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Sample records for brain peripheral benzodiazepine

  1. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B.; McKeever, P.; Young, A.B.

    1987-02-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of /sup 3/H-labeled PK 11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide) or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes.

  2. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of 3H-labeled PK 11195 [1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide] or [3H]flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes

  3. Imaging brain inflammation with [(11)C]PK11195 by PET and induction of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor after transient focal ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Santiago; Martín, Abraham; Arranz, Maria J; Pareto, Deborah; Purroy, Jesús; Verdaguer, Esther; Llop, Jordi; Gómez, Vanessa; Gispert, Joan D; Millán, Olga; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2007-12-01

    [(11)C]PK11195 is used in positron emission tomography (PET) studies for imaging brain inflammation in vivo as it binds to the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) expressed by reactive glia and macrophages. However, features of the cellular reaction required to induce a positive [(11)C]PK11195 signal are not well characterized. We performed [(11)C]PK11195 PET and autoradiography in rats after transient focal cerebral ischemia. We determined [(3)H]PK11195 binding and PBR expression in brain tissue and examined the lesion with several markers. [(11)C]PK11195 standard uptake value increased at day 4 and grew further at day 7 within the ischemic core. Accordingly, ex vivo [(3)H]PK11195 binding increased at day 4, and increases further at day 7. The PET signal also augmented in peripheral regions, but to a lesser extent than in the core. Binding in the region surrounding infarction was supported by [(11)C]PK11195 autoradiography at day 7 showing that the radioactive signal extended beyond the infarcted core. Enhanced binding was preceded by increases in PBR mRNA expression in the ipsilateral hemisphere, and a 18-kDa band corresponding to PBR protein was detected. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor immunohistochemistry showed subsets of ameboid microglia/macrophages within the infarcted core showing a distinctive strong PBR expression from day 4. These cells were often located surrounding microhemorrhages. Reactive astrocytes forming a rim surrounding infarction at day 7 also showed some PBR immunostaining. These results show cellular heterogeneity in the level of PBR expression, supporting that PBR is not a simple marker of inflammation, and that the extent of [(11)C]PK11195 binding depends on intrinsic features of the inflammatory cells.

  4. Platelet peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in repeated stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dar, D.E.; Bidder, M.; Gavish, M. (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)); Weizman, A.; Karp, L.; Tyano, S. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)); Grinshpoon, A.; Bleich, A.

    1991-01-01

    ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to platelet membranes and plasma stress hormones were studied in soldiers at the beginning of a parachute training course, following 6 days of preparatory exercises, and after the fourth actual parachute jump. A slight reduction (15%; NS) in the number of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) was detected at the end of the exercise period, prior to the first jump. Reduced density of PBR was observed immediately after the repeated actual jumps. Equilibrium dissociation constants were not affected by the stressful situation. Plasma cortisol and prolactin levels remained unaltered during the entire study period.

  5. Peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites on striated muscles of the rat: Properties and effect of denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.E.; Ickstadt, A. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pharmakologisches Inst.); Hopf, H.Ch. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1985-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites mediate some direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles, the properties of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding to rat biceps and rat diaphragm homogenates were investigated. In both tissues a single population of sites was found with a Ksub(D) value of 3 nmol/l. The density of these sites in both muscles was higher than the density in rat brain, but was considerably lower than in rat kidney. Competition experiments indicate a substrate specificity of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding similar to the properties already demonstrated for the specific binding of this ligand to peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in many other tissues. The properties of these sites in the rat diaphragm are not changed after motoric denervation by phrenicectomy. It is concluded that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites are not involved in direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles.

  6. Region-selective effects of neuroinflammation and antioxidant treatment on peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and NMDA receptors in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A.; Alvarado, M.; Budinger, T.F.; Grossman, R.; Hensley, K.; West, M.S.; Kotake, Y.; Ono, M.; Floyd, R.A.

    2001-12-10

    Following induction of acute neuroinflammation by intracisternal injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) in rats, quantitative autoradiography was used to assess the regional level of microglial activation and glutamate (NMDA) receptor binding. The possible protective action of the antioxidant phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone in this model was tested by administering the drug in the drinking water for 6 days starting 24 hours after endotoxin injection. Animals were killed 7 days post-injection and consecutive cryostat brain sections labeled with [3H]PK11195 as a marker of activated microglia and [125I]iodoMK801 as a marker of the open-channel, activated state of NMDA receptors. Lipopolysaccharide increased [3H]PK11195 binding in the brain, with the largest increases (2-3 fold) in temporal and entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. A significant (>50 percent) decrease in [125I]iodoMK801 binding was found in the same brain regions. Phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone treatment resulted in a partial inhibition ({approx}25 percent decrease) of the lipopolysaccharide-induced increase in [3H]PK11195 binding but completely reversed the lipopolysaccharide-induced decrease in [125I]iodoMK80 binding in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. Loss of NMDA receptor function in cortical and hippocampal regions may contribute to the cognitive deficits observed in diseases with a neuroinflammatory component, such as meningitis or Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Platelet peripheral benzodiazepine receptors are decreased in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peripheral benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors are located in a variety of tissues, including platelets, in the nuclear and/or mitochondrial membranes. The authors studied the density of peripheral BDZ receptors in platelets of 10 de novo Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, 18 PD patients treated with a levodopa/carbidopa combination, and in 15 healthy subjects matched for sex and age. The binding assay was conducted using [3H]PK 11195, a specific ligand for peripheral BDZ receptors. A significant decrease in the density of [3H]PK 11195 binding sites has been observed in PD patients with respect to controls but not between de novo and treated PD patients. No correlation has been found between the decrease in density of [3H]PK 11195 binding sites in platelets and either the duration or severity of PD. Peripheral BDZ receptors are implicated in the regulation of mitochondrial respiratory function. Thus, their decrease in PD might parallel the abnormalities in mitochondrial function recently found in this neurologic disease

  8. Identification, characterization, and purification of a 65,000 dalton protein in rat brain is photolabeled by nitro-containing benzodiazepines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzodiazepines bind to two well-characterized classes of nanomolar-affinity binding sites, the central and the peripheral types. Although these sites appear to mediate many of the effects of these compounds, they cannot account for all of the biochemical and physiologic effects of the benzodiazepines. In this investigation, a protein that is photolabeled by NO2-containing benzodiazepines was identified and characterized in rat brain by performing photaffinity labeling experiments with [3H]-clonazepam and [3H]-flunitrazepam. These experiments demonstrate that this photolabeled protein has a molecular weight of 65,000 daltons. Photolabeling of the protein was saturable, inhibited in a stereoselective manner by benzodiazepine enantiomers, inhibited by therapeutically-relevant concentrations of many different NO2-containing benzodiazepines, and was not inhibited by more than 70 non-benzodiazepine compounds. The photolabeled protein is distinct from the central and peripheral sites on the basis of molecular weight, benzodiazepine inhibitory potencies, subcellular localization, and tissue distribution

  9. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

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    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  10. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of [3H]Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in [14C]iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress [an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures], although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results

  11. Benzodiazepines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... longer duration of action are utilized to treat insomnia in patients with daytime anxiety. These benzodiazepines ... of abuse Abuse is frequently associated with adolescents and young adults who take the drug orally or crush it ...

  12. Extraction and purification from Ceratonia siliqua of compounds acting on central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avallone, R; Cosenza, F; Farina, F; Baraldi, C; Baraldi, M

    2002-08-01

    The presence of molecules with high affinity for central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors was determined in the pod and leaves of Ceratonia siliqua (carob). The amount of the substances able to selectively bind the central benzodiazepine receptor recovered from carob pods and leaves was respectively 12.17 and 18.7 ng diazepam equivalent/g. The amount of compounds active on peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in both pods and leaves was higher in comparison with the central one, being 49.83 and 40.00 PK 11195 equivalent/g, respectively. In particular the compounds acting on peripheral benzodiazepine receptors were found to be extremely concentrated in the young leaves (2572.57 ng PK 11195 equivalent/g). The presence of substances with central benzodiazepine activity in carob extracts seems of great importance in view of the possibility to use carob extract as potential natural products with anxiolytic-sedative effects. Moreover, the prevalence in leaves of substances acting on peripheral benzodiazepine receptor suggests the possible utilisation of leave extracts as chemopreventive agents.

  13. In vivo labelling in several rat tissues of 'peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites in several rat tissues were labelled by intravenous injection of [3H]PK 11195 and [3H]RO5-4864. Binding was saturable in all tissues studied and regional distribution paralleled the in vitro binding. A similar potency order of displacing compounds was found in vivo and in vitro PK 11195 > PK 11211 > RO5-4864 > diazepam > dipyridamole > clonazepam. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique to examine the effects of pharmacological manipulation on the binding sites in their native state. However, some properties (broader maximum during time course, higher percentage of particulate binding in the brain and independence of temperature) make [3H]PK 11195 the most suitable ligand for this kind of studies. (Auth.)

  14. Determinants of benzodiazepine brain uptake: lipophilicity versus binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, R M; Greenblatt, D J; Liebisch, D C; Luu, M D; Paul, S M

    1987-01-01

    Factors influencing brain uptake of benzodiazepine derivatives were evaluated in adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 8-10 per drug). Animals received single intraperitoneal doses of alprazolam, triazolam, lorazepam, flunitrazepam, diazepam, midazolam, desmethyldiazepam, or clobazam. Concentrations of each drug (and metabolites) in whole brain and serum 1 h after dosage were determined by gas chromatography. Serum free fraction was measured by equilibrium dialysis. In vitro binding affinity (apparent Ki) of each compound was estimated based on displacement of tritiated flunitrazepam in washed membrane preparations from rat cerebral cortex. Lipid solubility of each benzodiazepine was estimated using the reverse-phase liquid chromatographic (HPLC) retention index at physiologic pH. There was no significant relation between brain:total serum concentration ratio and either HPLC retention (r = 0.18) or binding Ki (r = -0.34). Correction of uptake ratios for free as opposed to total serum concentration yielded a highly significant correlation with HPLC retention (r = 0.78, P less than 0.005). However, even the corrected ratio was not correlated with binding Ki (r = -0.22). Thus a benzodiazepine's capacity to diffuse from systemic blood into brain tissue is much more closely associated with the physicochemical property of lipid solubility than with specific affinity. Unbound rather than total serum or plasma concentration most accurately reflects the quantity of drug available for diffusion. PMID:2888155

  15. Radiosynthesis and initial evaluation of [18F]-FEPPA for PET imaging of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: A novel [18F]-radiolabelled phenoxyanilide, [18F]-FEPPA, has been synthesized and evaluated, in vitro and ex vivo, as a potential positron emission tomography imaging agent for the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). Methods: [18F]-FEPPA and two other radiotracers for imaging PBR, namely [11C]-PBR28 and [11C]-PBR28-d3, were synthesised and evaluated in vitro and ex vivo as potential PBR imaging agents. Results: [18F]-FEPPA is efficiently prepared in one step from its tosylate precursor and [18F]-fluoride in high radiochemical yields and at high specific activity. FEPPA displayed a Ki of 0.07 nM for PBR in rat mitochondrial membrane preparations and a suitable lipophilicity for brain penetration (log P of 2.99 at pH 7.4). Upon intravenous injection into rats, [18F]-FEPPA showed moderate brain uptake [standard uptake value (SUV) of 0.6 at 5 min] and a slow washout (SUV of 0.35 after 60 min). Highest uptake of radioactivity was seen in the hypothalamus and olfactory bulb, regions previously reported to be enriched in PBR in rat brain. Analysis of plasma and brain extracts demonstrated that [18F]-FEPPA was rapidly metabolized, but no lipophilic metabolites were observed in either preparation and only 5% radioactive metabolites were present in brain tissue extracts. Blocking studies to determine the extent of specific binding of [18F]-FEPPA in rat brain were problematic due to large perturbations in circulating radiotracer and the lack of a reference region. Conclusions: Further evaluation of the potential of [18F]-FEPPA will require the employment of rigorous kinetic models and/or appropriate animal models

  16. Interactions of pyrethroid insecticides with GABA sub A and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaud, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are potent proconvulsants in the rat. All pyrethroids evincing proconvulsant activity elicited a similar 25-30% maximal reduction of seizure threshold. The Type II pyrethroids were the most potent proconvulsants with 1R{alpha}S, cis cypermethrin having an ED{sub 50} value of 6.3 nmol/kg. The proconvulsant activity of both Type I and Type II pyrenthroids was blocked by pretreatment with PK 11195, the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PTBR) antagonist. In contrast, phenytoin did not antagonize the proconvulsant activity of either deltamethrin or permethrin. Pyrethroids displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 to rat brain membranes with a significant correlation between the log EC{sub 50} values for their activities as proconvulsants and the log IC{sub 50} values for their inhibition of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 binding. Both Ro5-4864 and pyrethroid insecticides were found to influence specific ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding in a GABA-dependent manner. PK 11195 and the Type II pyrethroid, deltamethrin antagonized the Ro5-4864-induced modulation of ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding. Pyrethroid insecticides, Ro5-4864 and veratridine influenced GABA-gated {sup 36}Chloride influx. Moreover, the Type II pyrethroids elicited an increase in {sup 36}chloride influx in the absence of GABA-stimulation. Both of these actions were antagonized by PK 11195 and tetrodotoxin.

  17. Identification, characterization, and purification of a 65,000 dalton protein in rat brain is photolabeled by nitro-containing benzodiazepines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowling, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    Benzodiazepines bind to two well-characterized classes of nanomolar-affinity binding sites, the central and the peripheral types. Although these sites appear to mediate many of the effects of these compounds, they cannot account for all of the biochemical and physiologic effects of the benzodiazepines. In this investigation, a protein that is photolabeled by NO{sub 2}-containing benzodiazepines was identified and characterized in rat brain by performing photaffinity labeling experiments with ({sup 3}H)-clonazepam and ({sup 3}H)-flunitrazepam. These experiments demonstrate that this photolabeled protein has a molecular weight of 65,000 daltons. Photolabeling of the protein was saturable, inhibited in a stereoselective manner by benzodiazepine enantiomers, inhibited by therapeutically-relevant concentrations of many different NO{sub 2}-containing benzodiazepines, and was not inhibited by more than 70 non-benzodiazepine compounds. The photolabeled protein is distinct from the central and peripheral sites on the basis of molecular weight, benzodiazepine inhibitory potencies, subcellular localization, and tissue distribution.

  18. In vivo labelling in several rat tissues of 'peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benavides, J.; Guilloux, F.; Rufat, P.; Uzan, A.; Renault, C.; Dubroeucq, M.C.; Gueremy, C.; Le Fur, G. (Pharmuka Laboratoires, 92 - Gennevilliers (France))

    1984-03-16

    'Peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites in several rat tissues were labelled by intravenous injection of (/sup 3/H)PK 11195 and (/sup 3/H)RO5-4864. Binding was saturable in all tissues studied and regional distribution paralleled the in vitro binding. A similar potency order of displacing compounds was found in vivo and in vitro PK 11195 > PK 11211 > RO5-4864 > diazepam > dipyridamole > clonazepam. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique to examine the effects of pharmacological manipulation on the binding sites in their native state. However, some properties (broader maximum during time course, higher percentage of particulate binding in the brain and independence of temperature) make (/sup 3/H)PK 11195 the most suitable ligand for this kind of studies.

  19. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, 3H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a 3H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of 3H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A4, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each

  20. Physiology and physiopathology of central type Benzodiazepine receptors: Study in the monkey and in human brain using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new non-invasive technique that allows to study in a living subject central type benzodiazepine receptors is developed. A combined approach is applied using a specific positron-emitting radiotracer for the in vivo labelling of the receptors and positron emission tomography allowing, by external detection, a quantitative determination of tissue radioactivity. The radioligand used for the in vivo labelling of benzodiazepine receptors is the antagonist RO 15-1788 labelled with carbon 11. The various stages of the study are described: in vivo characterization in the monkey of central type benzodiazepine receptors; characterization of central type benzodiazepine receptors in human brain using selective molecules for the BZ1 benzodiazepine subclass; demonstration of the heterogeneity of central type benzodiazepine receptors in the brain; study of pathological alteration of benzodiazepine receptors in experimental epilepsy

  1. Radiosynthesis and initial evaluation of [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA for PET imaging of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Alan A. [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada)], E-mail: alan.wilson@camhpet.ca; Garcia, Armando; Parkes, Jun [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada); McCormick, Patrick [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8 (Canada); Stephenson, Karin A. [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Houle, Sylvain; Vasdev, Neil [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada)

    2008-04-15

    Introduction: A novel [{sup 18}F]-radiolabelled phenoxyanilide, [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA, has been synthesized and evaluated, in vitro and ex vivo, as a potential positron emission tomography imaging agent for the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). Methods: [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA and two other radiotracers for imaging PBR, namely [{sup 11}C]-PBR28 and [{sup 11}C]-PBR28-d3, were synthesised and evaluated in vitro and ex vivo as potential PBR imaging agents. Results: [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA is efficiently prepared in one step from its tosylate precursor and [{sup 18}F]-fluoride in high radiochemical yields and at high specific activity. FEPPA displayed a K{sub i} of 0.07 nM for PBR in rat mitochondrial membrane preparations and a suitable lipophilicity for brain penetration (log P of 2.99 at pH 7.4). Upon intravenous injection into rats, [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA showed moderate brain uptake [standard uptake value (SUV) of 0.6 at 5 min] and a slow washout (SUV of 0.35 after 60 min). Highest uptake of radioactivity was seen in the hypothalamus and olfactory bulb, regions previously reported to be enriched in PBR in rat brain. Analysis of plasma and brain extracts demonstrated that [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA was rapidly metabolized, but no lipophilic metabolites were observed in either preparation and only 5% radioactive metabolites were present in brain tissue extracts. Blocking studies to determine the extent of specific binding of [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA in rat brain were problematic due to large perturbations in circulating radiotracer and the lack of a reference region. Conclusions: Further evaluation of the potential of [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA will require the employment of rigorous kinetic models and/or appropriate animal models.

  2. Effect of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands on lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor activity in thioglycolate-treated mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, T.; Ogata, M.; Koga, K.; Shigematsu, A

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the effect of peripheral and central benzodiazepine receptor ligands on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activity in mouse macrophages, three types of ligands, 4'-chlorodiazepam (pure peripheral), midazolam (mixed), and clonazepam (pure central), were compared. Midazolam and 4'-chlorodiazepam significantly suppressed LPS (1-microgram/ml)-induced TNF activity in thioglycolate-elicited mouse macrophages. In every concentration examined (0.001 to 100 mi...

  3. Benzodiazepine receptor and neurotransmitter studies in the brain of suicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of benzodiazepine binding sites were studied on frozen sections of hippocampus of 7 suicides and 5 controls subjects, using biochemical and autoradiographic techniques. 3H flunitrazepam was used as ligand, clonazepam and CL 218,872 as displacing agents. Some neurotransmitters or their derivatives were evaluated quantitatively in parallel in the hippocampal tissue by liquid chromatography. The authors observed mainly an increase in the Ki of CL 218,872 subtype I binding sites in suicides, and an increase in % of type I binding sites. Among neurotransmitters, only norepinephrine differed significantly between controls and suicides. 36 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  4. Benzodiazepine receptor and neurotransmitter studies in the brain of suicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchon, M.; Kopp, N.; Rouzioux, J.J.; Lecestre, D.; Deluermoz, S.; Miachon, S.

    1987-12-14

    The characteristics of benzodiazepine binding sites were studied on frozen sections of hippocampus of 7 suicides and 5 controls subjects, using biochemical and autoradiographic techniques. /sup 3/H flunitrazepam was used as ligand, clonazepam and CL 218,872 as displacing agents. Some neurotransmitters or their derivatives were evaluated quantitatively in parallel in the hippocampal tissue by liquid chromatography. The authors observed mainly an increase in the Ki of CL 218,872 subtype I binding sites in suicides, and an increase in % of type I binding sites. Among neurotransmitters, only norepinephrine differed significantly between controls and suicides. 36 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  5. Quantitative autoradiographic determination of binding sites for a peripheral benzodiazepine ligand ((/sup 3/H)PK 11195) in human iris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valtier, D.; Malgouris, C.; Uzan, A.

    1987-01-01

    Specific binding sites of peripheral-type benzodiazepines were investigated in human iris/ciliary body (8 eyes). Examination of color-coded prints and densitometric quantification of autoradiograms were performed on slides (20 ..mu..m) labelled with (/sup 3/H)PK 11195 (1 nM) at 25 deg C. Nonspecific binding was determined with PK 11211 (5 ..mu..M) or Ro 5-4864 (5 ..mu..M). Binding sites were present on all the slides, with equivalent density in the 3 regions of the preparation (ciliary body, iris and pupil margin). The numbers of binding sites in ciliary body, iris, and pupil margin, respectively were: 42.7 +- 0.2, 30.1 +- 0.5 and 37.4 +- 0.4 femtomol/mg protein. Labelling on the pupil margin seemed to coincide with the iris sphincter muscle. The presence of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in iris muscular tissue, and particularly in the pupil margin, suggests that the iris preparation may be a valuable tool to detect putative physiological effects of peripheral benzodiazepines on muscular motility.

  6. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human skin: the relationship with epidermal cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoebner, P E; Carayon, P; Penarier, G; Fréchin, N; Barnéon, G; Casellas, P; Cano, J P; Meynadier, J; Meunier, L

    1999-06-01

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands. PBR is part of a heteromeric receptor complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores and in the early events of apoptosis. PBR may function as an oxygen-dependent signal generator; recent data indicate that these receptors may preserve the mitochondria of haematopoietic cell lines from damage caused by oxygen radicals. To identify PBRs in human skin, we used a specific monoclonal antibody directed against the C-terminus fragment of the human receptor. PBR immunoreactivity was found in keratinocytes, Langerhans cells, hair follicles and dermal vascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, confocal microscopic examination of skin sections revealed that PBR expression was strongly upregulated in the superficial differentiated layers of the epidermis. Ultrastructurally, PBRs were distributed throughout the cytoplasm but were selectively expressed on the mitochondrial membranes of epidermal cells. The elevated level of PBRs in the spinous layer was not associated with an increased number of mitochondria nor with an increased amount of mRNA as assessed by in situ hybridization on microautoradiographed skin sections. The present work provides, for the first time, evidence of PBR immunoreactivity in human skin. This mitochondrial receptor may modulate apoptosis in the epidermis; its increased expression in differentiated epidermal layers may represent a novel mechanism of natural skin protection against free radical damage generated by ultraviolet exposure. PMID:10354064

  7. Study on measurement of free ligand concentration in blood and quantitative analysis of brain benzodiazepine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Goromaru, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Osamu; Itoh, Takashi; Yamasaki, Toshiro.

    1988-11-01

    We developed the method to determine rapidly the free ligand concentration in the blood as an input function for the purpose of quantitative analysis of binding potential (B/sub max//K/sub d/) of brain benzodiazepine receptor in vivo. It was found that the unmetabolized radioligand in the blood after intravenous administration of /sup 3/H-Ro 15 - 1788 could be extracted by chloroform, whereas the radioactive metabolites could not be extracted. And the plasma protein binding of /sup 3/H-Ro 15 - 1788 was determined using an ultrafiltration method. The biodistribution of /sup 3/H-Ro 15 - 1788 in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pons-medulla after intravenous administration of the radiotracer in the control and forced-swimmed mice was examined. And the time course of the free ligand concentration in the blood was determined as described above. Further, the binding potential of benzodiazepine receptor in the mouse brain was analyzed using a simple mathematical model. It was suggested that the binding potential of benzodiazepine receptor in the mouse brain was significantly decreased by forced-swimming. In conclusion, it was found that these methods would be useful for quantitative analysis of clinical data in the human brain using /sup 11/C-Ro 15 - 1788 and positron emission tomography (PET).

  8. Radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of N-[{sup 11}C]methylated imidazopyridineacetamides as PET tracers for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimata, Katsuhiko [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan); Hatano, Kentaro [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)], E-mail: hatanok@nils.go.jp; Ogawa, Mikako [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka 431-3192 Japan (Japan); Abe, Junichiro [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan); Magata, Yasuhiro [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka 431-3192 Japan (Japan); Biggio, Giovanni; Serra, Mariangela [Department of Experimental Biology, University of Cagliari, Cagliari 09100 (Italy); Laquintana, Valentino; Denora, Nunzio; Latrofa, Andrea; Trapani, Giuseppe; Liso, Gaetano [Pharmaco-Chemistry Department, University of Bari, Bari 70125 (Italy); Ito, Kengo [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    Imidazopyridineacetoamide 5-8, a series of novel and potentially selective peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligands with affinities comparable to those of known PBR ligands, was investigated. Radiosyntheses of [{sup 11}C]5, 6, 7 or 8 was accomplished by N-methylation of the corresponding desmethyl precursors with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide in the presence of NaH in dimethylformamide (DMF), resulting in 25% to 77% radiochemical yield and specific activitiy of 20 to 150 MBq/nmol. Each of the labeled compounds was injected in ddY mice, and the radioactivity and weight of dissected peripheral organs and brain regions were measured. Organ distribution of [{sup 11}C]7 was consistent with the known PBR distribution. Moreover, [{sup 11}C]7 showed the best combination of brain uptake and PBR binding, leading to its high retention in the olfactory bulb and cerebellum, areas where PBR density is high in mouse brain. Coinjection of PK11195 or unlabeled 7 significantly reduced the brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]7. These results suggest that [{sup 11}C]7 could be a useful radioligand for positron emission tomography imaging of PBRs.

  9. Mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors regulate steroid biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhin, A.G.; Papadopoulos, V.; Costa, E.; Krueger, K.E. (Georgetown Univ. School of Medicine, Washington, DC (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Recent observations on the steroid synthetic capability within the brain open the possibility that benzodiazepines may influence steroid synthesis in nervous tissue through interactions with peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites, which are highly expressed in steroidogenic cells and associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. To examine this possibility nine molecules that exhibit a greater than 10,000-fold difference in their affinities for peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites were tested for their effects on a well-established steroidogenic model system, the Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cell line. 4{prime}-Chlorodiazepam, PK 11195, and PK 14067 stimulated steroid production by 2-fold in Y-1 cells, whereas diazepam, flunitrazepam, zolpidem, and PK 14068 displayed a lower (1.2- to 1.5-fold) maximal stimulation. In contrast, clonazepam and flumazenil did not stimulate steroid synthesis. The potencies of these compounds to inhibit {sup 3}H-labeled PK 11195 binding to peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites correlated with their potencies to stimulate steroid production. Similar findings were observed in bovine and rat adrenocortical cell preparations. These results suggest that ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition site acting on this mitochondrial receptor can enhance steroid production. This action may contribute specificity to the pharmacological profile of drugs preferentially acting on the benzodiazepine recognition site associated with the outer membrane of certain mitochondrial populations.

  10. Mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors regulate steroid biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations on the steroid synthetic capability within the brain open the possibility that benzodiazepines may influence steroid synthesis in nervous tissue through interactions with peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites, which are highly expressed in steroidogenic cells and associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. To examine this possibility nine molecules that exhibit a greater than 10,000-fold difference in their affinities for peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites were tested for their effects on a well-established steroidogenic model system, the Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cell line. 4'-Chlorodiazepam, PK 11195, and PK 14067 stimulated steroid production by 2-fold in Y-1 cells, whereas diazepam, flunitrazepam, zolpidem, and PK 14068 displayed a lower (1.2- to 1.5-fold) maximal stimulation. In contrast, clonazepam and flumazenil did not stimulate steroid synthesis. The potencies of these compounds to inhibit 3H-labeled PK 11195 binding to peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites correlated with their potencies to stimulate steroid production. Similar findings were observed in bovine and rat adrenocortical cell preparations. These results suggest that ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition site acting on this mitochondrial receptor can enhance steroid production. This action may contribute specificity to the pharmacological profile of drugs preferentially acting on the benzodiazepine recognition site associated with the outer membrane of certain mitochondrial populations

  11. In vivo study of drug interaction with brain benzodiazepine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, O.; Shinotoh, H.; Ito, T.; Suzuki, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Yamasaki, T.

    1985-05-01

    The possibility of direct estimation of in vivo Bz receptor occupancy in brain was evaluated using C-11, or H-3-flumazepil (Ro15-1788). In animal experiments, 1 ..mu..Ci of H-3-Ro15-1788 was injected at 0.5 or 20 hr after i.v. injection of various dosage of clonazepam. Then radioactivity in cerebral cortex, cerebellum and blood at 5 min. after injection of the tracer was compared. Competitive inhibition of in vivo binding was clearly observed when clonazepam was pretreated at 0.5 hr before injection of the tracer. On the other hand, brain radioactivity was increased when clonazepam was administered at 20 hr before injection of the tracer. This increase in binding of H-3-Ro15-1788 might be caused by rebound of Bz receptor function by treatment with Bz agonist, and this rebound may have an important role in physiological function. Clinical investigation concerning drug interaction with brain Bz receptor was performed in normal volunteer and patients with neurological disorders. The distribution of C-11-Ro15-1788 in the brain of patients chronically treated with clonazepam were significantly heterogeneous. However, cerebral blood flow estimated with N-13 NH3 of these patients were normal.

  12. In vivo study of drug interaction with brain benzodiazepine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of direct estimation of in vivo Bz receptor occupancy in brain was evaluated using C-11, or H-3-flumazepil (Ro15-1788). In animal experiments, 1 μCi of H-3-Ro15-1788 was injected at 0.5 or 20 hr after i.v. injection of various dosage of clonazepam. Then radioactivity in cerebral cortex, cerebellum and blood at 5 min. after injection of the tracer was compared. Competitive inhibition of in vivo binding was clearly observed when clonazepam was pretreated at 0.5 hr before injection of the tracer. On the other hand, brain radioactivity was increased when clonazepam was administered at 20 hr before injection of the tracer. This increase in binding of H-3-Ro15-1788 might be caused by rebound of Bz receptor function by treatment with Bz agonist, and this rebound may have an important role in physiological function. Clinical investigation concerning drug interaction with brain Bz receptor was performed in normal volunteer and patients with neurological disorders. The distribution of C-11-Ro15-1788 in the brain of patients chronically treated with clonazepam were significantly heterogeneous. However, cerebral blood flow estimated with N-13 NH3 of these patients were normal

  13. PK11195 binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor as a marker of microglia activation in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vowinckel, E; Reutens, D; Becher, B;

    1997-01-01

    Activated glial cells are implicated in regulating and effecting the immune response that occurs within the CNS as part of multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is expressed in glial cells. We exa...

  14. Biodistribution and dosimetry of [I-123]iodo-PK 11195 : a potential agent for SPET imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versijpt, J; Dumont, F; Thierens, H; Jansen, H; De Vos, F; Slegers, G; Santens, P; Dierckx, RA; Korf, J

    2000-01-01

    The highest concentrations of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) are found in the kidneys and heart. In addition, the PER has been reported to reflect neuro-inflammatory damage by co-localisation with activated microglia. PK 11195 is a high-affinity ligand for the PER. The aim of this stud

  15. Modulation of cholinephosphotransferase activity in breast cancer cell lines by Ro5-4864, a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor agonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in phospholipid and fatty acid profile are hallmarks of cancer progression. Increase in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor expression has been implicated in breast cancer. The benzodiazepine, Ro5-4864, increases cell proliferation in some breast cancer cell lines. Biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) has been identified as a marker for cells proliferating at high rates. Cholinephosphotransferase (CPT) is the terminal enzyme for the de novo biosynthesis of PC. We have addressed here whether Ro5-4864 facilitates some cancer causing mechanisms in breast cancer. We report that cell proliferation increases exponentially in aggressive breast cancer cell lines 11-9-1-4 and BT-549 when treated with nanomolar concentrations of Ro5-4864. This increase is seen within 24 h of treatment, consistent with the cell doubling time in these cells. Ro5-4864 also upregulates c-fos expression in breast cancer cell lines 11-9-1-4 and BT-549, while expression in non-tumorigenic cell line MCF-12A was either basal or slightly downregulated. We further examined the expression of the CPT gene in breast cancer (11-9-1-4, BT-549) and non-tumorigenic cell lines (MCF-12A, MCF-12F). We found that the CPT gene is overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines compared to the non-tumorigenic cell lines. Furthermore, the activity of CPT in forming PC is increased in the breast cancer cell lines cultured for 24 h. Additionally, we examined the CPT activity in the presence of nanomolar concentrations of Ro5-4864. Biosynthesis of PC was increased in breast cancer cell lines upon treatment. We therefore propose that Ro5-4864 facilitates PC formation, a process important in membrane biogenesis for proliferating cells

  16. Rapid and efficient radiosynthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195, a single photon emission computed tomography tracer for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimlott, Sally L. [Department of Clinical Physics, West of Scotland Radionuclide Dispensary, Western Infirmary, G11 6NT Glasgow (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.pimlott@clinmed.gla.ac.uk; Stevenson, Louise [Department of Chemistry, WestCHEM, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom); Wyper, David J. [Institute of Neurological Sciences, Southern General Hospital, G51 4TF Glasgow (United Kingdom); Sutherland, Andrew [Department of Chemistry, WestCHEM, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15

    Introduction: [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 is a high-affinity single photon emission computed tomography radiotracer for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors that has previously been used to measure activated microglia and to assess neuroinflammation in the living human brain. This study investigates the radiosynthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 in order to develop a rapid and efficient method that obtains [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a high specific activity for in vivo animal and human imaging studies. Methods: The synthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 was evaluated using a solid-state interhalogen exchange method and an electrophilic iododestannylation method, where bromine and trimethylstannyl derivatives were used as precursors, respectively. In the electrophilic iododestannylation method, the oxidants peracetic acid and chloramine-T were both investigated. Results: Electrophilic iododestannylation produced [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a higher isolated radiochemical yield and a higher specific activity than achievable using the halogen exchange method investigated. Using chloramine-T as oxidant provided a rapid and efficient method of choice for the synthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195. Conclusions: [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 has been successfully synthesized via a rapid and efficient electrophilic iododestannylation method, producing [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a higher isolated radiochemical yield and a higher specific activity than previously achieved.

  17. Chronic brief restraint decreases in vivo binding of benzodiazepine receptor ligand to mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaddeghi, M; Burke, T F; Moerschbaecher, J M

    1993-01-01

    This study examines the effects of chronic brief restraint on in vivo benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor binding in mouse brain. Three groups of mice were used. Mice in group 1 were neither restrained nor injected (ACUTE control). Mice in group 2 were restrained for 5-6 s by grabbing the back skin and holding the subject upside-down at a 45 degrees angle as if to be injected (CHRONIC SHAM control) for 7 d. Mice in group 3 (CHRONIC SALINE) received daily single intraperitoneal (ip) injections of saline (5 mL/kg) for 7 d. On d 8 BZD receptors were labeled in vivo by administration of 3 microCi [3H]flumazenil (ip). The levels of ligand bound in vivo to cerebral cortex (CX), cerebellum (CB), brain stem (BS), striatum (ST), hippocampus (HP), and hypothalamus (HY) were determined. Results indicated that the level of binding was significantly (p stress produces a decrease in BZD receptor binding sites. PMID:8385464

  18. The radiosynthesis of [18F]PK 14105 as an alternative radioligand for peripheral type benzodiazepine binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascali, C; Luthra, S K; Pike, V W; Price, G W; Ahier, R G; Hume, S P; Myers, R; Manjil, L; Cremer, J E

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed for labelling PK 14105 [N-methyl-N-(1-methyl-propyl)-1(2-fluoro-5-nitrophenyl)isoquinoline-3- carboxamide], a ligand that has high affinity and selectivity for peripheral type benzodiazepine binding sites (PBBS), with NCA fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.8 min, beta + = 96.9%). The method involves treating the 2-chloro-analogue with cyclotron-produced NCA [18F]fluoride in dimethyl sulphoxide, with rubidium carbonate as base, at 140 degrees C for 20 min. Purification is achieved by separation on a reverse phase Sep-Pak followed by PHLC on a silica gel column, to give chemically and radiochemically pure product with a specific activity of ca 7.4 GBq/mumol (200 mCi/mumol), decay-corrected to the end of radionuclide production (EOB). The radiosynthesis requires 210 min. giving a radiochemical yield of 10-20%, decay-corrected to EOB. [18F]PK 14105 was found to bind avidly to sites associated with kainic acid-induced unilateral lesions of rat striata. Such binding was blocked by pre-dosing the rat with PK 11195, so providing evidence for specific binding to PBBS. These results suggest that [18F]PK 14105 has potential for studying phenomena associated with PBBS in man by PET. PMID:2166014

  19. In vivo molecular imaging of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in the aged rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekzema, Elseline; Rojas, Santiago; Herance, Raúl; Pareto, Deborah; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Figueiras, Francisca P; Popota, Foteini; Ruiz, Alba; Flotats, Núria; Fernández, Francisco J; Rocha, Milagros; Rovira, Mariana; Víctor, Víctor M; Gispert, Juan D

    2012-07-01

    The GABA-ergic system, known to regulate neural tissue genesis during cortical development, has been postulated to play a role in cerebral aging processes. Using in vivo molecular imaging and voxel-wise quantification, we aimed to assess the effects of aging on the benzodiazepine (BDZ) recognition site of the GABA(A) receptor. To visualize BDZ site availability, [(11)C]-flumazenil microPET acquisitions were conducted in young and old rats. The data were analyzed and region of interest analyses were applied to validate the voxel-wise approach. We observed decreased [(11)C]-flumazenil binding in the aged rat brains in comparison with the young control group. More specifically, clusters of reduced radioligand uptake were detected in the bilateral hippocampus, cerebellum, midbrain, and bilateral frontal and parieto-occipital cortex. Our results support the pertinence of voxel-wise quantification in the analysis of microPET data. Moreover, these findings indicate that the aging process involves declines in neural BDZ recognition site availability, proposed to reflect alterations in GABA(A) receptor subunit polypeptide expression.

  20. Atuoradiographic detection of multiple sclerosis plaques with an ω3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine) binding site radiogland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Multiple Sclerosis (MS), the presence of monocyte-macrophages and microglial cells in active plaques is a constant feature. They are numerous at the border of active lesions where they constiture, with other cell types such as lymphocytes and oligodendrocytes the so-called flial wall. Monocyte-macrophages and microglial cells are thought to be directly involved in the process of demyelination. Some macrophages laden with meylin degradation products are also seen in the center of the plaqie, often located in the perivascular cuffs. In addition, astrocytic gliosis occurs in the center of the plaques. As all these cell types are richly endowed with ω3 sites, the feasibility of using ω3 site autoradiagraphy to detect the demyelination plaques in the brain of post-mortem cases of Multiple Sclerosis has been investigated. (Author). 8 refs

  1. Midazolam inhibits hippocampal long-term potentiation and learning through dual central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor activation and neurosteroidogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; O’Dell, Kazuko A.; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Charles F. Zorumski

    2010-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BDZs) enhance γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptor inhibition by direct actions on central BDZ receptors (CBRs). Although some BDZs also bind mitochondrial receptors (translocator protein 18kDa, TSPO) and promote the synthesis of GABA-enhancing neurosteroids, the role of neurosteroids in the clinical effects of BDZs is unknown. In rat hippocampal slices, we compared midazolam, an anesthetic BDZ with clonazepam, an anticonvulsant/anxiolytic BDZ that activates CBRs selectivel...

  2. Decreased GABA(A) benzodiazepine binding site densities in postmortem brains of Cloninger type 1 and 2 alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkanen, Virpi; Storvik, Markus; Häkkinen, Merja; Akamine, Yumiko; Tupala, Erkki; Virkkunen, Matti; Tiihonen, Jari

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol modulates the GABA(A) receptor to cause sedative, anxiolytic and hypnotic effects that are qualitatively similar to benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The aim of this study was to explore if GABA(A) receptor density is altered in post-mortem brains of anxiety-prone Cloninger type 1 and socially hostile type 2 alcoholic subtypes when compared to controls. The GABA(A) binding site density was measured by whole-hemisphere autoradiography with tritium labeled flunitrazepam ([(3)H]flunitrazepam) from 17 alcoholic (nine type 1, eight type 2) and 10 non-alcoholic post-mortem brains, using cold flumazepam as a competitive ligand. A total of eight specific brain areas were examined. Alcoholics displayed a significantly (p < 0.001, bootstrap type generalizing estimating equations model) reduced [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding site density when compared to controls. When localized, type 2 alcoholics displayed a significantly (p ≤ 0.05) reduced [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding site density in the internal globus pallidus, the gyrus dentatus and the hippocampus, whereas type 1 alcoholics differed from controls in the internal globus pallidus and the hippocampus. While previous reports have demonstrated significant alterations in dopaminergic and serotonergic receptors between type 1 and type 2 alcoholics among these same subjects, we observed no statistically significant difference in [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding site densities between the Cloninger type 1 and type 2 alcoholics. PMID:23332316

  3. The human peripheral benzodiazepine receptor gene: Cloning and characterization of alternative splicing in normal tissues and in a patient with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.; Miller, W.L. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Chang, Y.J.; Strauss, J.F. III (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor (mBzR) appears to be a key factor in the flow of cholesterol into mitochondia to permit the initiation of steroid hormone synthesis. The mBzR consists of three components; the 18-kDa component on the outer mitochondrial membrane appears to contain the benzodiazepine binding site, and is hence often termed the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). Using a cloned human PBR cDNA as probe, the authors have cloned the human PBR gene. The 13-kb gene is divided into four exons, with exon 1 encoding only a short 5[prime] untranslated segment. The 5[prime] flanking DNA lacks TATA and CAAT boxes but contains a cluster of SP-1 binding sites, typical of [open quotes]housekeeping[close quotes] genes. The encoded PBR mRNA is alternately spliced into two forms: [open quotes]authentic[close quotes] PBR mRNA retains all four exons, while a short form termed PBR-S lacks exon 2. While PBR-S contains a 102-codon open reading frame with a typical initiator sequence, the reading frame differs from that of PBR, so that the encoded protein is unrelated to PBR. RT-PCR and RNase protection experiments confirm that both PBR and PBR-S are expressed in all tissues examined and that expression of PBR-S is about 10 times the level of PBR. Expression of PBR cDNA in pCMV5 vectors transfected into COS-1 cells resulted in increased binding of [[sup 3]H]PK11195, but expression of PBR-S did not. It has been speculated that patients with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, who cannot make any steroids, might have a genetic lesion in mBzR. RT-PCR analysis of testicular RNA from such a patient, sequencing of the cDNA, and blotting analysis of genomic DNA all indicate that the gene and mRNA for the PBR component of mBzR are normal in this disease. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Human capital in European peripheral regions: brain - drain and brain - gain [poster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2004-01-01

    The issue of this project is brain drain and brain gain in peripheral European regions. It focuses on the design, implementation and evaluation of actions to reduce brain drain and foster so-called brain gain. The action areas are the Twente region in the Netherlands; the Central Switzerland Cantons

  5. Quantification of human brain benzodiazepine receptors using [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylflumazenil: a first report in volunteers and epileptic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, Philippe [Unite de Tomographie par Positrons, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, CMFA/REMA, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73-40 Avenue Mounier, 1200, Bruxelles (Belgium); Sanabria-Bohorquez, Sandra [Imaging Research, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, Philadelphia (United States); Bol, Anne; Volder, Anne de; Labar, Daniel [Unite de Tomographie par Positrons, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Rijckevorsel, K. van [Service de Neurologie, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Bruxelles (Belgium); Gallez, Bernard [Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, CMFA/REMA, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73-40 Avenue Mounier, 1200, Bruxelles (Belgium); Unite de Resonance Magnetique Biomedicale, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2003-12-01

    Fluorine-18 fluoroethylflumazenil ([{sup 18}F]FEF) is a tracer for central benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors which is proposed as an alternative to carbon-11 flumazenil for in vivo imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) in humans. In this study, [{sup 18}F]FEF kinetic data were acquired using a 60-min two-injection protocol on three normal subjects and two patients suffering from mesiotemporal epilepsy as demonstrated by abnormal magnetic resonance imaging and [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. First, a tracer bolus injection was performed and [{sup 18}F]FEF rapidly distributed in the brain according to the known BZ receptor distribution. Thirty minutes later a displacement injection of 0.01 mg/kg of unlabelled flumazenil was performed. Activity was rapidly displaced from all BZ receptor regions demonstrating the specific binding of [{sup 18}F]FEF. No displacement was observed in the pons. Plasma input function was obtained from arterial blood sampling, and metabolite analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Metabolite quantification revealed a fast decrease in tracer plasma concentration, such that at 5 min post injection about 70% of the total radioactivity in plasma corresponded to [{sup 18}F]FEF, reaching 24% at 30 min post injection. The interactions between [{sup 18}F]FEF and BZ receptors were described using linear compartmental models with plasma input and reference tissue approaches. Binding potential values were in agreement with the known distribution of BZ receptors in human brain. Finally, in two patients with mesiotemporal sclerosis, reduced uptake of [{sup 18}F]FEF was clearly observed in the implicated left hippocampus. (orig.)

  6. [3H]Clonazepam, like [3H]flunitrazepam, is a photoaffinity label for the central type of benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]Clonazepam, like [3H]flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to membrane proteins of brain tissue when exposed to UV light. In polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography, the same pattern of photolabelled proteins was obtained in cerebellum and in hippocampus when either [3H]clonazepam or [3H]flunitrazepam was used as photoaffinity label. Since [3H]clonazepam does not interact with the peripheral type of benzodiazepine binding site present in the brain, these results confirm previous evidence that the proteins photolabelled with [3H]flunitrazepam are associated with the central type of benzodiazepine receptor. (Auth.)

  7. Evaluation of a radiolabelled peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand in the central nervous system inflammation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: a possible probe for imaging multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) are upregulated on macrophages and activated microglia, and radioligands for the PBRs can be used to detect in vivo neuroinflammatory changes in a variety of neurological insults, including multiple sclerosis. Substituted 2-phenyl imidazopyridine-3-acetamides with high affinity and selectivity for PBRs have been prepared that are suitable for radiolabelling with a number of positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) isotopes. In this investigation, the newly developed high-affinity PBR ligand 6-chloro-2-(4'-iodophenyl)-3-(N,N-diethyl)imidazo [1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide, or CLINDE, was radiolabelled with123I and its biodistribution in the central nervous system (CNS) of rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) evaluated. EAE was induced in male Lewis rats by injection of an emulsion of myelin basic protein and incomplete Freund's adjuvant containing Mycobacterium butyricum. Biodistribution studies with123I-CLINDE were undertaken on EAE rats exhibiting different clinical disease severity and compared with results in controls. Disease severity was confirmed by histopathology in the spinal cord of rats. The relationship between inflammatory lesions and PBR ligand binding was investigated using ex vivo autoradiography and immunohistochemistry on rats with various clinical scores. 123I-CLINDE uptake was enhanced in the CNS of all rats exhibiting EAE when compared to controls. Binding reflected the ascending nature of EAE inflammation, with lumbar/sacral cord > thoracic cord > cervical cord > medulla. The amount of ligand binding also reflected the clinical severity of disease. Ex vivo autoradiography and immunohistochemistry revealed a good spatial correspondence between radioligand signal and foci of inflammation and in particular ED-1+ cells representing macrophages and microglia. These results demonstrate the ability of 123I-CLINDE to measure in vivo inflammatory

  8. Biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 123}I]iodo-Pk 11195: a potential agent for SPET imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versijpt, J. [Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands). Dept. of Biological Psychiatry; Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Dumont, F.; Vos, F. de; Slegers, G. [Dept. of Radiopharmacy, Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Thierens, H. [Dept. of Biomedical Physics and Radiation Protection, Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Jansen, H.; Dierckx, R.A. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Santens, P. [Dept. of Neurology, Ghent Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Korf, J. [Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands). Dept. of Biological Psychiatry

    2000-09-01

    The highest concentrations of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) are found in the kidneys and heart. In addition, the PBR has been reported to reflect neuro-inflammatory damage by co-localisation with activated microglia. PK 11195 is a high-affinity ligand for the PBR. The aim of this study was to investigate in humans the biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 123}I]iodo-PK 11195, a potential single-photon emission tomography tracer for the PBR. Five healthy volunteers were injected with 112 MBq of [{sup 123}I]iodo-PK 11195. Sequential whole-body scans were performed up to 72 h post injection. Multiple blood samples were taken, and urine was collected to measure the fraction voided by the renal system. Decay-corrected regions of interest of the whole-body images were analysed, and geometric mean count rates were used to determine organ activity. Organ absorbed doses and effective dose were calculated using the MIRD method. [{sup 123}I]iodo-PK 11195 was rapidly cleared from the blood, mainly by the hepatobiliary system. Approximately 22% was voided in urine after 48 h. Average organ residence times were 0.74, 0.44 and 0.29 h for the liver, upper large intestine and lower large intestine, respectively. The testes received the highest dose, 109.4 {mu}Gy/MBq. All other organs investigated received doses of less than 50 {mu}Gy/MBq. The effective dose was 40.3 {mu}Sv/MBq. In conclusion, [{sup 123}I]iodo-PK 11195 is a suitable agent for the visualisation of the PBR and indirectly for the imaging of neuro-inflammatory lesions. Taking into account the radiation burden of 7.46 mSv following an administration of 185 MBq, a [{sup 123}I]iodo-PK 11195 investigation has to be considered an ICRP risk category IIb investigation. (orig.)

  9. Biodistribution and dosimetry of [123I]iodo-Pk 11195: a potential agent for SPET imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The highest concentrations of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) are found in the kidneys and heart. In addition, the PBR has been reported to reflect neuro-inflammatory damage by co-localisation with activated microglia. PK 11195 is a high-affinity ligand for the PBR. The aim of this study was to investigate in humans the biodistribution and dosimetry of [123I]iodo-PK 11195, a potential single-photon emission tomography tracer for the PBR. Five healthy volunteers were injected with 112 MBq of [123I]iodo-PK 11195. Sequential whole-body scans were performed up to 72 h post injection. Multiple blood samples were taken, and urine was collected to measure the fraction voided by the renal system. Decay-corrected regions of interest of the whole-body images were analysed, and geometric mean count rates were used to determine organ activity. Organ absorbed doses and effective dose were calculated using the MIRD method. [123I]iodo-PK 11195 was rapidly cleared from the blood, mainly by the hepatobiliary system. Approximately 22% was voided in urine after 48 h. Average organ residence times were 0.74, 0.44 and 0.29 h for the liver, upper large intestine and lower large intestine, respectively. The testes received the highest dose, 109.4 μGy/MBq. All other organs investigated received doses of less than 50 μGy/MBq. The effective dose was 40.3 μSv/MBq. In conclusion, [123I]iodo-PK 11195 is a suitable agent for the visualisation of the PBR and indirectly for the imaging of neuro-inflammatory lesions. Taking into account the radiation burden of 7.46 mSv following an administration of 185 MBq, a [123I]iodo-PK 11195 investigation has to be considered an ICRP risk category IIb investigation. (orig.)

  10. The 18 kDa translocator protein (peripheral benzodiazepine receptor expression in the bone of normal, osteoprotegerin or low calcium diet treated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Wai-Ying Kam

    Full Text Available The presence of the translocator protein (TSPO, previously named as the mitochondrial or peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, in bone cells was studied in vitro and in situ using RT-qPCR, and receptor autoradiography using the selective TSPO ligand PK11195.In vitro, the TSPO is highly expressed in osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells.In situ, constitutive expression of TSPO is found in bone marrow and trabecular bone, e.g., spongiosa. Mice with a reduction of bone turnover induced by a 4-day treatment of osteoprotegerin reduces [(3H]PK11195 binding in the spongiosa (320±128 Bq x mg(-1, 499±106 Bq x mg(-1 in saline-treated controls. In contrast, mice with an increase in bone turnover caused by a 4-day low calcium diet increases [(3H]PK11195 binding in the spongiosa (615±90 Bq x mg(-1. Further, our study includes technical feasibility data on [(18F]fluoride microPET imaging of rodent bone with altered turnover. Despite [(18F]fluoride having high uptake, the in vivo signal differences were small. Using a phantom model, we describe the spillover effect and partial volume loss that affect the quantitative microPET imaging of the small bone structures in experimental mouse models. In summary, we demonstrate the expression of TSPO in small rodent bone tissues, including osteoblasts and osteoclasts. A trend increase in TSPO expression was observed in the spongiosa from low to high bone turnover conditions. However, despite the potential utility of TSPO expression as an in vivo biomarker of bone turnover in experimental rodent models, our small animal PET imaging data using [(18F]fluoride show that even under the condition of a good biological signal-to-noise ratio and high tracer uptake, the currently achievable instrument sensitivity and spatial resolution is unlikely to be sufficient to detect subtle differences in small structures, such as mouse bone.

  11. Human capital in European peripheral regions: brain - drain and brain - gain [poster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Frans H.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Project goal - The overall goal of the project is to build a legitimate transnational network to transfer ideas and experiences and implement measures to reduce brain drain and foster brain gain while reinforcing the economical and spatial development of peripheral regions in NWE. This means a highe

  12. Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, K; Vinberg, M; Kessing, L V

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker related to disease activity and neuroprogression in bipolar disorder, speculated to mirror alterations in brain expression of BDNF. The research area is rapidly evolving; however, recent...... investigations have yielded conflicting results with substantial variation in outcomes, highlighting the need to critically assess the state of current evidence. The aims of the study were to investigate differences in peripheral blood BDNF concentrations between bipolar disorder patients and healthy control...... subjects and between affective states in bipolar disorder patients, including assessment of the effect of treatment of acute episodes on BDNF levels. A systematic review of English language studies without considering publication status was conducted in PubMed (January 1950-November 2014), Embase (1974...

  13. Azaflavones compared to flavones as ligands to the benzodiazepine binding site of brain GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard; Liljefors, Tommy;

    2008-01-01

    A series of azaflavone derivatives and analogues were prepared and evaluated for their affinity to the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA(A) receptor, and compared to their flavone counterparts. Three of the compounds, the azaflavones 9 and 12 as well as the new flavone 13, were also assayed...

  14. Strategy for improved [11C]DAA1106 radiosynthesis and in vivo peripheral benzodiazepine receptor imaging using microPET, evaluation of [11C]DAA1106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) has shown considerable potential as a clinical marker of neuroinflammation and tumour progression. [11C]DAA1106 ([11C]N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-acetamide) is a promising positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand for imaging PBRs. Methods: A four-step synthetic route was devised to prepare DAA1123, the precursor for [11C]DAA1106. Two robust, high yielding methods for radiosynthesis based on [11C]-O-methylation of DAA1123 were developed and implemented on a nuclear interface methylation module, producing [11C]DAA1106 with up to 25% radiochemical yields at end-of-synthesis based on [11C]CH3I trapped. Evaluation of [11C]DAA1106 for in vivo imaging was performed in a rabbit model with microPET, and the presence of PBR receptor in the target organ was further corroborated by immunohistochemistry. Results: The standard solution method produced 2.6-5.2 GBq (n=19) of [11C]DAA1106, whilst the captive solvent method produced 1.6-6.3 GBq (n=10) of [11C]DAA1106. Radiochemical purities obtained were 99% and specific radioactivity at end-of-synthesis was up to 200 GBq/μmol for both methods. Based on radiochemical product, shorter preparation times and simplicity of synthesis, the captive solvent method was chosen for routine productions of [11C]DAA1106. In vivo microPET [11C]DAA1106 scans of rabbit kidney demonstrated high levels of binding in the cortex. The subsequent introduction of nonradioactive DAA1106 (0.2 μmol) produced considerable displacement of the radioactive signal in this region. The presence of PBR in kidney cortex was further corroborated by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions: A robust, high yielding captive solvent method of [11C]DAA1106 production was developed which enabled efficacious in vivo imaging of PBR expressing tissues in an animal model

  15. Evaluation of a radiolabelled peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand in the central nervous system inflammation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: a possible probe for imaging multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattner, F.; Katsifis, A.; Ballantyne, P. [ANSTO, Radiopharmaceuticals Division, Lucas Heights (Australia); Staykova, M.; Willenborg, D.O. [Australian National University Medical School, The Canberra Hospital, Neurosciences Research Unit, Woden, Canberra (Australia)

    2005-04-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) are upregulated on macrophages and activated microglia, and radioligands for the PBRs can be used to detect in vivo neuroinflammatory changes in a variety of neurological insults, including multiple sclerosis. Substituted 2-phenyl imidazopyridine-3-acetamides with high affinity and selectivity for PBRs have been prepared that are suitable for radiolabelling with a number of positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) isotopes. In this investigation, the newly developed high-affinity PBR ligand 6-chloro-2-(4'-iodophenyl)-3-(N,N-diethyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide, or CLINDE, was radiolabelled with{sup 123}I and its biodistribution in the central nervous system (CNS) of rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) evaluated. EAE was induced in male Lewis rats by injection of an emulsion of myelin basic protein and incomplete Freund's adjuvant containing Mycobacterium butyricum. Biodistribution studies with{sup 123}I-CLINDE were undertaken on EAE rats exhibiting different clinical disease severity and compared with results in controls. Disease severity was confirmed by histopathology in the spinal cord of rats. The relationship between inflammatory lesions and PBR ligand binding was investigated using ex vivo autoradiography and immunohistochemistry on rats with various clinical scores. {sup 123}I-CLINDE uptake was enhanced in the CNS of all rats exhibiting EAE when compared to controls. Binding reflected the ascending nature of EAE inflammation, with lumbar/sacral cord > thoracic cord > cervical cord > medulla. The amount of ligand binding also reflected the clinical severity of disease. Ex vivo autoradiography and immunohistochemistry revealed a good spatial correspondence between radioligand signal and foci of inflammation and in particular ED-1{sup +} cells representing macrophages and microglia. These results demonstrate the ability of {sup 123}I

  16. Characterization of astrocytic and neuronal benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons express benzodiazepine receptors. Neuronal benzodiazepine receptors were of high-affinity, K{sub D} values were 7.5-43 nM and the densities of receptors (B{sub max}) were 924-4131 fmol/mg protein. Astrocytes posses a high-affinity benzodiazepine receptor, K{sub D} values were 6.6-13 nM. The B{sub max} values were 6,033-12,000 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of the neuronal benzodiazepine receptor was that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor, where clonazepam has a high-affinity and Ro 5-4864 (4{prime}-chlorodiazepam) has a low-affinity. Whereas astrocytic benzoidazepine receptor was characteristic of the so called peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, which shows a high-affinity towards Ro 5-4863, and a low-affinity towards clonazepam. The astrocytic benzodiazepine receptors was functionally correlated with voltage dependent calcium channels, since dihydropyridines and benzodiazepines interacted with ({sup 3}H) diazepam and ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine receptors with the same rank order of potency, showing a statistically significant correlation. No such correlation was observed in neurons.

  17. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  18. (/sup 3/H)Clonazepam, like (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam, is a photoaffinity label for the central type of benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieghart, W. (Vienna Univ. (Austria)); Moehler, H. (Hoffmann-La Roche (F.) and Co., Basel (Switzerland))

    1982-06-16

    (/sup 3/H)Clonazepam, like (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to membrane proteins of brain tissue when exposed to UV light. In polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography, the same pattern of photolabelled proteins was obtained in cerebellum and in hippocampus when either (/sup 3/H)clonazepam or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam was used as photoaffinity label. Since (/sup 3/H)clonazepam does not interact with the peripheral type of benzodiazepine binding site present in the brain, these results confirm previous evidence that the proteins photolabelled with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam are associated with the central type of benzodiazepine receptor.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging research progress on brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the recent years, with the development of functional magnetic resonance imaging technology the brain plasticity and functional reorganization are hot topics in the central nervous system imaging studies. Brain functional reorganization and rehabilitation after peripheral nerve injury may have certain regularity. In this paper, the progress of brain functional magnetic resonance imaging technology and its applications in the world wide clinical and experimental researches of the brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury is are reviewed. (authors)

  20. Resveratrol attenuates peripheral and brain inflammation and reduces ischemic brain injury in aged female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sae Im; Shin, Jin A; Cho, Sunghee; Kim, Hye Won; Lee, Ji Yoon; Kang, Jihee Lee; Park, Eun-Mi

    2016-08-01

    Resveratrol is known to improve metabolic dysfunction associated with obesity. Visceral obesity is a sign of aging and is considered a risk factor for ischemic stroke. In this study, we investigated the effects of resveratrol on inflammation in visceral adipose tissue and the brain and its effects on ischemic brain injury in aged female mice. Mice treated with resveratrol (0.1 mg/kg, p.o.) for 10 days showed reduced levels of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, as well as a reduction in the size of adipocytes in visceral adipose tissue. Resveratrol also reduced interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α protein levels and immunoglobulin G extravasation in the brain. Mice treated with resveratrol demonstrated smaller infarct size, improved neurological function, and blunted peripheral inflammation at 3 days postischemic stroke. These results showed that resveratrol counteracted inflammation in visceral adipose tissue and in the brain and reduced stroke-induced brain injury and peripheral inflammation in aged female mice. Therefore, resveratrol administration can be a valuable strategy for the prevention of age-associated and disease-provoked inflammation in postmenopausal women. PMID:27318135

  1. Different sensitivities to competitive inhibition of benzodiazepine receptor binding of {sup 11}C-iomazenil and {sup 11}C-flumazenil in rhesus monkey brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Osamu; Hosoi, Rie; Kobayashi, Kaoru [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Itoh, Takashi; Gee, A.; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2001-04-01

    The in vivo binding kinetics of {sup 11}C-iomazenil were compared with those of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in rhesus monkey brain. The monkey was anesthetized with ketamine and intravenously injected with either {sup 11}C-iomazenil or {sup 11}C-flumazenil in combination with the coadministration of different doses of non-radioactive flumazenil (0, 5 and 20 {mu}g/kg). The regional distribution of {sup 11}C-iomazenil in the brain was similar to that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil, but the sensitivity of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding to competitive inhibition by non-radioactive flumazenil was much less than that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding. A significant reduction in {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in the cerebral cortex was observed with 20 {mu}g/kg of flumazenil, whereas a relatively smaller inhibition of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding in the same region was observed with the same dose of flumazenil. These results suggest that {sup 11}C-flumazenil may be a superior radiotracer for estimating benzodiazepine receptor occupancy in the intact brain. (author)

  2. Human capital in European peripheral regions: Brain - Drain and Brain - Gain : policies on brain drain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CSTM,

    2004-01-01

    Policies on brain drain Many policies are related to the problem of brain drain and brain gain. For instance, every policy that makes a region more attractive to live in, will make a region a more attractive place for the highly educated to settle. In theory this can be everything ranging from infra

  3. Benzodiazepines: Sedation and Agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety is common and frequently poses a barrier to necessary dental treatment. The increasing availability of conscious sedation in dental practice has made treatment much more accessible for anxious patients. At present, benzodiazepines are the most commonly used drugs in sedation practice and provide a pleasant experience for most, but not all, patients. An understanding of the mechanism of action of benzodiazepines should inform our practice and deepen our understanding of why and how sedation may fail. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: As an increasing number of dentists provide sedation for their patients an update on benzodiazepines is timely. PMID:27024905

  4. Neural dysregulation of peripheral insulin action and blood pressure by brain endoplasmic reticulum stress

    OpenAIRE

    Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Guo; Ahmed, Zaghloul; Wang, Yi; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was recently revealed to affect hypothalamic neuroendocrine pathways that regulate feeding and body weight. However, it remains unexplored whether brain ER stress could use a neural route to rapidly cause the peripheral disorders that underlie the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the metabolic syndrome. Using a pharmacologic model that delivered ER stress inducer thapsigargin into the brain, this study demonstrated that a short-term brain ER s...

  5. Benzodiazepine poisoning in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perković-Vukčević Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently ingested drugs in self-poisonings. Elderly may be at greater risk compared with younger individuals due to impaired metabolism and increased sensitivity to benzodiazepines. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity of benzodiazepines in elderly attempted suicide. Methods. A retrospective study of consecutive presentations to hospital after self-poisoning with benzodiazepines was done. Collected data consisted of patient's characteristics (age, gender, benzodiazepine ingested with its blood concentrations at admission, clinical findings including vital signs and Glasgow coma score, routine blood chemistry, complications of poisoning, details of management, length of hospital stay and outcome. According the age, patients are classified as young (15-40-year old, middle aged (41-65-year old and elderly (older than 65. Results. During a 2-year observational period 387 patients were admitted because of pure benzodiazepine poisoning. The most frequently ingested drug was bromazepam, the second was diazepam. The incidence of coma was significantly higher, and the length of hospital stay significantly longer in elderly. Respiratory failure and aspiration pneumonia occurred more frequently in old age. Also, flumazenil was more frequently required in the group of elderly patients. Conclusion. Massive benzodiazepines overdose in elderly may be associated with a significant morbidity, including deep coma with aspiration pneumonia, respiratory failure, and even death. Flumazenil is indicated more often to reduce CNS depression and prevent complications of prolonged unconsciousness, but supportive treatment and proper airway management of comatose patients is the mainstay of the treatment of acute benzodiazepine poisoning.

  6. Adverse effects of benzodiazepines

    OpenAIRE

    Claire Gudex

    1990-01-01

    The growing realisation that the benzodiazepines have potential for causing serious harm has caused concern due to their wide and common use. This has stimulated interest in the costs and benefits of their use. This paper is a review of the adverse effects of benzodiazepines, and concentrates on four areas of particular concern: drug dependence which the consequent withdrawal symptoms; psychological effects while on the drugs; use by the elderly’ and tolerance to the drug effects. Although th...

  7. Distribution of soya-saponin in brain and peripheral tissue after peritoneal injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    125I-soya-saponin was prepared to study the distribution of soya-saponin in body of rat, as well as in different areas of brain when peritoneal injection. The results showed that the peak value of radioactive soya-saponin in all tissue appeared at 30 min after peritoneal injection. There were higher radioactivities in brain and suprarene comparing with other organs. The highest radioactivity was seen in hypothalamus among the every brain areas. It is a first report that soyasaponin can pass through the blood brain barrier when peripheral injection. The result also supported the opinion that soyasaponin might act on the hypothalamus and central regulation of cardiovascular system. Another finding was that soyasaponin also showed a higher affinity with adrenal gland, which indicated that the soyasaponin might possess of peripheral effect for regulation of cardiovascular system as well

  8. Triple Peripheral Nerve Injury Accompanying to Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižlknur Can

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary injuries especially extremity fractures may be seen concurrently with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Peripheral nerve damages may accompany to these fractures and may be missed out, especially in acute stage. In this case report; damage of radial, ulnar and median nerves which was developed secondarily to distal humerus fracture that could not be detected in acute stage, in a patient who had motor vehicle accident (MVA. 29-year-old male patient was admitted with weakness in the right upper extremity. 9 months ago, he had traumatic brain injury because of MVA, and fracture of distal humerus was detected in follow-ups. Upon the suspect of the peripheral nerve injury, the diagnosis was confirmed with ENMG. The patient responded well to the rehabilitation program treatment. In a TBI patient, it must be kept in mind that there might be a secondary trauma and therefore peripheral nerve lesions may accompany to TBI.

  9. [Benzodiazepine and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of insomnia shows an age-associated increase. Especially, persons with age over 60 years frequently suffer from arousal during sleep and early-morning awakening. The reason of this phenomenon can be explained by age-related change in sleepwake regulation, comorbid diseases and psycho-social status. Benzodiazepine derivatives and benzodiazepine agonists have been widely used for treatment of insomnia. These GABA-A receptor agonist hypnotics have sedative effect, possibly causing various adverse events, i.e. falls and hip fracture, anterograde amnesia, next morning hangover especially in the elderly. When making a choice of treatment drugs for the elderly, low dose benzodiazepine hypnotics with relatively high Ω1-selectivity, and newer hypnotics including melatonic receptor agonist or orexin receptor antagonist can become important candidates considering their comorbid diseases or drug interaction with other medications. PMID:26065134

  10. Sharpening peripheral dose gradient via beam number enhancement from patient head tilt for stereotactic brain radiosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Joshua; Pierce, Marlon; Braunstein, Steve E.; Theodosopoulos, Philip V.; McDermott, Michael W.; Sneed, Penny K.; Ma, Lijun

    2016-10-01

    Sharp dose fall-off is the hallmark of brain radiosurgery for the purpose of delivering high dose radiation to the target while minimizing peripheral dose to regional normal brain tissue. In this study, a technique was developed to enhance the peripheral dose gradient by magnifying the total number of beams focused toward each isocenter through pre-programmed patient head tilting. This technique was tested in clinical settings on a dedicated brain radiosurgical system (GKPFX, Gamma Knife Perfexion, Elekta Oncology) by comparing dosimetry as well as delivery efficiency for 20 radiosurgical cases previously treated with the system. The 3-fold beam number enhancement (BNE) treatment plans were found to produce nearly identical target volume coverage (absolute value    0.2) and dose conformity (BNE CI  =  1.41  ±  0.22 versus 1.41  ±  0.11, P  >  0.99) as the original treatment plans. The total beam-on time for the 3-fold BNE treatment plans were also found to be comparable (peripheral dose gradient for brain radiosurgery. This work was presented in part at the 2015 ISRS Congress in Yokohama Japan.

  11. Strategy for improved [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 radiosynthesis and in vivo peripheral benzodiazepine receptor imaging using microPET, evaluation of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probst, Katrin C. [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)]|[BHF Carotid Imaging Group, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: kp296@wbic.cam.ac.uk; Izquierdo, David [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)]|[BHF Carotid Imaging Group, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bird, Joseph L.E. [BHF Carotid Imaging Group, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)]|[Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine Division, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Brichard, Laurent; Franck, Dominic; Fryer, Tim D.; Clark, John C. [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Davies, John R. [Cardiovascular Medicine Division, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Richards, Hugh K. [Neurology Unit, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Davenport, Anthony P. [Clinical Pharmacology Unit, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Weissberg, Peter L. [Cardiovascular Medicine Division, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Warburton, Elizabeth A. [BHF Carotid Imaging Group, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)]|[Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    Introduction: The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) has shown considerable potential as a clinical marker of neuroinflammation and tumour progression. [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 ([{sup 11}C]N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-acetamide) is a promising positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand for imaging PBRs. Methods: A four-step synthetic route was devised to prepare DAA1123, the precursor for [{sup 11}C]DAA1106. Two robust, high yielding methods for radiosynthesis based on [{sup 11}C]-O-methylation of DAA1123 were developed and implemented on a nuclear interface methylation module, producing [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 with up to 25% radiochemical yields at end-of-synthesis based on [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I trapped. Evaluation of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 for in vivo imaging was performed in a rabbit model with microPET, and the presence of PBR receptor in the target organ was further corroborated by immunohistochemistry. Results: The standard solution method produced 2.6-5.2 GBq (n=19) of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106, whilst the captive solvent method produced 1.6-6.3 GBq (n=10) of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106. Radiochemical purities obtained were 99% and specific radioactivity at end-of-synthesis was up to 200 GBq/{mu}mol for both methods. Based on radiochemical product, shorter preparation times and simplicity of synthesis, the captive solvent method was chosen for routine productions of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106. In vivo microPET [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 scans of rabbit kidney demonstrated high levels of binding in the cortex. The subsequent introduction of nonradioactive DAA1106 (0.2 {mu}mol) produced considerable displacement of the radioactive signal in this region. The presence of PBR in kidney cortex was further corroborated by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions: A robust, high yielding captive solvent method of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 production was developed which enabled efficacious in vivo imaging of PBR expressing tissues in an animal model.

  12. Nitric oxide synthase and neuronal NADPH diaphorase are identical in brain and peripheral tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, T. M.; Bredt, D S; M Fotuhi; Hwang, P M; Snyder, S. H.

    1991-01-01

    NADPH diaphorase staining neurons, uniquely resistant to toxic insults and neurodegenerative disorders, have been colocalized with neurons in the brain and peripheral tissue containing nitric oxide synthase (EC 1.14.23.-), which generates nitric oxide (NO), a recently identified neuronal messenger molecule. In the corpus striatum and cerebral cortex, NO synthase immunoreactivity and NADPH diaphorase staining are colocalized in medium to large aspiny neurons. These same neurons colocalize with...

  13. Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Some Rat Brain Structures and Peripheral Organs Underwent Cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Moniczewski, Andrzej; Wydra, Karolina; Suder, Agata; Filip, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) generates or intensifies cocaine-evoked toxicity in the brain and peripheral organs. The aim of this study was to examine superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and lipid peroxidation [measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) levels] in rats during maintenance of cocaine self-administration and after withdrawal by a yoked-triad procedure. Our results indicate that repeated cocaine self-administration provoked an elevation of SOD activity in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, dorsal ...

  14. Human capital in European peripheral regions: brain - drain and brain - gain: project design [poster

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Project design - The action plan consists of two overlapping phases. In the initial analytic phase the specific details of brain gain/ brain drain and their underlying processes in three regions are analyzed. This is not meant as a study project but rather a method to evaluate, design and implement brain drain gain instruments through a thorough analysis of processes. The implementation phase deals with the development, implementation and evaluation of instruments as well as the dissemination...

  15. Association between Peripheral Oxidative Stress and White Matter Damage in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ming Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative stress is believed to be one of the mechanisms involved in the neuronal damage after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, the disease severity correlation between oxidative stress biomarker level and deep brain microstructural changes in acute TBI remains unknown. In present study, twenty-four patients with acute TBI and 24 healthy volunteers underwent DTI. The peripheral blood oxidative biomarkers, like serum thiol and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS concentrations, were also obtained. The DTI metrics of the deep brain regions, as well as the fractional anisotropy (FA and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured and correlated with disease severity, serum thiol, and TBARS levels. We found that patients with TBI displayed lower FAs in deep brain regions with abundant WMs and further correlated with increased serum TBARS level. Our study has shown a level of anatomic detail to the relationship between white matter (WM damage and increased systemic oxidative stress in TBI which suggests common inflammatory processes that covary in both the peripheral and central reactions after TBI.

  16. Human capital in European peripheral regions: brain - drain and brain - gain: project design [poster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2004-01-01

    Project design - The action plan consists of two overlapping phases. In the initial analytic phase the specific details of brain gain/ brain drain and their underlying processes in three regions are analyzed. This is not meant as a study project but rather a method to evaluate, design and implement

  17. Aging aggravates ischemic stroke-induced brain damage in mice with chronic peripheral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Denes, Adam; Valonen, Piia; Wojciechowski, Sara; Magga, Johanna; Savchenko, Ekaterina; Humphreys, Neil; Grencis, Richard; Rothwell, Nancy; Koistinaho, Jari

    2013-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is confounded by conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and infection, all of which alter peripheral inflammatory processes with concomitant impact on stroke outcome. The majority of the stroke patients are elderly, but the impact of interactions between aging and inflammation on stroke remains unknown. We thus investigated the influence of age on the outcome of stroke in animals predisposed to systemic chronic infection. Th1-polarized chronic systemic infection was induced in 18-22 month and 4-month-old C57BL/6j mice by administration of Trichuris muris (gut parasite). One month after infection, mice underwent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and infarct size, brain gliosis, and brain and plasma cytokine profiles were analyzed. Chronic infection increased the infarct size in aged but not in young mice at 24 h. Aged, ischemic mice showed altered plasma and brain cytokine responses, while the lesion size correlated with plasma prestroke levels of RANTES. Moreover, the old, infected mice exhibited significantly increased neutrophil recruitment and upregulation of both plasma interleukin-17α and tumor necrosis factor-α levels. Neither age nor infection status alone or in combination altered the ischemia-induced brain microgliosis. Our results show that chronic peripheral infection in aged animals renders the brain more vulnerable to ischemic insults, possibly by increasing the invasion of neutrophils and altering the inflammation status in the blood and brain. Understanding the interactions between age and infections is crucial for developing a better therapeutic regimen for ischemic stroke and when modeling it as a disease of the elderly.

  18. [Benzodiazepin addiction: a silent addiction among older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Voshaar, R C

    2012-06-01

    Benzodiazepines are frequently prescribed for a longer period of time for anxiety disorders and insomnia in spite of the many guidelines to prescribe these drugs only short-term. These guidelines are based on the risk-benefit balance between long-term effectiveness and side effects like addiction, anterograde amnesia, and increased risk on falling (resulting in hip fractures), traffic accidents and even mortality. Also low-dose benzodiazepine use can lead to benzodiazepine dependence. Although initially most attention has been paid to the physical withdrawal syndrome, psychological aspects of benzodiazepine dependence have received more and more attention in the past decades. Recently, a relationship between the brain-reward system, involved in addiction, and benzodiazepine use, was demonstrated. When long-term benzodiazepine use is recognised as problematic by both physician and patient, different treatment modalities are available to support patients in achieving abstinence. One of every four patients is able to stop by themselves with the aid of a minimal intervention providing psychoeducation and encouragement. Two out of three long-term uses are able to stop their usage with the aid of systematic tapering protocols guided by a physician or psychologist. In case of an underlying insomnia or anxiety disorder, cognitive-behavioural therapy should be added to the tapering protocol. In contrast to the general opinion, advanced old age has no negative impact on the treatment response. PMID:22826915

  19. The brain response to peripheral insulin declines with age: a contribution of the blood-brain barrier?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Sartorius

    Full Text Available It is a matter of debate whether impaired insulin action originates from a defect at the neural level or impaired transport of the hormone into the brain. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of aging on insulin concentrations in the periphery and the central nervous system as well as its impact on insulin-dependent brain activity.Insulin, glucose and albumin concentrations were determined in 160 paired human serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples. Additionally, insulin was applied in young and aged mice by subcutaneous injection or intracerebroventricularly to circumvent the blood-brain barrier. Insulin action and cortical activity were assessed by Western blotting and electrocorticography radiotelemetric measurements.In humans, CSF glucose and insulin concentrations were tightly correlated with the respective serum/plasma concentrations. The CSF/serum ratio for insulin was reduced in older subjects while the CSF/serum ratio for albumin increased with age like for most other proteins. Western blot analysis in murine whole brain lysates revealed impaired phosphorylation of AKT (P-AKT in aged mice following peripheral insulin stimulation whereas P-AKT was comparable to levels in young mice after intracerebroventricular insulin application. As readout for insulin action in the brain, insulin-mediated cortical brain activity instantly increased in young mice subcutaneously injected with insulin but was significantly reduced and delayed in aged mice during the treatment period. When insulin was applied intracerebroventricularly into aged animals, brain activity was readily improved.This study discloses age-dependent changes in insulin CSF/serum ratios in humans. In the elderly, cerebral insulin resistance might be partially attributed to an impaired transport of insulin into the central nervous system.

  20. Wirelessly powered, fully internal optogenetics for brain, spinal and peripheral circuits in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Kate L; Yeh, Alexander J; Ho, John S; Tsao, Vivien; Mohan Iyer, Shrivats; Grosenick, Logan; Ferenczi, Emily A; Tanabe, Yuji; Deisseroth, Karl; Delp, Scott L; Poon, Ada S Y

    2015-10-01

    To enable sophisticated optogenetic manipulation of neural circuits throughout the nervous system with limited disruption of animal behavior, light-delivery systems beyond fiber optic tethering and large, head-mounted wireless receivers are desirable. We report the development of an easy-to-construct, implantable wireless optogenetic device. Our smallest version (20 mg, 10 mm(3)) is two orders of magnitude smaller than previously reported wireless optogenetic systems, allowing the entire device to be implanted subcutaneously. With a radio-frequency (RF) power source and controller, this implant produces sufficient light power for optogenetic stimulation with minimal tissue heating (optogenetic control throughout the nervous system (brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerve endings) of behaving mice. This technology opens the door for optogenetic experiments in which animals are able to behave naturally with optogenetic manipulation of both central and peripheral targets.

  1. Androgen manipulation and vasopressin binding in the rat brain and peripheral organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xin; Phillips, P.; Oldfield, B.; Trinder, D.; Risvanis, J.; Stephenson, J.; Johnston, C. (Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia))

    1994-03-01

    It is now widely recognized that there is a sexual dimorphism in the development of arginine vasopressin (AVP) immunoreactivity in certain parts of the brain, and that changes in brain AVP immunoreactivity change with manipulation of androgen status. The aim of the present experiment was to determine specifically any AVP receptor changes in response to manipulation of androgen levels using a selective V[sub 1] antagonist radioligand. Following castration, plasma testosterone levels fell and AVP immunoreactivity was reduced in the lateral septum and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. With testosterone supplementation in castrated animals, the immunoreactivity in these regions was restored to a higher degree than in sham-operated animals. Central and peripheral V[sub 1] AVP receptor binding (as determined using the selective AVP V)[sub 1] antagonist radioligand [[sup 125]I](d(CH[sub 2])[sub 5],sarcosine[sup 7]) AVP was not changed in any of the brain regions studied or in liver or kidney membranes from the three groups. The study demonstrates that there is no change in brain AVP receptor binding despite changes in regional AVP immunoreactivity in the brain, and excludes any confounding interaction with changes in oxytocin receptors. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Impact of Millimeter-Level Margins on Peripheral Normal Brain Sparing for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Lijun, E-mail: lijunma@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Larson, David A.; Pinnaduwage, Dilini; Fogh, Shannon; Barani, Igor; Nakamura, Jean; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate how millimeter-level margins beyond the gross tumor volume (GTV) impact peripheral normal brain tissue sparing for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A mathematical formula was derived to predict the peripheral isodose volume, such as the 12-Gy isodose volume, with increasing margins by millimeters. The empirical parameters of the formula were derived from a cohort of brain tumor and surgical tumor resection cavity cases (n=15) treated with the Gamma Knife Perfexion. This was done by first adding margins from 0.5 to 3.0 mm to each individual target and then creating for each expanded target a series of treatment plans of nearly identical quality as the original plan. Finally, the formula was integrated with a published logistic regression model to estimate the treatment-induced complication rate for stereotactic radiosurgery when millimeter-level margins are added. Results: Confirmatory correlation between the nominal target radius (ie, R{sub T}) and commonly used maximum target size was found for the studied cases, except for a few outliers. The peripheral isodose volume such as the 12-Gy volume was found to increase exponentially with increasing Δ/R{sub T}, where Δ is the margin size. Such a curve fitted the data (logarithmic regression, R{sup 2} >0.99), and the 12-Gy isodose volume was shown to increase steeply with a 0.5- to 3.0-mm margin applied to a target. For example, a 2-mm margin on average resulted in an increase of 55% ± 16% in the 12-Gy volume; this corresponded to an increase in the symptomatic necrosis rate of 6% to 25%, depending on the Δ/R{sub T} values for the target. Conclusions: Millimeter-level margins beyond the GTV significantly impact peripheral normal brain sparing and should be applied with caution. Our model provides a rapid estimate of such an effect, particularly for large and/or irregularly shaped targets.

  3. Peripheral injection of human umbilical cord blood stimulates neurogenesis in the aged rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanberg Paul R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis continues to occur throughout life but dramatically decreases with increasing age. This decrease is mostly related to a decline in proliferative activity as a result of an impoverishment of the microenvironment of the aged brain, including a reduction in trophic factors and increased inflammation. Results We determined that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCBMC given peripherally, by an intravenous injection, could rejuvenate the proliferative activity of the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. This increase in proliferation lasted for at least 15 days after the delivery of the UCBMC. Along with the increase in proliferation following UCBMC treatment, an increase in neurogenesis was also found in the aged animals. The increase in neurogenesis as a result of UCBMC treatment seemed to be due to a decrease in inflammation, as a decrease in the number of activated microglia was found and this decrease correlated with the increase in neurogenesis. Conclusion The results demonstrate that a single intravenous injection of UCBMC in aged rats can significantly improve the microenvironment of the aged hippocampus and rejuvenate the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. Our results raise the possibility of a peripherally administered cell therapy as an effective approach to improve the microenvironment of the aged brain.

  4. Peripheral injection of human umbilical cord blood stimulates neurogenesis in the aged rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachstetter, Adam D; Pabon, Mibel M; Cole, Michael J; Hudson, Charles E; Sanberg, Paul R; Willing, Alison E; Bickford, Paula C; Gemma, Carmelina

    2008-01-01

    Background Neurogenesis continues to occur throughout life but dramatically decreases with increasing age. This decrease is mostly related to a decline in proliferative activity as a result of an impoverishment of the microenvironment of the aged brain, including a reduction in trophic factors and increased inflammation. Results We determined that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCBMC) given peripherally, by an intravenous injection, could rejuvenate the proliferative activity of the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. This increase in proliferation lasted for at least 15 days after the delivery of the UCBMC. Along with the increase in proliferation following UCBMC treatment, an increase in neurogenesis was also found in the aged animals. The increase in neurogenesis as a result of UCBMC treatment seemed to be due to a decrease in inflammation, as a decrease in the number of activated microglia was found and this decrease correlated with the increase in neurogenesis. Conclusion The results demonstrate that a single intravenous injection of UCBMC in aged rats can significantly improve the microenvironment of the aged hippocampus and rejuvenate the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. Our results raise the possibility of a peripherally administered cell therapy as an effective approach to improve the microenvironment of the aged brain. PMID:18275610

  5. Brain-peripheral cell crosstalk in white matter damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Lo, Eng H

    2016-05-01

    White matter damage is an important part of cerebrovascular disease and may be a significant contributing factor in vascular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. It is well accepted that white matter homeostasis involves multifactorial interactions between all cells in the axon-glia-vascular unit. But more recently, it has been proposed that beyond cell-cell signaling within the brain per se, dynamic crosstalk between brain and systemic responses such as circulating immune cells and stem/progenitor cells may also be important. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that peripheral cells contribute to damage and repair after white matter damage. Depending on timing, phenotype and context, monocyte/macrophage can possess both detrimental and beneficial effects on oligodendrogenesis and white matter remodeling. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be activated after CNS injury and the response may also influence white matter repair process. These emerging findings support the hypothesis that peripheral-derived cells can be both detrimental or beneficial in white matter pathology in cerebrovascular disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia, edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26277436

  6. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...... antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy, but the results are conflicting....

  7. Acute Modulation of Brain Connectivity in Parkinson Disease after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cosimo Quattrocchi

    Full Text Available The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease.Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre- and post-effective AMPS and pre- and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample t-test analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition.Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-test analysis to rule out sub-threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12 and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42 and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79.Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration.This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective in modulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest.Clinical Trials.gov NCT01815281.

  8. Use and abuse of benzodiazepines*

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely used for the treatment of anxiety, insomnia, and certain neuromuscular and convulsive disorders. However, their widespread availability has given rise to fears that they are over-prescribed. The problem is compounded by the fact that there is no universal agreement among medical practitioners as to the clinical indications warranting the use of these drugs. Although most industrialized countries exercise control over the sale and manufacture of benzodiazepines, many...

  9. Age-dependent changes in lipid peroxide levels in peripheral organs, but not in brain, in senescence-accelerated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugo, S; Kitagawa, T; Minami, S; Esashi, Y; Oomura, Y; Tokumaru, S; Kojo, S; Matsushima, K; Sasaki, K

    2000-01-01

    The tissue concentration of lipid peroxides was determined in the brain, heart, liver, lung and kidney of accelerated senescence-prone (SAMP-8) and -resistant (SAMR-1) mice at 3, 6 and 9 months of age by a method involving chemical derivatization and high performance liquid chromatography. The level of lipid peroxides in the brain did not show an age-dependent change, but at each age the brain level of lipid peroxides was significantly higher in SAMP-8 than in SAMR-1. In contrast, the lipid peroxide levels in the peripheral organs showed increases with aging in both strains, and they were significantly higher in SAMP-8 than in SAMR-1 at both 3 and 6 months of age (except at 3 months of age in the kidney). These results suggest that increased oxidative stress in the brain and peripheral organs is a cause of the senescence-related degeneration and impairments seen in SAMP-8. PMID:10643812

  10. Ischemic preconditioning reduces peripheral oxidative damage associated with brain ischemia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Frassetto

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain ischemia followed by reperfusion causes neuronal death related to oxidative damage. Furthermore, it has been reported that subjects suffering from ischemic cerebrovascular disorders exhibit changes in circulating platelet aggregation, a characteristic that might be important for their clinical outcome. In the present investigation we studied tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated plasma chemiluminescence and thiol content as measures of peripheral oxidative damage in naive and preconditioned rats submitted to forebrain ischemia produced by the 4-vessel occlusion method. Rats were submitted to 2 or 10 min of global transient forebrain ischemia followed by 60 min or 1, 2, 5, 10 or 30 days of reperfusion. Preconditioned rats were submitted to a 10-min ischemic episode 1 day after a 2-min ischemic event (2 + 10 min, followed by 60 min or 1 or 2 days of reperfusion. It has been demonstrated that such preconditioning protects against neuronal death in rats and gerbils submitted to a lethal (10 min ischemic episode. The results show that both 2 and 10 min of ischemia cause an increase of plasma chemiluminescence when compared to control and sham rats. In the 2-min ischemic group, the effect was not present after reperfusion. In the 10-min ischemic group, the increase was present up to 1 day after recirculation and values returned to control levels after 2 days. However, rats preconditioned to ischemia (2 + 10 min and reperfusion showed no differences in plasma chemiluminescence when compared to controls. We also analyzed plasma thiol content since it has been described that sulfhydryl (SH groups significantly contribute to the antioxidant capacity of plasma. There was a significant decrease of plasma thiol content after 2, 10 and 2 + 10 min of ischemia followed by reperfusion when compared to controls. We conclude that ischemia may cause, along with brain oxidative damage and cell death, a peripheral oxidative damage that is reduced by the

  11. Photoperiodic responses of depression-like behavior, the brain serotonergic system, and peripheral metabolism in laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Kawai, Misato; Togo, Yuki; Goda, Ryosei; Kawase, Takahiro; Matsuo, Haruka; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Nagasawa, Mao; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2014-02-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is characterized by depression during specific seasons, generally winter. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying SAD remain elusive due to a limited number of animal models with high availability and validity. Here we show that laboratory C57BL/6J mice display photoperiodic changes in depression-like behavior and brain serotonin content. C57BL/6J mice maintained under short-day conditions, as compared to those under long-day conditions, demonstrated prolonged immobility times in the forced swimming test with lower brain levels of serotonin and its precursor l-tryptophan. Furthermore, photoperiod altered multiple parameters reflective of peripheral metabolism, including the ratio of plasma l-tryptophan to the sum of other large neutral amino acids that compete for transport across the blood-brain barrier, responses of circulating glucose and insulin to glucose load, sucrose intake under restricted feeding condition, and sensitivity of the brain serotonergic system to peripherally administered glucose. These data suggest that the mechanisms underlying SAD involve the brain-peripheral tissue network, and C57BL/6J mice can serve as a powerful tool for investigating the link between seasons and mood. PMID:24485474

  12. Effect of low-dose methylprednisolone on peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells and its significance in rats after brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin ZHANG

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effects of low-dose methylprednisolone(MP treatment after traumatic brain injury(TBI in rats on the number of peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs and injury area of the brain.Methods One hundred and fifty-four adult male Wistar rats were involved in the present study,and they were randomly divided into normal control group(n=18,TBI control group(n=38,MP control group(n=30,MP+TBI group(n=30 and TBI+MP group(n=38.The TBI model was reproduced by fluid percussion injury(FPI.MP(5mg/kg was intraperitoneally administered once a day for 4 days.Peripheral venous blood samples were taken on day 1,3,7 and 14,and the counts of EPCs were determined by flow cytometry.The rats were sacrificed on day 1 and 3,brain edema was estimated by dry-wet weight method,and the blood-brain barrier(BBB permeability was determined by Evans-blue extravasation.Results The counts of peripheral blood EPCs were significantly higher in MP control group,MP+TBI group and TBI+MP group on day 1,3 and 7 than that in normal control and TBI control group,and it returned to the level of normal control group on day 14.The BBB permeability was improved and brain edema alleviated in MP+TBI and TBI+MP group on day 3.Conclusion The administration of low-dose MP may increase the count of peripheral blood EPCs in rats,decrease BBB damage,and alleviate brain edema.

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates immune reaction in mice with peripheral nerve xenotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu X

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xin Yu,1 Laijin Lu,1 Zhigang Liu,1 Teng Yang,2 Xu Gong,1 Yubo Ning,3 Yanfang Jiang4 1Department of Hand Surgery, 2Department of Orthopedics, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 3Department of Orthopedics, Ningshi Orthopedics Hospital of Tonghua, Tonghua, 4Department of Central Laboratory, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, People’s Republic of China Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been demonstrated to play an important role in survival, differentiation, and neurite outgrowth for many types of neurons. This study was designed to identify the role of BDNF during peripheral nerve xenotransplantation. Materials and methods: A peripheral nerve xenotransplantation from rats to mice was performed. Intracellular cytokines were stained for natural killer (NK cells, natural killer T (NKT cells, T cells, and B cells and analyzed by flow cytometry in the spleen of the recipient mouse. Serum levels of related cytokines were quantified by cytometric bead array. Results: Splenic NK cells significantly increased in the xenotransplanted mice (8.47±0.88×107 cells/mL compared to that in the control mice (4.66±0.78×107 cells/mL, P=0.0003, which significantly reduced in the presence of BDNF (4.85±0.87×107 cells/mL, P=0.0004. In contrast, splenic NKT cell number was significantly increased in the mice with xenotransplantation plus BDNF (XT + BDNF compared to that of control group or of mice receiving xenotransplantation only (XT only. Furthermore, the number of CD3+ T cells, CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD3+CD4- T cells, interferon-γ-producing CD3+CD4+ T cells, and interleukin (IL-17-producing CD3+CD4+ T cells, as well as CD3-CD19+ B cells, was significantly higher in the spleen of XT only mice compared to the control mice (P<0.05, which was significantly reduced by BDNF (P<0.05. The number of IL-4-producing CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD3+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells was significantly higher in the spleen of XT + BDNF

  14. Ethanol suppression of peripheral blood mononuclear cell trafficking across brain endothelial cells in immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola C Hudson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lola C Hudson1, Brenda A Colby1, Rick B Meeker21Department of Molecular Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: Earlier studies suggested that the combination of alcohol use and immunodeficiency virus infection resulted in more severe neurologic disease than either condition individually. These deleterious interactions could be due to increased immune cell and virus trafficking or may result from interactions between ethanol and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated toxicity within the brain. To determine the extent to which increased trafficking played a role, we examined the effect of ethanol on the migration of different peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs subsets across a brain endothelial cell monolayer. We utilized combinations of feline brain endothelial cells with astrocytes, and/or microglia with either acute exposure to 0.08 g/dL ethanol, a combination of ethanol and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, or FIV alone. Adherence of PBMCs to endothelium was increased in all combinations of cells with the addition of ethanol. Despite increased PBMC adhesion with ethanol treatment, transmigration of B cells, monocytes, CD4 T cells and CD8 T cells was not increased and was actually decreased in the presence of astrocytes. Expression of three common adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1, ICAM2, and vascular cell adhesion molecule, was unchanged or slightly decreased by ethanol. This indicated that although adherence is increased by ethanol it is not due to an increased expression of adhesion molecules. RANTES, MIP1α, MIP1β, and MCP-1 mRNA expression was also studied in brain endothelial cells, astrocytes and microglia by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Ethanol treatment of astrocytes resulted in modest changes of

  15. Genetic Deletion of Rheb1 in the Brain Reduces Food Intake and Causes Hypoglycemia with Altered Peripheral Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchun Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive food/energy intake is linked to obesity and metabolic disorders, such as diabetes. The hypothalamus in the brain plays a critical role in the control of food intake and peripheral metabolism. The signaling pathways in hypothalamic neurons that regulate food intake and peripheral metabolism need to be better understood for developing pharmacological interventions to manage eating behavior and obesity. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, a serine/threonine kinase, is a master regulator of cellular metabolism in different cell types. Pharmacological manipulations of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 activity in hypothalamic neurons alter food intake and body weight. Our previous study identified Rheb1 (Ras homolog enriched in brain 1 as an essential activator of mTORC1 activity in the brain. Here we examine whether central Rheb1 regulates food intake and peripheral metabolism through mTORC1 signaling. We find that genetic deletion of Rheb1 in the brain causes a reduction in mTORC1 activity and impairs normal food intake. As a result, Rheb1 knockout mice exhibit hypoglycemia and increased lipid mobilization in adipose tissue and ketogenesis in the liver. Our work highlights the importance of central Rheb1 signaling in euglycemia and energy homeostasis in animals.

  16. The hunt for brain Aβ oligomers by peripherally circulating multi-functional nanoparticles: Potential therapeutic approach for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Simona; Minniti, Stefania; Gregori, Maria; Sancini, Giulio; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Ordóñez-Gutiérrez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco; Salmona, Mario; Re, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed the ability of liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and an ApoE-derived peptide (mApoE-PA-LIP) to reduce brain Aβ in transgenic Alzheimer mice. Herein we investigated the efficacy of mApoE-PA-LIP to withdraw Aβ peptide in different aggregation forms from the brain, using a transwell cellular model of the blood-brain barrier and APP/PS1 mice. The spontaneous efflux of Aβ oligomers (Aβo), but not of Aβ fibrils, from the 'brain' side of the transwell was strongly enhanced (5-fold) in presence of mApoE-PA-LIP in the 'blood' compartment. This effect is due to a withdrawal of Aβo exerted by peripheral mApoE-PA-LIP by sink effect, because, when present in the brain side, they did not act as Aβo carrier and limit the oligomer efflux. In vivo peripheral administration of mApoE-PA-LIP significantly increased the plasma Aβ level, suggesting that Aβ-binding particles exploiting the sink effect can be used as a therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer disease. From the Clinical Editor: Alzheimer disease (AD) at present is an incurable disease, which is thought to be caused by an accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain. Many strategies in combating this disease have been focused on either the prevention or dissolving these peptides. In this article, the authors showed the ability of liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and with an ApoE- derived peptide to withdraw amyloid peptides from the brain. The data would help the future design of more novel treatment for Alzheimer disease.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide impairs amyloid beta efflux from brain: altered vascular sequestration, cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption, peripheral clearance and transporter function at the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson Michelle A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defects in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1 and p-glycoprotein (Pgp clearance of amyloid beta (Aβ from brain are thought to contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. We have recently shown that induction of systemic inflammation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS results in impaired efflux of Aβ from the brain. The same treatment also impairs Pgp function. Here, our aim is to determine which physiological routes of Aβ clearance are affected following systemic inflammation, including those relying on LRP-1 and Pgp function at the blood–brain barrier. Methods CD-1 mice aged between 6 and 8 weeks were treated with 3 intraperitoneal injections of 3 mg/kg LPS at 0, 6, and 24 hours and studied at 28 hours. 125I-Aβ1-42 or 125I-alpha-2-macroglobulin injected into the lateral ventricle of the brain (intracerebroventricular (ICV or into the jugular vein (intravenous (IV was used to quantify LRP-1-dependent partitioning between the brain vasculature and parenchyma and peripheral clearance, respectively. Disappearance of ICV-injected 14 C-inulin from brain was measured to quantify bulk flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Brain microvascular protein expression of LRP-1 and Pgp was measured by immunoblotting. Endothelial cell localization of LRP-1 was measured by immunofluorescence microscopy. Oxidative modifications to LRP-1 at the brain microvasculature were measured by immunoprecipitation of LRP-1 followed by immunoblotting for 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitrotyrosine. Results We found that LPS: caused an LRP-1-dependent redistribution of ICV-injected Aβ from brain parenchyma to brain vasculature and decreased entry into blood; impaired peripheral clearance of IV-injected Aβ; inhibited reabsorption of CSF; did not significantly alter brain microvascular protein levels of LRP-1 or Pgp, or oxidative modifications to LRP-1; and downregulated LRP-1 protein levels and caused LRP-1 mislocalization in cultured brain

  18. Benzodiazepine metabolism: an analytical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrioli, Roberto; Mercolini, Laura; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2008-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are currently among the most frequently prescribed drugs all over the world. They act as anxiolytics, sedatives, hypnotics, amnesics, antiepileptics and muscle relaxants. Despite their common chemical scaffold, these drugs differ in their pharmacokinetic and metabolic properties. In particular, they are biotransformed by different cytochrome P450 isoforms and also by different UDP-glucuronosyltransferase subtypes. The most important studies on the metabolic characteristics of several 1,4-benzodiazepines, carried out from 1998 onwards, are reported and briefly discussed in this review. Moreover, the analytical methods related to these studies are also described and commented upon and their most important characteristics are highlighted. Most methods are based on liquid chromatography, which provides wide applicability and good analytical performance granting high precision, accuracy and feasibility. Mass spectrometry is gaining widespread acceptance, particularly if the matrix is very complex and variable, such as human or animal blood. However, spectrophotometric detection is still used for this purpose and can grant sufficient selectivity and sensitivity when coupled to suitable sample pre-treatment procedures. A monograph is included for each of the following benzodiazepines: alprazolam, bromazepam, brotizolam, clotiazepam, diazepam, etizolam, flunitrazepam, lorazepam, midazolam, oxazepam and triazolam. PMID:18855614

  19. Critical role of peripheral vasoconstriction in fatal brain hyperthermia induced by MDMA (Ecstasy) under conditions that mimic human drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Kim, Albert H; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2014-06-01

    MDMA (Ecstasy) is an illicit drug used by young adults at hot, crowed "rave" parties, yet the data on potential health hazards of its abuse remain controversial. Here, we examined the effect of MDMA on temperature homeostasis in male rats under standard laboratory conditions and under conditions that simulate drug use in humans. We chronically implanted thermocouple microsensors in the nucleus accumbens (a brain reward area), temporal muscle, and facial skin to measure temperature continuously from freely moving rats. While focusing on brain hyperthermia, temperature monitoring from the two peripheral locations allowed us to evaluate the physiological mechanisms (i.e., intracerebral heat production and heat loss via skin surfaces) that underlie MDMA-induced brain temperature responses. Our data confirm previous reports on high individual variability and relatively weak brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA under standard control conditions (quiet rest, 22-23°C), but demonstrate dramatic enhancements of drug-induced brain hyperthermia during social interaction (exposure to male conspecific) and in warm environments (29°C). Importantly, we identified peripheral vasoconstriction as a critical mechanism underlying the activity- and state-dependent potentiation of MDMA-induced brain hyperthermia. Through this mechanism, which prevents proper heat dissipation to the external environment, MDMA at a moderate nontoxic dose (9 mg/kg or ~1/5 of LD50 in rats) can cause fatal hyperthermia under environmental conditions commonly encountered by humans. Our results demonstrate that doses of MDMA that are nontoxic under cool, quiet conditions can become highly dangerous under conditions that mimic recreational use of MDMA at rave parties or other hot, crowded venues.

  20. Benzodiazepines and postoperative cognitive dysfunction in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, L.S.; Steentoft, Anni; Rasmussen, H.;

    1999-01-01

    hypnotics benzodiazepine,diazepam,age factor,anaesthesia,geriatric,psychological responses,postoperative......hypnotics benzodiazepine,diazepam,age factor,anaesthesia,geriatric,psychological responses,postoperative...

  1. THE ROLE OF ANDROGENS AND ESTROGENS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF BRAIN AND PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM: APPROACHES TO DEVELOPING ANIMAL MODELS FOR SEXUALLY DIMORPHIC BEHAVIORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation provides an overview of research on the effects of hormonally active chemicals on sexual differentiation of the brain including (a) research on the role of androgens and estrogens in the development of the brain and peripheral nervous system, (b) approaches to d...

  2. Early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor in human embryos and fetuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebebrand, J.; Hofmann, D.; Reichelt, R.; Schnarr, S.; Knapp, M.; Propping, P.; Foedisch, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) was investigated in human embryos and fetuses between 7 and 26 weeks of gestation. Brain tissue was gained from terminated pregnancies or spontaneous abortions. Binding studies, which were performed with /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (FNZ), revealed that specific benzodiazepine binding is already detectable at an embryonal age of 7 weeks post conception. Binding at this early stage can be displaced potently by clonazepam and the inverse agonist ..beta..-CCE. Additionally, /sup 3/H-FNZ binding is enhanced by GABA. Thus, benzodiazepine binding is of the central type. Receptor density increases steeply in whole brain between weeks 8 and 11 of gestation. In frontal cortex receptor density increases gradually between weeks 12 and 26 of gestation. No specific fetal disease entity (including trisomy 21) was consistently associated with exceptionally high or low B/sub max/-values.

  3. Early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor in human embryos and fetuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) was investigated in human embryos and fetuses between 7 and 26 weeks of gestation. Brain tissue was gained from terminated pregnancies or spontaneous abortions. Binding studies, which were performed with 3H-flunitrazepam (FNZ), revealed that specific benzodiazepine binding is already detectable at an embryonal age of 7 weeks post conception. Binding at this early stage can be displaced potently by clonazepam and the inverse agonist β-CCE. Additionally, 3H-FNZ binding is enhanced by GABA. Thus, benzodiazepine binding is of the central type. Receptor density increases steeply in whole brain between weeks 8 and 11 of gestation. In frontal cortex receptor density increases gradually between weeks 12 and 26 of gestation. No specific fetal disease entity (including trisomy 21) was consistently associated with exceptionally high or low B/sub max/-values

  4. Impairment of blood brain barrier is related with the neuroinflammation induced peripheral immune status in intracerebroventricular colchicine injected rats: An experimental study with mannitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Susmita; Ghosh, Arijit; Ghosh, Tusharkanti

    2016-09-01

    The neurodegeneration in AD patients may be associated with changes of peripheral immune responses. Some peripheral immune responses are altered due to neuroinflammation in colchicine induced AD (cAD) rats. The leaky blood brain barrier (BBB) in cAD-rats may be involved in inducing peripheral inflammation, though there is no report in this regard. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the role of BBB in cADrats by altering the BBB in a time dependent manner with injection (i.v.) of mannitol (BBB opener). The inflammatory markers in the brain and serum along with the peripheral immune responses were measured after 30 and 60min of mannitol injection in cAD rats. The results showed higher inflammatory markers in the hippocampus and serum along with alterations in peripheral immune parameters in cAD rats. Although the hippocampal inflammatory markers did not further change after mannitol injection in cAD rats, the serum inflammatory markers and peripheral immune responses were altered and these changes were greater after 60min than that of 30min of mannitol injection. The present study shows that the peripheral immune responses in cAD rats after 30 and 60min of mannitol injection are related to magnitude of impairment of BBB in these conditions. It can be concluded from this study that impairment of BBB in cAD rats is related to the changes of peripheral immune responses observed in that condition.

  5. Impairment of blood brain barrier is related with the neuroinflammation induced peripheral immune status in intracerebroventricular colchicine injected rats: An experimental study with mannitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Susmita; Ghosh, Arijit; Ghosh, Tusharkanti

    2016-09-01

    The neurodegeneration in AD patients may be associated with changes of peripheral immune responses. Some peripheral immune responses are altered due to neuroinflammation in colchicine induced AD (cAD) rats. The leaky blood brain barrier (BBB) in cAD-rats may be involved in inducing peripheral inflammation, though there is no report in this regard. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the role of BBB in cADrats by altering the BBB in a time dependent manner with injection (i.v.) of mannitol (BBB opener). The inflammatory markers in the brain and serum along with the peripheral immune responses were measured after 30 and 60min of mannitol injection in cAD rats. The results showed higher inflammatory markers in the hippocampus and serum along with alterations in peripheral immune parameters in cAD rats. Although the hippocampal inflammatory markers did not further change after mannitol injection in cAD rats, the serum inflammatory markers and peripheral immune responses were altered and these changes were greater after 60min than that of 30min of mannitol injection. The present study shows that the peripheral immune responses in cAD rats after 30 and 60min of mannitol injection are related to magnitude of impairment of BBB in these conditions. It can be concluded from this study that impairment of BBB in cAD rats is related to the changes of peripheral immune responses observed in that condition. PMID:27288705

  6. Is recovery driven by central or peripheral factors? A role for the brain in recovery following intermittent-sprint exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minett, Geoffrey M.; Duffield, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged intermittent-sprint exercise (i.e., team sports) induce disturbances in skeletal muscle structure and function that are associated with reduced contractile function, a cascade of inflammatory responses, perceptual soreness, and a delayed return to optimal physical performance. In this context, recovery from exercise-induced fatigue is traditionally treated from a peripheral viewpoint, with the regeneration of muscle physiology and other peripheral factors the target of recovery strategies. The direction of this research narrative on post-exercise recovery differs to the increasing emphasis on the complex interaction between both central and peripheral factors regulating exercise intensity during exercise performance. Given the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in motor-unit recruitment during exercise, it too may have an integral role in post-exercise recovery. Indeed, this hypothesis is indirectly supported by an apparent disconnect in time-course changes in physiological and biochemical markers resultant from exercise and the ensuing recovery of exercise performance. Equally, improvements in perceptual recovery, even withstanding the physiological state of recovery, may interact with both feed-forward/feed-back mechanisms to influence subsequent efforts. Considering the research interest afforded to recovery methodologies designed to hasten the return of homeostasis within the muscle, the limited focus on contributors to post-exercise recovery from CNS origins is somewhat surprising. Based on this context, the current review aims to outline the potential contributions of the brain to performance recovery after strenuous exercise. PMID:24550837

  7. Is recovery driven by central or peripheral factors? A role for the brain in recovery following intermittent-sprint exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey M Minett

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged intermittent-sprint exercise (i.e. team sports induce disturbances in skeletal muscle structure and function that are associated with reduced contractile function, a cascade of inflammatory responses, perceptual soreness and a delayed return to optimal physical performance. In this context, recovery from exercise-induced fatigue is traditionally treated from a peripheral viewpoint, with the regeneration of muscle physiology and other peripheral factors the target of recovery strategies. The direction of this research narrative on post-exercise recovery differs to the increasing emphasis on the complex interaction between both central and peripheral factors regulating exercise intensity during exercise performance. Given the role of the central nervous system (CNS in motor-unit recruitment during exercise, it too may have an integral role in post-exercise recovery. Indeed, this hypothesis is indirectly supported by an apparent disconnect in time-course changes in physiological and biochemical markers resultant from exercise and the ensuing recovery of exercise performance. Equally, improvements in perceptual recovery, even withstanding the physiological state of recovery, may interact with both feed-forward/feed-back mechanisms to influence subsequent efforts. Considering the research interest afforded to recovery methodologies designed to hasten the return of homeostasis within the muscle, the limited focus on contributors to post-exercise recovery from CNS origins is somewhat surprising. Based on this context, the current review aims to outline the potential contributions of the brain to performance recovery after strenuous exercise.

  8. Peripheral Blood Mitochondrial DNA as a Biomarker of Cerebral Mitochondrial Dysfunction following Traumatic Brain Injury in a Porcine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J Kilbaugh

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI has been shown to activate the peripheral innate immune system and systemic inflammatory response, possibly through the central release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. Our main purpose was to gain an initial understanding of the peripheral mitochondrial response following TBI, and how this response could be utilized to determine cerebral mitochondrial bioenergetics. We hypothesized that TBI would increase peripheral whole blood relative mtDNA copy number, and that these alterations would be associated with cerebral mitochondrial bioenergetics triggered by TBI.Blood samples were obtained before, 6 h after, and 25 h after focal (controlled cortical impact injury: CCI and diffuse (rapid non-impact rotational injury: RNR TBI. PCR primers, unique to mtDNA, were identified by aligning segments of nuclear DNA (nDNA to mtDNA, normalizing values to nuclear 16S rRNA, for a relative mtDNA copy number. Three unique mtDNA regions were selected, and PCR primers were designed within those regions, limited to 25-30 base pairs to further ensure sequence specificity, and measured utilizing qRT-PCR.Mean relative mtDNA copy numbers increased significantly at 6 and 25 hrs after following both focal and diffuse traumatic brain injury. Specifically, the mean relative mtDNA copy number from three mitochondrial-specific regions pre-injury was 0.84 ± 0.05. At 6 and 25 h after diffuse non-impact TBI, mean mtDNA copy number was significantly higher: 2.07 ± 0.19 (P < 0.0001 and 2.37 ± 0.42 (P < 0.001, respectively. Following focal impact TBI, relative mtDNA copy number was also significantly higher, 1.35 ± 0.12 (P < 0.0001 at 25 hours. Alterations in mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus and cortex post-TBI correlated with changes in the relative mtDNA copy number measured in peripheral blood.Alterations in peripheral blood relative mtDNA copy numbers may be a novel biosignature of cerebral mitochondrial bioenergetics

  9. The neural butterfly effect The injury to peripheral nerves changes the brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krzysztof Czaja

    2012-01-01

    @@ Regeneration of damaged innervations in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) has been well documented in both animals and human[1].After injury, the damaged neurite swells and undergoes retrograde degeneration.Once the debris is cleared, it begins to sprout and restore damaged connections.

  10. Benzodiazepine receptor quantification in vivo in humans using [11C]flumazenil and PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Bartenstein, P A; Lammertsma, A A;

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-11-labeled flumazenil combined with positron emission tomography (PET) was used to measure the concentration (Bmax) of the benzodiazepine (Bz) receptor in the brain and its equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for flumazenil in five normal subjects. The steady-state approach was used inj...

  11. Epilepsia partialis continua triggered by traumatic hand injury: a peripheral tuning of brain excitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglioli, Eliseu; Martins, William Alves; Cruz, Walter De la; Andrade, Victor; Silva, Vinicius Duval da; Nunes, Rafael Menezes; Palmini, André

    2016-03-01

    Epilepsia partialis continua is often refractory to antiepileptic medication and its causal relation to peripheral sensory stimuli has only rarely been suggested. We report a man who received surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy 10 years ago, who presented "de novo" epilepsia partialis continua following mild traumatic injury of the left hand. Continuous myoclonus of the left upper limb started the day after injury and persisted unabated for several weeks. Non-invasive evaluation was inconclusive. Acute electrocorticography during surgery under local anaesthesia revealed continuous, rhythmic spiking over the right sensorimotor cortex. Tailored excision of the posterior bank of the motor and adjacent sensory cortex immediately stopped the continuous myoclonus. Histopathology showed abnormal radial lamination and was compatible with focal cortical dysplasia type IA. Epilepsia partialis continua did not recur for seven years. Afferent stimuli from peripheral injury can disinhibit hyperexcitable sensorimotor cortex leading to epilepsia partialis continua. [Published with video sequences online]. PMID:26891988

  12. GDH-Dependent Glutamate Oxidation in the Brain Dictates Peripheral Energy Substrate Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karaca, Melis; Frigerio, Francesca; Migrenne, Stephanie;

    2015-01-01

    Glucose, the main energy substrate used in the CNS, is continuously supplied by the periphery. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, is foreseen as a complementary energy contributor in the brain. In particular, astrocytes actively take up glutamate and may use it through oxidative...... glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity. Here, we investigated the significance of glutamate as energy substrate for the brain. Upon glutamate exposure, astrocytes generated ATP in a GDH-dependent way. The observed lack of glutamate oxidation in brain-specific GDH null CnsGlud1(-/-) mice resulted....... Our data reveal the importance of glutamate as necessary energy substrate for the brain and the role of central GDH in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis....

  13. Fluctuations in Brain Temperature Induced by Lypopolysaccharides: Central and Peripheral Contributions

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jeremy S.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined changes in central (anterior-preoptic hypothalamus) and peripheral (temporal muscle and facial skin) temperatures in freely moving rats following intravenous administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) at low doses (1 and 10 μg/kg) at thermoneutral conditions (28˚C). Recordings were made with high temporal resolution (5-s bin) and the effects of LPS were compared with those induced by a tail-pinch, a standard arousing somato-sensory stimulus. At each dose,...

  14. Beyond the brain-Peripheral kisspeptin signaling is essential for promoting endometrial gland development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia León; Daniela Fernadois; Alexandra Sull; Judith Sull; Michele Calder; Kanako Hayashi; Moshmi Bhattacharya; Stephen Power; George A. Vilos; Vilos, Angelos G.; Manuel Tena-Sempere; Babwah, Andy V.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine growth and endometrial gland formation (adenogenesis) and function, are essential for fertility and are controlled by estrogens and other regulators, whose nature and physiological relevance are yet to be elucidated. Kisspeptin, which signals via Kiss1r, is essential for fertility, primarily through its central control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, but also likely through peripheral actions. Using genetically modified mice, we addressed the contributions of central and p...

  15. Sleep is not just for the brain: transcriptional responses to sleep in peripheral tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Anafi, Ron C.; Pellegrino, Renata; Shockley, Keith R.; Romer, Micah; Tufik, Sergio; Pack, Allan I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Many have assumed that the primary function of sleep is for the brain. We evaluated the molecular consequences of sleep and sleep deprivation outside the brain, in heart and lung. Using microarrays we compared gene expression in tissue from sleeping and sleep deprived mice euthanized at the same diurnal times. Results In each tissue, nearly two thousand genes demonstrated statistically significant differential expression as a function of sleep/wake behavioral state. To mitigate the...

  16. Beyond the brain-Peripheral kisspeptin signaling is essential for promoting endometrial gland development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Silvia; Fernadois, Daniela; Sull, Alexandra; Sull, Judith; Calder, Michele; Hayashi, Kanako; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Power, Stephen; Vilos, George A; Vilos, Angelos G; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Babwah, Andy V

    2016-01-01

    Uterine growth and endometrial gland formation (adenogenesis) and function, are essential for fertility and are controlled by estrogens and other regulators, whose nature and physiological relevance are yet to be elucidated. Kisspeptin, which signals via Kiss1r, is essential for fertility, primarily through its central control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, but also likely through peripheral actions. Using genetically modified mice, we addressed the contributions of central and peripheral kisspeptin signaling in regulating uterine growth and adenogenesis. Global ablation of Kiss1 or Kiss1r dramatically suppressed uterine growth and almost fully prevented adenogenesis. However, while uterine growth was fully rescued by E2 treatment of Kiss1(-/-) mice and by genetic restoration of kisspeptin signaling in GnRH neurons in Kiss1r(-/-) mice, functional adenogenesis was only marginally restored. Thus, while uterine growth is largely dependent on ovarian E2-output via central kisspeptin signaling, peripheral kisspeptin signaling is indispensable for endometrial adenogenesis and function, essential aspects of reproductive competence. PMID:27364226

  17. Peripheral nerve injury and TRPV1-expressing primary afferent C-fibers cause opening of the blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salter Michael W

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The blood-brain barrier (BBB plays the crucial role of limiting exposure of the central nervous system (CNS to damaging molecules and cells. Dysfunction of the BBB is critical in a broad range of CNS disorders including neurodegeneration, inflammatory or traumatic injury to the CNS, and stroke. In peripheral tissues, the vascular-tissue permeability is normally greater than BBB permeability, but vascular leakage can be induced by efferent discharge activity in primary sensory neurons leading to plasma extravasation into the extravascular space. Whether discharge activity of sensory afferents entering the CNS may open the BBB or blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB remains an open question. Results Here we show that peripheral nerve injury (PNI produced by either sciatic nerve constriction or transecting two of its main branches causes an increase in BSCB permeability, as assessed by using Evans Blue dye or horseradish peroxidase. The increase in BSCB permeability was not observed 6 hours after the PNI but was apparent 24 hours after the injury. The increase in BSCB permeability was transient, peaking about 24-48 hrs after PNI with BSCB integrity returning to normal levels by 7 days. The increase in BSCB permeability was prevented by administering the local anaesthetic lidocaine at the site of the nerve injury. BSCB permeability was also increased 24 hours after electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at intensity sufficient to activate C-fibers, but not when A-fibers only were activated. Likewise, BSCB permeability increased following application of capsaicin to the nerve. The increase in permeability caused by C-fiber stimulation or by PNI was not anatomically limited to the site of central termination of primary afferents from the sciatic nerve in the lumbar cord, but rather extended throughout the spinal cord and into the brain. Conclusions We have discovered that injury to a peripheral nerve and electrical stimulation of C

  18. Benzodiazepine-induced intestinal motor disturbances in rats: mediation by omega 2 (BZ2) sites on capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnafous, C; Scatton, B; BUÉNO, L.

    1994-01-01

    1. The central and peripheral effects of the omega (benzodiazepine) site ligands, clonazepam, alpidem, zolpidem, triazolam, flumazenil, ethyl beta carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) and N-methyl beta carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCM) on intestinal myoelectrical activity were evaluated in conscious rats, chronically fitted with Nichrome electrodes implanted on the duodenum and jejunum. The localization of the omega (benzodiazepine) receptors involved in these effects was evaluated by use of s...

  19. Parallel changes in gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the brain after maternal separation in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Vivienne

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functional integration of the neuro-, endocrine- and immune-systems suggests that the transcriptome of white blood cells may reflect neuropsychiatric states, and be used as a non-invasive diagnostic indicator. We used a mouse maternal separation model, a paradigm of early adversity, to test the hypothesis that transcriptional changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs are paralleled by specific gene expression changes in prefrontal cortex (PFC, hippocampus (Hic and hypothalamus (Hyp. Furthermore, we evaluated whether gene expression profiles of PBMCs could be used to predict the separation status of individual animals. Findings Microarray gene expression profiles of all three brain regions provided substantial evidence of stress-related neural differences between maternally separated and control animals. For example, changes in expression of genes involved in the glutamatergic and GABAergic systems were identified in the PFC and Hic, supporting a stress-related hyperglutamatergic state within the separated group. The expression of 50 genes selected from the PBMC microarray data provided sufficient information to predict treatment classes with 95% accuracy. Importantly, stress-related transcriptome differences in PBMC populations were paralleled by stress-related gene expression changes in CNS target tissues. Conclusion These results confirm that the transcriptional profiles of peripheral immune tissues occur in parallel to changes in the brain and contain sufficient information for the efficient diagnostic prediction of stress-related neural states in mice. Future studies will need to evaluate the relevance of the predictor set of 50 genes within clinical settings, specifically within a context of stress-related disorders.

  20. Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord, roots and peripheral nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossini, P M; Burke, D; Chen, R;

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide an up-date of previous IFCN report on "Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application" (Rossini et al., 1994). A new Committee, composed of international experts, some ...

  1. Social-cognitive predictors of intended and actual benzodiazepine cessation among chronic benzodiazepine users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Wolde, Geeske B.; Dijkstra, Arie; Van Empelen, Pepijn; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Zitman, Frans G.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term benzodiazepine use is associated with a variety of negative health consequences. Cessation of long-term use is therefore an important health goal. In a prospective study among chronic benzodiazepinc users (N=356) social-cognitive factors of benzodiazepine cessation were examined with a nin

  2. Peripheral obestatin has no effect on feeding behavior and brain Fos expression in rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Kobelt, Peter; Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Bannert, Norbert; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Inhoff, Tobias; Noetzel, Steffen; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F; Taché, Yvette; Mönnikes, Hubert

    2008-01-01

    Obestatin is produced in the stomach from proghrelin by post-translational cleavage. The initial report claimed anorexigenic effects of obestatin in mice. Contrasting studies indicated no effect of obestatin on food intake (FI). We investigated influences of metabolic state (fed/fasted), environmental factors (dark/light phase) and brain Fos response to intraperitoneal (ip) obestatin in rats, and used the protocol from the original study assessing obestatin effects in mice. FI was determined ...

  3. Manganese-enhanced MR imaging of brain activation evoked by noxious peripheral electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Myeounghoon; Lee, Kyuhong; Lee, Chulhyun; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Cheong, Chaejoon; Sohn, Jin-Hun; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2016-02-01

    As imaging technology develops, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has furthered our understanding of brain function by clarifying the anatomical structure and generating functional imaging data related to information processing in pain conditions. Recent studies have reported that manganese (Mn(2+))-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides valuable information about the functions of the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to identify specific brain regions activated during noxious electric stimulation using high-resolution MEMRI. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups: naïve, sham electrical stimulation, and noxious electric stimulation. Under urethane with α-chloralose mixture anesthesia, a catheter was placed in the external carotid artery to administrate 20% mannitol and manganese chloride (25mM MnCl2). Noxious electric stimulation (2Hz, 10V) was applied to the hind paw with a needle electrode. Stimulation-induced neuronal activation was detected using 4.7-T MRI. In response to noxious electrical stimulation, remarkable Mn(2+)-enhanced signals were observed in the agranular insular cortex, auditory cortex, primary somatosensory cortex of the hind limb, and granular and dysgranular insular cortex, which correspond to sensory tactile electric stimulus to the hindpaws. These results indicate that the combination of MEMRI with activity-induced Mn(2+)-dependent contrast can delineate functional areas in the rat brain. PMID:26733299

  4. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussara Mendonça Alvarenga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the “signs, meanings, and actions” model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were “nervousness”, “sleep problems”, and “worry” due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life’s problems in old age. Although it relieves the “nerves”, the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population.

  5. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Jussara Mendonça; Giacomin, Karla Cristina; Loyola Filho, Antônio Ignácio de; Uchoa, Elizabeth; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the "signs, meanings, and actions" model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were "nervousness", "sleep problems", and "worry" due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life's problems in old age. Although it relieves the "nerves", the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population. PMID:26039388

  6. Relations between peripheral and brain serotonin measures and behavioural responses in a novelty test in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursinus, Winanda W; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth; Zonderland, Johan J; Rodenburg, T Bas; de Souza, Adriana S; Koopmanschap, Rudie E; Kemp, Bas; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Korte, S Mechiel; van Reenen, Cornelis G

    2013-06-13

    Pigs differ in their behavioural responses towards environmental challenges. Individual variation in maladaptive responses such as tail biting, may partly originate from underlying biological characteristics related to (emotional) reactivity to challenges and serotonergic system functioning. Assessing relations between behavioural responses and brain and blood serotonin parameters may help in understanding susceptibility to the development of maladaptive responses. The objective of the current study was, therefore, to assess the relationship between the pigs' serotonergic parameters measured in both blood and brain, and the behaviour of pigs during a novelty test. Pigs (n=31) were subjected to a novelty test at 11weeks of age, consisting of 5-min novel environment exposure after which a novel object (a bucket) was introduced for 5min. Whole blood serotonin, platelet serotonin level, and platelet serotonin uptake were determined at 13weeks of age. Levels of serotonin, its metabolite and serotonin turnover were determined at 19weeks of age in the frontal cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus. The behaviour of the pigs was different during exposure to a novel object compared to the novel environment only, with more fear-related behaviours exhibited during novel object exposure. Platelet serotonin level and brain serotonergic parameters in the hippocampus were interrelated. Notably, the time spent exploring the test arena was significantly correlated with both platelet serotonin level and right hippocampal serotonin activity (turnover and concentration). In conclusion, the existence of an underlying biological trait - possibly fearfulness - may be involved in the pig's behavioural responses toward environmental challenges, and this is also reflected in serotonergic parameters. PMID:23685231

  7. A longitudinal study of pain, personality, and brain plasticity following peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Ruma; Anastakis, Dimitri J; Katz, Joel; Davis, Karen D

    2016-03-01

    We do not know precisely why pain develops and becomes chronic after peripheral nerve injury (PNI), but it is likely due to biological and psychological factors. Here, we tested the hypotheses that (1) high Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) scores at the time of injury and repair are associated with pain and cold sensitivity after 1-year recovery and (2) insula gray matter changes reflect the course of injury and improvements over time. Ten patients with complete median and/or ulnar nerve transections and surgical repair were tested ∼3 weeks after surgical nerve repair (time 1) and ∼1 year later for 6 of the 10 patients (time 2). Patients and 10 age-/sex-matched healthy controls completed questionnaires that assessed pain (patients) and personality and underwent quantitative sensory testing and 3T MRI to assess cortical thickness. In patients, pain intensity and neuropathic pain correlated with pain catastrophizing. Time 1 pain catastrophizing trended toward predicting cold pain thresholds at time 2, and at time 1 cortical thickness of the right insula was reduced. At time 2, chronic pain was related to the time 1 pain-PCS relationship and cold sensitivity, pain catastrophizing correlated with cold pain threshold, and insula thickness reversed to control levels. This study highlights the interplay between personality, sensory function, and pain in patients following PNI and repair. The PCS-pain association suggests that a focus on affective or negative components of pain could render patients vulnerable to chronic pain. Cold sensitivity and structural insula changes may reflect altered thermosensory or sensorimotor awareness representations. PMID:26588697

  8. Neuronal Sirt1 Deficiency Increases Insulin Sensitivity in Both Brain and Peripheral Tissues*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Min; Sarruf, David A.; Li, Pingping; Osborn, Olivia; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Talukdar, Saswata; Chen, Ai; Bandyopadhyay, Gautam; Xu, Jianfeng; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Dines, Kevin; Watkins, Steven; Kaiyala, Karl; Schwartz, Michael W.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2013-01-01

    Sirt1 is a NAD+-dependent class III deacetylase that functions as a cellular energy sensor. In addition to its well-characterized effects in peripheral tissues, emerging evidence suggests that neuronal Sirt1 activity plays a role in the central regulation of energy balance and glucose metabolism. To assess this idea, we generated Sirt1 neuron-specific knockout (SINKO) mice. On both standard chow and HFD, SINKO mice were more insulin sensitive than Sirt1f/f mice. Thus, SINKO mice had lower fasting insulin levels, improved glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance, and enhanced systemic insulin sensitivity during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies. Hypothalamic insulin sensitivity of SINKO mice was also increased over controls, as assessed by hypothalamic activation of PI3K, phosphorylation of Akt and FoxO1 following systemic insulin injection. Intracerebroventricular injection of insulin led to a greater systemic effect to improve glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in SINKO mice compared with controls. In line with the in vivo results, insulin-induced AKT and FoxO1 phosphorylation were potentiated by inhibition of Sirt1 in a cultured hypothalamic cell line. Mechanistically, this effect was traced to a reduced effect of Sirt1 to directly deacetylate and repress IRS-1 function. The enhanced central insulin signaling in SINKO mice was accompanied by increased insulin receptor signal transduction in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. In summary, we conclude that neuronal Sirt1 negatively regulates hypothalamic insulin signaling, leading to systemic insulin resistance. Interventions that reduce neuronal Sirt1 activity have the potential to improve systemic insulin action and limit weight gain on an obesigenic diet. PMID:23457303

  9. Unexpected effects of peripherally administered kynurenic acid on cortical spreading depression and related blood–brain barrier permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oláh G

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gáspár Oláh,1 Judit Herédi,1 Ákos Menyhárt,1 Zsolt Czinege,2 Dávid Nagy,1 János Fuzik,1 Kitti Kocsis,1 Levente Knapp,1 Erika Krucsó,1 Levente Gellért,1 Zsolt Kis,1 Tamás Farkas,1 Ferenc Fülöp,3 Árpád Párdutz,4 János Tajti,4 László Vécsei,4 József Toldi1 1Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Neuroscience, 2Department of Software Engineering, 3Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and MTA-SZTE Research Group for Stereochemistry, 4Department of Neurology and MTA-SZTE Neuroscience Research Group, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary Abstract: Cortical spreading depression (CSD involves a slowly-propagating depolarization wave in the cortex, which can appear in numerous pathophysiological conditions, such as migraine with aura, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Neurons and glial cells are also depolarized transiently during the phenomena. CSD is followed by a massive increase in glutamate release and by changes in the brain microcirculation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, endogenous kynurenic acid (KYNA and dizocilpine, on CSD and the related blood–brain barrier (BBB permeability in rats. In intact animals, KYNA hardly crosses the BBB but has some positive features as compared with its precursor L-Kynurenine, which is frequently used in animal studies (KYNA cannot be metabolized to excitotoxic agents such as 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid. We therefore investigated the possible effects of peripherally administered KYNA. Repetitive CSD waves were elicited by the application of 1 M KCl solution to the cortex. Direct current-electrocorticograms were measured for 1 hour. Four parameters of the waves were compared. Evans blue dye and fluorescent microscopy were used to study the possible changes in the permeability of the BBB. The results demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists can reduce the number of CSD waves and decrease

  10. Regulation of Schwann cell proliferation and migration by miR-1 targeting brain-derived neurotrophic factor after peripheral nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng Yi; Ying Yuan; Qianqian Chen; Xinghui Wang; Leilei Gong; Jie Liu; Xiaosong Gu; Shiying Li

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a global problem that causes disability and severe socioeconomic burden. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) benefits peripheral nerve regeneration and becomes a promising therapeutic molecule. In the current study, we found that microRNA-1 (miR-1) directly targeted BDNF by binding to its 3′-UTR and caused both mRNA degradation and translation suppression of BDNF. Moreover, miR-1 induced BDNF mRNA degradation primarily through binding to target site 3 rather th...

  11. [Analysis of the binding capacity of the benzodiazepine site of gabaa receptor in mice C57BL/6 and BALB/C pretreated with anxiolytics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarkova, M A

    2011-01-01

    The level of specific 3H-flunitrazepam binding in synaptosomal membranes of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice brain underwent to the stress of different types has been studied. Mild stress (Elevated Plus Maze) was shown to induce the decrease of benzodiazepine binding in BALB/c mice only, while the strong one (Exposure to a predator) was revealed to cause this decrease in both strains. Behavioral effects of different non-benzodiazepine drugs possessing anxiolytic properties (Afobazol, Ladasten and Noopept) was accompanied with the normalization of the level of benzodiazepine reception, reduced by the stress of both modalities. PMID:22232906

  12. In vivo imaging and characterization of [18F]DPA-714, a potential new TSPO ligand, in mouse brain and peripheral tissues using small-animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO), a biochemical marker of neuroinflammation, is highly expressed in the brain activated microglia and it is also expressed by peripheral inflammatory cells and normal peripheral tissues. Thus, development of radioligands for the TSPO may contribute to further understanding the in vivo TSPO function in central and peripheral inflammatory processes and other pathologies. Here, we report the biodistribution, the specific binding and the radiometabolites of [18F]DPA-714, a promising fluorinated PET radiotracer, in normal mice using a microPET/CT scanner. Methods: The in vivo biodistribution and kinetics of [18F]DPA-714 were measured in mice brain and peripheral tissues. Specific binding to TSPO sites was assessed using pharmacological competitive studies by means of saturation experiments performed by i.v. injection of 1 mg/kg of unlabeled DPA-714 or 3 mg/kg of unlabeled PK11195. A region of interest analysis was performed to generate time-activity curves in the brain, heart, lung, kidney, spleen and liver. Metabolites assay was performed in the plasma and peripheral organs by radio-HPLC. Results: [18F]DPA-714 reached high concentration in lung, heart, kidney and spleen, tissues well known to be rich in TSPO sites. [18F]DPA-714 kinetics were faster in the lung and slower in the kidney. Pre-injection of unlabeled DPA-714 or PK11195 inhibited about 80% of [18F]DPA-714 uptake in the lung and heart (p < 0.0005). The percentage of inhibition in the kidney was lower and achieved at later times only with DPA-714 (p < 0.05) but not with PK11195. Sixty minutes after radiotracer injection only unmetabolized radioligand was found in the brain, lung, heart and spleen. Conclusion: These results suggest that [18F]DPA-714 is a suitable PET ligand for imaging in mice brain and peripheral tissues since it binds with high specificity TSPO binding sites and it is almost unchanged at 60 minutes after radiotracer injection in the brain

  13. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor is related to cardiovascular risk factors in active and inactive elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembron-Lacny, A; Dziubek, W; Rynkiewicz, M; Morawin, B; Woźniewski, M

    2016-06-20

    Regular exercise plays an important preventive and therapeutic role in heart and vascular diseases, and beneficially affects brain function. In blood, the effects of exercise appear to be very complex and could include protection of vascular endothelial cells via neurotrophic factors and decreased oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to identify the age-related changes in peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its relationship to oxidative damage and conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers, such as atherogenic index, C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL), in active and inactive men. Seventeen elderly males (61-80 years) and 17 young males (20-24 years) participated in this study. According to the 6-min Åstrand-Rhyming bike test, the subjects were classified into active and inactive groups. The young and elderly active men had a significantly better lipoprotein profile and antioxidant status, as well as reduced oxidative damage and inflammatory state. The active young and elderly men had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels compared to their inactive peers. BDNF was correlated with VO2max (r=0.765, P<0.001). In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation of BDNF with atherogenic index (TC/HDL), hsCRP and oxLDL. The findings demonstrate that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness reflected in VO2max was associated with a higher level of circulating BDNF, which in turn was related to common CVD risk factors and oxidative damage markers in young and elderly men. PMID:27332774

  14. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor is related to cardiovascular risk factors in active and inactive elderly men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zembron-Lacny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regular exercise plays an important preventive and therapeutic role in heart and vascular diseases, and beneficially affects brain function. In blood, the effects of exercise appear to be very complex and could include protection of vascular endothelial cells via neurotrophic factors and decreased oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to identify the age-related changes in peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its relationship to oxidative damage and conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD biomarkers, such as atherogenic index, C-reactive protein (hsCRP and oxidized LDL (oxLDL, in active and inactive men. Seventeen elderly males (61-80 years and 17 young males (20-24 years participated in this study. According to the 6-min Åstrand-Rhyming bike test, the subjects were classified into active and inactive groups. The young and elderly active men had a significantly better lipoprotein profile and antioxidant status, as well as reduced oxidative damage and inflammatory state. The active young and elderly men had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels compared to their inactive peers. BDNF was correlated with VO2max (r=0.765, P<0.001. In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation of BDNF with atherogenic index (TC/HDL, hsCRP and oxLDL. The findings demonstrate that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness reflected in VO2max was associated with a higher level of circulating BDNF, which in turn was related to common CVD risk factors and oxidative damage markers in young and elderly men.

  15. Regional blood flow in brain and peripheral tissues during acute experimental arterial subdural bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlin, J R; Zwetnow, N N; Hall, C

    1993-01-01

    The effects of a large intracranial arterial subdural bleeding on regional blood flow in the brain (rCBF) and in other body organs were studied, using a porcine model. The bleeding was produced by leading blood through a catheter from the abdominal aorta via an electronic drop recorder into the subdural compartment (SDC) over the left cerebral hemisphere. Pressures in the right lateral cerebral ventricle and in the cisterna magna were recorded along with 15 other vital parameters. Measurements of rCBF were carried out using radioactive microspheres 1) before the start of bleeding, 2) during the early bleeding phase, and 3) during the late bleeding phase. When the bleeding was initiated, the intracranial pressures rose within one minute to a level approximately 40 mmHg below the systemic arterial pressure, whilst the latter usually decreased 30-40 mmHg. In the subsequent early bleeding phase the cerebral perfusion pressure and the bleeding pressure fluctuated at a level of approximately 40 mmHg for several minutes. In the late bleeding phase, the perfusion pressure decreased maximally, even when a Cushing reaction was activated. During the early bleeding phase the changes in rCBF varied between the cerebral regions. However, the mean flow remained largely constant in the presence of a decreasing cerebrovascular resistance, indicating that autoregulation of CBF was intact. Concomitantly, cardiac output and heart rate decreased, whilst regional blood flow in extracerebral organs tended to increase, possibly due to an intracranial effect on the autonomic nervous system. In the late bleeding phase, rCBF was critically reduced in all regions, in spite of a marked rise in systemic arterial pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8372718

  16. Comparison of Inflammatory and Acute-Phase Responses in the Brain and Peripheral Organs of the ME7 Model of Prion Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Colm; Wilcockson, David C.; Boche, Delphine; Perry, V. Hugh

    2005-01-01

    Chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are reported to be associated with microglial activation and increased brain and serum cytokines and acute-phase proteins (APPs). Unlike AD, prion disease is also associated with a peripheral component in that the presumed causative agent, PrPSc, also accumulates in the spleen and other lymphoreticular organs. It is unclear whether the reported systemic acute-phase response represents a systemic inflammatory...

  17. Benzodiazepine pathways in the chronically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hulten, Rolf; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Bakker, Albert; Leufkens, Hubert G.

    1999-01-01

    The association between patterns of use of benzodiazepines and chronic somatic morbidity was examined by applying the Chronic Disease Score (CDS). In the only pharmacy in a Dutch community, 6921 patients with data available covering a 10-year period (1983-1992) were included. In 1992, two-thirds of

  18. Catatonia in mixed alcohol and benzodiazepine withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Basu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is mostly caused by different neuropsychiatric conditions. We report a case of a 30 year old man suffering from both alcohol and benzodiazepine dependence who exhibited catatonic features soon after stopping the intake of substances. This case will help clinicians to recognize catatonic features within the varied symptomatology of substance withdrawal and thereby helping in its early diagnosis and management.

  19. Benzodiazepine Synthesis and Rapid Toxicity Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James T.; Boriraj, Grit

    2010-01-01

    A second-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment to introduce students to general concepts of medicinal chemistry is described. Within a single three-hour time window, students experience the synthesis of a biologically active small molecule and the assaying of its biological toxicity. Benzodiazepine rings are commonly found in antidepressant…

  20. Quantitative autoradiography of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors in the forebrain of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors was investigated in the turtle forebrain by the technique of in vitro receptor autoradiography. Muscarinic binding sites were labeled with 1 nM 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H-QNB), and benzodiazepine sites were demonstrated with the aid of 1 nM 3H-flunitrazepam (3H-FLU). Autoradiograms generated on 3H-Ultrofilm apposed to tissue slices revealed regionally specific distributions of muscarinic and benzodiazepine binding sites that are comparable with those for mammalian brain. Dense benzodiazepine binding was found in the anterior olfactory nucleus, the lateral and dorsal cortices, and the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR), a structure with no clear mammalian homologue. Muscarinic binding sites were most dense in the striatum, accumbens, DVR, lateral geniculate, and the anterior olfactory nucleus. Cortical binding sites were studied in greater detail by quantitative analysis of autoradiograms generated by using emulsion-coated coverslips. Laminar gradients of binding were observed that were specific for each radioligand; 3H-QNB sites were most dense in the inner molecular layer in all cortical regions, whereas 3H-FLU binding was generally most concentrated in the outer molecular layer and was least dense through all layers in the dorsomedial cortex. Because pyramidal cells are arranged in register in turtle cortex, the laminar patterns of receptor binding may reflect different receptor density gradients along pyramidal cell dendrites

  1. Possible interaction of fluoroquinolones with the benzodiazepine-GABAA-receptor complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Unseld, E; Ziegler, G.; Gemeinhardt, A; Janssen, U.; Klotz, U

    1990-01-01

    1. The possible involvement of the benzodiazepine (BZD)-GABAA-receptor complex in mediating CNS stimulatory effects of fluoroquinolones was tested in vitro, in a binding inhibition assay and in vivo, in a clinical drug interaction study using electro-encephalogram (EEG) monitoring. 2. The specific binding of [3H]-flunitrazepam to rat synaptic brain membranes was inhibited by various fluoroquinolones in a concentration-dependent manner. 3. Ofloxacin had CNS-stimulating effects as revealed by t...

  2. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptors in the rat kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumont, K.; Healy, D.P.; Fanestil, D.D.

    1984-11-01

    The localization of benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors in the rat kidney was studied by autoradiography after in vitro labeling of kidney slices with flunitrazepam. The affinity, density, and rank order of displacement of (/sup 3/H)-flunitrazepam by several BZDs (RO 5-4864 > diazepam > clonazepam) demonstrated that binding was to BZD receptors of the peripheral type. In autoradiograms obtained with tritium-sensitive film, a high density of silver grains was obtained in the outer medulla, with lower densities in the cortex. Binding was absent from the inner medulla (papilla). In higher resolution autoradiograms obtained with an emulsion-coated cover slip procedure, silver grains were seen to be concentrated over a tubular element in both outer medulla and cortex, identifiable by morphology and distribution as the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle and the distal convoluted tubule. The identity of the labeled tubules was confirmed by immunofluorescent localization in adjacent slices of Tamm-Horsfall protein, a specific marker for these segments of tubules. Investigation of the effects of peripherally specific BZDs such as RO 5-4864 on distal tubule function is indicated.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptors in the rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The localization of benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors in the rat kidney was studied by autoradiography after in vitro labeling of kidney slices with flunitrazepam. The affinity, density, and rank order of displacement of [3H]-flunitrazepam by several BZDs (RO 5-4864 > diazepam > clonazepam) demonstrated that binding was to BZD receptors of the peripheral type. In autoradiograms obtained with tritium-sensitive film, a high density of silver grains was obtained in the outer medulla, with lower densities in the cortex. Binding was absent from the inner medulla (papilla). In higher resolution autoradiograms obtained with an emulsion-coated cover slip procedure, silver grains were seen to be concentrated over a tubular element in both outer medulla and cortex, identifiable by morphology and distribution as the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle and the distal convoluted tubule. The identity of the labeled tubules was confirmed by immunofluorescent localization in adjacent slices of Tamm-Horsfall protein, a specific marker for these segments of tubules. Investigation of the effects of peripherally specific BZDs such as RO 5-4864 on distal tubule function is indicated

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor from bone marrow-derived cells promotes post-injury repair of peripheral nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Takemura

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF stimulates peripheral nerve regeneration. However, the origin of BNDF and its precise effect on nerve repair have not been clarified. In this study, we examined the role of BDNF from bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs in post-injury nerve repair. Control and heterozygote BDNF knockout mice (BDNF+/- received a left sciatic nerve crush using a cerebral blood clip. Especially, for the evaluation of BDNF from BMDCs, studies with bone marrow transplantation (BMT were performed before the injury. We evaluated nerve function using a rotarod test, sciatic function index (SFI, and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV simultaneously with histological nerve analyses by immunohistochemistry before and after the nerve injury until 8 weeks. BDNF production was examined by immunohistochemistry and mRNA analyses. After the nerve crush, the controls showed severe nerve dysfunction evaluated at 1 week. However, nerve function was gradually restored and reached normal levels by 8 weeks. By immunohistochemistry, BDNF expression was very faint before injury, but was dramatically increased after injury at 1 week in the distal segment from the crush site. BDNF expression was mainly co-localized with CD45 in BMDCs, which was further confirmed by the appearance of GFP-positive cells in the BMT study. Variant analysis of BDNF mRNA also confirmed this finding. BDNF+/- mice showed a loss of function with delayed histological recovery and BDNF+/+→BDNF+/- BMT mice showed complete recovery both functionally and histologically. These results suggested that the attenuated recovery of the BDNF+/- mice was rescued by the transplantation of BMCs and that BDNF from BMDCs has an essential role in nerve repair.

  5. Peripheral physiological reactivity and brain activity in specific phobias - Reactividad fisiológica periférica y actividad cerebral en las fobias específicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Martínez Selva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Specific phobias are exaggerated and irrational fears caused by specific stimuli. These anxiety disorders can appear together with physiological reactions and fight or flight responses. At a peripheral level the phobic response is featured by an increase in somatic and autonomic reactivity as shown by different physiological indices (heart rate, electrodermal activity and a potentiation of defensive reflexes, such as the cardiac defense response and the blink reflex. At a central level it has been described a network of brain structures that are involved both in the processing of the phobic stimulus and in the reaction that it provokes. This brain network is composed by the amygdala, the orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices and the anterior insula. An increase in the activity of these brain regions occurs during the phobic reaction that can be associated with the somatic and autonomic changes, the subjective experience of intense fear and the avoidance behavior elicited by the phobic stimulus.

  6. Characterization of seven cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcripts (CARTs) differentially expressed in the brain and peripheral tissues of Solea senegalensis (Kaup).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacic, Kruno; Martínez, Almudena; Martín-Robles, Águeda J; Muñoz-Cueto, José A; Morais, Sofia

    2015-12-01

    CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) is a peptide with neurotransmitter and neuroendocrine functions with several key roles, both centrally and peripherally. In mammals there is a single gene that produces two alternatively spliced variants in rat and a single transcript in human but in teleosts multiple genes have been found. In the present study we report the existence of seven transcripts in Senegalese sole and characterize their sequences and phylogenetic relationships, as well as their expression patterns in the brain and peripheral tissues, and in response to feeding. Both cart2a and cart4 showed a ubiquitous expression in the brain, while cart1a, cart1b and cart3a were similarly expressed and had higher transcript levels in the mesencephalon, followed by the diencephalon. On the other hand, cart2b showed a main expression in the olfactory bulbs, and cart3b was predominantly expressed in the spinal cord. The expression profile in peripheral tissues differed substantially between cart's, even between more recently duplicated genes. Collectively, all the tissues examined, except the muscle, express at least one of the different cart's, although the highest transcript levels were found in the brain, gonads (ovary and testis) and, in some cases, eye and kidney. Concerning the feeding response, only brain cart1a, cart2a and cart4 showed a significant postprandial regulation, although future studies are necessary to assess potential confounding effects of stress imposed by the force feeding technique employed. Senegalese sole exhibits the highest number of cart genes reported to date in a vertebrate species. Their differential expression patterns and feeding regulation suggest that multiple cart genes, resulting from at least 3 rounds of whole genome duplication, have been retained in fish genomes through subfunctionalization, or possibly even through neofunctionalization. PMID:26320854

  7. Differential role of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein in drug distribution into brain, CSF and peripheral nerve tissues in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liyue; Li, Xingwen; Roberts, Jonathan; Janosky, Brett; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    1. This study was designed to evaluate how the absence of P-glycoprotein (Pgp, Mdr1a), breast cancer-resistance protein (Bcrp, Abcg2) or both affects drug distribution into sciatic nerves, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in rats. 2. Pgp substrate (loperamide), BCRP substrates (dantrolene and proprietary compound X) and dual substrates (imatinib and proprietary compound Y) were well distributed into sciatic nerves with comparable nerve to plasma concentration ratios between wild-type and knockout (KO) rats. 3. Brain exposure increased substantially in Mdr1a(-/-) rats for loperamide and in Mdr1a(-/-)/Abcg2(-/-) rats for imatinib and compound Y, but minimally to modestly in Abcg2(-/-) rats for dantrolene and compound X. The deletion of Mdr1a or Abcg2 alone had little effect on brain distribution of compound Y. 4. While CSF to unbound brain concentration ratio remained ≥3 in the KO animals for dantrolene, compounds X and Y, it was reduced to 1 in the Mdr1a(-/-)/Abcg2(-/-) rats for imatinib. 5. The data indicate that Pgp and Bcrp do not play significant roles in drug distribution into peripheral nerve tissues in rats, while working in concert to regulate brain penetration. Our results further support that CSF concentration may not be a good surrogate for unbound brain concentration of efflux substrates.

  8. Pharmacology of benzodiazepine receptors: an update.

    OpenAIRE

    Sieghart, W.

    1994-01-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors are allosteric modulatory sites on GABAA receptors. GABAA receptors are probably composed of five protein subunits, at least some of which belong to different subunit classes. So far six alpha-, four beta-, three gamma-, and delta- and two rho = p subunits of GABAA receptors have been identified. A large number of different subunit combinations, each of which will result in a GABAA receptor with distinct electrophysiological and pharmacological properties, are therefo...

  9. Peripheral SLC6A4 DNA methylation is associated with in vivo measures of human brain serotonin synthesis and childhood physical aggression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsha Wang

    Full Text Available The main challenge in addressing the role of DNA methylation in human behaviour is the fact that the brain is inaccessible to epigenetic analysis in living humans. Using positron emission tomography (PET measures of brain serotonin (5-HT synthesis, we found in a longitudinal sample that adult males with high childhood-limited aggression (C-LHPA had lower in vivo 5-HT synthesis in the orbitofrontal cortex (OBFC. Here we hypothesized that 5-HT alterations associated with childhood aggression were linked to differential DNA methylation of critical genes in the 5-HT pathway and these changes were also detectable in peripheral white blood cells. Using pyrosequencing, we determined the state of DNA methylation of SLC6A4 promoter in T cells and monocytes isolated from blood of cohort members (N = 25 who underwent a PET scan, and we examined whether methylation status in the blood is associated with in vivo brain 5-HT synthesis. Higher levels of methylation were observed in both T cells and monocytes at specific CpG sites in the C-LHPA group. DNA methylation of SLC6A4 in monocytes appears to be associated more reliably with group membership than T cells. In both cell types the methylation state of these CpGs was associated with lower in vivo measures of brain 5-HT synthesis in the left and right lateral OBFC (N = 20 where lower 5-HT synthesis in C-LHPA group was observed. Furthermore, in vitro methylation of the SLC6A4 promoter in a luciferase reporter construct suppresses its transcriptional activity supporting a functional role of DNA methylation in SLC6A4 promoter regulation. These findings indicate that state of SLC6A4 promoter methylation is altered in peripheral white blood cells of individuals with physical aggression during childhood. This supports the relevance of peripheral DNA methylation for brain function and suggests that peripheral SLC6A4 DNA methylation could be a marker of central 5-HT function.

  10. Long-Term Use of Benzodiazepines: Implications and guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Potts, Nicholas L.S.; K Ranga R Krishnan

    1992-01-01

    Problems associated with physical dependence and abuse of benzodiazepines by a small percentage of patients have reduced their popularity from the most commonly prescribed psychoactive drug in the 1970s to being prescribed for mainly short periods. Patients who benefit from long-term benzodiazepine use are nearly ignored by the medical community as a whole. This article details what patient population can improve from long-term benzodiazepine therapy, the risks and benefits of treatment, and ...

  11. Is recovery driven by central or peripheral factors? A role for the brain in recovery following intermittent-sprint exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Geoffrey M Minett; Rob eDuffield

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged intermittent-sprint exercise (i.e., team sports) induce disturbances in skeletal muscle structure and function that are associated with reduced contractile function, a cascade of inflammatory responses, perceptual soreness, and a delayed return to optimal physical performance. In this context, recovery from exercise-induced fatigue is traditionally treated from a peripheral viewpoint, with the regeneration of muscle physiology and other peripheral factors the target of recovery stra...

  12. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    OpenAIRE

    Yakushiji, T; Fukuda, T.; Oyama, Y.; Akaike, N.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists ...

  13. Distribution of radiolabeled L-glutamate and D-aspartate from blood into peripheral tissues in naive rats: Significance for brain neuroprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klin, Yael [Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Zlotnik, Alexander; Boyko, Matthew; Ohayon, Sharon; Shapira, Yoram [The Division of Anesthesiology, Soroka Medical Center and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Teichberg, Vivian I., E-mail: Vivian.teichberg@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Blood glutamate has a half-life time of 2-3 min. {yields} Blood glutamate is submitted to rapid decarboxylation. {yields} Blood glutamate and its metabolites are mainly absorbed in skeletal muscle and liver. {yields} The skeletal muscle and liver are now targets for potential drugs affording brain neuroprotection. -- Abstract: Excess L-glutamate (glutamate) levels in brain interstitial and cerebrospinal fluids (ISF and CSF, respectively) are the hallmark of several neurodegenerative conditions such as stroke, traumatic brain injury or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Its removal could prevent the glutamate excitotoxicity that causes long-lasting neurological deficits. As in previous studies, we have established the role of blood glutamate levels in brain neuroprotection, we have now investigated the contribution of the peripheral organs to the homeostasis of glutamate in blood. We have administered naive rats with intravenous injections of either L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glutamic acid (L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu), L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glutamic acid (L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glu) or D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Aspartic acid (D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp), a non-metabolized analog of glutamate, and have followed their distribution into peripheral organs. We have observed that the decay of the radioactivity associated with L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu and L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glu was faster than that associated with glutamate non-metabolized analog, D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp. L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu was subjected in blood to a rapid decarboxylation with the loss of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. The three major sequestrating organs, serving as depots for the eliminated glutamate and/or its metabolites were skeletal muscle, liver and gut, contributing together 92% or 87% of total L-[U-{sup 14}C] Glu or D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp radioactivity capture. L-[U-{sup 14}C] Glu and D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp showed a different organ sequestration pattern. We conclude that glutamate is rapidly eliminated from the blood into peripheral tissues

  14. Scalability, reliability and validity of the benzodiazepine dependence self report questionnaire in outpatient benzodiazepine users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, C.C.; Breteler, M.H.M.; Timmermans, M.A.Y.; Ven, A.H.G.S. van der; Zitman, F.G.

    1999-01-01

    As there is no multidimensional instrument available which reflects the severity of BZD dependence comprehensively, the Benzodiazepine Dependence Self-Report Questionnaire (Bendep-SRQ) was developed and investigated. The Bendep-SRQ, Symptom Checlist-90, Schedules for Clinical Assessments in Neuropsy

  15. Regulation of Schwann cell proliferation and migration by miR-1 targeting brain-derived neurotrophic factor after peripheral nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sheng; Yuan, Ying; Chen, Qianqian; Wang, Xinghui; Gong, Leilei; Liu, Jie; Gu, Xiaosong; Li, Shiying

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a global problem that causes disability and severe socioeconomic burden. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) benefits peripheral nerve regeneration and becomes a promising therapeutic molecule. In the current study, we found that microRNA-1 (miR-1) directly targeted BDNF by binding to its 3′-UTR and caused both mRNA degradation and translation suppression of BDNF. Moreover, miR-1 induced BDNF mRNA degradation primarily through binding to target site 3 rather than target site 1 or 2 of BDNF 3′-UTR. Following rat sciatic nerve injury, a rough inverse correlation was observed between temporal expression profiles of miR-1 and BDNF in the injured nerve. The overexpression or silencing of miR-1 in cultured Schwann cells (SCs) inhibited or enhanced BDNF secretion from the cells, respectively, and also suppressed or promoted SC proliferation and migration, respectively. Interestingly, BDNF knockdown could attenuate the enhancing effect of miR-1 inhibitor on SC proliferation and migration. These findings will contribute to the development of a novel therapeutic strategy for peripheral nerve injury, which overcomes the limitations of direct administration of exogenous BDNF by using miR-1 to regulate endogenous BDNF expression. PMID:27381812

  16. [Leo Sternbach, an inventor of benzodiazepines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchibayashi, Masao

    2007-01-01

    A biography of Leo Sternbach, an inventor of benzodiazepine tranquillizers, is presented. It consists of (1) a societal desire for lifestyle pills, (2) Leo's birth in 1908 and youth, (3) education, (4) in Vienna, (5) in Zurich, (6) at Hoffmann-La Roche, Basel, (7) to the New World, (8) at Roche, Nutley NJ, (9) invention of the new drugs, (10) revolution of people's lifestyle, and (11) reward, retirement and obituary in 2005. This paper may be the first comprehensive biography of this remarkable chemist written in Japanese.

  17. Abnormal benzodiazepine and zinc modulation of GABAA receptors in an acquired absence epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Ellsworth, Kevin; Ellsworth, Marc; Schroeder, Katherine M; Smith, Kris; Fisher, Robert S

    2004-07-01

    Brain cholesterol synthesis inhibition (CSI) at a young age in rats has been shown to be a faithful model of acquired absence epilepsy, a devastating condition for which few therapies or models exist. We employed the CSI model to study cellular mechanisms of acquired absence epilepsy in Long-Evans Hooded rats. Patch-clamp, whole-cell recordings were compared from neurons acutely dissociated from the nucleus reticularis of thalamus (nRt) treated and untreated with a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, U18666A. In U18666A-treated animals, 91% of rats developed EEG spike-waves (SWs). Patchclamp results revealed that although there was no remarkable change in GABAA receptor affinity, both a loss of ability of benzodiazepines to enhance GABAA-receptor responses and an increase of Zn2+ inhibition of GABAA-receptor responses of nRt neurons occurred in Long-Evans Hooded rats previously administered U18666A. This change was specific, since no significant changes were found in neurons exposed to the GABA allosteric modulator, pentobarbital. Taken collectively, these findings provide evidence for abnormalities in benzodiazepine and Zn2+ modulation of GABAA receptors in the CSI model, and suggest that decreased gamma2 subunit expression may underlie important aspects of generation of thalamocortical SWs in atypical absence seizures. The present results are also consistent with recent findings that mutation of the gamma2 subunit of the GABAA receptor changes benzodiazepine modulation in families with generalized epilepsy syndromes.

  18. GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marley, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    LS mice are more sensitive to benzodiazepine-induced anesthesia; however, the two lines do not differ in their hypothermic response to flurazepam. SS mice are more resistant to 3-mercaptopropionic acid-induced seizures and more sensitive to the anticonvulsant effects of benzodiazepines. The various correlates of GABA and benzodiazepine actions probably are the results of different mechanisms of action and/or differential regional control. Bicuculline competition for /sup 3/H-GABA binding sites is greater in SS cerebellar tissue and /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding is greater in the mid-brain region of LS mice. GABA enhancement of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepma binding is greater in SS mice. Ethanol also enhances /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding and increases the levels of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding above those observed for GABA. Using correlational techniques on data from LS and SS mice and several inbred mouse strains, it was demonstrated that a positive relationship exists between the degree of receptor coupling within the GABA receptor complex and the degree of resistance to seizures.

  19. GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LS mice are more sensitive to benzodiazepine-induced anesthesia; however, the two lines do not differ in their hypothermic response to flurazepam. SS mice are more resistant to 3-mercaptopropionic acid-induced seizures and more sensitive to the anticonvulsant effects of benzodiazepines. The various correlates of GABA and benzodiazepine actions probably are the results of different mechanisms of action and/or differential regional control. Bicuculline competition for 3H-GABA binding sites is greater in SS cerebellar tissue and 3H-flunitrazepam binding is greater in the mid-brain region of LS mice. GABA enhancement of 3H-flunitrazepma binding is greater in SS mice. Ethanol also enhances 3H-flunitrazepam binding and increases the levels of 3H-flunitrazepam binding above those observed for GABA. Using correlational techniques on data from LS and SS mice and several inbred mouse strains, it was demonstrated that a positive relationship exists between the degree of receptor coupling within the GABA receptor complex and the degree of resistance to seizures

  20. Brain leukocyte infiltration initiated by peripheral inflammation or experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis occurs through pathways connected to the CSF-filled compartments of the forebrain and midbrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt Charlotte

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has been considered as a preferential pathway of circulation for immune cells during neuroimmune surveillance. In order to evaluate the involvement of CSF-filled spaces in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a model of multiple sclerosis, we performed a time-course analysis of immune cell association with the CSF-containing ventricles, velae, and cisterns in two active models of this disease. Methods Guinea-pig spinal cord homogenate-induced EAE in rat and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced EAE in mouse were used. Leukocyte distribution and phenotypes were investigated by immunohistochemistry in serial sections of brain areas of interest, as well as in CSF withdrawn from rat. Immune cells associated with the choroid plexuses were quantified. Results Freund’s adjuvant-induced peripheral inflammation in the absence of brain antigen led to a subtle but definite increase in the number of myeloid cells in the extraventricular CSF spaces. In both rats and mice, EAE was characterized by a sustained and initial infiltration of lymphocytes and monocytes within forebrain/midbrain fluid-filled compartments such as the velum interpositum and ambient cisterns, and certain basal cisterns. Leukocytes further infiltrated periventricular and pericisternal parenchymal areas, along perivascular spaces or following a downward CSF-to-tissue gradient. Cells quantified in CSF sampled from rats included lymphocytes and neutrophils. The distinctive pattern of cell distribution suggests that both the choroid plexus and the vessels lying in the velae and cisterns are gates for early leukocyte entry in the central nervous system. B-cell infiltration observed in the mouse model was restricted to CSF-filled extraventricular compartments. Conclusion These results identified distinctive velae and cisterns of the forebrain and midbrain as preferential sites of immune cell homing following

  1. The Relationship Between Brain Volume and Walking Outcomes in Older Adults With and Without Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Manor, Brad; Newton, Elizabeth; Abduljalil, Amir; Novak, Vera

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) alters walking. Yet, the compensatory role of central locomotor circuits remains unclear. We hypothesized that walking outcomes would be more closely related to regional gray matter volumes in older adults with DPN as compared with nonneuropathic diabetic patients and nondiabetic control subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Clinically important outcomes of walking (i.e., speed, stride duration variability, and double support time) were measured ...

  2. Immunocytochemical localization of a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in nervous tissue. I. Adult brain, retina, and peripheral nerve

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Monospecific antibodies were prepared to a previously characterized chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of brain and used in conjunction with the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique to localize the proteoglycan by immunoelectron microscopy. The proteoglycan was found to be exclusively intracellular in adult cerebellum, cerebrum, brain stem, and spinal cord. Some neurons and astrocytes (including Golgi epithelial cells and Bergmann fibers) showed strong cytoplasmic staining. Although in the centr...

  3. Identification of cells in rat brain and peripheral tissues expressing mRNA for members of the nerve growth factor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernfors, P; Wetmore, C; Olson, L; Persson, H

    1990-10-01

    Cells expressing mRNA for hippocampus-derived neurotrophic factor (HDNF/NT-3) or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were identified by in situ hybridization. In the rat brain, HDNF mRNA was predominantly found in pyramidal neurons in CA1 and CA2 of the hippocampus. Lower levels of HDNF mRNA were found in granular neurons of the dentate gyrus and in neurons of the taenia tecta and induseum griseum. BDNF mRNA-expressing cells were more widely distributed in the rat brain, with high levels in neurons of CA2, CA3, and the hilar region of the dentate gyrus, in the external and internal pyramidal layers of the cerebral cortex, in the claustrum, and in one brainstem structure. Lower levels were seen in CA1 and in the granular layer of the hippocampus, in the taenia tecta, and in the mammillary complex. In peripheral tissues, HDNF mRNA was found in glomerular cells in the kidney, secretory cells in the male rat submandibular gland, and epithelial cells in secondary and tertiary follicles in the ovary. Cells expressing BDNF mRNA were found in the dorsal root ganglia, where neurons of various sizes were labeled. PMID:2206535

  4. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  5. Benzodiazepines misuse: The study community level Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puangkot Sukdepat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Benzodiazepines (BZD misuse, abuse, and dependence are becoming a new problem in medicine, in Thailand, and the pharmacoepidemiology knowledge is insufficient. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of benzodiazepine use, misuse, abuse, and dependence in the general population of the Ubon Rachathani province, in Thailand. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of benzodiazepine use, misuse, abuse, and dependence in the general population. Settings and Design: The cross-sectional household survey research was conducted from October 2008 to June 2009, with a target population age of 15 years and above. This took place in Ubon Ratchathani Province, in Thailand. Materials and Methods: A total sample size of 2280 were selected from three-stage stratified random sampling. BZD were identified with an accuracy of generic name, trade name, and drug characteristics. The DSM-IV questionnaire was used to define misuse, abuse, and dependence. The accuracy of dependence was interpreted with the help of the judgment of a psychiatric nurse. Statistical analysis: For the statistical analyses, prevalence was estimated with weight adjustment, variances estimated by the Teylor Series Linearization method, and interpreted with 95% confidence interval (CI. Results: There were 46,805 current users [3.9% (95% CI: 2.2-6.4], 26,404 misusers [2.2% (95% CI: 1.6-6.2], 7,203 abusers [0.6% (95% CI: 0.1 - 4.1], and 2,402 with dependence [0.2% (0.1-9.2]. When considering the group of current users in this study, 57.2% misusers, 16.6% abusers, and 5.9% with dependence were found, respectively. Conclusions: All prevalence of use was higher than previously reported, in Thailand, while more than half of the current users had a behavior of misuse. Surveillance of misuse should be undertaken in the current use. The medical professional should counsel the patient on the harm of misuse and limit the amount of medicine, with necessary dispensing.

  6. Disability pension as predictor of later use of benzodiazepines among benzodiazepine users

    OpenAIRE

    Hartz, Ingeborg; Tverdal, Aage; Skille, Eivind Å.; Skurtveit, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    The proportion of Norwegians on disability pensions has doubled since the 1980s. The Norwegian Government wants action to stimulate the working capacity in those disability pensioners who have the potential to work. Information on factors that may impair rehabilitation efforts, including the unfavourable use of benzodiazepines, may be useful in this context. A longitudinal design, including data on 40–42 year old participants in Norwegian health surveys (year 1985–1989) linked to a prescripti...

  7. Antianxiety and antidepressant-like effects of AC-5216, a novel mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor ligand

    OpenAIRE

    Kita, Atsuko; Kohayakawa, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Tomoko; Ochi, Yoshiaki; Nakamichi, Keiko; Kurumiya, Satoshi; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Oka, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the ability of N-benzyl-N-ethyl-2-(7,8-dihydro-7-methyl-8-oxo-2-phenyl-9H-purin-9-yl)acetamide (AC-5216), a novel mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor (MBR) ligand, to produce anti-anxiety and antidepressant-like effects in various animal models.AC-5216 showed high affinity for MBRs prepared from rat whole brain (Ki 0.297 nM), rat glioma cells (IC50 3.04 nM) and human glioma cells (IC50 2.73 nM), but only negligible affinity for the other main receptors including central benz...

  8. The use of benzodiazepines in the aged patient: clinical and pharmacological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailly, Eric; Bourin, Michel

    2008-04-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely used to treat anxiety and insomnia in elderly patients. The interest of this prescription is discussed in this article. The discussion is based on the pharmacological properties and adverse effects of benzodiazepines in the elderly subjects. The conclusions are that benzodiazepines should be rarely prescribed in elderly people; many patients treated by benzodiazepines should be withdrawn and other therapeutic strategies than benzodiazepines should be considered to treat anxiety and insomnia in the elderly patients.

  9. Ruta 6 selectively induces cell death in brain cancer cells but proliferation in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes: A novel treatment for human brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Sen; Multani, Asha S; Banerji, Pratip; Banerji, Prasanta

    2003-10-01

    Although conventional chemotherapies are used to treat patients with malignancies, damage to normal cells is problematic. Blood-forming bone marrow cells are the most adversely affected. It is therefore necessary to find alternative agents that can kill cancer cells but have minimal effects on normal cells. We investigated the brain cancer cell-killing activity of a homeopathic medicine, Ruta, isolated from a plant, Ruta graveolens. We treated human brain cancer and HL-60 leukemia cells, normal B-lymphoid cells, and murine melanoma cells in vitro with different concentrations of Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2. Fifteen patients diagnosed with intracranial tumors were treated with Ruta 6 and Ca3(PO4)2. Of these 15 patients, 6 of the 7 glioma patients showed complete regression of tumors. Normal human blood lymphocytes, B-lymphoid cells, and brain cancer cells treated with Ruta in vitro were examined for telomere dynamics, mitotic catastrophe, and apoptosis to understand the possible mechanism of cell-killing, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed induction of survival-signaling pathways in normal lymphocytes and induction of death-signaling pathways in brain cancer cells. Cancer cell death was initiated by telomere erosion and completed through mitotic catastrophe events. We propose that Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2 could be used for effective treatment of brain cancers, particularly glioma.

  10. Genetic markers of a Munc13 protein family member, BAIAP3, are gender specifically associated with anxiety and benzodiazepine abuse in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Sonja M; Tantra, Martesa; Stepniak, Beata; Man, Kwun-Nok M; Müller-Ribbe, Katja; Begemann, Martin; Ju, Anes; Papiol, Sergi; Ronnenberg, Anja; Gurvich, Artem; Shin, Yong; Augustin, Iris; Brose, Nils; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders and substance abuse, including benzodiazepine use disorder, frequently occur together. Unfortunately, treatment of anxiety disorders still includes benzodiazepines, and patients with an existing comorbid benzodiazepine use disorder or a genetic susceptibility for benzodiazepine use disorder may be at risk of adverse treatment outcomes. The identification of genetic predictors for anxiety disorders, and especially for benzodiazepine use disorder, could aid the selection of the best treatment option and improve clinical outcomes. The brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor I-associated protein 3 (Baiap3) is a member of the mammalian uncoordinated 13 (Munc13) protein family of synaptic regulators of neurotransmitter exocytosis, with a striking expression pattern in amygdalae, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray. Deletion of Baiap3 in mice leads to enhanced seizure propensity and increased anxiety, with the latter being more pronounced in female than in male animals. We hypothesized that genetic variation in human BAIAP3 may also be associated with anxiety. By using a phenotype-based genetic association study, we identified two human BAIAP3 single-nucleotide polymorphism risk genotypes (AA for rs2235632, TT for rs1132358) that show a significant association with anxiety in women and, surprisingly, with benzodiazepine abuse in men. Returning to mice, we found that male, but not female, Baiap3 knockout (KO) mice develop tolerance to diazepam more quickly than control animals. Analysis of cultured Baiap3 KO hypothalamus slices revealed an increase in basal network activity and an altered response to diazepam withdrawal. Thus, Baiap3/BAIAP3 is gender specifically associated with anxiety and benzodiazepine use disorder, and the analysis of Baiap3/BAIAP3-related functions may help elucidate mechanisms underlying the development of both disorders. PMID:23698091

  11. Improving benzodiazepine prescribing in family practice through review and education.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosser, W.W.; Simms, J. G.; Patten, D W; J. Forster

    1981-01-01

    Indications for and dosages of four commonly prescribed benzodiazepines were recorded at a family medicine centre with the aid of a computerized data collection system. Four guidelines were then developed for appropriate prescribing of these drugs: (a) benzodiazepines should be used less frequently with increasing age; (b) short-acting drugs are preferable to long-acting drugs; (c) patients 65 years of age and over should receive half the daily dose prescribed for younger patients; and (d) us...

  12. Moderating Benzodiazepine Use in the Elderly: Curbing physicians' prescribing practices

    OpenAIRE

    Huston, Patricia G.

    1992-01-01

    In Quebec, the elderly receive 4.5 prescriptions per year for sedative-hypnotic medications, most of which are benzodiazepines. Similar rates have been documented in the rest of Canada and other Western countries. Physician prescribing practices must be moderated, as the incidence of cognitive dysfunction, injury, and hidden disorders associated with benzodiazepine use in the elderly is on the rise. Strategies to moderate sleeping pill use are discussed; a revised, less toxic approach to mana...

  13. Moderating Benzodiazepine Use in the Elderly: Curbing physicians' prescribing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, P G

    1992-10-01

    In Quebec, the elderly receive 4.5 prescriptions per year for sedative-hypnotic medications, most of which are benzodiazepines. Similar rates have been documented in the rest of Canada and other Western countries. Physician prescribing practices must be moderated, as the incidence of cognitive dysfunction, injury, and hidden disorders associated with benzodiazepine use in the elderly is on the rise. Strategies to moderate sleeping pill use are discussed; a revised, less toxic approach to managing insomnia is presented. PMID:21221306

  14. Moderating Benzodiazepine Use in the Elderly: Curbing physicians' prescribing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, P G

    1992-10-01

    In Quebec, the elderly receive 4.5 prescriptions per year for sedative-hypnotic medications, most of which are benzodiazepines. Similar rates have been documented in the rest of Canada and other Western countries. Physician prescribing practices must be moderated, as the incidence of cognitive dysfunction, injury, and hidden disorders associated with benzodiazepine use in the elderly is on the rise. Strategies to moderate sleeping pill use are discussed; a revised, less toxic approach to managing insomnia is presented.

  15. Secretory activity of the brain and peripheral organs: Spontaneous and stimulated release of noradrenaline in the ontogenesis of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, N S; Murtazina, A R; Dil'mukhametova, L K; Ikonopistseva, M A; Volina, E V; Ugrumov, M V

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous and K(+)-stimulated release of noradrenaline from the hypothalamus, adrenal gland, and organ of Zuckerkandl under their flowing incubation was investigated in the perinatal period of ontogenesis of rats. The results suggest that, during the investigated period of ontogenesis, adrenal glands are the main source of noradrenaline in the blood, whereas the contributions of the organ of Zuckerkandl and the brain are not as significant and change during this period. PMID:27193722

  16. Peripheral anti-inflammatory effects explain the ginsenosides paradox between poor brain distribution and anti-depression efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Kang An; Hao Haiping; Zheng Xiao; Liang Yan; Xie Yuan; Xie Tong; Dai Chen; Zhao Qijin; Wu Xiaolan; Xie Lin; Wang Guangji

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The effectiveness of ginseng in preventing and treating various central nervous system (CNS) diseases has been widely confirmed. However, ginsenosides, the principal components of ginseng, are characterized by poor accessibility to the brain, and this pharmacokinetic-pharmacological paradox remains poorly explained. Anti-inflammatory approaches are becoming promising therapeutic strategies for depression and other CNS diseases; however, previous studies have focused largel...

  17. Mice chronically infected with chimeric HIV resist peripheral and brain superinfection: a model of protective immunity to HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelschenbach, Jennifer L; Saini, Manisha; Hadas, Eran; Gu, Chao-Jiang; Chao, Wei; Bentsman, Galina; Hong, Jessie P; Hanke, Tomas; Sharer, Leroy R; Potash, Mary Jane; Volsky, David J

    2012-06-01

    Infection by some viruses induces immunity to reinfection, providing a means to identify protective epitopes. To investigate resistance to reinfection in an animal model of HIV disease and its control, we employed infection of mice with chimeric HIV, EcoHIV. When immunocompetent mice were infected by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of EcoHIV, they resisted subsequent secondary infection by IP injection, consistent with a systemic antiviral immune response. To investigate the potential role of these responses in restricting neurotropic HIV infection, we established a protocol for efficient EcoHIV expression in the brain following intracranial (IC) inoculation of virus. When mice were inoculated by IP injection and secondarily by IC injection, they also controlled EcoHIV replication in the brain. To investigate their role in EcoHIV antiviral responses, CD8+ T lymphocytes were isolated from spleens of EcoHIV infected and uninfected mice and adoptively transferred to isogenic recipients. Recipients of EcoHIV primed CD8+ cells resisted subsequent EcoHIV infection compared to recipients of cells from uninfected donors. CD8+ spleen cells from EcoHIV-infected mice also mounted modest but significant interferon-γ responses to two HIV Gag peptide pools. These findings suggest EcoHIV-infected mice may serve as a useful system to investigate the induction of anti-HIV protective immunity for eventual translation to human beings.

  18. A prospective comparative clinical study of peripheral blood counts and indices in patients with primary brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subeikshanan, V; Dutt, A; Basu, D; Tejus, MN; Maurya, VP; Madhugiri, VS

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elevation of the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been shown to be an indicator of poor prognosis in many malignancies including recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. Objectives: This study was aimed at assessing if the NLR and other leukocyte counts and indices were deranged in treatment-naïve patients with primary brain tumors when compared with an age-matched healthy control group. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective comparative clinical observational study by design. A healthy control population was compared with treatment-naïve patients diagnosed with intra- and extraaxial brain tumors. Leukocyte counts (neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, eosinophil, and basophil counts) as well as leukocyte ratios such as the NLR and the monocyte to lymphocyte ratio (MLR) were calculated. We also evaluated if the counts and indices were related to the tumor volume. Results: In all patients with tumors, the platelet and neutrophil counts were elevated when compared to the controls. In contrast, monocyte counts and the MLR were found to be decreased in patients with tumors when compared to the controls. The subset of patients with glioblastoma showed a significant increase in NLR when compared to the controls. Conclusions: Significant changes in the neutrophil, monocyte, and platelet counts as well as NLR and MLR were observed. Prospective longitudinal studies are required to determine the prognostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. PMID:27089106

  19. Insensitivity of astrocytes to interleukin 10 signaling following peripheral immune challenge results in prolonged microglial activation in the aged brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norden, Diana M; Trojanowski, Paige J; Walker, Frederick R; Godbout, Jonathan P

    2016-08-01

    Immune-activated microglia from aged mice produce exaggerated levels of cytokines. Despite high levels of microglial interleukin (IL)-10 in the aged brain, neuroinflammation was prolonged and associated with depressive-like deficits. Because astrocytes respond to IL-10 and, in turn, attenuate microglial activation, we investigated if astrocyte-mediated resolution of microglial activation was impaired with age. Here, aged astrocytes had a dysfunctional profile with higher glial fibrillary acidic protein, lower glutamate transporter expression, and significant cytoskeletal re-arrangement. Moreover, aged astrocytes had reduced expression of growth factors and IL-10 receptor-1 (IL-10R1). After in vivo lipopolysaccharide immune challenge, aged astrocytes had a molecular signature associated with reduced responsiveness to IL-10. This IL-10 insensitivity of aged astrocytes resulted in a failure to induce IL-10R1 and transforming growth factor β and resolve microglial activation. In addition, adult astrocytes reduced microglial activation when co-cultured ex vivo, whereas aged astrocytes did not. Consistent with the aging studies, IL-10R(KO) astrocytes did not augment transforming growth factor β after immune challenge and failed to resolve microglial activation. Collectively, a major cytokine-regulatory loop between activated microglia and astrocytes is impaired in the aged brain. PMID:27318131

  20. Expression of GLUT4 mRNA of peripheral tissues and insulin resistance in rats with severe traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Da-qing; ZHU Lie-lie; LI Yong-ling

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the expression of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) mRNA in skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissues and investigate the mechanism of posttraumatic insulin resistance.Methods: Sixteen adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 2 group (n=8 in each group), i.e., severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) group due to falls from a height and normal control group. Blood glucose and serum insulin were measured at 0.5 h before trauma and 3 h, 24 h, 72 h, 7 d after trauma, respectively. And insulin sensitivity was calculated by insulin activity index (IAI) formula. Skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue samples were collected at the same time when blood was sampled. The changes of expression of GLUT4 mRNA were observed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results: Accompanied by the decrease of insulin sensitivity, the expression of GLUT4 mRNA was significantly decreased in adipose tissues at 24 h and 72 h after trauma (P<0.01), however, such phenomena did not appear in skeletal muscle samples.Conclusions: To some extent, the development of posttraumatic insulin resistance is related to the abnormality of transcription activity of GLUT4 gene. Adipose tissues show some difference in the transcriptional level of GLUT4 gene after trauma as compared with skeletal muscle tissues.

  1. Drugged drivers in Norway with benzodiazepine detections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurtveit, Svetlana; Abotnes, Bjørg; Christophersen, Asbjørg S

    2002-01-24

    Norwegian drugged drivers with benzodiazepine (BZD) detections have been studied with regard to drug use pattern and rearrest rate. During 1995, 3343 drivers were apprehended by the police in Norway due to the suspicion of influence by drugs. Blood samples from all drivers were sent to the National Institute of Forensic Toxicology (NIFT). The samples were analysed using a standard program covering the most commonly abused drugs on the marked in Norway. BZDs, representing some of the most frequently detected drugs, were found in approximately 30% (n = 1051) of the cases, represented by 14% (n = 150) female and 86% (n = 901) male drivers. In 8% of the cases, one BZD only was detected, half of these cases with one BZD could reflect therapeutic use. One or more BZDs were combined with illegal drug(s) (73%), other prescribed drugs (10%), and/or alcohol (24%). 62% of the drivers with BZD detections, had earlier been arrested for the same offence, or six cases per rearrested driver. The frequency of earlier arrests were lower for female (34%) than for male (67%) drivers. Alcohol was most frequently found for those arrested for the first time before 1992, while BZD or illegal drugs were most frequently found for those with their first arrest during 1992-1995. Our study shows that apprehended drivers using BZD are mainly represented by drug abusers due to frequent multi-drug use, blood concentrations representing doses above therapeutic levels and high rearrest rate for the same offence. A treatment program or other reactions, are thus necessary in addition to fines, prison penalty and suspension of driving licence. PMID:11852205

  2. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng J. Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal.

  3. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Teng J.

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  4. Phenobarbital compared to benzodiazepines in alcohol withdrawal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askgaard, Gro; Hallas, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-acting benzodiazepines such as chlordiazepoxide are recommended as first-line treatment for alcohol withdrawal. These drugs are known for their abuse liability and might increase alcohol consumption among problem drinkers. Phenobarbital could be an alternative treatment option...... withdrawal 1998-2013 and treated with either phenobarbital or chlordiazepoxide. Patients were followed for one year. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) for benzodiazepine use, alcohol recidivism and mortality associated with alcohol withdrawal treatment, while adjusting for confounders. RESULTS: A total.......51 (95%CI 0.31-0.86). CONCLUSION: There was no decreased risk of subsequent benzodiazepine use or alcohol recidivism in patients treated with phenobarbital compared to chlordiazepoxide. Phenobarbital treatment was associated with decreased mortality, which might be confounded by somatic comorbidity among...

  5. Initial benzodiazepine use and improved health-related quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulten, Rolf; Teeuw, Bart; Bakker, Albert; Leufkens, Hubert G

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of initial benzodiazepine users was measured over time. Furthermore, benzodiazepine usage characteristics as determinants of change in mental and physical health status of the benzodiazepine users were examined. METHODS: In the only pharmacy of a

  6. Inhibition of benzodiazepine binding in vitro by amentoflavone, a constituent of various species of Hypericum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureithel, K H; Büter, K B; Engesser, A; Burkard, W; Schaffner, W

    1997-06-01

    Flower extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Hypericum hirsutum, Hypericum patulum and Hypericum olympicum efficiently inhibited binding of [3H]flumazenil to rat brain benzodiazepine binding sites of the GABAA-receptor in vitro with IC50 values of 6.83, 6.97, 13.2 and 6.14 micrograms/ml, respectively. Single constituents of the extracts like hypericin, the flavones quercetin and luteolin, the glycosylated flavonoides rutin, hyperoside and quercitrin and the biflavone 13, II8-biapigenin did not inhibit binding up to concentrations of 1 microM. In contrast, amentoflavone revealed an IC50 = 14.9 +/- 1.9 nM on benzodiazepine binding in vitro. Comparative HPLC analyses of hypericin and amentoflavone in extracts of different Hypericum species revealed a possible correlation between the amentoflavone concentration and the inhibition of flumazenil binding. For hypericin no such correlation was observed. Our experimental data demonstrate that amentoflavone, in contrast to hypericin, presents a very active compound with regard to the inhibition of [3H]-flumazenil binding in vitro and thus might be involved in the antidepressant effects of Hypericum perforatum extracts. PMID:9204773

  7. UV-guided screening of benzodiazepine producing species in Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Frydenvang, K.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2000-01-01

    The benzodiazepine sclerotigenin (auranthine B) recently described as a metabolite of Penicillium sclerotigenum, has been isolated as the major metabolite from an isolate of P. commune. The structure of sclerotigenin was established by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and by NMR spectrosc......The benzodiazepine sclerotigenin (auranthine B) recently described as a metabolite of Penicillium sclerotigenum, has been isolated as the major metabolite from an isolate of P. commune. The structure of sclerotigenin was established by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and by NMR....... aurantiogriseum is the only auranthine producing species in genus Penicillium. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  8. UV-guided screening of benzodiazepine producing species in Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld Larsen T; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Christian Frisvad J

    2000-01-01

    The benzodiazepine sclerotigenin (auranthine B) recently described as a metabolite of Penicillium sclerotigenum, has been isolated as the major metabolite from an isolate of P. commune. The structure of sclerotigenin was established by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and by NMR spectrosc......The benzodiazepine sclerotigenin (auranthine B) recently described as a metabolite of Penicillium sclerotigenum, has been isolated as the major metabolite from an isolate of P. commune. The structure of sclerotigenin was established by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and by NMR....... aurantiogriseum is the only auranthine producing species in genus Penicillium....

  9. Liganden des Benzodiazepin-Rezeptors: Studien über Benzodiazepine in pflanzlichen Geweben sowie über Hispidulin

    OpenAIRE

    Kavvadias, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wurden Liganden des zentralen Benzodiazepin-Rezeptors (BZD-R) aus pflanzlichen Geweben untersucht. Der erste Teil war dem Studium „natürlicher“ Benzodiazepine (BZD) gewidmet. Deren Vorkommen ist vielfach belegt; an ihrer Biogenese sind möglicherweise Mikroorganismen beteiligt. Es war nun zu prüfen, ob BZD auch unter Sterilbedingungen, d.h. nach Ausschluss mikrobieller Aktivität auftreten können. Hierzu wurden steril kultivierte pflanzliche Kalli und Regenerate, unter a...

  10. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushiji, T; Fukuda, T; Oyama, Y; Akaike, N

    1989-11-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists (CL 218,872, Ro 16-6028, Ro 17-1812 and Ro 23-0364), inverse agonists (Ro 15-3505, FG 7142 and beta-CCE) and a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil). 2. All full agonists at concentrations of 3 x 10(-6) M or less increased dose-dependently the peak amplitude of ICl elicited by 3 x 10(-6) M GABA to twice to three times larger than the control. However, no further augmentation of the GABA response was observed at concentrations of 1 x 10(-5) M or higher. Partial agonists also showed a dose-dependent augmentation of the GABA response at concentrations ranging from 3 x 10(-8) M to 3 x 10(-5) M, but their efficacies of augmentation of the GABA response were only about half or less of those of full agonists. Of the inverse agonists, beta-CCE had a unique dose-dependent effect on the GABA response. Beta-CCE reduced dose-dependently the GABA response at concentrations of less than 3 x 10(-6) M, but augmented it at concentrations of 3 x 10(-5) M and 6 x 10(-5) M. The inverse agonists reduced dose-dependently the GABA response. The benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, slightly augmented the GABA response at concentrations between 3 x 10 7M and 3 x 10 5 M. 3. These results show clear differences in the effects on the GABA response between these four categories of compounds known to affect the benzodiazepine recognition site of the GABA/ benzodiazepine receptor-chloride channel complex. Our experimental system of frog isolated sensory neurones and a 'concentration

  11. Psychological determinants of the intention to educate patients about benzodiazepines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Wolde, Geeske Brecht; Dijkstra, A.; Van Empelen, P.; Neven, A. Knuistingh; Zitman, F. G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective General practitioners and pharmacists do not properly educate their patients about the disadvantages of benzodiazepines. In order to increase and improve education, this study will investigate which psychological factors (i.e., beliefs, outcome expectation, social norm and self-efficacy) p

  12. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Lindschou, Jane; Winkel, Per;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We assessed if prolonged-release melatonin can facilitate withdrawal of long-term benzodiazepine usage in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. METHODS: Randomised, placebo-controlled, blinded, parallel superiority trial of 24 weeks duration. Participants were randomised to...... prolonged-release melatonin 2 mg daily versus matching placebo and were continuously guided to gradually reduce their usual benzodiazepine dosage. The primary outcome was mean benzodiazepine daily dosage at 24 weeks. Secondary outcomes included pattern of benzodiazepine dosage over time, benzodiazepine...... cessation proportion, and benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms. RESULTS: In total, 86 patients (21-74 years) were enrolled: 42 were randomised to melatonin versus 44 to placebo. We found no significant effect of melatonin on mean benzodiazepine dosage at 24 weeks (melatonin group 8.01 mg versus placebo group...

  13. The effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, J; Friberg, L; Jensen, J;

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was investigated in ten healthy, alert volunteers. The design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study. rCBF was measured by 133-Xe inhalation and single photon emission...... computerized tomography, SPECT, immediately before, and 5 and 35 min after intravenous injection of flumazenil 1.0 mg or placebo. In addition, mean arterial blood pressures or PaCO2, rCBF were analysed for changes in various regions of interest (RoI). No alterations were found either in the global CBF or in r......CBF in RoI after flumazenil injection. The results showed that a clinically active dose of flumazenil did not directly affect the cerebral circulation in the normal brain and indicated absence of significant intrinsic activity of the drug....

  14. Positron emission tomography assessment of effects of benzodiazepines on regional glucose metabolic rate in patients with anxiety disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (n = 18) entered a 21-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled random assignment trial of clorazepate. Positron emission tomography with 18F-deoxyglucose was carried out before and after treatment. Decreases in glucose metabolic rate in visual cortex and relative increases in the basal ganglia and thalamus were found. A correlation between regional changes in metabolic rate and regional benzodiazepine receptor binding density from other human autopsy studies was observed; brain regions highest in receptor density showed the greatest decrease in rate

  15. Positron emission tomography assessment of effects of benzodiazepines on regional glucose metabolic rate in patients with anxiety disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Haier, R.; Hazlett, E.; Ball, R.; Katz, M.; Sokolski, K.; Lagunas-Solar, M.; Langer, D.

    1987-06-22

    Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (n = 18) entered a 21-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled random assignment trial of clorazepate. Positron emission tomography with YF-deoxyglucose was carried out before and after treatment. Decreases in glucose metabolic rate in visual cortex and relative increases in the basal ganglia and thalamus were found. A correlation between regional changes in metabolic rate and regional benzodiazepine receptor binding density from other human autopsy studies was observed; brain regions highest in receptor density showed the greatest decrease in rate.

  16. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  17. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of [3H]diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot [Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture]. Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the [3H]diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT

  18. Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be associated with peripheral neuropathy. Metabolic and endocrine disorders impair the body’s ability to transform nutrients into ... to neuropathies as a result of chemical imbalances. Endocrine disorders that lead to hormonal imbalances can disturb normal ...

  19. Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injury (trauma) to a nerve, tumors, toxins, autoimmune responses, nutritional deficiencies, alcoholism, medical procedures, and vascular and metabolic disorders. Acquired peripheral neuropathies are caused by systemic disease, trauma from external agents, or infections or autoimmune disorders ...

  20. Recent trends in benzodiazepine use by injecting drug users in Victoria and Tasmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Craig L; Bruno, Raimondo B

    2002-12-01

    To address the lack of data on patterns of benzodiazepine use among injecting drug users (IDU) in Victoria and Tasmania, convenience samples of 152 Melbourne and 100 Hobart IDU were recruited from needle and syringe programme outlets and administered a structured survey on patterns of benzodiazepine use, injection-related health problems and drug use history. Most respondents had used benzodiazepines during the preceding 6 months, and more than one-third (Melbourne 36%, 95% CI, 28-44; Hobart 37%, 95% CI, 27-47) had injected benzodiazepines during this period. Diazepam was the preferred benzodiazepine for those using orally, while intravenous benzodiazepine users preferred to inject temazepam. Benzodiazepine injection for Melbourne IDU was related to greater levels of injection-related health problems. Patterns of benzodiazepine use amongst Melbourne and Hobart IDU are different to that in other Australian jurisdictions, with available data suggesting that prevalence of injection may be increasing. Ongoing monitoring of benzodiazepine injection, together with in-depth studies of supply characteristics and health impacts in jurisdictions where significant trends are detected is needed. Consideration of regulatory, supply, education and training options for the prevention of benzodiazepine injection is also indicated. PMID:12537706

  1. Symptom-triggered benzodiazepine therapy for alcohol withdrawal syndrome in the emergency department: a comparison with the standard fixed dose benzodiazepine regimen.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Eugene M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to compare symptom-triggered and standard benzodiazepine regimens for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome in an emergency department clinical decision unit. The authors found that the symptom-triggered approach reduced cumulative benzodiazepine dose and length of stay.

  2. Decrease in benzodiazepine receptor binding in a patient with Angelman syndrome detected by iodine-123 iomazenil and single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odano, Ikuo [Dept. of Radiology, Niigata Univ. School of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Anezaki, Toshiharu [Dept. of Neurology, Brain Research Inst., Niigata Univ., Niigata (Japan); Ohkubo, Masaki [Dept. of Radiology, Niigata Univ. School of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Nihon Medi-Physics Co. Ltd., Hyogo (Japan); Onishi, Yoshihiro [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Fukui Medical School, Fukui (Japan); Inuzuka, Takashi [Dept. of Neurology, Brain Research Inst., Niigata Univ., Niigata (Japan); Takahashi, Makoto [Dept. of Radiology, Niigata Univ. School of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Tsuji, Shoji [Dept. of Neurology, Brain Research Inst., Niigata Univ., Niigata (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    A receptor mapping technique using iodine-123 iomazenil and single-photon emission tomography (SPET) was employed to examine benzodiazepine receptor binding in a patient with Angelman syndrome (AS). AS is characterized by developmental delay, seizures, inappropriate laughter and ataxic movement. In this entity there is a cytogenic deletion of the proximal long arm of chromosome 15q11-q13, where the gene encoding the GABA{sub A} receptor {beta}3 subunit (GABRB3) is located. Since the benzodiazepine receptor is constructed as a receptor-ionophore complex that contains the GABA{sub A} receptor, it is a suitable marker for GABA-ergic synapsis. To determine whether benzodiazepine receptor density, which indirectly indicates changes in GABA{sub A} receptor density, is altered in the brain in patients with AS, we investigated a 27-year-old woman with AS using {sup 123}I-iomazenil and SPET. Receptor density was quantitatively assessed by measuring the binding potential using a simplified method. Regional cerebral blood flow was also measured with N-isopropyl-p-[{sup 123}]iodoamphetamine. We demonstrated that benzodiazepine receptor density is severely decreased in the cerebellum, and mildly decreased in the frontal and temporal cortices and basal ganglia, a result which is considered to indicate decreased GABA{sub A} receptor density in these regions. Although the deletion of GABRB3 was not observed in the present study, we indirectly demonstrated the disturbance of inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by the GABA{sub A} receptor in the investigated patient. {sup 123}I-iomazenil with SPET was useful to map benzodiazepine receptors, which indicate GABA{sub A} receptor distribution and their density. (orig.)

  3. Reducing Prescriptions of Long-acting Benzodiazepine Drugs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Sophie Isabel; Bjerrum, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged consumption of benzodiazepine drugs (BZD) and benzodiazepine receptor agonists (zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone; altogether Z drugs) is related to potential physiological and psychological dependence along with other adverse effects. This study aimed to analyse the prescribing of long......-acting BZD (half-life >10 hr), compared to short-acting BZD in Denmark during a 10-year period. Descriptive analysis of total sales data from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics, to individuals in the primary healthcare sector, of all BZD and Z-drugs in the period of 2003-2013. Prescription...... inhabitants/day in 2003 to 16.4 DDD/1000 inhabitants/day in 2013; a relative reduction of 37%. Prescription data in this study did not include information about indications for initiating treatments. In addition, due to compliance problems, some of the prescribed drugs may not have been consumed according...

  4. Pentameric ligand-gated ion channel ELIC is activated by GABA and modulated by benzodiazepines

    OpenAIRE

    Spurny, R.; Ramerstorfer, J.; Price, K; Brams, M.; M. Ernst; Nury, H.; Verheij, M.; Legrand, P.; Bertrand, D.; Bertrand, S.; Dougherty, D A; de Esch, I. J. P.; Corringer, P.-J.; Sieghart, W.; Lummis, S. C. R.

    2012-01-01

    GABA_A receptors are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels involved in fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are allosterically modulated by the anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and sedative-hypnotic benzodiazepines. Here we show that the prokaryotic homolog ELIC also is activated by GABA and is modulated by benzodiazepines with effects comparable to those at GABA_A receptors. Crystal structures reveal important features of GABA recognition and indicate that benzodiazepines, depending on their conc...

  5. Behavioral and neurophysiological signatures of benzodiazepine-related driving impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradly T Stone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Impaired driving due to drug use is a growing problem, worldwide; estimates show that 18-23.5% of fatal accidents, and up to 34% of injury accidents may be caused by drivers under the influence of drugs (Drummer et al., 2003; NHTSA, 2010; Walsh et al., 2004. Furthermore, at any given time, up to 16% of drivers may be using drugs that can impair one’s driving abilities (NHTSA, 2009. Currently, drug recognition experts (law enforcement officers with specialized training to identify drugged driving, have the most difficult time with identifying drivers potentially impaired on central nervous system (CNS depressants (Smith, Hayes, Yolton, Rutledge, & Citek, 2002. The fact that the use of benzodiazepines, a type of CNS depressant, is also associated with the greatest likelihood of causing accidents (Dassanayake, Michie, Carter, & Jones, 2011, further emphasizes the need to improve research tools in this area which can facilitate the refinement of, or additions to, current assessments of impaired driving. Our laboratories collaborated to evaluate both the behavioral and neurophysiological effects of a benzodiazepine, alprazolam, in a driving simulation (miniSim™. This drive was combined with a neurocognitive assessment utilizing time synched neurophysiology (EEG, ECG. While the behavioral effects of benzodiazepines are well characterized (Rapoport et al., 2009, we hypothesized that, with the addition of real-time neurophysiology and the utilization of simulation and neurocognitive assessment, we could find objective assessments of drug impairment that could improve the detection capabilities of drug recognition experts. Our analyses revealed that 1 specific driving conditions were significantly more difficult for benzodiazepine impaired drivers and; 2 the neurocognitive tasks’ metrics were able to classify impaired vs. unimpaired with up to 80% accuracy based on lane position deviation and lane departures. While this work requires replication in

  6. Comparison of blood flow and distribution of benzodiazepine receptors in focal epilepsy: Preliminary results of a SPECT study. Vergleich von Blutfluss und Benzodiazepin-Rezeptorverteilung bei fokaler Epilepsie: Vorlaeufige Ergebnisse einer SPECT-Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartenstein, P.; Schober, O.; Lottes, G.; Boettger, I. (Muenster Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin); Ludolph, A. (Muenster Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie); Beer, H.F. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Wuerenlingen (Switzerland))

    1989-10-01

    {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-SPECT and SPECT with the {sup 123}I-labelled benzodiazepine (Bz) receptor ligand Ro 16-0154 were performed in 10 patients suffering from partial epilepsy, without cerebral lesion in MRT or CT.2 h p.i. of Ro 16-0154 the distribution of activity correlated with the known distribution of Bz-receptors in the human brain. Perfusion and receptor-binding were found decreased in 7 patients of each study in the suspicious brain-area. {sup 123}I-labelled Ro 16-0154 is suitable for Bz-receptor mapping by SPECT. The decrease of Bz-receptor binding in epileptic foci, as described in PET-studies, was also detected by SPECT in 7 of 10 patients. (orig.).

  7. Subcellular localization and displacement by diuretics of the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site (PBS) from rat kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukeman, S.; Fanestil, D.

    1986-03-05

    Although the PBS has been identified in many organs, its function and cellular location are speculative. Using rapid filtration, binding of (/sup 3/H)RO 5-4864 (*RO) (.75 nM) was assessed in four subcellular fractions (.3 mg/ml) derived from depapillated rat kidney by differential centrifugation: N (450g x 2 min), O (13,000 x 10), P (105,000 x 30), and S. The binding distribution was: N-18%, O-74%, P-6%, and S-2%. Marker enzyme analysis revealed that O was enriched in mitochondria (M), lysosomes (L), peroxisomes (P), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but not plasma membrane, and that N contained small amounts (10-15%) of markers for the above. Repeated washing of O removed ER enzymes but preserved *RO binding. O was further fractionated with centrifugation (57,000g x 4 hr) on a linear sucrose gradient (18-65%); *RO binding then comigrated with M but not P and L markers. Centrifugation of isolated M (5500 x 10 min) on another linear sucrose gradient (37-65%) gave low and high density bands, which contained 65% and 35% of *RO binding activity, resp. *RO binding in O was specific, saturable, reversible, and inhibited by diuretics. Inhibitors with the highest potency were indacrinone (K/sub d/ = 35 ..mu..M), hydrochlorothiazide (100 ..mu..M), and ethacrynic acid (325 ..mu..M). Low potency inhibitors (K/sub d/ greater than or equal to 1 mM) included amiloride, triamterene, furosemide, bumetanide, and ozolinone.

  8. Peripheral markers of thyroid function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulla; Nygaard, Birte; Winther Jensen, Ebbe;

    2013-01-01

    the combination therapy. HYPOTHESIS: Peripheral tissue might also be stimulated during T4/T3 combination therapy compared with T4 monotherapy. METHODS: Serum levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), pro-collagen-1-N-terminal peptide (PINP), and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT...

  9. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  10. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited [3H]flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not [3H]muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-[3H]butylbicycloorthobenzoate [( 3H] TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively [3H] flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-[3H]CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated [3H]muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-[3H]CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for [3H]flunitrazepam, [3H]muscimol and [3H]TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested

  11. A control study on treatment for benzodiazepine dependence with trazodone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Hong-ju

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the efficacy and safety of trazodone in the treatment of benzodiazepine dependence. Methods Forty insomnia patients who met the Classification and Diagnostic Criteria of Mental Disorders in China Third Edition (CCMD-3 of dependence syndrome due to benzodiazepine were involved in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to trazodone group and placebo group for 3 months. The efficacy were assessed by Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA and polysomnography (PSG. Adverse events were assessed by Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS. Results The Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist of trazodone group was significantly lower after 7 d treatment than that of placebo group (P = 0.000, and HAMA score of the trazodone group was also significantly lower after 15 d treatment than that of placebo group (P = 0.000. There were no difference in Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist and HAMA of placebo group before and after treatment. Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist and HAMA of the trazodone group were decreased after treatment (P = 0.000. In comparison with placebo group, sleep parameters of the trazodone, including total sleep time (TST, sleep efficiency (SE, sleep latency (SL and slow wave sleep (SWS time presented improvement after 7 d treatment (P = 0.000, for all. After trazodone treatment, total sleep time, slow wave sleep time, sleep efficiency and sleep latency were improved (P = 0.000, for all. No obvious adverse reaction occurred. There were no significant differences in TESS scores between pre? and post?treatment in both groups (P > 0.05. Conclusion Trazodone is markedly effective and safe in the treatment for benzodiazepine dependence.

  12. The relation between the blood benzodiazepine concentration and performance in suspected impaired drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, B.E.; Lusthof, K.J.; de Gier, J.J.; Uges, D.R.; Egberts, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    Several experimental studies have shown a negative influence of benzodiazepines on driving skills. The objective of this study is to study the relationship between the blood concentration of benzodiazepines and the influence on performance in field sobriety tests. A retrospective case file evaluatio

  13. Peripheral intravenous line - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    PIV - infants; Peripheral IV - infants; Peripheral line - infants; Peripheral line - neonatal ... A peripheral intravenous line (PIV) is a small, short, plastic tube, called a catheter. A health care provider puts ...

  14. An audit of prescribing practices for benzodiazepines and Z-drugs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cadogan, C

    2015-03-01

    Concerns persist over the use of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in Ireland. A prospective prescription audit was conducted in 81 community pharmacies across Ireland over a four week period. The study sought to assess the level of prescription compliance with key components of benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing guidelines. 28% of audit booklets issued were returned, yielding data on 4,418 prescriptions. The findings suggest that little progress has been made in improving the prescribing of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in Ireland in the decade since publication of the Benzodiazepine Committee\\'s report. Fewer than one fifth of prescriptions (18.8%) were fully compliant with the assessment criteria and the majority (53.7%) had multiple discrepancies. This study highlights the importance of monitoring and auditing benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing practices. Interventions involving patients, prescribers and pharmacists are required to improve the prescribing and use of these medications in Ireland.

  15. Benzodiazepine use among adults residing in the urban settlements of Karachi, Pakistan: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharani Ambreen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are hardly any studies carried out in Pakistan on the usage of benzodiazepines at the level of community. This research was aimed to determine the frequency of benzodiazepine use, along with its associations with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics among community dwelling adults, residing in two urban settlements of Karachi, Pakistan. Methods We performed a cross sectional study from August 2008 to December 2009, in 2 areas of Karachi, namely Garden and Sultanabad. We followed the systematic sampling strategy to randomly select the households, with an adult of either sex and of age 18 years or more. Data collection was carried out through interview, using a pre-tested questionnaire, with items on socio-demographic position, medical history and benzodiazepine use. Student's t-test and χ2 test was employed to determine the associations between socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, and their relationship with benzodiazepine use was determined using applied logistic regression. Results The overall percentage of benzodiazepine consumption was estimated to be 14%. There were significantly more benzodiazepine users in the peri-urban Sultanabad community to the urban community of Garden (p-value = 0.001. The mean age (± SD for users was 51.3 (± 15.6 years compared to 37.1 (± 14.4 years among non-users. Bromazepam was the most widely used benzodiazepine (29%; followed by diazepam, with a median duration on primary use being 144 weeks (IQR = 48-240. The adjusted logistic regression model revealed that increasing age, location, female sex, unemployment and psychiatric consultation were associated with increased likelihood of benzodiazepine use. Conclusion We believe the unregulated over-the-counter sales of benzodiazepines and social conditions might be playing a role in this high consumption of benzodiazepines in the community.

  16. Analysis of specific 3H-diazepam binding in the brain of emotionally difference mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the behavior of inbred animals under conditions of emotional stress, of the biochemical parameters of the stress reaction, and of the effects of benzodiazepine tranquilizers, conducted in the authors' laboratory, showed that the character of the response to stress and the manifestation of the action of benzodiazepine depend on hereditary factors. The aim of this investigation was to study reception of tritium-labelled diazepam by brain cell membranes of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice

  17. Use of benzodiazepines or benzodiazepine related drugs and the risk of cancer: a population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Friis, Søren; Andersen, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    .02), liver 1.81 (95% CI 1.18, 2.80), lung 1.38 (95% CI 1.23, 1.54), pancreas 1.35 (95% CI 1.02, 1.79) and kidney 1.39 (95% CI 1.01, 1.91). For tobacco-related cancers, the OR was 1.15 (95% CI 1.09, 1.22) and for the remaining cancer sites 1.01 (95% CI 0.94, 1.08). Sub-group analyses revealed only small......AIM: Studies of the carcinogenic potential of benzodiazepines and related drugs (BZRD) have been equivocal. A recent study reported a 35% excess cancer risk among users of hypnotics, including benzodiazepines. METHOD: Using Danish nationwide registers, we conducted a matched case-control study...... of the association between BZRD and cancer risk. During 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2009, we identified 152 510 cases with a first time cancer who were matched (1:8) by age and gender to 1,220,317 cancer-free controls. A new-user design was applied by excluding all subjects who had used anxiolytics, hypnotics...

  18. High density of benzodiazepine binding sites in the substantia innominata of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarter, M.; Schneider, H.H.

    1988-07-01

    In order to study the neuronal basis of the pharmacological interactions between benzodiazepine receptor ligands and cortical cholinergic turnover, we examined the regional distribution of specific benzodiazepine binding sites using in vitro autoradiography. In the basal forebrain, the substantia innominata contained a high density of (/sup 3/H)lormetazepam (LMZ) binding sites (Bmax = 277 fmol/mg tissue; Kd = 0.55 nM). The label could be displaced by diazepam (IC50 = 100 nM), the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist beta-carboline ZK 93426 (45 nM) and the partial inverse agonist beta-carboline FG 7142 (540 nM). It is hypothesized that the amnesic effects of benzodiazepine receptor agonists are exerted through benzodiazepine receptors which are situated on cholinergic neurons in the substantia innominata and are involved in a tonic inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release. The benzodiazepine receptor antagonist ZK 93426 may exert its nootropic effects via benzodiazepine receptors in the substantia innominata and, consequently, by disinhibiting cortical acetylcholine release.

  19. Systematic review of modulators of benzodiazepine receptors in irritable bowel syndrome:Is there hope?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pooneh Salari; Mohammad Abdollahi

    2011-01-01

    Several drugs are used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but all have side effects and variable efficacy.Considering the role of the gut-brain axis,immune,neural,and endocrine pathways in the patho-genesis of IBS and possible beneficial effects of ben-zodiazepines (BZD) in this axis,the present systematic review focuses on the efficacy of BZD receptor modulators in human IBS.For the years 1966 to February 2011,all literature was searched for any articles on the use of BZD receptor modulators and IBS.After thorough evaluation and omission of duplicate data,10 out of 69 articles were included.BZD receptor modulators can be helpful,especially in the diarrhea-dominant form of IBS,by affecting the inflammatory,neural,and psychologic pathways,however,controversies still exist.Recently,a new BZD receptor modulator,dextofisopam was synthesized and studied in human subjects,but the studies are limited to phase II b clinical trials.None of the existing trials considered the neuroimmunomodulatory effectof BZDs in IBS,but bearing in mind the concentration-dependent effect of BZDs on cytokines and cell proliferation,future studies using pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic approaches are highly recommended.

  20. Synthesis of a Benzodiazepine-derived Rhodium NHC Complex by C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, Roberg G.; Gribble, Jr., Michael W.; Ellman, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-30

    The synthesis and characterization of a Rh(I)-NHC complex generated by C-H activation of 1,4-benzodiazepine heterocycle are reported. This complex constitutes a rare example of a carbene tautomer of a 1,4-benzodiazepine aldimine stabilized by transition metal coordination and demonstrates the ability of the catalytically relevant RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment to induce NHC-forming tautomerization of heterocycles possessing a single carbene-stabilizing heteroatom. Implications for the synthesis of benzodiazepines and related pharmacophores via C-H functionalization are discussed.

  1. A New Method of Separation of Four Benzodiazepines by RP-CEC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Lan ZHANG; Tong Hui ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    A new method to separate diazepam, nitrazepam, estazolam, alprazolam was established on both C18 and C8 CEC columns.The influence of separation voltage, Tris concentration, column temperature and the percentage of acetonitrile on the resolution and retention behavior of four benzodiazepines was investigated.The results showed that the percentage of acetonitrile had the largest effect on the resolution and retention behavior of the four benzodiazepines.Other separation conditions had also effects on the resolution and retention behavior, but smaller than the concentration of acetonitrile.Optimum separation conditions were obtained to separate four benzodiazepines on C18 and C8 CEC columns.

  2. Genetic Markers of a Munc13 Protein Family Member, BAIAP3, Are Gender Specifically Associated with Anxiety and Benzodiazepine Abuse in Mice and Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wojcik, Sonja M; Tantra, Martesa; Stepniak, Beata; Man, Kwun-nok M; Müller-Ribbe, Katja; Begemann, Martin; Ju, Anes; Papiol, Sergi; Ronnenberg, Anja; Gurvich, Artem; Shin, Yong; Augustin, Iris; Brose, Nils; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders and substance abuse, including benzodiazepine use disorder, frequently occur together. Unfortunately, treatment of anxiety disorders still includes benzodiazepines, and patients with an existing comorbid benzodiazepine use disorder or a genetic susceptibility for benzodiazepine use disorder may be at risk of adverse treatment outcomes. The identification of genetic predictors for anxiety disorders, and especially for benzodiazepine use disorder, could aid the selection of th...

  3. Transcriptional expression of inflammatory mediators in various somatosensory relay centers in the brain of rat models of peripheral mononeuropathy and local inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamaa, Farah; Chebaro, Maya; Safieh-Garabedian, Bared; Saadeh, Ryan; Jabbur, Suhayl J; Saadé, Nayef E

    2016-08-15

    Contradictory results have been reported regarding the role of inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system in mediating neuropathic pain and inflammatory hyperalgesia following peripheral nerve injury or localized inflammation. The present study aims to correlate between the mRNA expression and protein secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and nerve growth factor (NGF), in the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), spinal cord, brainstem and thalamus, and pain-related behavior in animal models of peripheral mononeuropathy and localized inflammation. Different groups of rats (n=8, each) were subjected to either lesion of the nerves of their hindpaws to induce mononeuropathy or intraplantar injection of endotoxin (ET) and were sacrificed at various time intervals. TNF-α, IL-1β and NGF mRNA expression and protein levels in the various centers involved in processing nociceptive information were determined, by RT-PCR and ELISA. Control groups were either subjected to sham surgery or to saline injection. Mononeuropathy and ET injection produced significant and sustained increases in the mRNA expression and protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and NGF in the ipsilateral and contralateral DRGs, spinal cord, and brainstem. No significant and consistent changes in the mRNA expression of cytokines were noticed in the thalamus, while a downregulation of the NGF-mRNA level was observed. The temporal and spatial patterns of the observed changes in mRNA expression of cytokines and NGF are not closely in phase with the observed allodynia and hyperalgesia in the different models, suggesting that the role of these mediators may not be reduced exclusively to the production and maintenance of pain. PMID:27397080

  4. Brain interleukin-1β and the intrinsic receptor antagonist control peripheral Toll-like receptor 3-mediated suppression of spontaneous activity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Yamato

    Full Text Available During acute viral infections such as influenza, humans often experience not only transient fever, but also prolonged fatigue or depressive feelings with a decrease in social activity for days or weeks. These feelings are thought to be due to neuroinflammation in the brain. Recent studies have suggested that chronic neuroinflammation is a precipitating event of various neurological disorders, but the mechanism determining the duration of neuroinflammation has not been elucidated. In this study, neuroinflammation was induced by intraperitoneal injection of polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C, a Toll-like receptor-3 agonist that mimics viral infection in male Sprague-Dawley rats, and then investigated how the neuroinflammation shift from acute to the chronic state. The rats showed transient fever and prolonged suppression of spontaneous activity for several days following poly I:C injection. NS-398, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, completely prevented fever, but did not improve spontaneous activity, indicating that suppression of spontaneous activity was not induced by the arachidonate cascade that generated the fever. The animals overexpressed interleukin (IL-1β and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra in the brain including the cerebral cortex. Blocking the IL-1 receptor in the brain by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. infusion of recombinant IL-1ra completely blocked the poly I:C-induced suppression of spontaneous activity and attenuated amplification of brain interferon (IFN-α expression, which has been reported to produce fatigue-like behavior by suppressing the serotonergic system. Furthermore, i.c.v. infusion of neutralizing antibody for IL-1ra prolonged recovery from suppression of spontaneous activity. Our findings indicated that IL-1β is the key trigger of neuroinflammation and that IL-1ra prevents the neuroinflammation entering the chronic state.

  5. Pharmacological properties of AC-3933, a novel benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, T; Kiyoshi, T; Kohayakawa, H; Iwamura, Y; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    We investigated in this study the pharmacological properties of AC-3933 (5-(3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one), a novel benzodiazepine receptor (BzR) partial inverse agonist. AC-3933 potently inhibited [3H]-flumazenil binding to rat whole brain membrane with a Ki value of 5.15 ± 0.39 nM and a GABA ratio of 0.84 ± 0.03. AC-3933 exhibited almost no affinity for the other receptors, transporters and ion channels used in this study. In addition, AC-3933, in the presence of GABA (1 μM), gradually but significantly increased [³⁵S] tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding to rat cortical membrane to 117.1% of the control (maximum increase ratio) at 3000 nM. However, this increase reached a plateau at 30 nM with hardly any change at a concentration range of 100-3000 nM (from 115.2% to 117.1%). AC-3933 (0.1-10 μM) significantly enhanced KCl-evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release from rat hippocampal slices in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, in vivo brain microdialysis showed that intragastric administration of AC-3933 at the dose of 10 mg/kg significantly increased extracellular ACh levels in the hippocampus of freely moving rats (area under the curve (AUC₀₋₂ h) of ACh level; 288.3% of baseline). These results indicate that AC-3933, a potent and selective BzR inverse agonist with low intrinsic activity, might be useful in the treatment of cognitive disorders associated with degeneration of the cholinergic system.

  6. Identification of the gene encoding Brain Cell Membrane Protein 1 (BCMP1, a putative four-transmembrane protein distantly related to the Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 / Epithelial Membrane Proteins and the Claudins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Daniel

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A partial cDNA clone from dog thyroid presenting a very significant similarity with an uncharacterized mouse EST sequence was isolated fortuitously. We report here the identification of the complete mRNA and of the gene, the product of which was termed "brain cell membrane protein 1" (BCMP1. Results The 4 kb-long mRNA sequence exhibited an open-reading frame of only 543 b followed by a 3.2 kb-long 3' untranslated region containing several AUUUA instability motifs. Analysis of the encoded protein sequence identified the presence of four putative transmembrane domains. Similarity searches in protein domain databases identified partial sequence conservations with peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22/ epithelial membrane proteins (EMPs and Claudins, defining the encoded protein as representative of the existence of a novel subclass in this protein family. Northern-blot analysis of the expression of the corresponding mRNA in adult dog tissues revealed the presence of a huge amount of the 4 kb transcript in the brain. An EGFP-BCMP1 fusion protein expressed in transfected COS-7 cells exhibited a membranous localization as expected. The sequences encoding BCMP1 were assigned to chromosome X in dog, man and rat using radiation hybrid panels and were partly localized in the currently available human genome sequence. Conclusions We have identified the existence in several mammalian species of a gene encoding a putative four-transmembrane protein, BCMP1, wich defines a novel subclass in this family of proteins. In dog at least, the corresponding mRNA is highly present in brain cells. The chromosomal localization of the gene in man makes of it a likely candidate gene for X-linked mental retardation.

  7. Sulfanilic acid catalyzed solvent-free synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sulfanilic acid has been found to be an efficient catalyst for the synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepines from o-phenylenediamine and ketones. This method is simple, effective and environmentally friendly and gives better yields.

  8. Iodine-125 radioimmunoassay for the direct detection of benzodiazepines in blood and urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, C.P.; Stead, A.H.; Mason, P.A.; Law, B.; Moffat, A.C.; McBrien, M.; Cosby, S.

    1986-05-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the direct detection of benzodiazepines in blood and urine is described. It is based on a commercially available antiserum and an easily synthesised radio-iodinated derivative of clonazepam that allows the use of relatively simple gamma-counting procedures. The assay can detect low therapeutic levels of all of the benzodiazepines currently available in the UK in 50-..mu..l samples of blood and urine (1-50 ng ml/sup -1/, depending on the drug); no prior sample preparation is required. It is inexpensive, rapid, simple to perform and is broadly specific for the benzodiazepine class of drugs. The assay offers a most suitable means of screening large numbers of samples of forensic interest for the presence of the benzodiazepines.

  9. An iodine-125 radioimmunoassay for the direct detection of benzodiazepines in blood and urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the direct detection of benzodiazepines in blood and urine is described. It is based on a commercially available antiserum and an easily synthesised radio-iodinated derivative of clonazepam that allows the use of relatively simple gamma-counting procedures. The assay can detect low therapeutic levels of all of the benzodiazepines currently available in the UK in 50-μl samples of blood and urine (1-50 ng ml-1, depending on the drug); no prior sample preparation is required. It is inexpensive, rapid, simple to perform and is broadly specific for the benzodiazepine class of drugs. The assay offers a most suitable means of screening large numbers of samples of forensic interest for the presence of the benzodiazepines. (author)

  10. Positive Drug Screen for Benzodiazepine Due to a Chinese Herbal Product

    OpenAIRE

    Eachus, Patricia L.

    1996-01-01

    A female athlete tested positive for benzodiazepine on a random drug screen. She denied taking any illicit or prescription drugs. The positive screen was found to be caused by undeclared addiction of diazepam to a Chinese herbal product, “Miracle Herb.” Some foreign vitamins, health care products, or herbal tea may contain banned or dangerous additives unknown to the consumer. These additives may include ingredients such as benzodiazepine, mefenamic acid, or corticosteroids. Possible physical...

  11. Benzodiazepine receptor binding in vivo with (/sup 3/)-Ro 15-1788

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeders, N.E.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1985-07-29

    In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding has generally been studied by ex vivo techniques. In this investigation, the authors identify the conditions where (/sup 3/H)-Ro 15-1788 labels benzodiazepine receptors by true in vivo binding, i.e. where workable specific to nonspecific ratios are obtained in intact tissues without homogenization or washing. (/sup 3/H)-Flunitrazepam and (/sup 3/H)-clonazepam did not exhibit useful in vivo receptor binding. 39 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  12. Benzodiazepine receptor binding in vivo with [3]-Ro 15-1788

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding has generally been studied by ex vivo techniques. In this investigation, the authors identify the conditions where [3H]-Ro 15-1788 labels benzodiazepine receptors by true in vivo binding, i.e. where workable specific to nonspecific ratios are obtained in intact tissues without homogenization or washing. [3H]-Flunitrazepam and [3H]-clonazepam did not exhibit useful in vivo receptor binding. 39 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  13. Addressing the Issue of Chronic, Inappropriate Benzodiazepine Use: How Can Pharmacists Play a Role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C. Gallagher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prescribing guidelines do not recommend the long-term use of benzodiazepines since their effectiveness with chronic use is out-weighed by risks including dependence, memory and cognitive impairment, hip fractures and traffic accidents. Despite these guidelines, historical data points to an increasing proportion of inappropriate, repeat prescribing of benzodiazepines in Ireland and elsewhere, with up to 33% of patients who use these drugs doing so long-term. The typical long-term benzodiazepine user is an older, socio-economically disadvantaged patient who has been prescribed these medicines by their general practitioner (GP and dispensed them by their community pharmacist. Misuse of benzodiazepines in nursing homes and psychiatric institutions is also of concern, with one Irish study indicating that almost half of all admissions to a psychiatric hospital were prescribed these drugs, usually despite a lack of clear clinical need. Discontinuation of benzodiazepines has proven to be of benefit, as it is followed by improvements in cognitive and psychomotor function, particularly in elderly patients. It is obvious that an inter-professional effort, focusing on the primary care setting, is required to address benzodiazepine misuse and to ensure appropriate pharmaceutical care. Pharmacists must be an integral part of this inter-professional effort, not least because they are uniquely positioned as the health professional with most frequent patient contact. There is already some supporting evidence that pharmacists’ involvement in interventions to reduce benzodiazepine use can have positive effects on patient outcomes. Here, this evidence is reviewed and the potential for pharmacists to play an expanded role in ensuring the appropriate use of benzodiazepines is discussed.

  14. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Genetic Damage by HCMV in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes from a Brain Tumor Case-Control Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rourke, Elizabeth A.; Lopez, Mirtha S.; Monroy, Claudia M. [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Scheurer, Michael E. [Department of Pediatrics and Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, The Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Etzel, Carol J. [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Albrecht, Thomas [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Bondy, Melissa L.; El-Zein, Randa A., E-mail: relzein@mdanderson.org [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-04-12

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection occurs early in life and viral persistence remains through life. An association between HCMV infection and malignant gliomas has been reported, suggesting that HCMV may play a role in glioma pathogenesis and could facilitate an accrual of genotoxic damage in the presence of γ-radiation; an established risk factor for gliomas. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV infection modifies the sensitivity of cells to γ-radiation-induced genetic damage. We used peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from 110 glioma patients and 100 controls to measure the level of chromosome damage and cell death. We evaluated baseline, HCMV-, γ-radiation and HCMV + γ-radiation induced genetic instability with the comprehensive Cytokinesis-Blocked Micronucleus Cytome (CBMN-CYT). HCMV, similar to radiation, induced a significant increase in aberration frequency among cases and controls. PBLs infected with HCMV prior to challenge with γ-radiation led to a significant increase in aberrations as compared to baseline, γ-radiation and HCMV alone. With regards to apoptosis, glioma cases showed a lower percentage of induction following in vitro exposure to γ-radiation and HCMV infection as compared to controls. This strongly suggests that, HCMV infection enhances the sensitivity of PBLs to γ-radiation-induced genetic damage possibly through an increase in chromosome damage and decrease in apoptosis.

  15. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Genetic Damage by HCMV in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes from a Brain Tumor Case-Control Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection occurs early in life and viral persistence remains through life. An association between HCMV infection and malignant gliomas has been reported, suggesting that HCMV may play a role in glioma pathogenesis and could facilitate an accrual of genotoxic damage in the presence of γ-radiation; an established risk factor for gliomas. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV infection modifies the sensitivity of cells to γ-radiation-induced genetic damage. We used peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from 110 glioma patients and 100 controls to measure the level of chromosome damage and cell death. We evaluated baseline, HCMV-, γ-radiation and HCMV + γ-radiation induced genetic instability with the comprehensive Cytokinesis-Blocked Micronucleus Cytome (CBMN-CYT). HCMV, similar to radiation, induced a significant increase in aberration frequency among cases and controls. PBLs infected with HCMV prior to challenge with γ-radiation led to a significant increase in aberrations as compared to baseline, γ-radiation and HCMV alone. With regards to apoptosis, glioma cases showed a lower percentage of induction following in vitro exposure to γ-radiation and HCMV infection as compared to controls. This strongly suggests that, HCMV infection enhances the sensitivity of PBLs to γ-radiation-induced genetic damage possibly through an increase in chromosome damage and decrease in apoptosis

  16. Circulating brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and frequency of BDNF positive T cells in peripheral blood in human ischemic stroke: Effect on outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Adeline; Yan, Jun; Csurhes, Peter; Greer, Judith; McCombe, Pamela

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to measure the levels of circulating BDNF and the frequency of BDNF-producing T cells after acute ischaemic stroke. Serum BDNF levels were measured by ELISA. Flow cytometry was used to enumerate peripheral blood leukocytes that were labelled with antibodies against markers of T cells, T regulatory cells (Tregs), and intracellular BDNF. There was a slight increase in serum BDNF levels after stroke. There was no overall difference between stroke patients and controls in the frequency of CD4(+) and CD8(+) BDNF(+) cells, although a subgroup of stroke patients showed high frequencies of these cells. However, there was an increase in the percentage of BDNF(+) Treg cells in the CD4(+) population in stroke patients compared to controls. Patients with high percentages of CD4(+) BDNF(+) Treg cells had a better outcome at 6months than those with lower levels. These groups did not differ in age, gender or initial stroke severity. Enhancement of BDNF production after stroke could be a useful means of improving neuroprotection and recovery after stroke.

  17. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Physiological high frequency activities (HFA are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections, or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI, compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response and N80 (late response of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFA(SEP(N20 and HFA(SEP(N80 and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFA(CCEP(N1 and HFA(CCEP(N2. HFA(SEP(N20 showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFA(CCEP(N1 had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFA(CCEP(N1 and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions.

  18. Review: Interventional radiology in peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peripheral vascular diseases (PVD) are referred to as diseases affecting the blood vessels other than the heart and the brain. Interventional endovascular treatment whenever feasible has become the first line of management in the treatment of PVD. Interventions may be aimed at either revascularization or deliberate occlusion of a diseased vessel(s). This article reviews the various peripheral vascular diseases with their appropriate endovascular management

  19. Synthesis, characterisation, stereochemistry and antimicrobial activity of 5 -piperazino- and 5-morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1, 5-benzodiazepines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ponnuswamy; A Akila; D Deepa Rajakumari; V Shreevidhyaa Suressh; G Usha

    2015-11-01

    Three 1,5-benzodiazepines viz., 5-chloroacetyl-, 5-piperazinoacetyl- and N5 -morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1H-1,5-benzodiazepines have been synthesized. The structural characterisation and the conformational preferences of the compounds have been carried out using IR, 1D and 2D NMR spectral data. The NMR spectral data show that the -acetyltetrahydro-1,5-benzodiazepines prefer to exist in boat conformation with exo orientation of >C=O at 5 position in the solution state. The X-ray crystal structure of 5-morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1H-1,5-benzodiazepine also supports boat conformation in the solid state. The antimicrobial activity for -acetyltetrahydro-1,5-benzodiazepines have been carried out. -morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1H-1,5-benzodiazepine demonstrated better antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  20. Classical activation of microglia in CD200-deficient mice is a consequence of blood brain barrier permeability and infiltration of peripheral cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denieffe, Stephanie; Kelly, Ronan J; McDonald, Claire; Lyons, Anthony; Lynch, Marina A

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between CD200, expressed on several cell types, and its receptor CD200R, expressed on cells of the myeloid lineage, has been shown to be an important factor in modulating inflammation in macrophage function in several conditions including colitis and arthritis. More recently its modulatory effect on microglial activation has been identified and CD200-deficiency has been associated with increased microglial activation accompanied by increased production of inflammatory cytokines. The response of glia prepared from CD200-deficient mice to stimuli like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is markedly greater than the response of cells prepared from wildtype mice and, consistent with this, is the recent observation that expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and signalling through NFκB are increased in microglia prepared from CD200-deficient mice. Here we show that glia from CD200-deficient mice are also more responsive to interferon-γ (IFNγ) which triggers classical activation of microglia. We investigated the effects of CD200-deficiency in vivo and report that there is an increase in expression of several markers of microglial activation including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, which is a hallmark of classically-activated microglia. These changes are accompanied by increased IFNγ, and the evidence suggests that this is produced by infiltrating cells including T cells and macrophages. We propose that these cells enter the brain as a consequence of increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability in CD200-deficient mice and that infiltration is assisted by increased expression of the chemokines, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), IFNγ-induced protein-10 (IP-10) and RANTES. This may have implications in neurodegenerative diseases where BBB permeability is compromised.

  1. Benzodiazepine use in COPD: empirical evidence from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halvorsen T

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Halvorsen,1 Pål E Martinussen21SINTEF Technology and Society, Department for Health Research, 2Department of Sociology and Political Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: The common comorbidities associated with COPD include, among others, anxiety, depression, and insomnia, for which the typical treatment involves the use of benzodiazepines (BZD. However, these medicines should be used with extra caution among COPD patients, since treatment with traditional BZD may compromise respiratory function. Aims: This study investigated the use of BZD among persons suffering from COPD by analyzing three relevant indicators: 1 the sum of defined daily doses (DDD; 2 the number of prescribers involved; and 3 the number of different types of BZD used. Data and methods: The study builds on a linkage of national prescription data and patient–administrative data, which includes all Norwegian drug prescriptions to persons hospitalized with a COPD diagnosis during 2009, amounting to a total of 5,380 observations. Regression techniques were used to identify the patients and the clinical characteristics associated with BZD use. Results: Of the 5,380 COPD patients treated in hospital during 2009, 3,707 (69% were dispensed BZD during the following 12 months. Moreover, they were dispensed on average 197.08 DDD, had 1.22 prescribers, and used 0.98 types of BZD during the year. Women are more likely to use BZD for all levels of BZD use. Overnight planned care not only increases the risk of BZD use (DDD, but also the number of prescribers and the types of BZD in use.Conclusion: In light of the high levels of BZD prescription found in this study, especially among women, it is recommended that general practitioners, hospital specialists, and others treating COPD patients should aim to acquire a complete picture of their patients’ BZD medication before more is prescribed in order to keep the use to a minimum

  2. Pattern of utilization of benzodiazepines in patients with hypertension: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divac Nevena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The analysis of drug prescribing in general practice in Serbia showed that the use of benzodiazepines is most frequently associated with hypertension. The aim of this study was to establish the correlation of the characteristics of patients with hypertension to antihypertensive drug therapy, and the intake of benzodiazepines. Methods. A special questionnaire was used for interviewing the patients (n = 171 chronically treated for hypertenson. Statistical tests used were χ2-test and Student's t-test. Results. No differences were noted in terms of age, gender, education, body weight, smoking habits and blood pressure (155±4.9/100±2.7 mmHg vs. 160±2.2/105±3.7 mmHg, between the group I (antihypertensive drugs+benzodiazepines: n = 79, and the group II (antihypertensives only: n = 92. The patients taking benzodiazepines received a lower number of different antihypertensive drugs (2.3±0.09 vs. 2.7±0.10; p < 0.01, but the total antihypertensive drug load was significantly greater than in the group II (2.6±0.10 vs. 1.9±0.15 defined daily doses (DDD/patient/day; p < 0.01. Benzodiazepines were taken for anxiety (62% and hypertension (21%, rarely for insomnia, mostly once a day, at bedtime. About half the patients took benzodiazepines regularly for months or years aware of the risk for addiction. Diazepam was used by 82% of the patients. The average daily exposure to benzodiazepines was 0.45±0.05 DDD/patient/day. The drug was bought without prescription in 25% of the patients, and without consulting a physician in 12% of them. Conclusion. The study confirmed a close association of hypertension with the use of benzodiazepines. The frequent use of benzodiazepines in the patients with hypertension might be caused by an inadequate response to antihypertensive drug therapy, besides anxiety and insomnia. The therapeutic efficacy of a long-term use of low doses of benzodiazepines in hypertension requires further investigation.

  3. [Peripheral neuropathies associated with hereditary cerebellar ataxias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheim, M; Tranchant, C

    2011-01-01

    Inherited cerebellar ataxias constitute a complicated and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders affecting the cerebellum and/or spinocerebellar tract, spinal cord and peripheral nerves. A peripheral neuropathy is frequently seen in inherited cerebellar ataxias although it rarely reveals the disease. Moreover, the peripheral neuropathy is helpful for the diagnostic procedure and contributes to the functional prognosis of the disease. Thus, electroneuromyography is essential in the algorithm for the diagnosis of inherited cerebellar ataxias, as well as brain MRI (looking especially for cerebellar atrophy) and the assessment of several biomarkers (alpha-foetoprotein, vitamin E, albumin, LDL cholesterol, lactic acid, phytanic acid).

  4. Childhood maternal care is associated with DNA methylation of the genes for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and oxytocin receptor (OXTR) in peripheral blood cells in adult men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unternaehrer, Eva; Meyer, Andrea Hans; Burkhardt, Susan C A; Dempster, Emma; Staehli, Simon; Theill, Nathan; Lieb, Roselind; Meinlschmidt, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    In adults, reporting low and high maternal care in childhood, we compared DNA methylation in two stress-associated genes (two target sequences in the oxytocin receptor gene, OXTR; one in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene, BDNF) in peripheral whole blood, in a cross-sectional study (University of Basel, Switzerland) during 2007-2008. We recruited 89 participants scoring  33 (n = 42, 35 women) on the maternal care subscale of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) at a previous assessment of a larger group (N = 709, range PBI maternal care = 0-36, age range = 19-66 years; median 24 years). 85 participants gave blood for DNA methylation analyses (Sequenom(R) EpiTYPER, San Diego, CA) and cell count (Sysmex PocH-100i™, Kobe, Japan). Mixed model statistical analysis showed greater DNA methylation in the low versus high maternal care group, in the BDNF target sequence [Likelihood-Ratio (1) = 4.47; p = 0.035] and in one OXTR target sequence Likelihood-Ratio (1) = 4.33; p = 0.037], but not the second OXTR target sequence [Likelihood-Ratio (1) BDNF (estimate = -0.005, 95% CI = -0.025 to 0.015; p = 0.626) or OXTR DNA methylation (estimate = -0.015, 95% CI = -0.038 to 0.008; p = 0.192). Hence, low maternal care in childhood was associated with greater DNA methylation in an OXTR and a BDNF target sequence in blood cells in adulthood. Although the study has limitations (cross-sectional, a wide age range, only three target sequences in two genes studied, small effects, uncertain relevance of changes in blood cells to gene methylation in brain), the findings may indicate components of the epiphenotype from early life stress.

  5. Effects of Benzodiazepines on Acinar and Myoepithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Tatiana M. F.; Alanis, Luciana R. A.; Sapelli, Silvana da Silva; de Lima, Antonio A. S.; de Noronha, Lucia; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.; Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Almalki, Atiah H.; Sari, Youssef; Ignacio, Sergio A.; Johann, Aline C. B. R.; Gregio, Ana M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines (BZDs), the most commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs with anxiolytic action, may cause hyposalivation. It has been previously shown that BZDs can cause hypertrophy and decrease the acini cell number. In this study, we investigated the effects of BZDs and pilocarpine on rat parotid glands, specifically on acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cells. Methods: Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into nine groups. Control groups received a saline solution for 30 days (C30) and 60 days (C60), and pilocarpine (PILO) for 60 days. Experimental groups received lorazepam (L30) and midazolam (M30) for 30 days. Another group (LS60 or MS60) received lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and saline for additional 30 days. Finally, other groups (LP60 or MP60) received either lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and pilocarpine for additional 30 days. The expression of calponin in myoepithelial cells and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in acinar and ductal cells were evaluated. Results: Animals treated with lorazepam showed an increase in the number of positive staining cells for calponin as compared to control animals (p acinar and ductal cells and a decrease in the positive staining cells for calponin as compared to midazolam administered with saline (MS60). Conclusion: We found that myoepithelial cells might be more sensitive to the effects of BZD than acinar and ductal cells in rat parotid glands. PMID:27445812

  6. Use of benzodiazepines in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcevic, Vladan; Berle, David; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Brakoulias, Vlasios; Ferrão, Ygor A; Viswasam, Kirupamani; Shavitt, Roseli; Miguel, Euripedes; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the frequency of benzodiazepine (BDZ) use in a large sample of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and ascertain the type of BDZ used and the correlates and predictors of BDZ use in OCD. The sample consisted of 955 patients with OCD from a comprehensive, cross-sectional, multicentre study conducted by the Brazilian Research Consortium on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders between 2003 and 2009. The rate of BDZ use over time in this OCD sample was 38.4%. Of individuals taking BDZs, 96.7% used them in combination with other medications, usually serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The most commonly used BDZ was clonazepam. Current age, current level of anxiety and number of additional medications for OCD taken over time significantly predicted BDZ use. This is the first study to comprehensively examine BDZ use in OCD patients, demonstrating that it is relatively common, despite recommendations from treatment guidelines. Use of BDZs in combination with several other medications over time and in patients with marked anxiety suggests that OCD patients taking BDZs may be more complex and more difficult to manage. This calls for further research and clarification of the role of BDZs in the treatment of OCD. PMID:26426443

  7. Benzodiazepine Misuse in the Elderly: Risk Factors, Consequences, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airagnes, Guillaume; Pelissolo, Antoine; Lavallée, Mélanie; Flament, Martine; Limosin, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    Benzodiazepine (BZD) inappropriate use (i.e., misuse and overuse) is a worldwide public health problem. Despite current knowledge about increased sensitivity to side effects in the elderly, that should lead to more caution, only a third of BZD prescriptions in this age group are considered appropriate. The most frequent inadequate situations are excessive duration and/or dosage of a medical prescription or self-medication, especially in a context where it would be contraindicated, e.g., long-acting BZD in the elderly. Polypharmacy and comorbidities are major risk factors. Consequences of BZD inappropriate use are falls, delirium and other cognitive dysfunction, acute respiratory failure, car accidents, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms. An emerging concern is a potentially increased risk of dementia. Contrary to most clinicians' belief, discontinuation of chronic BZD use in elderly patients is feasible, with adequate psychotherapeutic or pharmacological strategies, and can lead to long-term abstinence. Brief cognitive therapy mostly relies on psychoeducation and motivational enhancement and is particularly useful in this context. Further research is needed, notably in three areas: (1) assessing the impact of public health programs to prevent BZD inappropriate use in the elderly, (2) developing alternative strategies to treat anxiety and insomnia in elderly patients, and (3) exploring the association between chronic BZD use and dementia. PMID:27549604

  8. Effects of Benzodiazepines on Acinar and Myoepithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Tatiana M. F.; Alanis, Luciana R. A.; Sapelli, Silvana da Silva; de Lima, Antonio A. S.; de Noronha, Lucia; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.; Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Almalki, Atiah H.; Sari, Youssef; Ignacio, Sergio A.; Johann, Aline C. B. R.; Gregio, Ana M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines (BZDs), the most commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs with anxiolytic action, may cause hyposalivation. It has been previously shown that BZDs can cause hypertrophy and decrease the acini cell number. In this study, we investigated the effects of BZDs and pilocarpine on rat parotid glands, specifically on acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cells. Methods: Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into nine groups. Control groups received a saline solution for 30 days (C30) and 60 days (C60), and pilocarpine (PILO) for 60 days. Experimental groups received lorazepam (L30) and midazolam (M30) for 30 days. Another group (LS60 or MS60) received lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and saline for additional 30 days. Finally, other groups (LP60 or MP60) received either lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and pilocarpine for additional 30 days. The expression of calponin in myoepithelial cells and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in acinar and ductal cells were evaluated. Results: Animals treated with lorazepam showed an increase in the number of positive staining cells for calponin as compared to control animals (p < 0.05). Midazolam administered with pilocarpine (MP60) induced an increase in the proliferation of acinar and ductal cells and a decrease in the positive staining cells for calponin as compared to midazolam administered with saline (MS60). Conclusion: We found that myoepithelial cells might be more sensitive to the effects of BZD than acinar and ductal cells in rat parotid glands.

  9. Effects of various combinations of benzodiazepines with buprenorphine on arterial blood gases in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnay, Stéphane O; Mégarbane, Bruno; Borron, Stephen W; Risède, Patricia; Monier, Claire; Ricordel, Ivan; Baud, Frédéric J

    2008-09-01

    Fatalities have been attributed to combinations of high-dose buprenorphine with benzodiazepines. In rats, high-dose buprenorphine combined with midazolam was shown to induce sustained respiratory acidosis, while buprenorphine alone did not. However, the effects of buprenorphine combined with pharmacological doses of benzodiazepines remain unknown. Our objective was to compare the acute effects of four selected benzodiazepines used intravenously at equi-efficacious doses in rats, alone and in combination with buprenorphine on sedation, respiratory rate and arterial blood gases. Buprenorphine (30 mg/kg) did not significantly modify sedation level or respiratory rate, but induced mild and transient effects on pH and PaCO(2) (P < 0.05). Similarly, despite having no effects on respiratory rate, nordiazepam (10 mg/kg), bromazepam (1 mg/kg) and oxazepam (12 mg/kg) mildly and transiently altered pH and PaCO(2) (P < 0.05), whereas clonazepam (5 mg/kg) did not. Buprenorphine combined with each benzodiazepine induced no significant effects on respiratory rate or blood gases, in comparison with buprenorphine alone. However, combinations of oxazepam or nordiazepam with buprenorphine significantly deepened sedation. While both combinations reduced respiratory rate, buprenorphine + 30 mg/kg clonazepam significantly increased PaCO(2) and buprenorphine + 30 mg/kg nordiazepam decreased PaO(2). In conclusion, not all benzodiazepines induce significant respiratory depression at therapeutic doses. We were unable to demonstrate significant effects on rat ventilatory parameters of buprenorphine combined with equi-efficacious pharmacological doses of benzodiazepines in comparison with buprenorphine alone. Our results may suggest that effects of these combinations are rather mild. Respiratory failure may, however, result from the association of buprenorphine with elevated doses of benzodiazepines. PMID:18684226

  10. Tryptic mapping and membrane topology of the benzodiazepine receptor alpha-subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentes, K.U.; Venter, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    Rat brain membrane benzodiazepine receptors (BZR) were photoaffinity labelled specifically (in presence or absence of 6 ..mu..M clonazepam) with 10 nM /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (FNZ). Digestion of the FNZ-labelled, membrane-bound BZR with 200 ..mu..g trypsin/mg membrane protein yielded H/sub 2/O-soluble BZR-fragments of molecular mass (M/sub r/) 34, 31, 28, 24, 21, 18, 16, 12, 10 and 7kDa. Because the 34kDa-peptide is the largest fragment containing a FNZ-binding site they conclude that this represents the extracellular domain of the BZR. In the remaining pellet two labelled peptides with M/sub r/ of 44kDa and 28kDa were found that required the use of detergents for their solubilization; they therefore contain the membrane anchoring domain. Digestion of the 0.5% Na-deoxycholate solubilized, intact BZR (M/sub r/ 51kDa) resulted in the same tryptic pattern as the membrane form of the receptor plus two larger fragments of M/sub r/ 45kDa and 40kDa. Arrangement of all tryptic fragments with reference to the FNZ binding site reveals a membrane topology of the BZR alpha-subunit with 67% (34kDa) for the extracellular domain, 21% (11kDa) for the membrane anchoring domain and 12% (6kDa) for a putative cytoplasmic domain. The overlap between some of the labelled fragments suggest that the BZ binding site must be located near the membrane surface of the extracellular domain.

  11. Tryptic mapping and membrane topology of the benzodiazepine receptor alpha-subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat brain membrane benzodiazepine receptors (BZR) were photoaffinity labelled specifically (in presence or absence of 6 μM clonazepam) with 10 nM 3H-flunitrazepam (FNZ). Digestion of the FNZ-labelled, membrane-bound BZR with 200 μg trypsin/mg membrane protein yielded H2O-soluble BZR-fragments of molecular mass (M/sub r/) 34, 31, 28, 24, 21, 18, 16, 12, 10 and 7kDa. Because the 34kDa-peptide is the largest fragment containing a FNZ-binding site they conclude that this represents the extracellular domain of the BZR. In the remaining pellet two labelled peptides with M/sub r/ of 44kDa and 28kDa were found that required the use of detergents for their solubilization; they therefore contain the membrane anchoring domain. Digestion of the 0.5% Na-deoxycholate solubilized, intact BZR (M/sub r/ 51kDa) resulted in the same tryptic pattern as the membrane form of the receptor plus two larger fragments of M/sub r/ 45kDa and 40kDa. Arrangement of all tryptic fragments with reference to the FNZ binding site reveals a membrane topology of the BZR alpha-subunit with 67% (34kDa) for the extracellular domain, 21% (11kDa) for the membrane anchoring domain and 12% (6kDa) for a putative cytoplasmic domain. The overlap between some of the labelled fragments suggest that the BZ binding site must be located near the membrane surface of the extracellular domain

  12. Assessing the efficacy of melatonin to curtail benzodiazepine/Z drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Golombek, Diego A; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Brusco, Luis I; Vigo, Daniel E

    2016-07-01

    The abuse of benzodiazepine (BZP) and Z drugs has become, due to the tolerance and dependence they produce, a serious public health problem. Thirty years ago, we demonstrated in experimental animals the interaction of melatonin with central BZD receptors, and in 1997 we published the first series of elderly patients who reduced BZP consumption after melatonin treatment. Almost every single neuron in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the central pacemaker of the circadian system, contains γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and many results in animals point out to a melatonin interaction with GABA-containing neurons. In addition, central-type BZD antagonism, that obliterates GABAA receptor function, blunted most behavioral effects of melatonin including sleep. Melatonin is involved in the regulation of human sleep. This is supported by the temporal relationship between the rise of plasma melatonin levels and sleep propensity as well as by the sleep-promoting effects of exogenously administered melatonin. Both meta-analyses and consensus agreements give support to the therapeutic use of melatonin in sleep disorders. This action is attributed to MT1 and MT2 melatoninergic receptors localized in the SCN, as well as in other brain areas. This review discusses available data on the efficacy of melatonin to curtail chronic BZD/Z drug use in insomnia patients. A major advantage is that melatonin has a very safe profile, it is usually remarkably well tolerated and, in some studies, it has been administered to patients at very large doses and for long periods of time, without any potentiality of abuse. Further studies on this application of melatonin are warranted. PMID:26438969

  13. Cytokines and brain excitability

    OpenAIRE

    Galic, Michael A.; Riazi, Kiarash; Pittman, Quentin J.

    2011-01-01

    Cytokines are molecules secreted by peripheral immune cells, microglia, astrocytes and neurons in the central nervous system. Peripheral or central inflammation is characterized by an upregulation of cytokines and their receptors in the brain. Emerging evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory cytokines modulate brain excitability. Findings from both the clinical literature and from in vivo and in vitro laboratory studies suggest that cytokines can increase seizure susceptibility and may be in...

  14. Benzodiazepine effect of {sup 125}I-iomazenil-benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Ibaragi, 305-8575 (Japan)]. E-mail: gzl13162@nifty.ne.jp; Ogi, Shigeyuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Uchiyama, Mayuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Mori, Yutaka [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    To test the change in free or unoccupied benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) density in response to diazepam, we investigated {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) binding and serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats, which received psychological stress using a communication box for 5 days, were divided into two groups according to the amount of administered diazepam: no diazepam [D (0)] group and 10 mg/kg per day [D (10)] group of 12 rats each. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 125}I-IMZ of the D (10) group were significantly lower (P<.05) than those of the D (0) group in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus. The serum corticosterone level ratio in the D (10) group was significantly lower than that in the D (0) group (P<.05). From the change in serum corticosterone levels, diazepam attenuated the psychological stress produced by the physical stress to animals in adjacent compartments. From the reduced binding of {sup 125}I-IMZ, it is clear that diazepam competed with endogenous ligand for the free BZR sites, and the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus are important areas in which {sup 125}I-IMZ binding is strongly affected by administration of diazepam.

  15. Cellular and subcellular localization of protein I in the peripheral nervous system.

    OpenAIRE

    Fried, G.; Nestler, E J; De Camilli, P; Stjärne, L; Olson, L; Lundberg, J M; Hökfelt, T; Ouimet, C C; Greengard, P

    1982-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular distribution of protein I, a major brain phosphoprotein, has been studied in the peripheral nervous system. The levels of protein I in various peripheral nerves and innervated peripheral tissues were determined by radioimmunoassay and radioimmunolabeling of polyacrylamide gels. The results indicated tha protein I is present throughout the peripheral nervous system. Denervation studies of adrenal medulla and iris suggested that the protein I contained in peripheral...

  16. [The problems with the use of benzodiazepines in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourin, M

    2010-09-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZD) are widely used to treat anxiety and insomnia in elderly patients. The interest of this prescription is discussed in this article. The discussion is based on the pharmacological properties and adverse effects of BZDs in the elderly. The conclusions are that BZDs should be rarely prescribed in this population; many patients treated by BZDs should be withdrawn and therapeutic strategies, other than BZDs, should be considered to treat anxiety and insomnia in these patients. Problems posed by BZD in the aged patient are both of a pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic order. In comparison to young adult users, BZD users among the aged are essentially women; the latter take these medications during important periods in their lives and often have a strong comorbidity, such as cardiovascular or rhumatological problems or even psychiatric problems, such as depression or panic disorders. Aged patients who take BZD at high doses can also consume other drugs, such as alcohol, and often have a psychiatric history. Some important side effects are associated with the use of BZD; essentially concerning falls, and it has been noticed for some years that problems posed by aged car drivers can be enhanced by BZD. It is difficult to know if continual users of BZD really have an advantage over other users. However, instruments, such as an indicator in the form of an algorithm, have been developed to identify the appropriateness of prescribing BZD to elderly patients. It is obvious that it is essential, whenever possible, to have a recourse strategy for cessation, and as much as possible to use BZD with a short half-life that are not oxidised, i.e. essentially BZD that are not metabolised in the strictest sense of the term, such as lorazepam or temazepam. Daily doses must be extremely limited and duration of use should not exceed two or three months in young patients.

  17. Peripheral Amyloid-β Levels Regulate Amyloid-β Clearance from the Central Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Marcos A.; Kulstad, J. Jacob; Savard, Christopher E.; Green, Pattie S.; Lee, Sum P.; Craft, Suzanne; Watson, G. Stennis; Cook, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is cleared from the brain by both proteolytic digestion and transport across the blood-brain-barrier into the peripheral circulatory system. To investigate the role peripheral Aβ levels play in regulating Aβ brain clearance, we measured the clearance of [125I]-Aβ-{1-40 injected into the brains of liver-ligated rats that allowed peripheral Aβ levels to be maintained at elevated levels for approximately one hour with/without a single peripheral bolus of unlabeled Aβ-{1-40. We fou...

  18. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized clinical trial - the SMART trial protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Jennum, Poul;

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of schizophrenia frequently includes prolonged benzodiazepine administration despite a lack of evidence of its use. It is often difficult to discontinue benzodiazepines because of the development of dependence. We aim to assess if melatonin can facilitate the withdrawal of prolonged...... benzodiazepine administration in patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, we aim to investigate the association of benzodiazepine dose reduction with the following clinically important variables: sleep, psychophysiology, cognition, social function, and quality of life....

  19. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized clinical trial - the SMART trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Oranje Bob; Gluud Christian; Winkel Per; Hansen Jane L; Lublin Henrik; Jennum Poul; Fagerlund Birgitte; Baandrup Lone; Glenthoj Birte Y

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Treatment of schizophrenia frequently includes prolonged benzodiazepine administration despite a lack of evidence of its use. It is often difficult to discontinue benzodiazepines because of the development of dependence. We aim to assess if melatonin can facilitate the withdrawal of prolonged benzodiazepine administration in patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, we aim to investigate the association of benzodiazepine dose reduction with the following clinically importa...

  20. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized clinical trial - the SMART trial protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Jennum, Poul;

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of schizophrenia frequently includes prolonged benzodiazepine administration despite a lack of evidence of its use. It is often difficult to discontinue benzodiazepines because of the development of dependence. We aim to assess if melatonin can facilitate the withdrawal of prolonged ben...... benzodiazepine administration in patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, we aim to investigate the association of benzodiazepine dose reduction with the following clinically important variables: sleep, psychophysiology, cognition, social function, and quality of life....

  1. Does tailoring really make a difference? : the development and evaluation of tailored interventions aimed at benzodiazepine cessation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolde, Geeske Brecht ten

    2008-01-01

    Because of the problems associated with chronic benzodiazepine use, there is impetus to prevent and reduce chronic benzodiazepine use. The overall aim was to develop a 'tailor-made' intervention in order to reduce chronic use. Before developing tailored patient education, it is first of all importan

  2. Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; COJOCARU, Manole; SILOSI, Isabela; VRABIE, Camelia Doina

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system refers to parts of the nervous system outside the brain and spinal cord. Systemic autoimmune diseases can affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems in a myriad of ways and through a heterogeneous number of mechanisms leading to many different clinical manifestations. As a result, neurological complications of these disorders can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The most common complication of peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement ...

  3. Peripheral intravenous line (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A peripheral intravenous line is a small, short plastic catheter that is placed through the skin into a vein, ... or foot, but occasionally in the head. A peripheral intravenous line is used to give fluids and ...

  4. Peripheral arterial line (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A peripheral arterial line is a small, short plastic catheter placed through the skin into an artery of the arm or leg. The purpose of a peripheral arterial line is to allow continuous monitoring of ...

  5. Bridging the gap between education and appropriate use of benzodiazepines in psychiatric clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell’Osso B

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bernardo Dell’Osso,1,2,* Umberto Albert,3,* Anna Rita Atti,4 Claudia Carmassi,5 Giuseppe Carrà,6 Fiammetta Cosci,7 Valeria Del Vecchio,8 Marco Di Nicola,9 Silvia Ferrari,10 Arianna Goracci,11 Felice Iasevoli,12 Mario Luciano,8 Giovanni Martinotti,13 Maria Giulia Nanni,14 Alessandra Nivoli,15,16 Federica Pinna,17 Nicola Poloni,18 Maurizio Pompili,19 Gaia Sampogna,8 Ilaria Tarricone,20 Sarah Tosato,21 Umberto Volpe,8 Andrea Fiorillo8 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Milan, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy; 2Bipolar Disorders Clinic, Stanford Medical School, Stanford University, CA, USA; 3Rita Levi Montalcini Department of Neuroscience, University of Turin, Torino, 4Department of Biomedical and NeuroMotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, 5Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 6Division of Psychiatry, Faculty of Brain Sciences, University College London, London, UK; 7Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, 8Department of Psychiatry, University of Naples SUN, Naples, 9Institute of Psychiatry and Psychology, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, 10Department of Diagnostic-Clinical Medicine and Public Health, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, 11Department of Molecular Medicine and Clinical Department of Mental Health, University of Siena, Siena, 12Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Sciences and Odontostomatology, University Federico II of Naples, Naples, 13Department of Neuroscience, Imaging, and Clinical Science, University G.d Annunzio, Chieti-Pescara, 14Section of Psychiatry, Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, 15Psychiatric Institute, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy; 16Bipolar Disorder Unit, CIBERSAM, IDIBAPS, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 17Department of

  6. Selective peripheral denervation : comparison with pallidal stimulation and literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Bosch, D. Andries; Schuurman, P. Richard; Speelman, Johannes D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cervical dystonia who are non-responders to Botulinum toxin qualify for surgery. Selective peripheral denervation (Bertrand's procedure, SPD) and deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus (GPi-DBS) are available surgical options. Although peripheral denervation has potential advant

  7. Experiment K-6-18. Study of muscarinic and gaba (benzodiazepine) receptors in the sensory-motor cortex, hippcampus and spinal code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, N.; Damelio, F.; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    Frontal lobe samples of rat brains flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were processed for the study of muscarinic (cholinergic) and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors and for immunocytochemical localization of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although radioactive labeling of both muscarinic cholinergic and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors proved to be successful with the techniques employed, distinct receptor localization of individual laminae of the frontal neocortex was not possible since the sampling of the area was different in the various groups of animals. In spite of efforts made for proper orientation and regional identification of laminae, it was found that a densitometric (quantitation of autoradiograms) analysis of the tissue did not contribute to the final interpretation of the effects of weightlessness on these receptors. As to the immunocytochemical studies the use of both markers, GFAP and GABA antiserum, confirmed the suitability of the techniques for use in frozen material. However, similar problems to those encountered in the receptor studies prevented an adequate interpretation of the effects of micro-G exposure on the localization and distribution of GABA and GFAP. This study did, however, confirm the feasibility of investigating neurotransmitters and their receptors in future space flight experiments.

  8. Propylthiouracil and peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Van Boekel

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is a rare manifestation in hyperthyroidism. We describe the neurological manifestations of a 38 year old female with Graves' disease who developed peripheral neuropathy in the course of her treatment with propylthiouracil. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs disappeared. Therefore, we call attention for a possible toxic effect on peripheral nervous system caused by this drug.

  9. Nonpharmacological Alternatives to Benzodiazepine Drugs for the Treatment of Anxiety in Outpatient Populations: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Lois M; Whitburn, Amy Irene; Platt-Koch, Alexander G; Koch, Ronald L

    2016-08-01

    Overuse of benzodiazepine drugs to treat anxiety, mood, and sleep disorders is a growing problem in clinical practice. GABAergic medications (benzodiazepine drugs in particular) have side effects, drug interactions, and the potential to create tolerance and dependence in users. GABA-enhancing dietary supplements have similar and unique risks. Natural, non-chemical, anxiolytic treatments exist and can be safely recommended to patients. Three such treatments have been the focus of study in the past 20 years: mindfulness, meditation, and yoga. Growing evidence exists that these treatments can be safely recommended to patients with anxiety. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(8), 35-42.]. PMID:27479478

  10. Benzodiazepine Use and Misuse Among Patients in a Methadone Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Adamo Christopher

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzodiazepines (BZD misuse is a serious public health problem, especially among opiate-dependent patients with anxiety enrolled in methadone program because it puts patients at higher risk of life-threatening multiple drug overdoses. Both elevated anxiety and BZD misuse increase the risk for ex-addicts to relapse. However, there is no recent study to assess how serious the problem is and what factors are associated with BZD misuse. This study estimates the prevalence of BZD misuse in a methadone program, and provides information on the characteristics of BZD users compared to non-users. Methods An anonymous survey was carried out at a methadone program in Baltimore, MD, and all patients were invited to participate through group meetings and fliers around the clinic on a voluntary basis. Of the 205 returned questionnaires, 194 were complete and entered into final data analysis. Those who completed the questionnaire were offered a $5 gift card as an appreciation. Results 47% of the respondents had a history of BZD use, and 39.8% used BZD without a prescription. Half of the BZD users (54% started using BZD after entering the methadone program, and 61% of previous BZD users reported increased or resumed use after entering methadone program. Compared to the non-users, BZD users were more likely to be White, have prescribed medication for mental problems, have preexistent anxiety problems before opiate use, and had anxiety problems before entering methadone program. They reported more mental health problems in the past month, and had higher scores in anxiety state, depression and perceived stress (p Conclusions Important information on epidemiology of BZD misuse among methadone-maintenance patients suggests that most methadone programs do not address co-occurring anxiety problems, and methadone treatment may trigger onset or worsening of BZD misuse. Further study is needed to explore how to curb misuse and abuse of BZD in the

  11. Synthesis and Anticonvulsant Activity of Various Mannich and Schiff Bases of 1,5-Benzodiazepines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra N. Pandeya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines have a various behavioral effects in addition to their anxiolytic action. There is every reason to believe that the BZ/GABA receptor complex is involved in these effects, since GABAmimetic manipulations modify the effect of BZ in tests of convulsive activity, motor function, and appetitive behavior. 1,5-Benzodiazepines are biologically important molecules and are extensively used clinically as analgesic, hypnotic, sedative, and antidepressive agents. Hence, 1,5-Benzodiazepines were synthesized by condensation of o-phenylenediamine and ketones, for example, cyclohexanone and acetone in presence of sulfated zirconia (catalyst. Mannich bases were synthesized with acetophenone, p-nitroacetophenone, p-chloroacetophenone, and formaldehyde. Schiff bases were synthesized using Mannich base of 1,5-benzodiazepines with p-chloroaniline and p-chlorophenylsemicarbazide in the presence of glacial acetic acid. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by 1H NMR and IR spectral analyses. All the synthesized derivatives were evaluated at the dose of 30 mg/kg b.w for anticonvulsant activity by isoniazid induced convulsion model, and the compounds NBZD-3 and NBZD-8 were found to be the most active among all compounds. Among all the synthesized derivatives, compounds NBZD-13 and NBZD-17 were found to be the most active among all compounds using thiosemicarbazide induced model. Although NBZD-8, NBZD-10, and NBZD-18 are the compounds which had shown good anticonvulsant activity and have an advantage over that, they were not sedative.

  12. Triazoloquinazolinediones as novel high affinity ligands for the benzodiazepine site of GABA(A) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob; Gidlöf, Ritha; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard;

    2011-01-01

    Based on a pharmacophore model of the benzodiazepine-binding site of GABA(A) receptors, a series of 2-aryl-2,6-dihydro[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-c]quinazoline-3,5-diones (structure type I) were designed, synthesized, and identified as high-affinity ligands of the binding site. For several compounds, K(i...

  13. Determinants of Initiated and Continued Benzodiazepine Use in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Leonie; Giltay, Erik J.; van Veen, Tineke; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Longitudinal research on determinants of initiated and continued benzodiazepine (BZD) use is inconsistent and has identified many possible determinants. It is unclear which of those are most important in the prediction of BZD use. We aimed to identify the most important predictors of ini

  14. Synthesis and diversification of 1,2,3-triazole-fused 1,4-benzodiazepine scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, James R; Martin, Stephen F

    2011-03-01

    A substituted heterocyclic scaffold comprising a 1,4-benzodiazepine fused with a 1,2,3-triazole ring has been synthesized and diversified via a variety of refunctionalizations. The strategy features the rapid assembly of the scaffold by combining 3-4 reactants in an efficient multicomponent assembly process, followed by an intramolecular Huisgen cycloaddition.

  15. Associations of benzodiazepine craving with other clinical variables in a population of general practice patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, A.J.J.; Gorgels, W.J.M.J.; Voshaar, R.C. Oude; Breteler, M.H.M.; Balkom, van A.J.L.M.; Lisdonk, van de E.H.; Kan, C.C.; Zitman, F.G.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to (1) describe the characteristics of patients reporting craving for benzodiazepines (BZs) and (2) to search for associations between BZ craving and other clinical variables in a population of general practice (GP) patients who have made an attempt to discontin

  16. Associations of benzodiazepine craving with other clinical variables in a population of general practice patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, A.J.J.; Gorgels, W.J.M.J.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Breteler, M.H.M.; Balkom, A.J.L.M. van; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Kan, C.C.; Zitman, F.G.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to (1) describe the characteristics of patients reporting craving for benzodiazepines (BZs) and (2) to search for associations between BZ craving and other clinical variables in a population of general practice (GP) patients who have made an attempt to discontin

  17. Benzodiazepine receptor-mediated behavioral effects of nitrous oxide in the rat social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quock, R M; Wetzel, P J; Maillefer, R H; Hodges, B L; Curtis, B A; Czech, D A

    1993-09-01

    The present study was conducted to ascertain whether an anxiolytic effect of nitrous oxide was demonstrable in rats using the social interaction test and whether this drug effect might be mediated by benzodiazepine receptors. Compared to behavior of vehicle-pretreated, room air-exposed rats, rat pairs exposed to nitrous oxide showed a generally inverted U-shaped dose-response curve with the maximum increase in social interaction encounters occurring at 25% and significant increase in time of active social interaction at 15-35%; higher concentrations produced a sedative effect that reduced social interaction. Treatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the anxiolytic benzodiazepine chlordiazepoxide also increased social interaction. Pretreatment with 10 mg/kg of the benzodiazepine receptor blocker flumazenil, which alone had no effect, significantly antagonized the social interaction-increasing effects of both nitrous oxide and chlordiazepoxide. In summary, these findings suggest that nitrous oxide produces a flumazenil-sensitive effect comparable to that of chlordiazepoxide and implicate central benzodiazepine mechanisms in mediation of the anxiolytic effect of nitrous oxide.

  18. Social defeat stress switches the neural system mediating benzodiazepine conditioned motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riad-Allen, Lilian; van der Kooy, Derek

    2013-08-01

    Benzodiazepines have been demonstrated to have a high abuse liability in persons suffering from anxiety but have demonstrated mixed abuse liability findings in preclinical models. We hypothesized that by modeling anxiety in a male C57BL/6 mouse model it would be possible to reveal a preference for benzodiazepines within this subpopulation through negative reinforcement. Using the Tube Test of Social Dominance and the Resident/Intruder Paradigm we investigated whether animals identified as dominant or submissive/defeated would differentially display a preference for midazolam (a short acting benzodiazepine) in a conditioned place preference paradigm. Consistent with our hypotheses, benzodiazepine conditioned motivation was mediated by negative reinforcement as submissive but not dominant mice displayed a preference for midazolam. Furthermore, different neural systems mediated midazolam conditioned motivation depending on the stress status of the animal (single vs. repeated stress-as induced by the Resident/Intruder Paradigm). Singly stressed animals showed midazolam place preferences through a dopamine-independent pathway, whereas the place preferences of repeatedly stressed animals were mediated through a dopamine-dependent pathway. This demonstrates that stress is sufficient for switching the neural system mediating midazolam conditioned motivation. Finally, midazolam reinforcement in the conditioned place preference paradigm was shown to be predictive for dominance/submission status.

  19. Improved benzodiazepine radioreceptor assay using the MultiScreen (R) Assay System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, MJ; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, RA

    1999-01-01

    In this article, an improved benzodiazepine radioreceptor assay is described, which allows substantial reduction in assay time, The filtration in this method was performed by using the MultiScreen(R) Assay System. The latter consists of a 96-well plate with glass fibre filters sealed at the bottom,

  20. Comparative Study of Intranasal Midazolam and Intravenous Benzodiazepines in Control of Seizures in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janki Panchal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Seizures are very common in pediatric patients. As duration of seizures impacts morbidity and mortality to child’s life, control of seizures should be achieved as early as possible, preferably at home. Rectal diazepam and intranasal midazolam are available methods for control of seizures and can be learnt by parents. Methods: We assessed safety and efficacy of intranasal midazolam for control of seizures and also compared its effect with other benzodiazepines given by intravenous route. Results: Among 84 patients, success rate of treatment with Midazolam (intranasal was 45.5% and success rate with Benzodiazepines (intravenous was 90%. The difference is statistically significant. In present study, average time recorded to give drug after arrival at hospital in IN Midazolam group was 0.379 min, where as it was 1.598 min in IV Benzodiazepine group. Average time for cessation of seizures after giving drug was 3.001 min in IN Midazolam group, where as it was 1.009 min in IV Benzodiazepine group. Conclusion: Intra-venous route for control of seizures is most effective compare to Inta-nasal Midazolam. However intranasal Midazolam can be use full when IV access is not available at home or during transport of patient to health care centre. [Natl J of Med Res 2013; 3(1.000: 30-33

  1. Long-Term Benzodiazepine Use and Salivary Cortisol The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Leonie; Giltay, Erik J.; van Veen, Tineke; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Vreeburg, Sophie A.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Zitman, Frans G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: As benzodiazepines (BZDs) have anxiolytic effects, it is expected that they influence the stress system. During short-term treatment, BZD use was found to suppress cortisol levels. However, little research has been done on the effects of long-term BZD administration on the hypothalamic-p

  2. Phenylboronic acid catalysed synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepines via cyclocondensation of -phenylenediamine and ketones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santosh V Goswami; Prashant B Thorat; Sudhakar R Bhusare

    2013-07-01

    Phenylboronic acid has been found to be an efficient catalyst for the synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives via cyclocondensation of -phenylenediamine and various ketones in good to excellent yields (82-91%) using acetonitrile as solvent at reflux condition. The remarkable advantages offered by this method are easy mild reaction condition, experimental work up and good to excellent yields of products.

  3. Consumption of benzodiazepines without prescription among first-year nursing students at the University of Guayaquil, school of nursing, Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Nivia Pinos; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the consumption of benzodiazepines without prescription among first-year students from a nursing school of a public University in Ecuador. This is a descriptive, transversal and explanatory study with a quantitative approach. A questionnaire was used for data collection. The population studied was of 181 students. The results showed that 10.5% of the students had consumed benzodiazepine without prescription once in their lives. Of these, 6.1% consumed benzodiazepine in the last year, and 3.9% are currently consuming it. The diazepam was the most consumed BZD without prescription and pharmacies, were the place of higher access. The main reasons for the benzodiazepine consumption were: insomnia, anxiety, stress, depression, family and economical problems. The use of benzodiazepines with non-medicinal purposes is related to problems such as memory loss, retirement syndrome and sedation. When benzodiazepines are consumed jointly with alcohol or other drugs they can lead to coma or death. This study shows the serious consequences benzodiazepines cause when used by nursing students in Ecuador.

  4. Dependence and withdrawal reactions to benzodiazepines and sellective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: How did the health authorities react?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time. METHODS: Documentary study. We searched the web-sites of the European Medicines Agency and the drug agencies in USA......, UK, and Denmark for documents mentioning benzodiazepines or SSRIs. We supplemented with other relevant literature that could contribute to our study. The searches were performed in 2009 in PubMed, Google, BMJ and JAMA. RESULTS: It took many years before the drug regulators acknowledged benzodiazepine...

  5. Scientific calculating peripheral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethridge, C.D.; Nickell, J.D. Jr.; Hanna, W.H.

    1979-09-01

    A scientific calculating peripheral for small intelligent data acquisition and instrumentation systems and for distributed-task processing systems is established with a number-oriented microprocessor controlled by a single component universal peripheral interface microcontroller. A MOS/LSI number-oriented microprocessor provides the scientific calculating capability with Reverse Polish Notation data format. Master processor task definition storage, input data sequencing, computation processing, result reporting, and interface protocol is managed by a single component universal peripheral interface microcontroller.

  6. Neurogenesis in the adult peripheral nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krzysztof Czaja; Michele Fornaro; Stefano Geuna

    2012-01-01

    Most researchers believe that neurogenesis in mature mammals is restricted only to the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle in the central nervous system. In the peripheral nervous system, neurogenesis is thought to be active only during prenatal development, with the exception of the olfactory neuroepithelium. However, sensory ganglia in the adult peripheral nervous system have been reported to contain precursor cells that can proliferate in vitro and be induced to differentiate into neurons. The occurrence of insult-induced neurogenesis, which has been reported by several investigators in the brain, is limited to a few recent reports for the peripheral nervous system. These reports suggest that damage to the adult nervous system induces mechanisms similar to those that control the generation of new neurons during prenatal development. Understanding conditions under which neurogenesis can be induced in physiologically non-neurogenic regions in adults is one of the major challenges for developing therapeutic strategies to repair neurological damage. However, the induced neurogenesis in the peripheral nervous system is still largely unexplored. This review presents the history of research on adult neurogenesis in the peripheral nervous system, which dates back more than 100 years and reveals the evidence on the under estimated potential for generation of new neurons in the adult peripheral nervous system.

  7. DMT1 (IRE) expression in intestinal and erythroid cells is regulated by peripheral benzodiazepine receptor-associated protein 7

    OpenAIRE

    Okazaki, Yasumasa; Ma, Yuxiang; Yeh, Mary; Yin, Hong; Li, Zhen; Yeh, Kwo-yih; Glass, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) is essential for cellular uptake of iron, mediating iron absorption across the duodenal brush border membrane. We have previously shown that with iron feeding DMT1 in the brush border membrane undergoes endocytosis into the subapical compartment of enterocytes. To understand the mechanisms of iron-induced endocytosis of DMT1, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to find proteins that interact with DMT1 and isolated from a rat duodenal cDNA library a prot...

  8. 双氟沙星对异育银鲫血脑屏障渗透性及消除规律%BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER PERMEABILITY OF DIF AND ITS ELIMINATION COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN BRAIN AND PERIPHERAL TISSUES IN CARASSIUS AURATUS GIBELIO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮记明; 胡鲲; 杨先乐; 章海鑫; 王祎; 周爱玲; 赵依妮

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, difloxacin (DIF) which belongs to Fluorine quinolones (FQNS), has become one of the widely used drugs. For aquatic animals, the permeability of DIF getting through blood-brain barrier has not been reported. Using Carassius auratus gibelio as the research object, the blood-brain barrier permeability of DIF and its elimination comparative study between brain and peripheral tissues were conducted with tissue homogenate and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods. The results showed that, at the 96th hour, the content of DIF in brain tissue homogenate was (10.49±0.35) μg/g following its 96 hour median lethal dose (96h LD50); and the existences of DIF in brain could be detected at the 15 time points (0→960h) after the administration with its clinical recommended dosage (20 mg/kg). The results indicated that the DIF could penetrate through the blood-brain barrier into brain of C. auratus gibe-lio. In addition, the elimination process of DIF in brain after the administration of 20 mg/kg was the gentlest one among the tissues involved in this research. The highest content of DIF in brain was (0.392±0.007)μg/g. The highest value was reached at the 960th hour. The longest T1/2βof DIF in brain was 1157.713h. The brain of C. auratus gibelio could be used as a target tissue for DIF residual analysis. Furthermore, according to the regulation of European Union (2003) about the maximum residue limits (MRL) of DIF on food, the withdrawal time of DIF should be longer than 25d under the ex-periment conditions. The results would provide references for blood-brain barrier researching in fish, and for nerve toxi-city explorations of DIF and its clinical application in aquaculture.%以异育银鲫(Carassais auratus gibebio)为研究对象,采用组织匀浆法和高效液相色谱法,研究了双氟沙星(Difloxacin, DIF)通过异育银鲫血脑屏障情况,并比较分析了大脑和外周组织中DIF消除差异。结果显示,根据DIF 96h

  9. Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature for Psychopharmacologic Alternatives to Newer Antidepressants and Benzodiazepines

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, John; Goebert, Deborah; Takeshita, Junji; Lu, Brett Y.; Kang, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common, chronic, and debilitating. Treatment with benzodiazepines and newer antidepressants is often inadequate. This article reviews the effectiveness of alternative and augmenting medications, such as older antidepressants, antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and β-blockers.

  10. Synthesis of substituted 1,4-diazepines and 1,5-benzodiazepines using an efficient heteropolyacid-catalyzed procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaoua, Rachedine; Bennamane, Norah; Bakhta, Saliha; Benadji, Sihame; Rabia, Cherifa; Nedjar-Kolli, Bellara

    2011-01-01

    An efficient and improved procedure for the synthesis of 1,4-diazepine and 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives via the reaction of ketimine intermediates with aldehydes in the presence of Keggin-type heteropolyacids (HPAs) was developed. High yields and short reaction times were obtained for both electron-releasing and electron-withdrawing substituted 1,4-diazepine  and 1,5-benzodiazepines derivatives. PMID:21189457

  11. ELISA Detection of Phenazepam, Etizolam, Pyrazolam, Flubromazepam, Diclazepam and Delorazepam in Blood Using Immunalysis® Benzodiazepine Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Lauren C; Torrance, Hazel J; McKeown, Denise A

    2016-03-01

    Phenazepam and etizolam were the first uncontrolled benzodiazepines available for sale in the UK. Pyrazolam, flubromazepam and diclazepam are not used medicinally anywhere in the world; they are produced exclusively for the uncontrolled, recreational market. It is important to know whether potentially abused drugs like these can be detected in routine toxicological screening tests. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the Immunalysis® Benzodiazepines ELISA kit could detect phenazepam, etizolam, pyrazolam, flubromazepam, diclazepam and its metabolite delorazepam. Their cross-reactivity was assessed by comparing the absorbance of the drug with that of oxazepam, the reference standard. This study found that these uncontrolled benzodiazepines cross-react sufficiently to produce a positive result with the Immunalysis® Benzodiazepine ELISA kit. Cross-reactivity ranged from 79 to 107% for phenazepam, etizolam, pyrazolam, flubromazepam, diclazepam and delorazepam fortified into blood. The results show that it is possible to detect these newer benzodiazepines with traditional forensic toxicology laboratory tools and it is important to include these benzodiazepines in the confirmation tests. PMID:26518230

  12. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; PTA - peripheral artery - discharge; Angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; Balloon angioplasty - peripheral artery- discharge; PAD - PTA ...

  13. Novel Indications for Benzodiazepine Antagonist Flumazenil in GABA Mediated Pathological Conditions of the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Gary; Kelty, Erin; Hood, Sean; Norman, Amanda; Basso, Maria Rita; Reece, Albert Stuart

    2015-01-01

    This review paper discusses the central role of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in diverse physiological systems and functions and the therapeutic potential of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (Ro 15- 1788) for a wide range of disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). Our group and others have studied the potential of flumazenil as a treatment for benzodiazepine dependence. A small but growing body of research has indicated that flumazenil may also have clinical application in CNS disorders such as Parkinson's disease, idiopathic hypersomnia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Despite this body of research the therapeutic potential of flumazenil remains poorly understood and largely unrealized. The purpose of this paper is not to provide an exhaustive review of all possible therapeutic applications for flumazenil but rather to stimulate research interest, and discussion of the exciting therapeutic potential of this drug for a range of chronic debilitating conditions.

  14. Characteristics of benzodiazepine receptors in rats differing in predisposition to experimental alcoholism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burov, Yu.V.; Maiskii, A.I.; Yukhananov, R.Yu.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies the number and affinity of benzodiazepine receptors for diazepam in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of rats differently predisposed to the development of experimental alcoholism. Ethanol was injected once intraperitoneally, in a dose of 2.5 g/kg. Control animals received the same volume of physiological saline. Bound and free N-methyl-tritium-diazepam were separated by means of GF/B filters. The characteristics of benzodiazepine receptors are shown in rats differing in predisposition to the development of experimental alcoholism and in rats during voluntary chronic alcoholization. It is shown that weakening of functional acitivity of the GABA-benzodiazepam complex in animals predisposed to the development of experimental alcoholism is one of the neurochemical mechanisms of development of the abstinence syndrome.

  15. Acute myocardial infarction with multiple coronary thromboses in a young addict of amphetamines and benzodiazepines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al Shehri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old man of average build and a smoker, with a background of a psychiatric disorder, was brought by his neighbor to the emergency department after an hour of severe chest pain. Upon arrival at the hospital he had cardiac arrest, was resuscitated, and moved to the catheterization laboratory with inferior, posterior, and lateral myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography showed an unusual thrombosis in multiple coronary branches. Toxicology report showed high levels of amphetamines and benzodiazepines in the patient’s original blood sample. The patient was kept under ventilation for 18 days, with difficult recovery due to severe withdrawal manifestations, ventilation acquired pneumonia, and rhabdomyolysis inducing acute renal failure. The patient regained near normal left ventricular function after baseline severe regional and global dysfunction. We postulate a relationship between the use of amphetamines, potentiated by benzodiazepines, and occurrence of acute thrombosis of multiple major coronary arteries.

  16. Synthesis of 2-Substituted Benzimidazoles and 1,5-Disubstituted Benzodiazepines on Alumina and Zirconia Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. REKH; A. HAMZA; B. R. VENUGOPAE; N. NAGARAJU

    2012-01-01

    In this study, alumina, zirconia, manganese oxide/alumina, and manganese oxide/zirconia have been investigated for their catalytic activity in the condensation reaction between o-phenylenediamine and an aldehyde or a ketone to synthesise 2-substituted benzimidazoles and 1,5-disubstituted benzodiazepines respectively. Surface area, surface acidity, and morphology of the catalysts have been analysed and correlated with their catalytic activity. The isolated yields of 2-substituted benzimidazoles and 1,5-disubstituted benzodiazepines are in the range of 30% to 95%. A good correlation between the amount of surface acid sites as well as the surface morphology of the catalysts and the catalytic activity has been observed. This method has been found to be simple and economical. The solid supports could be regenerated and reused without much loss in their activity. Further, the solid supports have been also found to be effective as general catalysts in the condensation of o-phenylenediamine with other substituted aldehydes and ketones.

  17. Acute myocardial infarction with multiple coronary thromboses in a young addict of amphetamines and benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shehri, Mohammed A; Youssef, Ali A

    2016-07-01

    A 35-year-old man of average build and a smoker, with a background of a psychiatric disorder, was brought by his neighbor to the emergency department after an hour of severe chest pain. Upon arrival at the hospital he had cardiac arrest, was resuscitated, and moved to the catheterization laboratory with inferior, posterior, and lateral myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography showed an unusual thrombosis in multiple coronary branches. Toxicology report showed high levels of amphetamines and benzodiazepines in the patient's original blood sample. The patient was kept under ventilation for 18 days, with difficult recovery due to severe withdrawal manifestations, ventilation acquired pneumonia, and rhabdomyolysis inducing acute renal failure. The patient regained near normal left ventricular function after baseline severe regional and global dysfunction. We postulate a relationship between the use of amphetamines, potentiated by benzodiazepines, and occurrence of acute thrombosis of multiple major coronary arteries. PMID:27358538

  18. p-Nitrobenzoic acid promoted synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varala, Ravi; Enugala, Ramu; Adapa, Srinivas R. [Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad (India)]. E-mail: rvarala_iict@yahoo.co.in

    2007-03-15

    p-Nitrobenzoic acid was found to be the versatile Bronsted organic acid promoter among the carboxylic acids tested for the preparation of 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives from a wide range of substituted o-phenylenediamines and ketones. The corresponding products were obtained in good isolated yields (62-92%) under mild conditions using acetonitrile as solvent at ambient temperature. Further, the reagent could be easily recovered and reused. (author00.

  19. Gaining insight into benzodiazepine prescribing in General Practice in France: a data-based study.

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Le Vaillant; Rosman Sophia; Nathalie Pelletier-Fleury

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In recent decades, benzodiazepine (BZD) prescriptions have been called into question in most European countries by physicians and health authorities alike, and guidelines on medical indications and treatment duration have been established to avoid long-term use and dependency. In France, many public policy measures have been implemented as BZDs are among the most prescribed medications. General practitioners (GPs) were identified by the Caisse d'Assurance Maladie (the Fren...

  20. The combinatorial synthesis and chemical and biological evaluation of a 1,4-benzodiazepine library.

    OpenAIRE

    Bunin, B A; Plunkett, M J; Ellman, J A

    1994-01-01

    A library of 192 structurally diverse 1,4-benzodiazepine derivatives containing a variety of chemical functionalities including amides, carboxylic acids, amines, phenols, and indoles was constructed from three components, 2-aminobenzophenones, amino acids, and alkylating agents, by employing Geysen's pin apparatus [Geysen, H. M., Rodda, S. J., Mason, T. J., Tribbick, G. & Schoofs, P. G. (1987) J. Immunol. Methods 102, 259-274]. Rigorous analytical verification of the chemical integrity and yi...

  1. The GABA-A benzodiazepine receptor complex: Role of pet and spect in neurology and psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) for selective depiction of GABA-A-benzodiazepine receptor (GBZR) binding are complementary investigations in the diagnostic process of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review summarizes the current knowledge about options and limitations of PET and SPECT for in vivo diagnostics in neurology and psychiatry. The growing importance of GBZR-imaging for the understanding of pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment in different psychiatric syndromes is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Baclofen in the short-term maintenance treatment of benzodiazepine dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Lekhansh Shukla; Arun Kandasamy; Muralidharan Kesavan; Vivek Benegal

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence is a significant public health problem. Apart from the long-term tapering doses of BZD, no others drugs are available for the maintenance treatment of BZD dependence. Baclofen has been used in alcohol and other drug dependence as long-term anti-craving agent. Since alcohol and BZD act through the GABA receptor, we attempted to study the effect of Baclofen as maintenance treatment in a series of five cases with BZD dependence.

  3. Baclofen in the short-term maintenance treatment of benzodiazepine dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekhansh Shukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepine (BZD dependence is a significant public health problem. Apart from the long-term tapering doses of BZD, no others drugs are available for the maintenance treatment of BZD dependence. Baclofen has been used in alcohol and other drug dependence as long-term anti-craving agent. Since alcohol and BZD act through the GABA receptor, we attempted to study the effect of Baclofen as maintenance treatment in a series of five cases with BZD dependence.

  4. Differential interactions engendered by benzodiazepine and neuroactive steroid combinations on schedule-controlled responding in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Barak W; Platt, Donna M; Rowlett, James K

    2015-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are positive allosteric modulators of the GABAA receptor and are prescribed as anxiolytics, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants. While these drugs clearly have clinical value, their use is associated with unwanted side effects such as sedation and motor impairment. Neuroactive steroids are endogenous modulators of GABAA receptors and recent evidence has shown that combinations of the triazolo-benzodiazepine triazolam and the endogenous neuroactive steroid pregnanolone can produce both supra-additive anxiolytic effects and infra-additive reinforcing effects. In the present study, we investigated these same combinations as well as combinations of two clinically-relevant drugs from different chemical classes, the 1, 4 substituted (7-nitro) benzodiazepine clonazepam and the synthetic neuroactive steroid ganaxolone, in rats trained under a 10-response, fixed ratio (FR) schedule of food reinforcement. All four drugs induced a significant and dose-dependent suppression of food-maintained responding. From the dose-response functions, ED50s (i.e., the doses that engendered 50% of the maximum rate-decreasing effect) were generated for each drug. Dose-response functions for combinations of triazolam/pregnanolone, clonazepam/ganaxolone, triazolam/ganaxolone, and clonazepam/pregnanolone were then determined. Isobolographic analysis of the rate-decreasing effects of these combinations revealed that the potencies of the triazolam/pregnanolone combinations were supra-additive while the clonazepam/ganaxolone combinations were additive or infra-additive in relation to predicted values based on dose-additive effects. Furthermore, mixtures of clonazepam/pregnanolone were supra-additive while triazolam/ganaxolone combinations were additive, infra-additive and supra-additive. These results suggest that the ability of benzodiazepine and neuroactive steroid combinations to attenuate rates of food-maintained responding depends critically on both the constituent drugs and the

  5. Clonazepam as Agonist Substitution Treatment for Benzodiazepine Dependence: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo Giovanni Icro Maremmani; Luca Rovai; Fabio Rugani; Silvia Bacciardi; Matteo Pacini; Liliana Dell'Osso; Icro Maremmani

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, the misuse of benzodiazepines (BZDs) is a cause for a serious concern among pharmacologically inexperienced patients, whether treated or untreated, that could lead to significant complications, including tolerance, dependence, and addiction. We present a case report in which an Italian patient affected by anxiety disorder and treated with BZDs presented a severe case of dependence on BZDs. We treated him according to an agonist substitution approach, switching from the abused BZD to...

  6. Benzodiazepine receptor quantification in Huntington's disease with [123I]iomazenil and SPECT

    OpenAIRE

    Pinborg, L; Videbak, C; Hasselbalch, S; Sorensen, S.; Wagner, A; Paulson, O; Knudsen, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Increasing evidence suggests that metabolic changes predate neuronal death in Huntington's disease and emission tomography methods (PET and SPECT) have shown changes in glucose consumption and receptor function in early and possibly even presymptomatic disease. Because the GABAA-benzodiazepine receptor complex (BZR) is expressed on virtually all cerebral neurons BZR density images may be used to detect neuronal death. In this study the regional cerebral [123...

  7. Benzodiazepine discontinuation among community-dwelling older people: a population-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, J Simon; Lavikainen, Piia; Korhonen, Mikko; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2010-01-01

    Benzodiazepine discontinuation among community-dwelling older people: a population-based cohort study fax: +358-171-62424 (Bell, J. Simon) (Bell, J. Simon) Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland - P.O. Box 1627 - 70211 - Kuopio - FINLAND (Bell, J. Simon) Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Unit, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland - Kuopio - FINLAND (Bell, J. Simon) ...

  8. Memory Effects of Benzodiazepines: Memory Stages and Types Versus Binding-Site Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav M. Savic

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines are well established as inhibitory modulators of memory processing. This effect is especially prominent when applied before the acquisition phase of a memory task. This minireview concentrates on the putative subtype selectivity of the acquisition-impairing action of benzodiazepines. Namely, recent genetic studies and standard behavioral tests employing subtype-selective ligands pointed to the predominant involvement of two subtypes of benzodiazepine binding sites in memory modulation. Explicit memory learning seems to be affected through the GABAA receptors containing the α1 and α5 subunits, whereas the effects on procedural memory can be mainly mediated by the α1 subunit. The pervading involvement of the α1 subunit in memory modulation is not at all unexpected because this subunit is the major subtype, present in 60% of all GABAA receptors. On the other hand, the role of α5 subunits, mainly expressed in the hippocampus, in modulating distinct forms of memory gives promise of selective pharmacological coping with certain memory deficit states.

  9. Diagnostic Performance of Triagetrade mark for Benzodiazepines: Urine Analysis of the Dose of Therapeutic Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurisaki, Emiko; Hayashida, Makiko; Nihira, Makoto; Ohno, Youkichi; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Okano, Takaaki; Niwa, Shin-Ichi; Hiraiwa, Kouichi

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic performance of Triage for benzodiazepines in 74 urine specimens from outpatients given therapeutic doses of benzodiazepines and compared the results of EMIT assays. Results obtained in all urine samples were confirmed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Overall agreement between results of Triage and EMIT assays was 73%. All of the Triage-positive samples were also positive by EMIT assays. Results of Triage and EMIT assays were different for 20 samples obtained from patients given thienodiazepines (etizolam, brotizolam, and clotiazepam) and nitrobenzodiazepines (nitrazepam, flunitrazepam, and clonazepam). LC-MS confirmed parent drugs in urine specimens, consistent with the prescriptions of drugs. The low agreement between Triage and EMIT results in this study might be due to low sensitivity of Triage for thienodiazepines. Thienodiazines are frequently prescribed benzodiazepines, and Triage panel is the most frequently used screening kit in Japan. It should be noted that negative results obtained by a Triage test might not mean the absence of thienodiazepines. PMID:16297284

  10. Diagnostic performance of Triage for benzodiazepines: urine analysis of the dose of therapeutic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurisaki, Emiko; Hayashida, Makiko; Nihira, Makoto; Ohno, Youkichi; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Okano, Takaaki; Niwa, Shin-ichi; Hiraiwa, Kouichi

    2005-09-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic performance of Triage for benzodiazepines in 74 urine specimens from outpatients given therapeutic doses of benzodiazepines and compared the results of EMIT assays. Results obtained in all urine samples were confirmed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Overall agreement between results of Triage and EMIT assays was 73%. All of the Triage-positive samples were also positive by EMIT assays. Results of Triage and EMIT assays were different for 20 samples obtained from patients given thienodiazepines (etizolam, brotizolam, and clotiazepam) and nitrobenzodiazepines (nitrazepam, flunitrazepam, and clonazepam). LC-MS confirmed parent drugs in urine specimens, consistent with the prescriptions of drugs. The low agreement between Triage and EMIT results in this study might be due to low sensitivity of Triage for thienodiazepines. Thienodiazines are frequently prescribed benzodiazepines, and Triage panel is the most frequently used screening kit in Japan. It should be noted that negative results obtained by a Triage test might not mean the absence of thienodiazepines. PMID:16168176

  11. Paradoxical Akathisia Caused by Clonazepam, Clorazepate and Lorazepam in Patients with Traumatic Encephalopathy and Seizure Disorders: A Subtype of Benzodiazepine-Induced Disinhibition?

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, A B; Wroblewski, B A

    1993-01-01

    Akathisia is frequently reported to be caused by neuroleptic drugs and sometimes by certain other agents such as fluoxetine. Benzodiazepines are a common treatment. The principal mechanism of akathisia is thought to be neurochemical, probably dopaminergic with serotonin also playing an important role. It is not usually thought to be related to benzodiazepine-caused disinhibition. Four episodes of atypical or paradoxical benzodiazepine-induced akathisia in three patients are reported and analy...

  12. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  13. [Peripheral ulcerative keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamate, Alina-cristina; Avram, Corina Ioana; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative keratitis is frequently associated with collagen vascular diseases and presents a predilection for peripheral corneal localization, due to the distinct morphologic and immunologic features of the limbal conjunctiva, which provides access for the circulating immune complexes to the peripheral cornea via the capillary network. Deposition of immune complexes in the terminal ends of limbal vessels initiates an immune-mediated vasculitis process, with inflammatory cells and mediators involvement by alteration of the vascular permeability. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis generally correlates with exacerbations of the background autoimmune systemic disease. Associated sceritis, specially the necrotizing form, is usually observed in severe cases, which may evolve in corneal perforation and loss of vision. Although the first-line of treatment in acute phases is represented by systemic administration of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents are necessary for the treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with systemic diseases.

  14. Electrodiagnosis of peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mark A

    2012-05-01

    Electrodiagnostic studies are an important component of the evaluation of patients with suspected peripheral nerve disorders. The pattern of findings and the features that are seen on the motor and sensory nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography can help to identify the type of neuropathy, define the underlying pathophysiology (axonal or demyelinating), and ultimately help to narrow the list of possible causes. This article reviews the electrodiagnostic approach to and interpretation of findings in patients with peripheral neuropathies.

  15. Peripheral tumors alter neuroinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide in female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Pyter, Leah M.; Bih, Sarah El Mouatassim; Sattar, Husain; Prendergast, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is associated with an increased prevalence of depression. Peripheral tumors induce inflammatory cytokine production in the brain and depressive-like behaviors. Mounting evidence indicates that cytokines are part of a pathway by which peripheral inflammation causes depression. Neuroinflammatory responses to immune challenges can be exacerbated (primed) by prior immunological activation associated with aging, early-life infection, and drug exposure. This experiment tested the hypothesis ...

  16. Efeitos de derivados benzodiazepines na epilepsia: estudos eletrencefalográficos longitudinais The effects of benzodiazepine dérivâtes in epilepsies: longitudinal electroencephalographic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Pierre Lison

    1970-09-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudadas as modificações do quadro eletrencefalográfico em 24 crianças com manifestações epilépticas diárias, tratadas com derivados da benzodiazepina. O conjunto dos fenômenos eletrencefalográficos observados durante os seguimentos terapêuticos longitudinais traduz uma modificação importante dos mecanismos subcorticais envolvidos na gênese das crises convulsivas e na produção das descargas paroxísticas. Os fatos observados coadunam-se com a teoria de uma ação benzodiazepínica sobre o sistema reticular talâmico inespecífico. A ação benzodiazepínica predomina sobre o sistema de inibição ativo anexo ao sistema de projeção talamocortical. Discute-se ainda se essa ação se faz diretamente, através de formações quimiosensíveis existentes no seio do sistema reticular talâmico e/ou indiretamente, pela depressão de certas estruturas do sistema límbico, modificando desta forma o "feed-back" de importantes circuitos subcorticais que podem influenciar os neurônios centrencefálicos hiperexcitáveis.The modifications of the electroencephalic patterns in 24 childrens with daily epileptic seizures treated by benzodiazepine derivatives were studied. The electroencephalographic findings during the longitudinal therapeutic follow-ups disclose important modifications of the subcortical mechanisms involved in the production of the convulsive seizures and paroxistical discharges. These facts are in accordance with the hypothesis that benzodiazepine derivatives act upon the non-specific thalamic reticular system. The benzodiazepine derivatives are more active upon the inhibitory system related to the thalamocortical projection system. Two hypothesis are discussed: 1 — the drugs act upon chemoreceptors present in the thalamic reticular system; 2 — the act indirectly, depressing some elements of the limbic system and modifying in this way the feed-back of subcortical circuits which discharge upon hyperactive

  17. What will this do to me and my brain? Ethical issues in brain-to-brain interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildt, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Recent brain-to-brain interfacing studies provide proof of principle for the feasibility of various forms of direct information transfer between two brains, and may lead to the development of new approaches involving memory, emotions, or senses. What makes brain-to-brain interfaces unique is the transfer of information representing specific messages directly from one brain to another, without involving any activity of the peripheral nervous system or senses. The article discusses ethical issues that arise in neural interfacing. The focus is on the implications that brain-to-brain interfaces may have on the individual at the recipient side. PMID:25762903

  18. Peripheral neuroepithelioma of the kidney.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, K W; Ha, D. H.; Jung, W. H.

    1995-01-01

    Peripheral neuroepithelioma is a rare tumor, comprising less than 1% of all soft tissue malignancies arising from the peripheral nonautonomic nervous system. Most peripheral neuroepitheliomas reported were located in the extremities, thoraco-pulmonary region, and pelvic areas, and as many as 30% of cases were associated with peripheral nerve. We report one case of peripheral neuroepithelioma arising in the kidney, mimicking renal cell carcinoma on the CT scan.

  19. [Pilot study on prescription of benzodiazepines in Switzerland: does cognitive availability of legal rules affect medical prescribing behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, U; Lerch, S; Rehm, J; Crotti, C

    2004-01-01

    All 481 prescriptions of benzodiazepines from five Zurich pharmacies during a 6 week period were evaluated with respect to their compliance with the Swiss Law on Narcotics, which was formulated to prevent benzodiazepine dependence. Three weeks into the study, all 17 physicians with prescriptions of benzodiazepines practising in the catchment areas of two of the five pharmacies randomly selected were faxed an information sheet explaining formal juridical requirements for benzodiazepine prescription stipulated by the law. 28 % of all prescriptions were not compliant with the law. The older a patient, the greater his/her risk of receiving a non-compliant prescription. Neither sex of patients nor professional specialization of the prescribing doctor did impact prescription compliance. The preventive intervention, i. e. information on legal requirements, also had no significant impact on the compliance of prescriptions with the law. As other studies with soft interventions and educational measures directed to the prescribing physician also failed to reduce inappropriate prescription of benzodiazepines, it is concluded that sanctions against incompliant prescription behaviour should be considered as a preventive alternative. PMID:15372350

  20. 外周手术创伤致中枢炎症中血脑屏障的改变与术后认知功能障碍的关系%The role of blood brain barrier in the causing of central inflammation after peripheral surgery and the relationship with postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张祥; 董洪权; 钱燕宁

    2015-01-01

    背景 中枢炎症是术后认知功能障碍(postoperative cognitive dysfunction,POCD)的主要病理机制之一.而血脑屏障(blood brain barrier,BBB)结构和功能完整性的破坏在外周手术创伤后发生中枢炎症中发挥着不可或缺的作用.外周创伤后通过各种途径破坏BBB的完整性,导致BBB通透性的改变,引起和扩大中枢炎症,从而影响学习记忆和认知能力. 目的 探讨BBB在外周致中枢炎症中发挥的作用及其与认知功能的关系. 内容 主要从3个方面进行论述:中枢炎症与POCD的关系、BBB在外周致中枢炎症中的作用、BBB通透性的改变及其参与者. 趋向 中枢炎症是POCD的主要病理机制之一.BBB是外周手术致中枢炎症中起关键作用,但外周手术后BBB的变化及其与中枢炎症和认知的具体关系尚不清楚.%Background The central inflammatory response plays an important role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD).The disruption of blood brain barrier (BBB) play a key role in central inflammation after the peripheral surgical trauma.The inflammatory cytokines disrupt the integrity of BBB through a variety of pathway,thus causing and expanding the central inflammatory,affecting learning and cognitive abilities.Objective To investigate the role of BBB in central inflammation after the peripheral surgical trauma and the relationship with cognitive function.Content Reviewed mainly from three aspects:the relationship of central inflammation with POCD,the role of BBB in central inflammation induced by peripheral inflammation,the participants that involved in the change of BBB permeability.Trend The central inflammatory response plays an important role in POCD.BBB play a key rule in central inflammation induced by peripheral operation But the pathological change of BBB,and its exactly relationship with central inflammation are still unclear.

  1. Differential effects of benzodiazepines on phospholipid methylation in hippocampus and cerebellum of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacconi, M.T.; Salmona, M.

    1988-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between the occupancy of BDZ binding sites and phospholipid methylation in brain, the authors examined phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) activity in synaptosomes of rat hippocampi and cerebella in the presence of BDZ ligands with different modes of action. We found that Ro 5-4864, a specific ligand for peripheral type receptors, increased PL methylation in hippocampal and cerebellar synaptosomes. This effect was directly related to receptor occupancy, since the specific antagonist PK11195 inhibited the rise in PEMT activity induced by Ro 5-4864. Clonazepam, on the other hand, tended to reduce PL production in cerebellum and hippocampus except for hiccocampal (/sup 3/H)-phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine which was elevated by 40 to 70% at doses ranging from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/M. When equimolar concentrations of the antagonist Ro 15-1788 were given in association the clonazepam-induced phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine increase was reduced by 70%. These data support the involvement of structural and functional membrane alterations in the action of BDZ. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Differential effects of benzodiazepines on phospholipid methylation in hippocampus and cerebellum of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To elucidate the relationship between the occupancy of BDZ binding sites and phospholipid methylation in brain, the authors examined phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) activity in synaptosomes of rat hippocampi and cerebella in the presence of BDZ ligands with different modes of action. We found that Ro 5-4864, a specific ligand for peripheral type receptors, increased PL methylation in hippocampal and cerebellar synaptosomes. This effect was directly related to receptor occupancy, since the specific antagonist PK11195 inhibited the rise in PEMT activity induced by Ro 5-4864. Clonazepam, on the other hand, tended to reduce PL production in cerebellum and hippocampus except for hiccocampal (3H)-phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine which was elevated by 40 to 70% at doses ranging from 10-9 to 10-6M. When equimolar concentrations of the antagonist Ro 15-1788 were given in association the clonazepam-induced phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine increase was reduced by 70%. These data support the involvement of structural and functional membrane alterations in the action of BDZ. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  3. Alcohol involvement in opioid pain reliever and benzodiazepine drug abuse-related emergency department visits and drug-related deaths - United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher M; Paulozzi, Leonard J; Mack, Karin A

    2014-10-10

    The abuse of prescription drugs has led to a significant increase in emergency department (ED) visits and drug-related deaths over the past decade. Opioid pain relievers (OPRs) and benzodiazepines are the prescription drugs most commonly involved in these events. Excessive alcohol consumption also accounts for a significant health burden and is common among groups that report high rates of prescription drug abuse. When taken with OPRs or benzodiazepines, alcohol increases central nervous system depression and the risk for overdose. Data describing alcohol involvement in OPR or benzodiazepine abuse are limited. To quantify alcohol involvement in OPR and benzodiazepine abuse and drug-related deaths and to inform prevention efforts, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and CDC analyzed 2010 data for drug abuse-related ED visits in the United States and drug-related deaths that involved OPRs and alcohol or benzodiazepines and alcohol in 13 states. The analyses showed alcohol was involved in 18.5% of OPR and 27.2% of benzodiazepine drug abuse-related ED visits and 22.1% of OPR and 21.4% of benzodiazepine drug-related deaths. These findings indicate that alcohol plays a significant role in OPR and benzodiazepine abuse. Interventions to reduce the abuse of alcohol and these drugs alone and in combination are needed.

  4. Objective and subjective sleep quality: Melatonin versus placebo add-on treatment in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder withdrawing from long-term benzodiazepine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baandrup, Lone; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2016-06-30

    Benzodiazepines are frequently long-term prescribed for the treatment of patients with severe mental illness. This prescribing practice is problematic because of well-described side effects including risk of dependence. We examined the efficacy of prolonged-release melatonin on objective and subjective sleep quality during benzodiazepine discontinuation and whether sleep variables were associated with benzodiazepine withdrawal. Eligible patients included adults with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder and long-term use of benzodiazepines in combination with antipsychotics. All participants gradually tapered the use of benzodiazepines after randomization to add-on treatment with melatonin versus placebo. Here we report a subsample of 23 patients undergoing sleep recordings (one-night polysomnography) and 55 patients participating in subjective sleep quality ratings. Melatonin had no effect on objective sleep efficiency, but significantly improved self-reported sleep quality. Reduced benzodiazepine dosage at the 24-week follow-up was associated with a significantly decreased proportion of stage 2 sleep. These results indicate that prolonged-release melatonin has some efficacy for self-reported sleep quality after gradual benzodiazepine dose reduction, and that benzodiazepine discontinuation is not associated with rebound insomnia in medicated patients with severe mental illness. However, these findings were limited by a small sample size and a low retention rate. PMID:27107670

  5. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Sulfamide and Triazole Benzodiazepines as Novel p53-MDM2 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Yu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of sulfamide and triazole benzodiazepines were obtained with the principle of bioisosterism. The p53-murine double minute 2 (MDM2 inhibitory activity and in vitro antitumor activity were evaluated. Most of the novel benzodiazepines exhibited moderate protein binding inhibitory activity. Particularly, triazole benzodiazepines showed good inhibitory activity and antitumor potency. Compound 16 had promising antitumor activity against the U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cell line with an IC50 value of 4.17 μM, which was much better than that of nutlin-3. The molecular docking model also successfully predicted that this class of compounds mimicked the three critical residues of p53 binding to MDM2.

  6. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Sulfamide and Triazole Benzodiazepines as Novel p53-MDM2 Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiliang; Zhuang, Chunlin; Wu, Yuelin; Guo, Zizhao; Li, Jin; Dong, Guoqiang; Yao, Jianzhong; Sheng, Chunquan; Miao, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Wannian

    2014-01-01

    A series of sulfamide and triazole benzodiazepines were obtained with the principle of bioisosterism. The p53-murine double minute 2 (MDM2) inhibitory activity and in vitro antitumor activity were evaluated. Most of the novel benzodiazepines exhibited moderate protein binding inhibitory activity. Particularly, triazole benzodiazepines showed good inhibitory activity and antitumor potency. Compound 16 had promising antitumor activity against the U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cell line with an IC50 value of 4.17 μM, which was much better than that of nutlin-3. The molecular docking model also successfully predicted that this class of compounds mimicked the three critical residues of p53 binding to MDM2. PMID:25198897

  7. Detection and identification of the designer benzodiazepine flubromazepam and preliminary data on its metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Huppertz, Laura M; Hutter, Melanie; Buchwald, Armin; Ferlaino, Sascha; Auwärter, Volker

    2013-11-01

    The appearance of pyrazolam in Internet shops selling 'research chemicals' in 2012 marked the beginning of designer benzodiazepines being sold as recreational drugs or 'self medication'. With recent changes in national narcotics laws in many countries, where two uncontrolled benzodiazepines (phenazepam and etizolam), which were marketed by pharmaceutical companies in some countries, were scheduled, clandestine laboratories seem to turn to poorly characterized research drug candidates as legal substitutes. Following the appearance of pyrazolam, it comes with no surprise that recently, flubromazepam (7-bromo-5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one), a second designer benzodiazepine, was offered on the market. In this article, this new compound was characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight MS (LC-Q-ToF-MS). Additionally, a study was carried out, in which one of the authors consumed 4 mg of flubromazepam to gain preliminary data on the pharmacokinetic properties and the metabolism of this compound. For this purpose, serum as well as urine samples were collected for up to 31 days post-ingestion and analyzed applying LC-MS/MS and LC-Q-ToF-MS techniques. On the basis of this study, flubromazepam appears to have an extremely long elimination half-life of more than 100 h. One monohydroxylated compound and the debrominated compound could be identified as the predominant metabolites, the first allowing a detection of a consumption for up to 28 days post-ingestion when analyzing urine samples in our case. Additionally, various immunochemical assays were evaluated, showing that the cross-reactivity of the used assay seems not to be sufficient for safe detection of the applied dose in urine samples, bearing the risk that it could be misused in drug-withdrawal settings or in other circumstances requiring

  8. Distinct BOLD activation profiles following central and peripheral oxytocin administration in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig F Ferris

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature has suggested that intranasal oxytocin (OT or other systemic routes of administration can alter prosocial behavior, presumably by directly activating OT sensitive neural circuits in the brain. Yet there is no clear evidence that OT given peripherally can cross the blood-brain-barrier at levels sufficient to engage the OT receptor. To address this issue we examined changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal intensity in response to peripheral OT injections (0.1, 0.5 or 2.5 mg/kg during functional magnetic resonance (fMRI in awake rats imaged at 7.0 tesla. These data were compared to OT (1ug/5 µl given directly to the brain via the lateral cerebroventricle. Using a 3D annotated MRI atlas of the rat brain segmented into 171 brain areas and computational analysis we reconstructed the distributed integrated neural circuits identified with BOLD fMRI following central and peripheral OT. Both routes of administration caused significant changes in BOLD signal within the first 10 min of administration. As expected, central OT activated a majority of brain areas known to express a high density of OT receptors e.g., lateral septum, subiculum, shell of the accumbens, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This profile of activation was not matched by peripheral OT. The change in BOLD signal to peripheral OT did not show any discernible dose-response. Interestingly, peripheral OT affected all subdivisions of the olfactory bulb, in addition to the cerebellum and several brainstem areas relevant to the autonomic nervous system, including the solitary tract nucleus. The results from this imaging study do not support a direct central action of peripheral OT on the brain. Instead, the patterns of brain activity suggest that peripheral OT may interact at the level of the olfactory bulb and through sensory afferents from the autonomic nervous system to influence brain activity.

  9. [The use of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs for patients with sleeping problems - A survey among hospital doctors and nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, V; Heinemann, S; Himmel, W; Nau, R; Hummers-Pradier, E

    2016-07-01

    Aim | Benzodiazepines and Z-drugs are frequently prescribed sleep medications in spite of their poor risk-benefit ratio when used over a longer period of time. The aim of the study was to find out how the medical and nursing staff in a general hospital estimated the frequency of use for these drugs, and the risk-benefit ratio for elderly patients as well as the factors which positively influence the perceived use of these drugs. Methods | All members of the medical and nursing staff of a hospital received a questionnaire about their use of, and attitudes towards, benzodiazepines and Z-drugs. Absolute and relative frequencies were calculated to estimate the perceived frequency of use and the risk-benefit ratio. Multiple logistic regressions were used to analyze which factors are associated with a perceived high use of benzodiazepines or Z-drugs for insomnia. Results | More nurses than hospital doctors believed that they dispensed benzodiazepines often or always (57 % vs. 29 %) to patients with insomnia; this was also the case for Z-drugs (66 % vs. 29 %). Nearly half of the hospital doctors and 29 % of the nurses perceived more harms than benefits for benzodiazepines in the elderly. The following factors were associated with a high perceived usage of Z-drugs: working as a nurse (OR: 13,95; 95%-CI: 3,87-50,28), working in a non-surgical department (5,41; 2,00-14,61), having nursing staff perceived the frequency of prescription of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs and the risk-benefit ratio in different ways. Other aspects, such as working in a non-surgical department or having a smaller amount of working experience may also influence the decision to use Z-drugs. PMID:27359319

  10. Backgrounded but not peripheral

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovmark, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    -cultural construction of identity, and, as a matter of fact, that their role might be quite important. I argue that the DDAs are backgrounded but not peripheral, i.e. marginal or insignificant. And I introduce the notion of “contextualization cue” in this argument (Levinson, 2003a, Gumperz, 1992)....

  11. [A peripheral osteoma].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mizbah, K.; Soehardi, A.; Maal, T.J.J.; Weijs, W.L.J.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Barkhuysen, R.

    2012-01-01

    A 43-year-old man appeared with a painless, asymptomatic swelling on the left side of his neck, which had existed for years and had slowly been progressing. After surgical removal, it became clear that it had to do with a peripheral osteoma. This is a benign lesion with a low incidence. Generally, c

  12. Glutamate in peripheral organs: Biology and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jie; Li, Xiao-Hui; Li, Yuan-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Glutamate is a versatile molecule existing in both the central nervous system and peripheral organs. Previous studies have mainly focussed on the biological effect of glutamate in the brain. Recently, abundant evidence has demonstrated that glutamate also participates in the regulation of physiopathological functions in peripheral tissues, including the lung, kidney, liver, heart, stomach and immune system, where the glutamate/glutamate receptor/glutamate transporter system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of certain diseases, such as myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury and acute gastric mucosa injury. All these findings provide new insight into the biology and pharmacology of glutamate and suggest a potential therapeutic role of glutamate in non-neurological diseases. PMID:27164423

  13. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange VA presumes Veterans' early-onset peripheral neuropathy is related to their exposure to Agent Orange or other herbicides during service when the disease ...

  14. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial ...

  15. Prescription patterns of benzodiazepines in the Lebanese adult population: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan WH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wijdan H Ramadan,1 Ghada M El Khoury,1 Mary E Deeb,2 Marwan Sheikh-Taha1 1School of Pharmacy, 2School of Medicine, Lebanese American University, Byblos, Lebanon Abstract: This study assessed the profile of benzodiazepine (BDZ users in Lebanon. Adult patients visiting the pharmacies with prescriptions of BDZs were included in the study. Seven hundred and eighty-six current BDZ users were included, of whom 54.2% were females. Twenty-three percent reported being alcohol consumers and were mostly males. The two most commonly used BDZs were alprazolam (34.6% and bromazepam (33.6%. The indication for use was mainly anxiety (44.4%, insomnia (22.5%, and depression (15.9%. The prescribing physicians were primarily psychiatrists (43.2%, followed by general practitioners (29.7%. Forty percent had been taking the drug for more than a year. Among those using BDZs for at least 1 month, 35.5% increased the dose with time. Thirty-three percent reported having experienced side effects. Eighteen patients (2.3% reported taking more than one BDZ concomitantly, while 18.3% were taking drugs that should not be prescribed along with BDZs. In conclusion, the use of BDZs is highest among females, especially for the treatment of anxiety. Moreover, continuous use of the drugs for more than a year as well as significant potential drug interactions was identified. Keywords: benzodiazepines, prescribing patterns, controlled substances 

  16. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.

  17. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with 3H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 μM. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table

  18. Origin of pain in migraine: evidence for peripheral sensitisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Burstein, Rami; Ashina, Messoud;

    2009-01-01

    , in our view, neuronal hyperexcitability depends on activation of peripheral nociceptors. Although the onset of a migraine attack might take place in deep-brain structures, some evidence indicates that the headache phase depends on nociceptive input from perivascular sensory nerve terminals. The input...

  19. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  20. Peripheral giant cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padam Narayan Tandon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma or the so-called "giant cell epulis" is the most common oral giant cell lesion. It normally presents as a soft tissue purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in a background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. This lesion probably does not represent a true neoplasm, but rather may be reactive in nature, believed to be stimulated by local irritation or trauma, but the cause is not certainly known. This article reports a case of peripheral giant cell granuloma arising at the maxillary anterior region in a 22-year-old female patient. The lesion was completely excised to the periosteum level and there is no residual or recurrent swelling or bony defect apparent in the area of biopsy after a follow-up period of 6 months.

  1. Painful peripheral neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Bo; Xu-sheng HUANG

    2013-01-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy (PPN) is characterized by neuropathic pain (NP), which is accompanied by dysfunction of motor, sensory and autonomic nervous system. It always involves small nerve fibers, including A δ and C fibers. PPN can be classified into two types according to etiology: hereditary and acquired. Pain of PPN can manifest as spontaneous pain and stimulus-evoked pain (allodynia, hyperalgesia and hyperpathia). The manifestation of typical cases is length-dependent, which firstly...

  2. Peripheral Realism Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Schenoni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article we summarize the precepts of Peripheral Realism, its place in the intellectual history of International Relations Theory, its contributions to interpreting Latin American international politics and its insights for the future. After revising the intellectual merits and tenets of the theory in the four initial sections, we show how it predicted the behavior of Latin American states under unipolarity. Finally, we review its implications for a world where China may hold economic primacy.

  3. Peripheral Realism Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Schenoni; Carlos Escudé

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this article we summarize the precepts of Peripheral Realism, its place in the intellectual history of International Relations Theory, its contributions to interpreting Latin American international politics and its insights for the future. After revising the intellectual merits and tenets of the theory in the four initial sections, we show how it predicted the behavior of Latin American states under unipolarity. Finally, we review its implications for a world where China may hold ...

  4. Brain plasticity and hand function

    OpenAIRE

    Björkman, Anders

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the effects of cortical reorganisational changes following experimental deafferentation and peripheral nerve injury and apply the concept of brain plasticity to enhance sensory re-education following peripheral nerve injury and repair in the hand. In the first two papers the effects on hand function of contralateral deafferentation was investigated. Tourniquet induced anaesthesia (paper I) resulted in significant improvement in perception of to...

  5. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of infants exposed prenatally to buprenorphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the brains of newborns exposed to buprenorphine prenatally. Material and Methods: Seven neonates followed up antenatally in connection with their mothers' buprenorphine replacement therapy underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain before the age of 2 months. The infants were born to heavy drug abusers. Four mothers were hepatitis C positive, and all were HIV negative. All mothers smoked tobacco and used benzodiazepines. All pregnancies were full term, and no perinatal asphyxia occurred. All but one neonate had abstinence syndrome and needed morphine replacement therapy. Results: Neither structural abnormalities nor abnormalities in signal intensity were recorded. Conclusion: Buprenorphine replacement therapy does not seem to cause any major structural abnormalities of the brain, and it may prevent known hypoxic-ischemic brain changes resulting from uncontrolled drug abuse. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess possible abnormalities in the brain maturation process

  6. Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükali, Cem Ismail; Kürtüncü, Murat; Akçay, Halil İbrahim; Tüzün, Erdem; Öge, Ali Emre

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH) syndromes can be subclassified as primary and secondary. The main primary PNH syndromes are neuromyotonia, cramp-fasciculation syndrome (CFS), and Morvan's syndrome, which cause widespread symptoms and signs without the association of an evident peripheral nerve disease. Their major symptoms are muscle twitching and stiffness, which differ only in severity between neuromyotonia and CFS. Cramps, pseudomyotonia, hyperhidrosis, and some other autonomic abnormalities, as well as mild positive sensory phenomena, can be seen in several patients. Symptoms reflecting the involvement of the central nervous system occur in Morvan's syndrome. Secondary PNH syndromes are generally seen in patients with focal or diffuse diseases affecting the peripheral nervous system. The PNH-related symptoms and signs are generally found incidentally during clinical or electrodiagnostic examinations. The electrophysiological findings that are very useful in the diagnosis of PNH are myokymic and neuromyotonic discharges in needle electromyography along with some additional indicators of increased nerve fiber excitability. Based on clinicopathological and etiological associations, PNH syndromes can also be classified as immune mediated, genetic, and those caused by other miscellaneous factors. There has been an increasing awareness on the role of voltage-gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity in primary PNH pathogenesis. Then again, a long list of toxic compounds and genetic factors has also been implicated in development of PNH. The management of primary PNH syndromes comprises symptomatic treatment with anticonvulsant drugs, immune modulation if necessary, and treatment of possible associated dysimmune and/or malignant conditions. PMID:25719304

  7. Painful peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Bo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Painful peripheral neuropathy (PPN is characterized by neuropathic pain (NP, which is accompanied by dysfunction of motor, sensory and autonomic nervous system. It always involves small nerve fibers, including A δ and C fibers. PPN can be classified into two types according to etiology: hereditary and acquired. Pain of PPN can manifest as spontaneous pain and stimulus-evoked pain (allodynia, hyperalgesia and hyperpathia. The manifestation of typical cases is length-dependent, which firstly involves the feet, and then progresses proximally and to the hands, presenting a glove-stock pattern. PPN can be either an isolated disease entity or part of other diseases. The former indicates idiopathic small fiber neuropathy (SFN, while the latter contains various diseases involving peripheral nerve fibers, including systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy with other causes. The accessory examinations of PPN include quantitative sensory testing (QST, intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD, sympathetic skin response (SSR, etc. Among them, IENFD is the "golden standard" for SFN. The major therapeutic methods are to control primary diseases and relieve pain. Medications alleviating neuropathic pain consist of carbamazepine, pregabalin, gabapentin and amitriptyline, etc.

  8. AC-3933, a benzodiazepine partial inverse agonist, improves memory performance in MK-801-induced amnesia mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Iwamura, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    AC-3933, a novel benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, is a drug candidate for cognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease. We have previously reported that AC-3933 enhances acetylcholine release in the rat hippocampus and ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment and age-related cognitive decline in both rats and mice. In this study, we further evaluated the procognitive effect of AC-3933 on memory impairment induced by MK-801, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, in mice. Unlike the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil and the benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist FG-7142, oral administration of AC-3933 significantly ameliorated MK-801-induced memory impairment in the Y-maze test and in the object location test. Interestingly, the procognitive effects of AC-3933 on MK-801-induced memory impairment were not affected by the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil, although this was not the case for the beneficial effects of AC-3933 on scopolamine-induced memory deficit. Moreover, the onset of AC-3933 ameliorating effect on scopolamine- or MK-801-induced memory impairment was different in the Y-maze test. Taken together, these results indicate that AC-3933 improves memory deficits caused by both cholinergic and glutamatergic hypofunction and suggest that the ameliorating effect of AC-3933 on MK-801-induced memory impairment is mediated by a mechanism other than inverse activation of the benzodiazepine receptor.

  9. Affinity of 3-acyl substituted 4-quinolones at the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lager, Erik; Nilsson, Jakob; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard;

    2008-01-01

    The finding that alkyl 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylate and N-alkyl-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives may be high-affinity ligands at the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA(A) receptor, prompted a study of 3-acyl-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (3-acyl-4-quinolones). In...

  10. Awareness and use of Benzodiazepines in healthy volunteers and ambulatory patients visiting a tertiary care hospital: a cross sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Raoof

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Indiscriminate prescription of Benzodiazepines in Pakistan and subsequent availability over-the-counter without prescription is a major public health problem, requiring systematic inquiry through research. Additionally, there is limited data on the awareness and use of Benzodiazepines from developing countries making it impossible to devise meaningful health policies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This was an Observational, Cross-Sectional study. conducted at Aga Khan University. A total of 475 (58.5% males, 41.5% females people visiting a tertiary care hospital were interviewed by means of a structured questionnaire. The results showed that majority of population was aware of one or more Benzodiazepines (80.4% and 30.4% had used them at some point in life. 42.4% of the users had been using it for more than a year. Commonest reason for use was sleep disturbance. Frequency of usage was higher for females, married individuals, educated (>Grade12, high socioeconomic status and housewives. More (59% were prescribed than not and of them most by GP (58.5%. Only 36.5% of them were particularly told about the long-term addiction potential by the use of these drugs. CONCLUSION: Easy availability, access to re-fills without prescription and self prescription compounded with the lack of understanding of abuse potential of benzodiazepines constitutes a significant problem demanding serious consideration from health policy makers.

  11. Chlordiazepoxide enhances the anxiogenic action of CGS 8216 in the social interaction test: evidence for benzodiazepine withdrawal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, S E; Pellow, S

    1985-07-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor 'inverse agonist' CGS 8216 has a specific anxiogenic action in the social interaction test that cannot be reversed by other compounds acting at the benzodiazepine site: Ro 15-1788, FG 7142 or beta-CCE. We tried to reverse the anxiogenic effect with chlordiazepoxide, which is able to antagonise the anxiogenic effects of several other compounds acting at benzodiazepine or related sites. Chlordiazepoxide given acutely (10-20 mg/kg) was unable to antagonise the anxiogenic action of CGS 8216 (5-10 mg/kg); instead there was a tendency to enhance its effects. The effects of chlordiazepoxide after 5 days pretreatment were then assessed, since chronic treatment is necessary to reverse the anxiogenic actions of Ro 15-1788 and Ro 5-4864. At 5 mg/kg chronically, chlordiazepoxide was unable to antagonise the anxiogenic effect of CGS 8216, and at 20 mg/kg there was a significant enhancement of the effects of CGS 8216 on social interaction without an effect on locomotor activity. These results are discussed in terms of withdrawal from benzodiazepine treatment.

  12. Common Mechanisms Underlying the Proconflict Effects of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor, A Benzodiazepine Inverse Agonist and Electric Foot-Shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Sietse F. de; Katz, Jonathan L.; Valentino, Rita J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a benzodiazepine inverse agonist (methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline-3-carboxylate; DMCM) and electric foot-shock on rat conflict behavior were characterized and compared. Rats were trained to lever press under a multiple fixed-ratio schedul

  13. Bioassay-guided isolation of apigenin with GABA-benzodiazepine activity from Tanacetum parthenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäger, Anna Katharina; Krydsfeldt, Katrine; Rasmussen, Hasse Bonde

    2009-01-01

    Extracts of Tanacetum parthenium are used in the prophylactic treatment of migraine and have also been used in Danish folk medicine for the treatment of epilepsy. An ethanol extract of T. parthenium showed high affinity for the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine site. An ethanol extract of T. parthenium was ...

  14. Signal Transduction in Astrocytes during Chronic or Acute Treatment with Drugs (SSRIs, Antibipolar Drugs, GABA-ergic Drugs, and Benzodiazepines Ameliorating Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Hertz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic treatment with fluoxetine or other so-called serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs or with a lithium salt “lithium”, carbamazepine, or valproic acid, the three classical antibipolar drugs, exerts a multitude of effects on astrocytes, which in turn modulate astrocyte-neuronal interactions and brain function. In the case of the SSRIs, they are to a large extent due to 5-HT2B-mediated upregulation and editing of genes. These alterations induce alteration in effects of cPLA2, GluK2, and the 5-HT2B receptor, probably including increases in both glucose metabolism and glycogen turnover, which in combination have therapeutic effect on major depression. The ability of increased levels of extracellular K+ to increase [Ca2+]i is increased as a sign of increased K+-induced excitability in astrocytes. Acute anxiolytic drug treatment with benzodiazepines or GABAA receptor stimulation has similar glycogenolysis-enhancing effects. The antibipolar drugs induce intracellular alkalinization in astrocytes with lithium acting on one acid extruder and carbamazepine and valproic acid on a different acid extruder. They inhibit K+-induced and transmitter-induced increase of astrocytic [Ca2+]i and thereby probably excitability. In several cases, they exert different changes in gene expression than SSRIs, determined both in cultured astrocytes and in freshly isolated astrocytes from drug-treated animals.

  15. Benzodiazepine Overdose Induced Toxicity in One Patients%苯二氮卓艹类药物过量致中毒1例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马超; 张树荣

    2013-01-01

    1例64岁男性患者,因突然行走不能,伴头晕,继而人事不清,呼之不应,以“急性缺血性脑血管病”收入院。给予改善循环,营养脑细胞,抗血小板聚集等治疗。患者神清后,自述曾服8片安眠药,故考虑为苯二氮卓艹类药物中毒。在临床实践中,对于老年昏迷患者应考虑排除药物中毒,避免误诊的发生而影响治疗。%A 64 year old male patient was admitted to the hospital with sudden lost of the ability to walk with dizziness and subsequent unconsciousness. Acute cerebral hemorrhage was considered and the patient was given circulation improving therapy, nutrition supplement to the brain and antiplatelet therapy. The patient recalled himself taking 8 sleeping pills after his consciousness restored. Benzodiazepine overdose was diagnosed. In clinical practice, it is important to eliminate drug poisoning in elderly patients with coma, and avoid misdiagnosis.

  16. Benzodiazepine Use, Misuse, and Harm at the Population Level in Canada: A Comprehensive Narrative Review of Data and Developments Since 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Yoko; Wilson, Emily; Goldner, Elliot M; Fischer, Benedikt

    2016-07-01

    Benzodiazepines are commonly prescribed psycho-pharmaceuticals (e.g., for anxiety, tension, and insomnia); they are generally considered safe but have potential adverse effects. Benzodiazepine use in Canada versus internationally is comparably high, yet no recent comprehensive review of use, misuse, or related (e.g., morbidity, mortality) harm at the population level exists; the present review aimed to fill this gap. We searched four key scientific literature databases (Medline, CINAHL, EBM Reviews, and Web of Science) with relevant search terms, and collected relevant "gray literature" (e.g., survey, monitoring, government reports) data published in 1995-2015. Two reviewers conducted data screening and extraction; results were categorized and narratively summarized by key sub-topics. Levels of benzodiazepine use in the general population have been relatively stable in recent years; medical use is generally highest among older adults. Rates of non-medical use are fairly low in general but higher in marginalized (e.g., street drug use) populations; high and/or inappropriate prescribing appears common in older adults. Benzodiazepines are associated with various morbidity outcomes (e.g., accidents/injuries, cognitive decline, sleep disturbances, or psychiatric issues), again commonly observed in older adults; moreover, benzodiazepines are identified as a contributing factor in suicides and poisoning deaths. Overall there is a substantial benzodiazepine-related health problem burden-although lower than that for other psycho-medications (e.g., opioids)-in Canada, mainly as a result of overuse and/or morbidity. National benzodiazepine prescription guidelines are lacking, and few evaluated interventions to reduce benzodiazepine-related problems exist. There is a clear need for reducing inappropriate benzodiazepine use and related harm in Canada through improved evidence-based practice as well as monitoring and control. PMID:27056579

  17. Brain temperature and exercise performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars

    2012-01-01

    will impair voluntary motor activation during sustained maximal contractions. In humans the brain temperature increases in parallel with that of the body core making it very difficult to evaluate the independent effect of the cerebral temperature. Experiments with separate manipulation of the brain...... temperature in exercising goats indicate that excessive brain hyperthermia will directly affect motor performance. However, several homeostatic changes arise in parallel with hyperthermia including factors that may influence both peripheral and central fatigue and it is likely that these changes interact...... with the inhibitory effect of an elevated brain temperature....

  18. In(OTf)3-Catalyzed Synthesis of Functionalized 1,5-Benzodiazepines from o-Phenylenediamine and Alkyl Propiolates under Solvent-Free Reaction Conditions%In(OTf)3-Catalyzed Synthesis of Functionalized 1,5-Benzodiazepines from o-Phenylenediamine and Alkyl Propiolates under Solvent-Free Reaction Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海生; 杨进; 王磊

    2011-01-01

    A simple, environmental-friendly, and practical method for the synthesis of benzodiazepine derivatives through a reaction of substituted o-phenylenediamines with alkyl propiolates has been developed. The reactions generated the 1,5-benzodiazepines in good to excellent yields in the presence of catalytic amount of In(OTf)3 under sol- vent-free reaction conditions.

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  2. Methodology for benzodiazepine receptor binding assays at physiological temperature. Rapid change in equilibrium with falling temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, R.M.

    1986-12-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors of rat cerebellum were assayed with (/sup 3/H)-labeled flunitrazepam at 37/sup 0/C, and assays were terminated by filtration in a cold room according to one of three protocols: keeping each sample at 37 degrees C until ready for filtration, taking the batch of samples (30) into the cold room and filtering sequentially in the order 1-30, and taking the batch of 30 samples into the cold room and filtering sequentially in the order 30-1. the results for each protocol were substantially different from each other, indicating that rapid disruption of equilibrium occurred as the samples cooled in the cold room while waiting to be filtered. Positive or negative cooperativity of binding was apparent, and misleading effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid on the affinity of diazepam were observed, unless each sample was kept at 37/sup 0/C until just prior to filtration.

  3. Effects of genetic polymorphism of cytochrome P450 enzymes on the pharmacokinetics of benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasawa, T; Suzuki, A; Otani, K

    2007-08-01

    Pharmacogenetic studies have shown that several cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes exhibit genetic polymorphisms. Several benzodiazepines (BZPs) are metabolized predominantly or partly by polymorphic CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5. The pharmacokinetics of diazepam, etizolam, quazepam and desmethylclobazam have been shown to be affected by CYP2C19 polymorphism. The CYP3A5 polymorphism has been reported to affect the pharmacokinetics of alprazolam, but its effect on midazolam kinetics has been inconclusive. For etizolam and desmethylclobazam, some data suggest that CYP2C19 deficiency leads to side-effects or toxicity. For the remaining BZPs the clinical significance of the observed pharmacokinetic changes remains unclear. Further studies on the effects of genetic polymorphisms of CYP enzymes on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of BZPs are necessary to guide treatment individualization and optimization. PMID:17635335

  4. Polysubstance abuse: alcohol, opioids and benzodiazepines require coordinated engagement by society, patients, and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbu, Uzor C; Lotfipour, Shahram; Chakravarthy, Bharath

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published significant data trends related to substance abuse involving opioid pain relievers (OPR), benzodiazepines and alcohol in the United States. The CDC describes opioid misuse and abuse as an epidemic, with the use of OPR surpassing that of illicit drugs. Alcohol has also been a persistent problem and is associated with a number of emergency department visits and deaths independent of other substances. The use of these drugs in combination creates an additive effect with increased central nervous system suppression and a heightened risk of an overdose. We present a summary of the findings from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) with commentary on strategies to combat prescription drug and alcohol abuse.

  5. Clonazepam as Agonist Substitution Treatment for Benzodiazepine Dependence: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Giovanni Icro Maremmani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the misuse of benzodiazepines (BZDs is a cause for a serious concern among pharmacologically inexperienced patients, whether treated or untreated, that could lead to significant complications, including tolerance, dependence, and addiction. We present a case report in which an Italian patient affected by anxiety disorder and treated with BZDs presented a severe case of dependence on BZDs. We treated him according to an agonist substitution approach, switching from the abused BZD to a slow-onset, long-acting, high potency agonist (clonazepam, and looking at the methadone treatment model as paradigm. We decided to use clonazepam for its pharmacokinetic properties. The advantage of choosing a slow-onset, long-lasting BZD for the treatment of our patient was that it led us to a remarkable improvement in the clinical situation, including the cessation of craving, absence of withdrawal symptoms, reduced anxiety, improvements in social functioning, and a better cognition level.

  6. Benzodiazepine receptor distribution and cerebral blood flow in early blindness. A PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) distribution, which is thought to be affected by neuronal density in the cerebral cortex, and CBF using [11C]flumazenil and [15O]water PET in early blind (EB) and in blindfold sighted control (SC) subjects. PET images were co-registered to the subject's MRI. Using SPM96, MRI images were normalized in the Talairach and Tournoux coordinate system, and accordingly MRI-registered PET images were spatially normalized. Statistical parametric maps were computed on a voxel-by-voxel basis, using the general linear model. CBF for EB was significantly larger in the Brodmann area 17 and 18, especially anterior area, than that for SC, while there was no significant difference in BZR distribution. Our BZR data suggest that the amount of neurons do not change due to early visual deprivation in the visual cortex, in spite of high CBF in visual cortex of EB subjects. (author)

  7. GABA(A) receptors implicated in REM sleep control express a benzodiazepine binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tin Quang; Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2013-08-21

    It has been reported that non-subtype-selective GABAA receptor antagonists injected into the nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of rats induced long-lasting increases in REM sleep. Characteristics of these REM sleep increases were identical to those resulting from injection of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. Both actions were blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, atropine. Microdialysis of GABAA receptor antagonists into the PnO resulted in increased acetylcholine levels. These findings were consistent with GABAA receptor antagonists disinhibiting acetylcholine release in the PnO to result in an acetylcholine-mediated REM sleep induction. Direct evidence has been lacking for localization in the PnO of the specific GABAA receptor-subtypes mediating the REM sleep effects. Here, we demonstrated a dose-related, long-lasting increase in REM sleep following injection (60 nl) in the PnO of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline (DMCM, 10(-2)M). REM sleep increases were greater and more consistently produced than with the non-selective antagonist gabazine, and both were blocked by atropine. Fluorescence immunohistochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy, colocalized in PnO vesicular acetylcholine transporter, a presynaptic marker of cholinergic boutons, with the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor. These data provide support for the direct action of GABA on mechanisms of acetylcholine release in the PnO. The presence of the γ2 subunit at this locus and the REM sleep induction by DMCM are consistent with binding of benzodiazepines by a GABAA receptor-subtype in control of REM sleep.

  8. Electrical stimulation therapies for CNS disorders and pain are mediated by competition between different neuronal networks in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faingold, Carl L

    2008-11-01

    treatment of unanesthetized animals with antagonists (bicuculline or strychnine) of inhibitory neurotransmitter (GABA or glycine) receptors can cause CMR neurons to become consistently responsive to external inputs (e.g., peripheral nerve, sensory, or electrical stimuli in the brain) to which these neurons did not previously respond. Conversely, agents that enhance GABA-mediated inhibition (e.g., barbiturates and benzodiazepines) or antagonize glutamate-mediated excitation (e.g., ketamine) can cause CMR neurons to become unresponsive to inputs to which they responded previously. The responses of CMR neurons exhibit extensive short-term and long-term plasticity, which permits them to participate to a variable degree in many networks. Short-term plasticity subserves termination of disease symptoms, while long-term plasticity in CMR regions subserves symptom prevention. This network interaction hypothesis has value for future research in CNS disease mechanisms and also for identifying therapeutic targets in specific brain networks for more selective stimulation and pharmacological therapies.

  9. Drug-induced peripheral neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilholm, Ole Jakob; Christensen, Alex Alban; Zedan, Ahmed;

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by medication, and various descriptions have been applied for this condition. In this MiniReview, the term 'drug-induced peripheral neuropathy' (DIPN) is used with the suggested definition: Damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system caused by a chemical...... substance used in the treatment, cure, prevention or diagnosis of a disease. Optic neuropathy is included in this definition. A distinction between DIPN and other aetiologies of peripheral neuropathy is often quite difficult and thus, the aim of this MiniReview is to discuss the major agents associated...

  10. Effects of hippocampal injections of a novel ligand selective for the alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 subunits of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor on Pavlovian conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, David J; Tetzlaff, Julie E; Cook, James M; He, Xiaohui; Helmstetter, Fred J

    2002-07-01

    Benzodiazepine pharmacology has led to greater insight into the neural mechanisms underlying learning and anxiety. The synthesis of new compounds capable of modulating responses produced by these receptors has been made possible by the development of an isoform model of the GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptor complex. In the current experiment, rats were pretreated with several concentrations of the novel ligand RY024 (an alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 -selective benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist) in the hippocampus and were trained in a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm. RY024 independently produced fear-related behavior prior to training and, at the highest concentration, decreased the strength of conditioning observed 24 h after training. These data provide further evidence for the involvement of hippocampal GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptors in learning and anxiety.

  11. The Formation of 2,2,4-Trimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-1,5-Benzodiazepine from 1,2-Diaminobenzene in the Presence of Acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Odame

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to synthesize a 2-substituted benzimidazole from the reaction of o-phenylenediamine and isophthalic acid in the presence of acetone and ethanol under microwave irradiation, a salt of the isophthalate ion and 2,2,4-trimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-1,5-benzodiazepin-5-ium ion was obtained. The condensation of two moles of acetone with the amine groups resulted in the formation of the benzodiazepine which crystallized as an iminium cation forming a salt with the isophthalate anion. The formation of benzodiazepine was also confirmed by performing the reaction of o-phenylenediamine with excess acetone in ethanol under conventional heating conditions. The compounds were characterized by NMR, FTIR, HRMS and microanalysis as well as X-ray crystallography. The reaction mechanism leading to the formation of benzodiazepine is also discussed.

  12. Risk of hip fractures associated with benzodiazepines: Applying common protocol to a multi-database nested case-control study. The protect project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Requena, Gema; Logie, John; González-González, Rocío; Gardarsdottir, Helga; Afonso, Ana; Souverein, Patrick C.; Merino, Elisa Martin; Boudiaf, Nada; Huerta, Consuelo; Bate, Andrew; Alvarez, Yolanda; García-Rodríguez, Luis A.; Reynolds, Robert; Schlienger, Raymond G.; De Groot, Mark C.H.; Klungel, Olaf H.; De Abajo, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between benzodiazepines (BZD) and hip fractures has been estimated in several observational studies although diverse methodologies and definitions have hampered comparability. Objectives: To evaluate the discrepancies in the risk estimates of hip/femur fractures associate

  13. "I'm Not Waving, I'm Drowning": An Autoethnographical Exploration of Biographical Disruption and Reconstruction During Recovery From Prescribed Benzodiazepine Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, Alison M

    2016-03-01

    Benzodiazepines are group of drugs used mainly as sedatives, hypnotics, muscle relaxants, and anti-epileptics. Tapering off benzodiazepines is, for some users, a painful, traumatic, and protracted process. In this article, I use an autoethnographic approach, adopting the metaphor of water, to examine heuristically my experience of iatrogenic illness and recovery. I draw on personal journals and blog entries and former users' narratives to consider the particular form of biographical disruption associated with benzodiazepines and the processes involved in identity reconstruction. I emphasize the role of the online community in providing benzodiazepine users such as myself with a co-cultural community through which to share a voice and make sense of our experiences. I explain how the success stories of former users provided me with the hope that I, the "medical victim," could become the "victor" and in the process construct a new life and fresh identity. PMID:25800715

  14. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  15. Progress of peripheral nerve repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈峥嵘

    2002-01-01

    Study on repair of peripheral nerve injury has been proceeding over a long period of time. With the use of microsurgery technique since 1960s,the quality of nerve repair has been greatly improved. In the past 40 years, with the continuous increase of surgical repair methods, more progress has been made on the basic research of peripheral nerve repair.

  16. Progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Fan; Haichao Li; Yuwei Wang; Yanglin Zheng; Lianjun Jia; Zhihui Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of progesterone on peripheral nerve regeneration.DATA SOURCES: An online search of Medline and OVID databases was under taken to identify articles about progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration published in English between January 1990 and June 2004 by using the keywords of "peripheral nerve, injury, progesterone, regeneration".STUDY SELECTION: The data were primarily screened, those correlated with progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration were involved, and their original articles were further searched, the repetitive studies or reviews were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 59 articles about progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration were collected, and 26 of them were involved, the other 33 excluded ones were the repetitive studies or reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS: Recent researches found that certain amount of progesterone could be synthetized in peripheral nervous system, and the expression of progesterone receptor could be found in sensory neurons and Schwann cells. After combined with the receptor, endogenous and exogenous progesterone can accelerate the formation of peripheral nerve myelin sheath, also promote the axonal regeneration.CONCLUSION: Progesterone plays a role in protecting neurons, increasing the sensitivity of nerve tissue to nerve growth factor, and accelerating regeneration of nerve in peripheral nerve regeneration, which provides theoretical references for the treatment of demyelinated disease and nerve injury, as well as the prevention of neuroma, especially that the in vivo level of progesterone should be considered for the elderly people accompanied by neuropathy and patients with congenital luteal phase defect, which is of positive significance in guiding the treatment.

  17. Deriving stress from peripheral physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, J.J.G.; Van Dooren, M.; Van Beek, W.H.M.; Dijk, E.O.; Ouwerkerk, M.; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We set up an experiment to explore whether peripheral physiological parameters are capable of reflecting human (short term) stress. Methods For 30 participants, we measured peripheral physiology (SCR, ECG, RSP, TEMP, EMG) during several tasks (3 relaxing, 3 physically stressful, 3 mental

  18. Peripheral Polyneuropathy and Mefloquine Prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Chester, Alexander C.; Sandroni, Paola

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of a woman who developed a peripheral polyneuropathy shortly after completing 4 weekly doses of mefloquine hydrochloride (250 mg) malaria prophylaxis. Although mefloquine-related central nervous system neuropathy is well described in the literature, peripheral polyneuropathy similar to this case has been documented only once before, to our knowledge.

  19. Modulation of radioligand binding to the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex by a new component from Cyperus rotundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Lee, Kwang-Youn; Choi, Hyoung-Chul; Cho, Jungsook; Kang, Byung-Soo; Lim, Jae-Chul; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2002-01-01

    Four sesquiterpenes, beta-selinene, isocurcumenol, nootkatone and aristolone and one triterpene, oleanolic acid were isolated from the ethylacetate fraction of the rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus and tested for their ability to modulate gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A))-benzodiazepine receptor function by radioligand binding assays using rat cerebrocortical membranes. Among these compounds, only isocurcumenol, one of the newly identified constituents of this plant, was found to inhibit [3H]Ro15-1788 binding and enhance [3H]flunitrazepam binding in the presence of GABA. These results suggest that isocurcumenol may serve as a benzodiazepine receptor agonist and allosterically modulate GABAergic neurotransmission via enhancement of endogenous receptor ligand binding. PMID:11824542

  20. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Yousef W; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast...... agents. Peripheral CE-MRA is defined as an MR angiogram of the arteries from the aortic bifurcation to the feet. Advantages of CE-MRA include minimal invasiveness and lack of ionizing radiation. The basic technique employed for peripheral CE-MRA is the bolus-chase method. With this method a paramagnetic...... field strength of the MRI system, receiver coil configuration, use of parallel imaging, contrast bolus timing technique, and k-space filling strategies. Furthermore, it is possible to optimize peripheral CE-MRA using venous compression techniques, hybrid scan protocols, time-resolved imaging, and steady...

  1. The 1,4-benzodiazepine Ro5-4864 (4-chlorodiazepam) suppresses multiple pro-inflammatory mast cell effector functions

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefi, Omid Sascha; Wilhelm, Thomas; Maschke-Neuß, Karin; Kuhny, Marcel; Martin, Christian; Molderings, Gerhard J; Kratz, Felix; Hildenbrand, Bernd; Huber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Activation of mast cells (MCs) can be achieved by the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) as well as by additional receptors such as the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor and the receptor tyrosine kinase Kit (stem cell factor [SCF] receptor). Thus, pharmacological interventions which stabilize MCs in response to different receptors would be preferable in diseases with pathological systemic MC activation such as systemic mastocytosis. 1,4-Benzodiazepines (BDZs) have been reported to suppres...

  2. Study of potential drug-drug interactions between benzodiazepines and four commonly used antiepileptic drugs in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kartik N. Shah; Rana, Devang A.; Patel, Varsha J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines (BZD) is one of the commonly used drug groups for certain neurological diseases. As sometimes, the anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) may be used concomitantly with BZD there is a potential for drug-drug interactions. Study aimed to study potential drug-drug interactions between four commonly used AEDs (phenytoin, carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbitone, sodium valproate) and BZD (diazepam, clonazepam) in mice using maximal electroshock seizure (MES) method and pentylenetetra...

  3. Older adults and withdrawal from benzodiazepine hypnotics in general practice: effects on cognitive function, sleep, mood and quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, H. V.; Collins, R; Fletcher, S.; Kee, S. C. Y.; Woods, B.; Iliffe, S

    2003-01-01

    Background: Older adults are the main recipients of repeat prescriptions for benzodiazepine (BZD) hypnotics. BZDs can impair cognitive function and may not aid sleep when taken continuously for years. This study therefore aimed to determine if withdrawing from BZDs leads to changes in patients' cognitive function, quality of life, mood and sleep. Method: One hundred and ninety-two long-term users of BZD hypnotics, aged [gt-or-equal, slanted]65 years, were identified in 25 general practices...

  4. Synthesis of spiro[indolo-1,5-benzodiazepines] from 3-acetyl coumarins for use as possible antianxiety agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raviraj A Kusanur; Manjunath Ghate; Manohar V Kulkarni

    2004-08-01

    3-Acetyl coumarins (1) when allowed react with isatin (2) gave corresponding 3-(3'-hydroxy-2'-oxo indolo) acetyl coumarins (3), which on dehydration afforded the corresponding ,-unsaturated ketones (4). Cyclocondensation of (4) with substituted -phenylene diamines resulted in novel 3-coumarinyl spiro[indolo-1,5-benzodiazepines] (5). Structures of all the compounds have been established on the basis of their IR, NMR and mass spectral data and have been screened for their antimicrobial activity and antianxiety activity in mice.

  5. PTSD Symptom Severities, Interpersonal Traumas, and Benzodiazepines Are Associated with Substance-Related Problems in Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Guina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trauma is commonly associated with substance-related problems, yet associations between specific substances and specific posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSSs are understudied. We hypothesized that substance-related problems are associated with PTSS severities, interpersonal traumas, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey methodology in a consecutive sample of adult outpatients with trauma histories (n = 472, we used logistic regression to examine substance-related problems in general (primary, confirmatory analysis, as well as alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug problems specifically (secondary, exploratory analyses in relation to demographics, trauma type, PTSSs, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Results: After adjusting for multiple testing, several factors were significantly associated with substance-related problems, particularly benzodiazepines (AOR = 2.78; 1.99 for alcohol, 2.42 for tobacco, 8.02 for illicit drugs, DSM-5 PTSD diagnosis (AOR = 1.92; 2.38 for alcohol, 2.00 for tobacco, 2.14 for illicit drugs, most PTSSs (especially negative beliefs, recklessness, and avoidance, and interpersonal traumas (e.g., assaults and child abuse. Conclusion: In this clinical sample, there were consistent and strong associations between several trauma-related variables and substance-related problems, consistent with our hypotheses. We discuss possible explanations and implications of these findings, which we hope will stimulate further research, and improve screening and treatment.

  6. PTSD Symptom Severities, Interpersonal Traumas, and Benzodiazepines Are Associated with Substance-Related Problems in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guina, Jeffrey; Nahhas, Ramzi W.; Goldberg, Adam J.; Farnsworth, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is commonly associated with substance-related problems, yet associations between specific substances and specific posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSSs) are understudied. We hypothesized that substance-related problems are associated with PTSS severities, interpersonal traumas, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey methodology in a consecutive sample of adult outpatients with trauma histories (n = 472), we used logistic regression to examine substance-related problems in general (primary, confirmatory analysis), as well as alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug problems specifically (secondary, exploratory analyses) in relation to demographics, trauma type, PTSSs, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Results: After adjusting for multiple testing, several factors were significantly associated with substance-related problems, particularly benzodiazepines (AOR = 2.78; 1.99 for alcohol, 2.42 for tobacco, 8.02 for illicit drugs), DSM-5 PTSD diagnosis (AOR = 1.92; 2.38 for alcohol, 2.00 for tobacco, 2.14 for illicit drugs), most PTSSs (especially negative beliefs, recklessness, and avoidance), and interpersonal traumas (e.g., assaults and child abuse). Conclusion: In this clinical sample, there were consistent and strong associations between several trauma-related variables and substance-related problems, consistent with our hypotheses. We discuss possible explanations and implications of these findings, which we hope will stimulate further research, and improve screening and treatment. PMID:27517964

  7. Potential role of cortical 5-HT(2A) receptors in the anxiolytic action of cyamemazine in benzodiazepine withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamina, Amine; Naassila, Mickaël; Bourin, Michel

    2012-07-30

    The antipsychotic cyamemazine is a potent serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor (5-HT(2AR)) antagonist. A positron emission tomography (PET) study in human patients showed that therapeutic doses of cyamemazine produced near saturation of 5-HT(2AR) occupancy in the frontal cortex, whereas dopamine D(2) occupancy remained below the level for motor side effects observed with typical antipsychotics. Recently, numerous studies have revealed the involvement of 5-HT(2AR) in the pathophysiology of anxiety and a double-blind, randomized clinical trial showed similar efficacy of cyamemazine and bromazepam in reducing the anxiety associated with benzodiazepine withdrawal. Therefore, we reviewed the above articles about 5-HT(2AR) and anxiety in order to understand better the anxiolytic mechanisms of cyamemazine in benzodiazepine withdrawal. The 5-HT(2AR) is the most abundant serotonin receptor subtype in the cortex. Non-pharmacological studies with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and genetically modified mice clearly showed that cortical 5-HT(2AR) signaling positively modulates anxiety-like behavior. With a few exceptions, most other studies reviewed here further support this view. Therefore, the anxiolytic efficacy of cyamemazine in benzodiazepine withdrawal can be due to a 5-HT(2AR) antagonistic activity at the cortical level.

  8. Polysomnographic Findings in a Cohort of Chronic Insomnia Patients with Benzodiazepine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Marianna; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Marano, Giuseppe; Di Nicola, Marco; Dittoni, Serena; Gnoni, Valentina; Di Blasi, Chiara; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Bria, Pietro; Janiri, Luigi; Mazza, Salvatore; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate sleep modifications induced by chronic benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse. Methods: Cohort study, comparison of sleep measures between BDZs abusers and controls. Drug Addiction Unit (Institute of Psychiatry) and Unit of Sleep Disorders (Institute of Neurology) of the Catholic University in Rome. Six outpatients affected by chronic BDZ abuse were enrolled, (4 men, 2 women, mean age 53.3 ± 14.8, range: 34-70 years); 55 healthy controls were also enrolled (23 men, 32 women, mean age 54.2 ± 13.0, range: 27-76 years). All patients underwent clinical evaluation, psychometric measures, ambulatory polysomnography, scoring of sleep macrostructure and microstructure (power spectral fast-frequency EEG arousal, cyclic alternating pattern [CAP]), and heart rate variability. Results: BDZ abusers had relevant modification of sleep macrostructure and a marked reduction of fast-frequency EEG arousal in NREM (patients: 6.6 ± 3.7 events/h, controls 13.7 ± 4.9 events/h, U-test: 294, p = 0.002) and REM (patients: 8.4 ± 2.4 events/h, controls 13.3 ± 5.1 events/h, U-test: 264, p = 0.016), and of CAP rate (patients: 15.0 ± 8.6%, controls: 51.2% ± 12.1%, U-test: 325, p < 0.001). Discussion: BDZ abusers have reduction of arousals associated with increased number of nocturnal awakenings and severe impairment of sleep architecture. The effect of chronic BDZ abuse on sleep may be described as a severe impairment of arousal dynamics; the result is the inability to modulate levels of vigilance. Citation: Mazza M; Losurdo A; Testani E; Marano G; Di Nicola M; Dittoni S; Gnoni V; Di Blasi C; Giannantoni NM; Lapenta L; Brunetti V; Bria P; Janiri L; Mazza S; Della Marca G. Polysomnographic findings in a cohort of chronic insomnia patients with benzodiazepine abuse. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(1):35-42. PMID:24426818

  9. Peripheral Auditory Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, J; Hubbard, A; Neely, S; Tubis, A

    1986-01-01

    How weIl can we model experimental observations of the peripheral auditory system'? What theoretical predictions can we make that might be tested'? It was with these questions in mind that we organized the 1985 Mechanics of Hearing Workshop, to bring together auditory researchers to compare models with experimental observations. Tbe workshop forum was inspired by the very successful 1983 Mechanics of Hearing Workshop in Delft [1]. Boston University was chosen as the site of our meeting because of the Boston area's role as a center for hearing research in this country. We made a special effort at this meeting to attract students from around the world, because without students this field will not progress. Financial support for the workshop was provided in part by grant BNS- 8412878 from the National Science Foundation. Modeling is a traditional strategy in science and plays an important role in the scientific method. Models are the bridge between theory and experiment. Tbey test the assumptions made in experim...

  10. Peripheral and central markers of inflammation in mild cognitive impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Karim, Salman

    2011-01-01

    There has been accumulating scientific evidence, over the last three decades, of the role of inflammatory processes in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Population based studies suggest that plasma levels of inflammatory markers are raised in peripheral blood of people with AD. People on long term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a lower prevalence of AD. Moreover, both animal and human histopathology studies have reported localization of inflammation in brain are...

  11. Axon Regeneration in the Peripheral and Central Nervous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Huebner, Eric A.; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2009-01-01

    Axon regeneration in the mature mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is extremely limited after injury. Consequently, functional deficits persist after spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury, stroke, and related conditions that involve axonal disconnection. This situation differs from that in the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS), where long- distance axon regeneration and substantial functional recovery can occur in the adult. Both extracellular molecules and the intrinsi...

  12. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation.

  13. Quantification of Brain Access of Exendin-4 in the C57BL Mouse Model by SPIM Fluorescence Imaging and the Allen Mouse Brain Reference Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Secher, Anna; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    construct a SPIM brain atlas based on the Allen mouse brain 3D reference model and use it to analyze the access of peripherally injected Exendin-4 into the brain compared to a negative control group. The constructed atlas consists of an average SPIM volume obtained from eight C57BL mouse brains using group...

  14. Modeling peripheral olfactory coding in Drosophila larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J Hoare

    Full Text Available The Drosophila larva possesses just 21 unique and identifiable pairs of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs, enabling investigation of the contribution of individual OSN classes to the peripheral olfactory code. We combined electrophysiological and computational modeling to explore the nature of the peripheral olfactory code in situ. We recorded firing responses of 19/21 OSNs to a panel of 19 odors. This was achieved by creating larvae expressing just one functioning class of odorant receptor, and hence OSN. Odor response profiles of each OSN class were highly specific and unique. However many OSN-odor pairs yielded variable responses, some of which were statistically indistinguishable from background activity. We used these electrophysiological data, incorporating both responses and spontaneous firing activity, to develop a bayesian decoding model of olfactory processing. The model was able to accurately predict odor identity from raw OSN responses; prediction accuracy ranged from 12%-77% (mean for all odors 45.2% but was always significantly above chance (5.6%. However, there was no correlation between prediction accuracy for a given odor and the strength of responses of wild-type larvae to the same odor in a behavioral assay. We also used the model to predict the ability of the code to discriminate between pairs of odors. Some of these predictions were supported in a behavioral discrimination (masking assay but others were not. We conclude that our model of the peripheral code represents basic features of odor detection and discrimination, yielding insights into the information available to higher processing structures in the brain.

  15. Relationship Between Acute Benzodiazepine Poisoning and Acute Pancreatitis Risk: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Geng-Wang; Hung, Dong-Zong; Chen, Wei-Kung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-12-01

    We designed a population-based retrospective cohort study to investigate the association between the event of benzodiazepine (BZD) poisoning and the risk of acute pancreatitis.In the present study, 12,893 patients with BZD poisoning during 2000 to 2011 were enrolled and matched with 4 comparison patients according to mean age and sex. We determined the cumulative incidences and adjusted hazard ratios of acute pancreatitis.A significant association was observed between BZD poisoning and acute pancreatitis. After adjustment for potential risk factors, the patients with BZD poisoning had a 5.33-fold increased risk of acute pancreatitis compared with the controls without BZD poisoning (HR = 5.33, 95% CI = 2.26-12.60). The results revealed that acute pancreatitis in patients with BZD poisoning occurred in a follow-up time of ≤1 month (HR = 50.0, P pancreatitis was no different between the patients with and without BZD poisoning when the follow-up time was >1 month (HR = 1.07, P > .05).This population-based study revealed the positive correlation between the event of BZD poisoning and an increased risk of acute pancreatitis. The findings warrant further large-scale and in-depth investigation.

  16. Prescription patterns of benzodiazepines in the Lebanese adult population: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Wijdan H; El Khoury, Ghada M; Deeb, Mary E; Sheikh-Taha, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the profile of benzodiazepine (BDZ) users in Lebanon. Adult patients visiting the pharmacies with prescriptions of BDZs were included in the study. Seven hundred and eighty-six current BDZ users were included, of whom 54.2% were females. Twenty-three percent reported being alcohol consumers and were mostly males. The two most commonly used BDZs were alprazolam (34.6%) and bromazepam (33.6%). The indication for use was mainly anxiety (44.4%), insomnia (22.5%), and depression (15.9%). The prescribing physicians were primarily psychiatrists (43.2%), followed by general practitioners (29.7%). Forty percent had been taking the drug for more than a year. Among those using BDZs for at least 1 month, 35.5% increased the dose with time. Thirty-three percent reported having experienced side effects. Eighteen patients (2.3%) reported taking more than one BDZ concomitantly, while 18.3% were taking drugs that should not be prescribed along with BDZs. In conclusion, the use of BDZs is highest among females, especially for the treatment of anxiety. Moreover, continuous use of the drugs for more than a year as well as significant potential drug interactions was identified. PMID:27660452

  17. Therapeutic response of benzodiazepine, orphenadrine citrate and occlusal splint association in TMD pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M; Martinelli, Denise A; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B; de Albergaria-Barbosa, José R

    2003-04-01

    Loss of function, muscle inflammation, and pain are some of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Pharmacological strategies to minimize the clinical manifestation of these disorders often focus on blocking or inhibiting the pain-causing symptom. Resources such as muscle-relaxants, anxiety-relief drugs, and splint therapy are often used to reduce muscular hyperactivity related to TMD muscle pain. This study compares the effect of a randomly ordered association of occlusal splint therapy (S), nonsteroid anti-inflammatory with a muscle-relaxant drug (orphenadrine citrate) (O), and an anxiety-relief drug (benzodiazepine) (B), to ease painful TMD muscle symptoms. Clinical and anamnestic analyses were recorded in accordance with the Helkimo TMD index and applied before and after treatments. Twenty-one group two Helkimo TMD adult female patients were treated, all of whom were subjected to the three random therapeutic associations proposed: SBO, BOS, and OSB. The same operator applied the three specific associations over a period of 21 days in the proposed sequence, seven days for each therapy. The results show that all the groups presented the best results in terms of relief from pain after the therapeutic association (28.5% showed a decrease and 47.6% showed an absence of symptoms). No significant difference was observed among association therapeutic protocols. PMID:12723857

  18. Maternal Characteristics of Women Exposed to Hypnotic Benzodiazepine Receptor Agonist during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarke Askaa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is little knowledge regarding the characteristics of women treated with hypnotic benzodiazepine receptor agonists (HBRAs during pregnancy. In this large Danish cohort study, we characterize women exposed to HBRA during pregnancy. We determined changes in prevalence of HBRA use from 1997 to 2010 and exposure to HBRAs in relation to pregnancy. Methods. We performed a retrospective cohort study including 911,017 pregnant women in the period from 1997 to 2010. Information was retrieved from The Danish Birth Registry and The Registry of Medicinal Product Statistics to identify pregnant women redeeming a prescription of HBRAs. Results. We identified 2,552 women exposed to HBRAs during pregnancy, increasing from 0.18% in 1997 to 0.23% in 2010. Compared to unexposed women, exposed women were characterized by being older, with higher BMI, in their third or fourth parity, of lower income and education level, more frequently smokers, and more likely to be comedicated with antipsychotic, anxiolytic, or antidepressant drugs (P<0.0001. Conclusion. Women using HBRAs during their pregnancy differ from unexposed women in socioeconomic factors and were more likely to receive comedication. The consumption of HBRAs was reduced during pregnancy compared to before conception.

  19. Further characterization of benzodiazepine receptor differences in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular and conformational characteristics of benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors in cortex and cerebellum from long-sleep and mice were investigated using heat inactivation and beta-carboline competition techniques. To investigate differences in the allosteric coupling between GABA and BZ receptors, the protection of BZ receptors from heat inactivation, by GABA, was also evaluated. The two genotypes do not differ in the affinity or number of BZ receptors in the cortex or cerebellum. They do, however, appear to differ in the molecular structure and/or regulation of the conformational state of the receptor in the cortex, as indicated by a greater sensitivity of LS mice to both heat inactivation and beta-carboline competition of 3H-flunitrazepam (FNZ) binding in this region. Evidence for differences in the nature of coupling between GABA and BZ receptors is provided by the finding in that in both regions, GABA protected BZ receptors from inactivation to a greater degree in LS mice. The relationship between these differences and the multiplicity of expression of BZ receptors is discussed

  20. Further characterization of benzodiazepine receptor differences in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marley, R.J.; Stinchcomb, A.; Wehner, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular and conformational characteristics of benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors in cortex and cerebellum from long-sleep and mice were investigated using heat inactivation and beta-carboline competition techniques. To investigate differences in the allosteric coupling between GABA and BZ receptors, the protection of BZ receptors from heat inactivation, by GABA, was also evaluated. The two genotypes do not differ in the affinity or number of BZ receptors in the cortex or cerebellum. They do, however, appear to differ in the molecular structure and/or regulation of the conformational state of the receptor in the cortex, as indicated by a greater sensitivity of LS mice to both heat inactivation and beta-carboline competition of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (FNZ) binding in this region. Evidence for differences in the nature of coupling between GABA and BZ receptors is provided by the finding in that in both regions, GABA protected BZ receptors from inactivation to a greater degree in LS mice. The relationship between these differences and the multiplicity of expression of BZ receptors is discussed.

  1. Benzodiazepine receptor imaging with iomazenil SPECT in aphasic patients with cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshi, Yasuhiko; Kitamura, Shin; Ohyama, Masashi [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)] (and others)

    1999-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between prognosis of aphasia and neuronal damage in the cerebral cortex, we evaluated the distribution of central-type benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) binding in post-stroke aphasics with [{sup 123}I]iomazenil and SPECT. We performed iomazenil SPECT in six aphasic patients (aged from 45 to 75 years; all right-handed) with unilateral left cerebral infarction. Three patients showed signs of Broca's aphasia and the other three Wernicke's aphasia. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging was performed with [{sup 123}I]iodoamphetamine (IMP). The regions of interest (ROIs) on both images were set in the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex and language relevant area in both hemispheres. Three patients were classified in the mild prognosis group and the other three in the moderate prognosis group. The left language-relevant area was more closely concerned with the difference in aphasic symptoms than the right one in both BZR and CBF distribution, but the ipsilateral to the contralateral ratio (I/C ratio) in the language-relevant areas in the BZR distribution was significantly lower in the moderate prognosis group than in the mild prognosis group, although no difference was seen for these values between the two groups in the CBF distribution. These results suggest that BZR imaging, which makes possible an increase in neuronal cell viability in the cerebral cortex, is useful not only for clarifying the aphasic symptoms but also for evaluating the prognosis of aphasia in patients with cerebral infarction. (author)

  2. [Consumption of anxiolytic benzodiazepines: a correlation between SNGPC data and sociodemographic indicators in Brazilian capitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Ângelo José Pimentel de; Araújo, Aurigena Antunes de; Ferreira, Maria Ângela Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    The scope of this article is to determine the distribution and frequency of consumption of anxiolytic benzodiazepines and the correlation between consumption and demographic, epidemiological, economic and social characteristics. It is an ecological study with a sample of 27 state capitals. Data collection was performed through the ANVISA database for the dispensation of Alprazolam, Bromazepam, Clonazepam, Diazepam and Lorazepam in 2010-2012, the 2010 Demographic Census (IBGE), DATASUS and Medical Demographic Research. Descriptive statistical analysis and multiple linear regression analyses were performed for data analysis. The northern region has capitals with the lowest and the southeast has capitals with the highest average consumption of these products. The average consumption for the population of all capitals was 3.60 DHD. Alprazolam is the drug most dispensed by pharmacies and private drugstores with average 2.00 DHD for the capitals. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that 76% of the variation was explained by population density (β = 0.310 p = 0.045) and percentage of physicians (β = 0.507 p = 0.016). The consumption of short half-life anxiolytics has been on the increase, mainly in the cities of greater population density and concentration of physicians. PMID:26816166

  3. A Review of the Updated Pharmacophore for the Alpha 5 GABA(A Benzodiazepine Receptor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Clayton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An updated model of the GABA(A benzodiazepine receptor pharmacophore of the α5-BzR/GABA(A subtype has been constructed prompted by the synthesis of subtype selective ligands in light of the recent developments in both ligand synthesis, behavioral studies, and molecular modeling studies of the binding site itself. A number of BzR/GABA(A α5 subtype selective compounds were synthesized, notably α5-subtype selective inverse agonist PWZ-029 (1 which is active in enhancing cognition in both rodents and primates. In addition, a chiral positive allosteric modulator (PAM, SH-053-2′F-R-CH3 (2, has been shown to reverse the deleterious effects in the MAM-model of schizophrenia as well as alleviate constriction in airway smooth muscle. Presented here is an updated model of the pharmacophore for α5β2γ2 Bz/GABA(A receptors, including a rendering of PWZ-029 docked within the α5-binding pocket showing specific interactions of the molecule with the receptor. Differences in the included volume as compared to α1β2γ2, α2β2γ2, and α3β2γ2 will be illustrated for clarity. These new models enhance the ability to understand structural characteristics of ligands which act as agonists, antagonists, or inverse agonists at the Bz BS of GABA(A receptors.

  4. Prescribing Antidepressants and Benzodiazepines in the Netherlands: Is Chronic Physical Illness Involved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Th. M. van Eijk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we assessed differences in new and repeat prescriptions of psycho-tropics between patients receiving prescriptions for drugs to treat a common chronic disease and people without such prescriptions. The study used the databases of two Dutch health insurance companies (3 million people. We selected all Dutch men and women aged 45 and older who were registered for six consecutive years (1999–2004. Our analyses both found a consistent relation between psycho-tropics on the one hand and physical illness on the other. People with multi-morbidity were prescribed these drugs most often, especially men and those younger than 65. Epidemiological studies showed a prevalence of depression among people with multi-morbidity to be twice as high as among people without such conditions. According to recent guidelines non-drug treatment may be the first therapy option for patients with non severe depression. If prescribed for a long time, benzodiazepine prescriptions are especially known to be addictive. Our data raise the question to what extent patients with a chronic physical disease suffering from co-occurring mental problems are prescribed psycho-tropics in accord with the guidelines that also advise mental support in case of non severe mental problems. Further research can answer this important question.

  5. Novel modulatory effects of neurosteroids and benzodiazepines on excitatory and inhibitory neurons excitability: a multi-electrode array (MEA recording study"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia ePuia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The balance between glutamate- and GABA-mediated neurotransmission in the brain is fundamental in the nervous system, but it is regulated by the ‘tonic’ release of a variety of endogenous factors. One such important group of molecules are the neurosteroids (NSs which, similarly to benzodiazepines (BDZs, enhance GABAergic neurotransmission. The purpose of our work was to investigate, at in-vivo physiologically relevant concentrations, the effects of NSs and BDZs as GABA modulators on dissociated neocortical neuron networks grown in long-term culture. We used a multi-electrode array (MEA recording technique and a novel analysis that was able to both identify the action potentials of engaged excitatory and inhibitory neurons and to detect drug-induced network up-states (burst. We found that the NSs tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC and allopregnanolone (ALLO applied at low nM concentrations, produced different modulatory effects on the two neuronal clusters. Conversely, at high concentrations (1 µM, both NSs, decreased excitatory and inhibitory neuron cluster excitability; however, even several hours after washout, the excitability of inhibitory neurons continued to be depressed, leading to a network long term depression (LTD. The BDZs clonazepam (CLZ and midazolam (MDZ also decreased the network excitability, but only MDZ caused LTD of inhibitory neuron cluster. To investigate the origin of the LTD after MDZ application, we tested finasteride (FIN, an inhibitor of endogenous NSs synthesis. FIN did not prevent the LTD induced by MDZ, but surprisingly induced it after application of CLZ. The significance and possible mechanisms underlying these LTD effects of NSs and BDZs are discussed. Taken together, our results not only demonstrate that ex-vivo networks show a sensitivity to NSs and BDZs comparable to that expressed in vivo, but also provide a new global in-vitro description that can help in understanding their activity in more complex

  6. Deriving stress from peripheral physiology

    OpenAIRE

    De Vries, J.J.G.; van Dooren, M.; Van Beek, W.H.M.; Dijk, E.O.; Ouwerkerk, M; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We set up an experiment to explore whether peripheral physiological parameters are capable of reflecting human (short term) stress. Methods For 30 participants, we measured peripheral physiology (SCR, ECG, RSP, TEMP, EMG) during several tasks (3 relaxing, 3 physically stressful, 3 mentally stressful). After each task, we measured their blood pressure, asked them to complete the Stress ArousalChecklist, and took a saliva swab to measure the cortisol concentration. For each participa...

  7. Conditioned Contribution of Peripheral Cocaine Actions to Cocaine Reward and Cocaine-Seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bin; You, Zhi-Bing; Oleson, Erik B.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Myal, Stephanie; Wise, Roy A.

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine has actions in the peripheral nervous system that reliably precede—and thus predict—its soon-to-follow central rewarding effects. In cocaine-experienced animals, the peripheral cocaine signal is relayed to the central nervous system, triggering excitatory input to the ventral tegmental origin of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, the system that mediates the rewarding effects of the drug. We used cocaine methiodide, a cocaine analog that does not cross the blood–brain barrier, to ...

  8. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalography (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain.

  9. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ravi kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalograph y (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain

  10. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  11. Peripheral facial nerve palsy after therapeutic endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal dissection. This case is the first report of the development of peripheral FNP in a patient undergoing therapeutic endoscopy. We emphasize the fact that physicians should be attentive to the development of peripheral FNP following therapeutic endoscopy.

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  13. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  14. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... others live with symptoms of mental illness every day. They can be moderate, or serious and cause ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the ... distant nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  19. Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault: Detection and Stability of Benzodiazepines in Spiked Drinks Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Lata; Sharratt, Sarah D.; Cole, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are detected in a significant number of drug facilitated sexual assaults (DFSA). Whilst blood and urine from the victim are routinely analysed, due to the delay in reporting DFSA cases and the short half lives of most of these drugs in blood and urine, drug detection in such samples is problematic. Consideration of the drinks involved and analysis for drugs may start to address this. Here we have reconstructed the ‘spiking’ of three benzodiazepines (diazepam, flunitrazepam and temazepam) into five drinks, an alcopop (flavoured alcoholic drink), a beer, a white wine, a spirit, and a fruit based non-alcoholic drink (J2O) chosen as representative of those drinks commonly used by women in 16–24 year old age group. Using a validated GC-MS method for the simultaneous detection of these drugs in the drinks we have studied the storage stability of the benzodiazepines under two different storage conditions, uncontrolled room temperature and refrigerator (4°C) over a 25 day period. All drugs could be detected in all beverages over this time period. Diazepam was found to be stable in all of the beverages, except the J2O, under both storage conditions. Flunitrazepam and temazepam were found not to be stable but were detectable (97% loss of temazepam and 39% loss of flunitrazepam from J2O). The recommendations from this study are that there should be a policy change and that drinks thought to be involved in DFSA cases should be collected and analysed wherever possible to support other evidence types. PMID:24586489

  20. Drug facilitated sexual assault: detection and stability of benzodiazepines in spiked drinks using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lata Gautam

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines are detected in a significant number of drug facilitated sexual assaults (DFSA. Whilst blood and urine from the victim are routinely analysed, due to the delay in reporting DFSA cases and the short half lives of most of these drugs in blood and urine, drug detection in such samples is problematic. Consideration of the drinks involved and analysis for drugs may start to address this. Here we have reconstructed the 'spiking' of three benzodiazepines (diazepam, flunitrazepam and temazepam into five drinks, an alcopop (flavoured alcoholic drink, a beer, a white wine, a spirit, and a fruit based non-alcoholic drink (J2O chosen as representative of those drinks commonly used by women in 16-24 year old age group. Using a validated GC-MS method for the simultaneous detection of these drugs in the drinks we have studied the storage stability of the benzodiazepines under two different storage conditions, uncontrolled room temperature and refrigerator (4°C over a 25 day period. All drugs could be detected in all beverages over this time period. Diazepam was found to be stable in all of the beverages, except the J2O, under both storage conditions. Flunitrazepam and temazepam were found not to be stable but were detectable (97% loss of temazepam and 39% loss of flunitrazepam from J2O. The recommendations from this study are that there should be a policy change and that drinks thought to be involved in DFSA cases should be collected and analysed wherever possible to support other evidence types.

  1. Artifact suppression and analysis of brain activities with electroencephalography signals

    OpenAIRE

    Rashed-Al-Mahfuz, Md.; Islam, Md. Rabiul; Hirose, Keikichi; Molla, Md. Khademul Islam

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface is a communication system that connects the brain with computer (or other devices) but is not dependent on the normal output of the brain (i.e., peripheral nerve and muscle). Electro-oculogram is a dominant artifact which has a significant negative influence on further analysis of real electroencephalography data. This paper presented a data adaptive technique for artifact suppression and brain wave extraction from electroencephalography signals to detect regional bra...

  2. Effects of 2,3-benzodiazepine AMPA receptor antagonists on dopamine turnover in the striatum of rats with experimental parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megyeri, Katalin; Marko, Bernadett; Sziray, Nora; Gacsalyi, Istvan; Juranyi, Zsolt; Levay, Gyorgy; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2007-03-15

    Although levodopa is the current "gold standard" for treatment of Parkinson's disease, there has been disputation on whether AMPA receptor antagonists can be used as adjuvant therapy to improve the effects of levodopa. Systemic administration of levodopa, the precursor of dopamine, increases brain dopamine turnover rate and this elevated turnover is believed to be essential for successful treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, long-term treatment of patients with levodopa often leads to development of dyskinesia. Therefore, drugs that feature potentiation of dopamine turnover rate and are able to reduce daily levodopa dosages might be used as adjuvant in the treatment of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. To investigate such combined treatment, we have examined the effects of two non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonists, GYKI-52466 and GYKI-53405, alone or in combination with levodopa on dopamine turnover rate in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned striatum of the rat. We found here that repeated administration of levodopa, added with the peripheral DOPA decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa, increased dopamine turnover rate after lesioning the striatum with 6-hydroxydopamine. Moreover, combination of levodopa with GYKI-52466 or GYKI-53405 further increased dopamine turnover enhanced by levodopa administration while the AMPA receptor antagonists by themselves failed to influence striatal dopamine turnover. We concluded from the present data that potentiation observed between levodopa and AMPA receptor antagonists may reflect levodopa-sparing effects in clinical treatment indicating the therapeutic potential of such combination in the management of Parkinson's disease.

  3. Update on peripheral ulcerative keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagci A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ayse YagciEge University, School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Izmir, TurkeyAbstract: Ulcerative inflammation of the cornea occurs in the perilimbal cornea, and is associated with autoimmune collagen vascular and arthritic diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis is the most frequent underlying disease. The tendency for peripheral location is due to the distinct morphologic and immunologic characteristics of the limbal conjunctiva, which provides access for circulating immune complexes to the peripheral cornea via the capillary network. Deposition of immune complexes in the terminal ends of limbal vessels initiates immune-mediated vasculitis, and causes inflammatory cell and protein leakage due to vessel wall damage. Development of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with systemic disease may represent worsening of a potentially life-threatening disease. Accompanying scleritis, particularly the necrotizing form, is usually observed in severe cases, which may result in corneal perforation and loss of vision. Although first-line treatment with systemic corticosteroids is indicated for acute phases, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents are required for treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with multisystem disorders. Recently, infliximab, a chimeric antibody against proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha, was reported to be effective in cases refractory to conventional immunomodulatory therapy. The potential side effects of these therapies require close follow-up and regular laboratory surveillance.Keywords: autoimmune disease, peripheral ulcerative keratitis, treatment, tumor necrosis factor-alpha

  4. A validated method for simultaneous screening and quantification of twenty-three benzodiazepines and metabolites plus zopiclone and zaleplone in whole blood by liquid-liquid extraction and ultra-performance liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Hermansson, Sigurd; Steentoft, Anni;

    2010-01-01

    An ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) method for detection of 23 benzodiazepines and related compounds in whole blood was developed and validated. The method is used for screening and quantitation of benzodiazepines in whole blood received from autopsy c...

  5. Synthesis and conformational analysis of new derivatives of 7-chloro-1,3-dihydro-5-phenyl-2h-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one

    CERN Document Server

    Imanzadeh, G H; Sadra, Y

    2011-01-01

    1,4-benzodiazepine-2-ones and their derivatives are prominent structures in medicinal chemistry. These biomolecules have wide biological activities and posses therapeutic applications. In this works, we introduce new derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine-2-ones which are synthesized using michael addition reaction of 7-chloro- 1,3-dihydro-5-phenyl-2H-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-ones with fumaric esters that matches with green chemistry protocols. The structures of all products are confirmed by FT-IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and MASS spectroscopy. Since the stereochemistry of 1,4-benzo diazepine-2-ones is important, we study the most stable conformer of one of the products as a model for conformational analysis by hyper chem soft ware and semi empirical AM1 program. Also, using the 1H-NMR spectrum, we investigate the produced diastereomers of one of products as a model.

  6. Long-term, high-dose benzodiazepine prescriptions in veteran patients with PTSD: influence of preexisting alcoholism and drug-abuse diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermos, John A; Young, Melissa M; Lawler, Elizabeth V; Rosenbloom, David; Fiore, Louis D

    2007-10-01

    Databases from the New England Veterans Integrated Service Network were analyzed to determine factors associated with long-term, high-dose anxiolytic benzodiazepine prescriptions dispensed to patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and existing alcoholism and/or drug abuse diagnoses. Among 2,183 PTSD patients, 234 received the highest 10% average daily doses for alprazolam, clonazepam, diazepam, or lorazepam, doses above those typically recommended. Highest doses were more commonly prescribed to patients with existing drug abuse diagnoses. Among patients with PTSD and alcoholism, younger age, drug abuse, and concurrent prescriptions for another benzodiazepine and oxycodone/acetaminophen independently predicted high doses. Results indicate that for veteran patients with PTSD, alcoholism alone is not associated with high-dose benzodiazepines, but existing drug abuse diagnoses do increase that risk.

  7. Syntheses of Benzimidazoles, Quinoxalines and 3,3-Dihydro 1 H-1,5-benzodiazepines Starting from o-Phenylenediamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Yong; TANG Xiu-Bo; SHAO Chang-Xing; LI Ji-Tai; SUN Wen-Hua

    2005-01-01

    A series of benzo-fused heteroaromatic compounds with 5-, 6- and 7-membered rings, such as benzimidazole,quinoxaline and 1H-1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives, were synthesized through condensation reaction of o-phenyl-enediamine with aryl aldehydes or ketones. The experimental conditions were carefully examined, and the products were characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MS, IR and elemental analyses. In addition, the structure of a benzodiazaepine derivative with 7-membered ring was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis.

  8. Change in healthcare utilization and costs following initiation of benzodiazepine therapy for long-term treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Ariel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and benzodiazepine anxiolytics are used in the US to treat generalized anxiety disorder (GAD. While benzodiazepines typically provide rapid symptomatic relief, long-term use is not recommended due to risks of dependency, sedation, falls, and accidents. Methods Using a US health insurance database, we identified all persons with GAD (ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 300.02 who began a long-term course of treatment (≥90 days with a benzodiazepine anxiolytic between 1/1/2003 and 12/31/2007, We compared healthcare utilization and costs over the six-month periods preceding and following the date of treatment initiation (“pretreatment” and “post-treatment”, respectively, and focused attention on accident-related encounters (e.g., for treatment of fractures and care received for other reasons possibly related benzodiazepine use (e.g., sedation, dizziness. Results A total of 866 patients met all study entry criteria; 25% of patients began treatment on an add-on basis (i.e., adjunctive to escitalopram, paroxetine, sertraline, or venlafaxine, while 75% of patients did not receive concomitant therapy. Mean total healthcare costs increased by $2334 between the pretreatment and post-treatment periods (from $4637 [SD=$9840] to $6971 [$17,002]; p Conclusions Healthcare costs increase in patients with GAD beginning long-term (≥90 days treatment with a benzodiazepine anxiolytic; a substantial proportion of this increase is attributable to care associated with accidents and other known sequelae of long-term benzodiazepine use.

  9. Bias in Peripheral Depression Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, André F; Köhler, Cristiano A; Brunoni, André R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To aid in the differentiation of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) from healthy controls, numerous peripheral biomarkers have been proposed. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the existence of bias favoring the publication of significant results or inflating effect...... sizes has been conducted. METHODS: Here, we performed a comprehensive review of meta-analyses of peripheral nongenetic biomarkers that could discriminate individuals with MDD from nondepressed controls. PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched through April 10, 2015. RESULTS: From 15......-analyses, while 11 meta-analyses had evidence of small-study effects. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that there is an excess of studies with statistically significant results in the literature of peripheral biomarkers for MDD. The selective publication of 'positive studies' and the selective reporting...

  10. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Peripheral Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Zarina S; Pisapia, Jared M; Ma, Tracy S; Zager, Eric L; Heuer, Gregory G; Khoury, Viviane

    2016-01-01

    There are a variety of imaging modalities for evaluation of peripheral nerves. Of these, ultrasonography (US) is often underused. There are several advantages of this imaging modality, including its cost-effectiveness, time-efficient assessment of long segments of peripheral nerves, ability to perform dynamic maneuvers, lack of contraindications, portability, and noninvasiveness. It can provide diagnostic information that cannot be obtained by electrophysiologic or, in some cases, magnetic resonance imaging studies. Ideally, the neurosurgeon can use US as a diagnostic adjunct in the preoperative assessment of a patient with traumatic, neoplastic, infective, or compressive nerve injury. Perhaps its most unique use is in intraoperative surgical planning. In this article, a brief description of normal US nerve anatomy is presented followed by a description of the US appearance of peripheral nerve disease caused by trauma, tumor, infection, and entrapment.

  11. Synthesis of 2-(oxadiazolo, pyrimido, imidazolo, and benzimidazolo) substituted analogues of 1,4-benzodiazepin-5-carboxamides linked through a phenoxyl bridge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Kaur; D Kishore

    2014-11-01

    Exceedingly facile single-step expedient protocols based on the versatility and reactivity of corresponding intermediates amidine and imidate (8 and 9), derived from 5-carboxamido-1,4-benzodiazepin-5-(4'-methylpiperazinyl)-carboxamide have been developed to provide an easy installation of the oxadiazole, pyrimidine, imidazole and benzimidazole (9-14) based privileged templates at 2-position of 5-carboxamido-1,4-benzodiazepin-5-(4'-methylpiperazinyl)-carboxamide (4), through a phenoxyl spacer, by utilizing the synthetic strategy depicted in schemes 1 and 2.

  12. Comparative efficacy of two primary care interventions to assist withdrawal from long term benzodiazepine use: A protocol for a clustered, randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roca Miguel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although benzodiazepines are effective, long-term use is not recommended because of potential adverse effects; the risks of tolerance and dependence; and an increased risk of hip fractures, motor vehicle accidents, and memory impairment. The estimated prevalence of long-term benzodiazepine use in the general population is about 2,2 to 2,6%, is higher in women and increases steadily with age. Interventions performed by General Practitioners may help patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine use. We have designed a trial to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of two brief general practitioner-provided interventions, based on gradual dose reduction, and will compare the effectiveness of these interventions with that of routine clinical practice. Methods/Design In a three-arm cluster randomized controlled trial, general practitioners will be randomly allocated to: a a group in which the first patient visit will feature a structured interview, followed by visits every 2-3 weeks to the end of dose reduction; b a group in which the first patient visit will feature a structured interview plus delivery of written instructions to self-reduce benzodiazepine dose, or c routine care. Using a computerized pharmaceutical prescription database, 495 patients, aged 18-80 years, taking benzodiazepine for at least 6 months, will be recruited in primary care health districts of three regions of Spain (the Balearic Islands, Catalonia, and Valencia. The primary outcome will be benzodiazepine use at 12 months. The secondary outcomes will include measurements of anxiety and depression symptoms, benzodiazepine dependence, quality of sleep, and alcohol consumption. Discussion Although some interventions have been shown to be effective in reducing benzodiazepine consumption by long-term users, the clinical relevance of such interventions is limited by their complexity. This randomized trial will compare the effectiveness and safety of two

  13. Molecular mechanisms of benzodiazepine-induced down-regulation of GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit protein in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M. J.; Bristow, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment of rat cerebellar granule cells induced a transient down-regulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor alpha 1 subunit protein, that was dose-dependent (1 nM-1 microM) and prevented by the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (1 microM). After 2 days of treatment with 1 microM flunitrazepam the alpha 1 subunit protein was reduced by 41% compared to untreated cells, which returned to, and remained at, control cell levels from 4-12 days of treat...

  14. Exercise induces autophagy in peripheral tissues and in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    He, Congcong; Sumpter, Jr., Rhea; Levine, Beth

    2012-01-01

    We recently identified physical exercise as a newly defined inducer of autophagy in vivo. Exercise induced autophagy in multiple organs involved in metabolic regulation, such as muscle, liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. To study the physiological role of exercise-induced autophagy, we generated mice with a knock-in nonphosphorylatable mutation in BCL2 (Thr69Ala, Ser70Ala and Ser84Ala) (BCL2 AAA) that are defective in exercise- and starvation-induced autophagy but not in basal autophagy. We ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  17. Applying quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methodology for modeling postmortem redistribution of benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2014-06-01

    Postmortem redistribution (PMR) constitutes a multifaceted process, which complicates the interpretation of drug concentrations by forensic toxicologists. The present study aimed to apply quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis for modeling PMR data of structurally related drugs, 10 benzodiazepines and 10 tricyclic antidepressants. For benzodiazepines, an adequate QSAR model was obtained (R(2) = 0.98, Q(2) = 0.88, RMSEE = 0.12), in which energy, ionization and molecular size exerted significant impact. For tricyclic antidepressants, an adequate QSAR model with slightly inferior statistics (R(2) = 0.95, Q(2) = 0.87, RMSEE = 0.29) was established after exclusion of maprotiline, in which energy parameters, basicity character and lipophilicity exerted significant contribution. Thus, QSAR analysis could be used as a complementary tool to provide an informative illustration of the contributing molecular, physicochemical and structural properties in PMR process. However, the complexity, non-static and time-dependent nature of PMR endpoints raises serious concerns whether QSAR methodology could predict the degree of redistribution, highlighting the need for animal-derived PMR data.

  18. Antiplasmodial and GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor binding activities of five plants used in traditional medicine in Mali, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Sekou; Jäger, Anna K; Adsersen, Anne; Diallo, Drissa; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2007-04-01

    Extracts of five medicinal plants: Boscia angustifolia, Cissus quadrangularis, Securidaca longipedunculata, Stylosanthes erecta and Trichilia emetica, used traditionally in Malian traditional medicine were screened for in vitro antiplasmodial activity and GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor binding activity. Four extracts showed significant antiplasmodial activities, with the dichloromethane extract of leaf of Securidaca longipedunculata being the most active (IC(50) of 7 microg/ml [95% CI: 5-9]). The dichloromethane extract of leaf of Trichilia emetica, in addition to its antiplasmodial activity (IC(50): 12 microg/ml [95% CI: 12-14]), exhibited a good binding activity to the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor, while water and methanol extracts of the same plant did not show any activity. A strong GABA(A)-receptor complex binding activity was observed in the methanol extract of aerial part of Stylosanthes erecta. The results in this study justify some of the traditional indications of the plants investigated and may thus be candidates for Improved Traditional Medicines in Mali. PMID:17126508

  19. {sup 125}I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level during psychological stress in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi E-mail: GZL13162@nifty.ne.jp; Ogi, Shigeyuki; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Mori, Yutaka

    2004-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that benzodiazepine receptor density decreases in response to stress, we correlated {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) binding with serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats were divided into four groups; control group (CON, 10 rats), no physical or psychological stress; and one-, three-, and five-day stress groups of 12 rats each (1-DAY, 3-DAY, and 5-DAY, respectively), receiving psychological stress for the given number of days. Psychological stress were given to rats with a communication box. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 125}I-iomazenil of the 3-DAY and 5-DAY showed that {sup 125}I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding was significantly reduced in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen (p<0.05). Serum corticosterone level ratio appeared to be slightly elevated in 3-DAY and 5-DAY, although this elevation was not significant. These data suggest that {sup 125}I-IMZ is a useful radioligand to reflect received stress and its binding in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen is strongly affected by psychological stress.

  20. Arterial Blood Gas Analysis and the Outcome of Treatment in Tricyclic Antidepressants Poisoned Patients with Benzodiazepine Coingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Yaraghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Poisoning with tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs is still a major concern for emergency physicians and intensivists. Concomitant ingestion of other psychoactive drugs especially benzodiazepines with TCAs may make this clinical situation more complex. This study aimed to compare the arterial blood gas (ABG values and the outcome of treatment in patients with coingestion of TCA and benzodiazepine (TCA + BZD poisoning and TCA poisoning alone. Methods. In this cross-sectional study which was carried out in a tertiary care university hospital in Iran, clinical and paraclinical characteristics of one hundred forty TCA only or TCA + BZD poisoned patients (aged 18–40 years were evaluated. ABG analysis was done on admission in both groups. Outcomes were considered as survival with or without complication (e.g., intubation and the frequency of TCA poisoning complications. Results. Arterial pH was significantly lower in TCA + BZD poisoning group compared with TCA only poisoning group (7.34 ± 0.08 and 7.38 ± 0.08, resp.; P=0.02. However, other complications such as seizure, and the need for the endotracheal intubation were not significantly different. All patients in both groups survived. Conclusions. Concomitant TCA plus BZD poisoning may make the poisoned patients prone to a lower arterial pH level on hospital admission which may potentially increases the risk of cardiovascular complications in TCA poisoning.

  1. Pattern of benzodiazepine use in psychiatric outpatients in Pakistan: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Imran

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzodiazepines (BDZ are the largest-selling drug group in the world. The potential of dependence with BDZ has been known for almost three decades now. In countries like Pakistan where laws against unlicensed sale of BDZ are not implemented vigorously the risk of misuse of and dependence on these drugs is even higher. Previous studies have shown that BDZ prevalence among patients/visitors to general outpatient clinics in Pakistan may be as high as 30%. However, no research has been carried out on the prevalence of BDZ use in psychiatric patients in Pakistan. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional survey over 3 months in psychiatry outpatient clinics of two tertiary care hospitals in Karachi and Lahore. Besides basic socio-demographic data the participants were asked if they were taking a BDZ at present and if yes, the frequency, route and dosage of the drug, who had initiated the drug and why it had been prescribed. We used chi-square test and t-test to find out which socio-demographic or clinical factors were associated with an increased risk of BDZ use. We used Logistic Regression to find out which variable(s best predicted the increased likelihood of BDZ use. Results Out of a total of 419 participants 187 (45% of the participants had been currently using at least one BDZ. Seventy-three percent of the users had been using the drug for 4 weeks or longer and 87% were taking it every day. In 90% of cases the BDZ had been initiated by a doctor, who was a psychiatrist in 70% of the cases. Female gender, increasing age, living in Lahore, and having seen a psychiatrist before, were associated with an increased likelihood of using BDZ. Conclusion The study shows how high BDZ use is in psychiatric outpatients in Pakistan. Most of the users were taking it for a duration and with a frequency which puts them at risk of becoming dependent on BDZ. In most of the cases it had been initiated by a doctor. Both patients and doctors need to

  2. Gaining insight into benzodiazepine prescribing in General Practice in France: a data-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Le Vaillant

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent decades, benzodiazepine (BZD prescriptions have been called into question in most European countries by physicians and health authorities alike, and guidelines on medical indications and treatment duration have been established to avoid long-term use and dependency. In France, many public policy measures have been implemented as BZDs are among the most prescribed medications. General practitioners (GPs were identified by the Caisse d'Assurance Maladie (the French public health insurance fund as high prescribers for these drugs. In this context, the aim of the study was to determine GPs' rates and to identify correlates of BZD and Z-drugs prescribing. Methods Data on patient characteristics, diagnoses and BZD prescriptions were drawn from French GPs' electronic medical records. These were accessed via the database which the Société Française de Médecine Générale, the French Society of General Practice, has been compiling since 1993 in a network of 90 GPs working mainly in solo practices. The participants in this network routinely register data in their daily practice. The present study examined 51,216 patients from 52 GP practices and we performed a multivariate logistic regression. The dependent variable was whether a patient was prescribed BZD at least once during 2006. Results In the present study, 12.5% of patients older than 18 were prescribed BZDs at least once during 2006 and the average (SD was 2.6 (2.4 BZD prescriptions/patient/year. The adjusted odds (confidence interval of having at least one BZD prescription were 1.20 (1.10 - 1.30 in patients older than 65; 1.05 (1.01 - 1.10 in women; 1.25 (1.17 - 1.33 in patients with associated comorbidities (cardiovascular diseases and 1.76 (1.62 - 1.92 in heavy consumers of health care (more than 4 consultations with a GP per year. Conclusions The present study showed the persistence of high rates of BZD prescription by GPs, particularly in women and older

  3. Peripheral biomarkers of stroke: Focus on circulatory microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Murali; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world. Stroke occurs when blood flow stops, and that stoppage results in reduced oxygen supply to neurons in the brain. The occurrence of stroke increases with age, but anyone at any age can suffer from stroke. Recent research has implicated multiple cellular changes in stroke patients, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory responses, and changes in mRNA and proteins. Recent research has also revealed that stroke is associated with modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Stroke can be controlled by modifiable risk factors, including diet, cardiovascular, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, depression and traumatic brain injury. Stroke is the major risk factor for vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this article is to review the latest developments in research efforts directed at identifying 1) latest developments in identifying biomarkers in peripheral and central nervous system tissues, 2) changes in microRNAs (miRNAs) in patients with stroke, 3) miRNA profile and function in animal brain, and 4) protein biomarkers in ischemic stroke. This article also reviews research investigating circulatory miRNAs as peripheral biomarkers of stroke. PMID:27503360

  4. NGF, Brain and Behavioral Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Berry; Erika Bindocci; Enrico Alleva

    2012-01-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) was initially studied for its role as a key player in the regulation of peripheral innervations. However, the successive finding of its release in the bloodstream of male mice following aggressive encounters and its presence in the central nervous system led to the hypothesis that variations in brain NGF levels, caused by psychosocial stressor, and the related alterations in emotionality, could be functional to the development of proper strategies to cope with the st...

  5. Peripheral ossifying fibroma in the maxillary arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V A Trasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many types of localized reactive lesions may occur on the gingiva, including focal fibrous hyperplasia, pyogenic granuloma, peripheral giant cell granuloma and peripheral ossifying fibroma. Peripheral ossifying fibroma is a gingival growth, usually arising from interdental papilla and represents up to 2% of all lesions that are biopsied. Other terms used to describe this lesion include peripheral cementifying fibroma, peripheral fibroma with cementogenesis, peripheral fibroma with osteogenesis, peripheral fibroma with calcification, calcified or ossified fibrous epulis and calcified fibroblastic granuloma. This article reports a case of a 10 year old male child with an unusually large peripheral ossifying fibroma in the left maxillary alveolar ridge which showed recurrence after the surgical treatment.

  6. Benzodiazepine prescribing in children under 15 years of age receiving free medical care on the General Medical Services scheme in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, K

    2015-06-01

    To examine the prevalence and secular trends in benzodiazepine (BZD) prescribing in the Irish paediatric population. In addition, we examine coprescribing of antiepileptic, antipsychotic, antidepressant and psychostimulants in children receiving BZD drugs and compare BZD prescribing in Ireland to that in other European countries.

  7. Adverse Events Associated with Flumazenil Treatment for the Management of Suspected Benzodiazepine Intoxication - A Systematic Review with Meta-Analyses of Randomised Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Elisabeth I; Graudal, Niels; Ladekarl, Morten Baekbo;

    2016-01-01

    the risk of (S)AEs associated with the use of flumazenil in patients with impaired consciousness due to known or suspected benzodiazepine overdose. Studies included in the meta-analyses were identified by literature search in Medline, Cochrane Library and Embase using combinations of the words flumazenil...

  8. 3-Alkyl- and 3-amido-isothiazoloquinolin-4-ones as ligands for the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard; Liljefors, Tommy;

    2012-01-01

    Based on a pharmacophore model of the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA(A) receptors, developed with synthetic flavones and potent 3-carbonylquinolin-4-ones, 3-alkyl- and 3-amido-6-methylisothiazoloquinolin-4-ones were designed, prepared and assayed. The suggestion that the interaction betw...

  9. Systemic or Intra-Amygdala Infusion of the Benzodiazepine, Midazolam, Impairs Learning, but Facilitates Re-Learning to Inhibit Fear Responses in Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Genevra; Harris, Justin A.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2010-01-01

    A series of experiments used rats to study the effect of a systemic or intra-amygdala infusion of the benzodiazepine, midazolam, on learning and re-learning to inhibit context conditioned fear (freezing) responses. Rats were subjected to two context-conditioning episodes followed by extinction under drug or vehicle, or to two cycles of context…

  10. Systemic or Intra-Amygdala Injection of a Benzodiazepine (Midazolam) Impairs Extinction but Spares Re-Extinction of Conditioned Fear Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Genevra; Harris, Justin A.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2009-01-01

    Rats were subjected to one or two cycles of fear conditioning and extinction, injected with a benzodiazepine, midazolam, before the first or second extinction, and tested for long-term inhibition of fear responses (freezing). In Experiment 1, inhibition of context-conditioned fear was spared when midazolam was injected before the second…

  11. Reliability of self-reported use of amphetamine, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, cocaine, methadone, and opiates among acutely hospitalized elderly medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, B.; Olsen, L.; Poulsen, H.;

    2008-01-01

    Undisclosed use of illicit drugs and prescription controlled substances is frequent in some settings. The aim of the present study was to estimate the reliability of self-reported use of amphetamine, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, cocaine, methadone, and opiates among acutely...

  12. Application of cyclic ketones in MCR: Ugi/amide coupling based synthesis of fused tetrazolo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yerande, Swapnil; Newase, Kiran; Singh, Bhawani; Boltjes, André; Dömling, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Azido-Ugi reaction involving cyclic ketone, primary amine, isonitrile, and azide afforded substituted tetrazole derivatives 5. These intermediates were hydrolyzed to corresponding acid derivatives. EDAC/HOBt mediated amide bond formation of 5 gave fused tetrazolo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine 6 in high

  13. Application of chalcones in heterocycles synthesis: Synthesis of 2-(isoxazolo, pyrazolo and pyrimido) substituted analogues of 1,4-benzodiazepin-5-carboxamides linked through an oxyphenyl bridge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Kaur; D Kishore

    2013-05-01

    Versatility of chalcone derivative of 2-(4'-acetyl)-phenoxyl-5-carboxamido-1,4-benzodiazepin-5-(4'-methylpiperazinyl)-carboxamide (6) was explored to provide an easy one-pot access to its 2-(isoxazolo, pyrazolo and pyrimido) substituted analogues 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16.

  14. Functional characterization of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam at human GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Harriet; Ebert, Bjarke; Jensen, Henrik S.;

    2015-01-01

    different in vivo adverse effects and addiction liability profile than the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines. In this study, it was investigated whether the in vitro pharmacological properties of clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam could explain some of these clinical differences...

  15. Peripheral arterial disease: implications beyond the peripheral circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Whayne, Thomas F

    2013-11-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects a considerable percentage of the population. The manifestations of this disease are not always clinically overt. As a result, PAD remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. PAD is not just a disease of the peripheral arteries, but also an indication of generalized vascular atherosclerosis. PAD patients also have a high prevalence of other arterial diseases, such as coronary/carotid artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms. PAD is also a predictor of increased risk of lung and other cancers. The most often used examination for the establishment of the diagnosis of PAD, the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI), is also a predictor of generalized atherosclerosis, future cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality. Several markers that have been linked with PAD (e.g. C-reactive protein, serum bilirubin levels) may also have predictive value for other conditions besides PAD (e.g. kidney dysfunction). The management of PAD should therefore not be restricted to the peripheral circulation but should include measurements to manage and decrease the systemic atherosclerotic burden of the patient. PMID:23221278

  16. [Peripheral neuropathy caused by acute arsenic poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Campos, J; Ramos-Peek, J; Martínez-Barros, M; Zamora-Peralta, M; Martínez-Cerrato, J

    1998-01-01

    Although peripheral neuropathy is a fairly common finding in chronic arsenic poisoning, little is known about the acute effects of this metal on peripheral nerves. This report shows clinical and electrophysiological findings in a patient who developed peripheral neuropathy only three days after a high-dose ingestion of this metal due to a failed suicide attempt. We speculate that peripheral nerves and some cranial nerves can show not only clinical but also subclinical involvement that can only be detected by neurophysiological studies.

  17. Functional characterization of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam at human GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Harriet; Ebert, Bjarke; Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    The 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam is indicated for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients 2 years of age or older in the United States, and for treatment of anxiety and various forms of epilepsy elsewhere. Clobazam has been reported to exhibit different in vivo adverse effects and addiction liability profile than the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines. In this study, it was investigated whether the in vitro pharmacological properties of clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam could explain some of these clinical differences. The functional properties of the two 1,5-benzodiazepines were characterized at the human γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) subtypes α1β2γ(2S), α2β2γ(2S), α3β2γ(2S), α5β2γ(2S) and α6β2δ expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology and compared to those exhibited by the 1,4-benzodiazepine clonazepam. All three compounds potentiated GABA EC20-evoked responses through the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) GABA(A)Rs in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, with each displaying similar EC50 values at the four subtypes. Furthermore, the degrees of potentiation of the GABA EC20 currents through the four receptors mediated by saturating modulator concentrations did not differ substantially for any of the three benzodiazepines. The three compounds were substantially less potent (200-3900 fold) as positive allosteric modulators at the α6β2δ GABA(A)R than at the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) receptors. Interestingly, however, clobazam and especially N-desmethylclobazam were highly efficacious potentiators of α6β2δ receptor signaling. Although this activity component is unlikely to contribute to the in vivo effects of clobazam/N-desmethylclobazam, the 1,5-benzodiazepine could constitute an interesting lead for novel modulators targeting this low-affinity binding site in GABAARs. In conclusion, the non-selective modulation

  18. Coaching Peripheral Vision Training for Soccer Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Nelson Kautzner, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Brazilian Soccer began developing its current emphasis on peripheral vision in the late 1950s, by initiative of coach of the Canto do Rio Football Club, in Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, a pioneer in the development of peripheral vision training in soccer players. Peripheral vision training gained world relevance when a young talent from Canto do Rio,…

  19. Brain-Computer Interfaces, Virtual Reality, and Videogames

    OpenAIRE

    Reilly, Richard

    2008-01-01

    PUBLISHED Major challenges must be tackled for brain-computer interfaces to mature into an established communications medium for VR applications, which will range from basic neuroscience studies to developing optimal peripherals and mental gamepads and more efficient brain-signal processing techniques.

  20. 5-HT1A and benzodiazepine receptors in the basolateral amygdala modulate anxiety in the social interaction test, but not in the elevated plus-maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L E; Andrews, N; File, S E

    1996-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of the 5-HT1A receptors of the amygdala in modulating anxiety, rats were implanted with bilateral cannulae aimed at the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala complex and infused with either artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) or the selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (50-200 ng) and tested in two animal models of anxiety. In the elevated plus-maze test, no significant effects were detected in this dose range. In contrast, 8-OH-DPAT caused an overall reduction in levels of social investigation, thus indicating anxiogenic actions in the social interaction test. At 50 ng, 8-OH-DPAT had a selective action on anxiety, while at 200 ng there was a concomitant reduction in locomotor activity and, in some animals, signs of the 5-HT1A syndrome. Evidence that the anxiogenic effect of 8-OH-DPAT (50 ng) was due to activation of 5-HT1A receptors came from the finding that (-)-tertatolol, a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, reversed this effect at a dose (1.5 micrograms) which was silent when given alone. The benzodiazepine receptor agonist, midazolam (1 and 2 micrograms) was bilaterally administered into the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala and evoked clear-cut anxiolytic effects in the social interaction test. These data indicate that the agonist activation of post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala may produce anxiogenic effects, while agonist activation of BDZ receptors in the same areas evokes anxiolytic effects. Our results from the social interaction test are similar to those previously reported from tests of anxiety using punished paradigms, but contrast with those found in the elevated plus-maze. Thus, it is concluded that either the two tests have different sensitivities to midazolam and 8-OH-DPAT or more intriguingly, the tests are evoking fundamentally different states of anxiety, with that evoked by the plus-maze being mediated via brain areas or receptors different from those studied here.

  1. Peripheral Administration of a Long-Acting Peptide Oxytocin Receptor Agonist Inhibits Fear-Induced Freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Meera E; Majchrzak, Mark J; Fonseca, Kari R; Doran, Angela; Osgood, Sarah; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle; Feyfant, Eric; McInnes, Heather; Darvari, Ramin; Buhl, Derek L; Kablaoui, Natasha M

    2016-08-01

    Oxytocin (OT) modulates the expression of social and emotional behaviors and consequently has been proposed as a pharmacologic treatment of psychiatric diseases, including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia; however, endogenous OT has a short half-life in plasma and poor permeability across the blood-brain barrier. Recent efforts have focused on the development of novel drug delivery methods to enhance brain penetration, but few efforts have aimed at improving its half-life. To explore the behavioral efficacy of an OT analog with enhanced plasma stability, we developed PF-06655075 (PF1), a novel non-brain-penetrant OT receptor agonist with increased selectivity for the OT receptor and significantly increased pharmacokinetic stability. PF-06478939 was generated with only increased stability to disambiguate changes to selectivity versus stability. The efficacy of these compounds in evoking behavioral effects was tested in a conditioned fear paradigm. Both central and peripheral administration of PF1 inhibited freezing in response to a conditioned fear stimulus. Peripheral administration of PF1 resulted in a sustained level of plasma concentrations for greater than 20 hours but no detectable accumulation in brain tissue, suggesting that plasma or cerebrospinal fluid exposure was sufficient to evoke behavioral effects. Behavioral efficacy of peripherally administered OT receptor agonists on conditioned fear response opens the door to potential peripheral mechanisms in other behavioral paradigms, whether they are mediated by direct peripheral activation or feed-forward responses. Compound PF1 is freely available as a tool compound to further explore the role of peripheral OT in behavioral response. PMID:27217590

  2. Peripheral blood film - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewoyin, A S; Nwogoh, B

    2014-12-01

    The peripheral blood film (PBF) is a laboratory work-up that involves cytology of peripheral blood cells smeared on a slide. As basic as it is, PBF is invaluable in the characterization of various clinical diseases. This article highlights the basic science and art behind the PBF. It expounds its laboratory applications, clinical indications and interpretations in the light of various clinical diseases. Despite advances in haematology automation and application of molecular techniques, the PBF has remained a very important diagnostic test to the haematologist. A good quality smear, thorough examination and proper interpretation in line with patient's clinical state should be ensured by the haemato-pathologist. Clinicians should be abreast with its clinical utility and proper application of the reports in the management of patients. PMID:25960697

  3. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslantunali D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available D Arslantunali,1–3,* T Dursun,1,2,* D Yucel,1,4,5 N Hasirci,1,2,6 V Hasirci,1,2,7 1BIOMATEN, Center of Excellence in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Biotechnology, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 3Department of Bioengineering, Gumushane University, Gumushane, Turkey; 4Faculty of Engineering, Department of Medical Engineering, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 5School of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 6Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 7Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey *These authors have contributed equally to this work Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type are being presented. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, natural biomaterials, synthetic biomaterials

  4. Assessment of Peripheral Lung Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, Jason H. T.; Suki, Béla

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the lung periphery are major determinants of overall lung function, and can change dramatically in disease. In this review we examine the various experimental techniques that have provided data pertaining to the mechanical properties of the lung periphery, together with the mathematical models that have been used to interpret these data. These models seek to make a clear distinction between the central and peripheral compartments of the lung by encapsulating funct...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Trials — Participants Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

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    Full Text Available ... brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the ... mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons ...

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    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function ...

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How ... cell, and responds to signals from the environment; this all helps the cell maintain its balance with ...

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    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

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    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

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    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

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    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

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    Full Text Available ... medications could reduce the amount of trial and error and frustration that many people with depression experience ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain ...

  18. Brain Diseases

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    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

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    Full Text Available ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues ...

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    Full Text Available ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

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    Full Text Available ... neurons, the most highly specialized cells of all, conduct messages. Every cell in our bodies contains a ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

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    Full Text Available ... can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the ... healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  6. Tumefactive Brain Demyelination Accompanying MADSAM Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şefik Evren Erdener

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor (MADSAM neuropathy is characterized by asymmetric multifocal motor and sensory loss and conduction blocks in peripheral nerves. Peripheral demyelinating diseases may be accompanied by demyelination in central nervous system (CNS. In this report, a MADSAM patient with a solitary tumefactive demyelinating lesion in brain is presented. Neuroimaging due to a visual field defect revealed a right parietooccipital lesion, which was initially misdiagnosed as a tumor. Pathological examination showed that it was demyelinating in nature. Peripheral nervous symptoms of the patient developed two years later and she was then diagnosed with MADSAM. There was prominent clinical and electrophysiological response to steroid treatment. Tumefactive brain involvement was not previously reported for MADSAM neuropathy, although it was documented in a single case with typical chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP. CNS involvement should therefore be considered in MADSAM patients.

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ... new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body ... stress. impulse —An electrical communication signal sent between neurons ...

  9. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  10. A rapid fluorimetric screening method for the 1,4-benzodiazepines: Determination of their metabolite oxazepam in urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil Tejedor, A.M. [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, c/Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez Hernando, P. [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, c/Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: pfhernando@ccia.uned.es; Durand Alegria, J.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, c/Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    Oxazepam is the major metabolite screened in urine samples for the evidence of the use of benzodiazepine drugs. The methods currently used, however, are laborious and time consuming. This paper proposes an oxazepam detection method based on its hydrolysis and cyclization - a reaction catalysed by cerium (IV) in an ortho-phosphoric acid-containing medium - to form 2-chloro-9(10H)-acridinone, a strongly fluorescent molecule. The variables involved in the hydrolysis and cyclization stages were optimised. Oxazepam was detectable in the 5-900 ng mL{sup -1} range, with a detection limit of 4.15 ng mL{sup -1} for k = 3. The method was successfully used for the determination of oxazepam in urine samples collected at different times after the oral administration of Valium[reg] and Tranxilium[reg].

  11. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...... surgical techniques and better outcome after peripheral nerve injury. Decision making in peripheral nerve surgery continues to be a complex challenge, where the mechanism of injury, repeated clinical evaluation, neuroradiological and neurophysiological examination, and detailed knowledge of the peripheral...... nervous system response to injury are prerequisite to obtain the best possible outcome. Surgery continues to be the primary treatment modality for peripheral nerve tumors and advances in adjuvant oncological treatment has improved outcome after malignant peripheral nerve tumors. The present chapter...

  12. What will this do to me and my brain? Ethical issues in brain-to-brain interfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eHildt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For several years now, brain-computer interfaces (BCIs in which brain signals are used to navigate a computer, a prostheses or a technical device, have been developed in various experimental contexts (Wolpaw & Wolpaw 2012; Grübler & Hildt 2014. Researchers have recently taken the next step and run experiments based on connections between two brains. These so-called brain-to-brain interfaces (abbreviation: BBIs or BTBIs involve not only a BCI component deriving information from a brain and sending it to a computer, but also a computer-brain interface (CBI component delivering information to another brain. What results is technology-mediated brain-to-brain communication (B2B communication, i.e. direct communication between two brains that does not involve any activity of the peripheral nervous system. In what follows, ethical issues that arise in neural interfacing will be discussed after a short introduction to recent BBI experiments. In this, the focus will be on the implications BBIs may have on the individual at the CBI side of the BBI, i.e. on the recipient.

  13. The choroid plexus response to a repeated peripheral inflammatory stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palha Joana A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic systemic inflammation triggers alterations in the central nervous system that may relate to the underlying inflammatory component reported in neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, it is far from being understood whether and how peripheral inflammation contributes to induce brain inflammatory response in such illnesses. As part of the barriers that separate the blood from the brain, the choroid plexus conveys inflammatory immune signals into the brain, largely through alterations in the composition of the cerebrospinal fluid. Results In the present study we investigated the mouse choroid plexus gene expression profile, using microarray analyses, in response to a repeated inflammatory stimulus induced by the intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide every two weeks for a period of three months; mice were sacrificed 3 and 15 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection. The data show that the choroid plexus displays a sustained response to the repeated inflammatory stimuli by altering the expression profile of several genes. From a total of 24,000 probes, 369 are up-regulated and 167 are down-regulated 3 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection, while at 15 days the number decreases to 98 and 128, respectively. The pathways displaying the most significant changes include those facilitating entry of cells into the cerebrospinal fluid, and those participating in the innate immune response to infection. Conclusion These observations contribute to a better understanding of the brain response to peripheral inflammation and pave the way to study their impact on the progression of several disorders of the central nervous system in which inflammation is known to be implicated.

  14. "Anxiolytic" and "anxiogenic" benzodiazepines and beta-carbolines: effects on aggressive and social behavior in rats and squirrel monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerts, E M; Tornatzky, W; Miczek, K A

    1993-01-01

    Ethopharmacological studies on the behavior of socially housed rats and squirrel monkeys were conducted to explore the role of the benzodiazepine GABAA-coupled ionophore receptor complex in aggressive and social interactions. Benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) antagonists, ZK 93426 (1-10 mg/kg) and flumazenil (3-10 mg/kg), the partial agonist, ZK 91296 (1-10 mg/kg) and the partial inverse agonists Ro 15-4513 (0.3-10 mg/kg), were administered to (1) squirrel monkeys prior to 1 h focal observations within established social groups or to (2) resident male rats before confrontations with a naive male intruder in their home cage for 5 min. Aggression was modified in a similar manner in both species, although squirrel monkeys were more sensitive to BZR challenges. Specifically, resident male rats showed dose dependent reductions in attack bites directed at intruder males that were significant at the highest dose of ZK 93426 (10 mg/kg). In squirrel monkeys, ZK 93426 (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced aggressive grasps, threats and displays, as well as reducing the duration of being the target of aggression from untreated group members (1-10 mg/kg). The BZR partial agonist, ZK 91296 and the antagonist, flumazenil produced few effects on social behavior, low and high intensity aggression and motor activity in both species. Flumazenil (10-30 mg/kg) and ZK 91296 (10 mg/kg), but not ZK 93426, produced significant increases in foraging and feeding behaviors in squirrel monkeys. The hyperphagic effects of ZK 91296 and flumazenil, that are typical of BZR agonists compounds, were not observed in rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7870916

  15. Ventral tegmental area neurons are either excited or inhibited by cocaine’s actions in the peripheral nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Mejías-Aponte, Carlos A.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine’s multiple pharmacological substrates are ubiquitously present in the peripheral and central nervous system. Thus, upon its administration, cocaine acts in the periphery before directly acting in the brain. We determined whether cocaine alters ventral tegmental area (VTA) neuronal activity via peripheral actions, and whether this precedes its central actions. In urethane-anesthetized rats, we recorded VTA neurons responses to intravenous injections of two cocaine analogs: cocaine-hydr...

  16. Sex differences in the brain: a whole body perspective

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, Geert J.; Forger, Nancy G

    2015-01-01

    Most writing on sexual differentiation of the mammalian brain (including our own) considers just two organs: the gonads and the brain. This perspective, which leaves out all other body parts, misleads us in several ways. First, there is accumulating evidence that all organs are sexually differentiated, and that sex differences in peripheral organs affect the brain. We demonstrate this by reviewing examples involving sex differences in muscles, adipose tissue, the liver, immune system, gut, ki...

  17. fNIRS-based brain-computer interfaces: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Noman eNaseer; Keum-Shik eHong

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that allows the use of brain activity to control computers or other external devices. It can, by bypassing the peripheral nervous system, provide a means of communication for people suffering from severe motor disabilities or in a persistent vegetative state. In this paper, brain-signal generation tasks, noise removal methods, feature extraction/selection schemes, and classification techniques for fNIRS-based BCI are reviewed. The mos...

  18. Quaternary ammonium salt derivatives of allylphenols with peripheral analgesic effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B de Oliveira

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium salt derivatives of natural allylphenols were synthesized with the purpose of obtaining potential peripheral analgesics. These drugs, by virtue of their physicochemical properties, would not be able to cross the blood brain barrier. Their inability to enter into the central nervous system (CNS should prevent several adverse effects observed with classical opiate analgesics (Ferreira et al., 1984. Eugenol (1 O-methyleugenol (5 and safrole (9 were submitted to nitration, reduction and permethylation, leading to the ammonium salts 4, 8 and 12. Another strategy applied to eugenol (1, consisting in its conversion to a glycidic ether (13, opening the epoxide ring with secondary amines and methylation, led to the ammonium salts 16 and 17. All these ammonium salts showed significant peripheral analgesic action, in modified version of the Randall-Sellito test (Ferreira et al. 1978, at non-lethal doses. The ammonium salt 8 showed an activity comparable to that of methylnalorphinium, the prototype of an ideal peripheral analgesic (Ferreira et al., 1984.

  19. [A case of Sotos syndrome associated with peripheral nerve involvements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakawa, I; Katoh, H; Hara, K; Yasuda, T; Terao, A

    1992-03-01

    A case of the Sotos syndrome associated with peripheral nerve involvements was reported. A 52-year-old male was admitted to Kawasaki Medical School Hospital because of gait disturbance, muscle atrophy, and weakness in both hands. This case was diagnosed as the Sotos syndrome based on the following symptoms and findings, acromegaloid features, hypertrophic changes in the hands and feet, a history of epileptic episodes, a low IQ, a normal growth hormone value, and no tumor lesion in the pituitary gland. Radiological examination disclosed a cauliflower-like appearance of the finger tips and thickness of the heel pads. Brain CT and MRI revealed diffuse mild brain atrophy. An electroencephalogram showed diffuse theta waves with sharp waves in the right parietal region. A needle electromyogram revealed neurogenic change in both upper and lower limbs. A nerve conduction study disclosed the carpal tunnel syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome. These findings suggest that, as in the case of acromegaly, entrapment neuropathy and peripheral neuropathy can also be induced in the Sotos syndrome.

  20. Diagnostic approach to peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Usha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy refers to disorders of the peripheral nervous system. They have numerous causes and diverse presentations; hence, a systematic and logical approach is needed for cost-effective diagnosis, especially of treatable neuropathies. A detailed history of symptoms, family and occupational history should be obtained. General and systemic examinations provide valuable clues. Neurological examinations investigating sensory, motor and autonomic signs help to define the topography and nature of neuropathy. Large fiber neuropathy manifests with the loss of joint position and vibration sense and sensory ataxia, whereas small fiber neuropathy manifests with the impairment of pain, temperature and autonomic functions. Electrodiagnostic (EDx tests include sensory, motor nerve conduction, F response, H reflex and needle electromyography (EMG. EDx helps in documenting the extent of sensory motor deficits, categorizing demyelinating (prolonged terminal latency, slowing of nerve conduction velocity, dispersion and conduction block and axonal (marginal slowing of nerve conduction and small compound muscle or sensory action potential and dennervation on EMG. Uniform demyelinating features are suggestive of hereditary demyelination, whereas difference between nerves and segments of the same nerve favor acquired demyelination. Finally, neuropathy is classified into mononeuropathy commonly due to entrapment or trauma; mononeuropathy multiplex commonly due to leprosy and vasculitis; and polyneuropathy due to systemic, metabolic or toxic etiology. Laboratory investigations are carried out as indicated and specialized tests such as biochemical, immunological, genetic studies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination and nerve biopsy are carried out in selected patients. Approximately 20% patients with neuropathy remain undiagnosed but the prognosis is not bad in them.