n=30).Rats in sham-operated group and Hb group were each divided into three subgroups (6,12 and 24 h after hemoglobin injection

  7. Naoxintong dose effects on inflammatory factor expression in the rat brain following focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangjian Zhang; Li Xü; Zuoran Chen; Shuchao Hu; Liying Zhang; Haiyan Li; Ruichun Liu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Certain components of tetramethylpyrazine, a traditional Chinese medicine, exhibit protective effects against brain injury.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of different Naoxintong doses on expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (κ B), interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and complement 3 in rats following focal cerebral ischemia.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The randomized experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Neurology, Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University from June 2004 to June 2006. MATERIAIS: A total of 150 adult, healthy, male, Sprague Dawley rats, weighing 280-320 g, were selected. Naoxintong powder (mainly comprising szechwan lovage rhizome, milkvetch root, danshen root, and radix angelicae sinensis) was obtained from Buchang Pharmacy Co., Ltd. in Xianyang City of Shanxi Province of China, lot number 040608.METHODS: The rats were randomly assigned into sham operation, saline, high-dose Naoxintong, moderate-dose Naoxintong, and low-dose Naoxintong groups, with 30 rats in each group. Rat models of middle cerebral artery occlusion were established using the suture method, with the exception of the sham operation group. Rats in the high-dose, moderate-dose and low-dose Naoxintong groups received 4, 2, and 1 glkg Naoxintong respectively, by gavage. Rats in the saline group were treated with 1 mL saline by gavage. All rats were administered by garage at 5 and 23 hours following surgery, and subsequently, once per day.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At 6, 24, 48, 72 hours, and 7 days following model establishment, brain water content was measured. Histopathological changes in brain tissues were detected using hematoxylin-eosin staining. Expression of nuclear factor- κB, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and complement 3 was examined by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: A total of 150 rats were included in the final analysis with no loss. Brain water content was significantly increased in the ischemic hemisphere of rats from the saline, as

  8. No effect of ablation of surfactant protein-D on acute cerebral infarction in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Østergaard, Kamilla; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm;

    2014-01-01

    -induced increase in TNF mRNA production one day after induction of ischemia; however the TNF response to the ischemic insult was affected at five days. SP-D mRNA was not detected in parenchymal brain cells in either naïve mice or in mice subjected to focal cerebral ischemia. However, SP-D mRNA was detected...... were comparable in SP-D KO and WT mice. CONCLUSIONS: SP-D synthesis in middle cerebral artery cells is consistent with SP-D conceivably leaking into the infarcted area and affecting local cytokine production. However, there was no SP-D synthesis in parenchymal brain cells and ablation of SP-D had...

  9. Cladophialophora bantiana brain abscess masquerading cerebral tuberculoma in an immunocompetent host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Amit

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis is a term that collectively describes fungal infections caused by moulds and yeasts that have brown-pigmented cell walls (due to the presence of melanin. We report a case of 45 year female who had multiple coalescing lesions in the right basal ganglionic and thalamic region. Based on the imaging and investigation findings a diagnosis of cerebral tuberculoma was suspected. Histopathology of the excised specimen showed brown colored fungal hyphae surrounded by neutrophilic infiltrate. A diagnosis of phaeohyphomycosis caused by Cladophialophora bantiana was made and accordingly antifungal treatment was started. Brain abscess caused by Cladophialophora bantiana in an immunocompetent host is relatively uncommon and usually associated with overall high mortality. The best outcomes have been reported in patients who receive both surgical excision of the abscess followed by systemic antifungal therapy. In view of its rarity of these lesions preoperative diagnosis is difficult particularly in an immunocompetent host and absence of other risk factors.

  10. Malignant Neuroleptic Syndrome following Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery of Globus Pallidus Pars Internus in Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Meen Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare but potentially lethal outcome caused by sudden discontinuation or dose reduction of dopaminergic agents. We report an extremely rare case of NMS after deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery in a cerebral palsy (CP patient without the withdrawal of dopaminergic agents. A 19-year-old girl with CP was admitted for DBS due to medically refractory dystonia and rigidity. Dopaminergic agents were not stopped preoperatively. DBS was performed uneventfully under monitored anesthesia. Dopaminergic medication was continued during the postoperative period. She manifested spasticity and muscle rigidity, and was high fever resistant to anti-pyretic drugs at 2 h postoperative. At postoperative 20 h, she suffered cardiac arrest and expired, despite vigorous cardiopulmonary resuscitation. NMS should be considered for hyperthermia and severe spasticity in CP patients after DBS surgery, irrespective of continued dopaminergic medication.

  11. Abscesso cerebral por Nocardia sp em paciente imunossuprimido Brain abscess by Nocardia sp in immunocompromised patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Hueb Barata

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Paciente portadora de anemia hemolítica autoimune e púrpura trombocitopênica idiopática (Síndrome de Evans em uso de terapia imunossupressora (predinisona e azatioprina, desenvolveu quadro de abscesso cerebral não responsivo a 23 dias de terapia antimicrobiana. O diagnóstico de nocardiose foi possível após coleta de material de abscesso peribulbar e observação deste material por período superior há uma semana.Pacient with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenic purpura (Evans Syndrome, treated with immunosuppressive therapy (prednisone and azathioprine developed brain abscess unresponsive to antimicrobial therapy, in spite of its 23 days duration. Diagnosis could be possible after recover secretion of peribulbar abscess and maintenance of this material over seven days in incubation.

  12. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in a patient with posttraumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2012-01-01

    In patients with central nervous system disease, life-threatening hyponatremia can result from either the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) or cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS). Both clinical entities share many similar laboratory and clinical findings, and are characterized by low serum osmolality, inappropriately high urine osmolality, and high urine sodium levels. Despite outward similarities, the pathophysiology and treatment of these two conditions are very different. The former is treated with fluid restriction because of the increased level of free water and its dilutional effect causing hyponatremia, whereas the latter is treated with fluid and sodium resuscitation because of the increased loss of high urinary sodium. We present a 24-year-old man who developed CSWS after traumatic brain injury, showing diagnostic and treatment strategies undertaken in this patient and their impact on the course of CSWS. This case report illustrates the need for clinical awareness of CSWS in patients after head trauma.

  13. Cerebral blood flow and brain shrinkage seen on CT during ACTH therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagi, Y; Abe, J; Kawahigashi, K

    1986-01-01

    By means of the Doppler ultrasound method, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) was assessed in 21 children with epilepsy undergoing treatment with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). The maximum reduction in the internal carotid velocity, as an index of CBF during therapy, was about 35 percent compared with the values before therapy. Furthermore, sequential computed tomography (CT) examinations of the same subjects were performed to evaluate the change in the area of the intracranial brain parenchyma during therapy. The maximum reduction in the parenchymal area during therapy was about 10 percent. This corresponds to a 20 percent reduction in CBF according to Poiseuille's law, however, the remaining reduction in CBF demonstrated by velocity measurement cannot be explained only by that mechanical vascular factor. From these findings, it is concluded that in order to elucidate the mechanism of the CBF reduction, physiological factors such as changes in metabolism during therapy should also be evaluated in addition to the mechanical and physical causes.

  14. Increased cerebral blood flow in MELAS shown by Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, N.J.; Tsay, D.G. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); Liu, R.S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (Taiwan); Li, J.Y.; Kong, K.W. [Division of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); Kwok, C.G.; Strauss, H.W. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    We report cerebral SPECT studies on two siblings with the syndrome of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT was performed 8, 19 and 30 days after a stroke-like episode in one case and 10 days after a stroke-like episode, 6 h after a partial seizure and as a follow-up study in the other. Increased blood flow was seen in both these patients with stroke-like episodes due to MELAS. The cause of the increased blood flow is uncertain, but it may be related to the decreased pH created by local increase in lactic acid. (orig.)

  15. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems in the muscles or nerves. Instead, faulty development or damage to motor areas in the brain disrupt the brain's ability to adequately control movement and posture (United Cerebral Palsy, 2010). "Cerebral" refers to the ...

  16. Clinical significance of brain SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in cerebral palsy with normal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C. H.; Lim, S. Y.; Lee, I. Y.; Kim, O. H.; Bai, M. S.; Kim, S. J.; Yoon, S. N.; Cho, C. W. [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The cerebral palsy(CP) encephalopathies are often of uncertain etiology and various functional image findings comparing with anatomical image findings have been reported. However, only a few have mentioned its clinical implications. The purpose of our report is to compare clinical severity and functional SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in CP patients with normal MRI. Thirty six CP patients with bilateral spastic palsy who had normal MRI and brain SPECT were studied from July 1996 to September 1997. The patients' age at the time of SPECT was 22.84{+-}17.69 months. The patients were divided into two groups according to motor quotient(MQ); moderate defect (>50MQ : n=27 MQ=22.78{+-}10.36), mild defect (<50MQ : n=9, MQ=66.11{+-}13.87). The degree of rCBF decrease between the two groups was evaluated by {chi}{sup 2} test. Brain SPECT was performed following IV administration of 0.05-0.1 mCi/kg (minimum 2.0 mCi) of Tc-99m ECD and chloral hydrate sedation (50-80 mg/kg p.o) using a triple head system (MS 3, Siemens). Interpretation of brain SPECT was visual analysis: severe decrease is defined when the defect is moderate to marked and mild decrease in rCBF as mild. Seven of 36 (19.4%) showed unilateral or bilateral moderate decrease in rCBF in thalami, 20(55.6%) showed mild decrease, and 9(25.0%) showed no decreased rCBF. All 7 who had moderate thalamic defect reveled moderate motor defect clinically. Ten of 36(27.9%) revealed unilateral or bilateral moderate rCBF defect, 23 (63.9%) depicted mild defect, and 3(8.3%) showed no defect. Sixteen with moderate thalamic rCBF defect showed moderate motor defect in 15 patients. There was statistically significant (p=0.02605) relationship between rCBF defect and motor defect in our CP patients. In conclusion, brain SPECT appears sensitive, non-invasive tool in the evaluation as well as in the prognostication of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy patients and deserves further study using larger number of patients.

  17. Brain microvasculature defects and Glut1 deficiency syndrome averted by early repletion of the glucose transporter-1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Maoxue; Gao, Guangping; Rueda, Carlos B; Yu, Hang; Thibodeaux, David N; Awano, Tomoyuki; Engelstad, Kristin M; Sanchez-Quintero, Maria-Jose; Yang, Hong; Li, Fanghua; Li, Huapeng; Su, Qin; Shetler, Kara E; Jones, Lynne; Seo, Ryan; McConathy, Jonathan; Hillman, Elizabeth M; Noebels, Jeffrey L; De Vivo, Darryl C; Monani, Umrao R

    2017-01-20

    Haploinsufficiency of the SLC2A1 gene and paucity of its translated product, the glucose transporter-1 (Glut1) protein, disrupt brain function and cause the neurodevelopmental disorder, Glut1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS). There is little to suggest how reduced Glut1 causes cognitive dysfunction and no optimal treatment for Glut1 DS. We used model mice to demonstrate that low Glut1 protein arrests cerebral angiogenesis, resulting in a profound diminution of the brain microvasculature without compromising the blood-brain barrier. Studies to define the temporal requirements for Glut1 reveal that pre-symptomatic, AAV9-mediated repletion of the protein averts brain microvasculature defects and prevents disease, whereas augmenting the protein late, during adulthood, is devoid of benefit. Still, treatment following symptom onset can be effective; Glut1 repletion in early-symptomatic mutants that have experienced sustained periods of low brain glucose nevertheless restores the cerebral microvasculature and ameliorates disease. Timely Glut1 repletion may thus constitute an effective treatment for Glut1 DS.

  18. Predictive value of brain-specific proteins in serum for neurodevelopmental outcome after birth asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagdyman, Nicole; Grimmer, Ingrid; Scholz, Tristess; Muller, Christian; Obladen, Michael

    2003-08-01

    Brain-specific proteins have been used to detect cerebral injury after birth asphyxia. Previous investigations suggest that serum protein S-100beta, brain-specific creatine kinase (CK-BB), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) are capable of identifying patients with a risk of developing hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Whether detection of elevated serum concentrations of these proteins reflects long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remains to be investigated. We examined serum protein S-100beta, NSE, and CK-BB at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h after birth in 29 asphyxiated infants and 20 control infants. Neurodevelopmental follow-up examinations were performed at 20 mo of age using the German revision of the Griffiths scales for developmental assessment. Elevated concentrations of serum protein S-100beta, NSE, and CK-BB within 24 h after asphyxia did not correlate with long-term neurodevelopmental delay. We conclude that serum protein S-100beta, NSE, and CK-BB, sampled on the first day of life, is of limited value in predicting severe brain damage after birth asphyxia.

  19. Effect of thyrotropin-releasing hormone on cerebral free radical reactions following acute brain injury in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛光明; 顾秀娟; 苏玉林; 万锋; 苏芳忠; 薛德麟

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the early effect of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) on cerebral free radical reactions after acute brain injury in rabbits.Methods: 30 healthy white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: Group A (n=10), Group B (n=12) and Group C (n=8). The rabbits in Group A and Group B were injured by direct hit. At 0.5-4 hours after injury, the rabbits in Group A were injected with TRH (8 mg/kg body weight) through a vein and the rabbits in Group B were injected with normal saline of equal volume. The rabbits in Group C served as the normal control. Then all the rabbits were killed and brain tissues were obtained. The content of lipoperoxide (LPO), the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the water content of the brain tissues were measured.Results: The contents of LPO and water in brain tissues in Group A were lower and the activity of SOD was higher than those of Group B (P<0.05). After injury, intracranial pressure (ICP) rose rapidly and continuously with time passing by. When TRH was given to the animals in Group A, the rising speed of ICP slowed down significantly.Conclusions: TRH can decrease the cerebral free radical reactions and cerebral edema after acute brain injury in rats.

  20. Circulating cerebral S100B protein is associated with depressive symptoms following myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulner, D.M.; Smith, O.R.F.; de Jonge, P.; van Melle, J.P.; Slomp, J.; Storm, H.; Quere, M.; den Boer, J.A.; Honig, A.; Korf, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of depressive symptoms in the post-myocardial infarction (MI) period varies from 8 to 30%. Cerebral damage after MI, caused by transient ischemia, an inflammatory response or both, may contribute to development of post-MI depression. S100B is an established protein marker of c

  1. Altered free radical metabolism in acute mountain sickness: implications for dynamic cerebral autoregulation and blood-brain barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D M; Evans, K A; James, P E

    2008-01-01

    (2)) and following 6 h passive exposure to hypoxia (12% O(2)). Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCAv) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were measured for determination of CA following calculation of transfer function analysis and rate of regulation (RoR). Nine subjects......We tested the hypothesis that dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) function would be compromised in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subsequent to a hypoxia-mediated alteration in systemic free radical metabolism. Eighteen male lowlanders were examined in normoxia (21% O...

  2. 脑梗死大鼠缺血脑组织中 Slit2蛋白的表达及与血管新生的关系%Expression of Slit2 protein in infarction brain tissue and its correlation with angiogenesis in rats with cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海燕; 娄季宇; 白宏英; 曾志磊; 闫莹莹; 乐婷

    2015-01-01

    Aim:To explore the relationship between Slit 2/Robo1 signaling pathway and angiogenesis after ischemia . Methods:Forty-eight male SD rats were randomly allocated into sham operation group and D 1,D3,D7 model groups(n=12).The D1,D3,D7 model groups were to establish cerebral ischemia model by the suture method .Western blot was used to analyze the Slit2 expression in infarction brain tissue and RT-PCR was used to detect the expressions of Robo 1 and VEGF mRNA.Microvessel density ( MVD) was calculated through marking the vessel endothelial cells with CD 105.Results:There were significant differences in the Slit 2 protein, Robo1 and VEGF mRNA expressions ,and MVD among the 4 groups (F=394.528,1 058.653,898.938 and 142.753,P<0.001).The expressions of Slit2 protein, VEGF mRNA and MVD in D1,D3,D7 model groups were higher than that of the sham group , and increased by turn(P<0.05); the Robo1 mRNA expression were increased by turn(P<0.05),but still lower than that of the sham operation operation group .In the 3 model groups, the Slit2 protein expression was positively correlated with VEGF mRNA and MVD (r=0.974,0.926,P<0.001). Conclusion:Slit2/Robo1 signaling pathway may be involved in the process of angiogenesis after focal cerebral ischemia .%目的:探讨Slit2/Robo1信号通路在脑缺血后血管新生中的作用。方法:雄性SD大鼠48只,随机分为假手术组和模型1、3、7天组,每组12只。模型1、3、7天组采用线栓法制备大鼠永久性大脑中动脉缺血模型并分别于造模后第1、3、7天进行指标检测。应用Western blot方法检测缺血脑组织中Slit2蛋白的表达。应用RT-PCR方法检测缺血脑组织中Robo1、血管内皮生长因子(VEGF)mRNA的表达。利用CD105标记新生血管内皮细胞,计数大鼠脑组织中微血管密度( MVD)。结果:4组大鼠缺血脑组织中Slit2蛋白、Robo1和VEGF mRNA的表达及MVD差异有统计学意义(F=394.528、1058.653、898.938和142

  3. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji [Department of Biochemistry, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cailun Road, Shanghai 201203 (China); Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia, E-mail: jialuo888@uky.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific.

  4. Pine pollen inhibits cell apoptosis-related protein expression in the cerebral cortex of mice with arsenic poisoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhong Luo; Yaodong Wei; Taizhong Wang; Dongzhu Chen; Tiansheng Lu; Ruibo Wu; Keke Si

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that pine pollen can inhibit cerebral cortical cell apoptosis in mice with arsenic poisoning. The present study sought to detect the influence of pine pollen on apoptosis-related proteins. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting and enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assays were used to measure the levels of apoptosis-related proteins in the cerebral cortex of mice with arsenic poisoning. Results indicated that pine pollen suppressed cell apoptosis in the cerebral cortex of arsenic-poisoned mice by reducing Bax, Bcl-2 protein expression and increasing p53 protein expression.

  5. Systematization, description and territory of the caudal cerebral artery of the brain in broad-snouted Caiman (Caiman latirostris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygia Almeida

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Thirty heads with the neck segment of Caiman latirostris were used. The animals were provided from a creation center called Mister Caiman, under the authorization of the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (Ibama. Animals were sacrificed according to the slaughtering routine of the abattoir, and the heads were sectioned at the level of the third cervical vertebra. The arterial system was washed with cold saline solution, with drainage through jugular veins. Subsequently, the system was filled with red colored latex injection. Pieces were than fixed in 20% formaldehyde, for seven days. The brains were removed, with a spinal cord segment, the duramater removed and the arteries dissected. At the level of the hypophysis, the internal carotid artery gave off a rostral branch, and a short caudal branch, continuing, naturally, as the caudal cerebral artery. This artery projected laterodorsalwards and, as it overpassed the optic tract, gave off its I (the first central branch. Penetrated in the cerebral transverse fissure, emitting the diencephalic artery and next its II (second central branch. Still inside the fissure, originated occipital hemispheric branches and a pineal branch. Emerged from the cerebral transverse fissure, over the occipital pole of the cerebral hemisphere. Projected rostralwards, sagital to the cerebral longitudinal fissure, as interhemispheric artery. This artery gave off medial and convex hemispheric branches to the respective surfaces of the cerebral hemispheres, anastomosed with its contralateral homologous, forming the common ethmoidal artery. This artery entered the fissure between the olfactory peduncles, emerging ventrally and dividing into ethmoidal arteries, right and left, which progressed towards the nasal cavities, vascularizing them. The territory of the caudal cerebral artery included the most caudal area of the base of the cerebral hemisphere, its convex surface, the olfactory

  6. Effects of endurance exercise on expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein and myelin basic protein in developing rats with maternal infection-induced cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kijeong; Shin, Mal-Soon; Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Young-Pyo

    2014-02-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is a common white matter lesion affecting the neonatal brain. PVL is closely associated with cerebral palsy (CP) and characterized by increase in the number of astrocytes, which can be detected by positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Change in myelin basic protein (MBP) is an early sign of white matter abnormality. Maternal or placental infection can damage the neonatal brain. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill walking exercise on GFAP and MBP expressions in rats with maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PVL. Immunohistochemistry was performed for the detection of GFAP and MBP. The present results showed that intracervical maternal LPS injection during pregnancy increased GFAP expression in the striatum and decreased MBP expression in the corpus callosum of rats. The results also showed that treadmill walking exercise suppressed GFAP expression and enhanced MBP expression in the brains of rats with maternal LPS-induced PVL. The present study revealed that treadmill walking exercise is effective for the suppressing astrogliosis and hypomyelination associated with PVL. Here in this study, we showed that treadmill walking exercise may be effective therapeutic strategy for alleviating the detrimental effects of CP.

  7. Glutathione in Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Biology and Pathobiology: Implications for Brain Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The integrity of the vascular endothelium of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is central to cerebrovascular homeostasis. Given the function of the BBB as a physical and metabolic barrier that buffers the systemic environment, oxidative damage to the endothelial monolayer will have significant deleterious impact on the metabolic, immunological, and neurological functions of the brain. Glutathione (GSH is a ubiquitous major thiol within mammalian cells that plays important roles in antioxidant defense, oxidation-reduction reactions in metabolic pathways, and redox signaling. The existence of distinct GSH pools within the subcellular organelles supports an elegant mode for independent redox regulation of metabolic processes, including those that control cell fate. GSH-dependent homeostatic control of neurovascular function is relatively unexplored. Significantly, GSH regulation of two aspects of endothelial function is paramount to barrier preservation, namely, GSH protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury and GSH control of postdamage cell proliferation in endothelial repair and/or wound healing. This paper highlights our current insights and hypotheses into the role of GSH in cerebral microvascular biology and pathobiology with special focus on endothelial GSH and vascular integrity, oxidative disruption of endothelial barrier function, GSH regulation of endothelial cell proliferation, and the pathological implications of GSH disruption in oxidative stress-associated neurovascular disorders, such as diabetes and stroke.

  8. Morphine enhances the release of /sup 3/H-purines from rat brain cerebral cortical prisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P.H.; Phillis, J.W.; Yuen, H.

    1982-10-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that /sup 3/H-purines can be released from /sup 3/H-adenosine preloaded rat brain cortical prisms by a KCl-evoked depolarization. The KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines is dependent on the concentration of KCl present in the superfusate. At concentrations of 10(-7) approximately 10(-5)M morphine did not influence the basal release of /sup 3/H-purines from the prisms, although it enhanced the KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines. The enhancement of KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by morphine was concentration-dependent and was antagonized by naloxone, suggesting the involvement of opiate receptors. Uptake studies with rat brain cerebral cortical synaptosomes show that morphine is a very weak inhibitor of adenosine uptake. Comparisons with dipyridamole, a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake, suggest that this low level of inhibition of the uptake did not contribute significantly to the release of /sup 3/H-purine by morphine seen in our experiments. It is therefore suggested that morphine enhances KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by an interaction with opiate receptors and that the resultant increase in extracellular purine (adenosine) levels may account for some of the actions of morphine.

  9. Periodic 17β-estradiol pretreatment protects rat brain from cerebral ischemic damage via estrogen receptor-β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami P Raval

    Full Text Available Although chronic 17β-estradiol (E2 has been shown to be a cognition-preserving and neuroprotective agent in animal brain injury models, concern regarding its safety was raised by the failed translation of this phenomenon to the clinic. Previously, we demonstrated that a single bolus of E2 48 hr prior to ischemia protected the hippocampus from damage in ovariectomized rats via phosphorylation of cyclic-AMP response element binding protein, which requires activation of estrogen receptor subtype beta (ER-β. The current study tests the hypothesis that long-term periodic E2-treatment improves cognition and reduces post-ischemic hippocampal injury by means of ER-β activation. Ovariectomized rats were given ten injections of E2 at 48 hr intervals for 21 days. Hippocampal-dependent learning, memory and ischemic neuronal loss were monitored. Results demonstrated that periodic E2 treatments improved spatial learning, memory and ischemic neuronal survival in ovariectomized rats. Additionally, periodic ER-β agonist treatments every 48 hr improved post-ischemic cognition. Silencing of hippocampal ER-β attenuated E2-mediated ischemic protection suggesting that ER-β plays a key role in mediating the beneficial effects of periodic E2 treatments. This study emphasizes the need to investigate a periodic estrogen replacement regimen to reduce cognitive decline and cerebral ischemia incidents/impact in post-menopausal women.

  10. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-β pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-β pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  11. Neural stem cell transplantation in the hippocampus of rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury Activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt pathway and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zhao; Shengtao Yao; Shijun Wang

    2010-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are involved in neurological functional recovery following cerebral ischemia. Therefore, we hypothesized that mechanisms of neuroprotection by transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) on cerebral ischemia contributed to activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway and enhanced BDNF expression. In the present study, Wortmannin (a specific, covalent inhibitor of PI3K) was administered adjacent to ischemic hippocampus by stereotactic transplantation to further confirm the neuroprotective mechanisms of NSC transplantation following cerebral ischemia. Results showed that focal infarct volume was significantly smaller in the NSCs group, but the neurological behavior score in the NSC group was significantly greater than the middle cerebral artery occlusion model group, Wortmannin treatment group, and NSCs + Wortmannin treatment group. Protein expression of RDNF was significantly greater in the NSC group compared with the Wortmannin treatment group and NSCs + Wortmannin treatment group. These results suggest that the neuroprotective role of NSC transplantation in the cerebral ischemia activated the PI3K/Akt pathway and upregulated BDNF expression in lesioned brains.

  12. Initiation of resuscitation with high tidal volumes causes cerebral hemodynamic disturbance, brain inflammation and injury in preterm lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme R Polglase

    Full Text Available AIMS: Preterm infants can be inadvertently exposed to high tidal volumes (V(T in the delivery room, causing lung inflammation and injury, but little is known about their effects on the brain. The aim of this study was to compare an initial 15 min of high V(T resuscitation strategy to a less injurious resuscitation strategy on cerebral haemodynamics, inflammation and injury. METHODS: Preterm lambs at 126 d gestation were surgically instrumented prior to receiving resuscitation with either: 1 High V(T targeting 10-12 mL/kg for the first 15 min (n = 6 or 2 a protective resuscitation strategy (Prot V(T, consisting of prophylactic surfactant, a 20 s sustained inflation and a lower initial V(T (7 mL/kg; n = 6. Both groups were subsequently ventilated with a V(T 7 mL/kg. Blood gases, arterial pressures and carotid blood flows were recorded. Cerebral blood volume and oxygenation were assessed using near infrared spectroscopy. The brain was collected for biochemical and histologic assessment of inflammation, injury, vascular extravasation, hemorrhage and oxidative injury. Unventilated controls (UVC; n = 6 were used for comparison. RESULTS: High V(T lambs had worse oxygenation and required greater ventilatory support than Prot V(T lambs. High V(T resulted in cerebral haemodynamic instability during the initial 15 min, adverse cerebral tissue oxygenation index and cerebral vasoparalysis. While both resuscitation strategies increased lung and brain inflammation and oxidative stress, High V(T resuscitation significantly amplified the effect (p = 0.014 and p<0.001. Vascular extravasation was evident in the brains of 60% of High V(T lambs, but not in UVC or Prot V(T lambs. CONCLUSION: High V(T resulted in greater cerebral haemodynamic instability, increased brain inflammation, oxidative stress and vascular extravasation than a Prot V(T strategy. The initiation of resuscitation targeting Prot V(T may reduce the severity of brain injury in preterm neonates.

  13. Induction of complement proteins in a mouse model for cerebral microvascular Aβ deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFilippis Kelly

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ in cerebral vasculature, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA, is a common pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. In familial forms of CAA single mutations in the Aβ peptide have been linked to the increase of vascular Aβ deposits accompanied by a strong localized activation of glial cells and elevated expression of neuroinflammatory mediators including complement proteins. We have developed human amyloid-β precursor protein transgenic mice harboring two CAA Aβ mutations (Dutch E693Q and Iowa D694N that mimic the prevalent cerebral microvascular Aβ deposition observed in those patients, and the Swedish mutations (K670N/M671L to increase Aβ production. In these Tg-SwDI mice, we have reported predominant fibrillar Aβ along microvessels in the thalamic region and diffuse plaques in cortical region. Concurrently, activated microglia and reactive astrocytes have been detected primarily in association with fibrillar cerebral microvascular Aβ in this model. Here we show that three native complement components in classical and alternative complement pathways, C1q, C3, and C4, are elevated in Tg-SwDI mice in regions rich in fibrillar microvascular Aβ. Immunohistochemical staining of all three proteins was increased in thalamus, hippocampus, and subiculum, but not frontal cortex. Western blot analysis showed significant increases of all three proteins in the thalamic region (with hippocampus as well as the cortical region, except C3 that was below detection level in cortex. Also, in the thalamic region (with hippocampus, C1q and C3 mRNAs were significantly up-regulated. These complement proteins appeared to be expressed largely by activated microglial cells associated with the fibrillar microvascular Aβ deposits. Our findings demonstrate that Tg-SwDI mice exhibit elevated complement protein expression in response to fibrillar vascular Aβ deposition that is

  14. Induction of complement proteins in a mouse model for cerebral microvascular A beta deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong; DeFilippis, Kelly; Van Nostrand, William E

    2007-09-18

    The deposition of amyloid beta-protein (A beta) in cerebral vasculature, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), is a common pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. In familial forms of CAA single mutations in the A beta peptide have been linked to the increase of vascular A beta deposits accompanied by a strong localized activation of glial cells and elevated expression of neuroinflammatory mediators including complement proteins. We have developed human amyloid-beta precursor protein transgenic mice harboring two CAA A beta mutations (Dutch E693Q and Iowa D694N) that mimic the prevalent cerebral microvascular A beta deposition observed in those patients, and the Swedish mutations (K670N/M671L) to increase A beta production. In these Tg-SwDI mice, we have reported predominant fibrillar A beta along microvessels in the thalamic region and diffuse plaques in cortical region. Concurrently, activated microglia and reactive astrocytes have been detected primarily in association with fibrillar cerebral microvascular A beta in this model. Here we show that three native complement components in classical and alternative complement pathways, C1q, C3, and C4, are elevated in Tg-SwDI mice in regions rich in fibrillar microvascular A beta. Immunohistochemical staining of all three proteins was increased in thalamus, hippocampus, and subiculum, but not frontal cortex. Western blot analysis showed significant increases of all three proteins in the thalamic region (with hippocampus) as well as the cortical region, except C3 that was below detection level in cortex. Also, in the thalamic region (with hippocampus), C1q and C3 mRNAs were significantly up-regulated. These complement proteins appeared to be expressed largely by activated microglial cells associated with the fibrillar microvascular A beta deposits. Our findings demonstrate that Tg-SwDI mice exhibit elevated complement protein expression in response to fibrillar vascular A beta deposition

  15. Study of effect of oxygen/glucose-deprived culture on the brain-pancreas relative protein in PC12 cells and the mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-huaLIN; LuTIE; Ai-huaLIU; Xue-junLI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of oxygen/glucose-deprived (OGD)culture on the expression of a novel protein, brain-pancreas relative protein (BPRP), and the possible regulating mechanism in vitro. BPRP was a key protein found in our previous study of cerebral ischemia. METHODS: PC12 cells was selected and exposed to the Eagle's solution containing 1 mmol/L Na2S2O4 for

  16. Cerebral perfusion pressure and risk of brain hypoxia in severe head injury: a prospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Caballos, Antonio J; Murillo-Cabezas, Francisco; Cayuela-Domínguez, Aurelio; Domínguez-Roldán, Jose M; Rincón-Ferrari, M Dolores; Valencia-Anguita, Julio; Flores-Cordero, Juan M; Muñoz-Sánchez, M Angeles

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Higher and lower cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) thresholds have been proposed to improve brain tissue oxygen pressure (PtiO2) and outcome. We study the distribution of hypoxic PtiO2 samples at different CPP thresholds, using prospective multimodality monitoring in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Methods This is a prospective observational study of 22 severely head injured patients admitted to a neurosurgical critical care unit from whom multimodality data was collected during standard management directed at improving intracranial pressure, CPP and PtiO2. Local PtiO2 was continuously measured in uninjured areas and snapshot samples were collected hourly and analyzed in relation to simultaneous CPP. Other variables that influence tissue oxygen availability, mainly arterial oxygen saturation, end tidal carbon dioxide, body temperature and effective hemoglobin, were also monitored to keep them stable in order to avoid non-ischemic hypoxia. Results Our main results indicate that half of PtiO2 samples were at risk of hypoxia (defined by a PtiO2 equal to or less than 15 mmHg) when CPP was below 60 mmHg, and that this percentage decreased to 25% and 10% when CPP was between 60 and 70 mmHg and above 70 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion Our study indicates that the risk of brain tissue hypoxia in severely head injured patients could be really high when CPP is below the normally recommended threshold of 60 mmHg, is still elevated when CPP is slightly over it, but decreases at CPP values above it. PMID:16356218

  17. Differential Temporal Evolution Patterns in Brain Temperature in Different Ischemic Tissues in a Monkey Model of Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain temperature is elevated in acute ischemic stroke, especially in the ischemic penumbra (IP. We attempted to investigate the dynamic evolution of brain temperature in different ischemic regions in a monkey model of middle cerebral artery occlusion. The brain temperature of different ischemic regions was measured with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS, and the evolution processes of brain temperature were compared among different ischemic regions. We found that the normal (baseline brain temperature of the monkey brain was 37.16°C. In the artery occlusion stage, the mean brain temperature of ischemic tissue was 1.16°C higher than the baseline; however, this increase was region dependent, with 1.72°C in the IP, 1.08°C in the infarct core, and 0.62°C in the oligemic region. After recanalization, the brain temperature of the infarct core showed a pattern of an initial decrease accompanied by a subsequent increase. However, the brain temperature of the IP and oligemic region showed a monotonously and slowly decreased pattern. Our study suggests that in vivo measurement of brain temperature could help to identify whether ischemic tissue survives.

  18. Metástase cerebral: tratamento paliativo com radiocirurgia Brain metastasis: palliative treatment with radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio L. Faria

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available O artigo faz avaliação de 52 pacientes com metástase cerebral tratados com radiocirurgia estereotática na Universidade McGill, em Montreal. A radiocirurgia foi realizada com a técnica dinâmica em que, ao mesmo tempo, giram a mesa e a cabeça do acelerador linear de 10 MV. Todos os pacientes (56 tratamentos ao todo foram tratados com um único isocentro e uma dose única mediana de 1800 cGy na periferia da metástase. Em 88% dos casos a radiocirurgia foi usada após falha de tratamento radioterápico fracionado em todo cérebro. Todos os 52 casos tiveram avaliação com CT pós radiocirurgia. O seguimento mediano foi de 6 meses (variou entre 1 e 37 meses e a taxa de resposta, parcial ou completa, foi de 64%. Apenas 4 pacientes (7% tiveram algum tipo de complicação tardia relacionada ao tratamento. Estes achados vão de encontro com dados da literatura. A radiocirurgia é tratamento pouco agressivo, bem tolerado e com alta taxa de resposta para lesões locais e pode ser útil para pacientes selecionados. O seu valor definitivo, como tratamento único ou combinado com radioterapia em todo cérebro, está sendo avaliado de forma prospectiva e randomizada.This is a retrospective review of 52 patients with metastatic brain disease who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery at McGill University in Montreal. The radiosurgical treatment was performed with the dynamic rotation technique in which there is continuous and simultaneous movement of treatment couch and machine gantry of a 10 MV linac. All patients were treated with a single isocenter and a median dose of 1800 cGy was delivered. In 88% of the cases radiosurgery was given after failure from whole brain conventional irradiation. All 52 cases were assessed with brain CT post radiosurgery. The median follow up time was 6 months (range 1 -37 months and the response rate (partial or complete was 64%. Only 4 patientes (7% developed late complications related to the treatment. These findings are

  19. Quantitative evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow by visual stimulation in {sup 99m}Tc- HMPAO brain SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juh, Ra Hyeong; Suh, Tae Suk; Kwark, Chul Eun; Choe, Bo Young; Lee, Hyoung Koo; Chung, Yong An; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Soo Kyo [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of visual activation and quantitative analysis of regional cerebral blood flow. Visual activation was known to increase regional cerebral blood flow in the visual cortex in occipital lobe. We evaluated that change in the distribution of '9{sup 9m}Tc-HMPAO (Hexamethyl propylene amine oxime) to reflect in regional cerebral blood flow. The six volunteers were injected with 925 MBq (mean ages: 26.75 years, n=6, 3men, 3women) underwent MRI and {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT during a rest state with closed eyes and visual stimulated with 8 Hz LED. We delineate the region of interest and calculated the mean count per voxel in each of the fifteen slices to quantitative analysis. The ROI to whole brain ratio and regional index was calculated pixel to pixel subtraction visual non-activation image from visual activation image and constructed brain map using a statistical parameter map(SPM99). The mean regional cerebral blood flow was increased due to visual stimulation. The increase rate of the mean regional cerebral blood flow which of the activation region in primary visual cortex of occipital lobe was 32.50{+-}5.67%. The significant activation sites using a statistical parameter of brain constructed a rendering image and image fusion with SPECT and MRI. Visual activation was revealed significant increase through quantitative analysis in visual cortex. Activation region was certified in Talairach coordinate and primary visual cortex (Ba17),visual association area (Ba18,19) of Brodmann.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow by visual stimulation in {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juh, R. H.; Suh, T. S.; Chung, Y. A. [The Catholic Univ., of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of visual activation and quantitative analysis of regional cerebral blood flow. Visual activation was known to increase regional cerebral blood flow in the visual cortex in occipital lobe. We evaluated that change in the distribution of 99mTc-HMPAO (Hexamethyl propylene amine oxime) to reflect in regional cerebral blood flow. The six volunteers were injected with 925 MBq (mean ages: 26.75 years, n=6, 3men, 3women) underwent MRI and 99mTc- HMPAO SPECT during a rest state with closed eyes and visual stimulated with 8 Hz LED. We delineate the region of interest and calculated the mean count per voxel in each of the fifteen slices to quantitative analysis. The ROI to whole brain ratio and regional index was calculated pixel to pixel subtraction visual non-activation image from visual activation image and constructed brain map using a statistical parameter map (SPM99). The mean regional cerebral blood flow was increased due to visual stimulation. The increase rate of the mean regional cerebral blood flow which of the activation region in primary visual cortex of occipital lobe was 32.50{+-}5.67%. The significant activation sites using a statistical parameter of brain constructed a rendering image and image fusion with SPECT and MRI. Visual activation was revealed significant increase through quantitative analysis in visual cortex. Activation region was certified in Talairach coordinate and primary visual cortex (Ba17),visual association area (Ba18,19) of Brodmann.

  1. Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 Upregulation Precedes the Development of Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Cerebral Edema after Traumatic Brain Injury in Young Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Janet L; Todd, Tracey; Daniels, Zachary; Bazan, Nicolas G; Belayev, Ludmila

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies show that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) plays a pivotal role in development of cerebral edema, a known complication following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and a contributing factor to worsened neurologic recovery. Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is upregulated after cerebral ischemia and is neuroprotective. The significant role of ISG15 after TBI has not been studied. Postnatal Day (PND) 21 and PND24 mice were subjected to lateral closed-skull injury with impact depth of 2.0 or 2.25 mm. Behavior was examined at 7 d using two-object novel recognition and Wire Hang tests. Mice were sacrificed at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 7 d. ISG15 and MLCK were analyzed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry, blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption with Evans Blue (EB), and cerebral edema with wet/dry weights. EB extravasation and edema peaked at 72 h in both ages. PND21 mice had more severe neurological deficits, compared with PND24 mice. PND24 mice showed peak ISG15 expression at 6 h, and PND21 mice at 72 h. MLCK peaked in both age groups at 12 h and co-localized with ISG15 on immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. These studies provide evidence, ISG15 is elevated following TBI in mice, preceding MLCK elevation, development of BBB disruption, and cerebral edema.

  2. Hyperlipidemia affects neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in brains of focal cerebral ischemia rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianji Pei; Liqiang Liu; Jinping Pang; Xiaohong Tian

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperlipidemia, a risk factor for ischemic cerebrovascular disease, may mediate production of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) to induce increased nitric oxide levels, resulting in brain neuronal injury. OBJECTIVE: To investigate effects of hyperlipidemia on brain nNOS expression, and to verify changes in infarct volume and pathology during reperfusion, as well as neuronal injury following ischemia/reperfusion in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Complete, randomized grouping experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Physiology, Shanxi Medical University from March 2005 to March 2006. MATERIALS: A total of 144 eight-week-old, male, Wistar rats, weighing 160-180 g, were selected. A rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion was established by suture method after 4 weeks of formulated diet. Nitric oxide kit and rabbit anti-rat nNOS kit were respectively purchased from Nanjing Jiancheng Bioengineering Institute, China and Wuhan Boster Biological Technology, Ltd., China. METHODS: The rats were equally and randomly divided into high-fat diet and a normal diet groups. Rats in the high-fat diet group were fed a high-fat diet, consisting of 10% egg yolk powder, 5% pork fat, and 0.5% pig bile salt combined with standard chow to create hyperlipidemia. Rats in the normal diet group were fed a standard rat chow. A total of 72 rats in both groups were randomly divided into 6 subgroups: sham-operated, 4-hour ischemia, 4-hour ischemia/2-hour reperfusion, 4-hour ischemia/4-hour reperfusion, 4-hour ischemia/6-hour reperfusion, and 4-hour ischemia/12-hour reperfusion, with 12 rats in each subgroup. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: nNOS expression was measured by immunohistochemistry, and pathomorphology changes were detected by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Infarct volume and nitric oxide levels were respectively measured using 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: In the ischemic region, pathology

  3. Pranlukast reduces neutrophil but not macrophage/microglial accumulation in brain after focal cerebral ischemia in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-sheng CHU; Er-qing WEI; Guo-liang YU; San-hua FANG; Yu ZHOU; Meng-ling WANG; Wei-ping ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To determine whether pranlukast.a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor-1 antagonist,exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on focal cerebral ischemia in mice.Methods:Focal cerebral ischemia in mice was induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion(MCAO).In addition to neurological deficits,infarct volume,degenerated neurons and endogenous IgG exudation,we detected accumulation of neutrophils and macrophage/microglia in the ischemic brain tissue 72 h after MCAO.Pranlukast was iP injected 30 min before and after MCAO.Results:Pranlukast significantly attenuated neurological deficits,infarct volume,neuron degeneration and IgG exudation.Importantly,pranlukast(0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg) inhibited myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophil,but not CDllb-positive macrophage/microglial accumulation in the ischemic cortical tissue.Conclusion:Pranlukast exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on focal cerebral ischemia in the subacute phase that is limited to neutrophil recruitment through the disrupted blood-brain barrier.

  4. Mapping the dynamics of brain perfusion using functional ultrasound in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Clément; Isabel, Clothilde; Martin, Abraham; Dussaux, Clara; Savoye, Anne; Emmrich, Julius; Montaldo, Gabriel; Mas, Jean-Louis; Baron, Jean-Claude; Urban, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Following middle cerebral artery occlusion, tissue outcome ranges from normal to infarcted depending on depth and duration of hypoperfusion as well as occurrence and efficiency of reperfusion. However, the precise time course of these changes in relation to tissue and behavioral outcome remains unsettled. To address these issues, a three-dimensional wide field-of-view and real-time quantitative functional imaging technique able to map perfusion in the rodent brain would be desirable. Here, we applied functional ultrasound imaging, a novel approach to map relative cerebral blood volume without contrast agent, in a rat model of brief proximal transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to assess perfusion in penetrating arterioles and venules acutely and over six days thanks to a thinned-skull preparation. Functional ultrasound imaging efficiently mapped the acute changes in relative cerebral blood volume during occlusion and following reperfusion with high spatial resolution (100 µm), notably documenting marked focal decreases during occlusion, and was able to chart the fine dynamics of tissue reperfusion (rate: one frame/5 s) in the individual rat. No behavioral and only mild post-mortem immunofluorescence changes were observed. Our study suggests functional ultrasound is a particularly well-adapted imaging technique to study cerebral perfusion in acute experimental stroke longitudinally from the hyper-acute up to the chronic stage in the same subject.

  5. Effect of treadmill exercise on 5-HT, 5-HT1A receptor and brain derived neurophic factor in rats after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xiaofang; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Wan; Zheng, Zongju; Wu, Yuan; Zeng, Qian; Liu, Shudong; Liu, Ke; Li, Guangqin

    2014-05-01

    It has been well documented that exercise promotes neurological rehabilitation in patients with cerebral ischemia. However, the exact mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to discuss the effect of treadmill exercise on expression levels of 5-HT, 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) and brain derived neurophic factor (BDNF) in rat brains after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). A total of 55 rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: pMCAO group, pMCAO and treadmill exercise (pMCAO + Ex) group, and sham-operated group. Rats in pMCAO + Ex group underwent treadmill exercise for 16 days. Neurological function was evaluated by modified Neurological Severity Scores (mNSS). High-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection system was used to determine the content of 5-HT in cortex tissues. The protein levels of 5-HT1AR, BDNF and synaptophysin were measured by Western blot. The mNSS in pMCAO + Ex group was lower than that in pMCAO group on day 19 post-MCAO (p exercise (p exercise improves neurologic function, enhances neuronal plasticity and upregulates the levels of 5-HT, 5-HT1AR and BDNF in rats with pMCAO.

  6. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation presenting with steroid-responsive higher brain dysfunction: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeda Yasushi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 56-year-old man noticed discomfort in his left lower limb, followed by convulsion and numbness in the same area. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed white matter lesions in the right parietal lobe accompanied by leptomeningeal or leptomeningeal and cortical post-contrast enhancement along the parietal sulci. The patient also exhibited higher brain dysfunction corresponding with the lesions on MRI. Histological pathology disclosed β-amyloid in the blood vessels and perivascular inflammation, which highlights the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA-related inflammation. Pulse steroid therapy was so effective that clinical and radiological findings immediately improved. CAA-related inflammation is a rare disease, defined by the deposition of amyloid proteins within the leptomeningeal and cortical arteries associated with vasculitis or perivasculitis. Here we report a patient with CAA-related inflammation who showed higher brain dysfunction that improved with steroid therapy. In cases with atypical radiological lesions like our case, cerebral biopsy with histological confirmation remains necessary for an accurate diagnosis.

  7. A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Quistorff, Bjørn; Danielsen, Else R

    2003-01-01

    During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O(2)/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio...... young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AV(O2) from 3.2 +/- 0.1 at rest to 3.5 +/- 0.2 mM (mean +/-s.e.m.; P ...-venous differences (AV) for O(2), glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy...

  8. EMP-induced alterations of tight junction protein expression and disruption of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Gui-Rong; Qiu, Lian-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Li, Kang-Chu; Zhou, Yong-Chun; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Jia-Xing; Li, Yu-Rong; Guo, Guo-Zhen

    2010-07-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical to maintain cerebral homeostasis. In this study, we examined the effects of exposure to electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on the functional integrity of BBB and, on the localization and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins (occludin and ZO-1) in rats. Animals were sham or whole-body exposed to EMP at 200 kV/m for 400 pulses. The permeability of BBB in rat cerebral cortex was examined by using Evans Blue (EB) and lanthanum nitrate as vascular tracers. The localization and expression of TJ proteins were assessed by western blot and immunofluorescence analysis, respectively. The data indicated that EMP exposure caused: (i) increased permeability of BBB, and (ii) altered localization as well as decreased levels of TJ protein ZO-1. These results suggested that the alteration of ZO-1 may play an important role in the disruption of tight junctions, which may lead to dysfunction of BBB after EMP exposure.

  9. Impacts of acute imipramine treatment on plasma and brain amino acid metabolism in mice given graded levels of dietary chicken protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Mao; Murakami, Tatsuro; Tomonaga, Shozo; Sato, Mikako; Takahata, Yoshihisa; Morimatsu, Fumiki; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2012-12-01

    Several studies have shown a relationship between depression and animal protein intake. To evaluate whether the difference of dietary chicken protein levels induces an antidepressant-like effect and potentiates acute antidepressant effects, three levels of dietary chicken protein were used as the representative animal protein with imipramine used as the antidepressant. In addition, the effects of dietary chicken protein on brain metabolism were evaluated. Open field test (OFT) and forced swimming test (FST) were conducted on the 27th and 28th days, respectively. OFT and FST were not influenced by both imipramine and dietary protein levels. However, characteristic effects of imipramine treatment on brain monoamine metabolism were observed in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus. In addition, dietary protein significantly increased taurine and L-ornithine levels even though these amino acids were not contained in the diets. In conclusion, the metabolism of several amino acids in the plasma and brain were altered by dietary chicken protein.

  10. Plasmalemmal Vesicle Associated Protein-1 (PV-1 is a marker of blood-brain barrier disruption in rodent models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zarina S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmalemmal vesicle associated protein-1 (PV-1 is selectively expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from clinical specimens of primary and secondary malignant brain tumors, cerebral ischemia, and other central nervous system (CNS diseases associated with blood-brain barrier breakdown. In this study, we characterize the murine CNS expression pattern of PV-1 to determine whether localized PV-1 induction is conserved across species and disease state. Results We demonstrate that PV-1 is selectively upregulated in mouse blood vessels recruited by brain tumor xenografts at the RNA and protein levels, but is not detected in non-neoplastic brain. Additionally, PV-1 is induced in a mouse model of acute ischemia. Expression is confined to the cerebovasculature within the region of infarct and is temporally regulated. Conclusion Our results confirm that PV-1 is preferentially induced in the endothelium of mouse brain tumors and acute ischemic brain tissue and corresponds to blood-brain barrier disruption in a fashion analogous to human patients. Characterization of PV-1 expression in mouse brain is the first step towards development of rodent models for testing anti-edema and anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategies based on this molecule.

  11. Minocycline effects on cerebral edema: relations with inflammatory and oxidative stress markers following traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsi, Shadi; Federico, Fabiola; Croci, Nicole; Palmier, Bruno; Plotkine, Michel; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Jafarian-Tehrani, Mehrnaz

    2009-09-29

    One of the severe complications following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is cerebral edema and its effective treatment is of great interest to prevent further brain damage. This study investigated the effects of minocycline, known for its anti-inflammatory properties, on cerebral edema and its respective inflammatory markers by comparing different dose regimens, on oxidative stress and on neurological dysfunction following TBI. The weight drop model was used to induce TBI in mice. The brain water content was measured to evaluate cerebral edema. Inflammatory markers were detected by ELISA (IL-1beta), zymography and Western blot (MMP-9). The oxidative stress marker (glutathione levels) and neurological function were measured by Griffith technique and string test, respectively. Minocycline was administered i.p. once (5 min), twice (5 min and 3 h) or triple (5 min, 3 h and 9 h) following TBI. The first dose of minocycline only varied (45 or 90 mg/kg), whereas the following doses were all at 45 mg/kg. The single and double administrations of minocycline reduced the increase of inflammatory markers at 6 h post-TBI. Minocycline also reduced cerebral edema at this time point, only after double administration and at the high dose regimen, although with no effect on the TBI-induced oxidized glutathione increase. The anti-edematous effect of minocycline persisted up to 24 h, upon a triple administration, and accompanied by a neurological recovery. In conclusion, we reported an anti-edematous effect of minocycline after TBI in mice according to a specific treatment regimen. These findings emphasize that the beneficial effects of minocycline depend on the treatment regimen following a brain injury.

  12. Correlation of aquaporin-4 expression to blood-brain barrier permeability in rats with focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengcheng Xu; Haorong Feng; Jinbu Xu; Yongping Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemic cerebrovascular disease causes injury to the blood-brain barrier. The occurrence of brain edema is associated with aquaporin expression following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the correlation of aquaporin-4 expression to brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability in brain tissues of rat models of ischemia/reperfusion. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The randomized control experiment was performed at the Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Anesthesiology, Xuzhou Medical College, China from December 2006 to October 2007. MATERIALS: A total of 112 adult, male, Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 220-250 g, were used to establish rat models of middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion by the suture method. Rabbit anti-aquaporin-4 (Santa Cruz, USA) and Evans blue (Sigma, USA) were used to analyze the tissue. METHODS: The rats were randomized into sham-operated (n = 16) and ischemia/reperfusion (n = 96) groups. There were 6 time points in the ischemia/reperfusion group, comprising 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after reperfusion, with 16 rats for each time point. Rat models in the sham-operated group at 4 hours after surgery and rat models in the ischemia/reperfusion group at different time points were equally and randomly assigned into 4 different subgroups. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Brain water content on the ischemic side and the control side was measured using the dry-wet weight method. Blood-brain barrier function was determined by Evans Blue. Aquaporin-4 expression surrounding the ischemic focus, as well as the correlation of aquaporin-4 expression with brain water content and Evans blue staining, were measured using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Brain water content on the ischemic side significantly increased at 12 hours after reperfusion, reached a peak at 48 hours, and was still high at 72 hours. Brain water content was greater on the ischemic hemispheres, compared with the control hemispheres

  13. Low distribution of synaptic vesicle protein 2A and synaptotagimin-1 in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of spontaneously epileptic rats exhibiting both tonic convulsion and absence seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaya, R; Hosoyama, H; Sugata, S; Tokudome, M; Hirano, H; Tokimura, H; Kurisu, K; Serikawa, T; Sasa, M; Arita, K

    2012-09-27

    The spontaneously epileptic rat (SER) is a double mutant (zi/zi, tm/tm) which begins to exhibit tonic convulsions and absence seizures after 6 weeks of age, and repetitive tonic seizures over time induce sclerosis-like changes in SER hippocampus with high brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Levetiracetam, which binds to synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A), inhibited both tonic convulsions and absence seizures in SERs. We studied SER brains histologically and immunohistochemically after verification by electroencephalography (EEG), as SERs exhibit seizure-related alterations in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. SERs did not show interictal abnormal spikes and slow waves typical of focal epilepsy or symptomatic generalized epilepsy. The difference in neuronal density of the cerebral cortex was insignificant between SER and Wistar rats, and apoptotic neurons did not appear in SERs. BDNF distributions portrayed higher values in the entorhinal and piriform cortices which would relate with hippocampal sclerosis-like changes. Similar synaptophysin expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was found in both animals. Low and diffuse SV2A distribution portrayed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of SERs was significantly less than that of all cerebral lobes and inner molecular layer (IML) of the dentate gyrus (DG) of Wistar rats. The extent of low SV2A expression/distribution in SERs was particularly remarkable in the frontal (51% of control) and entorhinal cortices (47%). Lower synaptotagmin-1 expression (vs Wistar rats) was located in the frontal (31%), piriform (13%) and entorhinal (39%) cortices, and IML of the DG (38%) in SER. Focal low distribution of synaptotagmin-1 accompanying low SV2A expression may contribute to epileptogenesis and seizure propagation in SER.

  14. Blood-brain barrier permeability is positively correlated with cerebral microvascular perfusion in the early fluid percussion-injured brain of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong; Pan, Yaohua; Wang, Mingliang; Huang, Xianjian; Yin, Yuhua; Wang, Yu; Jia, Feng; Xiong, Wenhao; Zhang, Nu; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2012-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening following traumatic brain injury (TBI) provides a chance for therapeutic agents to cross the barrier, yet the reduction of the cerebral microvascular perfusion after TBI may limit the intervention. Meanwhile, optimizing the cerebral capillary perfusion by the strategies such as fluid administration may cause brain edema due to the BBB opening post trauma. To guide the TBI therapy, we characterized the relationship between the changes in the cerebral capillary perfusion and BBB permeability after TBI. First, we observed the changes of the cerebral capillary perfusion by the intracardiac perfusion of Evans Blue and the BBB disruption with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the rat subjected to lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury. The correlation between two variables was next evaluated with the correlation analysis. Since related to BBB breakdown, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity was finally detected by gelatin zymography. We found that the ratios of the perfused microvessel numbers in the lesioned cortices were significantly reduced at 0 and 1 h post trauma compared with that in the normal cortex, which then dramatically recovered at 4 and 24 h after injury, and that the BBB permeability was greatly augmented in the ipsilateral parts at 4, 12, and 24 h, and in the contralateral area at 24 h after injury compared with that in the uninjured brain. The correlation analysis showed that the BBB permeability increase was related to the restoration of the cerebral capillary perfusion over a 24-h period post trauma. Moreover, the gelatin zymography analysis indicated that the MMP-9 activity in the injured brain increased at 4 h and significantly elevated at 12 and 24 h as compared to that at 0 or 1 h after TBI. Our findings demonstrate that the 4 h post trauma is a critical turning point during the development of TBI, and, importantly, the correlation analysis may guide us how to treat TBI.

  15. Dose reduction in dynamic perfusion CT of the brain: effects of the scan frequency on measurements of cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and mean transit time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesmann, Martin [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Muenchen (Germany); Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen - Grosshadern, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Berg, Scott; Stoeckelhuber, B.M. [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiology, Luebeck (Germany); Bohner, G.; Klingebiel, R. [University Medicine Berlin, Department of Neuroradiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Schoepf, V.; Yousry, I.; Linn, J. [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Muenchen (Germany); Missler, U. [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duisburg-Nord, Department of Neuroradiology, Duisburg (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    The influence of the frequency of computed tomography (CT) image acquistion on the diagnostic quality of dynamic perfusion CT (PCT) studies of the brain was investigated. Eight patients with clinically suspected acute ischemia of one hemisphere underwent PCT, performed on average 3.4 h after the onset of symptoms. Sixty consecutive images per slice were obtained with individual CT images obtained at a temporal resolution of two images per second. Eight additional data sets were reconstructed with temporal resolutions ranging from one image per second to one image per 5 s. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) measurements were performed in identical regions of interest. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the PCT images visually to identify areas of abnormal perfusion. Perfusion images created up to a temporal resolution of one image per 3 s were rated to be diagnostically equal to the original data. Even at one image per 4 s, all areas of infarction were identified. Quantitative differences of CBF, CBV and MTT measurements were {<=}10% up to one image per 3 s. For PCT of the brain, temporal resolution can be reduced to one image per 3 s without significant compromise in image quality. This significantly reduces the radiation dose of the patient. (orig.)

  16. Annona muricata modulate brain-CXCL10 expression during cerebral malaria phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djamiatun, Kis; Matug, Sumia M. A.; Prasetyo, Awal; Wijayahadi, Noor; Nugroho, Djoko

    2017-02-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) contributes in malaria mortality. People in endemic region get benefices by using A. muricata-leaf extract (AME) before qualified for receiving standard anti-malaria, because AME restrains malaria infection and modulate immune responses. CXCL10 expressed by astrocytes limit brain inflammation. Vascular leakage was found in the brain of experimental CM. Additionally, biomarker related with vascular leakage, angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) levels increase in CM-patients. Objectives of this study were to determine the efficacy of ethanolic-AME in regulating brain-CXCL10-expression and Ang-2 levels during CM-phase. The study was post-test-only-control-group design. Thirty Swiss-mice were randomly divided in 6 groups. C+ and C- groups were PbA-inoculated and healthy-mice, respectively. X1 and X2 groups were healthy-mice treated with AME 100 and 150 mg/Kg BW/day, respectively. X3 and X4 groups were PbA-inoculated and received either dose mentioned above. CXCL10 was stained by IHC, and determined by Allred score. Plasma-Ang-2 was measured by elisa-method. Kruskal-Wallis-test showed the difference of CXCL10-expression among the studied groups (p=0.003). CXCL10-expression of C+ group was lower than healthy-mice which were C-, X1 and X2 groups (p=0.008, p=0.045, and p=0.012). CXCL10-expression of X3 was comparable to healthy mice (C-, X1 and X2), and was higher than C+ and X4 groups (p=0.012 and p=0.028). CXCL10-expression of X4 group was lower than C- and X2 groups (p=0.011 and p=0.016). Kruskal-Wallis-test showed no difference of Ang-2-levels among 6 groups (p = 0.175). The conclusion is A. muricata influences brain-CXCL10 expression during CM phase, but has no association with Ang-2 levels during CM phase.

  17. Cerebral glucose metabolism in long-term survivors of childhood primary brain tumors treated with surgery and radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Preben B.; Krabbe, Katja; Leffers, Anne M.;

    2003-01-01

    Delayed structural cerebral sequelae has been reported following cranial radiation therapy (CRT) to children with primary brain tumors, but little is known about potential functional changes. Twenty-four patients were included, diagnosed and treated at a median age of 11 years, and examined after...... that there is a general reduction in rCMRglc in long-term recurrence free survivors of childhood primary brain tumors treated with CRT in high doses (44-56 Gy)......Delayed structural cerebral sequelae has been reported following cranial radiation therapy (CRT) to children with primary brain tumors, but little is known about potential functional changes. Twenty-four patients were included, diagnosed and treated at a median age of 11 years, and examined after...... a median recurrence free survival of 16 years by MRI and Positron Emission Tomography using the glucose analog 2-18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG). Three patients were not analyzed further due to diffuse cerebral atrophy, which might be related to previous hydrocephalus. Twenty-one patients were...

  18. Lack of functional P2X7 receptor aggravates brain edema development after middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Melanie; Penk, Anja; Franke, Heike; Krügel, Ute; Nörenberg, Wolfgang; Huster, Daniel; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Effective therapeutic measures against the development of brain edema, a life-threatening complication of cerebral ischemia, are necessary to improve the functional outcome for the patient. Here, we identified a beneficial role of purinergic receptor P2X7 activation in acute ischemic stroke. Involvement of P2X7 in the development of neurological deficits, infarct size, brain edema, and glial responses after ischemic cerebral infarction has been analyzed. Neurologic evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging, and immunofluorescence assays were used to characterize the receptor's effect on the disease progress during 72 h after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Sham-operated animals were included in all experiments for control purposes. We found P2X7-deficient mice to develop a more prominent brain edema with a trend towards more severe neurological deficits 24 h after tMCAO. Infarct sizes, T2 times, and apparent diffusion coefficients did not differ significantly between wild-type and P2X7(-/-) animals. Our results show a characteristic spatial distribution of reactive glia cells with strongly attenuated microglia activation in P2X7(-/-) mice 72 h after tMCAO. Our data indicate that P2X7 exerts a role in limiting the early edema formation, possibly by modulating glial responses, and supports later microglia activation.

  19. Brain edema and tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis in rats with cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renlan Zhou; Peng Xie

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) participates in brain edema. However, it is unclear whether blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is associated with TWEAK during the process of brain edema OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of TWEAK on BBB permeability in brain edema.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An immunohistochemical observation, randomized, controlled animal experiment was pertbrmed at the Laboratory of Neurosurgical Anatomy, Xiangya Medical College, Central South University & Central Laboratory, Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University between January 2006 and December 2007.MATERIALS: A total of 48 adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal control (n =8), sham-operated (n = 8), and ischemia/reperfusion (n = 32). Rats from the ischemia/reperfusion group were randomly assigned to four subgroups according to different time points, i.e., 2 hours of ischemia followed by 6 hours (n = 8), 12 hours {n = 8), 1 day (n = 8), or 12 days (n = 8) of reperfusion.METHODS: Focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) using the suture method in rats from the ischemia/reperfusion group. Thread was introduced at a depth of 17-19 mm. Rats in the sham-operated group were subjected to experimental procedures similar to the ischemia/reperfusion group; however, the introducing depth of thread was 10 mm. The normal control group was not given any intervention.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: TWEAK expression was examined by immunohistochemistry; brain water content on the ischemic side was calculated as the ratio of dry to wet tissue weight; BBB permeability was measured by Evans blue extravasation.RESULTS: A total of eight rats died prior to and after surgery and an additional eight rats were randomly entered into the study. Thus 48 rats were included in the final analysis. In the ischemia/reperfusion group,TWEAK-positive cells were

  20. Normal cerebral perfusion of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPECT. Evaluation by an anatomical standardization technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Ryuta; Koyama, Masamichi; Ito, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Seiro; Sato, Kazunori; Ono, Shuichi; Goto, Ryoi; Sato, Tachio; Fukuda, Hiroshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer

    1996-01-01

    A single photon emitter labeled tracer, {sup 99m}Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD), has now been used for rCBF studies with SPECT. However, normal distribution pattern of this agent in the brain still remains unclear. Therefore, the specific purpose of this study was to investigate the normal distribution pattern of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPECT image. Regional cerebral distribution was measured with SPECT and 984{+-}17 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD in ten normal subjects. During the SPECT measurement, subjects were placed comfortably in a supine position with their eyes closed. Each SPECT image was anatomically standardized using a computerized brain atlas system of Roland et al. (HBA: Human Brain Atlas) and X-CT image. Anatomically standardized SPECT images were globally normalized to 100 count/voxel. Then, the mean and SD images of brain SPECT were calculated voxel-by-voxel basis. The highest radioactivity was found in the medial aspect of the occipital lobe. The results indicate that the normal distribution pattern of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD in the human brain may be not simply reflect the regional cerebral blood flow. (author).

  1. Human apolipoprotein E ɛ4 expression impairs cerebral vascularization and blood–brain barrier function in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alata, Wael; Ye, Yue; St-Amour, Isabelle; Vandal, Milène; Calon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (APOE) exists in three isoforms ɛ2, ɛ3, and ɛ4, of which APOE4 is the main genetic risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As cerebrovascular defects are associated with AD, we tested whether APOE genotype has an impact on the integrity and function of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in human APOE-targeted replacement mice. Using the quantitative in situ brain perfusion technique, we first found lower (13.0% and 17.0%) brain transport coefficient (Clup) of [3H]-diazepam in APOE4 mice at 4 and 12 months, compared with APOE2 and APOE3 mice, reflecting a decrease in cerebral vascularization. Accordingly, results from immunohistofluorescence experiments revealed a structurally reduced cerebral vascularization (26% and 38%) and thinner basement membranes (30% and 35%) in 12-month-old APOE4 mice compared with APOE2 and APOE3 mice, suggesting vascular atrophy. In addition, APOE4 mice displayed a 29% reduction in [3H]-d-glucose transport through the BBB compared with APOE2 mice without significant changes in the expression of its transporter GLUT1 in brain capillaries. However, an increase of 41.3% of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) was found in brain capillaries of 12-month-old APOE4 mice. In conclusion, profound divergences were observed between APOE genotypes at the cerebrovascular interface, suggesting that APOE4-induced BBB anomalies may contribute to AD development. PMID:25335802

  2. Human apolipoprotein E ɛ4 expression impairs cerebral vascularization and blood-brain barrier function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alata, Wael; Ye, Yue; St-Amour, Isabelle; Vandal, Milène; Calon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (APOE) exists in three isoforms ɛ2, ɛ3, and ɛ4, of which APOE4 is the main genetic risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As cerebrovascular defects are associated with AD, we tested whether APOE genotype has an impact on the integrity and function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in human APOE-targeted replacement mice. Using the quantitative in situ brain perfusion technique, we first found lower (13.0% and 17.0%) brain transport coefficient (Clup) of [(3)H]-diazepam in APOE4 mice at 4 and 12 months, compared with APOE2 and APOE3 mice, reflecting a decrease in cerebral vascularization. Accordingly, results from immunohistofluorescence experiments revealed a structurally reduced cerebral vascularization (26% and 38%) and thinner basement membranes (30% and 35%) in 12-month-old APOE4 mice compared with APOE2 and APOE3 mice, suggesting vascular atrophy. In addition, APOE4 mice displayed a 29% reduction in [(3)H]-d-glucose transport through the BBB compared with APOE2 mice without significant changes in the expression of its transporter GLUT1 in brain capillaries. However, an increase of 41.3% of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) was found in brain capillaries of 12-month-old APOE4 mice. In conclusion, profound divergences were observed between APOE genotypes at the cerebrovascular interface, suggesting that APOE4-induced BBB anomalies may contribute to AD development.

  3. Multivariate evaluation of brain function by measuring regional cerebral blood flow and event-related potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Yoshihiko; Mochida, Masahiko; Shutara, Yoshikazu; Nakagawa, Kazumi [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Nagata, Ken

    1998-07-01

    To measure the effect of events on human cognitive function, effects of odors by measurement regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and P300 were evaluated during the auditory odd-ball exercise. PET showed the increase in rCBF on the right hemisphere of the brain by coffee aroma. rCBF was measured by PET in 9 of right-handed healthy adults men, and P300 was by event-related potential (ERP) in each sex of 20 right-handed healthy adults. ERP showed the difference of the P300 amplitude between men and women, and showed the tendency, by odors except the lavender oil, that women had higher in the P300 amplitude than men. These results suggest the presence of effects on the cognitive function through emotional actions. Next, the relationship between rCBF and ERP were evaluated. The subjects were 9 of the right-handed healthy adults (average: 25.6{+-}3.4 years old). rCBF by PET and P300 amplitude by ERP were simultaneously recorded during the auditory odd-ball exercise using the tone-burst method (2 kHz of the low frequency aimed stimuli and 1 kHz of the high frequency non-aimed stimuli). The rCBF value was the highest at the transverse gyrus of Heschl and the lowest at the piriform cortex among 24 regions of interest (ROI) from both sides. The difference of P300 peak latent time among ROI was almost the same. The brain waves from Cz and Pz were similar and the average amplitude was highest at Pz. We found the high correlation in the right piriform cortex (Fz), and right (Fz, Cz) and left (Cz, Pz) transverse gyrus of Heschl between the P300 amplitude and rCBF. (K.H.)

  4. Predictors of malignant brain edema in middle cerebral artery infarction observed on CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoon; Jin, Seon Tak; Kim, Young Woo; Kim, Seong Rim; Park, Ik Seong; Jo, Kwang Wook

    2015-03-01

    Patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction accompanied by MCA occlusion with or without internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion have a poor prognosis, as a result of brain cell damage caused by both the infarction and by space-occupying and life-threatening edema formation. Multiple treatments can reduce the likelihood of edema formation, but tend to show limited efficacy. Decompressive hemicraniectomy with duroplasty has been promising for improving functional outcomes and reducing mortality, particularly improved functional outcomes can be achieved with early decompressive surgery. Therefore, identifying patients at risk for developing fatal edema is important and should be performed as early as possible. Sixty-four patients diagnosed with major MCA infarction with MCA occlusion within 8 hours of symptom onset were retrospectively reviewed. Early clinical, laboratory, and computed tomography angiography (CTA) parameters were analyzed for malignant brain edema (MBE). Twenty of the 64 patients (31%) had MBE, and the clinical outcome was poor (3month modified Rankin Scale >2) in 95% of them. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score, Clot Burden Score, and Collateral Score (CS) showed statically significant differences in both groups. Multivariable analyses adjusted for age and sex identified the independent predictors of MBE: NIHSS score >18 (odds ratio [OR]: 4.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-16.0, p=0.023) and CS on CTA <2 (OR: 7.28, 95% CI: 1.7-30.3,p=0.006). Our results provide useful information for selecting patients in need of aggressive treatment such as decompressive surgery.

  5. The expression of the Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (ceramide transporter) in adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencarelli, Chiara; Hammels, Caroline; Van Den Broeck, Joost; Losen, Mario; Steinbusch, Hellen; Revert, Francisco; Saus, Juan; Hopkins, David A; De Baets, Marc H; Steinbusch, Harry W; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2009-10-01

    The Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP) plays a critical role in brain development. Knockdown of GPBP leads to loss of myelinated tracts in the central nervous system and to extensive apoptosis in the brain during early embryogenesis. GPBP was initially identified as a protein associated with the autoantigen in Goodpasture autoimmune syndrome, where it was shown to be a kinase that regulates type IV collagen organization. GPBP isoforms bind and transport ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus and are therefore also known as ceramide transporters (CERT). Ceramide dysregulation is involved in autoimmunity and neurodegenerative disorders. In order to analyze the possible role of GPBP in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration we studied the basal GPBP expression in normal rat brain. High levels of immunoreactivity were detected in neurons of the cerebral cortex, hippocampal formation, the basal ganglia, the olfactory bulb and nuclei of the thalamus, the hypothalamus and the septal area. Lower expression levels of GPBP were observed widely throughout the brain, suggesting that GPBP plays an important role in central nervous system neuron function.

  6. Significant proteins affecting cerebral vasospasm using complementary ICPMS and MALDI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Renee N; Barry, Colin G; Pyne-Geithman, Gail; Caruso, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) following subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke affects more than one million people each year. The etiology and prevention of CV is currently of great interest to researchers in various fields of medical science. More recently, the idea that selenium could be playing a major role in the onset of cerebral vasospasm has come into the spotlight. This study focused on using newly established metallomics techniques in order to explore the proteome associated with CV and if selenium might affect the discovered proteins. Size exclusion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, along with LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF were both essential in determining protein identifications in three different sample types; a control (normal, healthy patient, CSF control), SAH stroke patients (no vasospasm, CSF C) and SAH CV patients (CSF V). The results of this study, although preliminary, indicate the current methods are applicable and warrant further application to these clinically important targets.

  7. A comparative study: use of a Brain-computer Interface (BCI device by people with cerebral palsy in interaction with computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina O. Heidrich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This article presents a comparative study among people with cerebral palsy and healthy controls, of various ages, using a Brain-computer Interface (BCI device. The research is qualitative in its approach. Researchers worked with Observational Case Studies. People with cerebral palsy and healthy controls were evaluated in Portugal and in Brazil. The study aimed to develop a study for product evaluation in order to perceive whether people with cerebral palsy could interact with the computer and compare whether their performance is similar to that of healthy controls when using the Brain-computer Interface. Ultimately, it was found that there are no significant differences between people with cerebral palsy in the two countries, as well as between populations without cerebral palsy (healthy controls.

  8. Theobromine up-regulates cerebral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and facilitates motor learning in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Mitsugu; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Katakura, Masanori; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Tanigami, Hayate; Yachie, Akihiro; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako; Shido, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Theobromine, which is a caffeine derivative, is the primary methylxanthine produced by Theobroma cacao. Theobromine works as a phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor to increase intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). cAMP activates the cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), which is involved in a large variety of brain processes, including the induction of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF supports cell survival and neuronal functions, including learning and memory. Thus, cAMP/CREB/BDNF pathways play an important role in learning and memory. Here, we investigated whether orally administered theobromine could act as a PDE inhibitor centrally and affect cAMP/CREB/BDNF pathways and learning behavior in mice. The mice were divided into two groups. The control group (CN) was fed a normal diet, whereas the theobromine group (TB) was fed a diet supplemented with 0.05% theobromine for 30 days. We measured the levels of theobromine, phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (p-VASP), phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB), and BDNF in the brain. p-VASP was used as an index of cAMP increases. Moreover, we analyzed the performance of the mice on a three-lever motor learning task. Theobromine was detectable in the brains of TB mice. The brain levels of p-VASP, p-CREB, and BDNF were higher in the TB mice compared with those in the CN mice. In addition, the TB mice performed better on the three-lever task than the CN mice did. These results strongly suggested that orally administered theobromine acted as a PDE inhibitor in the brain, and it augmented the cAMP/CREB/BDNF pathways and motor learning in mice.

  9. Cerebral blood volume affects blood–brain barrier integrity in an acute transient stroke model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuning; Kim, Jeong Kon; Atochin, Dmitriy N; Farrar, Christian T; Huang, Paul L; Suh, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Seon Joo; Shim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Hyungjoon; Cho, Gyunggoo; Kim, Young Ro

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient vascular reserve after an ischemic stroke may induce biochemical cascades that subsequently deteriorate the blood–brain barrier (BBB) function. However, the direct relationship between poor cerebral blood volume (CBV) restoration and BBB disruption has not been examined in acute stroke. To quantify BBB integrity at acute stages of transient stroke, in particular for cases in which extravasation of the standard contrast agent (Gd-DTPA) is not observed, we adopted the water exchange index (WEI), a novel magnetic resonance image-derived parameter to estimate the water permeability across the BBB. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and R2 relaxation rate constant were also measured for outlining the tissue abnormality, while fractional CBV and WEI were quantified for assessing vascular alterations. The significantly decreased ADC and R2 in the ischemic cortices did not correlate with the changes in CBV or WEI. In contrast, a strong negative correlation between the ipsilesional WEI and CBV was found, in which stroke mice were clustered into two groups: (1) high WEI and low CBV and (2) normal WEI and CBV. The low CBV observed for mice with a disrupted BBB, characterized by a high WEI, indicates the importance of CBV restoration for maintaining BBB stability in acute stroke. PMID:23462571

  10. Translation of near infrared brain imaging to assess children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, George; Khan, Bilal; Tian, Fenghua; Asanani, Nayan; Behbehani, Khosrow; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Liu, Hanli

    2009-02-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disorder of central origin in childhood and affects at least 2 children per 1000 live births every year. Neuroimaging techniques are needed to study neuroplastic rearrangements in the human brain in vivo as a result of CP. Unfortunately, accurate imaging from currently available techniques often requires the patients' complete body confinement, steadiness and minimal noise for a long period of time, which limits the success rate to less than 50% for normal children and worse for CP-affected ones. In this work we show that functional near infrared (fNIR) imaging is robust to motion artifacts and has excellent potential as a sensitive diagnostic tool for this motor disorder. We have analyzed data from pediatric normal and CP patients performing finger-tapping and handwaving motor cortex activation tasks. From these analyses we have identified both spatial and temporal metrics of NIR-based motor cortex activation patterns that can clearly distinguish between normal and CP patients. We also present data from additional patients where signal processing methods are applied to filter out concurrently recorded hemodynamic signals due to breathing and cardiac pulsation. It is shown that filtering can substantially improve the quality of activation data, thus enabling more accurate comparison of activation patterns between normal and CP-affected children.

  11. Cerebral salt wasting after traumatic brain injury: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jan; Garrett, Raymond E; Salottolo, Kristin; Slone, Denetta S; Mains, Charles W; Carrick, Matthew M; Bar-Or, David

    2015-11-11

    Electrolyte imbalances are common among patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) is an electrolyte imbalance characterized by hyponatremia and hypovolemia. Differentiating the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone and CSW remains difficult and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying CSW are unclear. Our intent was to review the literature on CSW within the TBI population, in order to report the incidence and timing of CSW after TBI, examine outcomes, and summarize the biochemical changes in patients who developed CSW. We searched MEDLINE through 2014, hand-reviewed citations, and searched abstracts from the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (2003-2014). Publications were included if they were conducted within a TBI population, presented original data, and diagnosed CSW. Publications were excluded if they were review articles, discussed hyponatremia but did not differentiate the etiology causing hyponatremia, or presented cases with chronic disease. Fifteen of the 47 publications reviewed met the selection criteria; nine (60%) were case reports, five (33%) were prospective and 1 (7%) was a retrospective study. Incidence of CSW varied between 0.8 - 34.6%. The populations studied were heterogeneous and the criteria used to define hyponatremia and CSW varied. Though believed to play a role in the development of CSW, increased levels of natriuretic peptides in patients diagnosed with CSW were not consistently reported. These findings reinforce the elusiveness of the CSW diagnosis and the need for strict and consistent diagnostic criteria.

  12. Evaluation of a collaborative wheelchair system in cerebral palsy and traumatic brain injury users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Burdet, Etienne; Teo, Chee Leong

    2009-06-01

    This article describes the evaluation of the Collaborative Wheelchair Assistant (CWA), a robotic wheelchair that lets the user control the speed and provides guiding assistance along virtual paths programmed in software. Three people with cerebral palsy and 2 with traumatic brain injury, who had been ruled out as candidates for independent mobility, were recruited. These subjects were first trained to use the CWA with and without path guidance before completing a navigation task. All subjects were able, after a few training sessions, to drive the wheelchair with path guidance safely and efficiently in an environment with obstacles and narrow passageways. The CWA enabled the subjects to drastically reduce their effort and intervention level without compromising performance. The results suggest that the CWA can provide driving assistance adapted to various disabilities. It could be used as a safe mobility device for some subjects who could eventually control a normal powered wheelchair after training and provide a way to increase the mobility of subjects with larger motor control or cognitive deficiencies.

  13. Protective effects of inhibition of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase activity against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    补娟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of inhibition of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) on shape,function and inflammatory factor of microglia for mice after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion

  14. A study of brain protection during total arch replacement comparing antegrade cerebral perfusion versus hypothermic circulatory arrest, with or without retrograde cerebral perfusion: analysis based on the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Yutaka; Miyata, Hiroaki; Motomura, Noboru; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2015-02-01

    Antegrade cerebral perfusion and hypothermic circulatory arrest, with or without retrograde cerebral perfusion, are 2 major types of brain protection that are used during aortic arch surgery. We conducted a comparative study of these methods in patients undergoing total arch replacement to evaluate the clinical outcomes in Japan, based on the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database. A total of 16,218 patients underwent total arch replacement between 2009 and 2012. Patients with acute aortic dissection or ruptured aneurysm, or who underwent emergency surgery were excluded, leaving 8169 patients for analysis. For the brain protection method, 7038 patients had antegrade cerebral perfusion and 1141 patients had hypothermic circulatory arrest/retrograde cerebral perfusion. A nonmatched comparison was made between the 2 groups, and propensity score analysis was performed among 1141 patients. The matched paired analysis showed that the minimum rectal temperature was lower in the hypothermic circulatory arrest/retrograde cerebral perfusion group (21.2°C ± 3.7°C vs 24.2°C ± 3.2°C) and that the duration of cardiopulmonary bypass and cardiac ischemia was longer in the antegrade cerebral perfusion group. There were no significant differences between the antegrade cerebral perfusion and hypothermic circulatory arrest/retrograde cerebral perfusion groups with regard to 30-day mortality (3.2% vs 4.0%), hospital mortality (6.0% vs 7.1%), incidence of stroke (6.7% vs 8.6%), or transient neurologic disorder (4.1% vs 4.4%). There was no difference in a composite outcome of hospital death, bleeding, prolonged ventilation, need for dialysis, stroke, and infection (antegrade cerebral perfusion 28.4% vs hypothermic circulatory arrest 30.1%). However, hypothermic circulatory arrest/retrograde cerebral perfusion resulted in a significantly higher rate of prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (>8 days: 24.2% vs 15.6%). Hypothermic circulatory arrest/retrograde cerebral

  15. Immunohistochemical Detection of Apoptosis-Related Proteins in Gerbil Hippocampus Transient Cerebral Ischemia: Neuroprotective Effect of Pitavastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Himeda

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed and selective neuronal damage was caused in the CA1 sector of hippocampus following 5 min of transient cerebral ischemia in gerbils. We investigated the immunohistochemical alterations of apoptosis-related proteins such as bcl-2α, bcl-xs/l, bax, cytochrome c, and active caspase 3 and TUNEL staining in the hippocampus at 1 and 5 hr and 1, 2, 5 and 14 days after transient cerebral ischemia in gerbils. We also examined the effect of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor pitavastatin against the alterations of apoptosis-related proteins and TUNEL staining in the hippocampus after cerebral ischemia. The alterations of apoptosis-related proteins in the hippocampal CA1 sector were more pronounced than the changes of hippocampal CA3 sector and dentate gyrus after cerebral ischemia. The alterations of apoptosis-related proteins in the hippocampal CA1 sector after cerebral ischemia preceded the neuronal damage in this region. Furthermore, the study with TUNEL staining showed that a marked increase of TUNEL-positive nuclei was evident only in the hippocampal CA1 sector 5 days after cerebral ischemia. Our immunohistochemical study also showed that pitavastatin prevented the alterations of apoptosis-related proteins and the increase of TUNEL-positive nuclei in the hippocampal CA1 sector 5 days after cerebral ischemia. The present study indicates that transient cerebral ischemia in gerbils causes the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 sector. Furthermore, our present study demonstrates that pitavastatin can prevent the alterations of apoptosis-related proteins and the increase of TUNEL-positive nuclei in the hippocampal CA1 sector after cerebral ischemia. Thus our study provides novel therapeutic strategies in clinical stroke.

  16. Identification of Cerebral Metal Ion Imbalance in the Brain of Aging Octodon degus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidy, Nady; Poljak, Anne; Marjo, Chris; Rutlidge, Helen; Rich, Anne; Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Jayasena, Tharusha; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of redox-active transition metals in the brain and metal dyshomeostasis are thought to be associated with the etiology and pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in particular. As well, distinct biometal imaging and role of metal uptake transporters are central to understanding AD pathogenesis and aging but remain elusive, due inappropriate detection methods. We therefore hypothesized that Octodon degus develop neuropathological abnormalities in the distribution of redox active biometals, and this effect may be due to alterations in the expression of lysosomal protein, major Fe/Cu transporters, and selected Zn transporters (ZnTs and ZIPs). Herein, we report the distribution profile of biometals in the aged brain of the endemic Chilean rodent O. degus—a natural model to investigate the role of metals on the onset and progression of AD. Using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, our quantitative images of biometals (Fe, Ca, Zn, Cu, and Al) appear significantly elevated in the aged O. degus and show an age-dependent rise. The metals Fe, Ca, Zn, and Cu were specifically enriched in the cortex and hippocampus, which are the regions where amyloid plaques, tau phosphorylation and glial alterations are most commonly reported, whilst Al was enriched in the hippocampus alone. Using whole brain extracts, age-related deregulation of metal trafficking pathways was also observed in O. degus. More specifically, we observed impaired lysosomal function, demonstrated by increased cathepsin D protein expression. An age-related reduction in the expression of subunit B2 of V-ATPase, and significant increases in amyloid beta peptide 42 (Aβ42), and the metal transporter ATP13a2 were also observed. Although the protein expression levels of the zinc transporters, ZnT (1,3,4,6, and 7), and ZIP7,8 and ZIP14 increased in the brain of aged O. degus, ZnT10, decreased. Although no significant age

  17. Structures and Interactions of Proteins in the Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lau Dalby

    The protein low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 (LRP1) plays multiple roles in the biology of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and Alzheimer’s disease. LRP1 is very important for clearance of Aβ both in the brain and by facilitating Aβ export over the blood brain barrier. In spite of the app......The protein low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 (LRP1) plays multiple roles in the biology of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and Alzheimer’s disease. LRP1 is very important for clearance of Aβ both in the brain and by facilitating Aβ export over the blood brain barrier. In spite...... the capsid structures found in retrovirus. By solving the structure of Arc capsid like domain we show that the ability to form these structures has likely been suppressed by making the linker between the two domains in Arc capsid like domain shorter and more rigid. Additionally we investigated...

  18. Heart Failure Protein May Signal Early Brain Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162447.html Heart Failure Protein May Signal Early Brain Damage Higher levels ... stress. Blood levels of NT-proBNP rise when heart failure worsens and fall when it gets better. Previous ...

  19. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    HONDA, Mitsuru; ICHIBAYASHI, Ryo; YOKOMURO, Hiroki; YOSHIHARA, Katsunori; MASUDA, Hiroyuki; HAGA, Daisuke; SEIKI, Yoshikatsu; KUDOH, Chiaki; KISHI, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1–3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3–4, GCS5–6, and GCS7–8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  20. Inhibition of Myosin light-chain kinase attenuates cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury in postnatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Janet L; Todd, Tracey; Bazan, Nicolas G; Belayev, Ludmila

    2013-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children less than 8 years of age leads to decline in intelligence and executive functioning. Neurological outcomes after TBI correlate to development of cerebral edema, which affect survival rates after TBI. It has been shown that myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) increases cerebral edema and that pretreatment with an MLCK inhibitor (ML-7) reduces cerebral edema. The aim of this study was to determine whether inhibition of MLCK after TBI in postnatal day 24 (PND-24) mice would prevent breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and development of cerebral edema and improve neurological outcome. We used a closed head injury model of TBI. ML-7 or saline treatment was administered at 4 h and every 24 h until sacrifice or 5 days after TBI. Mice were sacrificed at 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h and 7 days after impact. Mice treated with ML-7 after TBI had decreased levels of MLCK-expressing cells (20.7±4.8 vs. 149.3±40.6), less albumin extravasation (28.3±11.2 vs. 116.2±60.7 mm(2)) into surrounding parenchymal tissue, less Evans Blue extravasation (339±314 vs. 4017±560 ng/g), and showed a significant difference in wet/dry weight ratio (1.9±0.07 vs. 2.2±0.05 g), compared to saline-treated groups. Treatment with ML-7 also resulted in preserved neurological function measured by the wire hang test (57 vs. 21 sec) and two-object novel recognition test (old vs. new, 10.5 touches). We concluded that inhibition of MLCK reduces cerebral edema and preserves neurological function in PND-24 mice.

  1. Surgery-related thrombosis critically affects the brain infarct volume in mice following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Lin

    Full Text Available Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO model is widely used to mimic human focal ischemic stroke in order to study ischemia/reperfusion brain injury in rodents. In tMCAO model, intraluminal suture technique is widely used to achieve ischemia and reperfusion. However, variation of infarct volume in this model often requires large sample size, which hinders the progress of preclinical research. Our previous study demonstrated that infarct volume was related to the success of reperfusion although the reason remained unclear. The aim of present study is to explore the relationship between focal thrombus formation and model reproducibility with respect to infarct volume. We hypothesize that suture-induced thrombosis causes infarct volume variability due to insufficient reperfusion after suture withdrawal. Seventy-two adult male CD-1 mice underwent 90 minutes of tMCAO with or without intraperitoneal administration of heparin. Dynamic synchrotron radiation microangiography (SRA and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI were performed before and after tMCAO to observe the cerebral vascular morphology and to measure the cerebral blood flow in vivo. Infarct volume and neurological score were examined to evaluate severity of ischemic brain injury. We found that the rate of successful reperfusion was much higher in heparin-treated mice compared to that in heparin-free mice according to the result of SRA and LSCI at 1 and 3 hours after suture withdrawal (p<0.05. Pathological features and SRA revealed that thrombus formed in the internal carotid artery, middle cerebral artery or anterior cerebral artery, which blocked reperfusion following tMCAO. LSCI showed that cortical collateral circulation could be disturbed by thrombi. Our results demonstrated that suture-induced thrombosis was a critical element, which affects the success of reperfusion. Appropriate heparin management provides a useful approach for improving reproducibility of reperfusion

  2. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Mitsuru; Ichibayashi, Ryo; Yokomuro, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Kudoh, Chiaki; Kishi, Taichi

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1-3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3-4, GCS5-6, and GCS7-8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients.

  3. Protein synthesis in postischemic rat brain: a two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, M; Dienel, G A; Jacewicz, M; Pulsinelli, W A

    1986-12-01

    This study examined the pattern of protein synthesis in the neocortex, caudate-putamen, and the hippocampus following transient forebrain ischemia in rats. The animal model of temporary ischemia used in this study causes permanent damage to vulnerable neurons with a time course of injury that varies from hours (caudate nucleus) to days (hippocampus). To examine the spectrum of proteins synthesized in these regions at 3 and 18 h after recirculation, cerebral proteins were pulse-labeled in vivo by an intravenous injection of [35S]methionine. Newly synthesized (35S-labeled) and constitutive (unlabeled) proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and fluorography. In all three brain regions, specific proteins underwent preferential synthesis (Mr approximately 27,000, approximately 65,000, approximately 70,000, approximately 110,000), while others showed decreased synthesis (neuron-specific enolase, alpha- and beta-tubulin). There was an early (3 h post ischemia) induction of the Mr approximately 70,000 mammalian "stress" protein; at 18 h post ischemia, its synthesis remained high in the hippocampus but was diminished in the neocortex and had largely subsided in the caudate-putamen. All regions at 18 h showed increased synthesis of an Mr approximately 50,000 protein, tentatively identified as glial fibrillary acidic protein. The results show that temporary forebrain ischemia induces changes in protein synthesis that include features similar to those observed in other eukaryotic cells subjected to injurious stress. These postischemic changes in protein synthesis are qualitatively similar in all brain regions examined despite regional differences in the severity of subsequent neuronal damage. The persistent synthesis of the Mr approximately 70,000 stress protein in the hippocampus, however, may reflect continued metabolic injury long after the ischemic episode has passed.

  4. Early MEK1/2 Inhibition after Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rats Reduces Brain Damage and Improves Outcome by Preventing Delayed Vasoconstrictor Receptor Upregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sara Ellinor; Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global cerebral ischemia following cardiac arrest is associated with increased cerebral vasoconstriction and decreased cerebral blood flow, contributing to delayed neuronal cell death and neurological detriments in affected patients. We hypothesize that upregulation of contractile ETB...... and 5-HT1B receptors, previously demonstrated in cerebral arteries after experimental global ischemia, are a key mechanism behind insufficient perfusion of the post-ischemic brain, proposing blockade of this receptor upregulation as a novel target for prevention of cerebral hypoperfusion and delayed...... neuronal cell death after global cerebral ischemia. The aim was to characterize the time-course of receptor upregulation and associated neuronal damage after global ischemia and investigate whether treatment with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 can prevent cerebrovascular receptor upregulation and thereby...

  5. Melatonin Counteracts at a Transcriptional Level the Inflammatory and Apoptotic Response Secondary to Ischemic Brain Injury Induced by Middle Cerebral Artery Blockade in Aging Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Sergio D; Rancan, Lisa; Kireev, Roman; González, Alberto; Louzao, Pedro; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; García, Cruz; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2015-01-01

    Aging increases oxidative stress and inflammation. Melatonin counteracts inflammation and apoptosis. This study investigated the possible protective effect of melatonin on the inflammatory and apoptotic response secondary to ischemia induced by blockade of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) in aging male Wistar rats. Animals were subjected to MCA obstruction. After 24 h or 7 days of procedure, 14-month-old nontreated and treated rats with a daily dose of 10 mg/kg melatonin were sacrificed and right and left hippocampus and cortex were collected. Rats aged 2 and 6 months, respectively, were subjected to the same brain injury protocol, but they were not treated with melatonin. mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD), Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and sirtuin 1 was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In nontreated animals, a significant time-dependent increase in IL-1β, TNF-α, BAD, and BAX was observed in the ischemic area of both hippocampus and cortex, and to a lesser extent in the contralateral hemisphere. Hippocampal GFAP was also significantly elevated, while Bcl-2 and sirtuin 1 decreased significantly in response to ischemia. Aging aggravated these changes. Melatonin administration was able to reverse significantly these alterations. In conclusion, melatonin may ameliorate the age-dependent inflammatory and apoptotic response secondary to ischemic cerebral injury.

  6. Ablation of the 14-3-3gamma Protein Results in Neuronal Migration Delay and Morphological Defects in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachi, Tomoka; Cornell, Brett; Marshall, Courtney; Zhukarev, Vladimir; Baas, Peter W; Toyo-oka, Kazuhito

    2016-06-01

    14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitously-expressed and multifunctional proteins. There are seven isoforms in mammals with a high level of homology, suggesting potential functional redundancy. We previously found that two of seven isoforms, 14-3-3epsilon and 14-3-3zeta, are important for brain development, in particular, radial migration of pyramidal neurons in the developing cerebral cortex. In this work, we analyzed the function of another isoform, the protein 14-3-3gamma, with respect to neuronal migration in the developing cortex. We found that in utero 14-3-3gamma-deficiency resulted in delays in neuronal migration as well as morphological defects. Migrating neurons deficient in 14-3-3gamma displayed a thicker leading process stem, and the basal ends of neurons were not able to reach the boundary between the cortical plate and the marginal zone. Consistent with the results obtained from in utero electroporation, time-lapse live imaging of brain slices revealed that the ablation of the 14-3-3gamma proteins in pyramidal neurons slowed down their migration. In addition, the 14-3-3gamma deficient neurons showed morphological abnormalities, including increased multipolar neurons with a thicker leading processes stem during migration. These results indicate that the 14-3-3gamma proteins play an important role in radial migration by regulating the morphology of migrating neurons in the cerebral cortex. The findings underscore the pathological phenotypes of brain development associated with the disruption of different 14-3-3 proteins and will advance the preclinical data regarding disorders caused by neuronal migration defects.

  7. Aquaporin-11: A channel protein lacking apparent transport function expressed in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunenari Takashi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aquaporins are a family of integral membrane proteins composed of two subfamilies: the orthodox aquaporins, which transport only water, and the aquaglyceroporins, which transport glycerol, urea, or other small solutes. Two recently described aquaporins, numbers 11 and 12, appear to be more distantly related to the other mammalian aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins. Results We report on the characterization of Aquaporin-11 (AQP11. AQP11 RNA and protein is found in multiple rat tissues, including kidney, liver, testes and brain. AQP11 has a unique distribution in brain, appearing in Purkinje cell dendrites, hippocampal neurons of CA1 and CA2, and cerebral cortical neurons. Immunofluorescent staining of Purkinje cells indicates that AQP11 is intracellular. Unlike other aquaporins, Xenopus oocytes expressing AQP11 in the plasma membrane failed to transport water, glycerol, urea, or ions. Conclusion AQP11 is functionally distinct from other proteins of the aquaporin superfamily and could represent a new aquaporin subfamily. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the role of AQP11 in the brain.

  8. Role of nitric oxide synthases in early blood-brain barrier disruption following transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Jiang

    Full Text Available The role of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs in early blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption was determined using a new mouse model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was induced by ligating the middle cerebral artery (MCA at its M2 segment and reperfusion was induced by releasing the ligation. The diameter alteration of the MCA, arterial anastomoses and collateral arteries were imaged and measured in real time. BBB disruption was assessed by Evans Blue (EB and sodium fluorescein (Na-F extravasation at 3 hours of reperfusion. The reperfusion produced an extensive vasodilation and a sustained hyperemia. Although expression of NOSs was not altered at 3 hours of reperfusion, L-NAME (a non-specific NOS inhibitor abolished reperfusion-induced vasodilation/hyperemia and significantly reduced EB and Na-F extravasation. L-NIO (an endothelial NOS (eNOS inhibitor significantly attenuated cerebral vasodilation but not BBB disruption, whereas L-NPA and 7-NI (neuronal NOS (nNOS inhibitors significantly reduced BBB disruption but not cerebral vasodilation. In contrast, aminoguanidine (AG (an inducible NOS (iNOS inhibitor had less effect on either cerebral vasodilation or BBB disruption. On the other hand, papaverine (PV not only increased the vasodilation/hyperemia but also significantly reduced BBB disruption. Combined treatment with L-NAME and PV preserved the vasodilation/hyperemia and significantly reduced BBB disruption. Our findings suggest that nNOS may play a major role in early BBB disruption following transient focal cerebral ischemia via a hyperemia-independent mechanism.

  9. Epsilon PKC increases brain mitochondrial SIRT1 protein levels via heat shock protein 90 following ischemic preconditioning in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Thompson

    Full Text Available Ischemic preconditioning is a neuroprotective mechanism whereby a sublethal ischemic exposure is protective against a subsequent lethal ischemic attack. We previously demonstrated that SIRT1, a nuclear localized stress-activated deacetylase, is vital for ischemic preconditioning neuroprotection. However, a recent study demonstrated that SIRT1 can also localize to the mitochondria. Mitochondrial localized SIRT1 may allow for a direct protection of mitochondria following ischemic preconditioning. The objective of this study was to determine whether ischemic preconditioning increases brain mitochondrial SIRT1 protein levels and to determine the role of PKCɛ and HSP90 in targeting SIRT1 to the mitochondria. Here we report that preconditioning rats, with 2 min of global cerebral ischemia, induces a delayed increase in non-synaptic mitochondrial SIRT1 protein levels which was not observed in synaptic mitochondria. This increase in mitochondrial SIRT1 protein was found to occur only in neuronal cells and was mediated by PKCε activation. Inhibition of HSP90, a protein chaperone involved in mitochondrial protein import, prevented preconditioning induced increases in mitochondrial SIRT1 and PKCε protein. Our work provides new insights into a possible direct role of SIRT1 in modulating mitochondrial function under both normal and stress conditions, and to a possible role of mitochondrial SIRT1 in activating preconditioning induced ischemic tolerance.

  10. Proteomic Identification of Altered Cerebral Proteins in the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Sahngun Nahm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. Materials and Methods. After generating the CPIP animal model, we performed a proteomic analysis of the rat cerebrum using a multidimensional protein identification technology, and screened the proteins differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups. Results. A total of 155 proteins were differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups: 125 increased and 30 decreased; expressions of proteins related to cell signaling, synaptic plasticity, regulation of cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal formation were increased in the CPIP group. However, proenkephalin A, cereblon, and neuroserpin were decreased in CPIP group. Conclusion. Altered expression of cerebral proteins in the CPIP model indicates cerebral involvement in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Further study is required to elucidate the roles of these proteins in the development and maintenance of CRPS.

  11. Effect of glutamate on inflammatory responses of intestine and brain after focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Jie Sun; Ran Lu; Qing Ji; Jian-Guo Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the modulation of glutamate on post-ischemic intestinal and cerebral inflammatory responses in a ischemic and excitotoxic rat model.METHODS: Adult male rats were subjected to bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 15 min and injection of monosodium glutamate intraperitoneally, to decapitate them at selected time points. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) level and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), respectively.Hemodynamic parameters were monitored continuously during the whole process of cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.RESULTS: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) treated rats displayed statistically significant high levels of TNF-α in cerebral and intestinal tissuess within the first 6 h of ischemia. The rats with cerebral ischemia showed a minor decrease of TNF-α production in cerebral and intestinal tissuess. The rats with cerebral ischemia and treated with MSG displayed statistically significant low levels of TNF-α in cerebral and intestinal tissues. These results correlated significantly with NF-κB production calculated at the same intervals. During experiment, the mean blood pressure and heart rates in all groups were stable.CONCLUSION: Glutamate is involved in the mechanism of intestinal and cerebral inflammation responses. The effects of glutamate on cerebral and intestinal inflammatory responses after ischemia are up-regulated at the transcriptional level,through the NF-κB signal transduction pathway.

  12. Middle cerebral artery remodeling following transient brain ischemia is linked to early postischemic hyperemia: a target of uric acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onetti, Yara; Dantas, Ana P; Pérez, Belén; Cugota, Roger; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M; Vila, Elisabet; Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc

    2015-04-15

    Ischemia impairs blood supply to the brain, and reperfusion is important to restore cerebral blood flow (CBF) and rescue neurons from cell death. However, reperfusion can induce CBF values exceeding the basal values before ischemia. This hyperemic effect has been associated with a worse ischemic brain damage, albeit the mechanisms that contribute to infarct expansion are not clear. In this study, we investigated the influence of early postischemic hyperemia on brain damage and middle cerebral artery (MCA) properties and the effect of treatment with the endogenous antioxidant uric acid (UA). The MCA was occluded for 90 min followed by 24 h reperfusion in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Cortical CBF increases at reperfusion beyond 20% of basal values were taken as indicative of hyperemia. UA (16 mg/kg) or vehicle (Locke's buffer) was administered intravenously 135 min after MCA occlusion. Hyperemic compared with nonhyperemic rats showed MCA wall thickening (sham: 22.4 ± 0.8 μm; nonhyperemic: 23.1 ± 1.2 μm; hyperemic: 27.8 ± 0.9 at 60 mmHg; P < 0.001, hyperemic vs. sham) involving adventitial cell proliferation, increased oxidative stress, and interleukin-18, and more severe brain damage. Thus MCA remodeling after ischemia-reperfusion takes place under vascular oxidative and inflammatory stress conditions linked to hyperemia. UA administration attenuated MCA wall thickening, induced passive lumen expansion, and reduced brain damage in hyperemic rats, although it did not increase brain UA concentration. We conclude that hyperemia at reperfusion following brain ischemia induces vascular damage that can be attenuated by administration of the endogenous antioxidant UA. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. The efficacy of trovafloxacin versus ceftriaxone in the treatment of experimental brain abscess/cerebritis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Barnett R; Scheld, W Michael

    2003-08-22

    Current estimates of the mortality associated with brain abscesses range from 0-24%, with neurological sequellae in 30-55% of survivors. Although the incidence of brain abscess appears to be increasing, likely due to an increase in the population of immunosuppressed patients, the condition is still sufficiently uncommon to make human clinical trials of therapy problematic. An animal model to study the efficacy of new treatment regimens, specifically, new antimicrobial agents is therefore necessary. This study uses a well-defined experimental paradigm as an inexpensive method of inducing and studying the efficacy of antibiotics in brain abscess. The rat model of brain abscess/cerebritis developed at this institution was used to determine the relative efficacy of trovafloxacin as compared to ceftriaxone in animals infected with Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus ( approximately 10(5) CFU in 1 microliter) was injected with a Hamilton syringe, very slowly, over the course of 70 minutes after a two mm burr hole was created with a spherical carbide drill just posterior to the coronal suture and four mm lateral to the midline. Eighteen hours later treatment was begun; every 8 hours the rats were dosed with subcutaneous ceftriaxone (n = 10), trovafloxacin (n = 11) or 0.9% sterile pyogen-free saline (n = 10). After four days of treatment the brains were removed and sectioned with a scalpel. The entire injected hemisphere was homogenized and quantitative cultures performed. The mean +/- SEM log(10) colony forming units/ml S. aureus recovered from homogenized brain were as follows: controls 6.10 +/- 0.28; ceftriaxone 3.43 +/- 0.33; trovafloxacin 3.65 +/- 0.3. There was no significant difference in bacterial clearance between ceftriaxone versus trovafloxacin (p = 0.39). Trovafloxacin or other quinolones may provide a viable alternative to intravenous antibiotics in patients with brain abscess/cerebritis.

  14. Quantitation of brain edema and localisation of aquaporin 4 expression in relation to susceptibility to experimental cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampawong, Sumate; Combes, Valéry; Hunt, Nicholas H; Radford, Jane; Chan-Ling, Tailoi; Pongponratn, Emsri; Grau, Georges E R

    2011-08-15

    The pathogenic mechanisms underlying the occurrence of cerebral malaria (CM) are still incompletely understood but, clearly, cerebral complications may result from concomitant microvessel obstruction and inflammation. The extent to which brain edema contributes to pathology has not been investigated. Using the model of P. berghei ANKA infection, we compared brain microvessel morphology of CM-susceptible and CM-resistant mice. By quantitative planimetry, we provide evidence that CM is characterized by enlarged perivascular spaces (PVS). We show a dramatic aquaporin 4 (AQP4) upregulation, selectively at the level of astrocytic foot processes, in both CM and non-CM disease, but significantly more pronounced in mice with malarial-induced neurological syndrome. This suggests that a threshold of AQP4 expression is needed to lead to neurovascular pathology, a view that is supported by significantly higher levels in mice with clinically overt CM. Numbers of intravascular leukocytes significantly correlated with both PVS enlargement and AQP4 overexpression. Thus, brain edema could be a contributing factor in CM pathogenesis and AQP4, specifically in its astrocytic location, a key molecule in this mechanism. Since experimental CM is associated with substantial brain edema, it models paediatric CM better than the adult syndrome and it is tempting to evaluate AQP4 in the former context. If AQP4 changes are confirmed in human CM, it may represent a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Main Effects of Diagnoses, Brain Regions, and their Interaction Effects for Cerebral Metabolites in Bipolar and Unipolar Depressive Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hai-Zhu; Li, Hui; Liu, Chen-Feng; Guan, Ji-Tian; Guo, Xiao-Bo; Wen, Can-Hong; Ou, Shao-Min; Zhang, Yin-Nan; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Chong-Tao; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Ren-Hua; Wang, Xue-Qin

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies suggested patients with bipolar depressive disorder (BDd) or unipolar depressive disorder (UDd) have cerebral metabolites abnormalities. These abnormalities may stem from multiple sub-regions of gray matter in brain regions. Thirteen BDd patients, 20 UDd patients and 20 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled to investigate these abnormalities. Absolute concentrations of 5 cerebral metabolites (glutamate-glutamine (Glx), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), creatine (Cr), parietal cortex (PC)) were measured from 4 subregions (the medial frontal cortex (mPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and parietal cortex (PC)) of gray matter. Main and interaction effects of cerebral metabolites across subregions of gray matter were evaluated. For example, the Glx was significantly higher in BDd compared with UDd, and so on. As the interaction analyses showed, some interaction effects existed. The concentrations of BDds’ Glx, Cho, Cr in the ACC and HCs’ mI and Cr in the PC were higher than that of other interaction effects. In addition, the concentrations of BDds’ Glx and Cr in the PC and HCs’ mI in the ACC were statistically significant lower than that of other interaction effects. These findings point to region-related abnormalities of cerebral metabolites across subjects with BDd and UDd.

  16. [Effects of palmitic acid on activity of uncoupling proteins and proton leak in in vitro cerebral mitochondria from the rats exposed to simulated high altitude hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Liu, Jun-Ze; Xia, Chen

    2008-02-25

    To reveal the roles of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation induced by free fatty acid during hypoxic exposure, the effects of palmitic acid on activity of UCPs, proton leak and mitochondrial membrane potential in hypoxia-exposed rat brain mitochondria were observed in vitro. Adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were set randomly into control, acute hypoxia and chronic hypoxia groups (n=8 in each group). The acute and chronic hypoxic rats were exposed to simulated 5000 m high altitude in a hypobaric chamber 23 h/d for 3 d and 30 d, respectively. The brain mitochondria were isolated by centrifugation. UCP content and activity were detected by [(3)H]-GTP binding method. The proton leak was measured by TPMP(+) electrode and oxygen electrode. The membrane potential of mitochondria was calculated by detecting the fluorescence from Rodamine 123. Hypoxic exposure resulted in an increase in UCP activity and content as well as proton leak, but a decrease in the membrane potential of rat brain mitochondria. Palmitic acid resulted in further increases in UCP activity and content as well as proton leak, and further decrease in membrane potential of brain mitochondria in vitro from hypoxia-exposed rats, but hypoxic exposure decreased the reactivity of cerebral mitochondria to palmitic acid, especially in the acute hypoxia group. There was a negative correlation between mitochondrial proton leak and K(d) value (representing derivative of UCP activity, PB(max) (representing the maximal content of UCPs in mitochondrial inner membrane, P<0.01, r = 0.856). Cerebral mitochondrial membrane potential was negatively correlated with proton leak (P<0.01, r = -0.880). It is suggested that hypoxia-induced proton leak enhancement and membrane potential decrease are correlated with the increased activity of UCPs. Hypoxia can also decrease the sensitivity of cerebral mitochondria to palmitic acid, which may be a self-protective mechanism in high altitude

  17. Role of hydrogen sulfide in early blood-brain barrier disruption following transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Jiang

    Full Text Available We determined the role of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S in cerebral vasodilation/hyperemia and early BBB disruption following ischemic stroke. A cranial window was prepared over the left frontal, parietal and temporal cortex in mice. Transient focal cerebral Ischemia was induced by directly ligating the middle cerebral artery (MCA for two hours. Regional vascular response and cerebral blood flow (CBF during ischemia and reperfusion were measured in real time. Early BBB disruption was assessed by Evans Blue (EB and sodium fluorescein (Na-F extravasation at 3 hours of reperfusion. Topical treatment with DL-propargylglycine (PAG, an inhibitor for cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE and aspartate (ASP, inhibitor for cysteine aminotransferase/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (CAT/3-MST, but not O-(Carboxymethylhydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (CHH, an inhibitor for cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, abolished postischemic cerebral vasodilation/hyperemia and prevented EB and Na-F extravasation. CSE knockout (CSE-/- reduced postischemic cerebral vasodilation/hyperemia but only inhibited Na-F extravasation. An upregulated CBS was found in cerebral cortex of CSE-/- mice. Topical treatment with CHH didn't further alter postischemic cerebral vasodilation/hyperemia, but prevented EB extravasation in CSE-/- mice. In addition, L-cysteine-induced hydrogen sulfide (H2S production similarly increased in ischemic side cerebral cortex of control and CSE-/- mice. Our findings suggest that endogenous production of H2S by CSE and CAT/3-MST during reperfusion may be involved in postischemic cerebral vasodilation/hyperemia and play an important role in early BBB disruption following transient focal cerebral ischemia.

  18. Effects of assisted aquatic movement and horseback riding therapies on emotion and brain activation in patients with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kwangmin; Ali, Asif; Kwon, Minji; Lee, Changyoung; Kim, Yujin; Lee, Gyusung; Kim, Jingu

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of assisted aquatic movement and horseback riding therapies on emotion and brain activation in patients with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two right-handed patients with cerebral palsy (18 male, 14 female) whose ages ranged from 8 to 48 years participated in this experiment. Their cerebral palsy levels ranged from 1 to 3. The participants were assigned to one of three groups according to the experimental conditions: an assisted aquatic movement therapy group, a horseback riding therapy group, or a control group. Electroencephalograms, the Feeling Scale and the Felt Arousal Scale were examined as dependent variables. [Results] Analysis of self-reported data demonstrated a significant positive improvement in the emotions of participants in the assisted aquatic movement therapy group in comparison with the control group. With regard to the electroencephalogram analysis, the results of this study showed increased alpha power in the assisted aquatic movement therapy group compared with the horseback riding and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that professionals can consider assisted aquatic movement therapy as an effective therapeutic intervention for the improvement of mental health and brain activation.

  19. Noninvasive and painless magnetic stimulation of nerves improved brain motor function and mobility in a cerebral palsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamand, Véronique H; Schneider, Cyril

    2014-10-01

    Motor deficits in cerebral palsy disturb functional independence. This study tested whether noninvasive and painless repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation could improve motor function in a 7-year-old boy with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Stimulation was applied over different nerves of the lower limbs for 5 sessions. We measured the concurrent aftereffects of this intervention on ankle motor control, gait (walking velocity, stride length, cadence, cycle duration), and function of brain motor pathways. We observed a decrease of ankle plantar flexors resistance to stretch, an increase of active dorsiflexion range of movement, and improvements of corticospinal control of ankle dorsiflexors. Joint mobility changes were still present 15 days after the end of stimulation, when all gait parameters were also improved. Resistance to stretch was still lower than prestimulation values 45 days after the end of stimulation. This case illustrates the sustained effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation on brain plasticity, motor function, and gait. It suggests a potential impact for physical rehabilitation in cerebral palsy.

  20. EAAC1 Gene Deletion Increases Neuronal Death and Blood Brain Barrier Disruption after Transient Cerebral Ischemia in Female Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Young Choi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available EAAC1 is important in modulating brain ischemic tolerance. Mice lacking EAAC1 exhibit increased susceptibility to neuronal oxidative stress in mice after transient cerebral ischemia. EAAC1 was first described as a glutamate transporter but later recognized to also function as a cysteine transporter in neurons. EAAC1-mediated transport of cysteine into neurons contributes to neuronal antioxidant function by providing cysteine substrates for glutathione synthesis. Here we evaluated the effects of EAAC1 gene deletion on hippocampal blood vessel disorganization after transient cerebral ischemia. EAAC1−/− female mice subjected to transient cerebral ischemia by common carotid artery occlusion for 30 min exhibited twice as much hippocampal neuronal death compared to wild-type female mice as well as increased reduction of neuronal glutathione, blood–brain barrier (BBB disruption and vessel disorganization. Pre-treatment of N-acetyl cysteine, a membrane-permeant cysteine prodrug, increased basal glutathione levels in the EAAC1−/− female mice and reduced ischemic neuronal death, BBB disruption and vessel disorganization. These findings suggest that cysteine uptake by EAAC1 is important for neuronal antioxidant function under ischemic conditions.

  1. Salvianolic Acids for Injection (SAFI) suppresses inflammatory responses in activated microglia to attenuate brain damage in focal cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Pengwei; Wan, Yanjun; Geng, Shihan; He, Ying; Feng, Bo; Ye, Zhengliang; Zhou, Dazheng; Li, Dekun; Wei, Hongjun; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Yanjun; Ju, Aichun

    2017-02-23

    Inflammatory reactions induced by microglia in the brain play crucial roles in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) cerebral injuries. Microglia activation has been shown to be closely related to TLR4/NF-κB signal pathways. Salvianolic acids for injection (SAFI) have been used in clinical practice to treat ischemic stroke with reported neuroprotective effects; however, the underlying mechanisms are still uncertain. First, we studied the effect of SAFI on inflammatory responses in LPS-stimulated BV-2 microglia. Then, to discover whether the beneficial in vitro effects of SAFI lead to in vivo therapeutic effects, an MCAO (Middle cerebral artery occlusion) rat model was further employed to elucidate the probable mechanism of SAFI in treating ischemic stroke. Rats in the SAFI group were given SAFI (23 or 46mg/kg) before I/R injury. The results showed that SAFI treatment significantly decreased neuroinflammation and the infarction volume compared with the vehicle group. Activation of microglia cells was reduced, and TLR4/NF-κB signals, which were markedly inhibited by SAFI treatment in ischemic hemisphere, were accompanied by reduced expression and release of cytokines IL-1β and IL-6. This study provides evidence that SAFI effectively protects the brain after cerebral ischemia, which may be caused by attenuating inflammation in microglia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spatial patterns of whole brain grey and white matter injury in patients with occult spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xuetao; Nie, Binbin; Wang, Hong; Duan, Shaofeng; Zhang, Zan; Dai, Guanghui; Ma, Qiaozhi; Shan, Baoci; Ma, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (SDCP) is a common type of cerebral palsy (CP), which presents as a group of motor-impairment syndromes. Previous conventional MRI studies have reported abnormal structural changes in SDCP, such as periventricular leucomalacia. However, there are roughly 27.8% SDCP patients presenting normal appearance in conventional MRI, which were considered as occult SDCP. In this study, sixteen patients with occult SDCP and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were collected and the data were acquired on a 3T MR system. We applied voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis to investigate whole brain grey and white matter injury in occult SDCP. By using VBM method, the grey matter volume reduction was revealed in the bilateral basal ganglia regions, thalamus, insula, and left cerebral peduncle, whereas the white matter atrophy was found to be located in the posterior part of corpus callosum and right posterior corona radiata in the occult SDCP patients. By using TBSS, reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) values were detected in multiple white matter regions, including bilateral white matter tracts in prefrontal lobe, temporal lobe, internal and external capsule, corpus callosum, cingulum, thalamus, brainstem and cerebellum. Additionally, several regions of white matter tracts injury were found to be significantly correlated with motor dysfunction. These results collectively revealed the spatial patterns of whole brain grey and white matter injury in occult SDCP.

  3. Comparison of cerebral blood flow pattern by transcranial Doppler in patients with diffuse and focal causes of brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Vakilian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aims to assess the cerebral vessels flow in brain death patients with different causes, including focal and diffuse lesions and comparison of flows according to the underlying causes. Materials and Methods: Two groups of 15 brain-dead patients one with focal and the other with diffuse brain lesions were compared according to their cerebral blood flow pattern 48 h passed brain death certification. Results: Bilateral absence of flow in middle cerebral artery (MCA was found in 54.5% of brain-dead patients with diffuse lesion and 50.33% of those with focal lesions. Systolic spike pattern in MCA flow was found in 46.2% of patients with focal lesion and 16.65% of patients with diffuse lesion. Diastole-systole separation pattern in MCA was seen in 16.65% of patients with the diffuse lesions. This pattern in MCA was not seen in patients with the focal lesion group. In carotid arteries, we did not find the absence of flow in any cases. Thirty percent of all patients in both groups had a normal flow pattern (36.6% of patients with focal lesions and 23.3% of patients with diffuse lesion. Patients with focal lesion had 33.3% systolic spike pattern flow and had 23.35% diastole-systole separation flow pattern. In intra-cranial vessels, systolic spike pattern was more common among patients with focal lesions than patients with diffuse lesion, however, this difference was not statistically significant (46.2% of patients with focal lesion and 16.65% of patients with diffuse lesion (P value = 0.244-0.09. Diastole-systole separation flow was more common in patients with diffuse lesions than those with the focal lesions although this could not reach the significant level as the previous pattern (20% of patients with diffuse lesion versus no case in patients with focal lesion (P value = 0.181. Conclusion: Absence of flow was the most common brain flow pattern in the focal and diffuse group lesions. There was no difference in flow pattern

  4. A type-II positive allosteric modulator of α7 nAChRs reduces brain injury and improves neurological function after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Sun

    Full Text Available In the absence of clinically-efficacious therapies for ischemic stroke there is a critical need for development of new therapeutic concepts and approaches for prevention of brain injury secondary to cerebral ischemia. This study tests the hypothesis that administration of PNU-120596, a type-II positive allosteric modulator (PAM-II of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, as long as 6 hours after the onset of focal cerebral ischemia significantly reduces brain injury and neurological deficits in an animal model of ischemic stroke. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by a transient (90 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Animals were then subdivided into two groups and injected intravenously (i.v. 6 hours post-MCAO with either 1 mg/kg PNU-120596 (treated group or vehicle only (untreated group. Measurements of cerebral infarct volumes and neurological behavioral tests were performed 24 hrs post-MCAO. PNU-120596 significantly reduced cerebral infarct volume and improved neurological function as evidenced by the results of Bederson, rolling cylinder and ladder rung walking tests. These results forecast a high therapeutic potential for PAMs-II as effective recruiters and activators of endogenous α7 nAChR-dependent cholinergic pathways to reduce brain injury and improve neurological function after cerebral ischemic stroke.

  5. A study on the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria and cerebral babesiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamichi Aikawa

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral complications are important, but poorly understood pathological features of infections caused by some species of Plasmodium and Babesia. Patients dying from P. falciparum were classified as cerebral or non-cerebral cases according to the cerebral malaria coma scale. Light microscopy revealed that cerebral microvessels of cerebral malaria patients were field with a mixture of parazited and unparazited erythrocytes, with 94% of the vessels showing parasitized red blood cell (PRBC sequestration. Some degree of PRBC sequestration was also found in non-cerebral malaria patients, but the percentage of microvessls with sequestered PRBC was only 13% Electron microscopy demonstrated knobs on the membrane of PRBC that formed focal junctions with the capillary endothelium. A number of host cell molecules such as CD36, thrombospondim (TSP and intracellular adhesion molecule I (ICAM-1 may function as endothelial cell surfacereports for P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Affinity labeling of CD36 and TSP to the PRBC surface showed these molecules specifically bind to the knobs. Babesia bovis infected erythrocytes procedure projections of the erythrocyte membrane that are similar to knobs. When brain tissue from B. bovis-infected cattle was examined, cerebral capillaries were packed with PRBC. Infected erythrocytes formed focal attachments with cerebral endothelial cells at the site of these knob-like projections. These findings indicate that cerebral pathology caused by B. bovis is similar to human cerebral malaria. A search for cytoadherence proteins in the endothelial cells may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenisis of cerebral babesiosis.

  6. Attenuation of Brain Inflammatory Response after Focal Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion with Xuesaitong Injection(血塞通注射液) in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wei; XU Xiao-jun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the neuro-protective effect of Xuesaitong Injection ( 血塞通注射液 ,XST) on brain inflammatory response after transient focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. Methods:Focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion models of male rats were induced by transient occlusion for 2 h of middle cerebral artery (MCA) which was followed by 24 h reperfusion. XST was administered through intraperitoneal injection of 25 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg at 4 h after the onset of ischemia. After reperfusion for 24 h, the neurological function score was evaluated, the brain edema was detected with dry-wet weight method, the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) of ischemic cerebral cortex and caudate putamen was determined by spectrophotometry and immunohistochemistry respectively. Results: XST not only lowered neurological function score at the dose of 50 mg/kg, but reduced brain edema and inhibited MPO activity and ICAM-1 expression as compared with the ischemia/reperfusion model group ( P<0.01 ). Conclusion: XST has a definite effect on inhibiting the expression of ICAM-1 and neutrophil infiltration in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion when treatment started at 4 h after ischemia onset, and also attenuates inflammation in the infarcted cerebral area.neutrophil, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 of ischemic cerebral cortex and caudate putamen was determined by spectrophotometry and immunohistochemistry respectively. Results: XST not only lowered neurological function score at the dose of 50 mg/kg, but reduced brain edema and inhibited MPO activity and ICAM-1 expression as compared with the ischemia/reperfusion model group ( P<0.01 ). Conclusion: XST has a definite effect on inhibiting the expression of ICAM-1 and neutrophil infiltration in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion when treatment started at 4 h after ischemia onset, and also attenuates inflammation in the infarcted cerebral area.

  7. Cardiological evaluation of patients with a cerebral ischemic event: the relation between heart and brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A.M. Pop (Gheorghe)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractIn this study several aspects of the cardiological evaluation of patients with cerebral ischemia are described; its usefulness for diagnosis and treatment is discussed. The aim of this thesis is to approach the clinical and epidemiological aspects of patients with cerebral ischemic event

  8. ACTH, cyclic nucleotides, and brain protein phosphorylation in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, H; Veldhuis, H D; Schotman, P; Gispen, W H

    1976-01-01

    Endogenous phosphorylation of proteins from rat brain synaptosomal plasma membranes was studied in vitro. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) markedly stimulated(32)P incorporation in three protein bands with molecular weights of 75,000, 57,000, and 54,000, respectively. The effect of the behaviorally active peptide

  9. Cerebral malaria: insight into pathogenesis, complications and molecular biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Farah Hafiz; Hafiz, Muhammad Yusuf; Shoaib, Maria; Ahmed, Syed Ahsanuddin

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a medical emergency. All patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria with neurologic manifestations of any degree should be urgently treated as cases of cerebral malaria. Pathogenesis of cerebral malaria is due to damaged vascular endothelium by parasite sequestration, inflammatory cytokine production and vascular leakage, which result in brain hypoxia, as indicated by increased lactate and alanine concentrations. The levels of the biomarkers’ histidine-rich protein II, angiopoietin-Tie-2 system and plasma osteoprotegrin serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers. Brain imaging may show neuropathology around the caudate and putamen. Mortality is high and patients who survive sustain brain injury which manifests as long-term neurocognitive impairments. PMID:28203097

  10. Micromachined lab-on-a-tube sensors for simultaneous brain temperature and cerebral blood flow measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Wu, Pei-Ming; Hartings, Jed A; Wu, Zhizhen; Cheyuo, Cletus; Wang, Ping; LeDoux, David; Shutter, Lori A; Ramaswamy, Bharat Ram; Ahn, Chong H; Narayan, Raj K

    2012-08-01

    This work describes the development of a micromachined lab-on-a-tube device for simultaneous measurement of brain temperature and regional cerebral blood flow. The device consists of two micromachined gold resistance temperature detectors with a 4-wire configuration. One is used as a temperature sensor and the other as a flow sensor. The temperature sensor operates with AC excitation current of 500 μA and updates its outputs at a rate of 5 Hz. The flow sensor employs a periodic heating and cooling technique under constant-temperature mode and updates its outputs at a rate of 0.1 Hz. The temperature sensor is also used to compensate for temperature changes during the heating period of the flow sensor to improve the accuracy of flow measurements. To prevent thermal and electronic crosstalk between the sensors, the temperature sensor is located outside the "thermal influence" region of the flow sensor and the sensors are separated into two different layers with a thin-film Copper shield. We evaluated the sensors for accuracy, crosstalk and long-term drift in human blood-stained cerebrospinal fluid. These in vitro experiments showed that simultaneous temperature and flow measurements with a single lab-on-a-tube device are accurate and reliable over the course of 5 days. It has a resolution of 0.013 °C and 0.18 ml/100 g/min; and achieves an accuracy of 0.1 °C and 5 ml/100 g/min for temperature and flow sensors respectively. The prototype device and techniques developed here establish a foundation for a multi-sensor lab-on-a-tube, enabling versatile multimodality monitoring applications.

  11. On the control of brain-computer interfaces by users with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ian; Billinger, Martin; Laparra-Hernández, José; Aloise, Fabio; García, Mariano Lloria; Faller, Josef; Scherer, Reinhold; Müller-Putz, Gernot

    2013-09-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been proposed as a potential assistive device for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) to assist with their communication needs. However, it is unclear how well-suited BCIs are to individuals with CP. Therefore, this study aims to investigate to what extent these users are able to gain control of BCIs. This study is conducted with 14 individuals with CP attempting to control two standard online BCIs (1) based upon sensorimotor rhythm modulations, and (2) based upon steady state visual evoked potentials. Of the 14 users, 8 are able to use one or other of the BCIs, online, with a statistically significant level of accuracy, without prior training. Classification results are driven by neurophysiological activity and not seen to correlate with occurrences of artifacts. However, many of these users' accuracies, while statistically significant, would require either more training or more advanced methods before practical BCI control would be possible. The results indicate that BCIs may be controlled by individuals with CP but that many issues need to be overcome before practical application use may be achieved. This is the first study to assess the ability of a large group of different individuals with CP to gain control of an online BCI system. The results indicate that six users could control a sensorimotor rhythm BCI and three a steady state visual evoked potential BCI at statistically significant levels of accuracy (SMR accuracies; mean ± STD, 0.821 ± 0.116, SSVEP accuracies; 0.422 ± 0.069). Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nao-Xue-Shu Oral Liquid Protects and Improves Secondary Brain Insults of Hypertensive Cerebral Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongning Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine one traditional Chinese medicine (TCM Nao-Xue-Shu oral liquid which protects and improves secondary brain insults (SBI in hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage (HCH. Methods. 158 patients with HCH were divided into routine clinical medicine plus Nao-Xue-Shu oral liquid (n=78 as treatment group, and routine clinical medicine (n=80 only served as the control group. The incidence of SBI and the classification of a favorable prognosis and a bad prognosis using the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS were assessed to evaluate the clinical effects. The changes of IL-6 and TNF-α levels were determined to study the mechanism of the effects for the TCM. Results. The incidence of SBI at the end of week 2 was 8.97% in the treatment group and 23.75% in the control group, and the difference was significant (P<0.001. The incidence of a favorable prognosis was 48.72% in the treatment group and 32.72% in the control group, and the difference was significant (P<0.01 at the end of week 2. These findings indicate clear differences for IL-6 and TNF-α at the end of week 1 and week 2 compared with before treatment for the treatment group and a marked difference at the end of week 2 between the two groups. It also shows a significant difference between the end of week 2 and before treatment for IL-6 and TNF-α for the control group, although the difference was much smaller than the treatment group. Conclusion. Nao-Xue-Shu oral liquid could protect against the occurrence of SBI and improve HCH and SBI patients. It may also decrease the damage and the mass effects of the hematoma by reducing IL-6 and TNF-α to obtain the effects, and thus it is a potentially suitable drug for HCH and SBI.

  13. Complement factors C1q, C3 and C5 in brain and serum of mice with cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helbok Raimund

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patho-mechanisms leading to brain damage due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Immune-mediated and ischaemic mechanisms have been implicated. The role of complement factors C1q, C3 and C5 for the pathogenesis of CM were investigated in this study. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. The clinical severity of the disease was assessed by a battery of 40 standardized tests for evaluating neurological functions in mice. Brain homogenates and sera of mice with CM, infected animals without CM and non-infected control animals were analyzed for C1q, C3 and C5 up-regulation by Western blotting. Results Densitometric analysis of Western blots of brain homogenates yielded statistically significant differences in the levels of C1q and C5 in the analyzed groups. Correlation analysis showed a statistically significant association of C1q and C5 levels with the clinical severity of the disease. More severely affected animals showed higher levels of C1q and C5. No differences in complement levels were observed between frontal and caudal parts of the brain. Densitometric analysis of Western blot of sera yielded statistically lower levels of C1q in infected animals without CM compared to animals of the control group. Conclusion The current study provides direct evidence for up-regulation of complement factors C1q and C5 in the brains of animals with CM. Local complement up-regulation is a possible mechanism for brain damage in experimental cerebral malaria.

  14. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome following brain injury in three pediatric patients: suggestions for rapid diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkenbosch, John W; Lentz, Christopher W; Jimenez, David F; Tobias, Joseph D

    2002-02-01

    The association between hyponatremia and intracranial pathology has been well described. When accompanied by natriuresis, hyponatremia has most commonly been attributed to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. However, there is growing evidence to suggest that many of these patients may actually have cerebral mediated salt losses, a disorder referred to as the cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS). While this syndrome has been reasonably well described in adults, data regarding CSWS in pediatric-aged patients remains sparse. Since fluid management of these disorders is different, it is important that the clinician be able to rapidly differentiate between them. We report three cases of CSWS in acutely brain-injured children and comment on the role that early quantitation of urine volume and urine sodium concentration had in rapidly establishing the correct diagnosis.

  15. Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of childhood dystonic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Joseph R; Przekop, Allison; Olaya, Joffre E; Zouros, Alexander; Hsu, Frank P K

    2014-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) for dystonic cerebral palsy (CP) has rarely been reported, and its efficacy, though modest when compared with that for primary dystonia, remains unclear, especially in the pediatric population. The authors present a small series of children with dystonic CP who underwent bilateral pallidal DBS, to evaluate the treatment's efficacy and safety in the pediatric dystonic CP population. The authors conducted a retrospective review of patients (under the age of 18 years) with dystonic CP who had undergone DBS of the bilateral globus pallidus internus between 2010 and 2012. Two of the authors independently assessed outcomes using the Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale (BADS) and the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale-movement (BFMDRS-M). Five children were diagnosed with dystonic CP due to insults occurring before the age of 1 year. Mean age at surgery was 11 years (range 8-17 years), and the mean follow-up was 26.6 months (range 2-42 months). The mean target position was 20.6 mm lateral to the midcommissural point. The mean preoperative and postoperative BADS scores were 23.8 ± 4.9 (range 18.5-29.0) and 20.0 ± 5.5 (range 14.5-28.0), respectively, with a mean overall percent improvement of 16.0% (p = 0.14). The mean preoperative and postoperative BFMDRS-M scores were 73.3 ± 26.6 (range 38.5-102.0) and 52.4 ± 21.5 (range 34.0-80.0), respectively, with a mean overall percent improvement of 28.5% (p = 0.10). Those stimulated at least 23 months (4 patients) improved 18.3% (p = 0.14) on the BADS and 30.5% (p = 0.07) on the BFMDRS-M. The percentage improvement per body region yielded conflicting results between rating scales; however, BFMDRS-M scores for speech showed some of the greatest improvements. Two patients required hardware removal (1 complete system, 1 unilateral electrode) within 4 months after implantation because of infections that resolved with antibiotics. All postoperative dystonia rating scale scores improved with pallidal

  16. Large cerebral perfusion defects observed in brain perfusion SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young; Kim, Hahn Young; Roh, Hong Gee; Han, Seol Heui [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a memory disorder characterized by an episode of antegrade amnesia and bewilderment which persists for several hours. We analyzed brain perfusion SPECT findings and clinical outcome of patients who suffered from TGA. From September 2005 to August 2007, 12 patients underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT for neuroimaging of TGA. All patients also underwent MRI and MRA including DWI (MRI). Among them, 10 patients who could be chased more than 6 months were included in this study. Their average age was 60.74.0 yrs (M: F = 2: 8) and the average duration of amnesia was 4.42.2 hrs (1 hr {approx} 7 hrs). Duration from episode of amnesia to SPECT was 4.32.4 days (1{approx}9 days). Precipitating factors could be identified in 6 patients: emotional stress 3, hair dyeing 1, taking a nap 1 and angioplasty 1. SPECT and MRI was visually assessed, No cerebral perfusion defect was observed on SPECT in 3 patients and their clinical outcome was all good. Among 7 patients who had cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT, 3 patients had good clinical outcome, while others did not: one had hypercholesterolemia, another had depression, and 2 patients with cerebral perfusion defects at both temporoparetal cortex was later diagnosed as early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MRI was negative in 6 patients and 3 of them had excellent clinical outcome while other 3 were diagnosed as hypercholesterolemia, early AD and MCI. Among 4 patients with positive MRI, 3 showed good clinical outcome and their MRI showed lesions at medial temporal cortex and/or vertebral artery. One patient with microcalcification at left putamen was diagnosed to have depression. Large cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients which usually shows negative MRI.

  17. Induced arousal following zolpidem treatment in a vegetative state after brain injury in 7 cases Analysis using visual single photon emission computerized tomography and digitized cerebral state monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Du; Aijun Shan; Di Yang; Wei Xiang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported the use of zolpidem for induced arousal after permanent vegetative states. However, changes in brain function and EMG after zolpidem treatment requires further investigation. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of zolpidem, an unconventional drug, on inducing arousal in patients in a permanent vegetative state after brain injury using visual single photon emission computerized tomography and digitized cerebral state monitor. DESIGN: A self-controlled observation. SETTING: Shenzhen People's Hospital.PARTICIPANTS: Seven patients in a permanent vegetative state were selected from the Department of Neurosurgery, Shenzhen People's Hospital from March 2005 to May 2007. The group included 5 males and 2 females, 24–55 years of age, with a mean age of 38.5 years. All seven patients had been in a permanent vegetative statement for at least six months. The patient group included three comatose patients, who had sustained injuries to the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, or thalamus in motor vehicle accidents, and four patients, who had suffered primary/secondary brain stem injury. Informed consents were obtained from the patients’ relatives. METHODS: The patients brains were imaged by 99Tcm ECD single photon emission computerized tomography prior to treatment with zolpidem [Sanofi Winthrop Industrie, France, code number approved by the State Food & Drug Administration (SFDA) J20040033, specification 10 mg per tablet. At 8:00 p.m., 10 mg zolpidem was dissolved with distilled water and administered through a nasogastric tube at 1 hour before and after treatment and 1 week following treatment, respectively. Visual analysis of cerebral perfusion changes in the injured brain regions before and after treatment was performed. Simultaneously, three monitoring parameters were obtained though a cerebral state monitor, which included cerebral state index, electromyographic index, and burst suppression index. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison

  18. Intracerebroventricular administration of N-acetylaspartic acid impairs antioxidant defenses and promotes protein oxidation in cerebral cortex of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederzolli, Carolina Didonet; Rockenbach, Francieli Juliana; Zanin, Fernanda Rech; Henn, Nicoli Taiana; Romagna, Eline Coan; Sgaravatti, Angela M; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Wajner, Moacir; de Mattos Dutra, Angela; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S

    2009-06-01

    N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) is the biochemical hallmark of Canavan Disease, an inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of aspartoacylase activity. NAA is an immediate precursor for the enzyme-mediated biosynthesis of N-acetylaspartylglutamic acid (NAAG), whose concentration is also increased in urine and cerebrospinal fluid of patients affected by CD. This neurodegenerative disorder is clinically characterized by severe mental retardation, hypotonia and macrocephaly, and generalized tonic and clonic type seizures. Considering that the mechanisms of brain damage in this disease remain not fully understood, in the present study we investigated whether intracerebroventricular administration of NAA or NAAG elicits oxidative stress in cerebral cortex of 30-day-old rats. NAA significantly reduced total radical-trapping antioxidant potential, catalase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, whereas protein carbonyl content and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly enhanced. Lipid peroxidation indices and glutathione peroxidase activity were not affected by NAA. In contrast, NAAG did not alter any of the oxidative stress parameters tested. Our results indicate that intracerebroventricular administration of NAA impairs antioxidant defenses and induces oxidative damage to proteins, which could be involved in the neurotoxicity of NAA accumulation in CD patients.

  19. Clinical usefulness of brain-computer interface-controlled functional electrical stimulation for improving brain activity in children with spastic cerebral palsy: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Woo; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Evaluating the effect of brain-computer interface (BCI)-based functional electrical stimulation (FES) training on brain activity in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) was the aim of this study. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomized into a BCI-FES group (n=9) and a functional electrical stimulation (FES) control group (n=9). Subjects in the BCI-FES group received wrist and hand extension training with FES for 30 minutes per day, 5 times per week for 6 weeks under the BCI-based program. The FES group received wrist and hand extension training with FES for the same amount of time. Sensorimotor rhythms (SMR) and middle beta waves (M-beta) were measured in frontopolar regions 1 and 2 (Fp1, Fp2) to determine the effects of BCI-FES training. [Results] Significant improvements in the SMR and M-beta of Fp1 and Fp2 were seen in the BCI-FES group. In contrast, significant improvement was only seen in the SMR and M-beta of Fp2 in the control group. [Conclusion] The results of the present study suggest that BCI-controlled FES training may be helpful in improving brain activity in patients with cerebral palsy and may be applied as effectively as traditional FES training. PMID:27799677

  20. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  1. PET Imaging with [(18)F]FSPG Evidences the Role of System xc(-) on Brain Inflammation Following Cerebral Ischemia in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domercq, Maria; Szczupak, Boguslaw; Gejo, Jon; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Padro, Daniel; Gona, Kiran Babu; Dollé, Frédéric; Higuchi, Makoto; Matute, Carlos; Llop, Jordi; Martín, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    In vivo Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of the cystine-glutamate antiporter (system xc(-)) activity with [(18)F]FSPG is meant to be an attractive tool for the diagnosis and therapy evaluation of brain diseases. However, the role of system xc(-) in cerebral ischemia and its involvement in inflammatory reaction has been scarcely explored. In this work, we report the longitudinal investigation of the neuroinflammatory process following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats using PET with [(18)F]FSPG and the translocator protein (TSPO) ligand [(18)F]DPA-714. In the ischemic territory, [(18)F]FSPG showed a progressive binding increase that peaked at days 3 to 7 and was followed by a progressive decrease from days 14 to 28 after reperfusion. In contrast, [(18)F]DPA-714 evidenced maximum binding uptake values over day 7 after reperfusion. Ex vivo immnunohistochemistry confirmed the up-regulation of system xc(-) in microglial cells and marginally in astrocytes. Inhibition of system xc(-) with sulfasalazine and S-4-CPG resulted in increased arginase (anti-inflammatory M2 marker) expression at day 7 after ischemia, together with a decrease in TSPO and microglial M1 proinflammatory markers (CCL2, TNF and iNOS) expression. Taken together, these results suggest that system xc(-) plays a key role in the inflammatory reaction underlying experimental stroke.

  2. Cerebral malaria Malaria cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Blair Trujillo; Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata

    2003-01-01

    Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains...

  3. Retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) in aortic arch surgery: efficacy and possible mechanisms of brain protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavaria, J E; Pochettino, A

    1997-07-01

    Retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) was first introduced to treat air embolism during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Its use was reintroduced to extend the safety of hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) during operations involving an open aortic arch. RCP seems to prevent cerebral rewarming during HCA. Both clinical and animal data suggest that RCP provides between 10% and 30% of baseline cerebral blood flow when administered through the superior vena cava (SVC) at jugular pressures of 20 to 25 mm Hg. RCP flows producing jugular venous pressures higher than 30 mm Hg may cause cerebral edema. Cerebral blood flow generated by RCP is able to sustain some cerebral metabolic activity, yet is not able to fully meet cerebral energy demands even at temperatures of 12 degrees to 18 degrees C. RCP may further prevent embolic events during aortic arch surgery when administered at moderate jugular vein pressures (RCP, when applied during aortic arch reconstruction, may extend the safe HCA period and improve morbidity and mortality, especially when HCA times are more than 60 minutes. RCP applied in patients and severe carotid and brachiocephalic occlusive disease may be ineffective, and caution is in order when RCP times are greater than 90 minutes.

  4. Morphological brain damage, functional disorders and the possibilities of their treatment in children with infantile cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popko, J; Sobaniec, W; Król, E; Sendrowski, K; Kossakowski, D; Olszewski, S

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-four children with infantile cerebral palsy (6 girls and 18 boys aged 3-17 years), surgically treated in the years 1993-1997, were involved in the study. Neurological-orthopaedic examinations and computer tomography (CT) of the head allowed precise diagnosis and understanding of its pathology. The group consisted of 10 patients with hemiplegia, 10 with diplegia and 4 with severe quadriplegia. In 18 children changes in the brain were largely dependent on the clinical type of paresis. In hemiparesis, unilateral changes, such as cerebral cortex atrophy with enlarged ventricles, were predominant. Diplegia cases frequently showed periventricular damage to the white matter. Brain tomography in severe quadriplegia did not always correspond to the clinical condition. CT examinations revealed no abnormalities in the brain in 6 out of 24 cases. Since the results of rehabilitation were not satisfactory, 29 surgical procedures were performed in the presented group of patients, with improved the course of therapeutic rehabilitation or nursing care in all the children.

  5. Liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin alleviates brain edema after permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Akira T; Kurita, Daisaku; Furuya, Hiroyuki; Yamano, Mariko; Ogata, Yoshitaka; Haida, Munetaka

    2009-02-01

    Liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH) was proven to be protective in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. The present study evaluated LEH in a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion to clarify its effect during ischemia and reperfusion. Five minutes after thread occlusion of the MCA, rats were infused with 10 mL/kg of LEH (LEH, n = 13), and compared with normal controls (n = 11). Additional animals received the same MCA occlusion with no treatment (CT, n = 11), saline (saline, n = 10), empty liposome solution (EL, n = 13), or washed red blood cells (RBC, n = 7). Severity of brain edema was determined 24 h later by signal strength in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and pyriform lobe. The results showed that brain edema/infarction observed in any vehicle-infused control was significantly more severe than in LEH-treated rats. There was a tendency toward aggravated edema in rats receiving ELs. LEH infusion at a dose of 10 mL/kg significantly reduced edema formation as compared to other treatments in a wide area of the brain 24 h after permanent occlusion of the MCA. Low oncotic pressure of EL and LEH solution (vehicle solution) appeared to cause nonsignificant aggravation of edema and reduced protective effects of LEH.

  6. Enhanced neurofibrillary tangle formation, cerebral atrophy, and cognitive deficits induced by repetitive mild brain injury in a transgenic tauopathy mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Uryu, Kunihiro; Higuchi, Makoto; Longhi, Luca; Hoover, Rachel; Fujimoto, Scott; McIntosh, Tracy; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2005-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and repetitive TBI (rTBI) may culminate in dementia pugilistica (DP), a syndrome characterized by progressive dementia, parkinsonism, and the hallmark brain lesions of AD, including neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed by abnormal tau filaments and senile plaques (SPs) composed of Abeta fibrils. Previous study showed that mild rTBI (mrTBI) accelerated the deposition of Abeta in the brains of transgenic (Tg) mice (Tg2576) that over-express human Abeta precursor proteins with the familial AD Swedish mutations (APP695swe) and model of AD-like amyloidosis. Here, we report studies of the effects of mrTBI on AD-like tau pathologies in Tg mice expressing the shortest human tau isoform (T44) subjected to mrTBI, causing brain concussion without structural brain damage to simulate injuries linked to DP. Twelve-month-old Tg T44 (n = 18) and wild-type (WT; n = 24) mice were subjected to mrTBI (four times a day, 1 day per week, for 4 weeks; n = 24) or sham treatment (n = 18). Histopathological analysis of mice at 9 months after mrTBI revealed that one of the Tg T44 mice showed extensive telencephalic NFT and cerebral atrophy. Although statistical analysis of neurobehavioral tests at 6 months after mrTBI did not show any significant difference in any of groups of mice, the Tg T44 mouse with extensive NFT had an exceptionally low neurobehavioral score. The reasons for the augmentation of tau pathologies in only one T44 tau Tg mouse subjected to mrTBI remain to be elucidated.

  7. MRI findings of acute cerebral swelling and brain edema in the acute stage. A report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Hideo; Ueda, Shin; Matsumoto, Keizo; Kashihara, Michiharu; Furuichi, Masashi.

    1988-08-01

    We report two cases, one of acute cerebral swelling and the other with a major stroke, whose MRI has shown very interesting findings. Case 1, a 32-year-old male, was admitted to our service because of a lowering of his consciousness immediately after a head injury. On admission, the patient was semicomatous (E/sub 1/M/sub 2/V/sub 1/, with anisocoria (R > L). His plain skull X-ray was normal. A CT scan, however, demonstrated right isodensity hemispheric swelling associated with a subarachnoid hemorrhage in the right Sylvian fissure. A right carotid angiogram showed no vascular disorders. MR imaging of the spin density demonstrated a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter in the whole right hemisphere. Case 2, a 58-year-old female, was admitted because of a sudden onset of loss of consciousness, with right hemiparesis and dysarthria. On admission, her consciousness was semicomatous (E/sub 1/M/sub 3/V/sub 1/), and it deteriorated to a deep coma 1 hour later. A CT scan demonstrated a diffuse left hemispheric low density, with a finding of hemorrhagic infarction in the basal ganglia. MR imaging of the spin density showed a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter resembling that of Case 1. The findings of the spin-echo images of our two cases showed a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter in both. The hyperintensity and thickening of the gray matter apparently indicated a sort of hyperemia and brain edema. These findings led us to suspect that the hyperemia associated with acute cerebral swelling and ischemic brain edema of our two cases originated in the gray matter, although it has been considered that the pathogenesis of acute cerebral swelling is not known and that brain edema, especially vasogenic edema, will mostly develop in the white matter rather than in the gray matter.

  8. Quantitation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in human brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Bock, E; Warecka, K

    1980-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) content of 58 human brain tumours was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using monospecific antibody against GFA. Astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, spongioblastomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas contained relatively high...... amounts of GFA, up to 85 times the concentration in parietal grey substance of normal human brain. GFA was not found in neurinomas, meningiomas, adenomas of the hypophysis, or in a single case of metastasis of adenocarcinoma. Non-glial tumours of craniopharyngioma and haemangioblastoma were infiltrated...

  9. β-Dystroglycan cleavage by matrix metalloproteinase-2/-9 disturbs aquaporin-4 polarization and influences brain edema in acute cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W; Zhao, X; Chen, H; Zhong, D; Jin, J; Qin, Q; Zhang, H; Ma, S; Li, G

    2016-06-21

    Dystroglycan (DG) is widely expressed in various tissues, and throughout the cerebral microvasculature. It consists of two subunits, α-DG and β-DG, and the cleavage of the latter by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 underlies a number of physiological and pathological processes. However, the involvement of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage in cerebral ischemia remains uncertain. In astrocytes, DG is crucial for maintaining the polarization of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which plays a role in the regulation of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema. The present study aimed to explore the effects of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage on AQP4 polarization and brain edema in acute cerebral ischemia. A model of cerebral ischemia was established via permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in male C57BL/6 mice. Western blotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemical staining, immunofluorescent staining, electron microscopy, and light microscopy were used. Captopril was applied as a selective MMP-2/-9 inhibitor. Recombinant mouse MMP (rmMMP)-2 and -9 were used in an in vitro cleavage experiment. The present study demonstrated evidence of β-DG cleavage by MMP-2/-9 in pMCAO mouse brains; this cleavage was implicated in AQP4 redistribution and brain edema in cerebral ischemia. In addition, captopril exacerbated cytotoxic edema and ameliorated vasogenic edema at 24h after pMCAO, and alleviated brain edema and neurological deficit at 48h and 72h. In conclusion, this study provides novel insight into the effects of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage in acute cerebral ischemia. Such findings might facilitate the development of a therapeutic strategy for the optimization of MMP-2/-9 targeted treatment in cerebral ischemia.

  10. Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Cynthia A; Day, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome are secondary events that affect patients with traumatic brain injury. All 3 syndromes affect both sodium and water balance; however, they have differences in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Differentiating between hypernatremia (central neurogenic diabetes insipidus) and the 2 hyponatremia syndromes (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome) is critical for preventing worsening neurological outcomes in patients with head injuries.

  11. ShcC proteins: brain aging and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagi, Orli; Budovsky, Arie; Wolfson, Marina; Fraifeld, Vadim E

    2015-01-01

    To date, most studies of Shc family of signaling adaptor proteins have been focused on the near-ubiquitously expressed ShcA, indicating its relevance to age-related diseases and longevity. Although the role of the neuronal ShcC protein is much less investigated, accumulated evidence suggests its importance for neuroprotection against such aging-associated conditions as brain ischemia and oxidative stress. Here, we summarize more than decade of studies on the ShcC expression and function in normal brain, age-related brain pathologies and immune disorders with a focus on the interactions of ShcC with signaling proteins/pathways, and the possible implications of these interactions for changes associated with aging.

  12. Australian Cerebral Palsy Child Study: protocol of a prospective population based study of motor and brain development of preschool aged children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Roslyn N; Jordan, Rachel; Pareezer, Laura; Moodie, Anne; Finn, Christine; Luther, Belinda; Arnfield, Evyn; Pym, Aaron; Craven, Alex; Beall, Paula; Weir, Kelly; Kentish, Megan; Wynter, Meredith; Ware, Robert; Fahey, Michael; Rawicki, Barry; McKinlay, Lynne; Guzzetta, Andrea

    2013-06-11

    Cerebral palsy (CP) results from a static brain lesion during pregnancy or early life and remains the most common cause of physical disability in children (1 in 500). While the brain lesion is static, the physical manifestations and medical issues may progress resulting in altered motor patterns. To date, there are no prospective longitudinal studies of CP that follow a birth cohort to track early gross and fine motor development and use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to determine the anatomical pattern and likely timing of the brain lesion. Existing studies do not consider treatment costs and outcomes. This study aims to determine the pathway(s) to motor outcome from diagnosis at 18 months corrected age (c.a.) to outcome at 5 years in relation to the nature of the brain lesion (using structural MRI). This prospective cohort study aims to recruit a total of 240 children diagnosed with CP born in Victoria (birth years 2004 and 2005) and Queensland (birth years 2006-2009). Children can enter the study at any time between 18 months to 5 years of age and will be assessed at 18, 24, 30, 36, 48 and 60 months c.a. Outcomes include gross motor function (GMFM-66 & GMFM-88), Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS); musculoskeletal development (hip displacement, spasticity, muscle contracture), upper limb function (Manual Ability Classification System), communication difficulties using Communication and Symbolic Behaviour Scales-Developmental Profile (CSBS-DP), participation using the Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI), parent reported quality of life and classification of medical and allied health resource use and determination of the aetiology of CP using clinical evaluation combined with MRI. The relationship between the pathways to motor outcome and the nature of the brain lesion will be analysed using multiple methods including non-linear modelling, multilevel mixed-effects models and generalised estimating equations. This protocol

  13. The preliminary study of Ultraviolet-Irradiated and Oxygenated Blood Transfusion Therapy(UOBT) for Experimental Cerebral Infarction of Animal Brain Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Xiu-Chu; Feng You-Qi; Zhou gang; Wu jun-yi

    2000-01-01

    In this presented study, we have developed a photochemical model of cerebral in farction in rabbit with stable and reproducible infarct size and extent. This model is similar to the pathological changes in human cerebral infarction. Using this model, therapeutic effects and mechanisms of UOBT on brain ischemic injury were invetigated in rabbits following the photochemical infarcnon The results showed that UOBT could significantly reduce the mtarcted size, and improve the cerebral blood flow compared with the control animals treated with non-u-radiated ad non-oxygenated blood transfusion. These data suggest that the UOBT may have a therapeutic potential for clinical rehabilitation effect in stroke treatment

  14. Erythropoietin reduces apoptosis of brain tissue cells in rats after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury: a characteristic analysis using magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-juan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some in vitro experiments have shown that erythropoietin (EPO increases resistance to apoptosis and facilitates neuronal survival following cerebral ischemia. However, results from in vivo studies are rarely reported. Perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI have been applied successfully to distinguish acute cerebral ischemic necrosis and penumbra in living animals; therefore, we hypothesized that PWI and DWI could be used to provide imaging evidence in vivo for the conclusion that EPO could reduce apoptosis in brain areas injured by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. To validate this hypothesis, we established a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, and treated with intra-cerebroventricular injection of EPO (5,000 U/kg 20 minutes before injury. Brain tissue in the ischemic injury zone was sampled using MRI-guided localization. The relative area of abnormal tissue, changes in PWI and DWI in the ischemic injury zone, and the number of apoptotic cells based on TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL were assessed. Our findings demonstrate that EPO reduces the relative area of abnormally high signal in PWI and DWI, increases cerebral blood volume, and decreases the number of apoptotic cells positive for TUNEL in the area injured by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. The experiment provides imaging evidence in vivo for EPO treating cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  15. Erythropoietin reduces apoptosis of brain tissue cells in rats after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury:a characteristic analysis using magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-juan Jiang; Zhong-juan Wang; Yan-jun Zhao; Zhui-yang Zhang; Jing-jing Tao; Jian-yong Ma

    2016-01-01

    Somein vitro experiments have shown that erythropoietin (EPO) increases resistance to apoptosis and facilitates neuronal survival follow-ing cerebral ischemia. However, results fromin vivo studies are rarely reported. Perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been applied successfully to distinguish acute cerebral ischemic necrosis and penumbra in living animals; therefore, we hypothesized that PWI and DWI could be used to provide imaging evidencein vivo for the conclusion that EPO could reduce apoptosis in brain areas injured by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. To validate this hypothesis, we established a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, and treated with intra-cerebroventricular injection of EPO (5,000 U/kg) 20 minutes before injury. Brain tissue in the ischemic injury zone was sampled using MRI-guided localization. The relative area of abnormal tissue, changes in PWI and DWI in the ischemic injury zone, and the number of apoptotic cells based on TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) were assessed. Our ifndings demonstrate that EPO reduces the relative area of abnormally high signal in PWI and DWI, increases cerebral blood volume, and decreases the number of apoptotic cells positive for TUNEL in the area injured by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. The experiment pro-vides imaging evidencein vivo for EPO treating cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  16. Erythropoietin reduces apoptosis of brain tissue cells in rats after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury: a characteristic analysis using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chun-Juan; Wang, Zhong-Juan; Zhao, Yan-Jun; Zhang, Zhui-Yang; Tao, Jing-Jing; Ma, Jian-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Some in vitro experiments have shown that erythropoietin (EPO) increases resistance to apoptosis and facilitates neuronal survival following cerebral ischemia. However, results from in vivo studies are rarely reported. Perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been applied successfully to distinguish acute cerebral ischemic necrosis and penumbra in living animals; therefore, we hypothesized that PWI and DWI could be used to provide imaging evidence in vivo for the conclusion that EPO could reduce apoptosis in brain areas injured by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. To validate this hypothesis, we established a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, and treated with intra-cerebroventricular injection of EPO (5,000 U/kg) 20 minutes before injury. Brain tissue in the ischemic injury zone was sampled using MRI-guided localization. The relative area of abnormal tissue, changes in PWI and DWI in the ischemic injury zone, and the number of apoptotic cells based on TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) were assessed. Our findings demonstrate that EPO reduces the relative area of abnormally high signal in PWI and DWI, increases cerebral blood volume, and decreases the number of apoptotic cells positive for TUNEL in the area injured by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. The experiment provides imaging evidence in vivo for EPO treating cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  17. Insight into hypoxic preconditioning and ischemic injury through determination of nPKCε-interacting proteins in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sujuan; Li, Dongguo; Li, Yun; Yang, Xuan; Han, Song; Li, Junfa

    2013-08-01

    Cerebral hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) provides neuroprotection by intracellular signaling pathways. We previously demonstrated that novel protein kinase Cε (nPKCε) activation participated in cerebral HPC development. In this study, we explore the role of nPKCε in HPC-induced neuroprotection against middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced ischemic injury and identify its possible signaling molecules. A total of 131 adult male BALB/c mice were divided into eight groups: normoxic control (n=9), HPC (n=9), HPC+εV1-2 (n=13), Sham (n=19), HPC+sham (n=6), Ischemia (I, 6h MCAO, n=31), HPC+I (n=25) and HPC+εV1-2+I (n=19). nPKCε specific inhibitor εV1-2 was administered via intracerebroventricular injection. Western blot, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling were applied to determine nPKCε membrane translocation, infarction volume and programmed cell death (PCD), respectively. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-De) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were used to identify nPKCε-interacting proteins, followed by bioinformatics analysis of genee ontology (GO) to predict nPKCε-specific signaling pathways. Our results showed that HPC attenuates MCAO-induced brain injuries and stabilized nPKCεmembrane translocation in peri-infarct region, which was abolished by nPKCε-speecific inhibitor εV1-2. Proteomics analysis revealed 8 up- and 3 down-regulated nPKCε-interacting proteins both in cytosolic and particulate fractions of HPC mouse brain. GO analysis predicted 25 significant nPKCε-specific signaling pathways among the 16 identified nPKCε-interacting proteins in brain of HPC mice. This study is the first to report multiple nPKCε-interacting proteins and their signaling pathways in HPC mouse brain, suggesting that nPKCε signaling molecules is responsible for HPC-induced neuroprotection against cerebral ischemic

  18. Cerebral Malaria; Mechanisms Of Brain Injury And Strategies For Improved Neuro-Cognitive Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Idro, Richard; Marsh, Kevin; John, Chandy C.; Newton, Charles RJ

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is the most severe neurological complication of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. With over 575,000 cases annually, children in sub-Saharan Africa are the most affected. Surviving patients have an increased risk of neurological and cognitive deficits, behavioral difficulties and epilepsy making cerebral malaria a leading cause of childhood neuro-disability in the region. The pathogenesis of neuro-cognitive sequelae is poorly understood: coma develops through multiple mech...

  19. Elevation of 4-hydroxynonenal and malondialdehyde modified protein levels in cerebral cortex with cognitive dysfunction in rats exposed to 1-bromopropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhixia; Zeng, Tao; Xie, Keqin; Zhang, Cuili; Chen, Jingjing; Bi, Ye; Zhao, Xiulan

    2013-04-05

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP), an alternative to ozone-depleting solvents (ODS), exhibits central nervous system (CNS) toxicity in animals and humans. This study was designed to relate CNS damage by Morris water maze (MWM) test and oxidative stress to 1-BP exposure in the rat. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10), and treated with 0, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kgbw 1-BP for consecutive 12 days, respectively. From day 8 to day 12 of the experiment, MWM test was employed to assess the cognitive function of rats. The cerebral cortex of rats was obtained immediately following the 24h after MWM test conclusion. Glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and total thiol (total-SH) content, GSH reductase (GR) and GSH peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, malondialdehyde (MDA) level, as well as 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and MDA modified proteins in homogenates of cerebral cortex were measured. The obtained results showed that 1-BP led to cognitive dysfunction of rats, which was evidenced by delayed escape latency time and swimming distances in MWM performance. GSH and total-SH content, GSH/GSSG ratio, GR activity significantly decreased in cerebral cortex of rats, coupling with the increase of MDA level. 4-HNE and MDA modified protein levels obviously elevated after 1-BP exposure. GSH-Px activities in cerebral cortex of rats also increased. These data suggested that 1-BP resulted in enhanced lipid peroxidation of brain, which might play an important role in CNS damage induced by 1-BP.

  20. Visinin-like neuronal calcium sensor proteins regulate the slow calcium-activated afterhyperpolarizing current in the rat cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Claudio; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01

    Many neurons in the nervous systems express afterhyperpolarizations that are mediated by a slow calcium-activated potassium current. This current shapes neuronal firing and is inhibited by neuromodulators, suggesting an important role in the regulation of neuronal function. Surprisingly, very little is currently known about the molecular basis for this current or how it is gated by calcium. Recently, the neuronal calcium sensor protein hippocalcin was identified as a calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current in the hippocampus. However, while hippocalcin is very strongly expressed in the hippocampus, this protein shows a relatively restricted distribution in the brain. Furthermore, the genetic deletion of this protein only partly reduces the slow hyperpolarizing current in hippocampus. These considerations question whether hippocalcin can be the sole calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current. Here we use loss of function and overexpression strategies to show that hippocalcin functions as a calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current in the cerebral cortex, an area where hippocalcin is expressed at much lower levels than in hippocampus. In addition we show that neurocalcin δ, but not VILIP-2, can also act as a calcium sensor for the slow afterhyperpolarizing current. Finally we show that hippocalcin and neurocalcin δ both increase the calcium sensitivity of the afterhyperpolarizing current but do not alter its sensitivity to inhibition by carbachol acting through the Gαq-11-PLCβ signaling cascade. These results point to a general role for a subgroup of visinin-like neuronal calcium sensor proteins in the activation of the slow calcium-activated afterhyperpolarizing current. PMID:20980592

  1. Reduced Cerebral Oxygen Content in the DG and SVZ In Situ Promotes Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Brain In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult brain occurs mainly within two neurogenic structures, the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ of the forebrain. It has been reported that mild hypoxia promoted the proliferation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCsin vitro. Our previous study further demonstrated that an external hypoxic environment stimulated neurogenesis in the adult rat brain in vivo. However, it remains unknown how external hypoxic environments affect the oxygen content in the brain and result in neurogenesis. Here we use an optical fiber luminescent oxygen sensor to detect the oxygen content in the adult rat brain in situ under normoxia and hypoxia. We found that the distribution of oxygen in cerebral regions is spatiotemporally heterogeneous. The Po2 values in the ventricles (45∼50 Torr and DG (approximately 10 Torr were much higher than those of other parts of the brain, such as the cortex and thalamus (approximately 2 Torr. Interestingly, our in vivo studies showed that an external hypoxic environment could change the intrinsic oxygen content in brain tissues, notably reducing oxygen levels in both the DG and SVZ, the major sites of adult neurogenesis. Furthermore, the hypoxic environment also increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, two factors that have been reported to regulate neurogenesis, within the DG and SVZ. Thus, we have demonstrated that reducing the oxygen content of the external environment decreased Po2 levels in the DG and SVZ. This reduced oxygen level in the DG and SVZ might be the main mechanism triggering neurogenesis in the adult brain. More importantly, we speculate that varying oxygen levels may be the physiological basis of the regionally restricted neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  2. Reduced Cerebral Oxygen Content in the DG and SVZ In Situ Promotes Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Brain In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhou, Yanzhao; Zhao, Tong; Wu, Liying; Huang, Xin; Wu, Kuiwu; Xu, Lun; Li, Dahu; Liu, Shuhong; Zhao, Yongqi; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult brain occur