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Sample records for brain p1 n170

  1. P1 and N170 components distinguish human-like and animal-like makeup stimuli.

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    Luo, Shuwei; Luo, Wenbo; He, Weiqi; Chen, Xu; Luo, Yuejia

    2013-06-19

    This study used event-related potentials to investigate the sensitivity of P1 and N170 components to human-like and animal-like makeup stimuli, which were derived from pictures of Peking opera characters. As predicted, human-like makeup stimuli elicited larger P1 and N170 amplitudes than did animal-like makeup stimuli. Interestingly, a right hemisphere advantage was observed for human-like but not for animal-like makeup stimuli. Dipole source analyses of 130-200-ms window showed that the bilateral fusiform face area may contribute to the differential sensitivity of the N170 component in response to human-like and animal-like makeup stimuli. The present study suggests that the amplitudes of both the P1 and the N170 are sensitive for the mouth component of face-like stimuli.

  2. Responsivity to dyslexia training indexed by the N170 amplitude of the brain potential elicited by word reading.

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    Fraga González, G; Žarić, G; Tijms, J; Bonte, M; Blomert, L; Leppänen, P; van der Molen, M W

    2016-07-01

    The present study examined training effects in dyslexic children on reading fluency and the amplitude of N170, a negative brain-potential component elicited by letter and symbol strings. A group of 18 children with dyslexia in 3rd grade (9.05±0.46years old) was tested before and after following a letter-speech sound mapping training. A group of 20 third-grade typical readers (8.78±0.35years old) performed a single time on the same brain potential task. The training was differentially effective in speeding up reading fluency in the dyslexic children. In some children, training had a beneficial effect on reading fluency ('improvers') while a training effect was absent in others ('non-improvers'). Improvers at pre-training showed larger N170 amplitude to words compared to non-improvers. N170 amplitude decreased following training in improvers but not in non-improvers. But the N170 amplitude pattern in improvers continued to differ from the N170 amplitude pattern across hemispheres seen in typical readers. Finally, we observed a positive relation between the decrease in N170 amplitude and gains in reading fluency. Collectively, the results that emerged from the present study indicate the sensitivity of N170 amplitude to reading fluency and its potential as a predictor of reading fluency acquisition. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Responsivity to dyslexia training indexed by the N170 amplitude of the brain potential elicited by word reading

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    Fraga González, G.; Žarić, G.; Tijms, J.; Bonte, M.; Blomert, L.; Leppänen, P.; van der Molen, M.W.

    The present study examined training effects in dyslexic children on reading fluency and the amplitude of N170, a negative brain-potential component elicited by letter and symbol strings. A group of 18 children with dyslexia in 3rd grade (9.05 ± 0.46 years old) was tested before and after following a

  4. Early (N170/M170 face-sensitivity despite right lateral occipital brain damage in acquired prosopagnosia

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    Esther eAlonso Prieto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Compared to objects, pictures of faces elicit a larger early electromagnetic response at occipito-temporal sites on the human scalp, with an onset of 130 ms and a peak at about 170 ms. This N170 face effect is larger in the right than the left hemisphere and has been associated with the early categorization of the stimulus as a face. Here we tested whether this effect can be observed in the absence of some of the visual areas showing a preferential response to faces as typically identified in neuroimaging. Event related potentials were recorded in response to faces, cars and their phase-scrambled versions in a well-known brain-damaged case of prosopagnosia (PS. Despite the patient’s right inferior occipital gyrus lesion encompassing the most posterior cortical area showing preferential response to faces (occipital face area, OFA, we identified an early face-sensitive component over the right occipito-temporal hemisphere of the patient that was identified as the N170. A second experiment supported this conclusion, showing the typical N170 increase of latency and amplitude in response to inverted faces. In contrast, there was no N170 in the left hemisphere, where PS has a lesion to the middle fusiform gyrus and shows no evidence of face-preferential response in neuroimaging (no left fusiform face area, or lFFA. These results were replicated by a magneto-encephalographic (MEG investigation of the patient, disclosing a M170 component only in the right hemisphere. These observations indicate that face preferential activation in the inferior occipital cortex is not necessary to elicit early visual responses associated with face perception (N170/M170 on the human scalp. These results further suggest that when the right inferior occipital cortex is damaged, the integrity of the middle fusiform gyrus and/or the superior temporal sulcus – two areas showing face preferential responses in the patient’s right hemisphere - might be necessary to generate

  5. Influence of education level on design-induced N170 and P300 components of event related potentials in the human brain.

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    Begum, Tahamina; Reza, Faruque; Ahmed, Izmer; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2014-03-01

    Simple geometric and organic shapes and their arrangement are being used in different neuropsychology tests for the assessment of cognitive function, special memory and also for the therapy purpose in different patient groups. Until now there is no electrophysiological evidence of cognitive function determination for simple geometric, organic shapes and their arrangement. Then the main objective of this study is to know the cortical processing and amplitude, latency of visual induced N170 and P300 event related potential components on different geometric, organic shapes and their arrangement and different educational influence on it, which is worthwhile to know for the early and better treatment for those patient groups. While education influenced on cognitive function by using auditory oddball task, little is known about the influence of education on cognitive function induced by visual attention task in case of the choice of geometric, organic shapes and their arrangements. Using a 128-electrode sensor net, we studied the responses of the choice of the different geometric and organic shapes randomly in experiment 1 and their arrangements in experiment 2 in the high, medium and low education groups. In both experiments, subjects push the button "1" or "2" if like or dislike, respectively. Total 45 healthy subjects (15 in each group) were recruited. ERPs were measured from 11 electrode sites and analyzed to see the evoked N170/N240 and P300 ERP components. There were no differences between like and dislike in amplitudes even in latencies in every stimulus in both experiments. We fixed geometric shapes and organic shapes stimuli only, not like and dislike. Upon the stimulus types, N170 ERP component was found instead of N240, in occipito-temporal (T5, T6, O1 and O2) locations where the amplitude is the highest at O2 location and P300 was distributed in the central (Cz and Pz) locations in both experiments in all groups. In experiment 1, significant low amplitude and

  6. Is the N170 face specific? Controversy, context, and theory

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    Brian D. Earp

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In cognitive science, there is an ongoing debate about the architecture of the mind: does it consist of a number of mental “organs” each managing a different function in isolation, or is it more of general processor, adaptable to a wide range of tasks? One corner of this debate has centered on face processing. This is because face-perception is crucial to normal human functioning and some evidence shows that faces may be processed by the brain in a privileged way compared to other types of stimuli. For example, in EEG brain recordings, the N170 is a characteristic signal that occurs after a participant is exposed to an image of a face, but it is much less pronounced when other stimuli are shown. More than 15 years of research on the “N170 face effect” have yielded the standard view that the N170 is at the very least face-sensitive, and possibly even face-specific, that is, indexing modular processes tied exclusively to facial geometries. The specificity claim is clearly stronger, and hence subject to significant controversy; while the more conservative “sensitivity” claim had been regarded (until recently as effectively settled. Nevertheless, Thierry and colleagues, in a contentious 2007 article, sought to undermine even this “conservative” consensus: they argued that the apparent face-responsiveness of the N170 in prior research was due to systematic flaws in experimental design. Fiery debate has followed. In this review, we put the debate in its historical and philosophical context, and try to spell out some of the theoretical and logical assumptions that underlie the claims of the competing camps. We then show that the best available evidence counts, at least partially, against the Thierry et al. construal of the N170. Accordingly, it would be premature to abandon the “conservative” account of the N170, according to which it is – minimally – responsive to faces. We conclude by returning to the more controversial claim

  7. N170 ERPs could represent a logographic processing strategy in visual word recognition

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    Bernard Christian; Petit Laurent; Simon Gregory; Rebaï Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Occipito-temporal N170 component represents the first step where face, object and word processing are discriminated along the ventral stream of the brain. N170 leftward asymmetry observed during reading has been often associated to prelexical orthographic visual word form activation. However, some studies reported a lexical frequency effect for this component particularly during word repetition that appears in contradiction with this prelexical orthographic step. Here, we ...

  8. The naked truth: the face and body sensitive N170 response is enhanced for nude bodies.

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    Hietanen, Jari K; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    Recent event-related potential studies have shown that the occipitotemporal N170 component--best known for its sensitivity to faces--is also sensitive to perception of human bodies. Considering that in the timescale of evolution clothing is a relatively new invention that hides the bodily features relevant for sexual selection and arousal, we investigated whether the early N170 brain response would be enhanced to nude over clothed bodies. In two experiments, we measured N170 responses to nude bodies, bodies wearing swimsuits, clothed bodies, faces, and control stimuli (cars). We found that the N170 amplitude was larger to opposite and same-sex nude vs. clothed bodies. Moreover, the N170 amplitude increased linearly as the amount of clothing decreased from full clothing via swimsuits to nude bodies. Strikingly, the N170 response to nude bodies was even greater than that to faces, and the N170 amplitude to bodies was independent of whether the face of the bodies was visible or not. All human stimuli evoked greater N170 responses than did the control stimulus. Autonomic measurements and self-evaluations showed that nude bodies were affectively more arousing compared to the other stimulus categories. We conclude that the early visual processing of human bodies is sensitive to the visibility of the sex-related features of human bodies and that the visual processing of other people's nude bodies is enhanced in the brain. This enhancement is likely to reflect affective arousal elicited by nude bodies. Such facilitated visual processing of other people's nude bodies is possibly beneficial in identifying potential mating partners and competitors, and for triggering sexual behavior.

  9. Measuring the face-sensitive N170 with a gaming EEG system: A validation study.

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    de Lissa, Peter; Sörensen, Sidsel; Badcock, Nicholas; Thie, Johnson; McArthur, Genevieve

    2015-09-30

    The N170 is a "face-sensitive" event-related potential (ERP) that occurs at around 170ms over occipito-temporal brain regions. The N170's potential to provide insight into the neural processing of faces in certain populations (e.g., children and adults with cognitive impairments) is limited by its measurement in scientific laboratories that can appear threatening to some people. The advent of cheap, easy-to-use portable gaming EEG systems provides an opportunity to record EEG in new contexts and populations. This study tested the validity of the face-sensitive N170 ERP measured with an adapted commercial EEG system (the Emotiv EPOC) that is used at home by gamers. The N170 recorded through both the gaming EEG system and the research EEG system exhibited face-sensitivity, with larger mean amplitudes in response to the face stimuli than the non-face stimuli, and a delayed N170 peak in response to face inversion. The EPOC system produced very similar N170 ERPs to a research-grade Neuroscan system, and was capable of recording face-sensitivity in the N170, validating its use as research tool in this arena. This opens new possibilities for measuring the face-sensitive N170 ERP in people who cannot travel to a traditional ERP laboratory (e.g., elderly people in care), who cannot tolerate laboratory conditions (e.g., people with autism), or who need to be tested in situ for practical or experimental reasons (e.g., children in schools). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The background of reduced face specificity of N170 in congenital prosopagnosia.

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    Németh, Kornél; Zimmer, Márta; Schweinberger, Stefan R; Vakli, Pál; Kovács, Gyula

    2014-01-01

    Congenital prosopagnosia is lifelong face-recognition impairment in the absence of evidence for structural brain damage. To study the neural correlates of congenital prosopagnosia, we measured the face-sensitive N170 component of the event-related potential in three members of the same family (father (56 y), son (25 y) and daughter (22 y)) and in age-matched neurotypical participants (young controls: n = 14; 24.5 y±2.1; old controls: n = 6; 57.3 y±5.4). To compare the face sensitivity of N170 in congenital prosopagnosic and neurotypical participants we measured the event-related potentials for faces and phase-scrambled random noise stimuli. In neurotypicals we found significantly larger N170 amplitude for faces compared to noise stimuli, reflecting normal early face processing. The congenital prosopagnosic participants, by contrast, showed reduced face sensitivity of the N170, and this was due to a larger than normal noise-elicited N170, rather than to a smaller face-elicited N170. Interestingly, single-trial analysis revealed that the lack of face sensitivity in congenital prosopagnosia is related to a larger oscillatory power and phase-locking in the theta frequency-band (4-7 Hz, 130-190 ms) as well as to a lower intertrial jitter of the response latency for the noise stimuli. Altogether, these results suggest that congenital prosopagnosia is due to the deficit of early, structural encoding steps of face perception in filtering between face and non-face stimuli.

  11. The background of reduced face specificity of N170 in congenital prosopagnosia.

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    Kornél Németh

    Full Text Available Congenital prosopagnosia is lifelong face-recognition impairment in the absence of evidence for structural brain damage. To study the neural correlates of congenital prosopagnosia, we measured the face-sensitive N170 component of the event-related potential in three members of the same family (father (56 y, son (25 y and daughter (22 y and in age-matched neurotypical participants (young controls: n = 14; 24.5 y±2.1; old controls: n = 6; 57.3 y±5.4. To compare the face sensitivity of N170 in congenital prosopagnosic and neurotypical participants we measured the event-related potentials for faces and phase-scrambled random noise stimuli. In neurotypicals we found significantly larger N170 amplitude for faces compared to noise stimuli, reflecting normal early face processing. The congenital prosopagnosic participants, by contrast, showed reduced face sensitivity of the N170, and this was due to a larger than normal noise-elicited N170, rather than to a smaller face-elicited N170. Interestingly, single-trial analysis revealed that the lack of face sensitivity in congenital prosopagnosia is related to a larger oscillatory power and phase-locking in the theta frequency-band (4-7 Hz, 130-190 ms as well as to a lower intertrial jitter of the response latency for the noise stimuli. Altogether, these results suggest that congenital prosopagnosia is due to the deficit of early, structural encoding steps of face perception in filtering between face and non-face stimuli.

  12. Expectations about person identity modulate the face-sensitive N170.

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    Johnston, Patrick; Overell, Anne; Kaufman, Jordy; Robinson, Jonathan; Young, Andrew W

    2016-12-01

    Identifying familiar faces is a fundamentally important aspect of social perception that requires the ability to assign very different (ambient) images of a face to a common identity. The current consensus is that the brain processes face identity at approximately 250-300 msec following stimulus onset, as indexed by the N250 event related potential. However, using two experiments we show compelling evidence that where experimental paradigms induce expectations about person identity, changes in famous face identity are in fact detected at an earlier latency corresponding to the face-sensitive N170. In Experiment 1, using a rapid periodic stimulation paradigm presenting highly variable ambient images, we demonstrate robust effects of low frequency, periodic face-identity changes in N170 amplitude. In Experiment 2, we added infrequent aperiodic identity changes to show that the N170 was larger to both infrequent periodic and infrequent aperiodic identity changes than to high frequency identities. Our use of ambient stimulus images makes it unlikely that these effects are due to adaptation of low-level stimulus features. In line with current ideas about predictive coding, we therefore suggest that when expectations about the identity of a face exist, the visual system is capable of detecting identity mismatches at a latency consistent with the N170. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chinese Characters Elicit Face-Like N170 Inversion Effects

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    Wang, Man-Ying; Kuo, Bo-Cheng; Cheng, Shih-Kuen

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of both faces and Chinese characters is commonly believed to rely on configural information. While faces typically exhibit behavioral and N170 inversion effects that differ from non-face stimuli (Rossion, Joyce, Cottrell, & Tarr, 2003), the current study examined whether a similar reliance on configural processing may result in similar…

  14. Impact of head models in N170 component source imaging: results in control subjects and ADHD patients

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    Beltrachini, L.; Blenkmann, A.; von Ellenrieder, N.; Petroni, A.; Urquina, H.; Manes, F.; Ibáñez, A.; Muravchik, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    The major goal of evoked related potential studies arise in source localization techniques to identify the loci of neural activity that give rise to a particular voltage distribution measured on the surface of the scalp. In this paper we evaluate the effect of the head model adopted in order to estimate the N170 component source in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients and control subjects, considering faces and words stimuli. The standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography algorithm (sLORETA) is used to compare between the three shell spherical head model and a fully realistic model based on the ICBM-152 atlas. We compare their variance on source estimation and analyze the impact on the N170 source localization. Results show that the often used three shell spherical model may lead to erroneous solutions, specially on ADHD patients, so its use is not recommended. Our results also suggest that N170 sources are mainly located in the right occipital fusiform gyrus for faces stimuli and in the left occipital fusiform gyrus for words stimuli, for both control subjects and ADHD patients. We also found a notable decrease on the N170 estimated source amplitude on ADHD patients, resulting in a plausible marker of the disease.

  15. N170 face specificity and face memory depend on hometown size.

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    Balas, Benjamin; Saville, Alyson

    2015-03-01

    Face recognition depends on visual experience in a number of different ways. Infrequent exposure to faces belonging to categories defined by species, age, or race can lead to diminished memory for and discrimination between members of those categories relative to faces belonging to categories that dominate an observer's environment. Early visual impairment can also have long-lasting and broad effects on face discrimination - just a few months of visual impairment due to congenital cataracts can lead to diminished discrimination between faces that differ in their configuration, for example (Le Grand et al., 2001). Presently, we consider a novel aspect of visual experience that may impact face recognition: The approximate amount of different faces observers encountered during their childhood. We recruited undergraduate observers from small (500-1000 individuals) and large communities (30,000-100,000 individuals) and asked them to complete a standard face memory test and a basic ERP paradigm designed to elicit a robust N170 response, including the classic face inversion effect. We predicted that growing up in a small community might lead to diminished face memory and an N170 response that was less specific to faces. These predictions were confirmed, suggesting that the sheer number of faces one can interact with during their upbringing shapes their behavioral abilities and the functional architecture of face processing in the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrical Stimulation over Bilateral Occipito-Temporal Regions Reduces N170 in the Right Hemisphere and the Composite Face Effect

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    Yang, Li-Zhuang; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Bin; Yang, Zhiyu; Wei, Zhengde; Gu, Feng; Zhang, Jing; Cui, Guanbao; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Xiaochu; Rao, Hengyi

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that can modulate cortical excitability. Although the clinical value of tDCS has been advocated, the potential of tDCS in cognitive rehabilitation of face processing deficits is less understood. Face processing has been associated with the occipito-temporal cortex (OT). The present study investigated whether face processing in healthy adults can be modulated by applying tDCS over the OT. Experiment 1 investigated whether tDCS can affect N170, a face-sensitive ERP component, with a face orientation judgment task. The N170 in the right hemisphere was reduced in active stimulation conditions compared with the sham stimulation condition for both upright faces and inverted faces. Experiment 2 further demonstrated that tDCS can modulate the composite face effect, a type of holistic processing that reflects the obligatory attention to all parts of a face. The composite face effect was reduced in active stimulation conditions compared with the sham stimulation condition. Additionally, the current polarity did not modulate the effect of tDCS in the two experiments. The present study demonstrates that N170 can be causally manipulated by stimulating the OT with weak currents. Furthermore, our study provides evidence that obligatory attention to all parts of a face can be affected by the commonly used tDCS parameter setting. PMID:25531112

  17. Facial Cosmetics Exert a Greater Influence on Processing of the Mouth Relative to the Eyes: Evidence from the N170 Event-Related Potential Component.

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    Tanaka, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic makeup significantly influences facial perception. Because faces consist of similar physical structures, cosmetic makeup is typically used to highlight individual features, particularly those of the eyes (i.e., eye shadow) and mouth (i.e., lipstick). Though event-related potentials have been utilized to study various aspects of facial processing, the influence of cosmetics on specific ERP components remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the application of cosmetic makeup and the amplitudes of the P1 and N170 event-related potential components during facial perception tasks. Moreover, the influence of visual perception on N170 amplitude, was evaluated under three makeup conditions: Eye Shadow, Lipstick, and No Makeup. Electroencephalography was used to monitor 17 participants who were exposed to visual stimuli under each these three makeup conditions. The results of the present study subsequently demonstrated that the Lipstick condition elicited a significantly greater N170 amplitude than the No Makeup condition, while P1 amplitude was unaffected by any of the conditions. Such findings indicate that the application of cosmetic makeup alters general facial perception but exerts no influence on the perception of low-level visual features. Collectively, these results support the notion that the application of makeup induces subtle alterations in the processing of facial stimuli, with a particular effect on the processing of specific facial components (i.e., the mouth), as reflected by changes in N170 amplitude.

  18. Facial Cosmetics Exert a Greater Influence on Processing of the Mouth Relative to the Eyes: Evidence from the N170 Event-Related Potential Component

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    Tanaka, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic makeup significantly influences facial perception. Because faces consist of similar physical structures, cosmetic makeup is typically used to highlight individual features, particularly those of the eyes (i.e., eye shadow) and mouth (i.e., lipstick). Though event-related potentials have been utilized to study various aspects of facial processing, the influence of cosmetics on specific ERP components remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the application of cosmetic makeup and the amplitudes of the P1 and N170 event-related potential components during facial perception tasks. Moreover, the influence of visual perception on N170 amplitude, was evaluated under three makeup conditions: Eye Shadow, Lipstick, and No Makeup. Electroencephalography was used to monitor 17 participants who were exposed to visual stimuli under each these three makeup conditions. The results of the present study subsequently demonstrated that the Lipstick condition elicited a significantly greater N170 amplitude than the No Makeup condition, while P1 amplitude was unaffected by any of the conditions. Such findings indicate that the application of cosmetic makeup alters general facial perception but exerts no influence on the perception of low-level visual features. Collectively, these results support the notion that the application of makeup induces subtle alterations in the processing of facial stimuli, with a particular effect on the processing of specific facial components (i.e., the mouth), as reflected by changes in N170 amplitude. PMID:27656161

  19. Facial Cosmetics Exert a Greater Influence on Processing of the Mouth Relative to the Eyes: Evidence from the N170 Event-related Potential Component

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    Hideaki Tanaka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic makeup significantly influences facial perception. Because faces consist of similar physical structures, cosmetic makeup is typically used to highlight individual features, particularly those of the eyes (i.e., eye shadow and mouth (i.e., lipstick. Though event-related potentials have been utilized to study various aspects of facial processing, the influence of cosmetics on specific ERP components remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the application of cosmetic makeup and the amplitudes of the P1 and N170 event-related potential components during facial perception tasks. Moreover, the influence of visual perception on N170 amplitude, was evaluated under three makeup conditions: Eye Shadow, Lipstick, and No Makeup. Electroencephalography was used to monitor 17 participants who were exposed to visual stimuli under each these three makeup conditions. The results of the present study subsequently demonstrated that the Lipstick condition elicited a significantly greater N170 amplitude than the No Makeup condition, while P1 amplitude was unaffected by any of the conditions. Such findings indicate that the application of cosmetic makeup alters general facial perception but exerts no influence on the perception of low-level visual features. Collectively, these results support the notion that the application of makeup induces subtle alterations in the processing of facial stimuli, with a particular effect on the processing of specific facial components (i.e., the mouth, as reflected by changes in N170 amplitude.

  20. N170 Tuning in Chinese : Logographic Characters and Phonetic Pinyin Script

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    Qin, Rui; Maurits, Natasha; Maassen, Ben

    2016-01-01

    In alphabetic languages, print consistently elicits enhanced, left-lateralized N170 responses in the event-related potential compared to control stimuli. In the current study, we adopted a cross-linguistic design to investigate N170 tuning to logographic Chinese and to pinyin, an auxiliary phonetic

  1. N170 Tuning in Chinese: Logographic Characters and Phonetic Pinyin Script

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    Qin, Rui; Maurits, Natasha; Maassen, Ben

    2016-01-01

    In alphabetic languages, print consistently elicits enhanced, left-lateralized N170 responses in the event-related potential compared to control stimuli. In the current study, we adopted a cross-linguistic design to investigate N170 tuning to logographic Chinese and to "pinyin," an auxiliary phonetic system in Chinese. The results…

  2. Eyeglasses elicit effects similar to face-like perceptual expertise: evidence from the N170 response.

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    Cao, Xiaohua; Yang, Qi; Hu, Fengpei

    2016-03-01

    Studies of event-related potentials show that the specific N170 response has become a stable electrophysiological hallmark of objects related to expertise in early perceptual processing. In the present study, we investigated whether eyeglasses can elicit N170 effects similar to those elicited by objects of expertise. Our results showed that the N170 response elicited by eyeglasses was larger than the response elicited by objects that do not generate perceptual expertise (e.g., houses). Importantly, we found that eyeglasses could produce a within-category N170 adaptation effect, similar to that produced in response to objects of expertise (e.g., faces). Our results have revealed for the first time that with a large amount of experience, eyeglasses could evoke the face-like N170 response, which suggested that eyeglasses may become an object of perceptual expertise to some human observers.

  3. The face-specific N170 component is modulated by emotional facial expression

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    Tottenham Nim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the traditional two-stage model of face processing, the face-specific N170 event-related potential (ERP is linked to structural encoding of face stimuli, whereas later ERP components are thought to reflect processing of facial affect. This view has recently been challenged by reports of N170 modulations by emotional facial expression. This study examines the time-course and topography of the influence of emotional expression on the N170 response to faces. Methods Dense-array ERPs were recorded in response to a set (n = 16 of fear and neutral faces. Stimuli were normalized on dimensions of shape, size and luminance contrast distribution. To minimize task effects related to facial or emotional processing, facial stimuli were irrelevant to a primary task of learning associative pairings between a subsequently presented visual character and a spoken word. Results N170 to faces showed a strong modulation by emotional facial expression. A split half analysis demonstrates that this effect was significant both early and late in the experiment and was therefore not associated with only the initial exposures of these stimuli, demonstrating a form of robustness against habituation. The effect of emotional modulation of the N170 to faces did not show significant interaction with the gender of the face stimulus, or hemisphere of recording sites. Subtracting the fear versus neutral topography provided a topography that itself was highly similar to the face N170. Conclusion The face N170 response can be influenced by emotional expressions contained within facial stimuli. The topography of this effect is consistent with the notion that fear stimuli exaggerates the N170 response itself. This finding stands in contrast to previous models suggesting that N170 processes linked to structural analysis of faces precede analysis of emotional expression, and instead may reflect early top-down modulation from neural systems involved in

  4. When is a Face a Face? Schematic Faces, Emotion, Attention and the N170

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    Frances A. Maratos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Emotional facial expressions provide important non-verbal cues as to the imminent behavioural intentions of a second party. Hence, within emotion science the processing of faces (emotional or otherwise has been at the forefront of research. Notably, however, such research has led to a number of debates including the ecological validity of utilising schematic faces in emotion research, and the face-selectively of N170. In order to investigate these issues, we explored the extent to which N170 is modulated by schematic faces, emotional expression and/or selective attention. Eighteen participants completed a three-stimulus oddball paradigm with two scrambled faces as the target and standard stimuli (counter-balanced across participants, and schematic angry, happy and neutral faces as the oddball stimuli. Results revealed that the magnitude of the N170 associated with the target stimulus was: (i significantly greater than that elicited by the standard stimulus, (ii comparable with the N170 elicited by the neutral and happy schematic face stimuli, and (iii significantly reduced compared to the N170 elicited by the angry schematic face stimulus. These findings extend current literature by demonstrating N170 can be modulated by events other than those associated with structural face encoding; i.e. here, the act of labelling a stimulus a ‘target’ to attend to modulated the N170 response. Additionally, the observation that schematic faces demonstrate similar N170 responses to those recorded for real faces and, akin to real faces, angry schematic faces demonstrated heightened N170 responses, suggests caution should be taken before disregarding schematic facial stimuli in emotion processing research per se.

  5. N170 Changes Show Identifiable Chinese Characters Compete Primarily with Faces Rather than Houses.

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    Fan, Cong; He, Weiqi; He, Huamin; Ren, Guofang; Luo, Yuejia; Li, Hong; Luo, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Character processing is a crucial cognitive skill that is highly emphasized and industriously cultivated in contemporary society. In the present study, using a competition paradigm, we examined the electrophysiological correlates of different relationships between Chinese characters and faces and between Chinese characters and houses during early visual processing. We observed that identifiable Chinese characters compete primarily with faces rather than houses at an early visual processing stage, with a significantly reduced N170 for faces but not for houses, when they were viewed concurrently with identifiable characters relative to when they were viewed concurrently with unidentifiable characters. Consistent with our previous study, there was a significant increase in N170 after characters have been learned, indicating a modulatory effect of Chinese character identification level on N170 amplitude. Furthermore, we found an enlarged N170 in response to faces compared to houses, indicating that the neural mechanisms for processing faces and houses are different at an early visual processing stage.

  6. Activation of serotonin 2A receptors underlies the psilocybin-induced effects on α oscillations, N170 visual-evoked potentials, and visual hallucinations.

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    Kometer, Michael; Schmidt, André; Jäncke, Lutz; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2013-06-19

    Visual illusions and hallucinations are hallmarks of serotonergic hallucinogen-induced altered states of consciousness. Although the serotonergic hallucinogen psilocybin activates multiple serotonin (5-HT) receptors, recent evidence suggests that activation of 5-HT2A receptors may lead to the formation of visual hallucinations by increasing cortical excitability and altering visual-evoked cortical responses. To address this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of psilocybin (215 μg/kg vs placebo) on both α oscillations that regulate cortical excitability and early visual-evoked P1 and N170 potentials in healthy human subjects. To further disentangle the specific contributions of 5-HT2A receptors, subjects were additionally pretreated with the preferential 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (50 mg vs placebo). We found that psilocybin strongly decreased prestimulus parieto-occipital α power values, thus precluding a subsequent stimulus-induced α power decrease. Furthermore, psilocybin strongly decreased N170 potentials associated with the appearance of visual perceptual alterations, including visual hallucinations. All of these effects were blocked by pretreatment with the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin, indicating that activation of 5-HT2A receptors by psilocybin profoundly modulates the neurophysiological and phenomenological indices of visual processing. Specifically, activation of 5-HT2A receptors may induce a processing mode in which stimulus-driven cortical excitation is overwhelmed by spontaneous neuronal excitation through the modulation of α oscillations. Furthermore, the observed reduction of N170 visual-evoked potentials may be a key mechanism underlying 5-HT2A receptor-mediated visual hallucinations. This change in N170 potentials may be important not only for psilocybin-induced states but also for understanding acute hallucinatory states seen in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease.

  7. Category specificity in early perception: face and word n170 responses differ in both lateralization and habituation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Urs; Rossion, Bruno; McCandliss, Bruce D

    2008-01-01

    N170 event-related potential (ERP) responses to both faces and visual words raises questions about category specific processing mechanisms during early perception and their neural basis. Topographic differences across word and face N170s suggests a form of category specific processing in early perception - the word N170 is consistently left-lateralized, while less consistent evidence supports a right-lateralization for the face N170. Additionally, the face N170 shows a reduction in amplitude across consecutive individual faces, a form of habituation that might differ across studies thereby helping to explain inconsistencies in lateralization. This effect remains unexplored for visual words. The current study directly contrasts N170 responses to words and faces within the same subjects, examining both category-level habituation and lateralization effects. ERP responses to a series of different faces and words were collected under two contexts: blocks that alternated faces and words vs. pure blocks of a single category designed to induce category-level habituation. Global and occipito-temporal measures of N170 amplitude demonstrated an interaction between category (words, faces) and block context (alternating categories, same category). N170 amplitude demonstrated class-level habituation for faces but not words. Furthermore, the pure block context diminished the right-lateralization of the face N170, pointing to class-level habituation as a factor that might drive inconsistencies in findings of right-lateralization across different paradigms. No analogous effect for the word N170 was found, suggesting category specificity for this form of habituation. Taken together, topographic and habituation effects suggest distinct forms of perceptual processing drive the face N170 and the visual word form N170.

  8. Category specificity in early perception: face and word N170 responses differ in both lateralization and habituation properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Maurer

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced N170 ERP responses to both faces and visual words raises questions about category specific processing mechanisms during early perception and their neural basis. Topographic differences across word and face N170s might suggest a form of category specific processing in early perception - the word N170 is consistently left lateralized, while less consistent evidence suggests a right lateralization for the face N170. Additionally, the face N170 shows a reduction in amplitude across consecutive unique faces, a form of habituation that might differ across studies thereby helping to explain inconsistencies in lateralization. This effect remains unexplored for visual words. The current study directly contrasts N170 responses to words and faces within the same subjects, examining both category-level habituation and lateralization effects. ERP responses to a series of different faces and words were collected under two contexts: blocks that alternated faces and words versus pure blocks designed to induce category level habituation. Global and occipito-temporal measures of N170 amplitude demonstrated an interaction between category (word, faces and block context (alternating, pure. N170 amplitude demonstrated class level habituation for faces but not words. Furthermore, the pure block context diminished the right lateralization of the face N170, potentially pointing to class level habituation as a factor that might drive inconsistencies of right lateralization across different paradigms. No analogous effect for the word N170 was found, suggesting category specificity for this process. Taken together, these topographic and habituation effects suggest distinct forms of perceptual processing drive the face N170 and the visual word form N170.

  9. The face-selective N170 component is modulated by facial color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kae; Minami, Tetsuto; Nakauchi, Shigeki

    2012-08-01

    Faces play an important role in social interaction by conveying information and emotion. Of the various components of the face, color particularly provides important clues with regard to perception of age, sex, health status, and attractiveness. In event-related potential (ERP) studies, the N170 component has been identified as face-selective. To determine the effect of color on face processing, we investigated the modulation of N170 by facial color. We recorded ERPs while subjects viewed facial color stimuli at 8 hue angles, which were generated by rotating the original facial color distribution around the white point by 45° for each human face. Responses to facial color were localized to the left, but not to the right hemisphere. N170 amplitudes gradually increased in proportion to the increase in hue angle from the natural-colored face. This suggests that N170 amplitude in the left hemisphere reflects processing of facial color information. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Combined Effects of Inversion and Feature Removal on N170 Responses Elicited by Faces and Car Fronts

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    Kloth, Nadine; Itier, Roxane J.; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2013-01-01

    The face-sensitive N170 is typically enhanced for inverted compared to upright faces. Itier, Alain, Sedore, and McIntosh (2007) recently suggested that this N170 inversion effect is mainly driven by the eye region which becomes salient when the face configuration is disrupted. Here we tested whether similar effects could be observed with non-face…

  11. Cognitive Bias by Gender Interaction on N170 Response to Emotional Facial Expressions in Major and Minor Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingqu; Chen, Jiu; Jia, Ting; Ma, Wentao; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Zihe; Yang, Laiqi

    2016-03-01

    States of depression are considered to relate to a cognitive bias reactivity to emotional events. Moreover, gender effect may influence differences in emotional processing. The current study is to investigate whether there is an interaction of cognitive bias by gender on emotional processing in minor depression (MiD) and major depression (MaD). N170 component was obtained during a visual emotional oddball paradigm to manipulate the processing of emotional information in 33 MiD, 36 MaD, and 32 controls (CN). Compared with CN, in male, both MiD and MaD had lower N170 amplitudes for happy faces, but MaD had higher N170 amplitudes for sad faces; in female, both MiD and MaD had lower N170 amplitudes for happy and neutral faces, but higher N170 amplitudes for sad faces. Compared with MaD in male, MiD had higher N170 amplitudes for happy faces, lower N170 amplitudes for sad faces; in female, MiD only had higher N170 amplitudes for sad faces. Interestingly, a negative relationship was observed between N170 amplitude and the HDRS score for identification of happy faces in depressed patients while N170 amplitude was positively correlated with the HDRS score for sad faces identification. These results provide novel evidence for the mood-brightening effect with an interaction of cognitive bias by gender on emotional processing. It further suggests that female depression may be more vulnerable than male during emotional face processing with the unconscious negative cognitive bias and depressive syndromes may exist on a spectrum of severity on emotional face processing.

  12. The N170 is not modulated by attention in autism spectrum conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churches, Owen; Wheelwright, Sally; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Ring, Howard

    2010-04-21

    Face processing deficits are characteristic of autism spectrum conditions. However, event-related potential studies of autism spectrum conditions have found inconsistent results for the face selective N170 component. In this study, 15 adult males with autism spectrum conditions and 15 matched, typically developing controls completed a task in which pictures of faces were either attended to or ignored. In the control group, the N170 was larger when faces were attended to. However, there was no such modulation in the autism spectrum conditions group. This finding helps clarify the results from the earlier event-related potential studies of face processing in autism spectrum conditions and suggests that visual attention does not enhance face processing in autism spectrum conditions as it does in typical development.

  13. Mapping the distribution of language related genes FoxP1, FoxP2 and CntnaP2 in the brains of vocal learning bat species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenas-Cuadrado, Pedro M; Mengede, Janine; Baas, Laura; Devanna, Paolo; Schmid, Tobias A; Yartsev, Michael; Firzlaff, Uwe; Vernes, Sonja C

    2018-01-03

    Genes including FOXP2, FOXP1 and CNTNAP2, have been implicated in human speech and language phenotypes, pointing to a role in the development of normal language-related circuitry in the brain. Although speech and language are unique human phenotypes, a comparative approach is possible by addressing language-relevant traits in animal model systems. One such trait, vocal learning, represents an essential component of human spoken language, and is shared by cetaceans, pinnipeds, elephants, some birds and bats. Given their vocal learning abilities, gregarious nature, and reliance on vocalisations for social communication and navigation, bats represent an intriguing mammalian system in which to explore language-relevant genes. We used immunohistochemistry to detail the distribution of FoxP2, FoxP1 and Cntnap2 proteins, accompanied by detailed cytoarchitectural histology in the brains of two vocal learning bat species; Phyllostomus discolor and Rousettus aegyptiacus. We show widespread expression of these genes, similar to what has been previously observed in other species, including humans. A striking difference was observed in the adult Phyllostomus discolor bat, which showed low levels of FoxP2 expression in the cortex, contrasting with patterns found in rodents and non-human primates. We created an online, open-access database within which all data can be browsed, searched, and high resolution images viewed to single cell resolution. The data presented herein reveal regions of interest in the bat brain and provide new opportunities to address the role of these language-related genes in complex vocal-motor and vocal learning behaviours in a mammalian model system. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Fast, visual specialization for reading in English revealed by the topography of the N170 ERP response

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    McCandliss Bruce D

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N170 effects associated with visual words may be related to perceptual expertise effects that have been demonstrated for faces and other extensively studied classes of visual stimuli. Although face and other object expertise effects are typically bilateral or right-lateralized, the spatial topography of reading-related N170 effects are often left-lateralized, providing potential insights into the unique aspects of reading-related perceptual expertise. Methods Extending previous research in German 1, we use a high-density channel array to characterize the N170 topography for reading-related perceptual expertise in English, a language with inconsistent spelling-to-sound mapping. N170 effects related to overall reading-related expertise are defined by contrasting responses to visual words versus novel symbol strings. By contrasting each of these conditions to pseudowords, we examined how this reading-related N170 effect generalizes to well-ordered novel letter strings. Results A sample-by-sample permutation test computed on word versus symbol ERP topographies revealed differences during two time windows corresponding to the N170 and P300 components. Topographic centroid analysis of the word and symbol N170 demonstrated significant differences in both left-right as well as inferior-superior dimensions. Words elicited larger N170 negativities than symbols at inferior occipito-temporal channels, with the maximal effect over left inferior regions often unsampled in conventional electrode montages. Further contrasts produced inferior-superior topographic effects for the pseudoword-symbol comparison and left-lateralized topographic effects for the word-pseudoword comparison. Conclusion Fast specialized perception related to reading experience produces an N170 modulation detectable across different EEG systems and different languages. Characterization of such effects may be improved by sampling with greater spatial frequency recordings

  15. Maro Reef Site P1 9/15/2002 23-24M

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    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P1 (25.357 N, 170.495 W), between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Maro Reef Site P1 9/15/2002 19-20M

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    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P1 (25.357 N, 170.495 W), between 19 and 20 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Maro Reef Site P1 9/15/2002 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P1 (25.357 N, 170.495 W), between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Modulation of the N170 with Classical Conditioning: The Use of Emotional Imagery and Acoustic Startle in Healthy and Depressed Participants.

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    Camfield, David A; Mills, Jessica; Kornfeld, Emma J; Croft, Rodney J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that classical conditioning may be capable of modulating early sensory processing in the human brain, and that there may be differences in the magnitude of the conditioned changes for individuals with major depressive disorder. The effect of conditioning on the N170 event-related potential was investigated using neutral faces as conditioned stimuli (CS+) and emotional imagery and acoustic startle as unconditioned stimuli (UCS). In the first experiment, electroencephalogram was recorded from 24 undergraduate students (M = 21.07 years, SD = 3.38 years) under the following conditions: (i) CS+/aversive imagery, (ii) CS+/aversive imagery and acoustic startle, (iii) CS+/acoustic startle, and (iv) CS+/pleasant imagery. The amplitude of the N170 was enhanced following conditioning with aversive imagery as well as acoustic startle. In the second experiment, 26 healthy control participants were tested (17 females and 9 males, age M = 25.97 years, SD = 9.42) together with 18 depressed participants (13 females and 5 males, age M = 23.26 years, SD = 4.01) and three conditions were used: CS+/aversive imagery, CS+/pleasant imagery, and CS-. N170 amplitude at P7 was increased for the CS+/aversive condition in comparison to CS- in the conditioning blocks versus baseline. No differences between depressed and healthy participants were found. Across both experiments, evaluative conditioning was absent. It was concluded that aversive UCS are capable of modulating early sensory processing of faces, although further research is also warranted in regards to positive UCS.

  19. Left-lateralized N170 effects of visual expertise in reading: evidence from Japanese syllabic and logographic scripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Urs; Zevin, Jason D; McCandliss, Bruce D

    2008-10-01

    The N170 component of the event-related potential (ERP) reflects experience-dependent neural changes in several forms of visual expertise, including expertise for visual words. Readers skilled in writing systems that link characters to phonemes (i.e., alphabetic writing) typically produce a left-lateralized N170 to visual word forms. This study examined the N170 in three Japanese scripts that link characters to larger phonological units. Participants were monolingual English speakers (EL1) and native Japanese speakers (JL1) who were also proficient in English. ERPs were collected using a 129-channel array, as participants performed a series of experiments viewing words or novel control stimuli in a repetition detection task. The N170 was strongly left-lateralized for all three Japanese scripts (including logographic Kanji characters) in JL1 participants, but bilateral in EL1 participants viewing these same stimuli. This demonstrates that left-lateralization of the N170 is dependent on specific reading expertise and is not limited to alphabetic scripts. Additional contrasts within the moraic Katakana script revealed equivalent N170 responses in JL1 speakers for familiar Katakana words and for Kanji words transcribed into novel Katakana words, suggesting that the N170 expertise effect is driven by script familiarity rather than familiarity with particular visual word forms. Finally, for English words and novel symbol string stimuli, both EL1 and JL1 subjects produced equivalent responses for the novel symbols, and more left-lateralized N170 responses for the English words, indicating that such effects are not limited to the first language. Taken together, these cross-linguistic results suggest that similar neural processes underlie visual expertise for print in very different writing systems.

  20. Atypical Modulations of N170 Component during Emotional Processing and Their Links to Social Behaviors in Ex-combatants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra P. Trujillo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Emotional processing (EP is crucial for the elaboration and implementation of adaptive social strategies. EP is also necessary for the expression of social cognition and behavior (SCB patterns. It is well-known that war contexts induce socio-emotional atypical functioning, in particular for those who participate in combats. Thus, ex-combatants represent an ideal non-clinical population to explore EP modulation and to evaluate its relation with SCB. The aim of this study was to explore EP and its relation with SCB dimensions such as empathy, theory of mind and social skills in a sample of 50 subjects, of which 30 were ex-combatants from illegally armed groups in Colombia, and 20 controls without combat experience. We adapted an Emotional Recognition Task for faces and words and synchronized it with electroencephalographic recording. Ex-combatants presented with higher assertion skills and showed more pronounced brain responses to faces than Controls. They did not show the bias toward anger observed in control participants whereby the latter group was more likely to misclassify neutral faces as angry. However, ex-combatants showed an atypical word valence processing. That is, words with different emotions yielded no differences in N170 modulations. SCB variables were successfully predicted by neurocognitive variables. Our results suggest that in ex-combatants the links between EP and SCB functions are reorganized. This may reflect neurocognitive modulations associated to chronic exposure to war experiences.

  1. Atypical Modulations of N170 Component during Emotional Processing and Their Links to Social Behaviors in Ex-combatants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Sandra P.; Valencia, Stella; Trujillo, Natalia; Ugarriza, Juan E.; Rodríguez, Mónica V.; Rendón, Jorge; Pineda, David A.; López, José D.; Ibañez, Agustín; Parra, Mario A.

    2017-01-01

    Emotional processing (EP) is crucial for the elaboration and implementation of adaptive social strategies. EP is also necessary for the expression of social cognition and behavior (SCB) patterns. It is well-known that war contexts induce socio-emotional atypical functioning, in particular for those who participate in combats. Thus, ex-combatants represent an ideal non-clinical population to explore EP modulation and to evaluate its relation with SCB. The aim of this study was to explore EP and its relation with SCB dimensions such as empathy, theory of mind and social skills in a sample of 50 subjects, of which 30 were ex-combatants from illegally armed groups in Colombia, and 20 controls without combat experience. We adapted an Emotional Recognition Task for faces and words and synchronized it with electroencephalographic recording. Ex-combatants presented with higher assertion skills and showed more pronounced brain responses to faces than Controls. They did not show the bias toward anger observed in control participants whereby the latter group was more likely to misclassify neutral faces as angry. However, ex-combatants showed an atypical word valence processing. That is, words with different emotions yielded no differences in N170 modulations. SCB variables were successfully predicted by neurocognitive variables. Our results suggest that in ex-combatants the links between EP and SCB functions are reorganized. This may reflect neurocognitive modulations associated to chronic exposure to war experiences. PMID:28588462

  2. Training by visual identification and writing leads to different visual word expertise N170 effects in preliterate Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Li, Su; Zhao, Jing; Gaspar, Carl M; Weng, Xuchu

    2015-10-01

    The N170 component of EEG evoked by visual words is an index of perceptual expertise for the visual word across different writing systems. In the present study, we investigated whether these N170 markers for Chinese, a very complex script, could emerge quickly after short-term learning (∼ 100 min) in young Chinese children, and whether early writing experience can enhance the acquisition of these neural markers for expertise. Two groups of preschool children received visual identification and free writing training respectively. Short-term character training resulted in selective enhancement of the N170 to characters, consistent with normal expert processing. Visual identification training resulted in increased N170 amplitude to characters in the right hemisphere, and N170 amplitude differences between characters and faces were decreased; whereas the amplitude difference between characters and tools increased. Writing training led to the disappearance of an initial amplitude difference between characters and faces in the right hemisphere. These results show that N170 markers for visual expertise emerge rapidly in young children after word learning, independent of the type of script young children learn; and visual identification and writing produce different effects. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Training by visual identification and writing leads to different visual word expertise N170 effects in preliterate Chinese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The N170 component of EEG evoked by visual words is an index of perceptual expertise for the visual word across different writing systems. In the present study, we investigated whether these N170 markers for Chinese, a very complex script, could emerge quickly after short-term learning (∼100 min in young Chinese children, and whether early writing experience can enhance the acquisition of these neural markers for expertise. Two groups of preschool children received visual identification and free writing training respectively. Short-term character training resulted in selective enhancement of the N170 to characters, consistent with normal expert processing. Visual identification training resulted in increased N170 amplitude to characters in the right hemisphere, and N170 amplitude differences between characters and faces were decreased; whereas the amplitude difference between characters and tools increased. Writing training led to the disappearance of an initial amplitude difference between characters and faces in the right hemisphere. These results show that N170 markers for visual expertise emerge rapidly in young children after word learning, independent of the type of script young children learn; and visual identification and writing produce different effects.

  4. The N170 component is sensitive to face-like stimuli: a study of Chinese Peking opera makeup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tiantian; Mu, Shoukuan; He, Huamin; Zhang, Lingcong; Fan, Cong; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Mingming; He, Weiqi; Luo, Wenbo

    2016-12-01

    The N170 component is considered a neural marker of face-sensitive processing. In the present study, the face-sensitive N170 component of event-related potentials (ERPs) was investigated with a modified oddball paradigm using a natural face (the standard stimulus), human- and animal-like makeup stimuli, scrambled control images that mixed human- and animal-like makeup pieces, and a grey control image. Nineteen participants were instructed to respond within 1000 ms by pressing the 'F' or 'J' key in response to the standard or deviant stimuli, respectively. We simultaneously recorded ERPs, response accuracy, and reaction times. The behavioral results showed that the main effect of stimulus type was significant for reaction time, whereas there were no significant differences in response accuracies among stimulus types. In relation to the ERPs, N170 amplitudes elicited by human-like makeup stimuli, animal-like makeup stimuli, scrambled control images, and a grey control image progressively decreased. A right hemisphere advantage was observed in the N170 amplitudes for human-like makeup stimuli, animal-like makeup stimuli, and scrambled control images but not for grey control image. These results indicate that the N170 component is sensitive to face-like stimuli and reflect configural processing in face recognition.

  5. The effects of facial color and inversion on the N170 event-related potential (ERP) component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, T; Nakajima, K; Changvisommid, L; Nakauchi, S

    2015-12-17

    Faces are important for social interaction because much can be perceived from facial details, including a person's race, age, and mood. Recent studies have shown that both configural (e.g. face shape and inversion) and surface information (e.g. surface color and reflectance properties) are important for face perception. Therefore, the present study examined the effects of facial color and inverted face properties on event-related potential (ERP) responses, particularly the N170 component. Stimuli consisted of natural and bluish-colored faces. Faces were presented in both upright and upside down orientations. An ANOVA was used to analyze N170 amplitudes and verify the effects of the main independent variables. Analysis of N170 amplitude revealed the significant interactions between stimulus orientation and color. Subsequent analysis indicated that N170 was larger for bluish-colored faces than natural-colored faces, and N170 to natural-colored faces was larger in response to inverted stimulus as compared to upright stimulus. Additionally, a multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) investigated face-processing dynamics without any prior assumptions. Results distinguished, above chance, both facial color and orientation from single-trial electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Decoding performance for color classification of inverted faces was significantly diminished as compared to an upright orientation. This suggests that processing orientation is predominant over facial color. Taken together, the present findings elucidate the temporal and spatial distribution of orientation and color processing during face processing. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dissociated neural mechanisms for face detection and configural encoding: evidence from N170 and induced gamma-band oscillation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zion-Golumbic, Elana; Bentin, Shlomo

    2007-08-01

    Despite ample research, the structure and the functional characteristics of neural systems involved in human face processing are still a matter of active debate. Here we dissociated between a neural mechanism manifested by the face-sensitive N170 event-related potential effect and a mechanism manifested by induced electroencephalographic oscillations in the gamma band, which have been previously associated with the integration of individually coded features and activation of corresponding neural representations. The amplitude of the N170 was larger in the absence of the face contour but not affected by the configuration of inner components (ICs). Its latency was delayed by scrambling the configuration of the components as well as by the absence of the face contour. Unlike the N170, the amplitude of the induced gamma activity was sensitive to the configuration of ICs but insensitive to their presence within or outside a face contour. This pattern suggests a dual mechanism for early face processing, each utilizing different visual cues, which might indicate their respective roles in face processing. The N170 seems to be associated primarily with the detection and categorization of faces, whereas the gamma oscillations may be involved in the activation of their mental representation.

  7. Normal perception of Mooney faces in developmental prosopagnosia: Evidence from the N170 component and rapid neural adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towler, John; Gosling, Angela; Duchaine, Bradley; Eimer, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia (DP) have a severe difficulty recognizing the faces of known individuals in the absence of any history of neurological damage. These recognition problems may be linked to selective deficits in the holistic/configural processing of faces. We used two-tone Mooney images to study the processing of faces versus non-face objects in DP when it is based on holistic information (or the facial gestalt) in the absence of obvious local cues about facial features. A rapid adaptation procedure was employed for a group of 16 DPs. Naturalistic photographs of upright faces were preceded by upright or inverted Mooney faces or by Mooney houses. DPs showed face-sensitive N170 components in response to Mooney faces versus houses, and N170 amplitude reductions for inverted as compared to upright Mooney faces. They also showed the typical pattern of N170 adaptation effects, with reduced N170 components when upright naturalistic test faces were preceded by upright Mooney faces, demonstrating that the perception of Mooney and naturalistic faces recruits shared neural populations. Our findings demonstrate that individuals with DP can utilize global information about face configurations for categorical discriminations between faces and non-face objects, and suggest that face processing deficits emerge primarily at more fine-grained higher level stages of face perception. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  8. When rapid adaptation paradigm is not too rapid: Evidence of face-sensitive N170 adaptation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tengxiang; Feng, Xue; Feng, Chunliang; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2015-07-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that N170 adaptation effects evoked by face adaptors are general to face and non-face tests, implicating adaptor-locked interferences in the rapid adaptation paradigm. Here we examined the extent to which adaptor-locked interferences confound N170 adaptation effects in different experimental parameters by manipulating the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) duration and jitter between adaptors and tests. In the short SOA, those interferences were well visible for the grand-average ERP waveforms evoked by tests, and they are likely to render rapid adaptation paradigm with short SOA unreliable. The adaptor-locked interferences were attenuated by appropriately increasing SOA duration, such that face-sensitive adaptation effects were evident in the long SOA for both baseline-to-peak and peak-to-peak N170 measurements. These findings suggest that the rapid adaptation paradigm may work with a relative long SOA. Our findings provide useful information for future studies regarding the choosing of appropriate experimental parameters and measurements for the rapid adaptation paradigm. In addition, future studies are needed to investigate how to objectively subtract the overlaps of adaptors from tests and to validate the N170 adaptation effect with appropriate behavioral performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain Activity Related to the Judgment of Face-Likeness: Correlation between EEG and Face-Like Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Nihei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Faces represent important information for social communication, because social information, such as face-color, expression, and gender, is obtained from faces. Therefore, individuals' tend to find faces unconsciously, even in objects. Why is face-likeness perceived in non-face objects? Previous event-related potential (ERP studies showed that the P1 component (early visual processing, the N170 component (face detection, and the N250 component (personal detection reflect the neural processing of faces. Inverted faces were reported to enhance the amplitude and delay the latency of P1 and N170. To investigate face-likeness processing in the brain, we explored the face-related components of the ERP through a face-like evaluation task using natural faces, cars, insects, and Arcimboldo paintings presented upright or inverted. We found a significant correlation between the inversion effect index and face-like scores in P1 in both hemispheres and in N170 in the right hemisphere. These results suggest that judgment of face-likeness occurs in a relatively early stage of face processing.

  10. The Idea Is Good, but…: Failure to Replicate Associations of Oxytocinergic Polymorphisms with Face-Inversion in the N170.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha J L Munk

    Full Text Available In event-related potentials, the N170 manifests itself especially in reaction to faces. In the healthy population, face-inversion leads to stronger negative amplitudes and prolonged latencies of the N170, effects not being present in patients with autism-spectrum-disorder (ASD. ASD has frequently been associated with differences in oxytocinergic neurotransmission. This ERP-study aimed to investigate the face-inversion effect in association with oxytocinergic candidate genes. It was expected that risk-allele-carriers of the oxytocin-receptor-gene-polymorphism (rs53576 and of CD38 (rs379863 responded similar to upright and inverted faces as persons with ASD. Additionally, reactions to different facial emotional expressions were studied. As there have been difficulties with replications of those molecular genetic association studies, we aimed to replicate our findings in a second study.Seventy-two male subjects in the first-, and seventy-eight young male subjects in the replication-study conducted a face-inversion-paradigm, while recording EEG. DNA was extracted from buccal cells.Results revealed stronger N170-amplitudes and longer latencies in reaction to inverted faces in comparison to upright ones. Furthermore, effects of emotion on N170 were evident. Those effects were present in the first and in the second study. Whereas we found molecular-genetic associations of oxytocinergic polymorphisms with the N170 in the first study, we failed to do so in the replication sample.Results indicate that a deeper theoretical understanding of this research-field is needed, in order to generate possible explanations for these findings. Results, furthermore, support the hypotheses that success of reproducibility is correlated with strength of lower original p-values and larger effect sizes in the original study.

  11. SU-G-JeP1-01: A Combination of Real Time Electromagnetic Localization and Tracking with Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidhar, K Raja; Pangam, Suresh; Ponaganti, Srinivas; Krishna, Jayarama; Sujana, Kolla V; Komanduri, Priya K [American Oncology Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: 1. online verification of patient position during treatment using calypso electromagnetic localization and tracking system. 2. Verification and comparison of positional accuracy between cone beam computed tomography and calypso system. 3. Presenting the advantage of continuation localization in Stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. Methods: Ten brain tumor cases were taken for this study. Patients with head mask were under gone Computed Tomography (CT). Before scanning, mask was cut on the fore head area to keep surface beacons on the skin. Slice thickness of 0.65 mm were taken for this study. x, y, z coordinates of these beacons in TPS were entered into tracking station. Varian True Beam accelerator, equipped with On Board Imager was used to take Cone beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) to localize the patient. Simultaneously Surface beacons were used to localize and track the patient throughout the treatment. The localization values were compared in both systems. For localization CBCT considered as reference. Tracking was done throughout the treatment using Calypso tracking system using electromagnetic array. This array was in tracking position during imaging and treatment. Flattening Filter free beams of 6MV photons along with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy was used for the treatment. The patient movement was observed throughout the treatment ranging from 2 min to 4 min. Results: The average variation observed between calypso system and CBCT localization was less than 0.5 mm. These variations were due to manual errors while keeping beacon on the patient. Less than 0.05 cm intra-fraction motion was observed throughout the treatment with the help of continuous tracking. Conclusion: Calypso target localization system is one of the finest tools to perform radiosurgery in combination with CBCT. This non radiographic method of tracking is a real beneficial method to treat patients confidently while observing real-time motion information of the patient.

  12. Perceived arousal of facial expressions of emotion modulates the N170, regardless of emotional category: Time domain and time-frequency dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Pedro R; Ferreira-Santos, Fernando; Chaves, Pedro L; Paiva, Tiago O; Barbosa, Fernando; Marques-Teixeira, João

    2016-01-01

    Findings concerning the emotional modulation of the N170 component of the visual event-related potential are mixed. In the present report we tested the hypothesis that the emotional modulation of the N170 may be driven by the perceived emotional arousal of the stimuli, rather than by specific emotional categories. Fifty-four participants viewed facial expressions of anger, disgust, fear and happiness, plus low arousal neutral faces. All emotional categories were matched in arousal, while stimuli within each category varied parametrically in this dimension. The modulation of the electrocortical activity on the N170 time-window was analyzed in the time domain and via time-frequency decomposition. The effects of emotion and arousal were analyzed separately. In the time domain N170 amplitudes co-varied parametrically with perceived arousal, regardless of emotional category. This modulation was linearly associated with the power of the theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands. Moreover, fear was associated with a trend for increased N170 amplitudes, enhanced alpha power, and increased broad band inter-trial phase coherence. These results support the views that a) the activity in N170 time window is fundamentally modulated by perceived arousal, b) the modulation of the N170 may be the product of an increased evoked response, rather than the result of phase resetting processes, and c) facial expressions of fear retain some processing primacy, that may be related to their increased value as environmental cues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Negative “gossip” stimuli modulate left-lateralized P1 component while viewing neutral faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weed, Ethan; Allen, Micah Galen; Gramm, Daniel

    et al. (2011), translated to Danish. Neutral faces were taken from the PUT database (Kasiński et al., 2008). Participants (n=30) viewed each face together with the gossip stimuli a total of six times. Following this encoding period, 32 channels of EEG were recorded while participants viewed the faces...... was found. However, a secondary analysis showed that an even earlier left-lateralized component, the P1, was modulated by negative gossip stimuli. Supporting the results of Anderson et al. (2011), we found that linguistic information modulates early processing of faces. Although the N170 appears impervious...

  14. Reference: P1BS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available P1BS Schunmann PH, Richardson AE, Smith FW, Delhaize E. Characterization of promoter expre...ssion patterns derived from the Pht1 phosphate transporter genes of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). J Exp Bot. 55: 855-865. (2004) PubMed: 15020637 ...

  15. Early processing of emotional faces in a Go/NoGo task: lack of N170 right-hemispheric specialisation in children with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, Madlen; Stadelmann, Stephanie; Brandeis, Daniel; Jaeger, Sonia; Matuschek, Tina; Weis, Steffi; Kalex, Virgenie; Hiemisch, Andreas; von Klitzing, Kai; Döhnert, Mirko

    2015-09-01

    Emotionally biased information processing towards sad and away from happy information characterises individuals with major depression. To learn more about the nature of these dysfunctional modulations, developmental and neural aspects of emotional face processing have to be considered. By combining measures of performance (attention control, inhibition) in an emotional Go/NoGo task with an event-related potential (ERP) of early face processing (N170), we obtained a multifaceted picture of emotional face processing in a sample of children and adolescents (11-14 years) with major depression (MDD, n = 26) and healthy controls (CTRL, n = 26). Subjects had to respond to emotional faces (fearful, happy or sad) and withhold their response to calm faces or vice versa. Children of the MDD group displayed shorter N170 latencies than children of the CTRL group. Typical right lateralisation of the N170 was observed for all faces in the CTRL but not for happy and calm faces in the MDD group. However, the MDD group did not differ in their behavioural reaction to emotional faces, and effects of interference by emotional information on the reaction to calm faces in this group were notably mild. Although we could not find a typical pattern of emotional bias, the results suggest that alterations in face processing of children with major depression can be seen at early stages of face perception indexed by the N170. The findings call for longitudinal examinations considering effects of development in children with major depression as well as associations to later stages of processing.

  16. Structural and Biochemical Evidence That a TEM-1 [beta]-Lactamase N170G Active Site Mutant Acts via Substrate-assisted Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Nicholas G.; Shanker, Sreejesh; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram; Palzkill, Timothy; (Baylor)

    2010-03-12

    TEM-1 {beta}-lactamase is the most common plasmid-encoded {beta}-lactamase in Gram-negative bacteria and is a model class A enzyme. The active site of class A {beta}-lactamases share several conserved residues including Ser{sup 70}, Glu{sup 166}, and Asn{sub 170} that coordinate a hydrolytic water involved in deacylation. Unlike Ser{sup 70} and Glu{sup 166}, the functional significance of residue Asn{sup 170} is not well understood even though it forms hydrogen bonds with both Glu{sup 166} and the hydrolytic water. The goal of this study was to examine the importance of Asn{sup 170} for catalysis and substrate specificity of {beta}-lactam antibiotic hydrolysis. The codon for position 170 was randomized to create a library containing all 20 possible amino acids. The random library was introduced into Escherichia coli, and functional clones were selected on agar plates containing ampicillin. DNA sequencing of the functional clones revealed that only asparagine (wild type) and glycine at this position are consistent with wild-type function. The determination of kinetic parameters for several substrates revealed that the N170G mutant is very efficient at hydrolyzing substrates that contain a primary amine in the antibiotic R-group that would be close to the Asn{sup 170} side chain in the acyl-intermediate. In addition, the x-ray structure of the N170G enzyme indicated that the position of an active site water important for deacylation is altered compared with the wild-type enzyme. Taken together, the results suggest the N170G TEM-1 enzyme hydrolyzes ampicillin efficiently because of substrate-assisted catalysis where the primary amine of the ampicillin R-group positions the hydrolytic water and allows for efficient deacylation.

  17. ANTICUERPO ANTI-P1 Y EMBARAZO

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Nigel P.

    2003-01-01

    La presentación de un embarazo en una mujer con anticuerpos anti-P1 positivo, los efectos fetales, el tratamiento y seguimiento del feto. Anti-P1 es asociada con insuficiencia de la placenta y la muerte del feto. Este es el primer caso en la literatura donde hubo recuperación del crecimiento durante el segundo y el tercer trimestre

  18. Arithmetically Cohen-Macaulay sets of points in P^1 x P^1

    CERN Document Server

    Guardo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents a solution to the interpolation problem for arithmetically Cohen-Macaulay (ACM) sets of points in the multiprojective space P^1 x P^1.  It collects the various current threads in the literature on this topic with the aim of providing a self-contained, unified introduction while also advancing some new ideas.  The relevant constructions related to multiprojective spaces are reviewed first, followed by the basic properties of points in P^1 x P^1, the bigraded Hilbert function, and ACM sets of points.  The authors then show how, using a combinatorial description of ACM points in P^1 x P^1, the bigraded Hilbert function can be computed and, as a result, solve the interpolation problem.  In subsequent chapters, they consider fat points and double points in P^1 x P^1 and demonstrate how to use their results to answer questions and problems of interest in commutative algebra.  Throughout the book, chapters end with a brief historical overview, citations of related results, and, where relevan...

  19. Does Silent Reading Speed in Normal Adult Readers Depend on Early Visual Processes? Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korinth, Sebastian Peter; Sommer, Werner; Breznitz, Zvia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship of reading speed and early visual processes in normal readers. Here we examined the association of the early P1, N170 and late N1 component in visual event-related potentials (ERPs) with silent reading speed and a number of additional cognitive skills in a sample of 52 adult German readers utilizing a Lexical…

  20. Adsorption of nuclease p1 on chitosan nano-particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-E Shi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of nuclease P1 onto chitosan nano-particles is studied in this paper. The effect of some adsorption kinetics factors such as nuclease P1 concentration, chitosan nano-particles solution concentration, adsorption temperature, chitosan nano-particles size, solution pH, etc. is investigated. Adsorption of nuclease P1 onto chitosan nano-particles is fitted into Lagergren first-order equation at initial nuclease P1 concentration of 3.0 mg/mL. The first-order constant for nuclease P1 is 22.98 h-1. When nuclease P1 concentration is controlled into certain region, the adsorption fits into Freundlich isothermal linear equation. A mechanism of adsorption for nuclease P1 is proposed by analyzing IR spectra. The IR spectra shows that the hydrogen bond might be the main force between the hydroxyl group, the NH2 group and the nuclease P1.

  1. Adsorption of nuclease p1 on chitosan nano-particles

    OpenAIRE

    Lu-E Shi; Zhen-Xing Tang

    2009-01-01

    The sorption of nuclease P1 onto chitosan nano-particles is studied in this paper. The effect of some adsorption kinetics factors such as nuclease P1 concentration, chitosan nano-particles solution concentration, adsorption temperature, chitosan nano-particles size, solution pH, etc. is investigated. Adsorption of nuclease P1 onto chitosan nano-particles is fitted into Lagergren first-order equation at initial nuclease P1 concentration of 3.0 mg/mL. The first-order constant for nuclease P1 is...

  2. Differential effects of face-realism and emotion on event-related brain potentials and their implications for the uncanny valley theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Sebastian; Zell, Eduard; Botsch, Mario; Kissler, Johanna

    2017-03-01

    Cartoon characters are omnipresent in popular media. While few studies have scientifically investigated their processing, in computer graphics, efforts are made to increase realism. Yet, close approximations of reality have been suggested to evoke sometimes a feeling of eeriness, the “uncanny valley” effect. Here, we used high-density electroencephalography to investigate brain responses to professionally stylized happy, angry, and neutral character faces. We employed six face-stylization levels varying from abstract to realistic and investigated the N170, early posterior negativity (EPN), and late positive potential (LPP) event-related components. The face-specific N170 showed a u-shaped modulation, with stronger reactions towards both most abstract and most realistic compared to medium-stylized faces. For abstract faces, N170 was generated more occipitally than for real faces, implying stronger reliance on structural processing. Although emotional faces elicited highest amplitudes on both N170 and EPN, on the N170 realism and expression interacted. Finally, LPP increased linearly with face realism, reflecting activity increase in visual and parietal cortex for more realistic faces. Results reveal differential effects of face stylization on distinct face processing stages and suggest a perceptual basis to the uncanny valley hypothesis. They are discussed in relation to face perception, media design, and computer graphics.

  3. Differential effects of face-realism and emotion on event-related brain potentials and their implications for the uncanny valley theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Sebastian; Zell, Eduard; Botsch, Mario; Kissler, Johanna

    2017-03-23

    Cartoon characters are omnipresent in popular media. While few studies have scientifically investigated their processing, in computer graphics, efforts are made to increase realism. Yet, close approximations of reality have been suggested to evoke sometimes a feeling of eeriness, the "uncanny valley" effect. Here, we used high-density electroencephalography to investigate brain responses to professionally stylized happy, angry, and neutral character faces. We employed six face-stylization levels varying from abstract to realistic and investigated the N170, early posterior negativity (EPN), and late positive potential (LPP) event-related components. The face-specific N170 showed a u-shaped modulation, with stronger reactions towards both most abstract and most realistic compared to medium-stylized faces. For abstract faces, N170 was generated more occipitally than for real faces, implying stronger reliance on structural processing. Although emotional faces elicited highest amplitudes on both N170 and EPN, on the N170 realism and expression interacted. Finally, LPP increased linearly with face realism, reflecting activity increase in visual and parietal cortex for more realistic faces. Results reveal differential effects of face stylization on distinct face processing stages and suggest a perceptual basis to the uncanny valley hypothesis. They are discussed in relation to face perception, media design, and computer graphics.

  4. Electrophysiological correlates of emotional face processing after mild traumatic brain injury in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hondt, Fabien; Lassonde, Maryse; Thebault-Dagher, Fanny; Bernier, Annie; Gravel, Jocelyn; Vannasing, Phetsamone; Beauchamp, Miriam H

    2017-02-01

    Evidence suggests that social skills are affected by childhood mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), but the neural and affective substrates of these difficulties are still underexplored. In particular, nothing is known about consequences on the perception of emotional facial expressions, despite its critical role in social interactions and the importance of the preschool period in the development of this ability. This study thus aimed to investigate the electrophysiological correlates of emotional facial expressions processing after early mTBI. To this end, 18 preschool children (mean age 53 ± 8 months) who sustained mTBI and 15 matched healthy controls (mean age 55 ± 11 months) were presented with pictures of faces expressing anger, happiness, or no emotion (neutral) while event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded. The main results revealed that P1 amplitude was higher for happy faces than for angry faces, and that N170 latency was shorter for emotional faces than for neutral faces in the control group only. These findings suggest that preschool children who sustain mTBI do not present the early emotional effects that are observed in healthy preschool children at visuospatial and visual expertise stages. This study provides new evidence regarding the consequences of childhood mTBI on socioemotional processing, by showing alterations of emotional facial expressions processing, an ability known to underlie social competence and appropriate social interactions.

  5. Biochemical and immunological characterization of recombinant allergen Lol p 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, E; Faccini, S; Lidholm, J; Svensson, M; Brandazza, A; Longhi, R; Groenlund, H; Sidoli, A; Arosio, P

    1997-11-01

    Pollen from perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne), a major cause of type-I allergy worldwide, contains a complex mixture of allergenic proteins among which Lol p 1 is one of the most important. We describe the expression, purification and characterization of a recombinant Lol p 1 overproduced in Escherichia coli. The recombinant allergen, expressed in high yields and purified in milligram amounts, bound to specific IgE antibodies from human sera, induced histamine release from sensitized human basophils, and elicited rabbit antisera that recognize specifically recombinant Lol p 1 and natural Lol p 1 of pollen extract. Recombinant Lol p 1 was used to develop ImmunoCAP assays for analysis of 150 sera that were Radioallergosorbent test positive to L. perenne pollen. In 130 of them (87%) the assay detected a significant level of IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, reaching on average 37% of the level obtained with a test for IgE to the whole grass pollen extract. To map epitopes on Lol p 1, we produced three deletion mutants [des-(116-240)-Lol p 1, des-(1-88)-Lol p 1 and des-(133-189)-Lol p 1], which were efficiently expressed in bacteria. These all showed a strong reactivity with the specific rabbit IgG antibodies, but lacked most or all the allergenic properties of recombinant Lol p 1. A study of the antigenic structure of Lol p 1 was performed using the three deletion mutants and a set of 17-18-residue overlapping synthetic peptides covering the whole allergen sequence. The results indicate that human IgE and rabbit IgG antibodies bind to distinct regions of Lol p 1, and that at least some important IgE epitopes are mainly conformational. The findings suggest that recombinant allergens constitute useful reagents for further development of serological diagnosis of allergy, and that it should be possible to produce immunogenic fragments of allergenic proteins without allergenic properties.

  6. Immunological and biological properties of recombinant Lol p 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Y; Lamontagne, P; Boulanger, J; Brunet, C; Hébert, J

    1997-03-01

    Current forms of allergy diagnosis and therapies are based on the use of natural allergenic extracts. Despite strong evidence that higher therapeutic efficacy may be achieved with purified allergens, the purification of multiple allergic components from extracts is a fastidious and sometimes an impossible task. However, the use of recombinant allergens may be an alternative to overcome this problem. In this study, we compared the immunological properties of recombinant (r) Lol p 1 with those of the natural protein. We cloned directly the gene encoding Lol p 1 from genomic DNA of ryegrass pollen. This gene was subcloned into the expression vector pMAL-c and expressed as fusion protein. Subsequently, rLol p 1 was cleaved from maltose-binding protein using factor Xa. Using binding inhibition and proliferative assays, we assessed the immunological properties of the recombinant allergens. The capacity of rLol p 1 to trigger basophil histamine release and to elicit a skin reaction was also assessed and compared to those of its natural counterpart. We found that the Lol p 1 gene has no introns since we amplified this gene directly from genomic DNA. We demonstrated that the binding sites of anti-Lol p 1 monoclonal antibody, specific human IgG and IgE antibody are well conserved on rLol p 1 as no difference in the binding inhibition profile was observed when using either natural or recombinant protein. At the T-cell level, rLol p 1 elicited a T-cell response in mice comparable to that observed with the natural protein. In addition, we demonstrated that the biological characteristics of rLol p 1 were comparable to those of the natural counterpart, in that rLol p 1 elicited a skin wheal reaction and induced basophil histamine release in grass-allergic patients only. The data indicate that natural Lol p 1 and rLol p 1 shared identical immunological and biological properties.

  7. P1 peptidase–a mysterious protein of family Potyviridae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Potyviridae family, named after its type member, Potato virus Y (PVY), is the largest of the 65 plant virus groups and families currently recognized. The coding region for P1 peptidase is located at the very beginning of the viral genome of the family Potyviridae. Until recently P1 was thought of as serine peptidase with ...

  8. Dynamics of trimming the content of face representations for categorization in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J van Rijsbergen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available To understand visual cognition, it is imperative to determine when, how and with what information the human brain categorizes the visual input. Visual categorization consistently involves at least an early and a late stage: the occipito-temporal N170 event related potential related to stimulus encoding and the parietal P300 involved in perceptual decisions. Here we sought to understand how the brain globally transforms its representations of face categories from their early encoding to the later decision stage over the 400 ms time window encompassing the N170 and P300 brain events. We applied classification image techniques to the behavioral and electroencephalographic data of three observers who categorized seven facial expressions of emotion and report two main findings: (1 over the 400 ms time course, processing of facial features initially spreads bilaterally across the left and right occipito-temporal regions to dynamically converge onto the centro-parietal region; (2 concurrently, information processing gradually shifts from encoding common face features across all spatial scales (e.g., the eyes to representing only the finer scales of the diagnostic features that are richer in useful information for behavior (e.g., the wide opened eyes in 'fear'; the detailed mouth in 'happy'. Our findings suggest that the brain refines its diagnostic representations of visual categories over the first 400 ms of processing by trimming a thorough encoding of features over the N170, to leave only the detailed information important for perceptual decisions over the P300.

  9. P1 interneurons promote a persistent internal state that enhances inter-male aggression in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopfer, Eric D; Jung, Yonil; Inagaki, Hidehiko K; Rubin, Gerald M; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    How brains are hardwired to produce aggressive behavior, and how aggression circuits are related to those that mediate courtship, is not well understood. A large-scale screen for aggression-promoting neurons in Drosophila identified several independent hits that enhanced both inter-male aggression and courtship. Genetic intersections revealed that 8-10 P1 interneurons, previously thought to exclusively control male courtship, were sufficient to promote fighting. Optogenetic experiments indicated that P1 activation could promote aggression at a threshold below that required for wing extension. P1 activation in the absence of wing extension triggered persistent aggression via an internal state that could endure for minutes. High-frequency P1 activation promoted wing extension and suppressed aggression during photostimulation, whereas aggression resumed and wing extension was inhibited following photostimulation offset. Thus, P1 neuron activation promotes a latent, internal state that facilitates aggression and courtship, and controls the overt expression of these social behaviors in a threshold-dependent, inverse manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11346.001 PMID:26714106

  10. A novel porcine circovirus-like agent P1 is associated with wasting syndromes in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libin Wen

    Full Text Available A novel porcine pathogen tentatively named P1, which was obtained from the sera of the pigs exhibiting clinical signs of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS experimentally caused the classical clinic signs and pathologic lesions of the disease in pigs by direct in vivo injection with P1 DNA plasmids. Twenty colostrum-fed (CF pigs that were free of PCV2 and P1 at 1 month of age were randomly designated equally to two groups. Group 1 pigs were each injected with 400 µg of the cloned P1 plasmid DNA into the superficial inguinal lymph nodes and Group 2 were injected with same amount of the empty pSK vector DNA and served as controls. Viremias were positively detected in 8 of 10 P1 infected pigs from 14-21 days post-inoculation (dpi. The 8 infected animals showed pallor of skin and diarrhea. Gross lesions in the pigs euthanized on 35 dpi were similarly characterized by encephalemia, haemorrhage of the bladder mucosa, haemorrhage of the superficial inguinal lymph nodes, lung atrophy and haemorrhage. Histopathological lesions were arteriectasis and telangiectasia of the cavitas subarachnoidealis, interstitial pneumonia, mild atrophy of the cardiac muscle cells, histiocytic hyperplasia of the follicles in the tonsils, and haemorrhage of the inguinal lymph nodes. P1 DNA and antigens were confirmed by PCR and immunohistochemistry in the tissues and organs of the infected pigs, including the pancreas, bladders, testicles/ovaries, brains, lungs and liver. There were no obvious clinical signs and pathological lesions in the control pigs. This study demonstrated that P1 infection is one of the important pathologic agents on pig farms.

  11. Structural encoding processes contribute to individual differences in face and object cognition: Inferences from psychometric test performance and event-related brain potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowparast Rostami, Hadiseh; Sommer, Werner; Zhou, Changsong; Wilhelm, Oliver; Hildebrandt, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    The enhanced N1 component in event-related potentials (ERP) to face stimuli, termed N170, is considered to indicate the structural encoding of faces. Previously, individual differences in the latency of the N170 have been related to face and object cognition abilities. By orthogonally manipulating content domain (faces vs objects) and task demands (easy/speed vs difficult/accuracy) in both psychometric and EEG tasks, we investigated the uniqueness of the processes underlying face cognition as compared with object cognition and the extent to which the N1/N170 component can explain individual differences in face and object cognition abilities. Data were recorded from N = 198 healthy young adults. Structural equation modeling (SEM) confirmed that the accuracies of face perception (FP) and memory are specific abilities above general object cognition; in contrast, the speed of face processing was not differentiable from the speed of object cognition. Although there was considerable domain-general variance in the N170 shared with the N1, there was significant face-specific variance in the N170. The brain-behavior relationship showed that faster face-specific processes for structural encoding of faces are associated with higher accuracy in both perceiving and memorizing faces. Moreover, in difficult task conditions, qualitatively different processes are additionally needed for recognizing face and object stimuli as compared with easy tasks. The difficulty-dependent variance components in the N170 amplitude were related with both face and object memory (OM) performance. We discuss implications for understanding individual differences in face cognition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A brain-computer interface for potential non-verbal facial communication based on EEG signals related to specific emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashihara, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Unlike assistive technology for verbal communication, the brain-machine or brain-computer interface (BMI/BCI) has not been established as a non-verbal communication tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Face-to-face communication enables access to rich emotional information, but individuals suffering from neurological disorders, such as ALS and autism, may not express their emotions or communicate their negative feelings. Although emotions may be inferred by looking at facial expressions, emotional prediction for neutral faces necessitates advanced judgment. The process that underlies brain neuronal responses to neutral faces and causes emotional changes remains unknown. To address this problem, therefore, this study attempted to decode conditioned emotional reactions to neutral face stimuli. This direction was motivated by the assumption that if electroencephalogram (EEG) signals can be used to detect patients' emotional responses to specific inexpressive faces, the results could be incorporated into the design and development of BMI/BCI-based non-verbal communication tools. To these ends, this study investigated how a neutral face associated with a negative emotion modulates rapid central responses in face processing and then identified cortical activities. The conditioned neutral face-triggered event-related potentials that originated from the posterior temporal lobe statistically significantly changed during late face processing (600-700 ms) after stimulus, rather than in early face processing activities, such as P1 and N170 responses. Source localization revealed that the conditioned neutral faces increased activity in the right fusiform gyrus (FG). This study also developed an efficient method for detecting implicit negative emotional responses to specific faces by using EEG signals. A classification method based on a support vector machine enables the easy classification of neutral faces that trigger specific individual emotions. In

  13. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Martinez

    Full Text Available RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX, is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5'UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription.

  14. Conjugation of nitrated acetaminophen to Der p1 amplifies peripheral blood monocyte response to Der p1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan G Thomas

    Full Text Available An association of acetaminophen use and asthma was observed in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood study. However there are no clear mechanisms to explain an association between acetaminophen use and immunologic pathology. In acidic conditions like those in the stomach and inflamed airway, tyrosine residues are nitrated by nitrous and peroxynitrous acids. The resulting nitrotyrosine is structurally similar to 2,4-dinitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, known haptens that enhance immune responses by covalently binding proteins. Nitrated acetaminophen shares similar molecular structure.We hypothesized the acetaminophen phenol ring undergoes nitration under acidic conditions, producing 3-nitro-acetaminophen which augments allergic responses by acting as a hapten for environmental allergens.3-nitro-acetaminophen was formed from acetaminophen in the presence of acidified nitrite, purified by high performance liquid chromatography, and assayed by gas-chromatography mass spectrometry. Purified 3-nitro-acetaminophen was reacted with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p1 and analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify the modification site. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation response was measured in response to 3-nitro-acetaminophen and to 3-nitro-acetaminophen-modified Der p1.Acetaminophen was modified by nitrous acid forming 3-nitro-acetaminophen over a range of different acidic conditions consistent with airway inflammation and stomach acidity. The Der p1 protein-hapten adduct creation was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry proteomics modifying cysteine 132. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to 3-nitro-acetaminophen-modified Der p1 had increased proliferation and cytokine production compared to acetaminophen and Der p1 alone (n = 7; p < 0.05.These data suggests 3-nitro-acetaminophen formation and reaction with Der p1 provides a mechanism by which stomach acid or infection

  15. BACE1 inhibitors: optimization by replacing the P1' residue with non-acidic moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yoshio; Abdel-Rahman, Hamdy; Yamani, Abdellah; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Stochaj, Monika; Hidaka, Koushi; Kimura, Tooru; Hayashi, Yoshio; Saito, Kazuki; Ishiura, Shoichi; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-01

    Recently, we reported potent BACE1 inhibitors KMI-429, -684, and -574 possessing a hydroxymethylcarbonyl isostere as a substrate transition-state mimic. These inhibitors showed potent inhibitory activities in enzymatic and cell assays, especially, KMI-429 was confirmed to significantly inhibit Abeta production in vivo. However, acidic moieties at the P(4) and P(1)' positions of KMI-compounds were thought to be unfavorable for membrane permeability across the blood-brain barrier. Herein, we replaced acidic moieties at the P(4) position with other hydrogen bond acceptor groups, and these inhibitors exhibited improved BACE1 inhibitory activities in cultured cells. In this study, we replaced the acidic moieties at the P(1)' position with non-acidic and low molecular sized moieties.

  16. Early Adverse Caregiving Experiences and Preschoolers' Current Attachment Affect Brain Responses during Facial Familiarity Processing: An ERP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kungl, Melanie T; Bovenschen, Ina; Spangler, Gottfried

    2017-01-01

    When being placed into more benign environments like foster care, children from adverse rearing backgrounds are capable of forming attachment relationships to new caregivers within the first year of placement, while certain problematic social behaviors appear to be more persistent. Assuming that early averse experiences shape neural circuits underlying social behavior, neurophysiological studies on individual differences in early social-information processing have great informative value. More precisely, ERP studies have repeatedly shown face processing to be sensitive to experience especially regarding the caregiving background. However, studies on effects of early adverse caregiving experiences are restricted to children with a history of institutionalization. Also, no study has investigated effects of attachment security as a marker of the quality of the caregiver-child relationship. Thus, the current study asks how adverse caregiving experiences and attachment security to (new) caregivers affect early- and mid-latency ERPs sensitive to facial familiarity processing. Therefore, pre-school aged foster children during their second year within the foster home were compared to an age matched control group. Attachment was assessed using the AQS and neurophysiological data was collected during a passive viewing task presenting (foster) mother and stranger faces. Foster children were comparable to the control group with regard to attachment security. On a neurophysiological level, however, the foster group showed dampened N170 amplitudes for both face types. In both foster and control children, dampened N170 amplitudes were also found for stranger as compared to (foster) mother faces, and, for insecurely attached children as compared to securely attached children. This neural pattern may be viewed as a result of poorer social interactions earlier in life. Still, there was no effect on P1 amplitudes. Indicating heightened attentional processing, Nc amplitude responses

  17. Early Adverse Caregiving Experiences and Preschoolers' Current Attachment Affect Brain Responses during Facial Familiarity Processing: An ERP Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie T. Kungl

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available When being placed into more benign environments like foster care, children from adverse rearing backgrounds are capable of forming attachment relationships to new caregivers within the first year of placement, while certain problematic social behaviors appear to be more persistent. Assuming that early averse experiences shape neural circuits underlying social behavior, neurophysiological studies on individual differences in early social-information processing have great informative value. More precisely, ERP studies have repeatedly shown face processing to be sensitive to experience especially regarding the caregiving background. However, studies on effects of early adverse caregiving experiences are restricted to children with a history of institutionalization. Also, no study has investigated effects of attachment security as a marker of the quality of the caregiver-child relationship. Thus, the current study asks how adverse caregiving experiences and attachment security to (new caregivers affect early- and mid-latency ERPs sensitive to facial familiarity processing. Therefore, pre-school aged foster children during their second year within the foster home were compared to an age matched control group. Attachment was assessed using the AQS and neurophysiological data was collected during a passive viewing task presenting (foster mother and stranger faces. Foster children were comparable to the control group with regard to attachment security. On a neurophysiological level, however, the foster group showed dampened N170 amplitudes for both face types. In both foster and control children, dampened N170 amplitudes were also found for stranger as compared to (foster mother faces, and, for insecurely attached children as compared to securely attached children. This neural pattern may be viewed as a result of poorer social interactions earlier in life. Still, there was no effect on P1 amplitudes. Indicating heightened attentional processing, Nc

  18. RELATIVE PHOTOMETRY OF HAT-P-1b OCCULTATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Sasselov, Dimitar D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald L. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bakos, Gaspar A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Winn, Joshua N., E-mail: bbeky@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of two occultations of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-1b. By measuring the planet to star flux ratio near opposition, we constrain the geometric albedo of the planet, which is strongly linked to its atmospheric temperature gradient. An advantage of HAT-P-1 as a target is its binary companion ADS 16402 A, which provides an excellent photometric reference, simplifying the usual steps in removing instrumental artifacts from HST time-series photometry. We find that without this reference star, we would need to detrend the lightcurve with the time of the exposures as well as the first three powers of HST orbital phase, and this would introduce a strong bias in the results for the albedo. However, with this reference star, we only need to detrend the data with the time of the exposures to achieve the same per-point scatter, therefore we can avoid most of the bias associated with detrending. Our final result is a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.64 for the geometric albedo of HAT-P-1b between 577 and 947 nm.

  19. Observation of the ^1P_1 State of Charmonium

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; White, E J; Williams, J; Wiss, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Mahmood, A H; Severini, H; Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Mehrabyan, S S; Müller, J A; Savinov, V; Li, Z; López, A; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Cravey, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Park, W; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dorjkhaidav, O; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nandakumar, R; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Credé, V; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Phillips, E A; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Shepherd, M R; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weaver, K M; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stöck, H; Yelton, J

    2005-01-01

    The spin-singlet P-wave state of charmonium, hc(1P1), has been observed in the decay psi(2S) -> pi0 hc followed by hc -> gamma etac. Inclusive and exclusive analyses of the M(hc) spectrum have been performed. Two complementary inclusive analyses select either a range of energies for the photon emitted in hc -> gamma etac or a range of values of M(etac). These analyses, consistent with one another within statistics, yield M(h_c) =[3524.9 +/- 0.7 (stat) +/- 0.4 (sys)]MeV/c^2 and a product of the branching ratios B_psi(psi(2S) -> pi0 hc) x B_h(hc -> gamma etac) = [3.5 +/- 1.0 (stat) +/- 0.7 (sys)] x 10^{-4}. When the etac is reconstructed in seven exclusive decay modes, 17.5 +/- 4.5 hc events are seen with an average mass M(hc) = [3523.6 +/- 0.9 (stat) +/- 0.5 (sys)] MeV/c^2, and B_psi x B_h = [5.3 +/- 1.5 (stat) +/- 1.0 (sys)] x 10^{-4}. Because the inclusive and exclusive data samples are largely independent they are combined to yield an overall mass M(hc) = [3524.4 +/- 0.6 (stat) +/- 0.4 (sys)]MeV/c^2 and pro...

  20. Exploring the effects of antisocial personality traits on brain potentials during face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfabigan, Daniela M; Alexopoulos, Johanna; Sailer, Uta

    2012-01-01

    Antisocial individuals are characterized to display self-determined and inconsiderate behavior during social interaction. Furthermore, recognition deficits regarding fearful facial expressions have been observed in antisocial populations. These observations give rise to the question whether or not antisocial behavioral tendencies are associated with deficits in basic processing of social cues. The present study investigated early visual stimulus processing of social stimuli in a group of healthy female individuals with antisocial behavioral tendencies compared to individuals without these tendencies while measuring event-related potentials (P1, N170). To this end, happy and angry faces served as feedback stimuli which were embedded in a gambling task. Results showed processing differences as early as 88-120 ms after feedback onset. Participants low on antisocial traits displayed larger P1 amplitudes than participants high on antisocial traits. No group differences emerged for N170 amplitudes. Attention allocation processes, individual arousal levels as well as face processing are discussed as possible causes of the observed group differences in P1 amplitudes. In summary, the current data suggest that sensory processing of facial stimuli is functionally intact but less ready to respond in healthy individuals with antisocial tendencies.

  1. Exploring the effects of antisocial personality traits on brain potentials during face processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela M Pfabigan

    Full Text Available Antisocial individuals are characterized to display self-determined and inconsiderate behavior during social interaction. Furthermore, recognition deficits regarding fearful facial expressions have been observed in antisocial populations. These observations give rise to the question whether or not antisocial behavioral tendencies are associated with deficits in basic processing of social cues. The present study investigated early visual stimulus processing of social stimuli in a group of healthy female individuals with antisocial behavioral tendencies compared to individuals without these tendencies while measuring event-related potentials (P1, N170. To this end, happy and angry faces served as feedback stimuli which were embedded in a gambling task. Results showed processing differences as early as 88-120 ms after feedback onset. Participants low on antisocial traits displayed larger P1 amplitudes than participants high on antisocial traits. No group differences emerged for N170 amplitudes. Attention allocation processes, individual arousal levels as well as face processing are discussed as possible causes of the observed group differences in P1 amplitudes. In summary, the current data suggest that sensory processing of facial stimuli is functionally intact but less ready to respond in healthy individuals with antisocial tendencies.

  2. Design of pentapeptidic BACE1 inhibitors with carboxylic acid bioisosteres at P1' and P4 positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagad, Harichandra D; Hamada, Yoshio; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Hamada, Takashi; Abdel-Rahman, Hamdy; Yamani, Abdellah; Nagamine, Ayaka; Ikari, Hayato; Igawa, Naoto; Hidaka, Koushi; Sohma, Youhei; Kimura, Tooru; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2010-05-01

    We previously reported potent BACE1 inhibitors KMI-420 and KMI-570 possessing a hydroxymethylcarbonyl isostere as a substrate transition-state mimic. Acidic moieties at the P(1)(') and P(4) positions of KMI inhibitors are thought to be unfavorable in terms of membrane permeability across the blood-brain barrier. Herein, we replaced acidic moieties at the P(4) position with hydrogen bond accepting groups and acidic moieties at the P(1)(') position with less acidic and similar molecular-size moieties (carboxylic acid or tetrazole bioisosteres). These inhibitors exhibited improved BACE1 inhibitory activities and a thorough quantitative structure-activity relationship study was performed. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States); Smith, Adam N. [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (United States); Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine, E-mail: jbrady@dental.ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry (United States); Long, Joanna R., E-mail: jrlong@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ∼57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin.

  4. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni; Smith, Adam N; Crowley, Paula J; Brady, L Jeannine; Long, Joanna R

    2016-02-01

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ~57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin.

  5. Face coding is bilateral in the female brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Mado Proverbio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is currently believed that face processing predominantly activates the right hemisphere in humans, but available literature is very inconsistent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, ERPs were recorded in 50 right-handed women and men in response to 390 faces (of different age and sex, and 130 technological objects. Results showed no sex difference in the amplitude of N170 to objects; a much larger face-specific response over the right hemisphere in men, and a bilateral response in women; a lack of face-age coding effect over the left hemisphere in men, with no differences in N170 to faces as a function of age; a significant bilateral face-age coding effect in women. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LORETA reconstruction showed a significant left and right asymmetry in the activation of the fusiform gyrus (BA19, in women and men, respectively. The present data reveal a lesser degree of lateralization of brain functions related to face coding in women than men. In this light, they may provide an explanation of the inconsistencies in the available literature concerning the asymmetric activity of left and right occipito-temporal cortices devoted to face perception during processing of face identity, structure, familiarity or affective content.

  6. Face Coding Is Bilateral in the Female Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proverbio, Alice Mado; Riva, Federica; Martin, Eleonora; Zani, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Background It is currently believed that face processing predominantly activates the right hemisphere in humans, but available literature is very inconsistent. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, ERPs were recorded in 50 right-handed women and men in response to 390 faces (of different age and sex), and 130 technological objects. Results showed no sex difference in the amplitude of N170 to objects; a much larger face-specific response over the right hemisphere in men, and a bilateral response in women; a lack of face-age coding effect over the left hemisphere in men, with no differences in N170 to faces as a function of age; a significant bilateral face-age coding effect in women. Conclusions/Significance LORETA reconstruction showed a significant left and right asymmetry in the activation of the fusiform gyrus (BA19), in women and men, respectively. The present data reveal a lesser degree of lateralization of brain functions related to face coding in women than men. In this light, they may provide an explanation of the inconsistencies in the available literature concerning the asymmetric activity of left and right occipito-temporal cortices devoted to face perception during processing of face identity, structure, familiarity or affective content. PMID:20574528

  7. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  8. Genomic and proteomic analyses of the terminally redundant genome of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaP1: establishment of genus PaP1-like phages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuguang Lu

    Full Text Available We isolated and characterized a new Pseudomonas aeruginosa myovirus named PaP1. The morphology of this phage was visualized by electron microscopy and its genome sequence and ends were determined. Finally, genomic and proteomic analyses were performed. PaP1 has an icosahedral head with an apex diameter of 68-70 nm and a contractile tail with a length of 138-140 nm. The PaP1 genome is a linear dsDNA molecule containing 91,715 base pairs (bp with a G+C content of 49.36% and 12 tRNA genes. A strategy to identify the genome ends of PaP1 was designed. The genome has a 1190 bp terminal redundancy. PaP1 has 157 open reading frames (ORFs. Of these, 143 proteins are homologs of known proteins, but only 38 could be functionally identified. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed identification of 12 ORFs as structural protein coding genes within the PaP1 genome. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaP1, JG004, PAK_P1 and vB_PaeM_C2-10_Ab1 share great similarity. Besides their similar biological characteristics, the phages contain 123 core genes and have very close phylogenetic relationships, which distinguish them from other known phage genera. We therefore propose that these four phages be classified as PaP1-like phages, a new phage genus of Myoviridae that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  9. Expression and tissue localization of collectin placenta 1 (CL-P1, SRCL) in human tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellman, Lana; Skjødt, Karsten; Nielsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Collectin placenta-1 (CL-P1), also known as scavenger receptor with C-type lectin (SRCL), is a type II membrane glycoprotein that shares structural features with both collectins and type A scavenger receptors. CL-P1 was originally cloned from the placenta and found to be associated with endothelial...... proposed that CL-P1 plays a role in the host defense system and in the clearance of glycoproteins from the blood. With the aims of determining the detailed tissue expression of human CL-P1 we expressed CL-P1 recombinantly in both E. coli and CHO cells, and raised monoclonal antibodies against human CL-P1....... Three monoclonal antibodies were characterized and used in immunohistochemical analyses of a panel of cryo- and formalin-fixed sections. We find that CL-P1 mainly associates with cytotrophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts of the placenta, alveolar macrophages and to a less degree with macrophage...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  11. Expression of human protamine P1 in sperm of transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Keith, C.; Stilwell, J.; Lowe, X. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States); Anderson, G. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Transgenic mice were produced by pronuclear injection with DNA constructs containing human protamine P1 cDNA recombined with a murine protamine P1 promoter, and were identified by PCR. Expression of human P1 was investigated using huplm, a monoclonal antibody specific for human P1, applied to murine testicular cells, smears of epididymal sperm, and smears of detergent-isolated sperm nuclei. Various antibodies and nontransgenic littermates were used as controls. Two male founders (T3 and T7) sired more than five generations of transgenic offspring each with continued expression of human P1 in their sperm. Transgenic animals appear of normal fertility with sperm of typical nuclear morphology. The human P1 transgene was expressed postmeioticly in both lines, as expected. Nearly 100% of sperm of T3 and T7 hemizygotes labeled with huplm, consistent with complete diffusion of human P1 protein through the intercellular bridge of spermatogenic cells. Human P1 labeling of sperm nuclei was not visibly affected by sonication or by treatment with the detergent MATAB or the reducing agent DTT. A third founder female (T5) showed a transmission pattern consistent with insertion of the transgene into an X chromosome; her transgenic offspring expressed human P1 in only a small fraction of sperm. Human P1 transgenes may serve as efficient targets for germinal mutations and transgenicmice may provide promising models for investigating the DNA complexes.

  12. Opposing Roles of FoxP1 and Nfat3 in Transcriptional Control of Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shoumei; Kerppola, Tom K.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac homeostasis is maintained by a balance of growth-promoting and growth-modulating factors. Sustained elevation of calcium signaling can induce cardiac hypertrophy through activation of Nfat family transcription factors. FoxP family transcription factors are known to interact with Nfat proteins and to modulate their transcriptional activities in lymphocytes. We investigated FoxP1 interaction with Nfat3 (Nfatc4) and their effects on transcription of hypertrophy-associated genes in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. FoxP1-Nfat3 complexes were visualized using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis. Calcineurin activation induced FoxP1-Nfat3 BiFC complex formation. Amino acid substitutions in the predicted interaction interface inhibited it. FoxP1 repressed hypertrophy-associated genes (Myh7, Rcan1, Cx43, Anf, and Bnp) and counteracted their activation by constitutively nuclear Nfat3 (cnNfat3). In contrast, FoxP1 activated genes that maintain normal heart functions (Myh6 and p57Kip2) and cnNfat3 counteracted their activation by FoxP1. Amino acid substitutions in FoxP1 or cnNfat3 that inhibited their interaction abrogated the activation of hypertrophy-associated gene transcription by cnNfat3 and the repression of these genes by FoxP1. FoxP1 and Nfat3 co-occupied the promoter regions of hypertrophy-associated genes in neonatal and adult heart tissue. FoxP1 counteracted hypertrophic cardiomyocyte growth, and connexin 43 mislocalization caused by cnNfat3 expression. These data suggest that the opposing transcriptional activities of FoxP1 and Nfat3 maintain cardiomyocyte homeostasis. PMID:21606195

  13. Nutrient sequestration from wastewater by using zeolite Na-P1 synthesized from coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongfu; Xu, Suyun; Han, Runqi; Wang, Qiuchen

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the cation exchange property of the product zeolite Na-P1 (Z-P1) synthesized from coal fly ash (FA) by the alkali hydrothermal reaction, and to evaluate the water purification ability for the simultaneous removal of ammonium and phosphate. High-purity Z-P1 was obtained by optimizing the reaction conditions of aging time and crystallization temperature, and using FA particles of uniform particle size. Kinetic ammonium sorption experiments with Z-P1 were well described by both the Langmuir and Freundlich models, and the maximum adsorption capacity of the Z-P1 was 23.15 mg/g. Moreover, in order to determine the effect of magnesium intervention on the ammonium and phosphate removal from simulated swine wastewater, two forms of magnesium were studied, that is Mg-saturated Z-P1 and direct use of Mg2+ source with Z-P1, as compared with the control (sole Z-P1). Results showed that Mg2+ addition could improve phosphate removal efficiency significantly by forming struvite. Furthermore, dosing Z-P1 with dissolved Mg2+ was better than Mg-saturated Z-P1 in terms of ammonium and phosphate removal efficiencies, and the preparation cost. When dosing 20 g/L Z-P1 with 4 mM Mg2+, ammonium and phosphate removal efficiencies reached 65.2% and 92.3% after 30 min.

  14. Age-induced differences in brain neural activation elicited by visual emotional stimuli: A high-density EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolaki, Anthoula C; Kosmidou, Vasiliki E; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis Yiannis; Papadaniil, Chrysa; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios; Tsolaki, Magda

    2017-01-06

    Identifying the brain sources of neural activation during processing of emotional information remains a very challenging task. In this work, we investigated the response to different emotional stimuli and the effect of age on the neuronal activation. Two negative emotion conditions, i.e., 'anger' and 'fear' faces were presented to 22 adult female participants (11 young and 11 elderly) while acquiring high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) data of 256 channels. Brain source localization was utilized to study the modulations in the early N170 event-related-potential component. The results revealed alterations in the amplitude of N170 and the localization of areas with maximum neural activation. Furthermore, age-induced differences are shown in the topographic maps and the neural activation for both emotional stimuli. Overall, aging appeared to affect the limbic area and its implication to emotional processing. These findings can serve as a step toward the understanding of the way the brain functions and evolves with age which is a significant element in the design of assistive environments. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Expression of cecropin P1 gene increases resistance of Camelina sativa (L.) plants to microbial phytopathogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenko, N S; Kaliaeva, M A; Bur'ianov, Ia I

    2013-05-01

    Transgenic plants of camelina (Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz) with the synthetic gene of antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (cecP1) were obtained. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is performed using the binary vector pGA482::cecP1 by vacuum infiltration of flower buds. The presence of the cecP1 gene in the genome of plants was confirmed by PCR. cecP1 gene expression in transgenic plants was shown by Western blot analysis and by antimicrobial activity of plant extracts against the bacterial phytopathogene Erwinia carotovora. The plants of F0 and F1 generations had the normal phenotype and retained the ability to form viable seeds in self-pollination. cecP1 plants exhibit enhanced resistance to bacterial and fungal phytopathogens: Erwinia carotovora and Fusarium sporotrichioides. The increased sustainability of cecropin P1-expressing plants against salt stress is shown. The possibility of the integration of the cecP1 gene into the overall protective system of plants against biotic and abiotic stresses is discussed.

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  20. Interaction between the P1 protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and receptors on HEp-2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drasbek, Mette; Christiansen, Gunna; Drasbek, Kim Ryun

    2007-01-01

    The human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae can cause atypical pneumonia through adherence to epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The major immunogenic protein, P1, participates in the attachment of the bacteria to the host cells. To investigate the adhesion properties of P1, a recombinant...... protein (rP1-II) covering amino acids 1107-1518 of the P1 protein was produced. This protein inhibited the adhesion of M. pneumoniae to human HEp-2 cells, as visualized in a competitive-binding assay using immunofluorescence microscopy. Previous studies have shown that mAbs that recognize two epitopes...... in this region of P1 also reduce M. pneumoniae adhesion. Therefore, peptides covering these epitopes, of 8 and 13 aa, respectively, were synthesized to further investigate the adhesion region. None of these synthetic peptides reduced the binding of M. pneumoniae to the receptors on the host cells. Instead, 10...

  1. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Aspartate Aminotransferase-P1 from Lupin Root Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. T.; Jones, S. D.; Harvey, D.; Rodber, K. R.; Ryan, G. B.; Reynolds, PHS.

    1994-01-01

    Six hybridoma clones were obtained that secreted monoclonal antibodies against the aspartate aminotransferase-P1 (AAT-P1) isoenzyme from root nodules of Lupinus angustifolius [L.] cv Uniharvest. This enzyme is found constitutively in the plant cytosol fraction. The monoclonal antibodies produced were all of the immunoglobulin G1 class, recognized two distinct epitopes on the protein, and represented the major paratopes found in the immunoglobulin fraction of sera taken from mice and rabbits immunized with the pure AAT-P1 protein. One of these epitopes was unique to lupin nodule AAT-P1. The other epitope was shown to be present on enzyme from lupin bean, white clover and tobacco leaves, lupin roots and nodules, and potato tubers. Both epitopes were recognized by the appropriate monoclonal antibodies in both their native and denatured forms. None of the monoclonal antibodies produced reacted with Rhizobium lupini NZP2257, Escherichia coli extracts, or with the inducible aspartate aminotransferase-P2 (AAT-P2) isoform also found in root nodules. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay utilizing two monoclonal antibodies recognizing the two distinct epitopes was developed and was capable of quantitating AAT-P1 in plant extracts. The limit of detection of AAT-P1 was less than 15 pg/mL and AAT-P1 protein could be quantified in the range 80 to 1000 pg/mL. Using this assay, AAT-P1 protein was shown to remain relatively constant during nodule development. Use of an AAT-P2-specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits the enzyme activity of this isoform enabled the direct determination of AAT-P1 enzyme activity in nodule extracts. Using these assays, specific activities of the individual isoforms were calculated; that of the AAT-P1 isoform was shown to be 7.5-fold higher than that of the AAT-P2 isoform. PMID:12232065

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Pepper Genes Interacting with the CMV-P1 Helicase Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoomi Choi

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is a destructive pathogen affecting Capsicum annuum (pepper production. The pepper Cmr1 gene confers resistance to most CMV strains, but is overcome by CMV-P1 in a process dependent on the CMV-P1 RNA1 helicase domain (P1 helicase. Here, to identify host factors involved in CMV-P1 infection in pepper, a yeast two-hybrid library derived from a C. annuum 'Bukang' cDNA library was screened, producing a total of 76 potential clones interacting with the P1 helicase. Beta-galactosidase filter lift assay, PCR screening, and sequencing analysis narrowed the candidates to 10 genes putatively involved in virus infection. The candidate host genes were silenced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants that were then inoculated with CMV-P1 tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP. Plants silenced for seven of the genes showed development comparable to N. benthamiana wild type, whereas plants silenced for the other three genes showed developmental defects including stunting and severe distortion. Silencing formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor led to reduced virus accumulation. Formate dehydrogenase-silenced plants showed local infection in inoculated leaves, but not in upper (systemic leaves. In the calreticulin-3 precursor-silenced plants, infection was not observed in either the inoculated or the upper leaves. Our results demonstrate that formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor are required for CMV-P1 infection.

  3. The hypervariable amino-terminus of P1 protease modulates potyviral replication and host defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Pasin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The replication of many RNA viruses involves the translation of polyproteins, whose processing by endopeptidases is a critical step for the release of functional subunits. P1 is the first protease encoded in plant potyvirus genomes; once activated by an as-yet-unknown host factor, it acts in cis on its own C-terminal end, hydrolyzing the P1-HCPro junction. Earlier research suggests that P1 cooperates with HCPro to inhibit host RNA silencing defenses. Using Plum pox virus as a model, we show that although P1 does not have a major direct role in RNA silencing suppression, it can indeed modulate HCPro function by its self-cleavage activity. To study P1 protease regulation, we used bioinformatic analysis and in vitro activity experiments to map the core C-terminal catalytic domain. We present evidence that the hypervariable region that precedes the protease domain is predicted as intrinsically disordered, and that it behaves as a negative regulator of P1 proteolytic activity in in vitro cleavage assays. In viral infections, removal of the P1 protease antagonistic regulator is associated with greater symptom severity, induction of salicylate-dependent pathogenesis-related proteins, and reduced viral loads. We suggest that fine modulation of a viral protease activity has evolved to keep viral amplification below host-detrimental levels, and thus to maintain higher long-term replicative capacity.

  4. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  5. EPOXI C/GARRADD (2009 P1) - MRI RAW IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains Raw clear-filter, C2, CN, OH and dust continuum images of comet C/Garradd (2009 P1) acquired by the Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) from 20...

  6. EPOXI C/GARRADD (2009 P1) - MRI CALIBRATED IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains calibrated clear-filter, C2, CN, OH and dust continuum images of comet C/Garradd (2009 P1) acquired by the Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI)...

  7. Association of glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1)-313 A> G gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association of glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1)-313 A> G gene polymorphism and susceptibility to endometrial hyperplasia among Egyptian women. Afaf Elsaid, Wfaa Al-Kholy, Rana Ramadan, Rami Elshazli ...

  8. Phylogenetic and functional analysis of the bacteriophage P1 single-stranded DNA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Nilsson, A.S.; Lehnherr, H.

    2002-01-01

    Bacteriophage P1 encodes a single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB-P1), which shows 66% amino acid sequence identity to the SSB protein of the host bacterium Escherichia coli. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the P1 ssb gene coexists with its E. coli counterpart as an independent unit....... Expression studies showed that the P1 ssb gene is transcribed only, in an rpoS-independent fashion, during stationary-phase growth in E. coli. Mixed infection experiments demonstrated that a wild-type phage has a selective advantage over an ssb-null mutant when exposed to a bacterial host in the stationary...... phase. These results reconciled the observed evolutionary conservation with the seemingly redundant presence of ssb genes in many bacteriophages and conjugative plasmids....

  9. EPOXI C/GARRADD (2009 P1) - HRIV RAW IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains raw clear-filter images of comet C/Garradd (2009 P1) acquired by the High Resolution Visible CCD (HRIV) from 20 February through 09 April 2012...

  10. EPOXI C/GARRADD (2009 P1) - HRIV CALIBRATED IMAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains calibrated clear-filter images of comet C/Garradd (2009 P1) acquired by the High Resolution Visible CCD (HRIV) from 20 February through 09...

  11. EPOXI C/GARRADD (2009 P1) - HRII CALIBRATED SPECTRA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains calibrated, 1.05- to 4.8-micron spectral images of comet C/Garradd (2009 P1) acquired by the High Resolution Infrared Spectrometer on 26 March...

  12. EPOXI C/GARRADD (2009 P1) - HRII RAW SPECTRA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains raw, 1.05- to 4.8-micron spectral images of comet C/Garradd (2009 P1) acquired by the High Resolution Infrared Spectrometer on 26 March and...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies ... medication. This information may someday make it possible to predict who ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape from a dangerous ...

  16. Brain Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Brain lesions By Mayo Clinic Staff A brain lesion is an abnormality seen on a brain-imaging test, such as ... tomography (CT). On CT or MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don' ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) ...

  19. IGFBP-rP1, a potential molecule associated with colon cancer differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Hong

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our previous studies, we have demonstrated that insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein1 (IGFBP-rP1 played its potential tumor suppressor role in colon cancer cells through apoptosis and senescence induction. In this study, we will further uncover the role of IGFBP-rP1 in colon cancer differentiation and a possible mechanism by revealing responsible genes. Results In normal colon epithelium, immunohistochemistry staining detected a gradient IGFBP-rP1 expression along the axis of the crypt. IGFBP-rP1 strongly expressed in the differentiated cells at the surface of the colon epithelium, while weakly expressed at the crypt base. In colon cancer tissues, the expression of IGFBP-rP1 correlated positively with the differentiation status. IGFBP-rP1 strongly expressed in low grade colorectal carcinoma and weakly expressed in high grade colorectal carcinoma. In vitro, transfection of PcDNA3.1(IGFBP-rP1 into RKO, SW620 and CW2 cells induced a more pronounced anterior-posterior polarity morphology, accompanied by upregulation with alkaline phosphatase (AKP activity. Upregulation of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA was also observed in SW620 and CW2 transfectants. The addition of IGFBP-rP1 protein into the medium could mimic most but not all effects of IGFBP-rP1 cDNA transfection. Seventy-eight reproducibly differentially expressed genes were detected in PcDNA3.1(IGFBP-rP1-RKO transfectants, using Affymetrix 133 plus 2.0 expression chip platform. Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG of the enriched GO categories demonstrated that differential expression of the enzyme regulator activity genes together with cytoskeleton and actin binding genes were significant. IGFBP-rP1 could upreguate Transgelin (TAGLN, downregulate SRY (sex determining region Y-box 9(campomelic dysplasia, autosomal sex-reversal (SOX9, insulin receptor substrate 1(IRS1, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B (p15, inhibits CDK4 (CDKN2B, amphiregulin

  20. Efficacy of Leishmania donovani ribosomal P1 gene as DNA vaccine in experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masih, Shet; Arora, Sunil K; Vasishta, Rakesh K

    2011-09-01

    The acidic ribosomal proteins of the protozoan parasites have been described as prominent antigens during human disease. We present here data showing the molecular cloning and protective efficacy of P1 gene of Leishmania donovani as DNA vaccine. The PCR amplified complete ORF cloned in either pQE or pVAX vector was used either as peptide or DNA vaccine against experimentally induced visceral leishmaniasis in hamsters. The recombinant protein rLdP1 was given along with Freund's adjuvant and the plasmid DNA vaccine, pVAX-P1 was used alone either as single dose or double dose (prime and boost) in different groups of hamsters which were subsequently challenged with a virulent dose of 1×10(7) L. donovani (MHOM/IN/DD8/1968 strain) promastigotes by intra-cardiac route. While the recombinant protein rLdP1 or DNA vaccine pVAX-P1 in single dose format were not found to be protective, DNA vaccine in a prime-boost mode was able to induce protection with reduced mortality, a significant (75.68%) decrease in splenic parasite burden and increased expression of Th1 type cytokines in immunized hamsters. Histopathology of livers and spleens from these animals showed formation of mature granulomas with compact arrangement of lymphocytes and histiocytes, indicating its protective potential as vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Validation of experimental medicine methods in psychiatry: the P1vital approach and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Gerard R; Craig, Kevin J; Dourish, Colin T

    2011-06-15

    In the pharmaceutical industry deciding whether to progress a compound to the next stage of development or choosing between compounds in a development portfolio is laden with risk. This is particularly true of compounds developed to treat CNS disorders. The use of pre-clinical models in CNS drug development is well established but these models often lack predictive validity and many compounds fail when they reach the target patient group. Bridging the gap between pre-clinical CNS models and patient studies, P1vital's objective is to develop human volunteer models that will enable rapid, accurate and reliable decision making about which compounds to progress into patient trials. The research strategy of P1vital and its academic research network is to focus on science that progresses the development of clinical efficacy models. As part of this strategy P1vital established a CNS Experimental Medicine Consortium with members from both academic research and the pharmaceutical industry. This consortium is unique in that experimental medicine models initially developed through academic research are selected for further validation in a process that is managed by the Pharma members of the P1vital CNS Experimental Medicine Consortium steering (PEM) committee. The P1vital consortium is very much a work in progress. However, since its inception in 2007 the consortium has successfully delivered results from five clinical studies in four therapeutic areas namely, anxiety, cognitive disorders, schizophrenia and depression. 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. BEAM EXTRACTION FROM THE RECYCLER RING TO P1 LINE AT FERMILAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, M. [Fermilab; Capista, D. [Fermilab; Adams, P. [Fermilab; Morris, D. [Fermilab; Yang, M. J. [Fermilab; Hazewood, K. [Fermilab

    2016-10-03

    The transfer line for beam extraction from the Recycler ring to P1 line provides a way to deliver 8 GeV kinetic energy protons from the Booster to the Delivery ring, via the Recycler, using existing beam transport lines, and without the need for new civil construction. It was designed in 2012. The kicker magnets at RR520 and the lambertson magnet at RR522 in the RR were installed in 2014 Summer Shutdown, the elements of RR to P1 Stub (permanent quads, trim quads, correctors, BPMs, the toroid at 703 and vertical bending dipole at V703 (ADCW) were installed in 2015 Summer Shutdown. On Tuesday, June 21, 2016, beam line from the Recycler Ring to P1 line was commissioned. The detailed results will be presented in this report.

  3. Discovery and evaluation of potent P1 aryl heterocycle-based thrombin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mary Beth; Barrow, James C; Glass, Kristen L; Lundell, George F; Newton, Christina L; Pellicore, Janetta M; Rittle, Kenneth E; Selnick, Harold G; Stauffer, Kenneth J; Vacca, Joseph P; Williams, Peter D; Bohn, Dennis; Clayton, Franklin C; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Krueger, Julie A; Kuo, Lawrence C; Lewis, S Dale; Lucas, Bobby J; McMasters, Daniel R; Miller-Stein, Cynthia; Pietrak, Beth L; Wallace, Audrey A; White, Rebecca B; Wong, Bradley; Yan, Youwei; Nantermet, Philippe G

    2004-06-03

    In an effort to discover potent, clinically useful thrombin inhibitors, a rapid analogue synthetic approach was used to explore the P(1) region. Various benzylamines were coupled to a pyridine/pyrazinone P(2)-P(3) template. One compound with an o-thiadiazole benzylic substitution was found to have a thrombin K(i) of 0.84 nM. A study of ortho-substituted five-membered-ring heterocycles was undertaken and subsequently demonstrated that the o-triazole and tetrazole rings were optimal. Combination of these potent P(1) aryl heterocycles with a variety of P(2)-P(3) groups produced a compound with an extraordinary thrombin inhibitory activity of 1.4 pM. It is hoped that this potency enhancement in P(1) will allow for more diversification in the P(2)-P(3) region to ultimately address additional pharmacological concerns.

  4. Synthesis and P1' SAR exploration of potent macrocyclic tissue factor-factor VIIa inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladziata, Vladimir (Uladzimir); Glunz, Peter W.; Zou†, Yan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Jiang, Wen; Jacutin-Porte, Swanee; Cheney, Daniel L.; Wei, Anzhi; Luettgen, Joseph M.; Harper, Timothy M.; Wong, Pancras C.; Seiffert, Dietmar; Wexler, Ruth R.; Priestley, E. Scott (BMS)

    2016-10-01

    Selective tissue factor-factor VIIa complex (TF-FVIIa) inhibitors are viewed as promising compounds for treating thrombotic disease. In this contribution, we describe multifaceted exploratory SAR studies of S1'-binding moieties within a macrocyclic chemotype aimed at replacing cyclopropyl sulfone P1' group. Over the course of the optimization efforts, the 1-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)cyclopropane P1' substituent emerged as an improved alternative, offering increased metabolic stability and lower clearance, while maintaining excellent potency and selectivity.

  5. Glutathione S-transferase M1, T1 and P1 gene polymorphisms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moyassar Ahmad Zaki

    2014-04-18

    Apr 18, 2014 ... (GSTs) are a family of antioxidant enzymes that exert important antioxidant roles in ... GST isoenzymes M1, T1 and P1 with the risk of developing T2DM and its vascular related com- .... Human soluble GSTs collectively account for 4% of total ...... cDNA cloning and the characterization of a genetic polymor-.

  6. Midway Atoll Site P1A 12/3/2002 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P1A (28.244 N, 177.323 W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Metabolism of the dietary carcinogen TRP-P-1 in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafter, J.J.; Gustafsson, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    The heterocyclic amine 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido(4,3-b)indole (Trp-P-1) was administered as a single oral dose to conventional, bile-fistulated and germ-free rats. There was rapid excretion of Trp-P-1 and its metabolites via the bile, urine and feces. The pattern of metabolites did not differ markedly between the three excretory routes. While there was considerable excretion of unmetabolized Trp-P-1, at the dose level used, there was also extensive metabolism to primary ring-hydroxylated and N-acetylated metabolites which were polar enough to be excreted without undergoing conjugation reactions. Four of the metabolites exhibited mutagenic activity towards Salmonella typhimurium TA98 in the presence of S9 mix. However, all showed a lower mutagenicity than the parent compound. Studies with the bile-fistulated animals indicated that enterohepatic circulation was occurring with Trp-P-1. The intestinal microflora did not appear to have a major role to play in the metabolism of this heterocyclic amine but they did lead to the formation of bound fecal residues in the gut of the conventional animals.

  8. Mechanical response of FFTF reference and P1 cladding tubes under transient heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngahl, C.A.; Ariman, T.; Lepacek, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Burst tests of Type 316 stainless steel cladding tube samples subjected to increasing temperature and relatively constant internal pressure were conducted to assist in the pretest analysis of the P1 experiment performed in the Sodium Loop Safety Facility. This paper reports and analyzes the burst test results and those of subsequent transient heating work. The use of a modified extensometer in obtaining mechanical response data for stainless steel in the high temperature range is illustrated, some of such data is provided, and the potential of further experiments and analysis is indicated. Tubing of the same design as Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) cladding (20% cold worked, 0.230 in. OD, 15 mil wall) was tested as-received and after annealing or electrolytic thinning. P1 tubing (38% cold worked, 0.230 in. OD, 10 mil wall) was tested before and after aging under conditions anticipated in the P1 reactor experiment. The P1 cladding was designed to simulate FFTF tubing that had experienced irradiation embrittlement and attack by cesium oxide and sodium impurities.

  9. Inhibition of human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 by the flavonoid quercetin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, J.J. van; Hamman, O.B.; Iersel, M.L.P.S. van; Boeren, S.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Lo Bello, M.; Vervoort, J.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, the inhibition of human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1) by the flavonoid quercetin has been investigated. The results show a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of GSTP1-1 by quercetin. GSTP1-1 activity is completely inhibited upon 1 h incubation with 100 μM

  10. Two-dimensional indium sulfide framework constructed from pentasupertetrahedral p1 and supertetrahedral t2 clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qichun; Bu, Xianhui; Han, Lei; Feng, Pingyun

    2006-08-21

    A new open-framework indium sulfide ([In12S24H2]10-) constructed from pentasupertetrahedral sulfide clusters ([In8S17H],9- P1) and supertetrahedral sulfide clusters ([In4S10H],7-) T2) has been prepared through hydrothermal synthesis. Unlike previously reported P1 clusters that require divalent metal cations, the P1 cluster reported here consists of only trivalent ions (In3+) and is the only known example of tetrahedral clusters with a core sulfur site bonded to four trivalent ions. Each P1 cluster is joined to three T2 clusters (vice versa) to form an infinite two-dimensional sheet stacked along the crystallographic c-axis. In contrast with known three-dimensional open-framework indium sulfides in which locations of extraframework amines are rarely known due to disorder, structure-directing amine molecules are much less disordered as a result of host-guest N-H...S hydrogen bonding. The UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum shows that this material is a wide band gap semiconductor.

  11. Cotnparison between the Acarex R test and a Der p 1 ELISA for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    low Acarex R scores and the Der p 1 allergen levels detennined by EUSA. Acarex R scores of 2 and 3 ... House-dust mites are important allergens in the pathogenesis of eczema, asthma and allergic rhinitis.I .... exposure to house-dust mite allergens is associated ~th an increase in bronchial hyperreactivity and renders the ...

  12. Mutation analysis of the Mycobacterium leprae folP1 gene and dapsone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Noboru; Kai, Masanori; Makino, Masahiko

    2011-02-01

    Diaminodiphenylsulfone (dapsone) has long been used as a first-line drug worldwide for the treatment of leprosy. Diagnosis for dapsone resistance of Mycobacterium leprae by DNA tests would be of great clinical value, but the relationship between the nucleotide substitutions and susceptibility to dapsone must be clarified before use. In this study, we constructed recombinant strains of cultivable Mycobacterium smegmatis carrying the M. leprae folP1 gene with or without a point mutation, disrupting their own folP gene on the chromosome. Dapsone susceptibilities of the recombinant bacteria were measured to examine influence of the mutations. Dapsone MICs for most of the strains with mutations at codon 53 or 55 of M. leprae folP1 were 2 to 16 times as high as the MIC for the strain with the wild-type folP1 sequence, but mutations that changed Thr to Ser at codon 53 showed somewhat lower MIC values than the wild-type sequence. Strains with mutations at codon 48 or 54 showed levels of susceptibility to dapsone comparable to the susceptibility of the strain with the wild-type sequence. This study confirmed that point mutations at codon 53 or 55 of the M. leprae folP1 gene result in dapsone resistance.

  13. Mutation Analysis of the Mycobacterium leprae folP1 Gene and Dapsone Resistance▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Noboru; Kai, Masanori; Makino, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Diaminodiphenylsulfone (dapsone) has long been used as a first-line drug worldwide for the treatment of leprosy. Diagnosis for dapsone resistance of Mycobacterium leprae by DNA tests would be of great clinical value, but the relationship between the nucleotide substitutions and susceptibility to dapsone must be clarified before use. In this study, we constructed recombinant strains of cultivable Mycobacterium smegmatis carrying the M. leprae folP1 gene with or without a point mutation, disrupting their own folP gene on the chromosome. Dapsone susceptibilities of the recombinant bacteria were measured to examine influence of the mutations. Dapsone MICs for most of the strains with mutations at codon 53 or 55 of M. leprae folP1 were 2 to 16 times as high as the MIC for the strain with the wild-type folP1 sequence, but mutations that changed Thr to Ser at codon 53 showed somewhat lower MIC values than the wild-type sequence. Strains with mutations at codon 48 or 54 showed levels of susceptibility to dapsone comparable to the susceptibility of the strain with the wild-type sequence. This study confirmed that point mutations at codon 53 or 55 of the M. leprae folP1 gene result in dapsone resistance. PMID:21115799

  14. Tracking the potyviral P1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana plants during plum pox virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozárová, Z; Glasa, M; Šubr, Z W

    2017-01-01

    The P1 protein is derived from the N terminus of potyvirus-coded polyprotein. In addition to the proteolytic activity essential for its maturation, it probably participates in suppression of host defense and/or in virus replication. Clear validation of the P1 in vivo function(s), however, is not yet available. We applied an infectious cDNA clone of plum pox virus (PPV), where the P1 was N-fused with a hexahistidine tag, to trace this protein in Nicotiana benthamiana plants during the PPV infection. Immunoblot analysis with the anti-his antibody showed a diffuse band corresponding to the molecular weight about 70-80 kDa (about twice larger than expected) in the root samples from early stage of infection. This signal culminated on the sixth day post inoculation, later it rapidly disappeared. Sample denaturation by boiling in SDS before centrifugal clarification was essential, indicating strong affinity of P1-his to some plant compound sedimenting with the tissue and cell debris.

  15. Airborne study of grass allergen (Lol p 1) in different-sized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Linares, C; Díaz de la Guardia, C; Nieto Lugilde, D; Alba, F

    2010-01-01

    The Poaceae family is considered one of the main causes of pollen allergy in industrialized countries. The aim of this study is to establish the dynamics of the Poaceae allergens and determine their distribution in the different-sized particles in the atmosphere. The air of Granada (southern Spain) was sampled during the pollination period of Poaceae using a cascade impactor and a Hirst-type volumetric collector simultaneously. The sampled airborne allergens were analyzed by indirect ELISA and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Airborne pollen was evaluated with the Spanish Aerobiological Network methodology. Poaceae pollen and allergenic activity have parallel dynamics during the period of maximum pollination, which is reflected in the positive correlations between the 2 variables. In addition, the highest Lol p 1 concentrations were recorded in particle sizes lower than 3.3 mum (stage 4-F). The Spearman correlation test showed that airborne allergens are not dependent on meteorological factors, such as humidity, wind direction or sunshine, however, Lol p 1 allergen correlated positively with Poaceae pollen. The results of the present study confirm that the Lol p 1 allergen is detected more frequently with pollutants than with coarse particles with similar dynamics and a positive correlation between airborne pollen and aeroallergens. Moreover, Lol p 1 is released in stable weather conditions without large changes in humidity or temperature. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Hydrothermal conversion of South African coal fly ash into pure phase Zeolite Na-P1

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gitari, MW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available South African coal combustion power utilities generate huge amounts of coal fly ash that can be beneficiated into zeolitic products. This chapter reports on the optimization of the presynthesis and synthesis conditions for a pure-phase zeolite Na-P1...

  17. Characterization of P1 promoter activity of the β-galactoside α2,6 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-05

    Apr 5, 2012 ... malignant tissues. Expression is regulated by different promoters – P1, P2 and P3 – generating three mRNA isoforms ... β-galactoside α2,6-sialyltransferase I gene (siat 1) in cervical and hepatic cancer cell lines. J. Biosci. ..... as a promoter repressor when interacting with certain proteins such as EAPIII and ...

  18. Necker Island Site P1 9/10/2002 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Necker Island, site P1 (23.575N , 164.705W), between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Nihoa island Site P1 9/9/2002 40-41M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Nihoa island, site P1 (23.062N, 161.929W), between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Choline Modulation of the Aβ P1-40 Channel Reconstituted into a Model Lipid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Meleleo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs, implicated in memory and learning, in subjects affected by Alzheimer's disease result altered. Stimulation of α7-nAChRs inhibits amyloid plaques and increases ACh release. β-amyloid peptide (AβP forms ion channels in the cell and model phospholipid membranes that are retained responsible in Alzheimer disease. We tested if choline, precursor of ACh, could affect the AβP1-40 channels in oxidized cholesterol (OxCh and in palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC:Ch lipid bilayers. Choline concentrations of 5 × 10−11 M–1.5 × 10−8 M added to the cis- or trans-side of membrane quickly increased AβP1-40 ion channel frequency (events/min and ion conductance in OxCh membranes, but not in POPC:Ch membranes. Circular Dichroism (CD spectroscopy shows that after 24 and 48 hours of incubation with AβP1-40, choline stabilizes the random coil conformation of the peptide, making it less prone to fibrillate. These actions seem to be specific in that ACh is ineffective either in solution or on AβP1-40 channel incorporated into PLMs.

  1. Lisianski Island Site P1 9/30/2002 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Lisianski Island, site P1 (26.057 N, 173.971W), between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Lisianski Island Site P1 9/30/2002 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Lisianski Island, site P1 (26.057 N, 173.971W), between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Projectors, associators, visual imagery, and the time course of visual processing in grapheme-color synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsel, Ben D; Kutas, Marta; Coulson, Seana

    2017-10-01

    In grapheme-color synesthesia, seeing particular letters or numbers evokes the experience of specific colors. We investigate the brain's real-time processing of words in this population by recording event-related brain potentials (ERPs) from 15 grapheme-color synesthetes and 15 controls as they judged the validity of word pairs ('yellow banana' vs. 'blue banana') presented under high and low visual contrast. Low contrast words elicited delayed P1/N170 visual ERP components in both groups, relative to high contrast. When color concepts were conveyed to synesthetes by individually tailored achromatic grapheme strings ('55555 banana'), visual contrast effects were like those in color words: P1/N170 components were delayed but unchanged in amplitude. When controls saw equivalent colored grapheme strings, visual contrast modulated P1/N170 amplitude but not latency. Color induction in synesthetes thus differs from color perception in controls. Independent from experimental effects, all orthographic stimuli elicited larger N170 and P2 in synesthetes than controls. While P2 (150-250ms) enhancement was similar in all synesthetes, N170 (130-210ms) amplitude varied with individual differences in synesthesia and visual imagery. Results suggest immediate cross-activation in visual areas processing color and shape is most pronounced in so-called projector synesthetes whose concurrent colors are experienced as originating in external space.

  4. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by neurons that carries ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: ... of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  7. Scattering state spectroscopy of the reaction Mg*(3s3p 1P1)+CH4→MgH(v=0,1;N)+CH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, T. H.; Freel, C.; Kleiber, P. D.; Sando, K. M.

    1998-04-01

    We report scattering state spectroscopic studies of the chemical quenching dynamics of Mg*(3p(1P)) by CH4. We have measured the final-state resolved action spectra for the MgH(v=1,N) reactive product channels, following excitation of the Mg*(3p)-CH4 transient bimolecular collision complex. As in earlier work on the ground vibrational state of the product, we have found a strong electronic orbital alignment effect: Reaction to the vibrationally excited product follows only on the attractive excited potential-energy surfaces in "Π-like" symmetry. For both MgH(v=0 and 1) product channels we have found that the rotational quantum state distribution is independent of laser excitation wavelength, indicating that the rotational energy partitioning is determined by exit channel dynamics. However, our results show that the product vibrational energy disposal is a function of excitation laser wavelength, suggesting that the vibrational energy partitioning is correlated with the collisional impact parameter. We have also carried out a careful search for the MgCH3 reactive product in this system, finding no evidence for any observable branching to this product. We discuss the implications of these results for the chemical dynamics of this metal-alkane reaction system.

  8. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  9. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain ... imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function ... chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare that with ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Outreach Home Stakeholder Engagement Outreach Partnership Program Alliance for Research Progress Coalition ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  3. Prestimulus amplitudes modulate P1 latencies and evoked traveling alpha waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Alexandra Himmelstoss

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Traveling waves have been well documented in the ongoing, and more recently also in the evoked EEG. In the present study we investigate what kind of physiological process might be responsible for inducing an evoked traveling wave. We used a semantic judgment task which already proved useful to study evoked traveling alpha waves that coincide with the appearance of the P1 component. We found that the P1 latency of the leading electrode is significantly correlated with prestimulus amplitude size and that this event is associated with a transient change in alpha frequency. We assume that cortical background excitability, as reflected by an increase in prestimulus amplitude, is responsible for the observed change in alpha frequency and the initiation of an evoked traveling trajectory.

  4. Product Plan of New Generation System Camera "OLYMPUS PEN E-P1"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Haruo

    "OLYMPUS PEN E-P1", which is new generation system camera, is the first product of Olympus which is new standard "Micro Four-thirds System" for high-resolution mirror-less cameras. It continues good sales by the concept of "small and stylish design, easy operation and SLR image quality" since release on July 3, 2009. On the other hand, the half-size film camera "OLYMPUS PEN" was popular by the concept "small and stylish design and original mechanism" since the first product in 1959 and recorded sale number more than 17 million with 17 models. By the 50th anniversary topic and emotional value of the Olympus pen, Olympus pen E-P1 became big sales. I would like to explain the way of thinking of the product plan that included not only the simple functional value but also emotional value on planning the first product of "Micro Four-thirds System".

  5. Development of Quasi-3DOF upper limb rehabilitation system using ER brake: PLEMO-P1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, T; Fukushima, K; Furusho, J; Ozawa, T [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: kikuchi@mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, many researchers have studied the potential of using robotics technology to assist and quantify the motor functions for neuron-rehabilitation. Some kinds of haptic devices have been developed and evaluated its efficiency with clinical tests, for example, upper limb training for patients with spasticity after stroke. However, almost all the devices are active-type (motor-driven) haptic devices and they basically require high-cost safety system compared to passive-type (brake-based) devices. In this study, we developed a new practical haptic device 'PLEMO-P1'; this system adopted ER brakes as its force generators. In this paper, the mechanism of PLEMO-P1 and its software for a reaching rehabilitation are described.

  6. Complexity and diversity of the NKR-P1:Clr (Klrb1:Clec2 recognition systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Kirkham

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The NKR-P1 receptors were identified as prototypical natural killer (NK cell surface antigens and later shown to be conserved from rodents to humans on NK cells and subsets of T cells. C-type lectin-like in nature, they were originally shown to be capable of activating NK cell function and to recognize ligands on tumour cells. However, certain family members have subsequently been shown to be capable of inhibiting NK cell activity, and to recognize proteins encoded by a family of genetically linked C-type lectin-related (Clr ligands. Some of these ligands are expressed by normal, healthy cells, and modulated during transformation, infection, and cellular stress, while other ligands are upregulated during the immune response and during pathological circumstances. Here, we discuss historical and recent developments in NKR-P1 biology that demonstrate this NK receptor-ligand system to be far more complex and diverse than originally anticipated.

  7. Novel BACE1 inhibitors with a non-acidic heterocycle at the P1' position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Hamada, Yoshio; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2013-11-01

    We have reported potent peptidic and non-peptidic BACE1 inhibitors with a hydroxymethylcarbonyl (HMC) isostere as a substrate transition-state mimic. However, our potent inhibitors possess a tetrazole ring at the P1' position. It is desirable that central nervous system (CNS) drugs do not possess an acidic moiety. In this study, we synthesized non-acidic BACE1 inhibitors with heterocyclic derivatives at the P1' position. KMI-1764 (27) exhibited potent inhibitory activity (IC50=27nM). Interestingly, these non-acidic inhibitors tended to follow the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) equation and interacted with BACE1-Arg235 in the binding model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Tobacco Etch Virus Protease with Increased Substrate Tolerance at the P1' position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renicke, Christian; Spadaccini, Roberta; Taxis, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific proteases are important tools for in vitro and in vivo cleavage of proteins. They are widely used for diverse applications, like protein purification, assessment of protein–protein interactions or regulation of protein localization, abundance or activity. Here, we report the development of a procedure to select protease variants with altered specificity based on the well-established Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenine auxotrophy-dependent red/white colony assay. We applied this method on the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease to obtain a protease variant with altered substrate specificity at the P1’ Position. In vivo experiments with tester substrates showed that the mutated TEV protease still efficiently recognizes the sequence ENLYFQ, but has almost lost all bias for the amino acid at the P1’ Position. Thus, we generated a site-specific protease for synthetic approaches requiring in vivo generation of proteins or peptides with a specific N-terminal amino acid. PMID:23826349

  9. Purification and Characterization of Three Chitosanase Activities from Bacillus megaterium P1

    OpenAIRE

    Pelletier, A.; Sygusch, J

    1990-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium P1, a bacterial strain capable of hydrolyzing chitosan, was isolated from soil samples. Chitosan-degrading activity was induced by chitosan but not by its constituent d-glucosamine. Extracellular secretion of chitosanase reached levels corresponding to 1 U/ml under optimal conditions. Three chitosan-degrading proteins (chitosanases A, B, and C) were purified to homogeneity. Chitosanase A (43 kilodaltons) was highly specific for chitosan and represented the major chitosan-h...

  10. Glutathion-S-Transferase P1 polymorphisms association with broncopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants

    OpenAIRE

    Karagianni, P; Rallis, D; Fidani, L; Porpodi, M; Kalinderi, K; Tsakalidis, C.; Nikolaidis, N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress, characterized by the excretion of pre-oxidative and anti-oxidative proteases, has a key role in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). One of the many host anti-oxidant enzymes is glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), with three polymorphic alleles having been identified: homozygous ile, heterozygous ile/val and homozygous val isomorph. The aim of this study was to examine the genetic predisposition to BPD in the GSTP1 polymorphisms.

  11. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins P1 and P2 interact and colocalize at the vacuolar membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der M.W.; Carette, J.E.; Reinhoud, P.J.; Haegi, A.; Bol, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Replication of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs depends on the virus-encoded proteins P1 and P2. P1 contains methyltransferase- and helicase-like domains, and P2 contains a polymerase-like domain. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed an interaction between in vitro translated-P1 and P2 and

  12. Lateral supraorbital approach to ipsilateral PCA-P1 and ICA-PCoA aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehre, Felix; Jahromi, Behnam Rezai; Elsharkawy, Ahmed; Lehto, Hanna; Shekhtman, Oleg; Andrade-Barazarte, Hugo; Munoz, Francisco; Hijazy, Ferzat; Makhkamov, Makhkam; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysms of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) are rare and often associated with anterior circulation aneurysms. The lateral supraorbital approach allows for a very fast and safe approach to the ipsilateral lesions Circle of Willis. A technical note on the successful clip occlusion of two aneurysms in the anterior and posterior Circle of Willis via this less invasive approach has not been published before. The objective of this technical note is to describe the simultaneous microsurgical clip occlusion of an ipsilateral PCA-P1 and an internal carotid artery - posterior communicating artery (ICA-PCoA) aneurysm via the lateral supraorbital approach. The authors present a technical report of successful clip occlusions of ipsilateral located PCA-P1 and ICA-PCoA aneurysms. A 59-year-old female patient was diagnosed with a PCA-P1 and an ipsilateral ICA-PCoA aneurysm by computed tomography angiography (CTA) after an ischemic stroke secondary to a contralateral ICA dissection. The patient underwent microsurgical clipping after a lateral supraorbital craniotomy. The intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography and the postoperative CTA showed a complete occlusion of both aneurysms; the parent vessels (ICA and PCA) were patent. The patient presents postoperative no new neurologic deficit. The lateral supraorbital approach is suitable for the simultaneous microsurgical treatment of proximal anterior circulation and ipsilateral proximal PCA aneurysms. Compared to endovascular treatment, direct visual control of brainstem perforators is possible.

  13. Magnetic properties of Ak(ApB1-p)1Bh superlattices containing alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khater, A.; Ghantous, M.A.; Fresneau, M.

    2002-05-01

    An Ising model is presented for a simple cubic-type structure, to determine the magnetic properties for superlattices of periodic Ak(ApB1-p)1Bh formula consisting of k layers of spin-1/2 A ions, h layers of spin-1/2 B ions and single layer disordered alloy interfaces between them. The interface layers are characterized by random arrangements of A and B ions so that (ApB1-p)1 is a two-dimensional thermodynamically stable alloy. The magnetic properties studied concern notably the phase diagrams and the sublattice magnetizations of these systems. The model is general and can be used for ferro- or anti-ferromagnetic A-B exchange couplings. In this paper the A-A and B-B exchange couplings are considered ferromagnetic with no loss of generality. An effective field theory is employed to calculate the properties of these systems. We apply the method to various Fek(Fep Tb1-p)1Tbh superlattices. The needed exchange constants for the two-dimensional alloy interface are calculated in the framework of this model, and used to calculate these properties for different concentrations 0andleq;pandleq;1, for these superlattices. The architecture and concentration dependence of the magnetic properties is an important feature of this paper, allowing a useful experimental analysis of similar systems. (author)

  14. The P1 biomarker for assessing cortical maturation in pediatric hearing loss: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anu; Glick, Hannah; Deeves, Emily; Duncan, Erin

    2016-01-01

    We review evidence for a high degree of neuroplasticity of the central auditory pathways in early childhood, citing evidence of studies of the P1 and N1 cortical auditory evoked potentials in congenitally deaf children receiving cochlear implants at different ages during childhood, children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder and children with hearing loss and comorbid multiple disabilities. We discuss neuroplasticity, including cortico-cortical de-coupling and cross-modal re-organization that occurs in deafness. We provide evidence for the clinical utility of the P1 cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) as a non-invasive biomarker that can be used to objectively assess maturation of auditory cortex in clinical cases of cochlear implant patients and candidates. Finally, we present clinical case studies in which the P1 CAEP biomarker proved useful in clinical decision-making regarding intervention in cases of single-sided deafness, auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, mild hearing loss and hypoplastic auditory nerve. PMID:27688594

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... time in healthy people and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental ... the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading ... the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting messages. ... specialized brain systems. We have many specialized brain systems that work ... research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which ...

  19. Cloning and functional analysis of human acyl coenzyme A: Cholesterol acyltransferase1 gene P1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Cheng, Bei; Qi, Benling; Peng, Wen; Wen, Hui; Bai, Lijuan; Liu, Yun; Zhai, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) catalyzes the conversion of free cholesterol (FC) to cholesterol ester. The human ACAT1 gene P1 promoter has been cloned. However, the activity and specificity of the ACAT1 gene P1 promoter in diverse cell types remains unclear. The P1 promoter fragment was digested with KpnI/XhoI from a P1 promoter cloning vector, and was subcloned into the multiple cloning site of the Firefly luciferase vector pGL3‑Enhancer to obtain the construct P1E‑1. According to the analysis of biological information, the P1E‑1 plasmid was used to generate deletions of the ACAT1 gene P1 promoter with varying 5' ends and an identical 3' end at +65 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All the 5'‑deletion constructs of the P1 promoter were identified by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion mapping and DNA sequencing. The transcriptional activity of each construct was detected after transient transfection into THP‑1, HepG2, HEK293 and Hela cells using DEAE‑dextran and Lipofectamine 2000 liposome transfection reagent. Results showed that the transcriptional activity of the ACAT1 gene P1 promoter and deletions of P1 promoter in THP‑1 and HepG2 cells was higher than that in HEK293 and HeLa cells. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of P1E‑9 was higher compared with those of other deletions in THP‑1, HepG2, HEK293 and HeLa cells. These findings indicate that the transcriptional activity of the P1 promoter and the effects of deletions vary with different cell lines. Thus, the P1 promoter may drive ACAT1 gene expression with cell‑type specificity. In addition, the core sequence of ACAT1 gene P1 promoter was suggested to be between -125 and +65 bp.

  20. Characterization and phylogenetic utility of the mammalian protamine p1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Bussche, Ronald A; Hoofer, Steven R; Hansen, Eric W

    2002-03-01

    We sequenced the protamine P1 gene (ca. 450 bp) from 20 bats (order Chiroptera) and the flying lemur (order Dermoptera). We compared these sequences with published sequences from 19 other mammals representing seven orders (Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Cetacea, Perissodactyla, Primates, Proboscidea, and Rodentia) to assess structure, base compositional bias, and phylogenetic utility. Approximately 80% of second codon positions were guanine, resulting in protamine proteins containing a high frequency of arginine residues. Our data indicate that codon usage for arginine differs among higher mammalian taxa. Parsimony analysis of 40 species representing nine orders produced a well-resolved tree in which most nodes were supported strongly, except at the lowest taxonomic levels (e.g., within Artiodactyla and Vespertilionidae). These data support monophyly of several taxa proposed by morphologic and molecular studies (all nine orders: Laurasiatheria, Cetartiodactytla, Yangochiroptera, Noctilionoidea, Rhinolophoidea, Vespertilionoidea, Phyllostomidae, Natalidae, and Vespertilionidae) and, in agreement with recent molecular studies, reject monophyly of Archonta, Volitantia, and Microchiroptera. Bats were sister to a clade containing Perissodactyla, Carnivora, and Cetartiodactyla, and, although not unequivocally, rhinolophoid bats (traditional microchiropterans) were sister to megachiropterans. Sequences of the protamine P1 gene are useful for resolving relationships at and above the familial level in bats, and generally within and among mammalian orders, but with some drawbacks. The coding and intervening sequences are small, producing few phylogenetically informative characters, and aligning the intron is difficult, even among closely related families. Given these caveats, the protamine P1 gene may be important to future systematic studies because its functional and evolutionary constraints differ from other genes currently used in systematic studies. (C)2002 Elsevier Science

  1. Bismuth-induced Raman modes in GaP1- x Bi x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Theresa M.; Fluegel, Brian; Beaton, Daniel A.; Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2016-10-01

    Dilute bismide semiconductor alloys are a promising material platform for optoelectronic devices due to drastic impacts of bismuth on the electronic structure of the alloy. At the same time, the details of bismuth incorporation in the lattice are not fully understood. In this work, we conduct Raman scattering spectroscopy on GaP1- x Bi x epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and identify several bismuth-related Raman features including gap vibration modes at 296, 303, and 314 cm-1. This study paves the way for more detailed analysis of the local symmetry at bismuth incorporation sites in the dilute bismide alloy regime.

  2. Doc of prophage P1 is inhibited by its antitoxin partner Phd through fold complementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Pino, Abel; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Wyns, Lode

    2008-01-01

    Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin modules are involved in major physiological events set in motion under stress conditions. The toxin Doc (death on curing) from the phd/doc module on phage P1 hosts the C-terminal domain of its antitoxin partner Phd (prevents host death) through fold complementation...... evolutionary origin for the phd/doc operon. Doc induces growth arrest of Escherichia coli cells in a reversible manner, by targeting the protein synthesis machinery. Moreover, Doc activates the endogenous E. coli RelE mRNA interferase but does not require this or any other known chromosomal toxin...

  3. FURTHER CONSTRAINTS ON THE OPTICAL TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF HAT-P-1b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montalto, M.; Santos, N. C.; Martins, J. H. C.; Figueira, P.; Alonso, R. [Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço, Universidade do Porto, CAUP, Rua das Estrelas, PT4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Iro, N. [Theoretical Meteorology Group Klimacampus, University of Hamburg Grindelberg 5, D-20144, Hamburg (Germany); Desidera, S., E-mail: Marco.Montalto@astro.up.pt [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dellOsservatorio 5, Padova, I-35122 (Italy)

    2015-09-20

    We report on novel observations of HAT-P-1 aimed at constraining the optical transmission spectrum of the atmosphere of its transiting hot-Jupiter exoplanet. Ground-based differential spectrophotometry was performed over two transit windows using the DOLORES spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Our measurements imply an average planet to star radius ratio equal to R{sub p}/R{sub *} = (0.1159 ± 0.0005). This result is consistent with the value obtained from recent near-infrared measurements of this object, but differs from previously reported optical measurements, being lower by around 4.4 exoplanet scale heights. Analyzing the data over five different spectral bins of ∼600 Å wide, we observed a single peaked spectrum (3.7 σ level) with a blue cutoff corresponding to the blue edge of the broad absorption wing of sodium and an increased absorption in the region in-between 6180 and 7400 Å. We also infer that the width of the broad absorption wings due to alkali metals is likely narrower than the one implied by solar abundance clear atmospheric models. We interpret the result as evidence that HAT-P-1b has a partially clear atmosphere at optical wavelengths with a more modest contribution from an optical absorber than previously reported.

  4. Optimization of nonribosomal peptides production by a psychrotrophic fungus: Trichoderma velutinum ACR-P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Singh, Varun P; Singh, Deepika; Yusuf, Farnaz; Kumar, Anil; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Chaubey, Asha

    2016-11-01

    Trichoderma is an anamorphic filamentous fungal genus with immense potential for production of small valuable secondary metabolites with indispensable biological activities. Microbial dynamics of a psychrotrophic strain Trichoderma velutinum ACR-P1, isolated from unexplored niches of the Shiwalik region, bestowed with rich biodiversity of microflora, was investigated for production of nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) by metabolite profiling by intact-cell mass spectrometry (ICMS) employing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer. Being the first report on NRPs production by T. velutinum, studies on optimization of growth conditions by Response Surface Methodology (RSM) for production of NRPs by ACR-P1 was carried out strategically. Multifold enhancement in the yield of NRPs belonging to subfamily SF4 with medium chain of amino acid residues having m/z 1437.9, 1453.9, and 1452.0 at pH 5.9 at 20 °C and of subfamily SF1 with long-chain amino acid residues having m/z 1770.2, 1784.2, 1800.1, 1802.1, and 1815.1 was achieved at pH 7.0 at 25 °C. Complexities of natural mixtures were thus considerably reduced under respective optimized culture conditions accelerating the production of novel microbial natural products by saving time and resources.

  5. DSC Deconvolution of the Structural Complexity of c-MYC P1 Promoter G-Quadruplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettler, Jamie M.; Buscaglia, Robert; Le, Vu H.; Lewis, Edwin A.

    2011-01-01

    We completed a biophysical characterization of the c-MYC proto-oncogene P1 promoter quadruplex and its interaction with a cationic porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TMPyP4), using differential scanning calorimetry, isothermal titration calorimetry, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. We examined three different 24-mer oligonucleotides, including the wild-type (WT) sequence found in the c-MYC P1 promoter and two mutant G→T sequences that are known to fold into single 1:2:1 and 1:6:1 loop isomer quadruplexes. Biophysical experiments were performed on all three oligonucleotide sequences at two different ionic strengths (30 mM [K+] and 130 mM [K+]). Differential scanning calorimetry experiments demonstrated that the WT quadruplex consists of a mixture of at least two different folded conformers at both ionic strengths, whereas both mutant sequences exhibit a single two-state melting transition at both ionic strengths. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments demonstrated that both mutant sequences bind 4 mols of TMPyP4 to 1 mol of DNA, in similarity to the WT sequence. The circular dichroism spectroscopy signatures for all three oligonucleotides at both ionic strengths are consistent with an intramolecular parallel stranded G-quadruplex structure, and no change in quadruplex structure is observed upon addition of saturating amounts of TMPyP4 (i.e., 4:1 TMPyP4/DNA). PMID:21402034

  6. Improving the Catalytic Property of the Glycoside Hydrolase LXYL-P1–2 by Directed Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-Jing Chen; Xiao Liang; Hui-Xian Li; Tian-Jiao Chen; Ping Zhu

    2017-01-01

    The glycoside hydrolase LXYL-P1–2 from Lentinula edodes can specifically hydrolyze 7-β-xylosyltaxanes to form 7-β-hydroxyltaxanes for the semi-synthesis of paclitaxel. In order to improve the catalytic properties of the enzyme, we performed error-prone PCR to construct the random mutant library of LXYL-P1–2 and used the methanol-induced plate method to screen the mutants with improved catalytic properties. Two variants, LXYL-P1–2-EP1 (EP1, S91D mutation) and LXYL-P1–2-EP2 (EP2, T368E mutation...

  7. Brain Basics

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  11. Brain Diseases

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    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain. Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict ...

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  1. Brain Basics

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  1. Brain Basics

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  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

  3. Positive and negative symptom scores are correlated with activation in different brain regions during facial emotion perception in schizophrenia patients: a voxel-based sLORETA source activity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Won; Kim, Han-Sung; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2013-12-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most devastating of all mental illnesses, and has dimensional characteristics that include both positive and negative symptoms. One problem reported in schizophrenia patients is that they tend to show deficits in face emotion processing, on which negative symptoms are thought to have stronger influence. In this study, four event-related potential (ERP) components (P100, N170, N250, and P300) and their source activities were analyzed using EEG data acquired from 23 schizophrenia patients while they were presented with facial emotion picture stimuli. Correlations between positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) scores and source activations during facial emotion processing were calculated to identify the brain areas affected by symptom scores. Our analysis demonstrates that PANSS positive scores are negatively correlated with major areas of the left temporal lobule for early ERP components (P100, N170) and with the right middle frontal lobule for a later component (N250), which indicates that positive symptoms affect both early face processing and facial emotion processing. On the other hand, PANSS negative scores are negatively correlated with several clustered regions, including the left fusiform gyrus (at P100), most of which are not overlapped with regions showing correlations with PANSS positive scores. Our results suggest that positive and negative symptoms affect independent brain regions during facial emotion processing, which may help to explain the heterogeneous characteristics of schizophrenia. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... a major mood circuit called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain ... in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body circuit which plays ...

  5. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate have been ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic- ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. ... that regulates many functions, including mood, appetite, and sleep. synapse —The tiny gap between neurons, where nerve impulses are sent from one neuron to ... of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed New BRAIN Grants ...

  11. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside of the brain (ventricles) or surrounding your brain and spinal cord to drain the excess fluid into an external bag. Sometimes it may then be necessary to introduce a shunt system — which consists of a ... brain and ending in your abdominal cavity. Rehabilitative therapy. ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  14. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  15. FoxP1 stimulates angiogenesis by repressing the inhibitory guidance protein semaphorin 5B in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Grundmann

    Full Text Available Forkhead box (Fox transcription factors are important regulators of cardiovascular development and several Fox-proteins have recently been shown to modulate embryonic and post-natal angiogenesis. However, the role of the FoxP subfamily, which is highly expressed in cardiovascular tissue, has not been investigated so far. Here, we show that the transcription factor FoxP1 is the highest expressed FoxP-protein in endothelial cells and that it is upregulated at the site of neovascularization during hindlimb ischemia in mice. Silencing of FoxP1 results in a strong inhibition of proliferation, tube formation and migration of cultured endothelial cells. Accordingly, knockdown of FoxP1 in zebrafish was followed by a disruption of intersomitic vascular formation. Using gene expression profiling, we show that FoxP1 induces a specific change of the endothelial transcriptome and functions as a suppressor of semaphorin 5B, which has previously been described as a neuronal inhibitory factor. Our findings now demonstrate that semaphorin 5B also acts as a FoxP1- dependent suppressor of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and sprouting, mediating the effects of FoxP1. In summary, our data indicate that the transcription factor FoxP1 is essential for the angiogenic function of endothelial cells and functions as a suppressor of the inhibitory guidance cue semaphorin 5B, suggesting an important function of FoxP1 in the regulation of neovascularization.

  16. Molecular dynamics, thermodynamic, and mutational binding studies for tumor-specific LyP-1 in complex with p32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timur, Selin Seda; Yalçın, Gözde; Çevik, Özge; Andaç, Cenk; Gürsoy, R Neslihan

    2017-04-21

    Recent studies in tumor homing peptides have shown the specificity of LyP-1 (CGNKRTRGC) to tumor lymphatics. In this present work, we evaluated the possible interactions between cyclic LyP-1 and its receptor, p32, with molecular dynamics and docking studies in order to lead the design of novel LyP-1 derivatives, which could bind to p32 more effectively and perform enhanced antitumor effect. The total binding enthalpy energies have been obtained by MM-PBSA thermodynamic computations and the favorability of p32.LyP-1 complex in water has been shown by explicit water MD computations. The last 30 ns of molecular dynamics trajectory have shown the strong interaction of LyP-1 with the inner surface chains of p32, especially with chains B and C. ALA-SCAN mutagenesis studies have indicated the considerable influence of Asn3, Lys4, Arg5, and Arg7 amino acid residues on the specific binding of LyP-1. Within the knowledge of the critical role of p32 receptor in cancer cell metabolism, this study can lead to further developments in anticancer therapy by targeting p32 with LyP-1 derivatives as active targeting moiety. This data can also be applied for the development of new drug delivery systems in which LyP-1 can be used for its targeting and anticancer properties.

  17. Hypoallergenic Der p 1/Der p 2 combination vaccines for immunotherapy of house dust mite allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Wei; Blatt, Katharina; Thomas, Wayne R; Swoboda, Ines; Valent, Peter; Valenta, Rudolf; Vrtala, Susanne

    2012-08-01

    More than 50% of allergic patients have house dust mite (HDM) allergy. Group 1 and 2 allergens are the major HDM allergens. We sought to produce and perform preclinical characterization of a recombinant hypoallergenic combination vaccine for specific immunotherapy of HDM allergy. Synthetic genes coding for 2 hybrid proteins consisting of reassembled Der p 1 and Der p 2 fragments with (recombinant Der p 2 [rDer p 2]/1C) and without (rDer p 2/1S) cysteines were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity by means of affinity chromatography. Protein fold was determined by using circular dichroism analysis, allergenic activity was determined by testing IgE reactivity and using basophil activation assays, and the presence of T-cell epitopes was determined based on lymphoproliferation in allergic patients. Mice and rabbits were immunized to study the molecules' ability to induce an allergic response and whether they induce allergen-specific IgG capable of inhibiting allergic patients' IgE binding to the allergens, respectively. rDer p 2/1C and rDer p 2/1S were expressed in large amounts in E coli as soluble and folded proteins. Because of the lack of disulfide bonds, rDer p 2/1S did not form aggregates and was obtained as a monomeric protein, whereas rDer p 2/1C did form aggregates. Both hypoallergens lacked relevant IgE reactivity and had reduced ability to induce allergic inflammation and allergic responses but induced similar T-cell proliferation as the wild-type allergens. Immunization with the hypoallergens (rDer p 2/1S > rDer p 2/1C) induced IgG antibodies in rabbits that inhibited the IgE reactivity of patients with HDM allergy to Der p 1 and Der p 2. The preclinical characterization indicates that particularly rDer p 2/1S can be used as a safe hypoallergenic molecule for both tolerance and vaccination approaches to treat HDM allergy. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. HLA-DM Focuses on Conformational Flexibility Around P1 Pocket to Catalyze Peptide Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2013-10-17

    Peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecules to CD4+ T cells play a central role in the initiation of adaptive immunity. This antigen presentation process is characterized by the proteolytic cleavage of foreign and self proteins, and loading of the resultant peptides onto MHCII molecules. Loading and exchange of antigenic peptides is catalyzed by a non-classical MHCII molecule, HLA-DM. The impact of HLA-DM on epitope selection has been appreciated for a long time. However, the molecular mechanism by which HLA-DM mediates peptide exchange remains elusive. Here, we review recent efforts in elucidating how HLA-DM works, highlighted by two recently solved co-structures of HLA-DM bound to HLA-DO (a natural inhibitor of HLA-DM), or to HLA-DR1 (a common MHCII). In light of these efforts, a model for HLA-DM action in which HLA-DM utilizes conformational flexibility around the P1 pocket of the MHCII-peptide complex to catalyze peptide exchange is proposed.

  19. Isolation of a P1 phagemid encompassing the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, F.; Schneider, M.C.; Reeders, S.T. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated a P1 phagemid using primers for the 3 prime end of the tuberin gene (TSC2) on chromosome 16p13, which encompasses a large gene (KG8) which shows PKD1-specific mutations. The approximately 90-100 kilobase phagemid encompasses at least 4 genes (KG8, Nik7, KG3, and KM17). The CA repeats SM6 (upstream of the KG8 gene) and KG8 localized to the gene itself (3 prime untranslated) are found in the phagemid, as well as a number of trinucleotide repeat elements. One, a CCT-hybridizing fragment maps internal to the KG8 cDNA and appears to make the cosmid corresponding to the region (cGGG10) unstable. None of the previously published cosmids from the region completely encompasses the KG8 gene. A detailed R1 map of the region has been prepared and compared to the cosmid maps. Sequence of the regional genes will be presented. The phagemid will provide an alternative genomic source for evaluating the genomic sequence/map. In addition, this phagemid will potentially be useful as a vector for transfection of the entire PKD1 gene and its regulatory sequences.

  20. Glutathione S-transferase P1 correlated with oxidative stress in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zhao, Xin-Ping; Wang, Li-Yuan; Gao, Shuai; Zhao, Jing; Fan, Yu-Chen; Wang, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) is an important phase II enzyme that can protect cells from oxidative stress in various human cancers. However, few clinical studies were undertaken on the relationship between GSTP1 and oxidative stress in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The present study was therefore aimed to evaluate the potential associations between GSTP1 and oxidative stress in HCC patients. The GSTP1 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was determined by flow cytometry from 38 HCC patients and 38 chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. The GSTP1 mRNA level in PBMCs was determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay (ELISA) was performed to measure the oxidative stress status, including plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), xanthine oxidase (XOD), reduced glutathione hormone (GSH) and glutathione-S-transferases (GST). Significantly decreased GSTP1 protein expression was found in HCC patients than in CHB patients (Poxidative stress in the development of HCC from CHB.

  1. Surface-step-induced magnetic anisotropy of p(1{times}1) Fe on W(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mireles, Hector C.; Erskine, J. L.

    2001-06-01

    Magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements of ultrathin p(1{times}1) Fe films on graded-step-density W(100) are used to study step-induced magnetic anisotropy. Spot-profile-analysis low-energy-electron diffraction is used to characterize the stepped W(100) surface prior to film growth and the epitaxial Fe layer after vapor deposition. The experimental results are qualitatively compatible with prior experiments and with theoretical predictions based on the Neel model and on a one-dimensional micromagnetic model proposed by Hyman, Zangwell, and Stiles (HZS). The observed evolution of hysteresis loop shape as a function of step density and anisotropy strength (which was varied by chemisorption of oxygen) is observed to be consistent with a hysteresis loop phase diagram based on the HZS model. However, the measured variation of switching field versus vicinal angle {alpha} for 2 monolayer thick Fe films differs significantly from the quadratic dependence predicted by the Neel model and from the dependence predicted by HZS. The surface-step-induced anisotropy vanishes at high vicinality ({alpha}{similar_to}10{degree}) and novel two-state switching is observed at specific vicinal angles. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Understanding the Biocompatibility of Sintered Calcium Phosphate with Ratio of [Ca]/[P] = 1.50

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Lin Yen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatibility of sintered calcium phosphate pellets with [Ca]/[P] = 1.50 was determined in this study. Calcium pyrophosphate (CPP phase formed on the sintered pellets immersed in a normal saline solution for 14 d at 37∘C. The intensities of hydroxyapatite (HA reflections in the X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns of the pellets were retrieved to as-sintered state. The pellet surface morphology shows that CPP crystallites were clearly present and make an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP to discriminate against become to the area of slice join together. In addition, the intensities of the CPP reflections in the XRD patterns were the highest when the pellets were immersed for 28 d. When the CPP powders were extracted from the pellets after immersion in the solution for 14 d, the viability of 3T3 cells remained above 90% for culture times from 1 to 4 d. The pellet surface morphology observed using optical microscopy showed that the cells did not adhere to the bottom of the sintered pellets when cultured for 4 d; however, some CPP phase precipitates were formed, as confirmed by XRD. In consequence, the results suggest that the sintered HA powders are good materials for use in biomedical applications because of their good biocompatibility.

  3. Glutathion-S-Transferase P1 polymorphisms association with broncopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagianni, P; Rallis, D; Fidani, L; Porpodi, M; Kalinderi, K; Tsakalidis, C; Nikolaidis, N

    2013-10-01

    Oxidative stress, characterized by the excretion of pre-oxidative and anti-oxidative proteases, has a key role in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). One of the many host anti-oxidant enzymes is glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), with three polymorphic alleles having been identified: homozygous ile, heterozygous ile/val and homozygous val isomorph. The aim of this study was to examine the genetic predisposition to BPD in the GSTP1 polymorphisms. A prospective case-control study was carried out in the 2nd Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, Greece during 2008. The genetic polymorphisms of GSTP1 in 28 preterms <32 weeks gestational age (GA) with BPD compared to 74 controls (33 preterms without BPD and 41 healthy terms) were examined. The homozygous ile isomorph was predominant in all groups (preterms with BPD: 82%, preterms without BPD: 70%, healthy terms: 78%), followed by the heterozygous ile/val (14%, 18% and 20% respectively) and the homozygous val isomorph (4%, 12% and 2% respectively). The homozygous ile isomorph was also identified in the majority of preterms with mild (80%), moderate (100%) and severe (73%) BPD. The GSTP1 genetic distribution did not differ between the groups and GSTP1 polymorphisms were not associated with the severity of BPD. This study could not confirm an association between GSTP1 polymorphisms and the development of BPD or the severity of the disease.

  4. Preliminary Altitude Operational Characteristics of a J57-P1 Turbojet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Lewis E.; Saari, Martin J.

    1954-01-01

    The operational characteristics of a J57-P1 turbojet engine have been investigated at altitudes between 15,000 and 66,000 feet in the Lewis altitude wind tunnel. Included in this study is a discussion of fuel nozzle coking, the altitude operating limits with and without the standard engine control, the compressor surge characteristics, and the engine starting and windmilling characteristics. Severe circumferential turbine outlet temperature gradients which occurred at high altitude as a result of fuel nozzle coking were alleviated by the manufacturer's change in the fuel flow divider schedule and in a nozzle gasket material. Compressor air bleed is required to prevent surge of the outboard compressor in the low engine speed region. The maximum altitude at which the engine was operated without the control was about 66,000 feet at 0.8 flight Mach number and at a reduced engine speed to avoid compressor surge; with the engine control in operation, the altitude operating limit is reduced to approximately 59,000 feet. The maximum altitude at which the engine was started was about 40,000 feet.

  5. Endovascular Treatment of Giant P1/P2 Aneurysm by Direct Puncture of the Vertebral Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajner, M.; Obsza_Ska, K.; Nestorowicz, A.; Szczerbo-Trojanowska, M.; Trojanowski, T.

    2003-01-01

    Summary Vascular access is usually achieved through a femoral arterial puncture using a modified Seldinger technique. However, selective catheterization of the great cerebral vessels by femoral approach fails completely when the vessel is tortuous or atheromatous. In case of posterior vascular circulation aneurysms, transbrachial approach or direct puncture of the vertebral artery (VA) is an alternative. The aneurysms of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) are reported to be rare. Due to unfavorable anatomic location, the PCA aneurysms are difficult to reach during surgical procedure. Endovascular embolization is at present considered to be more effective and safer treatment of the PCA aneurysms arising from different segments, offering a viable alternative to the surgical approach. We report the case of the giant left PCA aneurysm, located at the junction of P1/P2 segments, successfully treated by parent artery occlusion achieved after the direct puncture of the right VA which was used because both VAs were tortuous, irregular and their ostia were not accessible by femoral approach. According to different authors, parent artery occlusion appears to be safe in the treatment of P2 segment aneurysms, whatever the location of the occlusion. In our case we decided to perform this kind of treatment believing it was the only possible one. PMID:20591315

  6. Sex differences in interhemispheric communication during face identity encoding: evidence from ERPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, Ornella; Leleu, Arnaud; Rebaï, Mohamed; Fiori, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Sex-related hemispheric lateralization and interhemispheric transmission times (IHTTs) were examined in twenty-four participants at the level of the first visual ERP components (P1 and N170) during face identity encoding in a divided visual-field paradigm. While no lateralization-related and sex-related differences were reflected in the P1 characteristics, these two factors modulated the N170. Indeed, N170 amplitudes indicated a right hemisphere (RH) dominance in men (and a more bilateral functioning in women). N170 latencies and the derived IHTTs confirmed the RH advantage in men but showed the reverse asymmetry in women. Altogether, the results of this study suggest a clear asymmetry in men and a more divided work between the hemispheres in women, with a tendency toward a left hemisphere (LH) advantage. Thus, by extending the pattern to the right-sided face processing, our results generalize previous findings from studies using other materials and indicating longer transfers from the specialized to the non-specialized hemisphere, especially in the male brain. Because asymmetries started from the N170 component, the first electrophysiological index of high-level perceptual processing on face representations, they also suggest a functional account for hemispheric lateralization and sex-related differences rather than a structural one. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Bactericide, Immunomodulating, and Wound Healing Properties of Transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin P1 In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lebedeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedure of manufacturing K. pinnata water extracts containing cecropin P1 (CecP1 from the formerly described transgenic plants is established. It included incubation of leaves at +4°C for 7 days, mechanical homogenization of leaves using water as extraction solvent, and heating at +70°C for inactivating plant enzymes. Yield of CecP1 (after heating and sterilizing filtration was 0.3% of total protein in the extract. The water extract of K. pinnata + CecP1 exhibits favorable effect on healing of wounds infected with S. aureus (equal to Cefazolin and with a combination of S. aureus with P. aeruginosa (better than Cefazolin. Wild-type K. pinnata extract exhibited evident microbicide activity against S. aureus with P. aeruginosa but it was substantially strengthened in K. pinnata + CecP1 extract. K. pinnata extracts (both wild-type and transgenic did not exhibit general toxicity and accelerated wound recovery. Due to immunomodulating activity, wild-type K. pinnata extract accelerated granulation of the wound bed and marginal epithelialization even better than K. pinnata + CecP1 extract. Immunomodulating and microbicide activity of K. pinnata synergizes with microbicide activity of CecP1 accelerating elimination of bacteria.

  8. Immunomodulating and Revascularizing Activity of Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Fungicide Activity of Biogenic Peptide Cecropin P1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Zakharchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata plants producing an antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (CecP1 have been reported. Now we report biological testing K. pinnata extracts containing CecP1 as a candidate drug for treatment of wounds infected with Candida albicans. The drug constitutes the whole juice from K. pinnata leaves (not ethanol extract sterilized with nanofiltration. A microbicide activity of CecP1 against an animal fungal pathogen in vivo was demonstrated for the first time. However, a favorable therapeutic effect of the transgenic K. pinnata extract was attributed to a synergism between the fungicide activity of CecP1 and wound healing (antiscar, revascularizing, and immunomodulating effect of natural biologically active components of K. pinnata. A commercial fungicide preparation clotrimazole eliminated C. albicans cells within infected wounds in rats with efficiency comparable to CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extract. But in contrast to K. pinnata extract, clotrimazole did not exhibit neither wound healing activity nor remodeling of the scar matrix. Taken together, our results allow assumption that CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extracts should be considered as a candidate drug for treatment of dermatomycoses, wounds infected with fungi, and bedsores.

  9. The mouse NKR-P1B:Clr-b recognition system is a negative regulator of innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mir Munir A; Chen, Peter; Mottashed, Amelia N; Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Thomas, Midhun J; Zhu, Qinzhang; Brooks, Colin G; Kartsogiannis, Vicky; Gillespie, Matthew T; Carlyle, James R; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2015-04-02

    NKR-P1B is a homodimeric type II transmembrane C-type lectinlike receptor that inhibits natural killer (NK) cell function upon interaction with its cognate C-type lectin-related ligand, Clr-b. The NKR-P1B:Clr-b interaction represents a major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I)-independent missing-self recognition system that monitors cellular Clr-b levels. We have generated NKR-P1B(B6)-deficient (Nkrp1b(-/-)) mice to study the role of NKR-P1B in NK cell development and function in vivo. NK cell inhibition by Clr-b is abolished in Nkrp1b(-/-) mice, confirming the inhibitory nature of NKR-P1B(B6). Inhibitory receptors also promote NK cell tolerance and responsiveness to stimulation; hence, NK cells expressing NKR-P1B(B6) and Ly49C/I display augmented responsiveness to activating signals vs NK cells expressing either or none of the receptors. In addition, Nkrp1b(-/-) mice are defective in rejecting cells lacking Clr-b, supporting a role for NKR-P1B(B6) in MHC-I-independent missing-self recognition of Clr-b in vivo. In contrast, MHC-I-dependent missing-self recognition is preserved in Nkrp1b(-/-) mice. Interestingly, spontaneous myc-induced B lymphoma cells may selectively use NKR-P1B:Clr-b interactions to escape immune surveillance by wild-type, but not Nkrp1b(-/-), NK cells. These data provide direct genetic evidence of a role for NKR-P1B in NK cell tolerance and MHC-I-independent missing-self recognition. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. The clinicopathological significance of forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Yang, Zhulin; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Ziru; Miao, Xiongying; Li, Daiqiang; Zou, Qiong; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly malignant tumor with poor prognosis, and the biomarkers for the early diagnosis, targeting therapy, and prognosis are still not clinically available. This study investigated the expression of forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a proteins in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumor tissues and pancreatic tissues with and without benign lesions using immunohistochemical staining. Results showed that the positive rates of forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a protein expression were significantly lower in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumors compared to peritumoral tissues, benign pancreatic tissues, and normal pancreatic tissues (p box P1 and forkhead box O3a protein expression exhibited dysplasia or intraepithelial neoplasia. The positive rates of forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a expression were significantly lower in cases with tumor mass >5 cm, lymph node metastasis, invasion to surrounding tissues and organs, and tumor-node-metastasis III + IV stage disease compared to cases with tumor mass ⩽5 cm (p box P1 and forkhead box O3a expression survived significantly shorter than patients with positive forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a expression (p = 0.000). Cox multivariate analysis revealed that negative forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a expression was an independent poor prognosis factor in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. The area under the curve of a receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.642 for forkhead box P1 (95% confidence interval: 0.553-0.730) and 0.655 for forkhead box O3a (95% confidence interval: 0.6568-0.742). Loss of forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a protein expression is associated with carcinogenesis, progression, and poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas.

  11. LyP-1-conjugated Fe3O4 nanoparticles suppress tumor growth by magnetic induction hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Peishan; Wang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Jieying; Zhang, Han; Yang, Xin; Huang, Yun; Tang, Jintian

    2017-11-22

    To find a promising drug carrier to suppress tumor using magnetic induction hyperthermia (MIH) and targeted therapy, two superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and LyP-1, respectively, were prepared and compared. The particle size ranges of PEG-SPIONs and LyP-1-SPIONs were 10~15nm, and 15~20nm, respectively. In FTIR spectra, PEG-SPIONs and LyP-1-SPIONs had strong peaks between 575 and 1630 cm-1. Specifically, the PEG-SPIONs mainly has peaks in 581 and 1630 cm-1. The LyP-1-SPIONs mainly had peaks in 575, 1050 and 1625 cm-1. The contents of Fe3O4 in the PEG-SPIONs and LyP-1-SPIONs were about 94.24% and 89.26%, respectively. The iron contents in the MCF-7 and CT-26 cells were 33.1±1.8pg and 27.9±0.95pg, respectively, after co-incubation with LyP-1-SPIONs for 8 hours. The LyP-1-SPIONs accumulated in the nucleus of MCF-7 cells while PEG-SPIONs in cytoplasma. In vitro, after 30 days we can found the tumor almost stopped to grow in Group LyP-1-SPIONs. LyP-1-SPIONs are promising in treating cancer as they accumulated in the nucleus of MCF-7 cells which expressed p32 and almost stopped tumor growth by combined MIH and targeted therapy.

  12. Broad-Host-Range IncP-1 plasmids and their resistance potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena ePopowska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasmids of the incompatibility group IncP-1, also called IncP, as extrachromosomal genetic elements can transfer and replicate virtually in all Gram-negative bacteria. They are composed of backbone genes that encode a variety of essential functions and accessory genes that have implications for human health and environmental bioremediation. Broad-host-range IncP plasmids are known to spread genes between distinct phylogenetic groups of bacteria. These genes often code for resistances to a broad spectrum of antibiotics, heavy metals and quaternary ammonium compounds used as disinfectants. The backbone of these plasmids carries modules that enable them to effectively replicate, move to a new host via conjugative transfer and to be stably maintained in bacterial cells. The adaptive, resistance and virulence genes are mainly located on mobile genetic elements integrated between the functional plasmid backbone modules. Environmental studies have demonstrated the wide distribution of IncP-like replicons in manure, soils and wastewater treatment plants. They also are present in strains of pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria, which can be a cause for concern, because they may encode multiresistance. Their broad distribution suggests that IncP plasmids play a crucial role in bacterial adaptation by utilizing horizontal gene transfer. This review summarizes the variety of genetic information and physiological functions carried by IncP plasmids, which can contribute to the spread of antibiotic and heavy metal resistance while also mediating the process of bioremediation of pollutants. Due to the location of the resistance genes on plasmids with a broad host range and the presence of transposons carrying these genes it seems that the spread of these genes would be possible and quite hazardous in infection control. Future studies are required to determine the level of risk of the spread of resistance genes located on these plasmids.

  13. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  14. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, H R

    1999-05-01

    Current law in the United States authorizes physicians to diagnose brain death by applying generally accepted neurologic criteria for determining loss of function of the entire brain. This article offers a medical-legal perspective on problems that may arise with respect to the determination of brain death. These include the possibility of diagnostic error, conceptual disagreements that may constrain the use of neurologic criteria to diagnose death, and the conflation of brain death and loss of consciousness. This article also addresses legal aspects of the debate over whether to expand the definition of brain death to include permanent unconsciousness. Although existing laws draw a clear distinction between brain death and the persistent vegetative state, many courts have authorized removal of life support from individuals whose unconsciousness is believed to be permanent on proof that removal accords with preferences expressed before sentience was lost.

  15. Structure-guided design and synthesis of P1' position 1-phenylcycloalkylamine-derived pentapeptidic BACE1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagad, Harichandra D; Hamada, Yoshio; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Hidaka, Koushi; Hamada, Takashi; Sohma, Youhei; Kimura, Tooru; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2011-09-01

    Previously, we reported potent pentapeptidic BACE1 inhibitors with the hydroxymethylcarbonyl isostere as a substrate transition-state mimic. To improve the in vitro potency, we further reported pentapeptidic inhibitors with carboxylic acid bioisosteres at the P(4) and P1' positions. In the current study, we screened new P1' position 1-phenylcycloalkylamine analogs to find non-acidic inhibitors that possess double-digit nanomolar range IC(50) values. An extensive structure-activity relationship study was performed with various amine derivatives at the P1' position. The most potent inhibitor of this pentapeptide series, KMI-1830, possessing 1-phenylcyclopentylamine at the P1' position had an IC(50) value of 11.6 nM against BACE1 in vitro enzymatic assay. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form ...

  17. Direct regulatory immune activity of lactic acid bacteria on Der p 1-pulsed dendritic cells from allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochard, Pierre; Hammad, Hamida; Ratajczak, Céline; Charbonnier-Hatzfeld, Anne-Sophie; Just, Nicolas; Tonnel, André-Bernard; Pestel, Joël

    2005-07-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are suggested to play a regulatory role in the development of allergic reactions. However, their potential effects on dendritic cells (DCs) directing the immune polarization remain unclear. The immunologic effect of Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 (LAB1) on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs) from patients allergic to house dust mite was evaluated. MD-DCs were stimulated for 24 hours with the related allergen Der p 1 in the presence or absence of LAB1. Cell-surface markers were assessed by means of FACS analysis, and the key polarizing cytokines IL-12 and IL-10 were quantified. The subsequent regulatory effect of pulsed MD-DCs on naive or memory T cells was evaluated by determining the T-cell cytokine profile. LAB1 induced the maturation of MD-DCs, even if pulsed with Der p 1. Interestingly, after incubation with LAB1 and Der p 1, MD-DCs produced higher amounts of IL-12 than Der p 1-pulsed DCs. Indeed, the T H 2 cytokine (IL-4 and IL-5) production observed when naive or memory autologous T cells were cocultured with Der p 1-pulsed MD-DCs was highly reduced in the presence of LAB1. Finally, in contrast to naive or memory T cells exposed once to Der p 1-pulsed DCs, T cells stimulated by MD-DCs pulsed with Der p 1 and LAB1 failed to produce T H 2 cytokines in response to a new stimulation with Der p 1-pulsed DCs. Thus in the presence of LAB1, MD-DCs from allergic patients tend to reorientate the T-cell response toward a beneficial T H 1 profile.

  18. [Expression of single chain fragment variable P1D3 antibody against shrimp white spot syndrome virus in Pichia pastoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Zhang, Min; Yuan, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Dai, He-Ping

    2006-11-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in aquaculture penaeid shrimp, which caused catastrophic economic losses in the worldwide. No adequate treatments against WSSV are available. In order to study infection mechanism of WSSV, a phage display scFv cDNA library against WSSV was constructed and a neutralizing antibody of scFv P1D3 was selected in our lab previously. In this study, scFv P1D3 was expressed successfully in yeast. Firstly, the original expression vector of P1D3, M13 phagmid, was used as a template to design primers with restriction sites of SnaB I and EcoR I . Then the gene of P1D3 was amplified by PCR. After digested by SnaB I and EcoR I , the fragment of scFv P1D3 with E-tag was inserted into yeast and E. coli shuttle plasmid pPIC9k. The recombinant plasmid pPIC9k-scFv P1D3-Etag was linearized with Bgl II and then transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115 by electroporation. Positive clones were selected and verified by PCR and DNA sequencing. The scFv PID3 was induced to express in yeast by methanol. The results of ELISA demonstrate that scFv P1D3 expressed in yeast still has high specificity to bind on WSSV and the binding activity is higher than that expressed in E. coli TG1. After several optimizing experiments, the results show that the expression amount of scFv P1D3 can reach to 302 mg/L in yeast culture supernatant. This experiment has offered a new source of antibody for the researches on passive immunology for shrimp.

  19. Non-relativistic limit of the compressible Navier-Stokes-Fourier-P1 approximation model arising in radiation hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Song; Li, Fucai; Xie, Feng

    2015-01-01

    As is well-known that the general radiation hydrodynamics models include two mainly coupled parts: one is macroscopic fluid part, which is governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, another is radiation field part, which is described by the transport equation of photons. Under the two physical approximations: "gray" approximation and P1 approximation, one can derive the so-called Navier-Stokes-Fourier-P1 approximation radiation hydrodynamics model from the general one. In t...

  20. Individual differences in face cognition: brain-behavior relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzmann, Grit; Kunina, Olga; Sommer, Werner; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2010-03-01

    Individual differences in perceiving, learning, and recognizing faces, summarized under the term face cognition, have been shown on the behavioral and brain level, but connections between these levels have rarely been made. We used ERPs in structural equation models to determine the contributions of neurocognitive processes to individual differences in the accuracy and speed of face cognition as established by Wilhelm, Herzmann, Kunina, Danthiir, Schacht, and Sommer [Individual differences in face cognition, in press]. For 85 participants, we measured several ERP components and, in independent tasks and sessions, assessed face cognition abilities and other cognitive abilities, including immediate and delayed memory, mental speed, general cognitive ability, and object cognition. Individual differences in face cognition were unrelated to domain-general visual processes (P100) and to processes involved with memory encoding (Dm component). The ability of face cognition accuracy was moderately related to neurocognitive indicators of structural face encoding (latency of the N170) and of activating representations of both faces and person-related knowledge (latencies and amplitudes of the early and late repetition effects, ERE/N250 and LRE/N400, respectively). The ability of face cognition speed was moderately related to the amplitudes of the ERE and LRE. Thus, a substantial part of individual differences in face cognition is explained by the speed and efficiency of activating memory representations of faces and person-related knowledge. These relationships are not moderated by individual differences in established cognitive abilities.

  1. Prospective randomized comparison of two embryo culture systems: P1 medium by Irvine Scientific and the Cook IVF Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yosef, Dalit; Amit, Ami; Azem, Foad; Schwartz, Tamar; Cohen, Tania; Mei-Raz, Nava; Carmon, Ariela; Lessing, Joseph B; Yaron, Yuval

    2004-08-01

    To compare the efficacy of two commercially available in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo culture media systems: the glucose-free P1 Medium supplemented with 20% synthetic serum substitute (SSS) (Irvine Scientific), and the Cook IVF Medium (Cook, Australia). A prospective randomized study. Medical center-based IVF Unit affiliated to the Faculty of Medicine of Tel Aviv University. IVF patients were randomly assigned to either P1 Medium supplemented with 20% SSS (182 patients, 196 cycles) or Cook Medium (167 patients, 179 cycles). Fertilization rates were similar with both media (52.3 +/- 26.1 and 53.8 +/- 27.6, respectively). Likewise, no difference was found in morphological characteristics and grading of cultured embryos. However, a significantly higher proportion of the embryos incubated in the P1 Medium reached the four-cell stage on day 2 or the 6-cell stage on day 3 postfertilization, compared to those incubated in Cook Medium (54.3% vs. 41.9%, p < 0.0001). Clinical pregnancy and delivery rates were improved when oocytes and embryos were cultured in P1 Medium. Finally, Implantation rate was significantly higher in the P1 Medium Group (9.9% vs. 6%, respectively). Our results suggest that the P1 Medium may be associated with a higher embryo cleavage rate and improved implantation rates compared to the Cook IVF Medium.

  2. Healing activity of proteolytic fraction (P1G10) from Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis in a cutaneous wound excision model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, K M; Barcelos, L S; Caliari, M V; Salas, C E; Lopes, M T P

    2017-10-05

    The proteolytic enzymes from Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis have demonstrated efficacy to accelerate healing of skin lesions. We report here the efficacy of the proteolytic fraction - P1G10 during repair of excisional wounds in rodent model and analyze possible mediators involved. Using 0.05% P1G10 we observed on day 3rd increased wound contraction accompanied by an increase in activated neutrophils and VEGF relative to the control. On day 7th neutrophils returned to normal levels, and at 0.01% P1G10, an increase in NAG activity used to monitor monocyte/macrophage, was observed. On the other hand, on day 7th, we observed a decrease in TGF-β at 0.05% P1G10, accompanied by an increased transformation of the latent TGF-β to its active form. Also, on day 7th a reduction in MMP-9 activity and the number of apoptotic cells was observed along with an increase in fibroblast levels. Morphometrically, it appears that treatment with P1G10 accelerates the decline of initial inflammatory phase and reduces some unwanted effects likely caused by remaining TGF-β or MMPs, thus enhancing the quality of scar. Overall, these data suggest that the active proteolytic fraction P1G10 enhances the efficacy of repair in excisional cutaneous wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Amr [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Present address: Genomics Facility, Agricultural Genetic Engineering Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619 (Egypt); Hutchens, Heather M. [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Howard Berg, R. [Integrated Microscopy Facility, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Saint Louis, MO 63132 (United States); Sue Loesch-Fries, L., E-mail: loeschfr@purdue.edu [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want to, resulting in ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape from a dangerous ... The brain's "fear hub," which helps activate the fight-or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and plays an important ... of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... MSC 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 Follow Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus NIMH Newsletter NIMH RSS ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... to the front of the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in ... Problems in making or using glutamate have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. ... Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah ... had problems getting to sleep and generally felt tired, listless, and had no ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where mental disorders begin and perhaps how to slow or stop ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity ... the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. ... brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... our physical surroundings but also factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain ... had problems getting to sleep and generally felt tired, listless, and had no ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of medical doctor who is an expert on mental ... of serotonin in the brain and help reduce symptoms of depression. Sarah also ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare that with brain development in ... Other medical professionals who can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or ... gets "the blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ... imaging (MRI) mdash;An imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation — ...

  3. Identification of a Supramolecular Functional Architecture of Streptococcus mutans Adhesin P1 on the Bacterial Cell Surface*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Kyle P.; Sullan, Ruby May A.; Crowley, Paula J.; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Tang, Wenxing; Besingi, Richard; Dufrene, Yves F.; Brady, L. Jeannine

    2015-01-01

    P1 (antigen I/II) is a sucrose-independent adhesin of Streptococcus mutans whose functional architecture on the cell surface is not fully understood. S. mutans cells subjected to mechanical extraction were significantly diminished in adherence to immobilized salivary agglutinin but remained immunoreactive and were readily aggregated by fluid-phase salivary agglutinin. Bacterial adherence was restored by incubation of postextracted cells with P1 fragments that contain each of the two known adhesive domains. In contrast to untreated cells, glutaraldehyde-treated bacteria gained reactivity with anti-C-terminal monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), whereas epitopes recognized by mAbs against other portions of the molecule were masked. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the ability of apical and C-terminal fragments of P1 to interact. Binding of several different anti-P1 mAbs to unfixed cells triggered release of a C-terminal fragment from the bacterial surface, suggesting a novel mechanism of action of certain adherence-inhibiting antibodies. We also used atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy with tips bearing various mAbs to elucidate the spatial organization and orientation of P1 on living bacteria. The similar rupture lengths detected using mAbs against the head and C-terminal regions, which are widely separated in the tertiary structure, suggest a higher order architecture in which these domains are in close proximity on the cell surface. Taken together, our results suggest a supramolecular organization in which additional P1 polypeptides, including the C-terminal segment originally identified as antigen II, associate with covalently attached P1 to form the functional adhesive layer. PMID:25666624

  4. mRNA Capping by Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus nsP1: Functional Characterization and Implications for Antiviral Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changqing; Guillén, Jaime; Rabah, Nadia; Blanjoie, Alexandre; Debart, Françoise; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne; Coutard, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    Alphaviruses are known to possess a unique viral mRNA capping mechanism involving the viral nonstructural protein nsP1. This enzyme harbors methyltransferase (MTase) and nsP1 guanylylation (GT) activities catalyzing the transfer of the methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to the N7 position of a GTP molecule followed by the formation of an m(7)GMP-nsP1 adduct. Subsequent transfer of m(7)GMP onto the 5' end of the viral mRNA has not been demonstrated in vitro yet. Here we report the biochemical characterization of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nsP1. We have developed enzymatic assays uncoupling the different reactions steps catalyzed by nsP1. The MTase and GT reaction activities were followed using a nonhydrolyzable GTP (GIDP) substrate and an original Western blot assay using anti-m3G/m(7)G-cap monoclonal antibody, respectively. The GT reaction is stimulated by S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (Ado-Hcy), the product of the preceding MTase reaction, and metallic ions. The covalent linking between nsP1 and m(7)GMP involves a phosphamide bond between the nucleotide and a histidine residue. Final guanylyltransfer onto RNA was observed for the first time with an alphavirus nsP1 using a 5'-diphosphate RNA oligonucleotide whose sequence corresponds to the 5' end of the viral genome. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of residues H37, H45, D63, E118, Y285, D354, R365, N369, and N375 revealed their respective roles in MT and GT reactions. Finally, the inhibitory effects of sinefungin, aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), and ribavirin triphosphate on MTase and capping reactions were investigated, providing possible avenues for antiviral research. Emergence or reemergence of alphaviruses represents a serious health concern, and the elucidation of their replication mechanisms is a prerequisite for the development of specific inhibitors targeting viral enzymes. In particular, alphaviruses are able, through an original reaction sequence, to add to their mRNA a cap

  5. Interaction of Biliverdin Chromophore with Near-Infrared Fluorescent Protein BphP1-FP Engineered from Bacterial Phytochrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya V. Stepanenko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Near-infrared (NIR fluorescent proteins (FPs designed from PAS (Per-ARNT-Sim repeats and GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylate cyclase/FhlA transcriptional activator domains of bacterial phytochromes covalently bind biliverdin (BV chromophore via one or two Cys residues. We studied BV interaction with a series of NIR FP variants derived from the recently reported BphP1-FP protein. The latter was engineered from a bacterial phytochrome RpBphP1, and has two reactive Cys residues (Cys15 in the PAS domain and Cys256 in the GAF domain, whereas its mutants contain single Cys residues either in the PAS domain or in the GAF domain, or no Cys residues. We characterized BphP1-FP and its mutants biochemically and spectroscopically in the absence and in the presence of denaturant. We found that all BphP1-FP variants are monomers. We revealed that spectral properties of the BphP1-FP variants containing either Cys15 or Cys256, or both, are determined by the covalently bound BV chromophore only. Consequently, this suggests an involvement of the inter-monomeric allosteric effects in the BV interaction with monomers in dimeric NIR FPs, such as iRFPs. Likely, insertion of the Cys15 residue, in addition to the Cys256 residue, in dimeric NIR FPs influences BV binding by promoting the BV chromophore covalent cross-linking to both PAS and GAF domains.

  6. Interaction of Biliverdin Chromophore with Near-Infrared Fluorescent Protein BphP1-FP Engineered from Bacterial Phytochrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Olesya V; Stepanenko, Olga V; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2017-05-08

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent proteins (FPs) designed from PAS (Per-ARNT-Sim repeats) and GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylate cyclase/FhlA transcriptional activator) domains of bacterial phytochromes covalently bind biliverdin (BV) chromophore via one or two Cys residues. We studied BV interaction with a series of NIR FP variants derived from the recently reported BphP1-FP protein. The latter was engineered from a bacterial phytochrome RpBphP1, and has two reactive Cys residues (Cys15 in the PAS domain and Cys256 in the GAF domain), whereas its mutants contain single Cys residues either in the PAS domain or in the GAF domain, or no Cys residues. We characterized BphP1-FP and its mutants biochemically and spectroscopically in the absence and in the presence of denaturant. We found that all BphP1-FP variants are monomers. We revealed that spectral properties of the BphP1-FP variants containing either Cys15 or Cys256, or both, are determined by the covalently bound BV chromophore only. Consequently, this suggests an involvement of the inter-monomeric allosteric effects in the BV interaction with monomers in dimeric NIR FPs, such as iRFPs. Likely, insertion of the Cys15 residue, in addition to the Cys256 residue, in dimeric NIR FPs influences BV binding by promoting the BV chromophore covalent cross-linking to both PAS and GAF domains.

  7. Photodynamics of blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase BlrP1 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its photoreceptor BLUF domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Penzkofer, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)], E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de; Griese, J.; Schlichting, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer medizinische Forschung, Abteilung Biomolekulare Mechanismen, Jahnstrasse 29, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gomelsky, Mark [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States)

    2008-12-10

    The BlrP1 protein from the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae consists of a BLUF and an EAL domain and may activate c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase by blue-light. The full-length protein, BlrP1, and its BLUF domain, BlrP1{sub B}LUF, are characterized by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy. The cofactor FAD in its oxidized redox state (FAD{sub ox}) is brought from the dark-adapted receptor state to the 10-nm red-shifted putative signalling state by violet light exposure. The recovery to the receptor state occurs with a time constant of about 1 min. The quantum yield of signalling state formation is about 0.17 for BlrP1{sub B}LUF and about 0.08 for BlrP1. The fluorescence efficiency of the FAD{sub ox} cofactor is small due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. Prolonged light exposure converts FAD{sub ox} in the signalling state to the fully reduced hydroquinone form FAD{sub red}H{sup -} and causes low-efficient chromophore release with subsequent photo-degradation. The photo-cycle and photo-reduction dynamics in the receptor state and in the signalling state are discussed.

  8. Photodynamics of blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase BlrP1 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its photoreceptor BLUF domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, A.; Penzkofer, A.; Griese, J.; Schlichting, I.; Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2008-12-01

    The BlrP1 protein from the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae consists of a BLUF and an EAL domain and may activate c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase by blue-light. The full-length protein, BlrP1, and its BLUF domain, BlrP1_BLUF, are characterized by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy. The cofactor FAD in its oxidized redox state (FAD ox) is brought from the dark-adapted receptor state to the 10-nm red-shifted putative signalling state by violet light exposure. The recovery to the receptor state occurs with a time constant of about 1 min. The quantum yield of signalling state formation is about 0.17 for BlrP1_BLUF and about 0.08 for BlrP1. The fluorescence efficiency of the FAD ox cofactor is small due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. Prolonged light exposure converts FAD ox in the signalling state to the fully reduced hydroquinone form FAD redH - and causes low-efficient chromophore release with subsequent photo-degradation. The photo-cycle and photo-reduction dynamics in the receptor state and in the signalling state are discussed.

  9. Optimization of hydrothermal synthesis of pure phase zeolite Na-P1 from South African coal fly ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M; Petrik, Leslie F; Gitari, Wilson M; Balfour, Gillian; Hums, Eric

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at optimizing the synthesis conditions for pure phase zeolite Na-P1 from three coal fly ashes obtained from power stations in the Mpumalanga province of South Africa. Synthesis variables evaluated were: hydrothermal treatment time (12-48 hours), temperature (100-160°C) and varying molar quantities of water during the hydrothermal treatment step (H(2)O:SiO(2) molar ratio ranged between 0-0.49). The optimum synthesis conditions for preparing pure phase zeolite Na-P1 were achieved when the molar regime was 1 SiO(2): 0.36 Al(2)O(3): 0.59 NaOH: 0.49 H(2)O and ageing was done at 47°C for 48 hours. The optimum hydrothermal treatment time and temperature was 48 hours and 140°C, respectively. Fly ashes sourced from two coal-fired power plants (A, B) were found to produce nearly same high purity zeolite Na-P1 under identical conditions whereas the third fly ash (C) lead to a low quality zeolite Na-P1 under these conditions. The cation exchange capacity for the high pure phase was found to be 4.11 meq/g. These results highlight the fact that adjustment of reactant composition and presynthesis or synthesis parameters, improved quality of zeolite Na-P1 can be achieved and hence an improved potential for application of zeolites prepared from coal fly ash.

  10. [Brain concussion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pälvimäki, Esa-Pekka; Siironen, Jari; Pohjola, Juha; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Brain concussion is a common disturbance caused by external forces or acceleration affecting the head. It may be accompanied by transient loss of consciousness and amnesia. Typical symptoms include headache, nausea and dizziness; these may remain for a week or two. Some patients may experience transient loss of inability to create new memories or other brief impairment of mental functioning. Treatment is symptomatic. Some patients may suffer from prolonged symptoms, the connection of which with brain concession is difficult to show. Almost invariably the prognosis of brain concussion is good.

  11. First reported cases of human adenovirus serotype 14p1 infection, Ireland, October 2009 to July 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Flanagan, D

    2011-02-01

    We report the first nine confirmed cases of human adenovirus 14p1 infection (HAdV-14p1), identified at different locations in Ireland between October 2009 and July 2010. These were the first notifications in Ireland and all were sporadic cases. Following these notifications, the Health Protection Surveillance Centre set up an enhanced surveillance system for HAdV-14p1 infection. Seven cases were male and five were aged less than one year. Three patients died, giving a case fatality rate of 33%. It should be noted that cases presented here were diagnosed on presentation to hospital and may represent the severe end of the spectrum of HAdV 14 disease in Ireland.

  12. Synthesis of P1'-functionalized macrocyclic transition-state mimicking HIV-1 protease inhibitors encompassing a tertiary alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Maria; Unge, Johan; Motwani, Hitesh V; Rosenquist, Åsa; Vrang, Lotta; Wallberg, Hans; Larhed, Mats

    2014-08-14

    Seven novel tertiary alcohol containing linear HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs), decorated at the para position of the benzyl group in the P1' side with (hetero)aromatic moieties, were synthesized and biologically evaluated. To study the inhibition and antiviral activity effect of P1-P3 macrocyclization, 14- and 15-membered macrocyclic PIs were prepared by ring-closing metathesis of the corresponding linear PIs. The macrocycles were more active than the linear precursors and compound 10f, with a 2-thiazolyl group in the P1' position, was the most potent PI of this new series (Ki 2.2 nM, EC50 0.2 μM). Co-crystallized complexes of both linear and macrocyclic PIs with the HIV-1 protease enzyme were prepared and analyzed.

  13. Major grass pollen allergen Lol p 1 binds to diesel exhaust particles: implications for asthma and air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, R B; Suphioglu, C; Taylor, P; Desai, R; Watson, H C; Peng, J L; Bursill, L A

    1997-03-01

    Grass pollen allergens are known to be present in the atmosphere in a range of particle sizes from whole pollen grains (approx. 20 to 55 microns in diameter) to smaller size fractions Lol p 1, immunogold labelling with specific monoclonal antibodies and a high voltage transmission electron-microscopic imaging technique. DECP are visualized as small carbon spheres, each 30-60 nm in diameter, forming fractal aggregates about 1-2 microns in diameter. Here we test our hypothesis and show by in vitro experiments that the major grass pollen allergen, Lol p 1, binds to one defined class of fine particles, DECP. DECP are in the respirable size range, can bind to the major grass pollen allergen Lol p 1 under in vitro conditions and represent a possible mechanism by which allergens can become concentrated in polluted air and thus trigger attacks of asthma.

  14. Efficient replication of recombinant Enterovirus B types, carrying different P1 genes in the coxsackievirus B5 replicative backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Nina; Sävneby, Anna; Gullberg, Maria; Evertsson, Kim; Klingel, Karin; Lindberg, A Michael

    2015-06-01

    Recombination is an important feature in the evolution of the Enterovirus genus. Phylogenetic studies of enteroviruses have revealed that the capsid genomic region (P1) is type specific, while the parts of the genome coding for the non-structural proteins (P2-P3) are species specific. Hence, the genome may be regarded as consisting of two modules that evolve independently. In this study, it was investigated whether the non-structural coding part of the genome in one type could support replication of a virus with a P1 region from another type of the same species. A cassette vector (pCas) containing a full-length cDNA copy of coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5) was used as a replicative backbone. The P1 region of pCas was replaced with the corresponding part from coxsackievirus B3 Nancy (CVB3N), coxsackievirus B6 Schmitt (CVB6S), and echovirus 7 Wallace (E7W), all members of the Enterovirus B species. The replication efficiency after transfection with clone-derived in vitro transcribed RNA was studied and compared with that of pCas. All the recombinant viruses replicated with similar efficiencies and showed threshold cycle (Ct) values, tissue culture infectivity dose 50 %, and plaque-forming unit titers comparable to viruses generated from the pCas construct. In addition to this, a clone without the P1 region was also constructed, and Western Blot and immunofluorescence staining analysis showed that the viral genome could be translated and replicated despite the lack of the structural protein-coding region. To conclude, the replicative backbone of the CVB5 cassette vector supports replication of intraspecies constructs with P1 regions derived from other members of the Enterovirus B species. In addition to this, the replicative backbone can be both translated and replicated without the presence of a P1 region.

  15. Evaluation of the Eological Management and Enhancement Alernative for Remediation of the K1007-P1 Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, M.J.

    2005-10-31

    An evaluation of the human and ecological risks associated with the P1 Pond and surrounding environs was conducted as part of the ETTP Site-Wide Remedial Investigation. The RI provides the basis for the focus on PCBs as the most important unacceptable risk to human and ecological health in the pond. Other P1 contaminants, media, or pathways of risk to receptors are identified in the RI, but are not addressed as a major risk reduction goal for the ETTP Site-Wide Feasibility Study. Therefore, the goal of the Ecological Management alternative is to reduce unacceptable risks associated with PCBs in fish. Many of the actions proposed for this alternative, however, are likely to reduce risks associated with other contaminants and their pathways. The high PCB concentrations in fish from the P1 Pond are most certainly due in part to the current ecological condition of the pond that maximizes PCB biomagnification. This basic assumption and the factors contributing to it were evaluated by conducting an intensive field study of the P1 Pond in the summer of 2004 (for a thorough presentation of current P1 Pond biological conditions, see Peterson et al. 2005). Major hypotheses regarding the P1 Pond's current fish community, PCB fate and transport processes, pond vegetation, and limnological conditions that contribute to the high PCB levels in fish were validated by the study (Appendix A), The results of the 2004 ecological assessment, in concert with long-term datasets obtained as part of the ETTP Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) and recent abiotic sampling for the RI, provide the basis for the assessment of current conditions.

  16. Dissolution kinetics of synthetic zeolite NaP1 and its implication to zeolite treatment of contaminated waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cama, Jordi; Ayora, Carles; Querol, Xavier; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2005-07-01

    The effect of pH on the dissolution kinetics of NaP1 zeolite, which was produced from the alkaline treatment of coal fly ash and may be used for decontamination of acid mine waters, is studied. The sample contains considerable amounts of accessory phases that partly dissolve during the experiment. Therefore, the dissolution rate was estimated during a stage in which the Al/Si ratio was equal to that of NaP1 (0.6). The release rate of these elements is controlled by the dissolution of the zeolite itself during this stage. The dissolution rate of NaP1 slows down with increasing pH in the acidic range, becomes constant at an intermediate pH, and increases with increasing pH in the basic range. The observed changes in rates were described using a rate law based on a surface speciation model. Using this rate law, we calculated the half-life of NaP1 to be about 2 years at near neutral pH and less than 10 days at pH below 3. For the utilization of NaP1 in the treatment of wastewaters or acid mine waters, these short half-lives bear two implications: (1) The treated waters must be kept at near neutral pH, and NaP1 should be added periodically to the treated waters in order to compensate for zeolite loss. (2) In water treatment applications that require a relatively short reaction time, the zeolite removed from the effluents should be kept dry in order to avoid its decomposition and the consequent release of the adsorbed metal to the environment.

  17. The Cucumber vein yellowing virus silencing suppressor P1b can functionally replace HCPro in Plum pox virus infection in a host-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Alberto; Dujovny, Gabriela; García, Juan Antonio; Valli, Adrian

    2012-02-01

    Plant viruses of the genera Potyvirus and Ipomovirus (Potyviridae family) use unrelated RNA silencing suppressors (RSS) to counteract antiviral RNA silencing responses. HCPro is the RSS of Potyvirus spp., and its activity is enhanced by the upstream P1 protein. Distinctively, the ipomovirus Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV) lacks HCPro but contains two P1 copies in tandem (P1aP1b), the second of which functions as RSS. Using chimeras based on the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV), we found that P1b can functionally replace HCPro in potyviral infections of Nicotiana plants. Interestingly, P1a, the CVYV protein homologous to potyviral P1, disrupted the silencing suppression activity of P1b and reduced the infection efficiency of PPV in Nicotiana benthamiana. Testing the influence of RSS in host specificity, we found that a P1b-expressing chimera poorly infected PPV's natural host, Prunus persica. Conversely, P1b conferred on PPV chimeras the ability to replicate locally in cucumber, CVYV's natural host. The deleterious effect of P1a on PPV infection is host dependent, because the P1aP1b-expressing PPV chimera accumulated in cucumber to higher levels than PPV expressing P1b alone. These results demonstrate that a potyvirus can use different RSS, and that particular RSS and upstream P1-like proteins contribute to defining the virus host range.

  18. Comparison of two automated assays of BTM (CTX and P1NP) and reference intervals in a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N R; Møllehave, L T; Hansen, Y B L

    2017-01-01

    the agreement on the two platforms. METHODS: Fasting sera from 2308 individuals (1250 males and 1058 females, age range 24-76 years) participating in the Health2006 study were analyzed for CTX and P1NP using the automated IDS-iSYS analyzer and the automated Cobas e411 analyzer. Participants in anti......-osteoporotic treatment were excluded, while subjects on hormonal contraceptives were included. RESULTS: There was significant disagreement between both the two P1NP assays with a mean difference of -3 μg/L (LoA -19 to 14) (p

  19. The crystal structure of recombinant proDer p 1, a major house dust mite proteolytic allergen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meno, Kåre; Thorsted, Peter B; Ipsen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Allergy to house dust mite is among the most prevalent allergic diseases worldwide. Most house dust mite allergic patients react to Der p 1 from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, which is a cysteine protease. To avoid heterogeneity in the sample used for crystallization, a modified recombinant....... Sequence variations in related species are concentrated on the surface, which explains the existence of cross-reacting and species-specific antibodies. This study describes the first crystal structure of one of the clinically most important house dust mite allergens, the cysteine protease Der p 1....

  20. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  1. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  2. Brain Stimulation Therapies

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    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  3. Anatomy of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with ... our original set of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... but can still remember past events and learned skills, and carry on a conversation, all which rely ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... medicine, the term environment includes not only our physical surroundings but also factors that can affect our ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News NIMH Director Gordon Elected AAAS Fellow NIMH Launches Director Twitter Account Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation More General Health Information ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and Groups Strategic Plan Offices and Divisions Budget Careers at NIMH ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ... The amygdala also appears to be involved in learning to fear an event, such as touching a ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and certain abilities, such as a good singing voice. A gene is a segment of DNA that ... as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... with symptoms of mental illness every day. They can be moderate, or serious and cause severe disability. ... disorders are brain disorders. Evidence shows that they can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Criteria (RDoC) Funding Funding Home Opportunities & Announcements Funding Strategy for Grants Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ...

  16. Brain abscess

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    ... including those with certain heart disorders, may receive antibiotics before dental or other procedures to help reduce the risk of infection. Alternative Names Abscess - brain; Cerebral abscess; CNS abscess Patient ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and ...

  18. Brain Basics

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  1. Brain Health

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    ... that combining good nutrition with mental, social and physical activities may have a greater benefit in maintaining or improving brain health than any single activity. At the Alzheimer’s Association ...

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    Full Text Available ... focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain ... of how environmental factors like diet, stress and post-natal care can change gene expression (when genes ...

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    Full Text Available ... specific protein. Scientists believe epigenetics play a major role in mental disorders and the effects of medications. ... feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity ...

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News NIMH Launches Director Twitter Account Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed More General Health Information from NIH MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from government ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's ... as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone or together in complex ways, to change ...

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    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability ...

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into ... factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ...

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    Full Text Available ... illnesses, such as depression, can occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... that contains codes to make proteins and other important body chemicals. DNA also includes information to control ... cells required for normal function and plays an important role during early brain development. It may also ...

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    Full Text Available ... focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain ... listless, and had no appetite most of the time. Weeks later, Sarah realized she was having trouble ...

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take ... slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in ...

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    Full Text Available ... to produce a specific protein. Scientists believe epigenetics play a major role in mental disorders and the ... thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention ...

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    Full Text Available ... another as chemical or electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the ... how she's responding to the treatment. She also begins regular talk therapy sessions with her psychiatrist. In ...

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    Full Text Available ... studied in mental health research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural " ... confront or escape from a dangerous situation. The amygdala also appears to be involved in learning to ...

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... and information that the cell needs for growth, metabolism, and repair. Cytoplasm is the substance that fills ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... This area of the brain also helps to control the amygdala during stressful events. Some research shows that people who have PTSD or ADHD have reduced activity in their PFCs. Anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) — the ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and Groups Strategic Plan Offices and Divisions Budget Careers at ... electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the outer layer of a ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

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    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare ... listless, and had no appetite most of the time. Weeks later, Sarah realized she was having trouble ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, ... studies suggest that having too little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions ...

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on neurons communicating with ... axon, most neurons release a chemical message (a neurotransmitter) which crosses the synapse and binds to receptors ...

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    Full Text Available ... Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict who ... people with depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, ...

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    Full Text Available ... Some people who develop a mental illness may recover completely; others may have repeated episodes of illness ... in early detection, more tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... from one neuron to another. Share Science News Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed ...

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    Full Text Available ... affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. ... and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... each other How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing ... understanding of genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... glutamate —The most common neurotransmitter in a person's body, which increases neuronal activity, is involved in early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal ...

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    Full Text Available ... in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common neurotransmitter, glutamate has ...

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    Full Text Available ... bind onto, leading to more normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the ... reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape ... genes that appear to increase risk or provide protection from various mental disorders. Other genes may change ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and information that the cell needs for growth, metabolism, and repair. Cytoplasm is the substance that fills ... as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... doctor that she had experienced long periods of deep sadness throughout her teenage years, but had never ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists to make important discoveries that ... increases neuronal activity, is involved in early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... taking SSRIs and has joined an online support group. Sharing her experiences with others also dealing with depression helps Sarah to better cope with her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists ...

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    Full Text Available ... her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of ... other. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) mdash;An imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... neuron to another. Share Science News NIMH Director Gordon Elected AAAS Fellow NIMH Launches Director Twitter Account Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation More General Health Information from NIH MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from government ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... cells required for normal function and plays an important role during early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

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    Full Text Available ... can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... sends impulses and extends from cell bodies to meet and deliver impulses to another nerve cell. Axons ... in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause ... normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... health research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" ... also appears to be involved in learning to fear an event, such as touching a hot stove, ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and memory. anterior cingulate cortex —Is involved in ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for mental disorders. ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... neuron's point of contact for receiving chemical and electrical signals called impulses from neighboring neurons. Axon which ... from one neuron to another as chemical or electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, and responds ... via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape ... Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science Education : Resources for science educators Pillbox: How to identify unknown ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... heart rate to responding when we sense a mistake, helping us feel motivated and stay focused on ... peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on neurons communicating with one another. Electrical impulses and chemical signals ... depression, can occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in mental illnesses. Scientists have already begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy ... our original set of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Labs at NIMH Home Research Areas Principal Investigators Administrative Oversight & Support Collaborations & Partnerships Join A Study News & ... unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing ...

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science Education : Resources for science educators Pillbox: How to identify ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain and nervous system. Glutamate is an excitatory transmitter: when it is released it increases the chance ... at www.nimh.nih.gov . Glossary action potential —Transmission of signal from the cell body to the ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her husband ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... people with depression often have lower than normal levels of serotonin. The types of medications most commonly ...

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that ... fast-acting antidepressant medications. Currently available antidepressants usually take four to six weeks to reach their full ...

  7. Metabolic regulation in the facultative methylotroph Arthrobacter P1. Growth on primary amines as carbon and energy sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, L.; Harder, W.

    1984-01-01

    During growth of the facultative methylotroph Arthrobacter P1 on methylamine or ethylamine both substrates are metabolized initially in an identical fashion, via the respective aldehydes. The regulatory mechanisms governing the synthesis and activities of enzymes involved in amine and aldehyde

  8. Glutathione S-transferases P1-1 and A1-1 in ovarian cyst fluids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boss, E.A.; Peters, W.H.M.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Boonstra, H.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study was to determine the gluthathione S-transferases (GST) P1-1 and A1-1 levels in cyst fluid from malignant, borderline, and benign ovarian tumors. The clinical relevance of these enzymes in cyst fluid was investigated, including the possible relation with

  9. Bismuth interstitial impurities and the optical properties of GaP1- x - y Bi x N y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Theresa M.; Beaton, Daniel A.; Perkins, John D.; Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2017-11-01

    Two distinctive regimes of behavior are observed from GaP1- x - y Bi x N y alloys with x band-edge localized states rather than from impurity bands and deep state luminescence. This change demonstrates a novel strategy for controlling luminescence in isoelectronic semiconductor alloys and is attributed to a disruption of carrier transfer processes.

  10. Synthesis of New 2-(1,3-Dithianylphenols and Hexakis-[p-(1,3-dithian-2-ylphenoxy]cyclotriphosphazene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prónayová Nadezda

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-Chloro-1,3-dithiane was obtained by the chlorination of 1,3-dithiane with N-chlorosuccinimide. Reactions of 2-chloro-1,3-dithiane with various substituted phenols lead to 2-(1,3-dithianylphenols (3. Hexakis-[p-(1,3-dithian-2-ylphenoxy]cyclotriphosphazene (6 was obtained by reaction with hexachlorotriazacyclotriphosphazene (5.

  11. Transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids from biogas plant digestates often belong to the IncP-1ε subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Birgit; Kyselková, Martina; Krögerrecklenfort, Ellen; Kreuzig, Robert; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Manure is known to contain residues of antibiotics administered to farm animals as well as bacteria carrying antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). These genes are often located on mobile genetic elements. In biogas plants (BGPs), organic substrates such as manure and plant material are mixed and fermented in order to provide energy, and resulting digestates are used for soil fertilization. The fate of plasmid carrying bacteria from manure during the fermentation process is unknown. The present study focused on transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids from digestates of seven BGPs, using manure as a co-substrate, and their phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Plasmids conferring resistance to either tetracycline or sulfadiazine were captured by means of exogenous plasmid isolation from digestates into Pseudomonas putida KT2442 and Escherichia coli CV601 recipients, at transfer frequencies ranging from 10(-5) to 10(-7). Transconjugants (n = 101) were screened by PCR-Southern blot hybridization and real-time PCR for the presence of IncP-1, IncP-1ε, IncW, IncN, IncP-7, IncP-9, LowGC, and IncQ plasmids. While 61 plasmids remained unassigned, 40 plasmids belonged to the IncP-1ε subgroup. All these IncP-1ε plasmids were shown to harbor the genes tet(A), sul1, qacEΔ1, intI1, and integron gene cassette amplicons of different size. Further analysis of 16 representative IncP-1ε plasmids showed that they conferred six different multiple antibiotic resistance patterns and their diversity seemed to be driven by the gene cassette arrays. IncP-1ε plasmids displaying similar restriction and antibiotic resistance patterns were captured from different BGPs, suggesting that they may be typical of this environment. Our study showed that BGP digestates are a potential source of transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids, and in particular the broad host range IncP-1ε plasmids might contribute to the spread of ARGs when digestates are used as fertilizer.

  12. Transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids from biogas plant digestates often belong to the IncP-1ε subgroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit eWolters

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manure is known to contain residues of antibiotics administered to farm animals as well as bacteria carrying antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs. These genes are often located on mobile genetic elements. In biogas plants (BGPs, organic substrates such as manure and plant material are mixed and fermented in order to provide energy, and resulting digestates are used for soil fertilization. The fate of plasmid carrying bacteria from manure during the fermentation process is unknown. The present study focused on transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids from digestates of seven BGPs, using manure as a co-substrate, and their phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Plasmids conferring resistance to either tetracycline or sulfadiazine were captured by means of exogenous plasmid isolation from digestates into Pseudomonas putida KT2442 and Escherichia coli CV601 recipients, at transfer frequencies ranging from 10-5 to 10-7. Transconjugants (n = 101 were screened by PCR-Southern blot hybridization and real-time PCR for the presence of IncP-1, IncP-1ε, IncW, IncN, IncP-7, IncP-9, LowGC and IncQ plasmids. While 61 plasmids remained unassigned, 40 plasmids belonged to the IncP-1ε subgroup. All these IncP-1ε plasmids were shown to harbor the genes tetA, sul1, qacE∆1, intI1 and integron gene cassette amplicons of different size. Further analysis of 16 representative IncP-1ε plasmids showed that they conferred six different multiple antibiotic resistance patterns and their diversity seemed to be driven by the gene cassette arrays. IncP-1ε plasmids displaying similar restriction and antibiotic resistance patterns were captured from different BGPs, suggesting that they may be typical for this environment. Our study showed that BGP digestates are a potential source of transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids and in particular the broad host range IncP-1ε plasmids might contribute to the spread of ARGs when digestates are used as fertilizer.

  13. Three-Dimensional Domain Swapping Changes the Folding Mechanism of the Forkhead Domain of FoxP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Exequiel; Córdova, Cristóbal; Villalobos, Pablo; Reyes, Javiera; Komives, Elizabeth A; Ramírez-Sarmiento, César A; Babul, Jorge

    2016-06-07

    The forkhead family of transcription factors (Fox) controls gene transcription during key processes such as regulation of metabolism, embryogenesis, and immunity. Structurally, Fox proteins feature a conserved DNA-binding domain known as forkhead. Interestingly, solved forkhead structures of members from the P subfamily (FoxP) show that they can oligomerize by three-dimensional domain swapping, whereby structural elements are exchanged between adjacent subunits, leading to an intertwined dimer. Recent evidence has largely stressed the biological relevance of domain swapping in FoxP, as several disease-causing mutations have been related to impairment of this process. Here, we explore the equilibrium folding and binding mechanism of the forkhead domain of wild-type FoxP1, and of two mutants that hinder DNA-binding (R53H) and domain swapping (A39P), using size-exclusion chromatography, circular dichroism, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Our results show that domain swapping of FoxP1 occurs at micromolar protein concentrations within hours of incubation and is energetically favored, in contrast to classical domain-swapping proteins. Also, DNA-binding mutations do not significantly affect domain swapping. Remarkably, equilibrium unfolding of dimeric FoxP1 follows a three-state N2 ↔ 2I ↔ 2U folding mechanism in which dimer dissociation into a monomeric intermediate precedes protein unfolding, in contrast to the typical two-state model described for most domain-swapping proteins, whereas the A39P mutant follows a two-state N ↔ U folding mechanism consistent with the second transition observed for dimeric FoxP1. Also, the free-energy change of the N ↔ U in A39P FoxP1 is ∼2 kcal⋅mol(-1) larger than the I ↔ U transition of both wild-type and R53H FoxP1. Finally, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry reveals that the intermediate strongly resembles the native state. Our results suggest that domain swapping in FoxP1 is at least

  14. Characterization of a broad host-spectrum virulent Salmonella bacteriophage fmb-p1 and its application on duck meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changbao; Chen, Qiming; Zhang, Chong; Yang, Jie; Lu, Zhaoxin; Lu, Fengxia; Bie, Xiaomei

    2017-05-15

    The aim of this study was to find a virulent bacteriophage for the biocontrol of Salmonella in duck meat. A broad host-spectrum virulent phage, fmb-p1, was isolated and purified from an duck farm, and its host range was determined to include S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, S. Saintpaul, S. Agona, S. Miami, S. Anatum, S. Heidelberg and S. Paratyphi-C. Electron microscopy and genome sequencing showed that fmb-p1 belongs to the family Siphoviridae. The genome of fmb-p1 is composed of a 43,327-bp double-stranded DNA molecule with 60 open reading frames and a total G+C content of 46.09%. There are no deleterious sequences or genes encoding known harmful products in the phage fmb-p1 genome. Phage fmb-p1 was stable under different temperature (40-75°C), pH (4-10) and NaCl solutions (1-11%). The phage treatment (9.9×10 9 PFU/cm 2 ) caused a peak reduction in S. Typhimurium of 4.52 log CFU/cm 2 in ready-to-eat (RTE) duck meat, whereas potassium sorbate treatment (PS, 2mg/cm 2 ) resulted in a 0.05-0.12 log reduction. Compared to PS treatment, there was significant difference in the S. Typhimurium reduction (P˂0.05) by phage treatment at both 4°C and 25°C. The results suggested that phage could be applied to reduce Salmonella, on commercial poultry products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Silencing of Plum pox virus 5'UTR/P1 sequence confers resistance to a wide range of PPV strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nicola-Negri, Elisa; Tavazza, Mario; Salandri, Laura; Ilardi, Vincenza

    2010-12-01

    An effective disease-control strategy should protect the host from the major economically important and geographically widespread variants of a pathogen. Plum pox virus (PPV) is the causal agent of sharka, the most devastating viral disease of Prunus species. We have shown previously that the hairpin RNA expression driven by h-UTR/P1, h-P1/HCPro, h-HCPro and h-HCPro/P3 constructs, derived from the PPV-M ISPaVe44 isolate, confers resistance to the homologous virus in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Since the production of transgenic stone fruits and their evaluation for PPV resistance would take several years, the ISPaVe44-resistant plant lines were used to evaluate which construct would be the best candidate to be transferred to Prunus elite cultivars. To do that, nine PPV isolates of the D, M, Rec, EA and C strains originally collected from five Prunus species in different geographical areas, were typed by sequencing and used to challenge the transgenic N. benthamiana lines; 464 out of 464 virus-inoculated plants of lines h-UTR/P1, h-HCPro and h-HCPro/P3 showed complete and long-lasting resistance to the seven PPV isolates of D, M and Rec strains. Moreover, the h-UTR/P1 plants were also fully resistant to PPV-C and -EA isolates. Our data suggest that the h-UTR/P1 construct is of particular practical interest to obtain stone fruit plants resistant to the sharka disease.

  16. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain death should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain death legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain death has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The active ClpP protease from M. tuberculosis is a complex composed of a heptameric ClpP1 and a ClpP2 ring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akopian, Tatos; Kandror, Olga; Raju, Ravikiran M; UnniKrishnan, Meera; Rubin, Eric J; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2012-01-01

    ...) ClpP1P2 activity against certain peptides and proteins. These activators function cooperatively to induce the dissociation of ClpP1 and ClpP2 tetradecamers into heptameric rings, which then re...

  18. Ferrocene labelings as inhibitors and dual electrochemical sensors of human glutathione S-transferase P1-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C; Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; García-Maroto, Federico; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; García-Fuentes, Luís

    2012-12-01

    The inhibitory and sensor properties of two ferrocene conjugates, in which the ferrocene and glutathione are linked through a spacer arm of different length and chemical structure, on human Pi glutathione S-transferase, were examined by activity assays, ITC, fluorescence spectroscopy and voltammetry. Such ferrocene conjugates are strong competitive inhibitors of this enzyme with an enhanced binding affinity, the one bearing the longest spacer arm being the most potent inhibitor. Voltammetric measurements showed a strong decrease of the peak current intensity and an increase of the oxidation potential upon binding of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates to GST P1-1 showing that both conjugates can be used as dual electrochemical sensors for GST P1-1. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A viral suppressor P1/HC-pro increases the GFP gene expression in agrobacterium-mediated transient assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pengda; Liu, Jinying; He, Hongxia; Yang, Meiying; Li, Meina; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xingzhi

    2009-08-01

    More than 20 post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) suppressors have been found since HC-Pro, the first gene silencing suppressor, was found in 1998. The silencing suppressor strongly suggested that gene silencing functions as natural defense mechanisms against viruses. It also represented a valuable tool for the dissection of the gene silencing pathway. We have used P1/HC-Pro RNA silencing suppressor activity to increase green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in tobacco using an Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system. P1/HC-Pro stimulated GFP-gene expression but not dsGFP-gene expression was shown by RT-PCR, Northern and Western blot analysis. Expression of the gene silencing suppressor and the target gene provided a new strategy of heterogeneous gene expressing in plants. It may be of commercial significance to produce foreign proteins using plant bioreactors.

  20. The Level of Mite Dermatophagoides’ Allergens (Der-p 1 and Der-f 1 in Birjand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fereidouni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: House dust mite allergens especially pyroglyphid species are among the most important indoor allergens and have an important role in development of asthma and allergies. Materials and Methods: In current study, the level of two main allergens from mites including Der-p1 and Der-f 1 in dust of 28 homes in Birjand city was measured by ELISA method. Results: All samples were negative for Der-p1. Low leverl of Der-f 1 was detected in one sample. Prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and rhinoconjunctivitis was 2%, 28% and 15% respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that House dust mites could not grow in Birjand climate.

  1. Filled and empty states of Zn-TPP films deposited on Fe(001)-p(1×1)O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussetti, Gianlorenzo; Calloni, Alberto; Yivlialin, Rossella; Picone, Andrea; Bottegoni, Federico; Finazzi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Zn-tetraphenylporphyrin (Zn-TPP) was deposited on a single layer of metal oxide, namely an Fe(001)-p(1×1)O surface. The filled and empty electronic states were measured by means of UV photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopy on a single monolayer and a 20 monolayer thick film. The ionization energy and the electron affinity of the organic film were deduced and the interface dipole was determined and compared with data available in the literature.

  2. Synthesis of Zeolites Na-P1 from South African Coal Fly Ash: Effect of Impeller Design and Agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainganye, Dakalo; Ojumu, Tunde Victor; Petrik, Leslie

    2013-05-16

    South African fly ash has been shown to be a useful feedstock for the synthesis of some zeolites. The present study focuses on the effect of impeller design and agitation rates on the synthesis of zeolite Na-P1 which are critical to the commercialization of this product. The effects of three impeller designs (4-flat blade, Anchor and Archimedes screw impellers) and three agitation speeds (150, 200 and 300 rpm) were investigated using a modified previously reported synthesis conditions; 48 hours of ageing at 47 °C and static hydrothermal treatment at 140 °C for 48 hours. The experimental results demonstrated that the phase purity of zeolite Na-P1 was strongly affected by the agitation rate and the type of impeller used during the ageing step of the synthesis process. Although zeolite Na-P1 was synthesized with a space time yield (STY) of 15 ± 0.4 kg d-1m-3and a product yield of 0.98±0.05 g zeolites/g fly ash for each impeller at different agitation speeds, zeolite formation was assessed to be fairly unsuccessful in some cases due the occurrence of undissolved mullite and/or the formation of impurities such as hydroxysodalite with the zeolitic product. This study also showed that a high crystalline zeolite Na-P1 can be synthesized from South African coal fly ash using a 4-flat blade impeller at an agitation rate of 200 rpm during the ageing step at 47 °C for 48 hours followed by static hydrothermal treatment at 140 °C for 48 hours.

  3. The IGR-CaP1 Xenograft Model Recapitulates Mixed Osteolytic/Blastic Bone Lesions Observed in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Al Nakouzi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastases have a devastating impact on quality of life and bone pain in patients with prostate cancer and decrease survival. Animal models are important tools in investigating the pathogenesis of the disease and in developing treatment strategies for bone metastases, but few animal models recapitulate spontaneous clinical bone metastatic spread. In the present study, IGR-CaP1, a new cell line derived from primary prostate cancer, was stably transduced with a luciferase-expressing viral vector to monitor tumor growth in mice using bioluminescence imaging. The IGR-CaP1 tumors grew when subcutaneously injected or when orthotopically implanted, reconstituted the prostate adenocarcinoma with glandular acini-like structures, and could disseminate to the liver and lung. Bone lesions were detected using bioluminescence imaging after direct intratibial or intracardiac injections. Anatomic bone structure assessed using high-resolution computed tomographic scans showed both lytic and osteoblastic lesions. Technetium Tc 99m methylene diphosphonate micro single-photon emission computed tomography confirmed the mixed nature of the lesions and the intensive bone remodeling. We also identified an expression signature for responsiveness of IGR-CaP1 cells to the bone microenvironment, namely expression of CXCR4, MMP-9, Runx2, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, ADAMTS14, FGFBP2, and HBB. The IGR-CaP1 cell line is a unique model derived from a primary tumor, which can reconstitute human prostate adenocarcinoma in animals and generate experimental bone metastases, providing a novel means for understanding the mechanisms of bone metastasis progression and allowing preclinical testing of new therapies.

  4. Detection of S1-P1 and S3-P3 interactions between papain and four synthetic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel M Papamichael

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the S1 - P1 and S3 - P3 interactions between papain and four synthetic peptide substrates were found as to be important. The values of Km were estimated as to be practically identical between these substrates; this latter is supporting the conclusions obtained by considering the estimated values of other kinetic parameters. Nevertheless, based on the estimated kcat and/or k cat/Km parameters of the used substrates, we concluded that an aromatic ring at the P3 position, and a positively charged side chain of the residue at the P1 position of the synthetic substrates were favored considerably their interaction with papain.Neste estudo, o S1 - P1 e S3 - P3, interações entre papaina e quatro substratos sintéticos de pepetídios foram considerados importantes. Os valores de Km foram estimados e são praticamente idênticos entre esses substratos; Isso dá suporte as conclusões obtidas, considerando os valores parâmetros cinéticos estimados. No obstante, baseou na estimação parâmetros kcat e/ou k cat /Km dos substratos utilizados. Se pode concluir que um anel aromático na posição P3, e uma corrente carregada positivamente da cadeia do resíduo na posição P1 dos substratos sintéticos favoreceram interação com a papaina.

  5. Filled and empty states of Zn-TPP films deposited on Fe(001-p(1×1O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianlorenzo Bussetti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Zn-tetraphenylporphyrin (Zn-TPP was deposited on a single layer of metal oxide, namely an Fe(001-p(1×1O surface. The filled and empty electronic states were measured by means of UV photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopy on a single monolayer and a 20 monolayer thick film. The ionization energy and the electron affinity of the organic film were deduced and the interface dipole was determined and compared with data available in the literature.

  6. Structural analysis of the functional influence of the surface peptide Gtf-P1 on Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferase C activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Jean-San; Shiau, Yu-Shuan; Huang, Po-Tsarng; Shiau, Yuh-Yuan; Tsai, Yau-Wei; Chou, Hsiou-Chuan; Tseng, Lih-Jung; Wu, Wen-Tar; Hsu, Pi-Jung; Lou, Kuo-Long

    2003-06-01

    Glucosyltransferases (GtfB/C/D) in Streptococcus mutans are responsible for synthesizing water-insoluble and water-soluble glucans from sucrose and play very crucial roles in the formation of dental plaque. A monoclonal antibody against a 19-mer peptide fragment named Gtf-P1 was found in GtfC to reduce the enzyme activity to 50%. However, a similar experiment suggested almost unchanged activity in GtfD, despite of the very high sequence homology between the two enzymes. No further details are yet available to elucidate the biochemical mechanism responsible for such discrimination. For a better understanding of the catalytic behavior of these glucosyltransferases, structural and functional analyses were performed. First, the exact epitope was identified to specify the residue(s) required for monoclonal antibody recognition. The results suggest that the discrimination is determined solely by single residue substitution. Second, based on a combined sequence and secondary structure alignment against known crystal structure of segments from closely related proteins, a three-dimensional homology model for GtfC was built. Structural analysis for the region communicating between Gtf-P1 and the catalytic triad revealed the possibility for an "en bloc" movement of hydrophobic residues, which may transduce the functional influence on enzyme activity from the surface of molecule into the proximity of the active site. Figure Side chain interactions between Gtf-P1 and catalytic Asp-477 in GtfC. Calpha-tracing of GtfC with the two crucial peptides (Gtf-P1, orange; Gtf-P2, blue) and the catalytic triad residues ( red) highlighted to show their relative spatial organization. Side chains for the residues are also depicted according to their atom types. The structure is viewed with the barrel opening facing down

  7. Characterization of the human T cell response to rye grass pollen allergens Lol p 1 and Lol p 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, M D; Papalia, L; Eusebius, N P; O'Hehir, R E; Rolland, J M

    2002-12-01

    Knowledge of dominant T cell epitopes of major allergens recognized by allergic individuals is required to improve efficacy and safety of allergen immunotherapy. Rye grass pollen (RGP) is the most important source of seasonal aeroallergens in temperate climates and Lol p 1 and Lol p 5 are the two major IgE-reactive allergens. This study aimed to characterize the T cell response to these allergens using a large panel of RGP-sensitive individuals. Short-term RGP-specific T cell lines (TCL) were generated from 38 RGP-sensitive subjects and stimulated with Lol p 1 and/or Lol p 5 allergens and synthetic 20-mer peptides. Proliferative responses were determined by 3H-thymidine uptake and IL-5 and IFN-gamma in culture supernatants analysed by ELISA. Of 17 subjects tested for reactivity to both allergens 16 (94%) responded to Lol p 1 and/or Lol p 5, establishing these as major T cell-reactive allergens. Sites of T cell reactivity were spread throughout the allergen molecules but regions of high reactivity were found. For Lol p 1 these spanned residues 19-38, 109-128, 154-173, 190-209, and for Lol p 5 37-56, 100-119, 145-164, 154-173, 190-209, 217-236 and 226-245. IL-5 and IFN-gamma were produced by T cells cultured with proliferation-inducing peptides. T cell responses to RGP major allergens have been extensively characterized, providing fundamental information for developing T cell-targeted immunotherapy for RGP allergy.

  8. Synthesis of Zeolites Na-P1 from South African Coal Fly Ash: Effect of Impeller Design and Agitation

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie Petrik; Tunde Victor Ojumu; Dakalo Mainganye

    2013-01-01

    South African fly ash has been shown to be a useful feedstock for the synthesis of some zeolites. The present study focuses on the effect of impeller design and agitation rates on the synthesis of zeolite Na-P1 which are critical to the commercialization of this product. The effects of three impeller designs (4-flat blade, Anchor and Archimedes screw impellers) and three agitation speeds (150, 200 and 300 rpm) were investigated using a modified previously reported synthesis conditions; 48 hou...

  9. Synthesis of Zeolites Na-P1 from South African Coal Fly Ash: Effect of Impeller Design and Agitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Petrik

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available South African fly ash has been shown to be a useful feedstock for the synthesis of some zeolites. The present study focuses on the effect of impeller design and agitation rates on the synthesis of zeolite Na-P1 which are critical to the commercialization of this product. The effects of three impeller designs (4-flat blade, Anchor and Archimedes screw impellers and three agitation speeds (150, 200 and 300 rpm were investigated using a modified previously reported synthesis conditions; 48 hours of ageing at 47 °C and static hydrothermal treatment at 140 °C for 48 hours. The experimental results demonstrated that the phase purity of zeolite Na-P1 was strongly affected by the agitation rate and the type of impeller used during the ageing step of the synthesis process. Although zeolite Na-P1 was synthesized with a space time yield (STY of 15 ± 0.4 kg d−1m−3and a product yield of 0.98±0.05 g zeolites/g fly ash for each impeller at different agitation speeds, zeolite formation was assessed to be fairly unsuccessful in some cases due the occurrence of undissolved mullite and/or the formation of impurities such as hydroxysodalite with the zeolitic product. This study also showed that a high crystalline zeolite Na-P1 can be synthesized from South African coal fly ash using a 4-flat blade impeller at an agitation rate of 200 rpm during the ageing step at 47 °C for 48 hours followed by static hydrothermal treatment at 140 °C for 48 hours.

  10. A 1.6-Mb P1-based physical map of the Down syndrome region on chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohira, Miki; Suzuki, Kazunobu [National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)]|[Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Ichikawa, Hitoshi [National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The Down Syndrome (DS) region on chromosome 21, which is responsible for the main features of DS such as characteristic facial features, a congenital heart defect, and mental retardation, has been defined by molecular analysis of DS patients with partial trisomy 21. The 2.5-Mb region around the marker D21S55 between D21S17 and ERG in 21q22 is thought to be important, although contributions of other regions cannot be excluded. In this region, we focused on a 1.6-Mb region between a NotI site, LA68 (D21S396, which is mapped distal to D21S17) and ERG, because analysis of a Japanese DS family with partial trisomy 21 revealed that the proximal border of its triplicated region was distal to LA68. We constructed P1 contigs with 46 P1 clones covering more than 95% of the 1.6-Mb region. A high-resolution restriction map using BamHI was also constructed for more details analysis. Our P1 contig map supplements other physical maps previously reported and provides useful materials for further analysis including isolation and sequencing of the DS region. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Substance P(1-7) induces antihyperalgesia in diabetic mice through a mechanism involving the naloxone-sensitive sigma receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Anna; Ohsawa, Masahiro; Hallberg, Mathias; Nyberg, Fred; Kamei, Junzo

    2010-01-25

    We have recently explored the role of the tachykinin substance P neuroactive fragment substance P(1-7) in the mediation of anti-inflammatory effects using a blister model in the rat paw (Wiktelius et al., 2006). We observed that this heptapeptide induced a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the substance P-induced response, which was reversible by the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. In the present study, we examined the ability of substance P(1-7) to induce antihyperalgesic effects in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. We found that the substance P fragment strongly and dose-dependently produced antihyperalgesia in diabetic mice. This effect was reversed by naloxone but not by the selective opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine, naltrindole or nor-binaltorphimine, selective for the micro-, delta- or kappa-opioid receptor, respectively. In addition, the antihyperalgesic effect induced by substance P(1-7) was partly reversed by a sigma(1) receptor agonist (+)-pentazocine, but not a sigma(1) receptor antagonist BD1047 ([2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(diamino)ethylamine), suggesting that involvement of the naloxone-sensitive sigma-receptor for the action of the SP related heptapeptides. These results suggest that hyperalgesia in diabetic mice may be, in part, due to the enhanced endogenous sigma(1) receptor systems in the spinal cord.

  12. The viral capping enzyme nsP1: a novel target for the inhibition of chikungunya virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delang, L; Li, C; Tas, A; Quérat, G; Albulescu, I C; De Burghgraeve, T; Guerrero, N A Segura; Gigante, A; Piorkowski, G; Decroly, E; Jochmans, D; Canard, B; Snijder, E J; Pérez-Pérez, M J; van Hemert, M J; Coutard, B; Leyssen, P; Neyts, J

    2016-08-22

    The chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has become a substantial global health threat due to its massive re-emergence, the considerable disease burden and the lack of vaccines or therapeutics. We discovered a novel class of small molecules ([1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidin-7(6H)-ones) with potent in vitro activity against CHIKV isolates from different geographical regions. Drug-resistant variants were selected and these carried a P34S substitution in non-structural protein 1 (nsP1), the main enzyme involved in alphavirus RNA capping. Biochemical assays using nsP1 of the related Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus revealed that the compounds specifically inhibit the guanylylation of nsP1. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report demonstrating that the alphavirus capping machinery is an excellent antiviral drug target. Considering the lack of options to treat CHIKV infections, this series of compounds with their unique (alphavirus-specific) target offers promise for the development of therapy for CHIKV infections.

  13. Differential distribution of the P1 and P2 protamine gene sequences in eutherian and marsupial mammals and a monotreme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P A; Yelick, P C; Liem, H; Hecht, N B

    1988-02-01

    At the protein level, the P1 protamine is the predominant form of mammalian protamine, present in all mammalian spermatozoa analyzed to date. An additional variant, the P2 protamine, has been detected only in spermatozoa of the mouse, hamster and human. Southern blot analysis of a group of restriction enzyme-digested mammalian DNAs has revealed the presence of sequences homologous to the P1 and P2 mouse protamine genes in diverse species. In agreement with protein studies, nucleotide sequences homologous to the mouse P1 protamine cDNA are widespread, being present in the genomic DNAs of human, rat, dog, ram, horse, bull, hamster, baboon, flying fox (megabat), microbat, boar, North American opossum, and wallaby. Although we detect genomic sequences with strong homology to the mouse protamine 2 cDNA in rat and hamster, we also find weaker but reproducible hybridization to the genomic DNA of human, boar, dog, bull, microbat, wallaby, and platypus. With the exception of the human, the P2 protamine has not been detected in the spermatozoa of these latter species.

  14. Ukpebor p1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BIG TIMMY

    Air Pollution Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Benin, Nigeria. Department of Mathematics and ... The particulate samples from where the metals were characterized and quantified, were collected between December 2007 ... using leaded gasoline, industrial processes such as ferrous and non ferrous ...

  15. Ukpebor p1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BIG TIMMY

    Air Pollution Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Benin, Nigeria. Department of Mathematics and Statistics, ... important role in determining their health effects. (Radojevic and Bashkin, 2007). The particle size .... of air pollution related health problems (e.g. catarrh, cough, asthma and emphysema).

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as mood, ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to ...

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    Full Text Available ... for the cell to work properly including small structures called cell organelles. Dendrites branch off from the cell body ... to their final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with each other and ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... to control the amygdala during stressful events. Some research shows that people who ... social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her ...

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by neurons that carries ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ... identify unknown pills from the National Library of Medicine Contact Us The National Institute of Mental Health ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in the brain and help reduce symptoms of depression. Sarah also has several follow-up visits scheduled with the psychiatrist to check how she's responding to the treatment. She also begins regular talk therapy sessions with her psychiatrist. In these sessions, she ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control and memory. serotonin —A neurotransmitter that regulates many functions, including ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... A highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... National Institutes of Health (NIH), a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Top

  4. Robot brains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babuska, R.

    2011-01-01

    The brain hosts complex networks of neurons that are responsible for behavior in humans and animals that we generally call intelligent. I is not easy to give an exact definition of intelligence – for the purpose of this talk it will suffice to say that we refer to intelligence as a collection of

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she lost interest in her job. She had ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences may have made it harder for Sarah ... front of the brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic ... factors like diet, stress and post-natal care can change gene expression ( ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... ClinicalTrials.gov : Federally and privately supported research using human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... different roles, from controlling blood pressure and heart rate to responding when we sense a mistake, helping us feel motivated and stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive ... events. Some research shows that people who have PTSD or ADHD have reduced activity in their PFCs. ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such ... for growing, staying alive, and making new neurons. prefrontal cortex —A highly developed area at the front of ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News NIMH Director Gordon Elected AAAS Fellow NIMH Launches Director Twitter Account Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation More General Health Information from NIH MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from government agencies ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the release of various hormones, and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some behavioral traits. epigenetics —The study of ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... neuron to bind onto, leading to more normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Join A Study News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us About Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... a cell that contains DNA and information the cell needs for growing, staying alive, and making new neurons. prefrontal cortex —A highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed New BRAIN Grants ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists to make important ... that regulates many functions, including mood, appetite, and sleep. synapse —The tiny gap between neurons, where nerve impulses are sent ... More General Health Information from NIH MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from government ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... common neurotransmitter in a person's body, which increases neuronal activity, is involved in early brain development, and ... rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve ...

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    Full Text Available ... Join A Study News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us About Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and Groups Strategic ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... is damaged, a person can't create new memories, but can still remember past events and learned skills, and carry on a conversation, all which rely on different parts of the brain. The hippocampus may be involved in mood disorders through its control of a major mood circuit ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... memories of fear and safety may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . ... possible to predict who will develop a mental disorder and to tailor the treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists ... inside contents of a cell from its surrounding environment. cytoplasm ... the cell to work properly. dendrite —The point of contact for receiving ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... doctor, who ran some tests. After deciding her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of medical doctor who is an expert on mental ... Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of information to the front of the brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some behavioral traits. epigenetics —The study of how environmental factors like diet, stress and post-natal care ...

  6. Forkhead box protein P1 as a downstream target of transforming growth factor-β induces collagen synthesis and correlates with a more stable plaque phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Pieter T; Grundmann, Sebastian; Goumans, Marie-José; de Kleijn, Dominique; Moll, Frans; de Boer, Onno; van der Wal, Allard C; van Soest, Alex; de Vries, Jean-Paul; van Royen, Niels; Piek, Jan J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E

    2011-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, modulated by plaque stabilizing and de-stabilizing cell populations such as infiltrating monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs). Transcription factors regulating proliferation and differentiation of atherosclerosis relevant cell types are of interest in this context. The forkhead box transcription factor FoxP1 modulates monocyte differentiation. We studied FoxP1 expression in atherosclerotic tissue, correlated FoxP1 expression with plaque characteristics and identified associations between FoxP1 and plaque proteins. 116 Atherosclerotic plaques from carotid endarterectomy samples were histologically classified (fibrous, fibroatheromatous, atheromatous) and subjected to semi-quantitative protein analysis. Macrophage, SMC content and intraplaque thrombus amount were determined histologically. FoxP1 expression was investigated by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. In addition FoxP1 was overexpressed in vitro to identify causal relations between FoxP1 and plaque proteins. FoxP1 expression was observed in SMCs, macrophages, endothelial cells and T-cells within the plaque. High SMC and collagen content correlated with increased FoxP1 isoform (72 kD and 95 kD) levels. 72 kD FoxP1 expression was lower in plaques containing intraplaque thrombus. FoxP1 correlated with active intraplaque TGFβ signaling. In vitro stimulation of SMCs with TGFβ resulted in increased FoxP1 levels. 72 kD FoxP1 correlated with expression of pro-fibrotic EGR-1 and increased Col1A1 expression. FoxP1 is expressed by different cell types in atherosclerotic lesions and associated with more stable plaque characteristics and intraplaque TGFβ signaling. FoxP1 expression in vitro is induced by TGFβ, resulting in increased collagen and EGR-1 expression, providing a mechanism for the observed association with a more stable plaque phenotype. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  8. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  9. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  10. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Newly Diagnosed Neurological Exam ...

  11. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood ...

  12. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  13. Topography and source analysis of brain activity associated with selective spatial attention and memory search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, A.A.; Mulder, G.; van Hooff, H.; de Lange, J.; Peters, M.J.; Dunajski, Z.; Dunajski, Z.

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the topographical aspects of the ERP reflections of visual spatial attention and memory search. Spatial attention was found to enhance the amplitudes of the P1 and N1 deflections. The brain activity in the P1-N1 latency range could be modeled with a single moving equivalent dipole,

  14. Brain Basics: Know Your Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frontal lobes. Whether you appreciate symphonies or rock music, your brain responds through the activity of these lobes. At the top of each temporal lobe is an area responsible for receiving ... those associated with music. Other parts of this lobe seem to integrate ...

  15. The Creative Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Ned

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the differences between left-brain and right-brain functioning and between left-brain and right-brain dominant individuals, and concludes that creativity uses both halves of the brain. Discusses how both students and curriculum can become more "whole-brained." (Author/JM)

  16. Functional characterization of replication and stability factors of an incompatibility group P-1 plasmid from Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Woo; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Stenger, Drake C

    2010-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa strain riv11 harbors a 25-kbp plasmid (pXF-RIV11) belonging to the IncP-1 incompatibility group. Replication and stability factors of pXF-RIV11 were identified and used to construct plasmids able to replicate in X. fastidiosa and Escherichia coli. Replication in X. fastidiosa required a 1.4-kbp region from pXF-RIV11 containing a replication initiation gene (trfA) and the adjacent origin of DNA replication (oriV). Constructs containing trfA and oriV from pVEIS01, a related IncP-1 plasmid of the earthworm symbiont Verminephrobacter eiseniae, also were competent for replication in X. fastidiosa. Constructs derived from pXF-RIV11 but not pVEIS01 replicated in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Xanthomonas campestris, and Pseudomonas syringae. Although plasmids bearing replication elements from pXF-RIV11 or pVEIS01 could be maintained in X. fastidiosa under antibiotic selection, removal of selection resulted in plasmid extinction after 3 weekly passages. Addition of a toxin-antitoxin addiction system (pemI/pemK) from pXF-RIV11 improved plasmid stability such that >80 to 90% of X. fastidiosa cells retained plasmid after 5 weekly passages in the absence of antibiotic selection. Expression of PemK in E. coli was toxic for cell growth, but toxicity was nullified by coexpression of PemI antitoxin. Deletion of N-terminal sequences of PemK containing the conserved motif RGD abolished toxicity. In vitro assays revealed a direct interaction of PemI with PemK, suggesting that antitoxin activity of PemI is mediated by toxin sequestration. IncP-1 plasmid replication and stability factors were added to an E. coli cloning vector to constitute a stable 6.0-kbp shuttle vector (pXF20-PEMIK) suitable for use in X. fastidiosa.

  17. Transcriptional analysis of Mycobacterium fortuitum cultures upon hydrogen peroxide treatment using the novel standard rrnA-P1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebollo María

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of an intracellular pathogen to establish infection depends on the capacity of the organism to survive and replicate inside the host. Mycobacterium fortuitum is a bacteria that contains genes involved in the detoxification of the oxygen reactive species such as those produced by the host during the infection. In this work, we investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide on the transcription and expression of these genes by developing a real time quantitative PCR technique (qRT-PCR using the ribosomal promoter region (rrnA-P1 as reference product for quantification of the mRNA levels. Results M. fortuitum cultures were treated with different hydrogen peroxide concentrations (0.02 to 20 mM during several periods of time (30 to 120 minutes. The activity of the enzymes KatGII and SodA, and the transcription of corresponding genes were evaluated. The transcriptional regulator furAII gene was also studied. The ribosomal promoter region rrnA-P1 was validated as referential product under the stress conditions checked by qRT-PCR. Minor changes were observed under the conditions tested except when bacteria were incubated in the presence of 20 mM hydrogen peroxide. Under those conditions, the levels of transcription of the three genes under study increased at 30 minutes of treatment. The viability of the bacteria was not influenced under the conditions tested. Conclusion In this work, we have quantified transcriptional responses to stress suggesting that, the opportunistic pathogen M. fortuitum is more resistant and differs in behaviour in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, when compared to the major pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis. Besides, we demonstrate the mycobacterial non-coding region rrnA-P1 to be a suitable reference product in the analysis of qRT-PCR transcriptional data of M. fortuitum.

  18. Discovery of a potential lead compound for treating leprosy with dapsone resistance mutation in M. leprae folP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, J; Ramanathan, K; Nawaz Khan, F; Dhanasekaran, D; Shanthi, V

    2016-06-21

    Dapsone resistance is a serious impediment to the implementation of the present leprosy control strategies. In the recent past, many studies have been undertaken to address the antibiotic activity and binding pattern of dapsone against both native and mutant (Pro55Leu) folP1. Yet, there is no well-developed structural basis for understanding drug action and there is dire need for new antibacterial therapies. In the present study, molecular simulation techniques were employed alongside experimental strategies to address and overcome the mechanism of dapsone resistance. In essence, we report the identification of small molecule compounds to effectively and specifically inhibit the growth of M. leprae through targeting dihydropteroate synthase, encoded by folP1 which is involved in folic acid synthesis. Initially, ADME and toxicity studies were employed to screen the lead compounds, using dapsone as standard drug. Subsequently, molecular docking was employed to understand the binding efficiency of dapsone and its lead compounds against folP1. Further, the activity of the screened lead molecule was studied by means of molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Furthermore, we synthesized 4-(2-fluorophenylsulfonyl)benzenamine, using (2-fluorophenyl)boronic acid and 4-aminobenzenesulfonyl chloride, and the compound structure was confirmed by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. Most importantly, the antibacterial activity of the compound was also examined and compared against dapsone. Overall, the result from our analysis suggested that CID21480113 (4-(2-fluorophenylsulfonyl)benzenamine) could be developed into a promising lead compound and could be effective in treating dapsone resistant leprosy cases.

  19. Silicon Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Beyond the digital neural networks of Chap. 16, the more radical mapping of brain-like structures and processes into VLSI substrates has been pioneered by Carver Mead more than 30 years ago [1]. The basic idea was to exploit the massive parallelism of such circuits and to create low-power and fault-tolerant information-processing systems. Neuromorphic engineering has recently seen a revival with the availability of deep-submicron CMOS technology, which allows for the construction of very-large-scale mixed-signal systems combining local analog processing in neuronal cells with binary signalling via action potentials. Modern implementations are able to reach the complexity-scale of large functional units of the human brain, and they feature the ability to learn by plasticity mechanisms found in neuroscience. Combined with high-performance programmable logic and elaborate software tools, such systems are currently evolving into user-configurable non-von-Neumann computing systems, which can be used to implement and test novel computational paradigms. The chapter introduces basic properties of biological brains with up to 200 Billion neurons and their 1014 synapses, where action on a synapse takes ˜10 ms and involves an energy of ˜10 fJ. We outline 10x programs on neuromorphic electronic systems in Europe and the USA, which are intended to integrate 108 neurons and 1012 synapses, the level of a cat's brain, in a volume of 1 L and with a power dissipation intelligence, we references Hawkins' view to first perceive the task and then design an intelligent technical response.

  20. Bismuth interstitial impurities and the optical properties of GaP1- x - y Bi x N y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Theresa M.; Beaton, Daniel A.; Perkins, John D.; Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2017-11-01

    Two distinctive regimes of behavior are observed from GaP1- x - y Bi x N y alloys with x < 2.4%, y < 3.4% grown by molecular beam epitaxy. These regimes are correlated with abundant bismuth interstitial impurities that are encouraged or suppressed according to the sample growth temperature, with up to 55% of incorporated bismuth located interstitially. When bismuth interstitials are present, radiative recombination arises at near-band-edge localized states rather than from impurity bands and deep state luminescence. This change demonstrates a novel strategy for controlling luminescence in isoelectronic semiconductor alloys and is attributed to a disruption of carrier transfer processes.

  1. The subcellular distribution of the human ribosomal "stalk" components: P1, P2 and P0 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    The ribosomal "stalk" structure is a distinct lateral protuberance located on the large ribosomal subunit in prokaryotic, as well as in eukaryotic cells. In eukaryotes, this ribosomal structure is composed of the acidic ribosomal P proteins, forming two hetero-dimers (P1/P2) attached......-proteins that are not actively transported into the nucleus; moreover, this might imply that the "stalk" constituents are assembled onto the ribosomal particle at the very last step of ribosomal maturation, which takes part in the cell cytoplasm....

  2. Novel group A rotavirus G8 P[1] as primary cause of an ovine diarrheic syndrome outbreak in weaned lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Cardiel, I; Fernández-Jiménez, M; Luján, L; Buesa, J; Espada, J; Fantova, E; Blanco, J; Segalés, J; Badiola, J J

    2011-05-05

    Rotavirus is a worldwide major cause of diarrhea outbreaks in neonatal ruminants. An outbreak of ovine diarrheic syndrome (ODS) in 50-75 days-old lambs (weaned lambs) is described. Fecal immunochromatography and intestinal immunohistochemistry for rotavirus group A were performed. In addition, semi-nested multiplex RT-PCR for G and P rotavirus genotyping in combination with sequencing were performed, to support the diagnosis and identify the viral strain. A novel ovine rotavirus group A G8 P[1] strain was determined as the main cause of the ODS observed, whereas other pathogens were ruled out. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Animating Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borck, Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper famously accused the rising field of social neuroscience of using faulty statistics under the catchy title ‘Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience’. This Special Issue invites us to take this claim as the starting point for a cross-cultural analysis: in which meaningful ways can recent research in the burgeoning field of functional imaging be described as, contrasted with, or simply compared to animistic practices? And what light does such a reading shed on the dynamics and effectiveness of a century of brain research into higher mental functions? Reviewing the heated debate from 2009 around recent trends in neuroimaging as a possible candidate for current instances of ‘soul catching’, the paper will then compare these forms of primarily image-based brain research with older regimes, revolving around the deciphering of the brain’s electrical activity. How has the move from a decoding paradigm to a representational regime affected the conceptualisation of self, psyche, mind and soul (if there still is such an entity)? And in what ways does modern technoscience provide new tools for animating brains? PMID:27292322

  4. New insights into alkylammonium-functionalized clinoptilolite and Na-P1 zeolite: Structural and textural features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Barbara; Matusik, Jakub; Bajda, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The area of zeolites' application could be expanded by utilizing their surfaces. Zeolites are frequently modified to increase their hydrophobicity and to generate the negative charge of the surface. The main objective of the study was to investigate and compare the features of natural clinoptilolite and synthetic zeolite Na-P1 modified by selected surfactants involving quaternary ammonium salts. The FTIR study indicates that with increasing carbon chain length in the surfactant attached to the zeolites surface the molecules adopt a more disordered structure. FTIR was also used to determine the efficiency of surface modification. Thermal analysis revealed that the presence of surfactant results in additional exothermic effects associated with the breaking of electrostatic bonds between zeolites and surfactants. The mass losses are in line with ECEC and CHN data. The textural study indicates that the synthetic zeolite Na-P1 has better sorption properties than natural clinoptilolite. The modification process always reduces the SBET and porosity of the material. With an increasing carbon chain length of surfactants all the texture parameters decrease.

  5. Bacteriophage P1 pac sites inserted into the chromosome greatly increase packaging and transduction of Escherichia coli genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haomin; Masters, Millicent

    2014-11-01

    The Escherichia coli bacteriophage P1 packages host chromosome separately from phage DNA, and transfers it to recipient cells at low frequency in a process called generalized transduction. Phage genomes are packaged from concatemers beginning at a specific site, pac. To increase transduction rate, we have inserted pac into the chromosome at up to five equally spaced positions; at least this many are fully tolerated in the absence of P1 infection. A single chromosomal pac greatly increases transduction of downstream markers without decreasing phage yields; 3.5 × as much total chromosomal DNA is packaged. Additional insertions decrease phage yield by > 90% and also decrease phage DNA synthesis, although less dramatically. Packaging of chromosomal markers near to and downstream of each inserted pac site is, at the same time, increased by greater than 10 fold. Transduction of markers near an inserted pac site can be increased by over 1000-fold, potentially allowing identification of such transductants by screening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Invasive Meningococcal Disease in Québec, Canada, Due to an Emerging Clone of ST-269 Serogroup B Meningococci with Serotype Antigen 17 and Serosubtype Antigen P1.19 (B:17:P1.19)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Dennis K. S.; Lorange, Manon; Ringuette, Louise; Dion, Réjean; Giguère, Michel; Henderson, Averil M.; Stoltz, Jan; Zollinger, Wendell D.; De Wals, Philippe; Tsang, Raymond S. W.

    2006-01-01

    During periods of endemic meningococcal disease, serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis is responsible for a significant percentage of invasive diseases, and no particular clone or strain predominates (F. E. Ashton and D. A. Caugant, Can. J. Microbiol. 47: 293-289, 2001), However, in the winter of 2004 to 2005, a cluster of serogroup B meningococcal disease occurred in one region in the province of Québec, Canada. The N. meningitidis strain responsible for this cluster of cases was identified as sequence type ST-269 with the antigenic formula B:17:P1.19. Retrospective analysis of isolates from 2000 onwards showed that this clone first emerged in the province of Québec in 2003. The emergence of this clone of serogroup B meningococci occurred after a mass vaccination against serogroup C N. meningitidis, suggesting possible capsule replacement. PMID:16891487

  7. Invasive meningococcal disease in Quebec, Canada, due to an emerging clone of ST-269 serogroup B meningococci with serotype antigen 17 and serosubtype antigen P1.19 (B:17:P1.19).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Dennis K S; Lorange, Manon; Ringuette, Louise; Dion, Réjean; Giguère, Michel; Henderson, Averil M; Stoltz, Jan; Zollinger, Wendell D; De Wals, Philippe; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2006-08-01

    During periods of endemic meningococcal disease, serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis is responsible for a significant percentage of invasive diseases, and no particular clone or strain predominates (F. E. Ashton and D. A. Caugant, Can. J. Microbiol. 47: 293-289, 2001), However, in the winter of 2004 to 2005, a cluster of serogroup B meningococcal disease occurred in one region in the province of Québec, Canada. The N. meningitidis strain responsible for this cluster of cases was identified as sequence type ST-269 with the antigenic formula B:17:P1.19. Retrospective analysis of isolates from 2000 onwards showed that this clone first emerged in the province of Québec in 2003. The emergence of this clone of serogroup B meningococci occurred after a mass vaccination against serogroup C N. meningitidis, suggesting possible capsule replacement.

  8. Clinical evaluation of a single oral dose of human-bovine (UK) reassortant rotavirus vaccines Wa x UK (P1A[8],G6) and Wa x (DS-1 x UK) (P1A[8],G2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Maryna C; Sperber, Ellen; Wagner, Mariam; Hoshino, Yasutaka; Dudas, Robert; Hodgins, Vicki; Marron, Jennifer; Nehring, Pamela; Casey, Roberta; Burns, Barbara; Karron, Ruth; Clements-Mann, Mary Lou; Kapikian, Albert Z

    2002-03-01

    The safety, infectivity, and immunogenicity of two human-bovine reassortant rotavirus candidate vaccines were evaluated in adults, children, and infants. One of these, Wa x UK, contained a single human rotavirus gene from the Wa strain that encoded VP4 P1A specificity in a background of 10 bovine genes including the VP7 gene that encodes G6 specificity, whereas the other, Wa x (DS-1 x UK), possessed the human rotavirus VP4 gene from the Wa strain as well as the human VP7 gene from strain DS-1 that encoded G2 specificity. Each of these vaccines appeared to be well-tolerated and immunogenic in infants less than 6 months of age following a single oral dose, and therefore should be evaluated further as vaccine candidates. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Development and characterization of murine monoclonal antibody specific for the P1.4 PorA proteins from strain B:4:P1.(7b.4. of Neisseria meningitidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Pérez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis isolates are conventionally classified by serosubtyping that characterizes the reactivities of the PorA outer membrane protein variable-region epitopes with monoclonal antibodies. Porins are outer membrane proteins (OMPs of N. meningitidis serogroup B and have attracted study principally for two reasons: their use in the classification of meningococcal isolates into serotype and subtype and as potential components of vaccines against this important pathogen. New murine hybridomas, secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against PorA serotype P1.4 of N. meningitidis serogroup B, were generated using conventional hybridoma procedures. The monoclonal antibodies obtained were characterized by Western blot and whole cell ELISA, using reference strains from different N. meningitidis serotypes and subtypes. All monoclonal antibodies belong to isotype IgG1. Others hybridomas producing MAbs against PorB and FrpB were also obtained.

  10. 40 CFR 721.4040 - Glycols, polyethylene-, 3-sulfo-2-hydroxypropyl-p-(1,1,3,3-tetra-methylbutyl)phenyl ether, sodium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-hydroxypropyl-p-(1,1,3,3-tetra-methylbutyl)phenyl ether, sodium salt. 721.4040 Section 721.4040 Protection of...-, 3-sulfo-2-hydroxypropyl-p-(1,1,3,3-tetra-methylbutyl)phenyl ether, sodium salt. (a) Chemical..., polyethylene-, 3-sulfo-2-hydroxypropyl-p-(1,1,3,3-tetramethyl butyl)phenyl ether, sodium salt (P-90-1565) is...

  11. 7P1/2 hyperfine splitting in 206 , 207 , 209 , 213Fr and the hyperfine anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Orozco, L. A.; Collister, R.; Gwinner, G.; Tandecki, M.; Behr, J. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.

    2013-05-01

    We perform precision measurements on francium, the heaviest alkali with no stable isotopes, at the recently commissioned Francium Trapping Facility at TRIUMF. A combination of RF and optical spectroscopy allows better than 10 ppm (statistical) measurements of the 7P1 / 2 state hyperfine splitting for the isotopes 206 , 207 , 209 , 213Fr, in preparation for weak interaction studies. Together with previous measurements of the ground state hyperfine structure, it is possible to extract the hyperfine anomaly. This is a correction to the point interaction of the nuclear magnetic moment and the electron wavefunction, known as the Bohr Weisskopf effect. Our measurements extend previous measurements to the neutron closed shell isotope (213) as well as further in the neutron deficient isotopes (206, 207). Work supported by NSERC and NRC from Canada, NSF and DOE from USA, CONYACT from Mexico.

  12. Cavity length and stripe width dependent lasing characteristics of InAs/InP(1 0 0) quantum dot lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. G.; Gong, Q.; Wang, X. Z.; Cao, C. F.; Zhou, Z. W.; Wang, H. L.

    2016-03-01

    The lasing characteristics of InAs/InP(1 0 0) quantum dot lasers grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy were carefully studied by varying cavity length and stripe width. With the increase of injection current, the lasers having a longer cavity length and a wider stripe width exhibited simultaneously two-lasing peaks or/three-lasing peaks. The high-energy peak undergoes continuous buleshift, while the low-energy peaks are somewhat fixed. At the same times, the injection current density decreased as the stripe width increase. When the lasers were applied to external cavity system, the shorter cavity length of InAs/InP quantum dot laser had a wider tunable range.

  13. Precision Measurement Method for Branching Fractions of Excited P1/2 States Applied to Ca+40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Michael; Pruttivarasin, Thaned; Kokish, Mark; Talukdar, Ishan; Häffner, Hartmut

    2013-07-01

    We present a method for measuring branching fractions for the decay of J=1/2 atomic energy levels to lower-lying states based on time-resolved recording of the atom’s fluorescence during a series of population transfers. We apply this method to measure the branching fractions for the decay of the 4P1/22 state of Ca+40 to the 4S1/22 and 3D3/22 states to be 0.935 65(7) and 0.064 35(7), respectively. The measurement scheme requires that at least one of the lower-lying states be long lived. The method is insensitive to fluctuations in laser light intensity and magnetic field and is readily applicable to various atomic species due to its simplicity. Our result distinguishes well among existing state-of-the-art theoretical models of Ca+.

  14. Quenching of the resonance 5s(3P1) state of krypton atoms in collisions with krypton and helium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayarnyi, D. A.; L'dov, A. Yu; Kholin, I. V.

    2014-11-01

    The processes of collision quenching of the resonance 5s[3/2]1o(3P1) state of the krypton atom are studied by the absorption probe method in electron-beam-excited high-pressure He - Kr mixtures with a low content of krypton. The rate constants of plasmochemical reactions Kr* + Kr + He → Kr*2 + He [(4.21 ± 0.42) × 10-33 cm6 s-1], Kr* + 2He → HeKr* + He [(4.5 ± 1.2) × 10-36 cm6 s-1] and Kr* + He → products + He [(2.21 ± 0.22) × 10-15 cm3 s-1] are measured for the first time. The rate constants of similar reactions are refined for krypton in the metastable 5s[3/2]2o (3P2) state.

  15. A Study of C/2009 P1 Garradd's Dominant Volatiles as Observed by the Deep Impact HRI-IR Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaga, Lori M.; A'Hearn, M.; Farnham, T.; Gersch, A.; Bodewits, D.; Klaasen, K.

    2012-10-01

    In 2012, the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft observed comet C/2009 P1 Garradd during its post-perihelion passage through the inner Solar System. The HRI-IR observations of Garradd (1.05-4.85 microns) were made on March 26 and April 2 when Garradd was at a heliocentric distance of 2 AU. All three dominant cometary volatiles, H2O, CO2, and CO, were detected simultaneously in the data and preliminary analysis shows that Garradd has high CO2 and CO to water ratios as compared to other comets. Further analysis and comparison to theoretical molecular emission spectra will allow for more accurate production rates and absolute abundances to be calculated. Derived values will be presented. Correlations with rotation period will also be studied. Final results will be compared to the DI narrow-band analysis and other pre- and post-perihelion data of Garradd’s 2011 apparition.

  16. Impact of conjugal transfer on the stability of IncP-1 plasmid pKJK5 in bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren J

    2007-01-01

    The intrinsic stability of IncP-1 plasmid pKJK5 was assessed in both an Escherichia coli and a Kluyvera sp. population maintained in bacterial mats and in liquid nutrient broth without selective pressure. A fluorescence tagging/flow cytometry approach was used to detect and quantify plasmid loss from populations harboring either conjugation-proficient or -deficient pKJK5 derivatives. The results show that the plasmid's ability to conjugate plays an important role in its stable maintenance in populations of both species. This effect was most pronounced in dense bacterial populations and to a far lesser extent during growth in liquid broth. Furthermore, conjugation-proficient plasmids were able to spread infectiously in the bacterial mats initiated with various ratios of plasmid-harboring cells, resulting in a nearly exclusively plasmid-harboring population.

  17. The subcellular distribution of the human ribosomal "stalk" components: P1, P2 and P0 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    to the ribosome through the P0 protein. The "stalk" is essential for the ribosome activity, taking part in the interaction with elongation factors.In this report, we have shown that the subcellular distribution of the human P proteins does not fall into standard behavior of regular ribosomal proteins. We have...... used two approaches to assess the distribution of the P proteins, in vivo experiments with GFP fusion proteins and in vitro one with anti-P protein antibodies. In contrast to standard r-proteins, the P1 and P2 proteins are not actively transported into the nucleus compartment, remaining predominantly...... in the cytoplasm (the perinuclear compartment). The P0 protein was found in the cytoplasm, as well as in the nucleus; however, the nucleoli were excluded. This protein was scattered around the nuclei, and the distribution might reflect association with the so-called nuclear bodies. This is the first example of r...

  18. CIGS P1, P2, P3 Scribing Processes using a Pulse Programmable Industrial Fiber Laser: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekow, M.; Murison, R.; Panarello, T.; Dunsky, C.; Dinkel, C.; Nikumb, S.; Pern, F. J.; Mansfield, L.

    2010-10-01

    We describe a novel set of laser processes for the CIGS P1, P2 and P3 scribing steps, the development of which has been enabled by a unique pulse-programmable fiber laser. We find that the unique pulse control properties of this 1064 nm wavelength laser have significant effects on the material removal dynamics of the various film layers in the CIGS material system. In the case of the P2 and P3 processes, the shaped pulses create new laser/material interaction effects that permit the material to be cleanly and precisely removed with zero Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) at the edges of the scribe. The new P2 and P3 processes we describe demonstrate the first use of infrared nanosecond laser pulses that eliminate the HAZ and the consequent localized compositional changes in the CIGS absorber material that result in poor shunt resistance. SEM micrographs and EDX compositional scans are presented. For the P1 scribe, we process the bi-layer molybdenum from the film side as well as through the glass substrate. Microscopic inspection and compositional analysis of the scribe lines are not sufficient to determine electrical and optical performance in working PV modules. Therefore, to demonstrate the applicability of the infrared pulse-programmable laser to all three scribing processes for thin-film CIGS, we fabricate small-size multiple-cell monolithically interconnected mini-modules in partnership with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (Golden, Colorado). A total of four mini-modules are produced, two utilizing all laser scribing, and two with the P2 and P3 steps mechanically scribed (by a third party) for reference. Mini-module performance data measured at NREL is presented, and we also discuss the commercialization potential of the new single-laser CIGS scribing process. Finally we present a phenomenological model to describe this physics underlying this novel ablation process.

  19. Measurement of IgE antibodies against purified grass pollen allergens (Lol p 1, 2, 3 and 5) during immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ree, R; Van Leeuwen, W A; Dieges, P H; Van Wijk, R G; De Jong, N; Brewczyski, P Z; Kroon, A M; Schilte, P P; Tan, K Y; Simon-Licht, I F; Roberts, A M; Stapel, S O; Aalberse, R C

    1997-01-01

    IgE titres tend to rise early after the start of immunotherapy, followed by a decline to pre-immunotherapy levels or lower. We were interested to know whether the early increase in IgE antibodies includes new specificities of IgE, and whether these responses persist. Sera of 64 patients undergoing grass pollen immunotherapy were tested for IgE against four purified grass pollen allergens: Lol p 1, 2, 3, and 5. At least two serum samples were taken, one before the start of therapy and one between 5 and 18 months after the first immunization (mean: 10 months). The mean IgE responses to Lol p 1, 2 and 3 showed a moderate but not significant increase. In contrast, the mean IgE response to Lol p 5 showed a significant decrease of > 30%. IgE against total Lohum perenne pollen extract moderately increased (> 20%), showing that a RAST for total pollen is not always indicative for the development of IgE against its major allergens. For > 40% of the patients it was found that IgE against one or more of the four allergens increased, while IgE against the remaining allergen(s) decreased. For 10 sera the ratio of IgE titres against at least two allergens changed by at least a factor of 5. The changes in specific IgE also included conversions from negative (< 0.1 RU) to positive (0.6 to 5.0 RU) for five patients. For two patients, the induction of these 'new' IgE antibodies against major allergens was shown to result in a response that was persistent over several years. Although active induction of new IgE specificities by immunotherapy was not really proven, the observations in this study indicate that monitoring of IgE against purified (major) allergens is necessary to evaluate changes in specific IgE in a reliable way.

  20. Immunogenicity and in vitro and in vivo protective effects of antibodies targeting a recombinant form of the Streptococcus mutans P1 surface protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Milene Tavares; Souza, Renata D; Ferreira, Ewerton L; Robinette, Rebekah; Crowley, Paula J; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Brady, L Jeannine; Ferreira, Luís C S; Ferreira, Rita C C

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major etiologic agent of dental caries, a prevalent worldwide infectious disease and a serious public health concern. The surface-localized S. mutans P1 adhesin contributes to tooth colonization and caries formation. P1 is a large (185-kDa) and complex multidomain protein considered a promising target antigen for anticaries vaccines. Previous observations showed that a recombinant P1 fragment (P1(39-512)), produced in Bacillus subtilis and encompassing a functional domain, induces antibodies that recognize the native protein and interfere with S. mutans adhesion in vitro. In the present study, we further investigated the immunological features of P1(39-512) in combination with the following different adjuvants after parenteral administration to mice: alum, a derivative of the heat-labile toxin (LT), and the phase 1 flagellin of S. Typhimurium LT2 (FliCi). Our results demonstrated that recombinant P1(39-512) preserves relevant conformational epitopes as well as salivary agglutinin (SAG)-binding activity. Coadministration of adjuvants enhanced anti-P1 serum antibody responses and affected both epitope specificity and immunoglobulin subclass switching. Importantly, P1(39-512)-specific antibodies raised in mice immunized with adjuvants showed significantly increased inhibition of S. mutans adhesion to SAG, with less of an effect on SAG-mediated bacterial aggregation, an innate defense mechanism. Oral colonization of mice by S. mutans was impaired in the presence of anti-P1(39-512) antibodies, particularly those raised in combination with adjuvants. In conclusion, our results confirm the utility of P1(39-512) as a potential candidate for the development of anticaries vaccines and as a tool for functional studies of S. mutans P1. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.