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Sample records for brain oxidative stress

  1. Diabetes and the Brain: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Autophagy

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    María Muriach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder associated with chronic complications including a state of mild to moderate cognitive impairment, in particular psychomotor slowing and reduced mental flexibility, not attributable to other causes, and shares many symptoms that are best described as accelerated brain ageing. A common theory for aging and for the pathogenesis of this cerebral dysfunctioning in diabetes relates cell death to oxidative stress in strong association to inflammation, and in fact nuclear factor κB (NFκB, a master regulator of inflammation and also a sensor of oxidative stress, has a strategic position at the crossroad between oxidative stress and inflammation. Moreover, metabolic inflammation is, in turn, related to the induction of various intracellular stresses such as mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and autophagy defect. In parallel, blockade of autophagy can relate to proinflammatory signaling via oxidative stress pathway and NFκB-mediated inflammation.

  2. Carbofuran-induced oxidative stress in mammalian brain.

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    Rai, Devendra K; Sharma, Bechan

    2007-09-01

    Chronic exposure to carbofuran, a carbamate pesticide, via oral administration has been reported to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat brain. However, information regarding the effect of short-term intraperitoneal (i.p.) carbofuran intoxication on oxidative stress is lacking. In the present study, the effect of carbofuran on oxidative indices in brain of Wistar rats has been determined by exposing the animals to three subacute concentrations (0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg body weight) equivalent to 10, 20, and 40%, respectively, of its LD50 (i.p.) for 24 h. Rat liver has been used as a positive control. The results demonstrated that carbofuran treatment at the 3 concentrations tested caused significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) by 12.50, 34.38, and 59.38%, respectively. The increased oxidative stress at same pesticide concentrations significantly induced activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in rat brain; the impact on catalase being more marked only at high-pesticide doses (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg body weight). Carbofuran also caused reduction in protein content of rat tissues tested. Rat brain was more severely affected by carbofuran than liver. The results clearly demonstrated that i.p. administration of carbofuran accelerated oxidative stress in rat brain in a dose-dependent manner.

  3. Brain oxidative stress induced by obstructive jaundice in rats.

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    Chroni, Elisabeth; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Karageorgos, Nikolaos; Konstantinou, Dimitris; Georgiou, Christos

    2006-02-01

    The effect of experimental obstructive jaundice on the oxidative status of brain tissues in rats was examined. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: Group I was the control, group II was the sham operated, and groups III and IV were bile duct ligated and killed on the 5th and the 10th day, respectively. Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring the thiol redox state (protein and nonprotein components) and lipid peroxidation level variations in samples from the cerebral cortex, midbrain, and cerebellar tissue in all animals. Results indicated the presence of oxidative stress in the jaundiced animals that was more pronounced on the 10th day as indicated by a decrease in reduced glutathione and protein thiol and an increase in protein disulphide and lipid peroxidation. A dramatic elevation of the level of total nonprotein mixed disulphide level was found specifically in the midbrain in the 10th day group. This suggests an accumulation of nonprotein disulfides other than oxidized glutathione, which remained unchanged, in this particular brain area. This study showed a correlation between experimental obstructive jaundice and the oxidative stress in the rats' brain, implying that a similar pathogenetic mechanism may play a key role in cholestatic liver disease, resulting in hepatic encephalopathy in humans.

  4. Does exercise reduce brain oxidative stress? A systematic review.

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    Camiletti-Moirón, D; Aparicio, V A; Aranda, P; Radak, Z

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present systematic review was to investigate the influence of different exercise programs on brain oxidative stress. A search of the literature was conducted up to 1 December 2012 across five databases: PUBMED, SCOPUS, SPORTS DISCUS, Web of Science, and The Cochrane Library. The search strategy used in the electronic databases mentioned was established as: (swim* OR exercise OR training) AND ("oxidative stress" AND brain) for each database. A methodological quality assessment valuation/estimation was additionally carried out in the final sample of studies. Of 1553 potentially eligible papers, 19 were included after inclusion and exclusion criteria. The methodological quality assessment showed a total score in the Quality Index between 40% and 80%, with a mean quality of 56.8%. Overall, regular moderate aerobic exercise appears to promote antioxidant capacity on brain. In contrast, anaerobic or high-intensity exercise, aerobic-exhausted exercise, or the combination of both types of training could deteriorate the antioxidant response. Future investigations should be focused on establishing a standardized exercise protocol, depending on the exercise metabolism wanted to test, which could enhance the objective knowledge in this topic.

  5. Selective neuronal vulnerability to oxidative stress in the brain

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    Xinkun Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS, caused by the imbalance between the generation and detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS, plays an important role in brain aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and other related adverse conditions, such as ischemia. While ROS/RNS serve as signaling molecules at physiological levels, an excessive amount of these molecules leads to oxidative modification and, therefore, dysfunction of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The response of neurons to this pervasive stress, however, is not uniform in the brain. While many brain neurons can cope with a rise in OS, there are select populations of neurons in the brain that are vulnerable. Because of their selective vulnerability, these neurons are usually the first to exhibit functional decline and cell death during normal aging, or in age-associated neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of selective neuronal vulnerability (SNV to OS is important in the development of future intervention approaches to protect such vulnerable neurons from the stresses of the aging process and the pathological states that lead to neurodegeneration. In this review, the currently known molecular and cellular factors that contribute to SNV to OS are summarized. Included among the major underlying factors are high intrinsic OS, high demand for ROS/RNS-based signaling, low ATP production, mitochondrial dysfunction, and high inflammatory response in vulnerable neurons. The contribution to the selective vulnerability of neurons to OS by other intrinsic or extrinsic factors, such as deficient DNA damage repair, low calcium-buffering capacity, and glutamate excitotoxicity, are also discussed.

  6. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER STIMULATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN BRAIN MICROGLIA AND DAMAGES NEURONS IN CULTURE.

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    Ambient particulate matter (PM) damages biological targets through oxidative stress (OS) pathways. Several reports indicate that the brain is one of those targets. Since microglia (brain macrophage) are critical to OS-mediated neurodegeneration, their response to concentrated amb...

  7. Brain susceptibility to oxidative stress in the perinatal period.

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    Perrone, Serafina; Tataranno, Luisa M; Stazzoni, Gemma; Ramenghi, Luca; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) occurs at birth in all newborns as a consequence of the hyperoxic challenge due to the transition from the hypoxic intrauterine environment to extrauterine life. Free radical (FRs) sources such as inflammation, hyperoxia, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion, neutrophil and macrophage activation, glutamate and free iron release, all increases the OS during the perinatal period. Newborns, and particularly preterm infants, have reduced antioxidant defences and are not able to counteract the harmful effects of FRs. Energy metabolism is central to life because cells cannot exist without an adequate supply of ATP. Due to its growth, the mammalian brain can be considered as a steady-state system in which ATP production matches ATP utilisation. The developing brain is particularly sensitive to any disturbances in energy generation, and even a short-term interruption can lead to long-lasting and irreversible damage. Whenever energy failure develops, brain damage can occur. Accumulating evidence indicates that OS is implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurological diseases, such as intraventricular haemorrhage, hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and epilepsy.

  8. Anti-oxidative effects of curcumin on immobilization-induced oxidative stress in rat brain, liver and kidney.

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    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samini, Fariborz

    2017-03-01

    Restraint stress has been indicated to induce oxidative damage in tissues. Several investigations have reported that curcumin (CUR) may have a protective effect against oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of CUR on restraint stress induced oxidative stress damage in the brain, liver and kidneys. For chronic restraint stress, rats were kept in the restrainers for 1h every day, for 21 consecutive days. The animals received systemic administrations of CUR daily for 21days. In order to evaluate the changes of the oxidative stress parameters following restraint stress, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), as well as antioxidant enzyme activities superoxide dismutase (SOD) glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) were measured in the brain, liver and kidney of rats after the end of restraint stress. The restraint stress significantly increased MDA level, but decreased the level of GSH and activists of SOD, GPx, GR, and CAT the brain, liver and kidney of rats in comparison to the normal rats (Poxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, prevented apoptosis, and increased antioxidant defense mechanism activity in the tissues versus the control group (Pstress-induced oxidative damage in the brain, liver and kidney of rats and propose that CUR may be useful agents against oxidative stress in the tissues.

  9. Quinolinic acid induces oxidative stress in rat brain synaptosomes.

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    Santamaría, A; Galván-Arzate, S; Lisý, V; Ali, S F; Duhart, H M; Osorio-Rico, L; Ríos, C; St'astný, F

    2001-03-26

    The oxidative action of quinolinic acid (QUIN), and the protective effects of glutathione (GSH), and 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), were tested in rat brain synaptosomes, Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was quantified after the exposure of synaptosomes to increasing concentrations of QUIN (25-500 microM). The potency of QUIN to induce lipid peroxidation (LP) was tested as a regional index of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) production, and the antioxidant actions of both GSH (50 microM) and APV (250 microM) on QUIN-induced LP were evaluated in synaptosomes prepared from different brain regions. QUIN induced concentration-dependent increases in ROS formation and TBARS in all regions analyzed, but increased production of fluorescent peroxidized lipids only in the striatum and the hippocampus, whereas both GSH and APV decreased this index. These results suggest that the excitotoxic action of QUIN involves regional selectivity in the oxidative status of brain synaptosomes, and may be prevented by substances exhibiting antagonism at the NMDA receptor.

  10. Voluntary exercise prevents oxidative stress in the brain of phenylketonuria mice

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    Mazzola, Priscila Nicolao; Bruinenberg, Vibeke; Anjema, Karen; van Vliet, Danique; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; van Spronsen, Francjan J; van der Zee, Eddy A; Zschocke, Johannes; Baumgartner, Matthias; Patterson, Marc; Rahman, Shamima

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High phenylalanine levels in phenylketonuria (PKU) have been associated with brain oxidative stress and amino acid imbalance. Exercise has been shown to improve brain function in hyperphenylalaninemia and neurodegenerative diseases. This study aimed to verify the effects of exercise on c

  11. Effects of Atorvastatin on the Hypertension-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain

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    Mohammadi, Mohammad Taghi; Amini, Reza; Jahanbakhsh, Zahra; Shekarforoush, Shahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is well known that the development of brain oxidative stress is one of the most serious complications of arterial hypertension that evokes brain tissue damage. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of atorvastatin treatment (20 mg/kg/day), as an antioxidant, to prevent the brain tissue oxidative stress in the hypertensive (HTN) rats. Methods: Experiments were performed in four groups of rats (n = 5 each group): sham, sham-treated, HTN and HTN treated. Rats were made ...

  12. Brain imaging for oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Okazawa, H; Ikawa, M; Tsujikawa, T; Kiyono, Y; Yoneda, M

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress, one of the most probable molecular mechanisms for neuronal impairment, is reported to occur in the affected brain regions of various neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, many studies showed evidence of a link between oxidative stress or mitochondrial damage and neuronal degeneration. Basic in vitro experiments and postmortem studies demonstrated that biomarkers for oxidative damage can be observed in the pathogenic regions of the brain and the affected neurons. Model animal studies also showed oxidative damage associated with neuronal degeneration. The molecular imaging method with positron emission tomography (PET) is expected to delineate oxidatively stressed microenvironments to elucidate pathophysiological changes of the in vivo brain; however, only a few studies have successfully demonstrated enhanced stress in patients. Radioisotope copper labeled diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) may be the most promising candidate for this oxidative stress imaging. The tracer is usually known as a hypoxic tissue imaging PET probe, but the accumulation mechanism is based on the electron rich environment induced by mitochondrial impairment and/or microsomal over-reduction, and thus it is considered to represent the oxidative stress state correlated with the degree of disease severity. In this review, Cu-ATSM PET is introduced in detail from the basics to practical methods in clinical studies, as well as recent clinical studies on cerebrovascular diseases and neurodegenerative diseases. Several other PET probes are also introduced from the point of view of neuronal oxidative stress imaging. These molecular imaging methods should be promising tools to reveal oxidative injuries in various brain diseases.

  13. Oxidative stress and brain morphology in individuals with depression, anxiety and healthy controls.

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    van Velzen, Laura S; Wijdeveld, Madelief; Black, Catherine N; van Tol, Marie-Jose; van der Wee, Nic J A; Veltman, Dick J; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Schmaal, Lianne

    2017-02-26

    Oxidative stress is a biological process, caused by an imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, in favour of the ROS. This imbalance leads to oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA and ultimately cell death. Studies in rodents have shown that the brain, particularly the amygdala and hippocampus, is sensitive to oxidative stress, although studies on the association between oxidative stress and brain morphology in humans are lacking. Oxidative stress has also been associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and may be related to volumetric abnormalities in the amygdala and hippocampus in MDD and anxiety disorders. In this study we aimed to examine the association between two robust measures of oxidative damage in plasma (8-OHdG and F2-isoprostanes) and volume of the hippocampus and amygdala in a large sample of individuals with and without MDD and/or anxiety (N=297). In secondary analyses, we examine whether this association is similar in patients and controls. 8-OHdG and F2-isoprostanes plasma levels were determined using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and volume of the hippocampus and amygdala and hippocampal subfields was determined using Freesurfer. We found no association between plasma markers (or interaction with MDD and/or anxiety disorder diagnosis) and subcortical volume, suggesting that peripheral oxidative stress damage is not associated with subcortical brain volume.

  14. The comparison of methods for measuring oxidative stress in zebrafish brains.

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    Moussavi Nik, Seyyed Hani; Croft, Kevin; Mori, Trevor A; Lardelli, Michael

    2014-06-01

    The zebrafish is a versatile model organism with the potential to contribute to our understanding of the molecular pathological mechanisms underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD). An early characteristic of AD brain pathology is lipid peroxidation resulting from oxidative stress. However, changes in lipid peroxidation have not yet been assessed in zebrafish brains, and an earlier attempt to observe changes in F₂-isoprostane levels in the brains of zebrafish exposed to hypoxia was unsuccessful. In this article, we examine the utility of various assays of lipid peroxidation and more general assays of intracellular oxidative stress to detect the changes in oxidative stress in the brains of adult zebrafish exposed to hypoxia or explanted into a sodium azide solution for chemical mimicry of hypoxia. Levels of F₂-isoprostanes and F₄-neuroprostanes were low and variable in zebrafish brains such that statistically significant changes due to hypoxia or chemical mimicry of hypoxia could not be observed. However, measurement of lipid hydroperoxides did reveal significant changes in lipid peroxidation under these conditions, while analyses of catalase gene expression and an assay based on 2',7'-dicholorofluorescein oxidation also revealed changes in oxidative stress levels.

  15. Possible effects of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

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    Ersoy, Alevtina; Koc, Emine Rabia; Sahin, Semsettin; Duzgun, Ulkuhan; Acar, Burcu; Ilhan, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    The problem of noise has recently gained more attention as it has become an integral part of our daily lives. However, its influence has yet to be fully elucidated. Other than being an unpleasant stimulus, noise may cause health disorders through annoyance and stress, including oxidative stress. Rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, may possess antioxidant properties. Based on rat models, our project investigates the effect of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in the brain tissue. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats were used. The rats were divided into four groups: Noise exposure plus rosuvastatin usage, only noise exposure, only rosuvastatin usage, and control. After the data had been collected, oxidant and antioxidant parameters were analyzed in the cerebral cortex, brain stem, and cerebellum. Results indicated that superoxide dismutase values were significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex, while malondialdehyde values in the brainstem and cerebellum were significantly increased in the group with only noise exposure. Superoxide dismutase values in the brainstem were significantly increased, but nitric oxide values in the cerebellum and brainstem and malondialdehyde values in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex were significantly decreased in the group where only rosuvastatin was used. During noise exposure, the use of rosuvastatin caused significantly increased superoxide dismutase values in the cerebral cortex and brainstem, but significantly reduced malondialdehyde values in the brain stem. Consequently, our data show that brain tissue was affected by oxidative stress due to continued exposure to noise. This noise-induced stress decreases with rosuvastatin therapy.

  16. Assessment of oxidative stress parameters of brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice in acute stress model

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    Gulay Hacioglu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Exposing to stress may be associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Therefore, high level of oxidative stress may eventually give rise to accumulation of oxidative damage and development of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. It has been presented that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF supports neurons against various neurodegenerative conditions. Lately, there has been growing evidence that changes in the cerebral neurotrophic support and especially in the BDNF expression and its engagement with ROS might be important in various disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, we aimed to investigate protective effects of BDNF against stress-induced oxidative damage. Materials and Methods: Five- to six-month-old male wild-type and BDNF knock-down mice were used in this study. Activities of catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD enzymes, and the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA were assessed in the cerebral homogenates of studied groups in response to acute restraint stress. Results: Exposing to acute physiological stress led to significant elevation in the markers of oxidative stress in the cerebral cortexes of experimental groups. Conclusion: As BDNF-deficient mice were observed to be more susceptible to stress-induced oxidative damage, it can be suggested that there is a direct interplay between oxidative stress indicators and BDNF levels in the brain.

  17. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats.

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    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress.

  18. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R.; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  19. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Ortiz-Avila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats. Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm, besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress.

  20. Oxidative stress-mediated brain dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA formation in Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis

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    Geogres eRammouz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurosteroids are steroids made by brain cells independently of peripheral steroidogenic sources. The biosynthesis of most neurosteroids is mediated by proteins and enzymes similar to those identified in the steroidogenic pathway of adrenal and gonadal cells. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA is a major neurosteroid identified in the brain. Over the years we have reported that, unlike other neurosteroids, DHEA biosynthesis in rat, bovine, and human brain is mediated by an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism, independent of the cytochrome P450 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1 enzyme activity found in the periphery. This alternative pathway is induced by pro-oxidant agents, such as Fe2+ and b-amyloid peptide. Neurosteroids are involved in many aspects of brain function, and as such, are involved in various neuropathologies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. AD is a progressive, yet irreversible neurodegenerative disease for which there are limited means for ante-mortem diagnosis. Using brain tissue specimens from control and AD patients, we provided evidence that DHEA is formed in the AD brain by the oxidative stress-mediated metabolism of an unidentified precursor, thus depleting levels of the precursor in the blood stream. We tested for the presence of this DHEA precursor in human serum using a Fe2+-based reaction and determined the amounts of DHEA formed. Fe2+ treatment of the serum resulted in a dramatic increase in DHEA levels in control patients, whereas only a moderate or no increase was observed in AD patients. The DHEA variation after oxidation correlated with the patients’ cognitive and mental status. In this review, we present the cumulative evidence for oxidative stress as a natural regulator of DHEA formation and the use of this concept to develop a blood-based diagnostic tool for neurodegenerative diseases linked to oxidative stress, such as AD.

  1. The Effect of Mangiferin Against Brain Damage Caused by Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Induced by Doxorubicin

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    Soni Siswanto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (DOX is an anthracycline antibiotic used for anticancer therapy. However, this agent can cause various systemic side effects including cognitive impairments in chronic use. Brain damage due to DOX is caused by an increase of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α level in the brain. Increased TNF-α can further lead to chronic inflammation which can lead to neuronal deaths or neurodegenerative diseases. Mangiferin (MAG, a compound extracted from Mangifera indica, has been found neuroprotective activities, but its effect on DOX-induced brain damage is unknown. This study aims to determine the effect of MAG on brain damage induced by DOX. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced by DOX intraperitoneally. MAG was given orally at the doses of 30 and 60 mg/kg bw for 7 consecutive weeks. The parameters measured were inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in brain tissue. Coadministration of MAG with DOX reduced inflammation which was marked by the reduction of TNF-α mRNA expression, decreased TNF-α level and reduction of oxidative stress marked by increase of superoxide dismutase level and decrease of malondialdehyde level. In conclusion, MAG was shown to have a neuroprotective effect on brain damage induced by DOX, partly due to inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  2. Furan fatty acids efficiently rescue brain cells from cell death induced by oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira, A.; Cox, R.C.; Egmond, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of rat brain C6 astroglioma cells with furan fatty acid F6 prior to exposure to hydrogen peroxide shows a strong protective effect of F6 against cell death resulting from oxidative stress. This protective effect is obtained only for F6 administered as a free fatty acid and with an intact f

  3. Chronic vitamin C deficiency does not accelerate oxidative stress in ageing brains of guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Hasselholt, Stine; Miyashita, Namiyo

    2012-01-01

    , a lack of vitamin C could be associated with an increase in redox imbalance in the ageing brain. The present study compared oxidative stress of ageing to that of a long-term non-scorbutic vitamin C deficiency in guinea pigs. Adults (3-9 months old) were compared to old (36-42 months old) animals during...

  4. Piroxicam attenuates 3-nitropropionic acid-induced brain oxidative stress and behavioral alteration in mice.

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    C, Jadiswami; H M, Megha; Dhadde, Shivsharan B; Durg, Sharanbasappa; Potadar, Pandharinath P; B S, Thippeswamy; V P, Veerapur

    2014-12-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) is a fungal toxin that produces Huntington's disease like symptoms in both animals and humans. Piroxicam, a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, used as anti-inflammatory agent and also known to decrease free oxygen radical production. In this study, the effect of piroxicam was evaluated against 3-NP-induced brain oxidative stress and behavioral alteration in mice. Adult male Swiss albino mice were injected with vehicle/piroxicam (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before 3-NP challenge (15 mg/kg, i.p.) regularly for 14 days. Body weights of the mice were measured on alternative days of the experiment. At the end of the treatment schedule, mice were evaluated for behavioral alterations (movement analysis, locomotor test, beam walking test and hanging wire test) and brain homogenates were used for the estimation of oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and catalase). Administration of 3-NP significantly altered the behavioral activities and brain antioxidant status in mice. Piroxicam, at both the tested doses, caused a significant reversal of 3-NP-induced behavioral alterations and oxidative stress in mice. These findings suggest piroxicam protects the mice against 3-NP-induced brain oxidative stress and behavioral alteration. The antioxidant properties of piroxicam may be responsible for the observed beneficial actions.

  5. Association between Peripheral Oxidative Stress and White Matter Damage in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Wei-Ming Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative stress is believed to be one of the mechanisms involved in the neuronal damage after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, the disease severity correlation between oxidative stress biomarker level and deep brain microstructural changes in acute TBI remains unknown. In present study, twenty-four patients with acute TBI and 24 healthy volunteers underwent DTI. The peripheral blood oxidative biomarkers, like serum thiol and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS concentrations, were also obtained. The DTI metrics of the deep brain regions, as well as the fractional anisotropy (FA and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured and correlated with disease severity, serum thiol, and TBARS levels. We found that patients with TBI displayed lower FAs in deep brain regions with abundant WMs and further correlated with increased serum TBARS level. Our study has shown a level of anatomic detail to the relationship between white matter (WM damage and increased systemic oxidative stress in TBI which suggests common inflammatory processes that covary in both the peripheral and central reactions after TBI.

  6. AGE-INDEPENDENT, GREY-MATTER-LOCALIZED, BRAIN ENHANCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN MALE FISCHER 344 RATS,1,2

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    While studies showed that aging is accompanied by increased exposure of the brain to oxidative stress, others have not detected any age-correlated differences in levels of markers of oxidative stress. Use of conventional markers of oxidative damage in vivo, which may be formed ex...

  7. Acute effect of aspartame-induced oxidative stress in Wistar albino rat brain.

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    Ashok, Iyaswamy; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy; Wankhar, Dapkupar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the acute effect of aspartame on oxidative stress in the Wistar albino rat brain. We sought to investigate whether acute administration of aspartame (75 mg/kg) could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain 24 hours after administration. To mimic human methanol metabolism, methotrexate treated rats were used to study aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally as a single dose and studied along with controls and methotrexate treated controls. Blood methanol and formate level were estimated after 24 hours and rats were sacrificed and free radical changes were observed in discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduce dglutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation and protein thiol levels. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase levels (GPx), and catalase activity (CAT) with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Aspartame exposure resulted in detectable methanol even after 24 hours. Methanol and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions. The observed alteration in aspartame fed animals may be due to its metabolite methanol and elevated formate. The elevated free radicals due to methanol induced oxidative stress.

  8. Furan fatty acids efficiently rescue brain cells from cell death induced by oxidative stress.

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    Teixeira, Antoinette; Cox, Ruud C; Egmond, Maarten R

    2013-08-01

    Treatment of rat brain C6 astroglioma cells with furan fatty acid F6 prior to exposure to hydrogen peroxide shows a strong protective effect of F6 against cell death resulting from oxidative stress. This protective effect is obtained only for F6 administered as a free fatty acid and with an intact furan ring. It is proposed that brain cells are rescued by F6 scavenging radicals elicited by lipid peroxidation within the cell membrane. Oxidative processes outside the cell membrane, such as protein carbonylation, are not affected by F6. Furan fatty acids such as those present in fish oils and marine organisms are likely beneficial for consumption in reducing the risk of diseases that have been implicated to arise from oxidative stress, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Possible effects of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in rat brain

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    Alevtina Ersoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of noise has recently gained more attention as it has become an integral part of our daily lives. However, its influence has yet to be fully elucidated. Other than being an unpleasant stimulus, noise may cause health disorders through annoyance and stress, including oxidative stress. Rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, may possess antioxidant properties. Based on rat models, our project investigates the effect of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in the brain tissue. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats were used. The rats were divided into four groups: Noise exposure plus rosuvastatin usage, only noise exposure, only rosuvastatin usage, and control. After the data had been collected, oxidant and antioxidant parameters were analyzed in the cerebral cortex, brain stem, and cerebellum. Results indicated that superoxide dismutase values were significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex, while malondialdehyde values in the brainstem and cerebellum were significantly increased in the group with only noise exposure. Superoxide dismutase values in the brainstem were significantly increased, but nitric oxide values in the cerebellum and brainstem and malondialdehyde values in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex were significantly decreased in the group where only rosuvastatin was used. During noise exposure, the use of rosuvastatin caused significantly increased superoxide dismutase values in the cerebral cortex and brainstem, but significantly reduced malondialdehyde values in the brain stem. Consequently, our data show that brain tissue was affected by oxidative stress due to continued exposure to noise. This noise-induced stress decreases with rosuvastatin therapy.

  10. Inhibition of rat brain microsomal cytochrome P450-dependent dealkylation activities by an oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrange, P; El-Bachá, R D; Netter, P; Minn, A

    2001-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that an oxidative stress not only alters cellular lipids and nucleic acids, but also numerous proteins. This oxidation results in alterations of some cellular functions, either by reversible modifications allowing a post-transcriptional regulation of enzyme activities or receptor affinities, or by irreversible modifications of the protein, triggering its inactivation and destruction. In the present work, we examined the effects of an experimental oxidative stress on rat brain microsomal cytochrome P450-dependent dealkylation activities. For that purpose, superoxide anions were produced either by the NADPH-dependent redox cycling of a quinine, menadione, or by the addition of apomorphine, which produces by autoxidation both superoxide anions and apomorphine-derived quinones. The inhibition of brain cytochrome P450-dependent alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activities was dependent on both menadione or apomorphine concentrations. Simultaneously, an increase of microsomal carbonyl groups was recorded. Immunoblotting characterization of brain microsomal oxidized protein was carried out, using antibodies raised against 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine as a reagent of protein carbonyl groups, and a revelation by a chemiluminescence method. We observed an increase in cerebral CYP1A protein oxidation, related to menadione concentration, suggesting that oxidation of cytochrome P450 protein may result in its catalytic inactivation.

  11. Melatonin prevents brain oxidative stress induced by obstructive jaundice in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Adolfo; Túnez, Isaac; Martínez, Rubén; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan Rafael; Ramírez, Luz María; Recio, Marta; Ochoa, Luís; Arjona, Alvaro; Montilla, Pedro; Muntané, Jordi; Padillo, Francisco J

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of melatonin on brain oxidative stress in experimental biliary obstruction. Cholestasis was done by a double ligature and section of the extrahepatic biliary duct. Melatonin was injected intraperitoneally (500 microg/kg/day). Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) contents were determined in the brain tissue. Biliary obstruction raised MDA and reduced GSH contents in the cortex, cerebellum, and hypothalamus areas. Moreover, the scavenger enzyme activity significantly dropped in all areas of the brain. Melatonin drastically reduced MDA concentration and enhanced GSH concentration, as well as all antioxidant enzyme activity in all brain areas obtained from the bile duct-ligated animals. In conclusion, the treatment with melatonin decreased lipid peroxidation and recovered the antioxidant status in the brain from cholestatic animals.

  12. Effect of chronic exposure to aspartame on oxidative stress in the brain of albino rats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Iyyaswamy; Sheeladevi Rathinasamy

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the chronic effect of the artificial sweetener aspartame on oxidative stress in brain regions of Wistar strain albino rats. Many controversial reports are available on the use of aspartame as it releases methanol as one of its metabolite during metabolism. The present study proposed to investigate whether chronic aspartame (75 mg/kg) administration could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain. To mimic the human methanol metabolism, methotrexate (MTX)-treated rats were included to study the aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally and studied along with controls and MTX-treated controls. The blood methanol level was estimated, the animal was sacrificed and the free radical changes were observed in brain discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein thiol levels. It was observed that there was a significant increase in LPO levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, GPx levels and CAT activity with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Moreover, the increases in some of these enzymes were region specific. Chronic exposure of aspartame resulted in detectable methanol in blood. Methanol per se and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions.

  13. Effect of chronic exposure to aspartame on oxidative stress in the brain of albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyyaswamy, Ashok; Rathinasamy, Sheeladevi

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the chronic effect of the artificial sweetener aspartame on oxidative stress in brain regions of Wistar strain albino rats. Many controversial reports are available on the use of aspartame as it releases methanol as one of its metabolite during metabolism. The present study proposed to investigate whether chronic aspartame (75 mg/kg) administration could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain. To mimic the human methanol metabolism, methotrexate (MTX)-treated rats were included to study the aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally and studied along with controls and MTX-treated controls. The blood methanol level was estimated, the animal was sacrificed and the free radical changes were observed in brain discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein thiol levels. It was observed that there was a significant increase in LPO levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, GPx levels and CAT activity with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Moreover, the increases in some of these enzymes were region specific. Chronic exposure of aspartame resulted in detectable methanol in blood. Methanol per se and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions.

  14. Anti-oxidative effects of Rooibos tea (Aspalathus linearis on immobilization-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

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    In-Sun Hong

    Full Text Available Exposure to chronic psychological stress may be related to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS or free radicals, and thus, long-term exposure to high levels of oxidative stress may cause the accumulation of oxidative damage and eventually lead to many neurodegenerative diseases. Compared with other organs, the brain appears especially susceptible to excessive oxidative stress due to its high demand for oxygen. In the case of excessive ROS production, endogenous defense mechanisms against ROS may not be sufficient to suppress ROS-associated oxidative damage. Dietary antioxidants have been shown to protect neurons against a variety of experimental neurodegenerative conditions. In particular, Rooibos tea might be a good source of antioxidants due to its larger proportion of polyphenolic compounds. An optimal animal model for stress should show the features of a stress response and should be able to mimic natural stress progression. However, most animal models of stress, such as cold-restraint, electric foot shock, and burn shock, usually involve physical abuse in addition to the psychological aspects of stress. Animals subjected to chronic restraint or immobilization are widely believed to be a convenient and reliable model to mimic psychological stress. Therefore, in the present study, we propose that immobilization-induced oxidative stress was significantly attenuated by treatment with Rooibos tea. This conclusion is demonstrated by Rooibos tea's ability to (i reverse the increase in stress-related metabolites (5-HIAA and FFA, (ii prevent lipid peroxidation (LPO, (iii restore stress-induced protein degradation (PD, (iv regulate glutathione metabolism (GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio, and (v modulate changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT.

  15. Metabolic enhancer piracetam attenuates rotenone induced oxidative stress: a study in different rat brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Joshi, Neeraj; Raju, Kunumuri Sivarama; Wahajuddin, Muhammad; Singh, Rama Kant; Singh, Sarika

    2015-01-01

    Piracetam is clinically being used nootropic drug but the details of its neuroprotective mechanism are not well studied. The present study was conducted to assess the effects of piracetam on rotenone induced oxidative stress by using both ex vivo and in vivo test systems. Rats were treated with piracetam (600 mg/kg b.w. oral) for seven constitutive days prior to rotenone administration (intracerebroventricular, 12 µg) in rat brain. Rotenone induced oxidative stress was assessed after 1 h and 24 h of rotenone administration. Ex vivo estimations were performed by using two experimental designs. In one experimental design the rat brain homogenate was treated with rotenone (1 mM, 2 mM and 4 mM) and rotenone+piracetam (10 mM) for 1 h. While in second experimental design the rats were pretreated with piracetam for seven consecutive days. On eighth day the rats were sacrificed, brain homogenate was prepared and treated with rotenone (1 mM, 2 mM and 4mM) for 1h. After treatment the glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in brain homogenate. In vivo study showed that pretreatment of piracetam offered significant protection against rotenone induced decreased GSH and increased MDA level though the protection was region specific. But the co-treatment of piracetam with rotenone did not offer significant protection against rotenone induced oxidative stress in ex vivo study. Whereas ex vivo experiments in rat brain homogenate of piracetam pretreated rats, showed the significant protection against rotenone induced oxidative stress. Findings indicated that pretreatment of piracetam significantly attenuated the rotenone induced oxidative stress though the protection was region specific. Piracetam treatment to rats led to its absorption and accumulation in different brain regions as assessed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. In conclusion, study indicates the piracetam is able to enhance the antioxidant capacity in brain cells

  16. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction in rat brain induced by carbofuran exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Kumar, Vikas; Kamboj, Amit; Sandhir, Rajat

    2008-11-01

    Repeated low-dose exposure to carbofuran exerts its neurotoxic effects by non-cholinergic mechanisms. Emerging evidence indicates that oxidative stress plays an important role in carbofuran neurotoxicity after sub-chronic exposure. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction as a primary event responsible for neurotoxic effects observed after sub-chronic carbofuran exposure. Carbofuran was administered to rats at a dose of 1 mg/kg orally for a period of 28 days. There was a significant inhibition in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (66.6%) in brain samples after 28 days of carbofuran exposure. Mitochondrial respiratory chain functions were assessed in terms of MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction and activity of succinate dehydrogenase in isolated mitochondria. It was observed that carbofuran exposure significantly inhibited MTT reduction (31%) and succinate dehydrogenase activity (57%). This was accompanied by decrease in low-molecular weight thiols (66.6%) and total thiols (37.4%) and an increase in lipid peroxidation (43.7%) in the mitochondria isolated from carbofuran-exposed rat brain. The changes in mitochondrial oxidative stress and functions were associated with impaired cognitive and motor functions in the animals exposed to carbofuran as compared to the control animals. Based on these results, it is clear that carbofuran exerts its neurotoxicity by impairing mitochondrial functions leading to oxidative stress and neurobehavioral deficits.

  17. The Ayurvedic drug, Ksheerabala, ameliorates quinolinic acid-induced oxidative stress in rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Swathy, S. S.; Indira, M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of neurotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress. There is hardly any cure for neurotoxicity in modern medicine, whereas many drugs in Ayurveda possess neuroprotective effects; however, there is no scientific validation for these drugs. Ksheerabala is an ayurvedic drug which is used to treat central nervous system disorders, arthritis, and insomnia. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of Ksheerabala on quinolinic acid-induced toxicity in rat brain. The o...

  18. To study the oxidative stress induced by lindane in epileptic rats brains and their modulation by neurosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Tanwar

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The result of the present study provides evidence that oxidative stress produced in the brain after chronic exposure of lindane may be the mechanism of epileptogenesis. Though NS have been shown to be neuroprotective, but they failed to reverse chronic oxidative stress produced by lindane. Further studies are required to demonstrate interaction of NS with lindane in oxidative stress. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 389-394

  19. The acute effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on oxidative stress in rat brain

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    Simić Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Oxidative stress and oxygen free radicals are thought to play an important role in acute effects of a number of neurotoxic processes. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy, a ring substituted amphetamine derivate, has attracted a great deal of media attention in recent years due to its widespread abuse as recreational drug by the young generation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on oxidative stress parameters (index of lipid peroxidation - ILP, superoxide radicals O2-, superoxide dismutase - SOD and glutathione - GSH in frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus in Wistar rats. Materials and methods The study included 40 male Wistar rats (200-250 g, housed 4 per cage having free access to food and water. MDMA was dissolved in distillated water and administered peroraly at 5, 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg. 8 hours following MDMA, the rats were killed by decapitation, their brains were rapidly removed and the brain structures were dissected out on ice and analyzed biochemically. Results Acute peroral administration of a single dose (5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg resulted in increase of ILP, O2-, SOD and decrease of GSH. Conclusion The results obtained in the present study suggest that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity and that the mechanism of MDMA neurotoxycity may vary between brain regions.

  20. Evidence linking oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation in the brain of individuals with autism

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    Daniel eRossignol

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders that are defined solely on the basis of behavioral observations. Therefore, ASD has traditionally been framed as a behavioral disorder. However, evidence is accumulating that ASD is characterized by certain physiological abnormalities, including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and immune dysregulation/inflammation. While these abnormalities have been reported in studies that have examined peripheral biomarkers such as blood and urine, more recent studies have also reported these abnormalities in brain tissue derived from individuals diagnosed with ASD as compared to brain tissue derived from control individuals. A majority of these brain tissue studies have been published since 2010. The brain regions found to contain these physiological abnormalities in individuals with ASD are involved in speech and auditory processing, social behavior, memory, and sensory and motor coordination. This manuscript examines the evidence linking oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and immune dysregulation/inflammation in the brain of ASD individuals, suggesting that ASD has a clear biological basis with features of known medical disorders. This understanding may lead to new testing and treatment strategies in individuals with ASD.

  1. Effect of 900 MHz radiofrequency radiation on oxidative stress in rat brain and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgici, Birsen; Akar, Aysegul; Avci, Bahattin; Tuncel, Ozgur Korhan

    2013-03-01

    The increasing use of mobile telephones raises the question of possible adverse effects of the electromagnetic fields (EMF) that these phones produce. In this study, we examined the oxidative stress in the brain tissue and serum of rats that resulted from exposure to a 900-MHz EMF at a whole body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of 1.08 W/kg for 1 h/day for 3 weeks. We also examined the antioxidant effect of garlic powder (500 mg/kg/day) given orally to EMF-exposed rats. We found that malondialdehyde (MDA) (p advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) (p electromagnetic radiation (EMR) exposure and that garlic has a protective effect against this oxidative stress.

  2. Bacopa monnieri as an Antioxidant Therapy to Reduce Oxidative Stress in the Aging Brain

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    Tamara Simpson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The detrimental effect of neuronal cell death due to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in age-related cognitive decline and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. The Indian herb Bacopa monnieri is a dietary antioxidant, with animal and in vitro studies indicating several modes of action that may protect the brain against oxidative damage. In parallel, several studies using the CDRI08 extract have shown that extracts of Bacopa monnieri improve cognitive function in humans. The biological mechanisms of this cognitive enhancement are unknown. In this review we discuss the animal studies and in vivo evidence for Bacopa monnieri as a potential therapeutic antioxidant to reduce oxidative stress and improve cognitive function. We suggest that future studies incorporate neuroimaging particularly magnetic resonance spectroscopy into their randomized controlled trials to better understand whether changes in antioxidant status in vivo cause improvements in cognitive function.

  3. High-protein diet induces oxidative stress in rat brain: protective action of high-intensity exercise against lipid peroxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Camiletti-Moir??n, Daniel; Aparicio Garc??a-Molina, Virginia A.; Nebot Valenzuela, Elena; Medina, Gerardo; Mart??nez, Rosario; Kapravelou, Garyfallia; Andrade, Ana; Porres-Foulquie, Jes??s; L??pez-Jurado, Mar??a; Aranda Ram??rez, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    diets as well as aerobic exercise could promote antioxidant capacity and consequently reduce free radicals overproduction on brain. However, little is know regarding to the high-protein diets and high intensity exercise on oxidative stress production. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of high-protein diets and high-intensity exercise (HIE) on brain oxidative stress markers. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 male Wistar rats were randomly distributed i...

  4. Ovariectomy-induced chronic abdominal hypernociception in rats: Relation with brain oxidative stress

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    Bárbara B. Garrido-Suárez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Ovarian hormone deficiency observed in menopausal women increases the production of reactive oxygen species, which could be implicated in central sensitization subjacent in chronic functional pain syndromes. Aims: To examine the hyperalgesic state induced by ovariectomy in adult rats and its relation to some oxidative stress outcomes. Methods: The female Wistar rats were divided into normal, sham ovariectomized (OVX and OVX groups, which were tested for mechanical and thermal hypernociception during 6 weeks and a single acetic acid-induced test 6 weeks after surgery. Redox biomarkers determinations of superoxide dismutase (SOD enzyme activity, glutathione (GSH and nitrates/nitrites as an indicator of nitric oxide (NO concentrations were determined in the brain and cerebellum of 6 animals of each group. Results: Exclusivity OVX rats developed a robust state of mechanical hypernociception and allodynia in the abdomen, hindlimbs and proximal tail. Besides, thermal pain thresholds (hot plate decreased. That was established 3-4 weeks after OVX and lasted for the 6 weeks of the experiment. Increases in visceral sensitivity were also observed in OVX rats. SOD enzyme activity decreased in OVX rats, which showed major deficit for this enzymatic defense under visceral inflammatory injury. However GSH concentrations were increased in brain of OVX animals that allow the balance during acute inflammation. NO concentrations were raised only in OVX rats exposure to chemical inflammatory injury. Conclusions: OVX in rats provide a useful model, which mimics the functional pain in females that could be related with brain oxidative stress.

  5. Dietary whey protein stimulates mitochondrial activity and decreases oxidative stress in mouse female brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shertzer, Howard G; Krishan, Mansi; Genter, Mary Beth

    2013-08-26

    In humans and experimental animals, protein-enriched diets are beneficial for weight management, muscle development, managing early stage insulin resistance and overall health. Previous studies have shown that in mice consuming a high fat diet, whey protein isolate (WPI) reduced hepatosteatosis and insulin resistance due in part to an increase in basal metabolic rate. In the current study, we examined the ability of WPI to increase energy metabolism in mouse brain. Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal AIN-93M diet for 12 weeks, with (WPI group) or without (Control group) 100g WPI/L drinking water. In WPI mice compared to controls, the oxidative stress biomarkers malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalkenals were 40% lower in brain homogenates, and the production of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide were 25-35% less in brain mitochondria. Brain mitochondria from WPI mice remained coupled, and exhibited higher rates of respiration with proportionately greater levels of cytochromes a+a3 and c+c1. These results suggested that WPI treatment increased the number or improved the function of brain mitochondria. qRT-PCR revealed that the gene encoding a master regulator of mitochondrial activity and biogenesis, Pgc-1alpha (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha) was elevated 2.2-fold, as were the PGC-1alpha downstream genes, Tfam (mitochondrial transcription factor A), Gabpa/Nrf-2a (GA-binding protein alpha/nuclear respiratory factor-2a), and Cox-6a1 (cytochrome oxidase-6a1). Each of these genes had twice the levels of transcript in brain tissue from WPI mice, relative to controls. There was no change in the expression of the housekeeping gene B2mg (beta-2 microglobulin). We conclude that dietary whey protein decreases oxidative stress and increases mitochondrial activity in mouse brain. Dietary supplementation with WPI may be a useful clinical intervention to treat conditions associated with oxidative stress or diminished mitochondrial activity in the

  6. Citric acid effects on brain and liver oxidative stress in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Youness, Eman R; Mohammed, Nadia A; Morsy, Safaa M Youssef; Omara, Enayat A; Sleem, Amany A

    2014-05-01

    Citric acid is a weak organic acid found in the greatest amounts in citrus fruits. This study examined the effect of citric acid on endotoxin-induced oxidative stress of the brain and liver. Mice were challenged with a single intraperitoneal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 200 μg/kg). Citric acid was given orally at 1, 2, or 4 g/kg at time of endotoxin injection and mice were euthanized 4 h later. LPS induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver tissue, resulting in marked increase in lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde [MDA]) and nitrite, while significantly decreasing reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) showed a pronounced increase in brain tissue after endotoxin injection. The administration of citric acid (1-2 g/kg) attenuated LPS-induced elevations in brain MDA, nitrite, TNF-α, GPx, and PON1 activity. In the liver, nitrite was decreased by 1 g/kg citric acid. GPx activity was increased, while PON1 activity was decreased by citric acid. The LPS-induced liver injury, DNA fragmentation, serum transaminase elevations, caspase-3, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression were attenuated by 1-2 g/kg citric acid. DNA fragmentation, however, increased after 4 g/kg citric acid. Thus in this model of systemic inflammation, citric acid (1-2 g/kg) decreased brain lipid peroxidation and inflammation, liver damage, and DNA fragmentation.

  7. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (pmicrowave exposed groups (pmicrowave exposed animal (pmicrowave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (pmicrowave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect. The study also indicates that increased oxidative stress and inflammatory response might be the factors involved in DNA damage following low intensity microwave exposure.

  8. Astaxanthin alleviates brain aging in rats by attenuating oxidative stress and increasing BDNF levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wanqiang; Wang, Xin; Xiang, Qisen; Meng, Xu; Peng, Ye; Du, Na; Liu, Zhigang; Sun, Quancai; Wang, Chan; Liu, Xuebo

    2014-01-01

    Astaxanthin (AST) is a carotenoid pigment which possesses potent antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties. The aim of this study was to investigate whether administration of AST had protective effects on D-galactose-induced brain aging in rats, and further examined its protective mechanisms. The results showed that AST treatment significantly restored the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increased glutathione (GSH) contents and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), but decreased malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonylation and 8-hydroxy-2- deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in the brains of aging rats. Furthermore, AST increased the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, but decreased the expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the brains of aging rats. Additionally, AST ameliorated histopathological changes in the hippocampus and restored brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in both the brains and hippocampus of aging rats. These results suggested that AST could alleviate brain aging, which may be due to attenuating oxidative stress, ameliorating hippocampus damage, and upregulating BDNF expression.

  9. Mechanisms of oxidative stress in brain ischemia injury%氧化应激在脑缺血损伤中的作用机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹洋; 吴伟康

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in brain injury after ischemia, which is a complex cascade. These oxidants produced by oxidative stress are directly involved in oxidative damage with cellular macromolecules such as lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, which lead to cell death. Oxidants are also mediators in signaling involving mitochondria pathway, DNA repair enzymes, and transcription factor that may lead to apoptosis after cerebral ischemia. Antioxidangt enzymes (such as superoxide dismutase,etc) provide useful tools in dissecting the events involving oxidative stress in signaling and damage in ischemic brain injury. This review focuses on the mechanisms of oxidative stress during brain ischemia.

  10. Curcumin Mediated Attenuation of Carbofuran Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Ashish; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Bechan

    2016-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of carbofuran to improve crop productivity causes adverse effects in nontargets including mammalian systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate carbofuran induced oxidative stress in rat brain stem and its attenuation by curcumin, a herbal product. Out of 6 groups of rats, 2 groups received two different doses of carbofuran, that is, 15 and 30% of LD50, respectively, for 30 days. Out of these, 2 groups receiving same doses of carbofuran were pretreated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight). The levels of antioxidants, TBARS, GSH, SOD, catalase, and GST were determined in rat brain stem. The 2 remaining groups served as placebo and curcumin treated, respectively. The data suggested that carbofuran at different doses caused significant alterations in the levels of TBARS and GSH in dose dependent manner. The TBARS and GSH contents were elevated. The activities of SOD, catalase, and GST were significantly inhibited at both doses of carbofuran. The ratio of P/A was also found to be sharply increased. The pretreatment of curcumin exhibited significant protection from carbofuran induced toxicity. The results suggested that carbofuran at sublethal doses was able to induce oxidative stress in rat brain which could be attenuated by curcumin. PMID:27213055

  11. Curcumin Mediated Attenuation of Carbofuran Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The indiscriminate use of carbofuran to improve crop productivity causes adverse effects in nontargets including mammalian systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate carbofuran induced oxidative stress in rat brain stem and its attenuation by curcumin, a herbal product. Out of 6 groups of rats, 2 groups received two different doses of carbofuran, that is, 15 and 30% of LD50, respectively, for 30 days. Out of these, 2 groups receiving same doses of carbofuran were pretreated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight. The levels of antioxidants, TBARS, GSH, SOD, catalase, and GST were determined in rat brain stem. The 2 remaining groups served as placebo and curcumin treated, respectively. The data suggested that carbofuran at different doses caused significant alterations in the levels of TBARS and GSH in dose dependent manner. The TBARS and GSH contents were elevated. The activities of SOD, catalase, and GST were significantly inhibited at both doses of carbofuran. The ratio of P/A was also found to be sharply increased. The pretreatment of curcumin exhibited significant protection from carbofuran induced toxicity. The results suggested that carbofuran at sublethal doses was able to induce oxidative stress in rat brain which could be attenuated by curcumin.

  12. Evaluation of the effects of fructose on oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Abigail; Vilela, Thais Ceresér; Taschetto, Luciane; Vuolo, Franciele; Petronilho, Fabricia; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the accumulation of fructose in tissues and biological fluids of patients. The disease results from a deficiency of aldolase B, responsible for metabolizing fructose in the liver, kidney, and small intestine. We investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory parameters in the cerebral cortex of 30-day-old Wistar rats. Animals received subcutaneous injection of sodium chloride (0.9 %) (control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g) (fructose group). One hour later, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortex was isolated. Oxidative stress (levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), carbonyl content, nitrate and nitrite levels, 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation, glutathione (GSH) levels, as well as the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) and neuroinflammatory parameters (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity) were investigated. Acute fructose administration increased levels of TBA-RS and carbonyl content, indicating lipid peroxidation and protein damage. Furthermore, SOD activity increased, whereas CAT activity was decreased. The levels of GSH, nitrate, and nitrite and DCFH oxidation were not altered by acute fructose administration. Finally, cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α levels, as well as MPO activity, were not altered. Our present data indicate that fructose provokes oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex, which induces oxidation of lipids and proteins and changes of CAT and SOD activities. It seems therefore reasonable to propose that antioxidants may serve as an adjuvant therapy to diets or to other pharmacological agents used for these patients, to avoid oxidative damage to the brain.

  13. Oxidative Stress Is a Central Target for Physical Exercise Neuroprotection Against Pathological Brain Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mesa, Yoelvis; Colie, Sandra; Corpas, Rubén; Cristòfol, Rosa; Comellas, Francesc; Nebreda, Angel R; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is suggested for preventing or delaying senescence and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have examined its therapeutic value in the advanced stage of AD-like pathology in 3xTg-AD female mice through voluntary wheel running from 12 to 15 months of age. Mice submitted to exercise showed improved body fitness, immunorejuvenation, improvement of behavior and cognition, and reduced amyloid and tau pathology. Brain tissue analysis of aged 3xTg-AD mice showed high levels of oxidative damage. However, this damage was decreased by physical exercise through regulation of redox homeostasis. Network analyses showed that oxidative stress was a central event, which correlated with AD-like pathology and the AD-related behaviors of anxiety, apathy, and cognitive loss. This study corroborates the importance of redox mechanisms in the neuroprotective effect of physical exercise, and supports the theory of the crucial role of oxidative stress in the switch from normal brain aging to pathological aging and AD.

  14. Amelioration of the haloperidol-induced memory impairment and brain oxidative stress by cinnarizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; El-Sayed El-Shamarka, Marwa; Salem, Neveen A; El-Mosallamy, Aliaa E M K; Sleem, Amany A

    2012-01-01

    Haloperidol is a classic antipsychotic drug known for its propensity to cause extrapyramidal symptoms and impaired memory, owing to blockade of striatal dopamine D2 receptors. Cinnarizine is a calcium channel blocker with D2 receptor blocking properties which is widely used in treatment of vertiginous disorders. The present study aimed to see whether cinnarizine would worsen the effect of haloperidol on memory function and on oxidative stress in mice brain. Cinnarizine (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg), haloperidol, or haloperidol combined with cinnarizine was administered daily via the subcutaneous route and mice were examined on weekly basis for their ability to locate a submerged plate in the water maze test. Mice were euthanized 30 days after starting drug injection. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (nitrite/nitrate) were determined in brain. Haloperidol substantially impaired water maze performance. The mean time taken to find the escape platform (latency) was significantly delayed by haloperidol (2 mg/kg, i.p.) on weeks 1-8 of the test, compared with saline control group. In contrast, those treated with haloperidol and cinnarizine showed significantly shorter latencies, which indicated that learning had occurred immediately. Haloperidol resulted in increased MDA in cortex, striatum, cerebellum and midbrain. GSH decreased in cortex, striatum and cerebellum and nitric oxide increased in cortex. Meanwhile, treatment with cinnarizine (20 mg/kg) and haloperidol resulted in significant decrease in MDA cortex, striatum, cerebellum and midbrain and an increase in GSH in cortex and striatum, compared with haloperidol group. These data suggest that cinnarizine improves the haloperidol induced brain oxidative stress and impairment of learning and memory in the water maze test in mice.

  15. Interleukin-6 deficiency reduces the brain inflammatory response and increases oxidative stress and neurodegeneration after kainic acid-induced seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Molinero, A; Carrasco, J

    2001-01-01

    , and caused a significant mortality (62%) only in the latter mice, indicating that interleukin-6 deficiency increased the susceptibility to kainic acid-induced brain damage. To compare the histopathological damage caused to the brain, control and interleukin-6 null mice were administered 8.75mg/kg kainic acid...... morphological hippocampal damage, oxidative stress and apoptotic neuronal death were increased. Since metallothionein-I+II levels were lower, and those of inducible nitric oxide synthase higher, these concomitant changes are likely to contribute to the observed increased oxidative stress and neuronal death...

  16. Penicillamine Increases Free Copper and Enhances Oxidative Stress in the Brain of Toxic Milk Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-Pu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Fu-Rong; Liang, Xiu-Ling; Li, Xun-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is characterized by the accumulation of copper arising from a mutation in the ATP7B gene. Penicillamine (PA) makes 10–50% of the patients with neurologic symptoms neurologically worse at the early stage of administration. The aim of this study was to determine how the copper metabolism changes and whether the change impairs the brain of toxic milk (tx) mice, an animal model of WD, during the PA administration. The free copper and protein-bound copper concentrations in the serum, cortex and basal ganglia of tx mice with PA administration for 3 days, 10 days and 14 days, respectively, were investigated. The expression of copper transporters, ATP7A and CTR1,was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR, immunofluorescence and Western blot. Then SOD, MDA and GSH/GSSG were detected to determine whether the oxidative stress changed correspondingly. The results revealed the elevated free copper concentrations in the serum and brain, and declined protein-bound copper concentrations in the brain of tx mice during PA administration. Meanwhile, transiently increased expression of ATP7A and CTR1 was observed generally in the brain parenchyma by immunofluorescence, real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. Additionally, ATP7A and CTR1 were observed to locate mainly at Golgi apparatus and cellular membrane respectively. Intense staining of ATP7A in the choroid plexus was found in tx mice on the 3rd and 10th day of PA treatment, but rare staining of ATP7A and CTR1 in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Decreased GSH/GSSG and increased MDA concentrations were also viewed in the cortex and basal ganglia. Our results suggested the elevated free copper concentrations in the brain might lead to the enhanced oxidative stress during PA administration. The increased free copper in the brain might come from the copper mobilized from brain parenchyma cells but not from the serum according to the ATP7A and CTR1 expression analysis. PMID:22629446

  17. Combinations of Ashwagandha leaf extracts protect brain-derived cells against oxidative stress and induce differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjot Shah

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha, a traditional Indian herb, has been known for its variety of therapeutic activities. We earlier demonstrated anticancer activities in the alcoholic and water extracts of the leaves that were mediated by activation of tumor suppressor functions and oxidative stress in cancer cells. Low doses of these extracts were shown to possess neuroprotective activities in vitro and in vivo assays.We used cultured glioblastoma and neuroblastoma cells to examine the effect of extracts (alcoholic and water as well as their bioactive components for neuroprotective activities against oxidative stress. Various biochemical and imaging assays on the marker proteins of glial and neuronal cells were performed along with their survival profiles in control, stressed and recovered conditions. We found that the extracts and one of the purified components, withanone, when used at a low dose, protected the glial and neuronal cells from oxidative as well as glutamate insult, and induced their differentiation per se. Furthermore, the combinations of extracts and active component were highly potent endorsing the therapeutic merit of the combinational approach.Ashwagandha leaf derived bioactive compounds have neuroprotective potential and may serve as supplement for brain health.

  18. Bioenergetics failure and oxidative stress in brain stem mediates cardiovascular collapse associated with fatal methamphetamine intoxication.

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    Faith C H Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whereas sudden death, most often associated with cardiovascular collapse, occurs in abusers of the psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH, the underlying mechanism is much less understood. The demonstration that successful resuscitation of an arrested heart depends on maintained functionality of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, which is responsible for the maintenance of stable blood pressure, suggests that failure of brain stem cardiovascular regulation, rather than the heart, holds the key to cardiovascular collapse. We tested the hypothesis that cessation of brain stem cardiovascular regulation because of a loss of functionality in RVLM mediated by bioenergetics failure and oxidative stress underlies the cardiovascular collapse elicited by lethal doses of METH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Survival rate, cardiovascular responses and biochemical or morphological changes in RVLM induced by intravenous administration of METH in Sprague-Dawley rats were investigated. High doses of METH induced significant mortality within 20 min that paralleled concomitant the collapse of arterial pressure or heart rate and loss of functionality in RVLM. There were concurrent increases in the concentration of METH in serum and ventrolateral medulla, along with tissue anoxia, cessation of microvascular perfusion and necrotic cell death in RVLM. Furthermore, mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activity or electron transport capacity and ATP production in RVLM were reduced, and mitochondria-derived superoxide anion level was augmented. All those detrimental physiological and biochemical events were reversed on microinjection into RVLM of a mobile electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, coenzyme Q10; a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant and superoxide anion scavenger, Mito-TEMPO; or an oxidative stress-induced necrotic cell death inhibitor, IM-54. CONCLUSION: We conclude that sustained anoxia and cessation of local blood flow

  19. Oxidative stress in the developing brain: effects of postnatal glucocorticoid therapy and antioxidants in the rat.

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    Emily J Camm

    Full Text Available In premature infants, glucocorticoids ameliorate chronic lung disease, but have adverse effects on long-term neurological function. Glucocorticoid excess promotes free radical overproduction. We hypothesised that the adverse effects of postnatal glucocorticoid therapy on the developing brain are secondary to oxidative stress and that antioxidant treatment would diminish unwanted effects. Male rat pups received a clinically-relevant tapering course of dexamethasone (DEX; 0.5, 0.3, and 0.1 mg x kg(-1 x day(-1, with or without antioxidant vitamins C and E (DEXCE; 200 mg x kg(-1 x day(-1 and 100 mg x kg(-1 x day(-1, respectively, on postnatal days 1-6 (P1-6. Controls received saline or saline with vitamins. At weaning, relative to controls, DEX decreased total brain volume (704.4±34.7 mm(3 vs. 564.0±20.0 mm(3, the soma volume of neurons in the CA1 (1172.6±30.4 µm(3 vs. 1002.4±11.8 µm(3 and in the dentate gyrus (525.9±27.2 µm(3 vs. 421.5±24.6 µm(3 of the hippocampus, and induced oxidative stress in the cortex (protein expression: heat shock protein 70 [Hsp70]: +68%; 4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE]: +118% and nitrotyrosine [NT]: +20%. Dexamethasone in combination with vitamins resulted in improvements in total brain volume (637.5±43.1 mm(3, and soma volume of neurons in the CA1 (1157.5±42.4 µm(3 and the dentate gyrus (536.1±27.2 µm(3. Hsp70 protein expression was unaltered in the cortex (+9%, however, 4-HNE (+95% and NT (+24% protein expression remained upregulated. Treatment of neonates with vitamins alone induced oxidative stress in the cortex (Hsp70: +67%; 4-HNE: +73%; NT: +22% and in the hippocampus (NT: +35%. Combined glucocorticoid and antioxidant therapy in premature infants may be safer for the developing brain than glucocorticoids alone in the treatment of chronic lung disease. However, antioxidant therapy in healthy offspring is not recommended.

  20. Acute renal failure potentiates methylmalonate-induced oxidative stress in brain and kidney of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, P F; Alves, L; Pettenuzzo, L F; Felisberto, F; Rodrigues, L B; Freitas, B W; Petronilho, F; Dal-Pizzol, F; Streck, E L; Ferreira, G C

    2013-03-01

    Tissue methylmalonic acid (MMA) accumulation is the biochemical hallmark of methylmalonic acidemia. The disease is clinically characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and kidney failure, whose pathophysiology is still unclear. In the present work we investigated the effects of acute MMA administration on various parameters of oxidative stress in cerebral cortex and kidney of young rats, as well as the influence of acute renal failure on MMA-elicited effects on these parameters. Acute renal failure was induced by gentamicin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic whose utilization over prolonged periods causes nephrotoxicity. The administration of gentamicin alone increased carbonyl content and inhibited superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in cerebral cortex, as well as increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) and sulfhydryl levels and diminished glutathione peroxidase activity in kidney. On the other hand, MMA administration increased TBA-RS levels in cerebral cortex and decreased SOD activity in kidney. Furthermore, the simultaneous administration of MMA and gentamicin to the rats provoked an augment in TBA-RS levels and superoxide generation in cerebral cortex and in TBA-RS, carbonyl and sulfhydryl levels in kidney, while diminished SOD activity in both studied tissues. Finally, nitrate/nitrite content, reduced glutathione levels, 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and catalase activity were not affected by this animal treatment in either tissue. In conclusion, our present data are in line with the hypothesis that MMA acts as a toxin in brain and kidney of rats and suggest that renal injury potentiates the toxicity of MMA on oxidative stress parameters in brain and peripheral tissues.

  1. Investigations of oxidative stress effects and their mechanisms in rat brain after systemic administration of ceria engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardas, Sarita S.

    Advancing applications of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) in various fields create the opportunity for intended (e.g. drug and gene delivery) or unintended (e.g. occupational and environmental) exposure to ENM. However, the knowledge of ENM-toxicity is lagging behind their application development. Understanding the ENM hazard can help us to avoid potential human health problems associated with ENM applications as well as to increase their public acceptance. Ceria (cerium [Ce] oxide) ENM have many current and potential commercial applications. Beyond the traditional use of ceria as an abrasive, the scope of ceria ENM applications now extends into fuel cell manufacturing, diesel fuel additives and for therapeutic intervention as a putative antioxidant. However, the biological effects of ceria ENM exposure have yet to be fully defined. Both pro-and anti-oxidative effects of ceria ENM exposure are repeatedly reported in literature. EPA, NIEHS and OECD organizations have nominated ceria for its toxicological evaluation. All these together gave us the impetus to examine the oxidative stress effects of ceria ENM after systemic administration. Induction of oxidative stress is one of the primary mechanisms of ENM toxicity. Oxidative stress plays an important role in maintaining the redox homeostasis in the biological system. Increased oxidative stress, due to depletion of antioxidant enzymes or molecules and / or due to increased production of reactive oxygen (ROS) or nitrogen (RNS) species may lead to protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and/or DNA damage. Increased protein oxidation or lipid peroxidation together with antioxidant protein levels and activity can serve as markers of oxidative stress. To investigate the oxidative stress effects and the mechanisms of ceria-ENM toxicity, fully characterized ceria ENM of different sizes (˜ 5nm, 15nm, 30nm, 55nm and nanorods) were systematically injected into rats intravenously in separate experiments. Three brain regions

  2. Biochemical characterization of sirtuin 6 in the brain and its involvement in oxidative stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Alessio; de Stefano, Maria Chiara; Mollinari, Cristiana; Racaniello, Mauro; Garaci, Enrico; Merlo, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a member of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase protein family and has been implicated in the control of glucose and lipid metabolism, cancer, genomic stability and DNA repair. Moreover, SIRT6 regulates the expression of a large number of genes involved in stress response and aging. The role of SIRT6 in brain function and neuronal survival is largely unknown. Here, we biochemically characterized SIRT6 in brain tissues and primary neuronal cultures and found that it is highly expressed in cortical and hippocampal regions and enriched in the synaptosomal membrane fraction. Immunoblotting analysis on cortical and hippocampal neurons showed that SIRT6 is downregulated during maturation in vitro, reaching the lowest expression at 11 days in vitro. In addition, SIRT6 overexpression in terminally differentiated cortical and hippocampal neurons, mediated by a neuron-specific recombinant adeno-associated virus, downregulated cell viability under oxidative stress condition. By contrast, under control condition, SIRT6 overexpression had no detrimental effect. Overall these results suggest that SIRT6 may play a role in synaptic function and neuronal maturation and it may be implicated in the regulation of neuronal survival.

  3. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields induce oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikonda, Pavan K; Rajendra, Pilankatta; Devendranath, D; Gunasekaran, B; Channakeshava; Aradhya, Shivakumara R S; Sashidhar, Rao B; Subramanyam, Chivukula

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to understand the influence of long-term exposure of rats to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF), focusing on oxidative stress (OS) on different regions of rat's brain. Male Wistar rats (21-day-old) were exposed to ELF-MF (50 Hz; 50 and 100 µT) for 90 days continuously; hippocampal, cerebellar and cortical regions from rats were analyzed for (i) reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) metabolites indicative of OS and (iii) antioxidant enzymes. In comparison to control group rats, the rats that were continuously exposed to ELF-MF caused OS and altered glutathione (GSH/GSSG) levels in dose-dependent manner in all the regions of the brain. Accumulation of ROS, lipid peroxidation end products and activity of superoxide dismutase in different regions was in the descending order of cerebellum glutathione peroxidase activity were in the descending order of hippocampus 50 µT. Varied influences observed in different regions of the brain, as documented in this study, may contribute to altered metabolic patterns in its related regions of the central nervous system, leading to aberrant neuronal functions.

  4. Neonatal hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in the rat brain: the role of pentose phosphate pathway enzymes and NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Andrea Pereira; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Dias; de Souza, Laila Oliveira; Bitencourt, Fernanda; Mazzola, Priscila Nicolao; Coelho, Juliana Gonzales; Mescka, Caroline Paula; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the consequences of diabetes on the central nervous system (CNS) have received great attention. However, the mechanisms by which hyperglycemia affects the central nervous system remain poorly understood. In addition, recent studies have shown that hyperglycemia induces oxidative damage in the adult rat brain. In this regard, no study has assessed oxidative stress as a possible mechanism that affects the brain normal function in neonatal hyperglycemic rats. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate whether neonatal hyperglycemia elicits oxidative stress in the brain of neonate rats subjected to a streptozotocin-induced neonatal hyperglycemia model (5-day-old rats). The activities of glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD), 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase (6-PGD), NADPH oxidase (Nox), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), the production of superoxide anion, the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), and the protein carbonyl content were measured. Neonatal hyperglycemic rats presented increased activities of G6PD, 6PGD, and Nox, which altogether may be responsible for the enhanced production of superoxide radical anion that was observed. The enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, CAT, and GSHPx) that were observed in neonatal hyperglycemic rats, which may be caused by a rebound effect of oxidative stress, were not able to hinder the observed lipid peroxidation (TBA-RS) and protein damage in the brain. Consequently, these results suggest that oxidative stress could represent a mechanism that explains the harmful effects of neonatal hyperglycemia on the CNS.

  5. Oxidative stress induces the decline of brain EPO expression in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Chen, Yubao; Shao, Siying; Tang, Qing; Chen, Weihai; Chen, Yi; Xu, Xiaoyu

    2016-10-01

    Brain Erythropoietin (EPO), an important neurotrophic factor and neuroprotective factor, was found to be associated with aging. Studies found EPO expression was significantly decreased in the hippocampus of aging rat compared with that of the youth. But mechanisms of the decline of the brain EPO during aging remain unclear. The present study utilized a d-galactose (d-gal)-induced aging model in which the inducement of aging was mainly oxidative injury, to explore underlying mechanisms for the decline of brain EPO in aging rats. d-gal-induced aging rats (2months) were simulated by subcutaneously injecting with d-gal at doses of 50mg·kg(-1), 150mg·kg(-1) and 250mg·kg(-1) daily for 8weeks while the control group received vehicle only. These groups were all compared with the aging rats (24months) which had received no other treatment. The cognitive impairment was assessed using Morris water maze (MWM) in the prepared models, and the amount of β-galactosidase, the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) level and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the hippocampus was examined by assay kits. The levels of EPO, EPOR, p-JAK2 and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) in the hippocampus were detected by western blot. Additionally, the correlation coefficient between EPO/EPOR expression and MDA level was analyzed. The MWM test showed that compared to control group, the escape latency was significantly extended and the times of crossing the platform was decreased at the doses of 150mg·kg(-1) and 250mg·kg(-1) (pEPO, EPOR, p-JAK2, and HIF-2αin the brain of d-gal-treated rats were significantly decreased (pEPO (r=-0.701, pEPO in the hippocampus and oxidative stress might be the main reason for the decline of brain EPO in aging rats, involved with the decrease of HIF-2α stability.

  6. Vitamin C deficiency in weanling guinea pigs: differential expression of oxidative stress and DNA repair in liver and brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Trueba, Gilberto Perez; Poulsen, Henrik E;

    2007-01-01

    Neonates are particularly susceptible to malnutrition due to their limited reserves of micronutrients and their rapid growth. In the present study, we examined the effect of vitamin C deficiency on markers of oxidative stress in plasma, liver and brain of weanling guinea pigs. Vitamin C deficiency...

  7. Prolonging in utero-like oxygenation after birth diminishes oxidative stress in the lung and brain of mice pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Escobar

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Delaying the increase in tissue oxygenation to occur after birth reduces short-and-long-term oxidative stress in the lung. Similar yet more subtle effects were found in the brain. Apparently, the fetal-to-neonatal transition under hypoxic conditions appears to have protective qualities.

  8. Toluene effects on Oxidative Stress in Brain regions of Young-adult, Middleage,and Senescent Brown Norway Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is not well understood. To extend knowledge in this area, we examined effects in rat brain of the volatile organic compound toluene. The objective was to test whether oxidative stress plays a role in the adver...

  9. Protective effects of carbenoxolone are associated with attenuation of oxidative stress in ischemic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lang Zhang; Yu-Min Li; Yu-Hong Jing; Shao-Yu Wang; Yan-Feng Song; Jie Yin

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has suggested that the gap junction plays an important role in the determination of cerebral ischemia,but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated.In this study,we assessed the effect of a gap-junction blocker,carbenoxolone (CBX),on ischemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury and the possible mechanisms.By using the transient cerebral ischemia model induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h,we found that pre-administration of CBX (25 mg/kg,intracerebroventricular injection,30 min before cerebral ischemic surgery) diminished the infarction size in rats.And this was associated with a decrease of reactive oxygen species generation and inhibition of the activation of astrocytes and microglia.In PC12 cells,H202 treatment induced more coupling and apoptosis,while CBX partly inhibited the opening of gap junctions and improved the cell viability.These results suggest that cerebral ischemia enhances the opening of gap junctions.Blocking the gap junction with CBX may attenuate the brain injury after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion by partially contributing to amelioration of the oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  10. Dichlorvos and lindane induced oxidative stress in rat brain: Protective effects of ginger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dichlorvos and lindane pesticide causes toxicity in animals including humans. Ginger (Zingiber officinale is widely used as a culinary medicine in the Ayurvedic system of medicine, possessing a number of pharmacological properties. Objective: This study was designed to assess ameliorating effects of ginger juice in dichlorvos and lindane induced neurotoxicity in wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Dichlorvos (8.8 mg/kg bw and lindane (8.8 mg/kg bw were orally administered alone as well as in combination to adult male and female wistar rats for 14 days followed by the post-treatment of ginger juice (100 mg/kg bw for 14 days. Lipid peroxidation (LPO, reduced glutathione (GSH, and activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione S-transferase (GST, glutathione reductase (GR, quinine reductase (QR, and protein level were measured to evaluate the toxicity of these pesticides in brain. Results: Dichlorvos and lindane administration alone and in combination increased LPO and decreased the GSH level, SOD, CAT, GPx, GST, GR, QR activity, and protein. Oxidative stress due to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS is believed to be involved in the toxicities induced by these pesticides. Post-treatment of ginger juice decreased LPO and increased the level of GSH, SOD, CAT, GPx, GST, GR, QR activity and protein in the brain of rats. Conclusions: The results indicated that dichlorovos and lindane induced tissue damage was ameliorated by ginger juice.

  11. Review of transcranial photobiomodulation for major depressive disorder: targeting brain metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Paolo; Petrie, Samuel R; Hamblin, Michael R; Henderson, Theodore A; Iosifescu, Dan V

    2016-07-01

    We examined the use of near-infrared and red radiation (photobiomodulation, PBM) for treating major depressive disorder (MDD). While still experimental, preliminary data on the use of PBM for brain disorders are promising. PBM is low-cost with potential for wide dissemination; further research on PBM is sorely needed. We found clinical and preclinical studies via PubMed search (2015), using the following keywords: "near-infrared radiation," "NIR," "low-level light therapy," "low-level laser therapy," or "LLLT" plus "depression." We chose clinically focused studies and excluded studies involving near-infrared spectroscopy. In addition, we used PubMed to find articles that examine the link between PBM and relevant biological processes including metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis. Studies suggest the processes aforementioned are potentially effective targets for PBM to treat depression. There is also clinical preliminary evidence suggesting the efficacy of PBM in treating MDD, and comorbid anxiety disorders, suicidal ideation, and traumatic brain injury. Based on the data collected to date, PBM appears to be a promising treatment for depression that is safe and well-tolerated. However, large randomized controlled trials are still needed to establish the safety and effectiveness of this new treatment for MDD.

  12. Evidence of oxidative stress in brain and liver of young rats submitted to experimental galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Márcia B; Ferreira, Bruna K; Cararo, José Henrique; Chipindo, Adália E; Magenis, Marina L; Michels, Monique; Danielski, Lucinéia G; de Oliveira, Marcos R; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L; Petronilho, Fabricia; Schuck, Patrícia F

    2016-12-01

    Galactosemia is a disorder of galactose metabolism, leading to the accumulation of this carbohydrate. Galactosemic patients present brain and liver damage. For evaluated oxidative stress, 30-day-old males Wistar rats were divided into two groups: galactose group, that received a single injection of this carbohydrate (5 μmol/g), and control group, that received saline 0.9 % in the same conditions. One, twelve or twenty-four hours after the administration, animals were euthanized and cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and liver were isolated. After one hour, it was found a significant increase in TBA-RS levels, nitrate and nitrite and protein carbonyl contents in cerebral cortex, as well as protein carbonyl content in the cerebellum and in hepatic level of TBA-RS, and a significant decrease in nitrate and nitrite contents in cerebellum. TBA-RS levels were also found increased in all studied tissues, as well as nitrate and nitrite contents in cerebral cortex and cerebellum, that also present increased protein carbonyl content and impairments in the activity of antioxidant enzymes of rats euthanized at twelve hours. Finally, animals euthanized after twenty-four hours present an increase of TBA-RS levels in studied tissues, as well as the protein carbonyl content in cerebellum and liver. These animals also present an increased nitrate and nitrite content and impairment of antioxidant enzymes activities. Taken together, our data suggest that acute galactose administration impairs redox homeostasis in brain and liver of rats.

  13. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  14. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPases:Targets of oxidative stress in brain aging and neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asma; Zaidi

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase(PMCA)pumps play an important role in the maintenance of precise levels of intracellular Ca2+[Ca2+]i,essential to the functioning of neurons.In this article,we review evidence showing age-related changes of the PMCAs in synaptic plasma membranes(SPMs).PMCA activity and protein levels in SPMs diminish progressively with increasing age. The PMCAs are very sensitive to oxidative stress and undergo functional and structural changes when exposed to oxidants of physiological relevance.The major signatures of oxidative modification in the PMCAs are rapid inactivation,conformational changes,aggregation, internalization from the plasma membrane and proteolytic degradation.PMCA proteolysis appears to be mediated by both calpains and caspases.The predominance of one proteolytic pathway vs the other,the ensuing pattern of PMCA degradation and its consequence on pump activity depends largely on the type of insult,its intensity and duration.Experimental reduction of PMCA expression not only alters the dynamics of cellular Ca2+ handling but also has a myriad of downstream conse-quences on various aspects of cell function,indicating a broad role of these pumps.Age-and oxidation-related down-regulation of the PMCAs may play an important role in compromised neuronal function in the aging brain and its several-fold increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease,and stroke.Therapeutic approaches that protect the PMCAs and stabilize[Ca2+]i homeostasis may be capable of slowing and/or preventing neuronal degeneration.The PMCAs are therefore emerging as a new class of drug targets for therapeutic interventions in various chronic degenerative disorders.

  15. Dexamethasone Treatment Reverses Cognitive Impairment but Increases Brain Oxidative Stress in Rats Submitted to Pneumococcal Meningitis

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    Tatiana Barichello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with a significant mortality rate and neurologic sequelae. The animals received either 10 μL of saline or a S. pneumoniae suspension and were randomized into different groups: sham: placebo with dexamethasone 0.7 mg/kg/1 day; placebo with dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg/7 days; meningitis groups: dexamethasone 0.7 mg/kg/1 day and dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg/7 days. Ten days after induction we evaluated memory and oxidative stress parameters in hippocampus and cortex. In the step-down inhibitory avoidance task, we observed memory impairment in the meningitis group with dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg/7 days. The lipid peroxidation was increased in hippocampus in the meningitis groups with dexamethasone and in cortex only in the meningitis group with dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg/7 days. The protein carbonyl was increased in hippocampus in the meningitis groups with dexamethasone and in cortex in the meningitis groups with and without dexamethasone. There was a decrease in the proteins integrity in hippocampus in all groups receiving treatment with dexamethasone and in cortex in all groups with dexamethasone (0.7 mg/kg/1 day. The mitochondrial superoxide was increased in the hippocampus and cortex in the meningitis group with dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg/7 days. Our findings demonstrate that dexamethasone reverted cognitive impairment but increased brain oxidative stress in hippocampus and cortex in Wistar rats ten days after pneumococcal meningitis induction.

  16. Nanoscale Particulate Matter from Urban Traffic Rapidly Induces Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Olfactory Epithelium with Concomitant Effects on Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hank; Saffari, Arian; Sioutas, Constantinos; Forman, Henry J.; Morgan, Todd E.; Finch, Caleb E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rodent models for urban air pollution show consistent induction of inflammatory responses in major brain regions. However, the initial impact of air pollution particulate material on olfactory gateways has not been reported. Objective: We evaluated the olfactory neuroepithelium (OE) and brain regional responses to a nanosized subfraction of urban traffic ultrafine particulate matter (nPM, < 200 nm) in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. Methods: Adult mice were exposed to reaerosolized nPM for 5, 20, and 45 cumulative hours over 3 weeks. The OE, the olfactory bulb (OB), the cerebral cortex, and the cerebellum were analyzed for oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Acute responses of the OE to liquid nPM suspensions were studied with ex vivo and primary OE cultures. Results: After exposure to nPM, the OE and OB had rapid increases of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) protein adducts, whereas the cerebral cortex and cerebellum did not respond at any time. All brain regions showed increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) protein by 45 hr, with earlier induction of TNFα mRNA in OE and OB. These responses corresponded to in vitro OE and mixed glial responses, with rapid induction of nitrite and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), followed by induction of TNFα. Conclusions: These findings show the differential time course of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses to nPM between the OE and the brain. Slow cumulative transport of inhaled nPM into the brain may contribute to delayed responses of proximal and distal brain regions, with potential input from systemic factors. Citation: Cheng H, Saffari A, Sioutas C, Forman HJ, Morgan TE, Finch CE. 2016. Nanoscale particulate matter from urban traffic rapidly induces oxidative stress and inflammation in olfactory epithelium with concomitant effects on brain. Environ Health Perspect 124:1537–1546; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP134 PMID:27187980

  17. Regular exercise prevents oxidative stress in the brain of hyperphenylalaninemic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzola, Priscila; Terra, Melaine; Rosa, Andrea; Mescka, Caroline; Piccoli, Bruna; Jacques, Carlos; Dalazen, Giovana; Cortes, Marcelo; Coelho, Juliana; Dutra-Filho, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is caused by deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase, leading to accumulation of phenylalanine and its metabolites. Clinical features of PKU patients include mental retardation, microcephaly, and seizures. Oxidative stress has been found in these patients, and is possibly relat

  18. Intermittent hypoxia hypobaric exposure minimized oxidative stress and antioxidants in brain cells of Sprague Dawleymice

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    Wardaya Wardaya

    2013-05-01

    antioxidants in Sprague Dawley male mice.Methods: The experimental study was in February-April 2010 consisted of one control group and four exposed groups of male mice Sprague Dawley. Each groups consisted of 5 mice. The control group did not have IHH. The exposed groups (with an interval of one week had once, twice, three, or four times IHH using a chamber flight. All exposed groups were treated hypobaric equivalent to: 35,000 ft altitude (1 minutes, 25,000 ft (5 minutes, and 18,000 ft (25 minutes. All of their brains had 8-OHdG and SOD measured.Results: The 8-OHdG level among three time IHH exposures had already returned to the control value (P = 0.843. The SOD level increased progressively among two, three, and four times IHH. However after the second exposure, it was found that the SOD level was similar to the control value, 0.231 ± 0.042 (P = 0.191.Conclusion: In conclusion, three times of IHH may improve the effect of hypoxia hypobaric on oxidative stress and specific activity of antioxidants in Sprague Dawley male mice. The SOD level was increased at an earlier exposure, which was after one IHH exposure.Keywords: intermittent hypoxia hypobaric, oxidative stress, antioxidants

  19. Nicotine mediates expression of genes related to antioxidant capacity and oxidative stress response in HIV-1 transgenic rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guohua; Nesil, Tanseli; Cao, Junran; Yang, Zhongli; Chang, Sulie L; Li, Ming D

    2016-02-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the progression of HIV-1 infection. Nicotine can either protect neurons from neurodegeneration or induce oxidative stress, depending on its dose and degree of oxidative stress impairment. However, the relationship between nicotine and oxidative stress in the HIV-1-infected individuals remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of nicotine on expression of genes related to the glutathione (GSH)-centered antioxidant system and oxidative stress in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) of HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) and F344 control rats. Adult HIV-1Tg and F344 rats received nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, base, s.c.) or saline injections once per day for 27 days. At the end of treatment, various brain regions including the NAc and VTA were collected from each rat. Following total RNA extraction and complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis of each sample, quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis was performed for 43 oxidative-stress-related genes. Compared with F344 control rats, HIV-1Tg rats showed a significant downregulation of genes involved in ATPase and cyctochrome oxidase at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level in both regions. Further, we found a significant downregulation of Gstm5 in the NAc and upregulation of Cox1, Cox3, and Gsta6 in the VTA of HIV-1Tg rats. HIV-1Tg rats showed brain-region-specific responses to chronic nicotine treatment. This response resulted in a change in the expression of genes involved in antioxidant mechanisms including the downregulation of genes such as Atp5h, Calml1, Gpx7, Gstm5, Gsr, and Gsta6 and upregulation of Sod1 in the NAc, as well as downregulation of genes like Cox5a, Gpx4, Gpx6, Gpx7, Gstm5, and Sod1 in the VTA of HIV-1Tg rats. Together, we conclude that chronic nicotine treatment has a dual effect on the antioxidant defense system and oxidative-stress-induced apoptosis signaling in HIV-1Tg rats. These findings suggest that

  20. Perspectives on Molecular Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Strategies in Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    André Mendes Arent; Luiz Felipe de Souza; Roger Walz; Alcir Luiz Dafre

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently associated with abnormal blood-brain barrier function, resulting in the release of factors that can be used as molecular biomarkers of TBI, among them GFAP, UCH-L1, S100B, and NSE. Although many experimental studies have been conducted, clinical consolidation of these biomarkers is still needed to increase the predictive power and reduce the poor outcome of TBI. Interestingly, several of these TBI biomarkers are oxidatively modified to carbonyl group...

  1. The Effects of the Melatonin Treatment on the Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Diabetic Eye and Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürpınar, Tuğba; Ekerbiçer, Nuran; Uysal, Nazan; Barut, Turgay; Tarakçı, Figen; Tuglu, M. Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of complications in diabetes mellitus. Antioxidant therapy has been thought to decrease oxidative stress. The objective of the present study was to explore the effects of melatonin (MLT) on oxidative stress in diabetic rat eye and brain tissue by using immunohistochemical methods. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin, (STZ, 55 mg/kg/i.p) in adult rats. MLT was given 10 mg/kg/i.p once a day for 2 weeks beginning from the sixth week. Six weeks later, rats were divided into three groups: control (CR), STZ-induced diabetic (STZ), and STZ-induced diabetic group received melatonin (STZ+MLT). Although no significant difference was observed with respect to antioxidant status, NOS activity tended to be higher in the untreated diabetic rats than in the treated rats. It was observed that MLT treatment improved the histopathological changes including apoptosis and oxidative stress in brain and eye in diabetic rat. PMID:22654617

  2. The Effects of the Melatonin Treatment on the Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Diabetic Eye and Brain

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    Tuğba Gürpınar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of complications in diabetes mellitus. Antioxidant therapy has been thought to decrease oxidative stress. The objective of the present study was to explore the effects of melatonin (MLT on oxidative stress in diabetic rat eye and brain tissue by using immunohistochemical methods. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin, (STZ, 55 mg/kg/i.p in adult rats. MLT was given 10 mg/kg/i.p once a day for 2 weeks beginning from the sixth week. Six weeks later, rats were divided into three groups: control (CR, STZ-induced diabetic (STZ, and STZ-induced diabetic group received melatonin (STZ+MLT. Although no significant difference was observed with respect to antioxidant status, NOS activity tended to be higher in the untreated diabetic rats than in the treated rats. It was observed that MLT treatment improved the histopathological changes including apoptosis and oxidative stress in brain and eye in diabetic rat.

  3. Effects of Lead and Cadmium on Brain Endothelial Cell Survival, Monolayer Permeability, and Crucial Oxidative Stress Markers in an in Vitro Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier

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    Shakila Tobwala

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, which is the loss of balance between antioxidant defense and oxidant production in the cells, is implicated in the molecular mechanism of heavy metal-induced neurotoxicity. Given the key role of lead (Pb and cadmium (Cd in inducing oxidative stress, we investigated their role in disrupting the integrity and function of immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3. To study this, hCMEC/D3 cells were exposed to control media or to media containing different concentrations of Pb or Cd. Those exposed to Pb or Cd showed significantly higher oxidative stress than the untreated group, as indicated by cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS, glutathione (GSH levels, and catalase enzyme activity. Pb also induced oxidative stress-related disruption of the hCMEC/D3 cell monolayer, as measured by trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER, the dextran permeability assay, and the level of tight junction protein, zona occluden protein (ZO-2. However, no significant disruption in the integrity of the endothelial monolayer was seen with cadmium at the concentrations used. Taken together, these results show that Pb and Cd induce cell death and dysfunction in hCMEC/D3 cells and, in the case of Pb, barrier disruption. This suggests blood brain barrier (BBB dysfunction as a contributing mechanism in Pb and Cd neurotoxicities.

  4. Elevation of brain glutathione by gamma-glutamylcysteine ethyl ester protects against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Jennifer; Kanski, Jaroslaw; Varadarajan, Sridhar; Tsoras, Maria; Butterfield, D Allan

    2002-06-15

    Elevation of glutathione (GSH) has been recognized as an important method for modulating levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain. We investigated the antioxidant properties of gamma-glu-cys-ethyl ester (GCEE) in vitro and its ability to increase GSH levels upon in vivo i.p. injection. GCEE displays antioxidant activity similar to GSH as assessed by various in vitro indices such as hydroxyl radical scavenging, dichlorofluorescein fluorescence (DCF), protein specific spin labeling, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and protein carbonyls. Intraperitoneal injection of GCEE to gerbils resulted in a 41% increase in brain total GSH levels in vivo as determined by the DTNB-GSH reductase recycling method. Gerbils injected with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, had 40% less total brain glutathione. Gerbils injected with BSO followed by a GCEE injection had GSH levels similar to vehicle-injected controls, suggesting that GCEE upregulates GSH biosynthesis by providing gamma-glutamylcysteine and not cysteine. Cortical synaptosomes from GCEE-injected animals were less susceptible to peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage as assessed by DCF fluorescence, protein-specific spin labeling, and GS activity. These experiments suggest that GCEE is effective in increasing brain GSH levels and may potentially play an important therapeutic role in attenuating oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases associated with oxidative stress such as Alzheimer disease.

  5. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

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    Valérie Wolff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities, Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities, Vtmpd (complex IV activity, together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0, were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P<0.0001, Vsucc (−65%; P<0.0001, and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P<0.001. Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0 was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P<0.001. Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P<0.05 and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P<0.001. Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient’s vulnerability to stroke.

  6. The Effect of Aging on Mitochondrial Complex I and the Extent of Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarkova, Zuzana; Kovalska, Maria; Timkova, Veronika; Racay, Peter; Lehotsky, Jan; Kaplan, Peter

    2016-08-01

    One of the characteristic features of the aging is dysfunction of mitochondria. Its role in the regulation of metabolism and apoptosis suggests a possible link between these cellular processes. This study investigates the relationship of respiratory complex I with aging-related oxidative stress in the cerebral mitochondria. Deterioration of complex I seen in senescent (26-months old) mitochondria was accompanied by decline in total thiol group content, increase of HNE and HNE-protein adducts as well as decreased content of complex I subunits, GRIM-19 and NDUFV2. On the other hand, decline of complex I might be related with the mitochondrial apoptosis through increased Bax/Bcl-2 cascade in 15-month old animal brains. Higher amount of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL with the lower content of GRIM-19 could maintain to some extent elevated oxidative stress in mitochondria as seen in the senescent group. In the cortical M1 region increased presence of TUNEL+ cells and more than 20-times higher density of Fluoro-Jade C+ cells in 26-months old was observed, suggesting significant neurodegenerative effect of aging in the neuronal cells. Our study supports a scenario in which the age-related decline of complex I might sensitize neurons to the action of death agonists, such as Bax through lipid and protein oxidative stimuli in mitochondria. Although aging is associated with oxidative stress, these changes did not increase progressively with age, as similar extent of lesions was observed in oxidative stress markers of the both aged groups.

  7. BRAIN DAMAGE AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN THE PERINATAL PERIOD: MELATONIN AS A NEUROPROTECTIVE NEW DRUG

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    S. Perrone

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal factors represent the main determinants of hypoxicischemic encephalopathy (HIE rather than intra- or post-partum conditions in perinatal period. Oxidative stress (OS plays a key role in perinatal brain damage. The development of therapeutic strategies to improve the outcomes of babies with HIE is still mandatory. Aim: to evaluate the effectiveness of melatonin as a neuroprotective drug. To investigate the influence of Melatonin on the OS biomarkers production in an animal model of cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. Methods: 30 rat pups were subjected to ligation of the right common carotid artery and exposed for 2.5 hours at an hypoxic condition. A group of 15 rats was administered melatonin at a dose of 15 mg/kg 5 minutes after the procedure (Mel GROUP. At the same time 15 rats received placebo (HI GROUP. A group of 5 healthy rats was used as sham operated (S GROUP. Isoprostanes (IsoPs, neuroprostanes (NPs and neurofurans (NFs, all markers of OS were measured at 1, 24 and 48 h from ischemic injury in homogenized cerebral cortex of the two sides, right (hypoxia and ischemia and left (hypoxia. Results: In the HI group were observed: a significant increase of IsoPs on the left side of cortex after 1 h from HI injury (p<0.001; a significant increase of NPs on both sides after 24 h (p<0.05 and a significant increase of NFs on the left (p<0.05 after 24 h. After 48 h in the Mel group was observed a significant increase of IsoPs on the left (p<0.05 and of NPs on both sides of cerebral cortex (p<0.05. Conclusions: Melatonin reduces OS biomarkers in cerebral cortex of HI rats after 24 h from its administration. The drug is no longer effective after 48 h. These results lay the groundwork for future clinical studies in infants.

  8. The Ayurvedic drug, Ksheerabala, ameliorates quinolinic acid-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathy, S S; Indira, M

    2010-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of neurotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress. There is hardly any cure for neurotoxicity in modern medicine, whereas many drugs in Ayurveda possess neuroprotective effects; however, there is no scientific validation for these drugs. Ksheerabala is an ayurvedic drug which is used to treat central nervous system disorders, arthritis, and insomnia. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of Ksheerabala on quinolinic acid-induced toxicity in rat brain. The optimal dose of Ksheerabala was found from a dose escalation study, wherein it was found that Ksheerabala showed maximum protection against quinolinic acid-induced neurotoxicity at a dose of 15 microL/100 g body weight/day, which was selected for further experiments. Four groups of female albino rats were maintained for 21 days as follows: 1. Control group, 2. Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight), 3. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight), 4. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight) + Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight). At the end of the experimental period, levels of lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonyls, and activities of scavenging enzymes were analyzed. The results revealed that quinolinic acid intake caused enhanced lipid and protein peroxidation as evidenced by increased levels of peroxidation products such as malondialdehyde, hydroperoxide, conjugated dienes, and protein carbonyls. On the other hand, the activities of scavenging enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase as well as the concentration of glutathione were reduced. On coadminstration of Ksheerabala along with quinolinic acid, the levels of all the biochemical parameters were restored to near-normal levels, indicating the protective effect of the drug. These results were reinforced by histopathological studies.

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by oxidative stress in the brains of hamsters infected with the 263 K scrapie agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S I; Ju, W K; Choi, E K; Kim, J; Lea, H Z; Carp, R I; Wisniewski, H M; Kim, Y S

    1998-09-01

    Scrapie, one of the prion diseases, is a transmissible neurodegenerative disease of sheep and other animals. Clinical symptoms of prion diseases are characterized by a long latent period, followed by progressive ataxia, tremor, and death. To study the induction of neurodegeneration during scrapie infection, we have analyzed the activities of various antioxidant enzymes and mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex, brain stem, and cerebellum of scrapie-infected hamsters. The activity of mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) was decreased, while the activities of cytosolic Cu/Zn-SOD and catalase were not altered in infected brains. The activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were increased in scrapie-infected hamsters. The decreased activity of Mn-SOD might result in increasing oxidative stress in the mitochondria of infected brain; this concept is supported by our findings of a high level of lipid peroxidation, and low levels of ATPase and cytochrome c oxidase activity in the infected cerebral mitochondria. In addition, structural abnormalities of mitochondria have been observed in the neurons of hippocampus and cerebral cortex of infected brain. These results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress gives rise to neurodegeneration in prion disease.

  10. EFFECTS OF TOLUENE ON BRAIN OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS IN AGING BROWN NORWAY RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging-related susceptibility to environmental chemicals is poorly understood. Oxidative stress (OS) appears to play an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. The objectives of this study, therefore, were to test whether OS is a potential toxicity pathway for tol...

  11. Making Sense of Oxidative Stress in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Mediator or Distracter in Brain Injury?

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    Jing eZhang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to cognitive impairment, metabolic derangements and cardiovascular disease and mortality. Identifying the mechanisms by which this prevalent disorder influences health outcomes is now of utmost importance. As the prevalence of this disorder steadily increases, therapies are needed to prevent or reverse sleep apnea morbidities now more than ever before. Oxidative stress is implicated in cardiovascular morbidities of sleep apnea. What role oxidative stress plays in neural injury and cognitive impairments has been difficult to understand without readily accessible tissue to biopsy in persons with and without sleep apnea. An improved understanding of the role oxidative stress plays in neural injury in sleep apnea may be developed by integrating information gained examining neural tissue in animal models of sleep apnea with key features of redox biochemistry and clinical sleep apnea studies where extra-neuronal oxidative stress characterizations have been performed. Collectively, this information sets the stage for developing and testing novel therapeutic approaches to treat and prevent, not only central nervous system injury and dysfunction in sleep apnea, but also the cardiovascular and potentially metabolic conditions associated with this prevalent, disabling disorder.

  12. CARBARYL EFFECTS ON OXIDATIVE STRESS IN BRAIN REGIONS OF ADOLESCENT AND SENESCENT BROWN NORWAY RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. Understanding age-related susceptibility is crucial in assessing the human health risks of chemicals. Growing evidence implicates as in carbamate toxicity in addition to cholinesterase-inhibit...

  13. Oxidative Stress and Protein Quality Control Systems in the Aged Canine Brain as a Model for Human Neurodegenerative Disorders

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    Mariarita Romanucci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aged dogs are considered the most suitable spontaneous animal model for studying normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Elderly canines naturally develop cognitive dysfunction and neuropathological hallmarks similar to those seen in humans, especially Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology. Pet dogs also share similar living conditions and diets to humans. Oxidative damage accumulates in the canine brain during aging, making dogs a valid model for translational antioxidant treatment/prevention studies. Evidence suggests the presence of detective protein quality control systems, involving ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs, in the aged canine brain. Further studies on the canine model are needed to clarify the role of age-related changes in UPS activity and HSP expression in neurodegeneration in order to design novel treatment strategies, such as HSP-based therapies, aimed at improving chaperone defences against proteotoxic stress affecting brain during aging.

  14. Effects of chronic haloperidol and/or clozapine on oxidative stress parameters in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinho, Fabiano R; Jornada, Luciano K; Schröder, Nadja; Roesler, Rafael; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João

    2007-08-01

    Decreased antioxidant activity is considered as one of the causes of tardive dyskinesia in schizophrenic patients in a prolonged neuroleptic treatment course. Haloperidol (HAL) has been hypothesized to increase oxidative stress, while clozapine (CLO) would produce less oxidative damage. The objective was to determine whether CLO for 28 days could reverse or attenuate HAL-induced oxidative damage in animals previously treated with HAL for 28 days. HAL significantly increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels in the cortex (CX) and striatum and increased protein carbonyls in hippocampus (HP) and CX and this was not attenuated by CLO treatment. In the total radical trapping antioxidant parameter assay there was a decrease in the HP total antioxidant potential induced by HAL and by treatment with HAL + CLO. Our findings demonstrated that the atypical antipsychotic CLO could not revert oxidative damage caused by HAL.

  15. NITRIC OXIDE (NO, CITRULLINE - NO CYCLE ENZYMES, GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ANOXIA (HYPOBARIC HYPOXIA AND REPERFUSION IN RAT BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Swamy, Mohd Jamsani Mat Salleh, K. N .S. Sirajudeen, Wan Roslina Wan Yusof, G. Chandran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is postulated to be involved in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders due to hypoxia/ anoxia in brain due to increased release of glutamate and activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in pathophysiology of many neurological disorders and in brain function. To understand their role in anoxia (hypobaric hypoxia and reperfusion (reoxygenation, the nitric oxide synthase, argininosuccinate synthetase, argininosuccinate lyase, glutamine synthetase and arginase activities along with the concentration of nitrate /nitrite, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and total antioxidant status were estimated in cerebral cortex, cerebellum and brain stem of rats subjected to anoxia and reperfusion. The results of this study clearly demonstrated the increased production of nitric oxide by increased activity of nitric oxide synthase. The increased activities of argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase suggest the increased and effective recycling of citrulline to arginine in anoxia, making nitric oxide production more effective and contributing to its toxic effects. The decreased activity of glutamine synthetase may favor the prolonged availability of glutamic acid causing excitotoxicity leading to neuronal damage in anoxia. The increased formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and decreased total antioxidant status indicate the presence of oxidative stress in anoxia and reperfusion. The increased arginase and sustained decrease of GS activity in reperfusion group likely to be protective.

  16. An Abnormal Nitric Oxide Metabolism Contributes to Brain Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Model for the Fragile X Syndrome, a Possible Role in Intellectual Disability

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    Elena Lima-Cabello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fragile X syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Although many research has been performed, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear and needs further investigation. Oxidative stress played major roles in the syndrome. The aim was to investigate the nitric oxide metabolism, protein nitration level, the expression of NOS isoforms, and furthermore the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 subunit in different brain areas on the fragile X mouse model. Methods. This study involved adult male Fmr1-knockout and wild-type mice as controls. We detected nitric oxide metabolism and the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κBp65 subunit, comparing the mRNA expression and protein content of the three NOS isoforms in different brain areas. Results. Fmr1-KO mice showed an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism and increased levels of protein tyrosine nitrosylation. Besides that, nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly increased in the Fmr1-knockout mice. mRNA and protein levels of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly decreased in the knockout mice. However, the epithelial nitric oxide synthase isoform displayed no significant changes. Conclusions. These data suggest the potential involvement of an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of the fragile X syndrome.

  17. An Abnormal Nitric Oxide Metabolism Contributes to Brain Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Model for the Fragile X Syndrome, a Possible Role in Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Cabello, Elena; Garcia-Guirado, Francisco; Calvo-Medina, Rocio; el Bekay, Rajaa; Perez-Costillas, Lucia; Quintero-Navarro, Carolina; Sanchez-Salido, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fragile X syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Although many research has been performed, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear and needs further investigation. Oxidative stress played major roles in the syndrome. The aim was to investigate the nitric oxide metabolism, protein nitration level, the expression of NOS isoforms, and furthermore the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 subunit in different brain areas on the fragile X mouse model. Methods. This study involved adult male Fmr1-knockout and wild-type mice as controls. We detected nitric oxide metabolism and the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κBp65 subunit, comparing the mRNA expression and protein content of the three NOS isoforms in different brain areas. Results. Fmr1-KO mice showed an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism and increased levels of protein tyrosine nitrosylation. Besides that, nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly increased in the Fmr1-knockout mice. mRNA and protein levels of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly decreased in the knockout mice. However, the epithelial nitric oxide synthase isoform displayed no significant changes. Conclusions. These data suggest the potential involvement of an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of the fragile X syndrome. PMID:26788253

  18. Toluene effects on oxidative stress in brain regions of young-adult, middle-age, and senescent Brown Norway rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S., E-mail: kodavanti.prasada@epa.gov [Neurotoxicology Branch, Toxicity Assessment Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Royland, Joyce E. [Genetic and Cellular Toxicology Branch, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Richards, Judy E. [Research Core Unit, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Besas, Jonathan; MacPhail, Robert C. [Neurotoxicology Branch, Toxicity Assessment Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is not well understood. To extend knowledge in this area, we examined effects in rat brain of the volatile organic compound, toluene. The objective was to test whether oxidative stress (OS) plays a role in the adverse effects caused by toluene exposure, and if so, if effects are age-dependent. OS parameters were selected to measure the production of reactive oxygen species (NADPH Quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), NADH Ubiquinone reductase (UBIQ-RD)), antioxidant homeostasis (total antioxidant substances (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS), glutathione transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GRD)), and oxidative damage (total aconitase and protein carbonyls). In this study, Brown Norway rats (4, 12, and 24 months) were dosed orally with toluene (0, 0.65 or 1 g/kg) in corn oil. Four hours later, frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, and hippocampus were dissected, quick frozen on dry ice, and stored at - 80 Degree-Sign C until analysis. Some parameters of OS were found to increase with age in select brain regions. Toluene exposure also resulted in increased OS in select brain regions. For example, an increase in NQO1 activity was seen in frontal cortex and cerebellum of 4 and 12 month old rats following toluene exposure, but only in the hippocampus of 24 month old rats. Similarly, age and toluene effects on glutathione enzymes were varied and brain-region specific. Markers of oxidative damage reflected changes in oxidative stress. Total aconitase activity was increased by toluene in frontal cortex and cerebellum at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Protein carbonyls in both brain regions and in all age groups were increased by toluene, but step-down analyses indicated toluene effects were statistically significant only in 12 month old rats. These results indicate changes in OS parameters with age and toluene exposure

  19. Minocycline effects on cerebral edema: relations with inflammatory and oxidative stress markers following traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsi, Shadi; Federico, Fabiola; Croci, Nicole; Palmier, Bruno; Plotkine, Michel; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Jafarian-Tehrani, Mehrnaz

    2009-09-29

    One of the severe complications following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is cerebral edema and its effective treatment is of great interest to prevent further brain damage. This study investigated the effects of minocycline, known for its anti-inflammatory properties, on cerebral edema and its respective inflammatory markers by comparing different dose regimens, on oxidative stress and on neurological dysfunction following TBI. The weight drop model was used to induce TBI in mice. The brain water content was measured to evaluate cerebral edema. Inflammatory markers were detected by ELISA (IL-1beta), zymography and Western blot (MMP-9). The oxidative stress marker (glutathione levels) and neurological function were measured by Griffith technique and string test, respectively. Minocycline was administered i.p. once (5 min), twice (5 min and 3 h) or triple (5 min, 3 h and 9 h) following TBI. The first dose of minocycline only varied (45 or 90 mg/kg), whereas the following doses were all at 45 mg/kg. The single and double administrations of minocycline reduced the increase of inflammatory markers at 6 h post-TBI. Minocycline also reduced cerebral edema at this time point, only after double administration and at the high dose regimen, although with no effect on the TBI-induced oxidized glutathione increase. The anti-edematous effect of minocycline persisted up to 24 h, upon a triple administration, and accompanied by a neurological recovery. In conclusion, we reported an anti-edematous effect of minocycline after TBI in mice according to a specific treatment regimen. These findings emphasize that the beneficial effects of minocycline depend on the treatment regimen following a brain injury.

  20. Interplay between pro-inflammatory cytokines and brain oxidative stress biomarkers: evidence of parallels between butyl paraben intoxication and the valproic acid brain physiopathology in autism rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Hoda G; Ali, Elham H A; Elgoly, Amany H Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    Butyl paraben is a preservative used in food, drugs and cosmetics. Neurotoxic effect was reported recently beside the potential estrogenic activity of parabens. There is controversy as to the potential harmful effects of butyl parabens, which are suspected to contribute to autism and learning disabilities. The purpose of this study was to examine the similarities between paraben intoxication signs in the rat brain and brain markers in an autistic like rat model. This study provides evidence of many parallels between the two, including (1) oxidative stress, (2) decreased reduced glutathione levels and elevated oxidised glutathione, (3) mitochondrial dysfunction, and (4) neuroinflammation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the brain (tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1-beta, and interleukin-6). (5) Increased protein oxidation reported by a significant increase in 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT)/tyrosine ratio. (6) A marked disturbance was found in the production of energy carriers (AMP, ATP and AMP/ATP ratio) in comparison with the control. The evidence suggests that paraben may, to some extent, either cause or contribute to the brain physiopathology in ASDs or pathogens that produce the brain pathology observed in the diagnosed rat model of ASD.

  1. Protective effect of arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced oxidative stress in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahua; Manna, Prasenjit; Sil, Parames C

    2008-02-01

    Arsenic, a notoriously poisonous metalloid, is ubiquitous in the environment, and it affects nearly all organ systems of animals including humans. The present study was designed to investigate the preventive role of a triterpenoid saponin, arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced oxidative damage in murine brain. Sodium arsenite was selected as a source of arsenic for this study. The free-radical-scavenging activity and the in vivo antioxidant power of arjunolic acid were determined from its 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay, respectively. Oral administration of sodium arsenite at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days significantly decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase, the level of cellular metabolites, reduced glutathione, total thiols and increased the level of oxidized glutathione. In addition, it enhanced the levels of lipid peroxidation end products and protein carbonyl content. Treatment with arjunolic acid at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for 4 days prior to arsenic administration almost normalized above indices. Histological findings due to arsenic intoxication and arjunolic acid treatment supported the other biochemical changes in murine brains. Results of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assays clearly showed the in vitro radical scavenging as well as the in vivo antioxidant power of arjunolic acid, respectively. The effect of a well-established antioxidant, vitamin C, has been included in the study as a positive control. Combining all, results suggest that arjunolic acid possessed the ability to ameliorate arsenic-induced oxidative insult in murine brain and is probably due to its antioxidant activity.

  2. Oxidative stress, aging, and central nervous system disease in the canine model of human brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Elizabeth; Rofina, Jaime; Zicker, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Decline in cognitive functions that accompany aging in dogs may have a biologic basis, and many of the disorders associated with aging in dogs may be mitigated through dietary modifications that incorporate specific nutraceuticals. Based on previous research and the results of laboratory and clinical studies, antioxidants may be one class of nutraceutical that provides benefits to aged dogs. Brains of aged dogs accumulate oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, which may lead to dysfunction of neuronal cells. The production of free radicals and lack of increase in compensatory antioxidant enzymes may lead to detrimental modifications to important macromolecules within neurons. Reducing oxidative damage through food ingredients rich in a broad spectrum of antioxidants significantly improves, or slows the decline of, learning and memory in aged dogs.

  3. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on sperm function, oxidative stress and membrane integrity in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, A; Amidi, F; Sedighi Gilani, M A; Moawad, A R; Asadi, E; Khanlarkhni, N; Fallah, P; Rezaiian, Z; Sobhani, A

    2017-03-01

    Oxidative stress has negative impacts on the clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction techniques. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes the viability of nerve cells and is known to decrease oxidative stress and apoptosis in different cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of BDNF treatment on human sperm functions that are known to be essential for fertilisation. Our findings showed that treatment of human spermatozoa with 0.133 nM BDNF significantly increased the percentages of both total (P = 0.001) and progressive (P sperm cells compared to those observed in the nontreated (control) group. We also showed that the mean fluorescence intensity of DCFH-DA, as an indicator of intracellular reactive oxygen species, was significantly lower (P sperm cells (P sperm cells compared to the control (P = 0.001). In conclusion, BDNF has protective effects against oxidative stress in spermatozoa and could improve sperm functions that are essential for sperm-egg fusion and subsequent fertilisation.

  4. Cyclosporine Treatment Reduces Oxygen Free Radical Generation and Oxidative Stress in the Brain of Hypoxia-Reoxygenated Newborn Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang-Qin; Chaudhary, Hetal; Brocks, Dion R.; Bigam, David L.; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It has previously been shown in traumatic brain injury animal models that treatment with cyclosporine reduces brain injury. However, the potential neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine in asphyxiated neonates has yet to be fully studied. Using an acute newborn swine model of hypoxia-reoxygenation, we evaluated the effects of cyclosporine on the brain, focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and markers of oxidative stress. Piglets (1–4 d, 1.4–2.5 kg) were block-randomized into three hypoxia-reoxygenation experimental groups (2 h hypoxia followed by 4 h reoxygenation)(n = 8/group). At 5 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. saline (placebo, controls) or cyclosporine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg i.v. bolus) in a blinded-randomized fashion. An additional sham-operated group (n = 4) underwent no hypoxia-reoxygenation. Systemic hemodynamics, carotid arterial blood flow (transit-time ultrasonic probe), cerebral cortical H2O2 production (electrochemical sensor), cerebral tissue glutathione (ELISA) and cytosolic cytochrome-c (western blot) levels were examined. Hypoxic piglets had cardiogenic shock (cardiac output 40–48% of baseline), hypotension (mean arterial pressure 27–31 mmHg) and acidosis (pH 7.04) at the end of 2 h of hypoxia. Post-resuscitation cyclosporine treatment, particularly the higher dose (10 mg/kg), significantly attenuated the increase in cortical H2O2 concentration during reoxygenation, and was associated with lower cerebral oxidized glutathione levels. Furthermore, cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated the increase in cortical cytochrome-c and lactate levels. Carotid blood arterial flow was similar among groups during reoxygenation. Conclusively, post-resuscitation administration of cyclosporine significantly attenuates H2O2 production and minimizes oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia

  5. Cyclosporine treatment reduces oxygen free radical generation and oxidative stress in the brain of hypoxia-reoxygenated newborn piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richdeep S Gill

    Full Text Available Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It has previously been shown in traumatic brain injury animal models that treatment with cyclosporine reduces brain injury. However, the potential neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine in asphyxiated neonates has yet to be fully studied. Using an acute newborn swine model of hypoxia-reoxygenation, we evaluated the effects of cyclosporine on the brain, focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 production and markers of oxidative stress. Piglets (1-4 d, 1.4-2.5 kg were block-randomized into three hypoxia-reoxygenation experimental groups (2 h hypoxia followed by 4 h reoxygenation (n = 8/group. At 5 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. saline (placebo, controls or cyclosporine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg i.v. bolus in a blinded-randomized fashion. An additional sham-operated group (n = 4 underwent no hypoxia-reoxygenation. Systemic hemodynamics, carotid arterial blood flow (transit-time ultrasonic probe, cerebral cortical H(2O(2 production (electrochemical sensor, cerebral tissue glutathione (ELISA and cytosolic cytochrome-c (western blot levels were examined. Hypoxic piglets had cardiogenic shock (cardiac output 40-48% of baseline, hypotension (mean arterial pressure 27-31 mmHg and acidosis (pH 7.04 at the end of 2 h of hypoxia. Post-resuscitation cyclosporine treatment, particularly the higher dose (10 mg/kg, significantly attenuated the increase in cortical H(2O(2 concentration during reoxygenation, and was associated with lower cerebral oxidized glutathione levels. Furthermore, cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated the increase in cortical cytochrome-c and lactate levels. Carotid blood arterial flow was similar among groups during reoxygenation. Conclusively, post-resuscitation administration of cyclosporine significantly attenuates H(2O(2 production and minimizes oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia-reoxygenation.

  6. Antioxidant treatment ameliorates experimental diabetes-induced depressive-like behaviour and reduces oxidative stress in brain and pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; Abelaira, Helena M; Titus, Stephanie E; Carlessi, Anelise S; Matias, Beatriz I; Bruchchen, Livia; Florentino, Drielly; Vieira, Andriele; Petronilho, Fabricia; Ceretta, Luciane B; Zugno, Alexandra I; Quevedo, João

    2016-03-01

    Studies have shown a relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and the development of major depressive disorder. Alterations in oxidative stress are associated with the pathophysiology of both diabetes mellitus and major depressive disorder. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine on behaviour and oxidative stress parameters in diabetic rats. To this aim, after induction of diabetes by a single dose of alloxan, Wistar rats were treated with N-acetylcysteine or deferoxamine for 14 days, and then depressive-like behaviour was evaluated. Oxidative stress parameters were assessed in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens and pancreas. Diabetic rats displayed depressive-like behaviour, and treatment with N-acetylcysteine reversed this alteration. Carbonyl protein levels were increased in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and pancreas of diabetic rats, and both N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine reversed these alterations. Lipid damage was increased in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and pancreas; however, treatment with N-acetylcysteine or deferoxamine reversed lipid damage only in the hippocampus and pancreas. Superoxide dismutase activity was decreased in the amygdala, nucleus accumbens and pancreas of diabetic rats. In diabetic rats, there was a decrease in catalase enzyme activity in the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, nucleus accumbens and pancreas, but an increase in the hippocampus. Treatment with antioxidants did not have an effect on the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, animal model of diabetes produced depressive-like behaviour and oxidative stress in the brain and periphery. Treatment with antioxidants could be a viable alternative to treat behavioural and biochemical alterations induced by diabetes.

  7. Combination of omega-3 Fatty acids, lithium, and aripiprazole reduces oxidative stress in brain of mice with mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunagiri, Pandiyan; Rajeshwaran, Krishnamoorthy; Shanthakumar, Janakiraman; Tamilselvan, Thangavel; Balamurugan, Elumalai

    2014-09-01

    Manic episode in bipolar disorder (BD) was evaluated in the present study with supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in combination with aripiprazole and lithium on methylphenidate (MPD)-induced manic mice model. Administration of MPD 5 mg/kg bw intraperitoneally (i.p.) caused increase in oxidative stress in mice brain. To retract this effect, supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids 1.5 ml/kg (p.o.), aripiprazole 1.5 mg/kg bw (i.p.), and lithium 50 mg/kg bw (p.o) were given to mice. Omega-3 fatty acids alone and in combination with aripiprazole- and lithium-treated groups significantly reduced the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and lipid peroxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) in the brain. MPD treatment significantly decreased the reduced glutathione (GSH) level and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and they were restored by supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids with aripiprazole and lithium. There is no remarkable difference in the effect of creatine kinase (CK) activity between MPD-induced manic model and the treatment groups. Therefore, our results demonstrate that oxidative stress imbalance and mild insignificant CK alterations induced by administration of MPD can be restored back to normal physiological levels through omega-3 fatty acids combined with lithium and aripiprazole that attributes to effective prevention against mania in adult male Swiss albino mice.

  8. Carbonated soft drinks induce oxidative stress and alter the expression of certain genes in the brains of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Terras, Adel; Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Alkhedaide, Adel; Attia, Hossam Fouad; Alharthy, Abdullah; Banaja, Abdel Elah

    2016-04-01

    In Saudi Arabia, the consumption of carbonated soft drinks is common and often occurs with each meal. Carbonated soft drink consumption has been shown to exhibit effects on the liver, kidney and bone. However, the effects of these soft drinks on brain activity have not been widely examined, particularly at the gene level. Therefore, the current study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the effects of chronic carbonated soft drink consumption on oxidative stress, brain gene biomarkers associated with aggression and brain histology. In total, 40 male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Group 1 served as a control and was provided access to food and water ad libitum; and groups 2‑4 were given free access to food and carbonated soft drinks only (Cola for group 2, Pepsi for group 3 and 7‑UP for group 4). Animals were maintained on these diets for 3 consecutive months. Upon completion of the experimental period, animals were sacrificed and serological and histopathological analyses were performed on blood and tissues samples. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze alterations in gene expression levels. Results revealed that carbonated soft drinks increased the serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA). Carbonated soft drinks were also observed to downregulate the expression of antioxidants glutathione reductase (GR), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the brain when compared with that in the control rats. Rats administered carbonated soft drinks also exhibited decreased monoamine oxidase A (MAO‑A) and acetylcholine esterase (AChE) serum and mRNA levels in the brain. In addition, soft drink consumption upregulated mRNA expression of dopamine D2 receptor (DD2R), while 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5‑HTT) expression was decreased. However, following histological examination, all rats had a normal brain structure. The results of this study demonstrated that that carbonated soft drinks induced oxidative stress and

  9. Role of aqueous extract of Cynodon dactylon in prevention of carbofuran- induced oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase inhibition in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, D K; Sharma, R K; Rai, P K; Watal, G; Sharma, B

    2011-02-12

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorating effect of aqueous extract of C. dactylon on carbofuran induced oxidative stress (OS) and alterations in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the brain of rats. Vitamin C was used as a positive control. Wistar rats were administered with single sub-acute oral dose (1.6 mgkg-1 b.wt.) of carbofuran for 24 h. The OS parameters such as lipid peroxidation (LPO) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes including super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and that of AChE were studied in brain. Carbofuran treatment significantly increased the activities of SOD and CAT by 75 and 60%, respectively. It also induced the level of LPO by 113%. In contrast, the activities of GST and AChE were recorded to be diminished by 25 and 33%, respectively. Pretreatment of the rats with aqueous extract of C. dactylon (oral; 500mgkg-1) restored SOD activity completely but CAT activity only partially (7%). Carbofuran induced LPO was moderated by 95% in the brain of C. dactylon treated rats. The observed changes in OS parameters in C. dactylon treated group were comparable to that observed in vitamin C (200 mg-kg-1 b. wt.) treated group. Surprisingly, C. dactylon treatment significantly recovered the activity of AChE to a similar level as observed in the brain of control group. In contrast vitamin C treatment did not cause significant change in the activity of AChE in carbofuran treated group. There were no noticeable changes in the aforementioned study parameters in the brain of rats receiving C. dactylon and vitamin C, only. The results suggest that the study is extremely important in the context of development of new anticholinestesterase and antioxidant antidotes against carbofuran from C. dactylon.

  10. Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase in brain: Does oxidative stress influence the 24-hydroxycholesterol esterification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marca, Valeria; Maresca, Bernardetta; Spagnuolo, Maria Stefania; Cigliano, Luisa; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Di Iorio, Giuseppe; Abrescia, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    24-Hydroxycholesterol (24OH-C) is esterified by the enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We report here that the level of 24OH-C esters was lower in CSF of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis than in healthy subjects (54% vs 68% of total 24OH-C, p=0.0005; n=8). Similarly, the level of 24OH-C esters in plasma was lower in patients than in controls (62% vs 77% of total 24OH-C; p=0.0076). The enzyme amount in CSF, as measured by densitometry of the protein band revealed by immunoblotting, was about 4-fold higher in patients than in controls (p=0.0085). As differences in the concentration of the LCAT stimulator Apolipoprotein E were not found, we hypothesized that the reduced 24OH-C esterification in CSF of patients might depend on oxidative stress. We actually found that oxidative stress reduced LCAT activity in vitro, and 24OH-C effectively stimulated the enzyme secretion from astrocytoma cells in culture. Enhanced LCAT secretion from astrocytes might represent an adaptive response to the increase of non-esterified 24OH-C percentage, aimed to avoid the accumulation of this neurotoxic compound. The low degree of 24OH-C esterification in CSF or plasma might reflect reduced activity of LCAT during neurodegeneration.

  11. Effect of N-acetylcysteine, allopurinol and vitamin E on jaundice-induced brain oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgos, Nikolaos; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Chroni, Elisabeth; Konstantinou, Dimitris; Assimakopoulos, Stelios F; Georgiou, Christos

    2006-09-21

    We examined the possible protective effect of certain antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine, allopurinol and vitamin E) against the oxidative stress of brain tissue induced by experimental obstructive jaundice in rats. Thirty-six male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups; group I control, group II sham operated, group III bile duct ligated and groups IV, V, and VI in which the rats, after bile duct ligation, were given every day an intraperitoneal injection with N-acetylcysteine, allopurinol and Vit-E respectively. All rats were sacrificed on the tenth day by exsanguination and the oxidative state in samples from cortex, midbrain and cerebellum was assessed by measuring the thiol redox state and lipid peroxidation quantified by MDA measurements. The main finding was that all three antioxidants decrease lipid peroxidation in the three brain areas. Cysteine levels increased and protein thiol levels were reserved only in the group treated with N-acetylcysteine, whereas oxidized glutathione increased dramatically in the group treated with allopurinol, suggesting that each antioxidant agent had a certain influence profile on the different antioxidant defense systems. The observed effects of the antioxidants in this experimental model could also provide insight into some aspects of jaundice-induced hepatic encephalopathy in humans.

  12. Citicoline protects brain against closed head injury in rats through suppressing oxidative stress and calpain over-activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ke; Gu, Yi; Zhao, Yumei; Li, Zhenzong; Sun, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Citicoline, a natural compound that functions as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cell membrane phospholipids, is essential for membrane integrity and repair. It has been reported to protect brain against trauma. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of citicoline on closed head injury (CHI) in rats. Citicoline (250 mg/kg i.v. 30 min and 4 h after CHI) lessened body weight loss, and improved neurological functions significantly at 7 days after CHI. It markedly lowered brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability, enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and the levels of glutathione, reduced the levels of malondialdehyde and lactic acid. Moreover, citicoline suppressed the activities of calpain, and enhanced the levels of calpastatin, myelin basic protein and αII-spectrin in traumatic tissue 24 h after CHI. Also, it attenuated the axonal and myelin sheath damage in corpus callosum and the neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields 7 days after CHI. These data demonstrate the protection of citicoline against white matter and grey matter damage due to CHI through suppressing oxidative stress and calpain over-activation, providing additional support to the application of citicoline for the treatment of traumatic brain injury.

  13. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction induced by isoniazid: study on isolated rat liver and brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadpour, Morteza; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza; Mashayekhi, Vida; Haj Mohammad Ebrahim Tehrani, Kamaleddin; Jafarian, Iman; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH or isonicotinic hydrazide) is used for the treatment and prophylaxis of tuberculosis. Liver and brain are two important target organs in INH toxicity. However, the exact mechanisms behind the INH hepatotoxicity or neurotoxicity have not yet been completely understood. Considering the mitochondria as one of the possible molecular targets for INH toxicity, the aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms of INH mitochondrial toxicity on isolated mitochondria. Mitochondria were isolated by differential ultracentrifugation from male Sprague-Dawley rats and incubated with different concentrations of INH (25-2000 μM) for the investigation of mitochondrial parameters. The results indicated that INH could interact with mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibit its activity. Our results showed an elevation in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial membrane potential collapse after exposure of isolated liver mitochondria in INH. However, different results were obtained in brain mitochondria. Noteworthy, significant glutathione oxidation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion and lipid peroxidation were observed in higher concentration of INH, as compared to liver mitochondria. In conclusion, our results suggest that INH may initiate its toxicity in liver mitochondria through interaction with electron transfer chain, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane potential decline and cytochrome c expulsion which ultimately lead to cell death signaling.

  14. Protective effects of organoselenium compounds against methylmercury-induced oxidative stress in mouse brain mitochondrial-enriched fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F. Meinerz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the potential neuroprotective effect of 1-100 µM of four organoselenium compounds: diphenyl diselenide, 3’3-ditri-fluoromethyldiphenyl diselenide, p-methoxy-diphenyl diselenide, and p-chloro-diphenyl diselenide, against methylmercury-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in mitochondrial-enriched fractions from adult Swiss mouse brain. Methylmercury (10-100 µM significantly decreased mitochondrial activity, assessed by MTT reduction assay, in a dose-dependent manner, which occurred in parallel with increased glutathione oxidation, hydroperoxide formation (xylenol orange assay and lipid peroxidation end-products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS. The co-incubation with diphenyl diselenide (100 µM completely prevented the disruption of mitochondrial activity as well as the increase in TBARS levels caused by methylmercury. The compound 3’3-ditrifluoromethyldiphenyl diselenide provided a partial but significant protection against methylmercury-induced mitochondrial dysfunction (45.4 ± 5.8% inhibition of the methylmercury effect. Diphenyl diselenide showed a higher thiol peroxidase activity compared to the other three compounds. Catalase blocked methylmercury-induced TBARS, pointing to hydrogen peroxide as a vector during methylmercury toxicity in this model. This result also suggests that thiol peroxidase activity of organoselenium compounds accounts for their protective actions against methylmercury-induced oxidative stress. Our results show that diphenyl diselenide and potentially other organoselenium compounds may represent important molecules in the search for an improved therapy against the deleterious effects of methylmercury as well as other mercury compounds.

  15. Protection against 1,2-di-methylhydrazine-induced systemic oxidative stress and altered brain neurotransmitter status by probiotic Escherichia coli CFR 16 secreting pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sumeet; Singh, Ashish; Chaudhari, Nirja; Nampoothiri, Laxmipriya P; Kumar, G Naresh

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutant 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) is attributed to systemic oxidative stress and is known to cause neurotropic effect by altering brain neurotransmitter status. Probiotics are opted as natural therapeutic against oxidative stress and also have the ability to modulate gut-brain axis. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is water-soluble, heat-stable antioxidant molecule. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant efficacy of PQQ-producing probiotic E. coli CFR 16 on DMH-induced systemic oxidative damage and altered neurotransmitter status in rat brain. Adult virgin Charles Forster rats (200-250 g) were given DMH dose (25 mg/kg body weight, s.c.) for 8 weeks. Blood lipid peroxidation levels exhibited a marked increase while antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase were found to be reduced in DMH-treated rats. Likewise, brain serotonin and norepinephrine levels displayed a significant decrease, whereas epinephrine levels demonstrated a marked increase in brain of these rats. PQQ-producing E. coli CFR 16 supplementation reduced systemic oxidative stress and also restored brain neurotransmitter status. However, E. coli CFR 16 did not show any effect on these parameters. In contrast, E. coli CFR 16:: vgb-gfp and E. coli CFR 16:: vgb-gfp vector exhibited some degree of protection again oxidative stress but they were not able to modulate neurotransmitter levels. In conclusion, continuous and sustained release of PQQ by probiotic E. coli in rat intestine ameliorates systemic oxidative stress and restored brain neurotransmitter levels.

  16. Hydroalcoholic seed extract of Coriandrum sativum (Coriander) alleviates lead-induced oxidative stress in different regions of rat brain.

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    Velaga, Manoj Kumar; Yallapragada, Prabhakara Rao; Williams, Dale; Rajanna, Sharada; Bettaiya, Rajanna

    2014-06-01

    Lead exposure is known to cause apoptotic neurodegeneration and neurobehavioral abnormalities in developing and adult brain by impairing cognition and memory. Coriandrum sativum is an herb belonging to Umbelliferae and is reported to have a protective effect against lead toxicity. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to evaluate the protective activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of C. sativum seed against lead-induced oxidative stress. Male Wistar strain rats (100-120 g) were divided into four groups: control group: 1,000 mg/L of sodium acetate; exposed group: 1,000 mg/L lead acetate for 4 weeks; C. sativum treated 1 (CST1) group: 250 mg/kg body weight/day for seven consecutive days after 4 weeks of lead exposure; C. sativum treated 2 (CST2) group: 500 mg/kg body weight/day for seven consecutive days after 4 weeks of lead exposure. After the exposure and treatment periods, rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation, and the whole brain was immediately isolated and separated into four regions: cerebellum, hippocampus, frontal cortex, and brain stem along with the control group. After sacrifice, blood was immediately collected into heparinized vials and stored at 4 °C. In all the tissues, reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation products (LPP), and total protein carbonyl content (TPCC) were estimated following standard protocols. An indicator enzyme for lead toxicity namely delta-amino levulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) activity was determined in the blood. A significant (psativum resulted in a tissue-specific amelioration of oxidative stress produced by lead.

  17. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Oxidative Stress in Guinea Pig after Systemic Exposure to Modified Cell-Free Hemoglobin

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    Butt, Omer I.; Buehler, Paul W.; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Systemic exposure to cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) or its breakdown products after hemolysis or with the use of Hb-based oxygen therapeutics may alter the function and integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Using a guinea pig exchange transfusion model, we investigated the effect of a polymerized cell-free Hb (HbG) on the expression of endothelial tight junction proteins (zonula occludens 1, claudin-5, and occludin), astrocyte activation, IgG extravasation, heme oxygenase (HO), iron deposition, oxidative end products (4-hydroxynonenal adducts and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3). Reduced zonula occludens 1 expression was observed after HbG transfusion as evidenced by Western blot and confocal microscopy. Claudin-5 distribution was altered in small- to medium-sized vessels. However, total expression of claudin-5 and occludin remained unchanged except for a notable increase in occludin 72 hours after HbG transfusion. HbG-transfused animals also showed increased astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and IgG extravasation after 72 hours. Increased HO activity and HO-1 expression with prominent enhancement of HO-1 immunoreactivity in CD163-expressing perivascular cells and infiltrating monocytes/macrophages were also observed. Consistent with oxidative stress, HbG increased iron deposition, 4-hydroxynonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine immunoreactivity, and cleaved caspase-3 expression. Systemic exposure to an extracellular Hb triggers blood-brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress, which may have important implications for the use of Hb-based therapeutics and may provide indirect insight on the central nervous system vasculopathies associated with excessive hemolysis. PMID:21356382

  18. Neurobehavioural Changes and Brain Oxidative Stress Induced by Acute Exposure to GSM900 Mobile Phone Radiations in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

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    Nirwane, Abhijit; Sridhar, Vinay; Majumdar, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    The impact of mobile phone (MP) radiation on the brain is of specific interest to the scientific community and warrants investigations, as MP is held close to the head. Studies on humans and rodents revealed hazards MP radiation associated such as brain tumors, impairment in cognition, hearing etc. Melatonin (MT) is an important modulator of CNS functioning and is a neural antioxidant hormone. Zebrafish has emerged as a popular model organism for CNS studies. Herein, we evaluated the impact of GSM900MP (GSM900MP) radiation exposure daily for 1 hr for 14 days with the SAR of 1.34W/Kg on neurobehavioral and oxidative stress parameters in zebrafish. Our study revealed that, GSM900MP radiation exposure, significantly decreased time spent near social stimulus zone and increased total distance travelled, in social interaction test. In the novel tank dive test, the GSM900MP radiation exposure elicited anxiety as revealed by significantly increased time spent in bottom half; freezing bouts and duration and decreased distance travelled, average velocity, and number of entries to upper half of the tank. Exposed zebrafish spent less time in the novel arm of the Y-Maze, corroborating significant impairment in learning as compared to the control group. Exposure decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) activities whereas, increased levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) was encountered showing compromised antioxidant defense. Treatment with MT significantly reversed the above neurobehavioral and oxidative derangements induced by GSM900MP radiation exposure. This study traced GSM900MP radiation exposure induced neurobehavioral aberrations and alterations in brain oxidative status. Furthermore, MT proved to be a promising therapeutic candidate in ameliorating such outcomes in zebrafish. PMID:27123163

  19. Oxidative Stress in BPH

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    Murat Savas

    2009-01-01

    The present study has shown that there were not relationship between potency of oxidative stress and BPH. Further well designed studies should be planned to find out whether the oxidative stress-related parameters play role in BPH as an interesting pathology in regard of the etiopathogenesis. Keywords: benign prostatic hyperplasia, oxidative stress, prostate

  20. Silica nanoparticles mediated neuronal cell death in corpus striatum of rat brain: implication of mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Arshiya; Rizvi, Syed Husain Mustafa; Mahdi, Farzana; Tripathi, Sandeep; Ahmad, Iqbal; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Khanna, Vinay K.; Singh, Ranjana; Patel, Devendra K.; Mahdi, Abbas Ali

    2014-11-01

    Extensive uses of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) in biomedical and industrial fields have increased the risk of exposure, resulting concerns about their safety. We focussed on some of the safety aspects by studying neurobehavioural impairment, oxidative stress (OS), neurochemical and ultrastructural changes in corpus striatum (CS) of male Wistar rats exposed to 80-nm SiNPs. Moreover, its role in inducing mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated neuronal apoptosis was also investigated. The results demonstrated impairment in neurobehavioural indices, and a significant increase in lipid peroxide levels (LPO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide (O2 -) and protein carbonyl content, whereas there was a significant decrease in the activities of the enzymes, manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) content, suggesting impaired antioxidant defence system. Protein (cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, p53, caspase-3, caspase 12 and CHOP/Gadd153) and mRNA (Bcl-2, Bax, p53 and CHOP/Gadd153, cytochrome c) expression studies of mitochondrial and ER stress-related apoptotic factors suggested that both the cell organelles were involved in OS-mediated apoptosis in treated rat brain CS. Moreover, electron microscopic studies clearly showed mitochondrial and ER dysfunction. In conclusion, the result of the study suggested that subchronic SiNPs' exposure has the potential to alter the behavioural activity and also to bring about changes in biochemical, neurochemical and ultrastructural profiles in CS region of rat brain. Furthermore, we also report SiNPs-induced apoptosis in CS, through mitochondrial and ER stress-mediated signalling.

  1. Neuroprotective effects of sevoflurane against electromagnetic pulse-induced brain injury through inhibition of neuronal oxidative stress and apoptosis.

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    Bin Deng

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic pulse (EMP causes central nervous system damage and neurobehavioral disorders, and sevoflurane protects the brain from ischemic injury. We investigated the effects of sevoflurane on EMP-induced brain injury. Rats were exposed to EMP and immediately treated with sevoflurane. The protective effects of sevoflurane were assessed by Nissl staining, Fluoro-Jade C staining and electron microscopy. The neurobehavioral effects were assessed using the open-field test and the Morris water maze. Finally, primary cerebral cortical neurons were exposed to EMP and incubated with different concentration of sevoflurane. The cellular viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, superoxide dismutase (SOD activity and malondialdehyde (MDA level were assayed. TUNEL staining was performed, and the expression of apoptotic markers was determined. The cerebral cortexes of EMP-exposed rats presented neuronal abnormalities. Sevoflurane alleviated these effects, as well as the learning and memory deficits caused by EMP exposure. In vitro, cell viability was reduced and LDH release was increased after EMP exposure; treatment with sevoflurane ameliorated these effects. Additionally, sevoflurane increased SOD activity, decreased MDA levels and alleviated neuronal apoptosis by regulating the expression of cleaved caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2. These findings demonstrate that Sevoflurane conferred neuroprotective effects against EMP radiation-induced brain damage by inhibiting neuronal oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  2. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

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    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  3. Protective effects of Petroselinum crispum (Mill) Nyman ex A. W. Hill leaf extract on D-galactose-induced oxidative stress in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Shreya R; Patil, Rahul B; Pillai, Meena M

    2009-05-01

    With an aim to examine the effect of ethanolic extract of P. crispum (Parsley) leaves on the D-galactose-induced oxidative stress in the brain of mouse, the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) involved in oxygen radical (OR)-detoxification and antiperoxidative defense were measured in conjunction with an index of lipid peroxidation in mitochondrial fraction of various regions of the mouse brain. A significant decrease in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity was observed in D-galactose-stressed mice, while catalase activity was increased. Treatment of D-galactose-stressed mice with the ethanolic extract of P. crispum showed protection against the induced oxidative stress in brain regions. Concentration of thiobarbituric acid-reactive product was greatly elevated in D-galactose stress-induced mice and was significantly reduced in the brain regions of these mice upon treatment with P. crispum. It is postulated that parsley shows a protective effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage in the mouse brain.

  4. Rice Germosprout Extract Protects Erythrocytes from Hemolysis and the Aorta, Brain, Heart, and Liver Tissues from Oxidative Stress In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Jakir; Islam, Saiful

    2016-01-01

    Identifying dietary alternatives for artificial antioxidants capable of boosting antihemolytic and antioxidative defense has been an important endeavor in improving human health. In the present study, we studied antihemolytic and antioxidative effects of germosprout (i.e., the germ part along with sprouted stems plus roots) extract prepared from the pregerminated rice. The extract contained considerable amounts of antioxidant β-carotene (414 ± 12 ng/g of extract) and phytochemicals such as total polyphenols (12.0 ± 1.1 mg gallic acid equivalent/g of extract) and flavonoids (11.0 ± 1.4 mg catechin equivalent/g of extract). The antioxidant potential of the extract was assessed by its DPPH- (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl-) free radical scavenging activity where we observed that germosprout extract had considerable antioxidative potentials. To evaluate antihemolytic effect of the extract, freshly prepared erythrocytes were incubated with either peroxynitrite or Fenton's reagent in the absence or presence of the extract. We observed that erythrocytes pretreated with the extract exhibited reduced degree of in vitro hemolysis. To support the proposition that germosprout extract could act as a good antioxidative agent, we also induced in vitro oxidative stress in erythrocyte membranes and in the aorta, brain, heart, and liver tissue homogenates in the presence of the extract. As expected, germosprout extract decreased oxidative stress almost to the same extent as that of vitamin E, as measured by lipid peroxide levels, in all the mentioned tissues. We conclude that rice germosprout extract could be a good natural source of antioxidants to reduce oxidative stress-induced hemolysis and damage of blood vessels and other tissues. PMID:27413391

  5. Rice Germosprout Extract Protects Erythrocytes from Hemolysis and the Aorta, Brain, Heart, and Liver Tissues from Oxidative Stress In Vitro

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    Shahdat Hossain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying dietary alternatives for artificial antioxidants capable of boosting antihemolytic and antioxidative defense has been an important endeavor in improving human health. In the present study, we studied antihemolytic and antioxidative effects of germosprout (i.e., the germ part along with sprouted stems plus roots extract prepared from the pregerminated rice. The extract contained considerable amounts of antioxidant β-carotene (414±12 ng/g of extract and phytochemicals such as total polyphenols (12.0±1.1 mg gallic acid equivalent/g of extract and flavonoids (11.0±1.4 mg catechin equivalent/g of extract. The antioxidant potential of the extract was assessed by its DPPH- (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl- free radical scavenging activity where we observed that germosprout extract had considerable antioxidative potentials. To evaluate antihemolytic effect of the extract, freshly prepared erythrocytes were incubated with either peroxynitrite or Fenton’s reagent in the absence or presence of the extract. We observed that erythrocytes pretreated with the extract exhibited reduced degree of in vitro hemolysis. To support the proposition that germosprout extract could act as a good antioxidative agent, we also induced in vitro oxidative stress in erythrocyte membranes and in the aorta, brain, heart, and liver tissue homogenates in the presence of the extract. As expected, germosprout extract decreased oxidative stress almost to the same extent as that of vitamin E, as measured by lipid peroxide levels, in all the mentioned tissues. We conclude that rice germosprout extract could be a good natural source of antioxidants to reduce oxidative stress-induced hemolysis and damage of blood vessels and other tissues.

  6. Influence of Momordica charantia on oxidative stress-induced perturbations in brain monoamines and plasma corticosterone in albino rats

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    Ch. Naga Kavitha

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: This study reveals the antistress activity of MC as it significantly reverted the stress-induced changes, and the activity might be attributed to its antioxidant activity since stress is known to involve several oxidative mechanisms.

  7. Agavins Increase Neurotrophic Factors and Decrease Oxidative Stress in the Brains of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

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    Elena Franco-Robles

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fructans obtained from agave, called agavins, have recently shown significant benefits for human health including obesity. Therefore, we evaluated the potential of agavins as neuroprotectors and antioxidants by determining their effect on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF as well as oxidative brain damage in of obese mice. Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD and treated daily with 5% (HFD/A5 or 10% (HFD/A10 of agavins or a standard diet (SD for 10 weeks. The levels of BDNF and GDNF were evaluated by ELISA. The oxidative stress was evaluated by lipid peroxidation (TBARS and carbonyls. SCFAs were also measured with GC-FID. Differences between groups were assessed using ANOVA and by Tukey’s test considering p < 0.05. Results: The body weight gain and food intake of mice HFD/A10 group were significantly lower than those in the HFD group. Agavins restored BDNF levels in HFD/A5 group and GDNF levels of HFD/A5 and HFD/A10 groups in cerebellum. Interestingly, agavins decreased TBARS levels in HFD/A5 and HFD/A10 groups in the hippocampus, frontal cortex and cerebellum. Carbonyl levels were also lower in HFD/A5 and HFD/A10 for only the hippocampus and cerebellum. It was also found that agavins enhanced SCFAs production in feces. Conclusion: Agavins may act as bioactive ingredients with antioxidant and protective roles in the brain.

  8. Oxidative stress and the antioxidant enzyme system in the developing brain

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    So-Yeon Shim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants are vulnerable to the oxidative stress due to the production of large amounts of free radicals, antioxidant system insufficiency, and immature oligodendroglial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS play a pivotal role in the development of periventricular leukomalacia. The three most common ROS are superoxide (O2&#8226;-, hydroxyl radical (OH&#8226;, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Under normal physiological conditions, a balance is maintained between the production of ROS and the capacity of the antioxidant enzyme system. However, if this balance breaks down, ROS can exert toxic effects. Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase are considered the classical antioxidant enzymes. A recently discovered antioxidant enzyme family, peroxiredoxin (Prdx, is also an important scavenger of free radicals. Prdx1 expression is induced at birth, whereas Prdx2 is constitutively expressed, and Prdx6 expression is consistent with the classical antioxidant enzymes. Several antioxidant substances have been studied as potential therapeutic agents; however, further preclinical and clinical studies are required before allowing clinical application.

  9. Influence of perinatal trans fat on behavioral responses and brain oxidative status of adolescent rats acutely exposed to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pase, C S; Roversi, Kr; Trevizol, F; Roversi, K; Kuhn, F T; Schuster, A J; Vey, L T; Dias, V T; Barcelos, R C S; Piccolo, J; Emanuelli, T; Bürger, M E

    2013-09-01

    Because consumption of processed foods has increased in the last decades and so far its potential influence on emotionality and susceptibility to stress is unknown, we studied the influence of different fatty acids (FA) on behavioral and biochemical parameters after acute restrain stress (AS) exposure. Two sequential generations of female rats were supplemented with soybean oil (control group; C-SO), fish oil (FO) and hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF) from pregnancy and during lactation. At 41days of age, half the animals of each supplemented group were exposed to AS and observed in open field and elevated plus maze task, followed by euthanasia for biochemical assessments. The HVF-supplemented group showed higher anxiety-like symptoms per se, while the C-SO and FO groups did not show these behaviors. Among groups exposed to AS, HVF showed locomotor restlessness in the open field, while both C-SO and HVF groups showed anxiety-like symptoms in the elevated plus maze, but this was not observed in the FO group. Biochemical evaluations showed higher lipoperoxidation levels and lower cell viability in cortex in the HVF group. In addition, HVF-treated rats showed reduced catalase activity in striatum and hippocampus, as well as increased generation of reactive species in striatum, while FO was associated with increased cell viability in the hippocampus. Among groups exposed to AS, HVF increased reactive species generation in the brain, decreased cell viability in the cortex and striatum, and decreased catalase activity in the striatum and hippocampus. Taken together, our findings show that the type of FA provided during development and growth over two generations is able to modify the brain oxidative status, which was particularly adversely affected by trans fat. In addition, the harmful influence of chronic consumption of trans fats as observed in this study can enhance emotionality and anxiety parameters resulting from stressful situations of everyday life, which can

  10. Oxidative Stress Induced by Cigarette Smoke Extracts in Human Brain Cells (T98G) and Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HBMEC) in Mono- and Co-Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hyeong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Kwang-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to examine oxidative stress induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in human brain cells (T98G) and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) in mono- and co-culture systems. Cell viability of T98G cells exposed to CSC (0.05-4 mg/ml) was significantly decreased compared to CSE (0.025-20%). There were no marked differences between quantities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by either CSE (2, 4, and 10%) or CSC (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mg/ml) treatment compared to control. However, a significant effect was noted in ROS generation following CSC incubation at 4mg/ml. Cellular integrity of HBMEC decreased to 74 and 64% within 120 h of exposure at the IC50 value of CSE and CSC, respectively. This study suggests that chronic exposure to cigarette smoking might initiate damage to the blood-brain barrier.

  11. Oxidative stress and myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Yuko; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide are produced highly in myocarditis. ROS, which not only act as effectors for pathogen killing but also mediate signal transduction in the stress responsive pathways, are closely related with both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, oxidative stress overwhelming the capacity of anti-oxidative system generated in severe inflammation has been suggested to damage tissues and exacerbate inflammation. Oxidative stress worsens the autoimmunological process of myocarditis, and suppression of the anti-oxidative system and long-lasting oxidative stress could be one of the pathological mechanisms of cardiac remodeling leading to inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is considered to be one of the promising treatment targets of myocarditis. Evidences of anti-oxidative treatments in myocarditis have not been fully established. Basic strategies of anti-oxidative treatments include inhibition of ROS production, activation of anti-oxidative enzymes and elimination of generated free radicals. ROS are produced by mitochondrial respiratory chain reactions and enzymes including NADPH oxidases, cyclooxygenase, and xanthine oxidase. Other systems involved in inflammation and stress response, such as NF-κB, Nrf2/Keap1, and neurohumoral factors also influence oxidative stress in myocarditis. The efficacy of anti-oxidative treatments could also depend on the etiology and the phases of myocarditis. We review in this article the pathological significance of ROS and oxidative stress, and the potential anti-oxidative treatments in myocarditis.

  12. Effects of aluminum and extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation on oxidative stress and memory in brain of mice.

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    Deng, Yuanxin; Zhang, Yanwen; Jia, Shujie; Liu, Junkang; Liu, Yanxia; Xu, Weiwei; Liu, Lei

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of aluminum and extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) on oxidative stress and memory of SPF Kunming mice. Sixty male SPF Kunming mice were divided randomly into four groups: control group, ELF-MF group (2 mT, 4 h/day), load aluminum group (200 mg aluminum/kg, 0.1 ml/10 g), and ELF-MF + aluminum group (2 mT, 4 h/day, 200 mg aluminum/kg). After 8 weeks of treatment, the mice of three experiment groups (ELF-MF group, load aluminum group, and ELF-MF + aluminum group) exhibited firstly the learning memory impairment, appearing that the escaping latency to the platform was prolonged and percentage in the platform quadrant was reduced in the Morris water maze (MWM) task. Secondly are the pathologic abnormalities including neuronal cell loss and overexpression of phosphorylated tau protein in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. On the other hand, the markers of oxidative stress were determined in mice brain and serum. The results showed a statistically significant decrease in superoxide dismutase activity and increase in the levels of malondialdehyde in the ELF-MF group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01), load aluminum group (P < 0.01), and ELF-MF + aluminum group (P < 0.01). However, the treatment with ELF-MF + aluminum induced no more damage than ELF-MF and aluminum did, respectively. In conclusion, both aluminum and ELF-MF could impact on learning memory and pro-oxidative function in Kunming mice. However, there was no evidence of any association between ELF-MF exposure with aluminum loading.

  13. L-Theanine alleviates the neuropathological changes induced by PCB (Aroclor 1254) via inhibiting upregulation of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, Thangarajan; Asha, Deivasigamani; Nagarajan, Ganesan; Sreenivas, Arivazhagan; Nivedha, Rajendran

    2016-03-01

    The present study is aimed at evaluating the protective role of L-theanine on aroclor 1254-induced oxidative stress in rat brain. Intraperitoneal administration of Aroclor 1254 (2 mg/kg b.wt. for 30 days) caused oxidative stress in rat brain and also caused neurobehavioral changes. Oxidative stress was assessed by determining the levels of lipid peroxide (LPO), protein carbonyl content, and changes in activities of creatine kinase (CK), acetylcholinesterase (AchE), and ATPases in the hippocampus, cerebellum and cerebral cortex of control and experimental rats. Histopathological results showed that PCB caused neuronal loss in all three regions. PCB upregulated the mRNA expressions of inflammatory cytokines. Oral administration of L-theanine (200 mg/kg b.wt.) increased the status of antioxidants, decreased the levels of LPO, nitric oxide (NO) and increased the activities of CK, AchE and ATPases. L-Theanine restored normal architecture of brain regions and downregulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, L-theanine shows a protective role against PCBs-induced oxidative damage in rat brain.

  14. Oxidative Stress Increases the Blood Brain Barrier Permeability Resulting in Increased Incidence of Brain Metastasis in BRCA Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Increased Incidence of Brain Metastasis in BRCA Mutation Carriers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Hava Avraham, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Beth Israel...Permeability Resulting in Increased Incidence of Brain Metastasis in BRCA Mutation Carriers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0172 5c...significantly up-regulated with a decrease in cellular sensitivity to paclitaxel. Cells that harbor endogenous mutant or defective BRCA l (such as MDA-MB-436

  15. Carbofuran induced oxidative stress mediated alterations in Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase activity in rat brain: amelioration by vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Kumar; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2014-07-01

    Pesticides cause oxidative stress and adversely influence Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in animals. Since impact of carbofuran has not been properly studied in the mammalian brain, the ability of carbofuran to induce oxidative stress and modulation in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and its amelioration by vitamin E was performed. The rats divided into six groups received two different doses of carbofuran (15% and 30% LD50) for 15 days. The results suggested that the carbofuran treatment caused a significant elevation in levels of malonaldehyde and reduced glutathione and sharp inhibition in the activities of super oxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione-S-transferase; the effect being dose dependent. Carbofuran at different doses also caused sharp reduction in the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. The pretreatment of vitamin E, however, showed a significant recovery in these indices. The pretreatment of rats with vitamin E offered protection from carbofuran-induced oxidative stress.

  16. Oxidative stress of brain and liver is increased by Wi-Fi (2.45GHz) exposure of rats during pregnancy and the development of newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ömer; Kahya, Mehmet Cemal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    An excessive production of reactive oxygen substances (ROS) and reduced antioxidant defence systems resulting from electromagnetic radiation (EMR) exposure may lead to oxidative brain and liver damage and degradation of membranes during pregnancy and development of rat pups. We aimed to investigate the effects of Wi-Fi-induced EMR on the brain and liver antioxidant redox systems in the rat during pregnancy and development. Sixteen pregnant rats and their 48 newborns were equally divided into control and EMR groups. The EMR groups were exposed to 2.45GHz EMR (1h/day for 5 days/week) from pregnancy to 3 weeks of age. Brain cortex and liver samples were taken from the newborns between the first and third weeks. In the EMR groups, lipid peroxidation levels in the brain and liver were increased following EMR exposure; however, the glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, and vitamin A, vitamin E and β-carotene concentrations were decreased in the brain and liver. Glutathione (GSH) and vitamin C concentrations in the brain were also lower in the EMR groups than in the controls; however, their concentrations did not change in the liver. In conclusion, Wi-Fi-induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver of developing rats was the result of reduced GSH-Px, GSH and antioxidant vitamin concentrations. Moreover, the brain seemed to be more sensitive to oxidative injury compared to the liver in the development of newborns.

  17. Testosterone replacement attenuates cognitive decline in testosterone-deprived lean rats, but not in obese rats, by mitigating brain oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintana, Hiranya; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2015-10-01

    Testosterone replacement improves metabolic parameters and cognitive function in hypogonadism. However, the effects of testosterone therapy on cognition in obese condition with testosterone deprivation have not been investigated. We hypothesized that testosterone replacement improves cognitive function in testosterone-deprived obese rats by restoring brain insulin sensitivity, brain mitochondrial function, and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Thirty male Wistar rats had either a bilateral orchiectomy (ORX: O, n = 24) or a sham operation (S, n = 6). ORX rats were further divided into two groups fed with either a normal diet (NDO) or a high-fat diet (HFO) for 12 weeks. Then, ORX rats in each dietary group were divided into two subgroups (n = 6/subgroup) and were given either castor oil or testosterone (2 mg/kg/day, s.c.) for 4 weeks. At the end of this protocol, cognitive function, metabolic parameters, brain insulin sensitivity, hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and brain mitochondrial function were determined. We found that testosterone replacement increased peripheral insulin sensitivity, decreased circulation and brain oxidative stress levels, and attenuated brain mitochondrial ROS production in HFO rats. However, testosterone failed to restore hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in HFO rats. In contrast, in NDO rats, testosterone decreased circulation and brain oxidative stress levels, attenuated brain mitochondrial ROS production, and restored hippocampal synaptic plasticity as well as cognitive function. These findings suggest that testosterone replacement improved peripheral insulin sensitivity and decreased oxidative stress levels, but failed to restore hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in testosterone-deprived obese rats. However, it provided beneficial effects in reversing cognitive impairment in testosterone-deprived non-obese rats.

  18. Berry fruit and nuts: their role in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation in the aging brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry fruits and nuts are nutrient dense and contain a variety of bioactive phytochemicals, specifically polyphenols. A growing body of literature describes pre-clinical research, using both in vitro and in vivo techniques, which show beneficial effects of nut and berry consumption on the brain in ...

  19. Cytokines, neurotrophins, and oxidative stress in brain disease from mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Guglielmo R D; Gargiulo, Nadia; Faraonio, Raffaella; Castaldo, Sigismondo; Gonzalez Y Reyero, Enrico; Di Natale, Paola

    2007-02-15

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPS IIIB; Sanfilippo syndrome type B) is characterized by profound neurological deterioration. Because a murine model of MPS IIIB disease is available, we focused on analysis of gene expression in the brain and cerebellum of 7-month-old MPS IIIB mice by pathway-specific filter microarrays designed to probe apoptotic-related, neurotrophic signalling molecules and inflammatory cytokines and receptors. Moreover, we extended the analysis with real-time PCR performed at 1, 3, 7 months after birth. Bdnf was down-regulated in the brain but up-regulated in the cerebellum at 7 months of age, both at RNA and at protein levels. Cbln1 presented a threefold increase in the oldest brains while remaining unaltered in the cerebellum. Ccl3, Casp11, gp91(phox), p67(phox), and p47(phox) showed an increased expression in both brain and cerebellum at each examined time point. Ccl3, in particular, exhibited in both organs and at all times tested approximately a tenfold increase in its expression. Insofar as p47(phox), p67(phox), and gp91(phox) are all components of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase, our results suggest the possible involvement of the reactive oxygen species in the genesis of neurodegeneration in MPS IIIB disease.

  20. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction induced by isoniazid : study on isolated rat liver and brain mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahadpour, Morteza; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza; Mashayekhi, Vida; Hajmohammadebrahimtehrani, K.; Jafarian, Iman; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH or isonicotinic hydrazide) is used for the treatment and prophylaxis of tuberculosis. Liver and brain are two important target organs in INH toxicity. However, the exact mechanisms behind the INH hepatotoxicity or neurotoxicity have not yet been completely understood. Considering the

  1. Acute and subchronic toxicity of inhaled toluene in male Long Evans rats: oxidative stress markers in brain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Research interested in oxidative stress markers following exposure to VOCs. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Kodavanti , P., J. Royland ,...

  2. Bilirubin oxidation in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T W

    2000-01-01

    Bilirubin is a product of heme catabolism which by virtue of its lipid solubility can cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the brain. Neonatal jaundice is a common transitional phenomenon which is due to the combination of increased heme catabolism and rate limitations as far as hepatic conjugation and biliary excretion of bilirubin. In the great majority of cases this is an innocuous condition, which is even posited to have some beneficial effects due to the ability of bilirubin to quench free oxygen radicals. However, because bilirubin is neurotoxic, hyperbilirubinemia in the newborn may exceptionally result in death in the neonatal period, or survival with severe neurological sequelae (kernicterus). Bilirubin enters the brain through an intact blood-brain barrier. Clearance of bilirubin from brain partly involves retro-transfer through the blood-brain barrier, and possibly also through the brain-CSF barrier into CSF. Work in our lab during the past 5 years has substantiated earlier work which had suggested that bilirubin may also be metabolized in brain. The responsible enzyme is found on the inner mitochondrial membrane, and oxidizes bilirubin at a rate of 100-300 pmol bilirubin/mg protein/minute. The enzyme activity is lower in the newborn compared with the mature animal, and is also lower in neurons compared with glia. Studies of different rat strains have documented genetic variability. The enzyme is cytochrome-c-dependent, but has as yet not been unequivocally identified. The rate of oxidation of bilirubin is such that this enzyme probably contributes meaningfully to the clearance of bilirubin from brain.

  3. Human brain harbors single nucleotide somatic variations in functionally relevant genes possibly mediated by oxidative stress [version 3; referees: 2 approved

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    Anchal Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatic variation in DNA can cause cells to deviate from the preordained genomic path in both disease and healthy conditions. Here, using exome sequencing of paired tissue samples, we show that the normal human brain harbors somatic single base variations measuring up to 0.48% of the total variations. Interestingly, about 64% of these somatic variations in the brain are expected to lead to non-synonymous changes, and as much as 87% of these represent G:C>T:A transversion events. Further, the transversion events in the brain were mostly found in the frontal cortex, whereas the corpus callosum from the same individuals harbors the reference genotype. We found a significantly higher amount of 8-OHdG (oxidative stress marker in the frontal cortex compared to the corpus callosum of the same subjects (pT:A transversions in the cortex. We found significant enrichment for axon guidance and related pathways for genes harbouring somatic variations. This could represent either a directed selection of genetic variations in these pathways or increased susceptibility of some loci towards oxidative stress. This study highlights that oxidative stress possibly influence single nucleotide somatic variations in normal human brain.

  4. Oxidative stress response of Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) to mercury and selenium bioaccumulation in liver, kidney, and brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David J.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Adelsbach, Terrence L.; Stebbins, Katherine R.

    2011-01-01

    Bioindicators of oxidative stress were examined in prebreeding and breeding adult and chick Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) and in prebreeding adult Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) in San Francisco Bay, California. Highest total mercury (THg) concentrations (mean±standard error;μg/g dry wt) in liver (17.7±1.7), kidney (20.5±1.9), and brain (3.0±0.3) occurred in breeding adult Forster's terns. The THg concentrations in liver were significantly correlated with hepatic depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH), increased oxidized glutathione (GSSG):GSH ratio, and decreased hepatic gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity in adults of both tern species. Prefledging Forster's tern chicks with one-fourth the hepatic THg concentration of breeding adults exhibited effects similar to adults. Total mercury-related renal GSSG increased in adults and chicks. In brains of prebreeding adults, THg was correlated with a small increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) activity, suggestive of a compensatory response. Brain THg concentrations were highest in breeding adult Forster's terns and brain tissue exhibited increased lipid peroxidation as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, loss of protein bound thiols (PBSH), and decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes, GSSG reductase (GSSGrd), and G-6-PDH. In brains of Forster's tern chicks there was a decrease in total reduced thiols and PBSH. Multiple indicator responses also pointed to greater oxidative stress in breeding Forster's terns relative to prebreeding terns, attributable to the physiological stress of reproduction. Some biondicators also were related to age and species, including thiol concentrations. Enzymes GGT, G-6-PDH, and GSSGred activities were related to species. Our results indicate that THg concentrations induced oxidative stress in terns, and suggest that histopathological, immunological, and behavioral effects may occur in terns as reported in other species.

  5. The protective effect of N-acetylcysteine on oxidative stress in the brain caused by the long-term intake of aspartame by rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finamor, Isabela A; Ourique, Giovana M; Pês, Tanise S; Saccol, Etiane M H; Bressan, Caroline A; Scheid, Taína; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Llesuy, Susana F; Partata, Wânia A; Pavanato, Maria A

    2014-09-01

    Long-term intake of aspartame at the acceptable daily dose causes oxidative stress in rodent brain mainly due to the dysregulation of glutathione (GSH) homeostasis. N-Acetylcysteine provides the cysteine that is required for the production of GSH, being effective in treating disorders associated with oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine treatment (150 mg kg(-1), i.p.) on oxidative stress biomarkers in rat brain after chronic aspartame administration by gavage (40 mg kg(-1)). N-Acetylcysteine led to a reduction in the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, and carbonyl protein levels, which were increased due to aspartame administration. N-Acetylcysteine also resulted in an elevation of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase activities, as well as non-protein thiols, and total reactive antioxidant potential levels, which were decreased after aspartame exposure. However, N-acetylcysteine was unable to reduce serum glucose levels, which were increased as a result of aspartame administration. Furthermore, catalase and glutathione S-transferase, whose activities were reduced due to aspartame treatment, remained decreased even after N-acetylcysteine exposure. In conclusion, N-acetylcysteine treatment may exert a protective effect against the oxidative damage in the brain, which was caused by the long-term consumption of the acceptable daily dose of aspartame by rats.

  6. Decreased cysteine uptake by EAAC1 gene deletion exacerbates neuronal oxidative stress and neuronal death after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Young; Kim, In Yeol; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Bo Eun; Lee, Song Hee; Kho, A Ra; Jung, Hee Jae; Sohn, Min; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2016-07-01

    Excitatory amino acid carrier type 1 (EAAC1), a high-affinity glutamate transporter, can expend energy to move glutamate into neurons. However, under normal physiological conditions, EAAC1 does not have a great effect on glutamate clearance but rather participates in the neuronal uptake of cysteine. This process is critical to maintaining neuronal antioxidant function by providing cysteine for glutathione synthesis. Previous study showed that mice lacking EAAC1 show increased neuronal oxidative stress following transient cerebral ischemia. In the present study, we sought to characterize the role of EAAC1 in neuronal resistance after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Young adult C57BL/6 wild-type or EAAC1 (-/-) mice were subjected to a controlled cortical impact model for TBI. Neuronal death after TBI showed more than double the number of degenerating neurons in the hippocampus in EAAC1 (-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. Superoxide production, zinc translocation and microglia activation similarly showed a marked increase in the EAAC1 (-/-) mice. Pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) reduced TBI-induced neuronal death, superoxide production and zinc translocation. These findings indicate that cysteine uptake by EAAC1 is important for neuronal antioxidant function and survival following TBI. This study also suggests that administration of NAC has therapeutic potential in preventing TBI-induced neuronal death.

  7. Correlations between the Memory-Related Behavior and the Level of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in the Mice Brain, Provoked by an Acute Administration of CB Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Slomka, Tomasz; Budzynska, Barbara; Biala, Grazyna

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid (CB) receptors, is involved in memory-related responses, as well as in processes that may affect cognition, like oxidative stress processes. The purpose of the experiments was to investigate the impact of CB1 and CB2 receptor ligands on the long-term memory stages in male Swiss mice, using the passive avoidance (PA) test, as well as the influence of these compounds on the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in the mice brain. A single injection of a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, AM 251, improved long-term memory acquisition and consolidation in the PA test in mice, while a mixed CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 impaired both stages of cognition. Additionally, JWH 133, a selective CB2 receptor agonist, and AM 630, a competitive CB2 receptor antagonist, significantly improved memory. Additionally, an acute administration of the highest used doses of JWH 133, WIN 55,212-2, and AM 630, but not AM 251, increased total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the brain. In turn, the processes of lipids peroxidation, expressed as the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), were more advanced in case of AM 251. Thus, some changes in the PA performance may be connected with the level of oxidative stress in the brain.

  8. Correlations between the Memory-Related Behavior and the Level of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in the Mice Brain, Provoked by an Acute Administration of CB Receptor Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kruk-Slomka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid (CB receptors, is involved in memory-related responses, as well as in processes that may affect cognition, like oxidative stress processes. The purpose of the experiments was to investigate the impact of CB1 and CB2 receptor ligands on the long-term memory stages in male Swiss mice, using the passive avoidance (PA test, as well as the influence of these compounds on the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in the mice brain. A single injection of a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, AM 251, improved long-term memory acquisition and consolidation in the PA test in mice, while a mixed CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 impaired both stages of cognition. Additionally, JWH 133, a selective CB2 receptor agonist, and AM 630, a competitive CB2 receptor antagonist, significantly improved memory. Additionally, an acute administration of the highest used doses of JWH 133, WIN 55,212-2, and AM 630, but not AM 251, increased total antioxidant capacity (TAC in the brain. In turn, the processes of lipids peroxidation, expressed as the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA, were more advanced in case of AM 251. Thus, some changes in the PA performance may be connected with the level of oxidative stress in the brain.

  9. The interplay between oxidative stress and brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates the outcome of a saturated fat diet on synaptic plasticity and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aiguo; Ying, Zhe; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2004-04-01

    A diet high in saturated fat (HF) decreases levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), to the extent that compromises neuroplasticity and cognitive function, and aggravates the outcome of brain insult. By using the antioxidant power of vitamin E, we performed studies to determine the role of oxidative stress as a mediator for the effects of BDNF on synaptic plasticity and cognition caused by consumption of the HF diet. Male adult rats were maintained on a HF diet for 2 months with or without 500 IU/kg of vitamin E. Supplementation of the HF diet with vitamin E dramatically reduced oxidative damage, normalized levels of BDNF, synapsin I and cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), caused by the consumption of the HF diet. In addition, vitamin E supplementation preserved the process of activation of synapsin I and CREB, and reversed the HF-impaired cognitive function. It is known that BDNF facilitates the synapse by modulating synapsin I and CREB, which have been implicated in synaptic plasticity associated to learning and memory. These results show that oxidative stress can interact with the BDNF system to modulate synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. Therefore, studies appear to reveal a mechanism by which events classically related to the maintenance of energy balance of the cell, such as oxidative stress, can interact with molecular events that modulate neuronal and behavioural plasticity.

  10. Oxidative stress and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David G; Gongora, Maria Carolina

    2009-05-01

    This review has summarized some of the data supporting a role of ROS and oxidant stress in the genesis of hypertension. There is evidence that hypertensive stimuli, such as high salt and angiotensin II, promote the production of ROS in the brain, the kidney, and the vasculature and that each of these sites contributes either to hypertension or to the untoward sequelae of this disease. Although the NADPH oxidase in these various organs is a predominant source, other enzymes likely contribute to ROS production and signaling in these tissues. A major clinical challenge is that the routinely used antioxidants are ineffective in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease and hypertension. This is likely because these drugs are either ineffective or act in a non-targeted fashion, such that they remove not only injurious ROS Fig. 5. Proposed role of T cells in the genesis of hypertension and the role of the NADPH oxidase in multiple cells/organs in modulating this effect. In this scenario, angiotensin II stimulates an NADPH oxidase in the CVOs of the brain, increasing sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic nerve terminals in lymph nodes activate T cells, and angiotensin II also directly activates T cells. These stimuli also activate expression of homing signals in the vessel and likely the kidney, which attract T cells to these organs. T cells release cytokines that stimulate the vessel and kidney NADPH oxidases, promoting vasoconstriction and sodium retention. SFO, subfornical organ. 630 Harrison & Gongora but also those involved in normal cell signaling. A potentially important and relatively new direction is the concept that inflammatory cells such as T cells contribute to hypertension. Future studies are needed to understand the interaction of T cells with the CNS, the kidney, and the vasculature and how this might be interrupted to provide therapeutic benefit.

  11. The Effect of Oral Feeding of Tribulus Terrestris Fruit on Some Markers of Oxidative Stress in the Brain of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Roghani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic diabetes mellitus in the long run accompanies enhanced oxidative stress burden and decreases activity of antioxidant defense system. Due to significant role of these factors in development of some neurological disorders and with regard to antidiabetic and antioxidant effect of Tribulus terrestris (TT, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of its oral administration on brain tissue level of some markers of lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in diabetic rats. Methods: In this experimental study, rats were divided into 4 groups, i.e. control, TT-treated control, diabetic, and TT-treated diabetic groups. For induction of diabetes, streptozotcin (STZ was intraperitoneally administered (60mg/Kg. In addition, TT-treated groups received TT mixed with standard pelleted food at a weight ratio of 3% for 5 weeks. Level of malondialdehyde (MDA and nitrite as well as activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD in brain tissue were measured at the end of the study. Results: Diabetic rats showed a significant increase in tissue level of MDA (p<0.01 and nitrite (p<0.01 and a non-significant reduction of SOD activity. Furthermore, TT treatment significantly reduced level of MDA p<0.01 and nitrite (p<0.05. Also, SOD activity in treated-diabetic group was non-significantly higher as compared to diabetics. Conclusion: Chronic oral treatment with TT could attenuate some markers of lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in brain tissue in diabetic rats which this could possibly prevent some neurological disorders due to enhanced oxidative stress.

  12. Long-term streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats leads to severe damage of brain blood vessels and neurons via enhanced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongying; Fan, Shourui; Song, Dianping; Wang, Zhuo; Ma, Shungao; Li, Shuqing; Li, Xiaohong; Xu, Mian; Xu, Min; Wang, Xianmo

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate pathophysiological alterations and oxidative stress in various stages of streptozotocin (STZ)‑induced diabetes mellitus (DM) in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (120) were randomized into DM and control groups. Body mass, plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels, as well as aldose reductase (AR) activities, in brain tissue and serum were determined. Electron microscopy was used to observe neuron and vessel changes in the brain. In STZ‑treated rats, blood glucose, low density lipoproteins, triglycerides and total cholesterol levels increased 1.43‑3.0‑fold and high density lipoprotein, HbA1c and insulin sensitivity index increased 1.1‑1.23‑fold compared with control. At week 16 following treatment, DM rat serum H2O2 concentration was increased, indicating oxidative stress and mRNA levels of GPx and SOD were 2‑fold higher than the control. Protein GPx and SOD levels were reduced (Pblood vessels in the DM rat brains became increasingly abnormal over time with altered Golgi bodies, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum cisterns, concurrent with SOD inactivation and AR protein accumulation. Disease progression in rats with STZ‑induced DM included brain pathologies with vascular and neuron cell abnormalities, associated with the reduction of SOD, CAT and GPx activities and also AR accumulation.

  13. AGING AND LIFE-STAGE SUSCEPTIBILITY: TOLUENE EFFECTS ON BRAIN OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS IN BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to test whether oxidative stress (OS) is a potential toxicity pathway following toluene exposure and to determine if these effects are age-dependent. We ...

  14. TOLUENE EFFECTS ON OXIDATIVE STRESS IN BRAIN REGIONS OF YOUNG-ADULT, MIDDLE-AGE AND SENESCENT BROWN NORWAY RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging-related susceptibility to environmental chemicals is poorly understood. Oxidative stress (OS) appears to play an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. The objectives of this study, therefore, were to test whether OS is a potential toxicity pathway for tol...

  15. Staphylococcal response to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmarie eGaupp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are a versatile genus of bacteria that are capable of causing acute and chronic infections in diverse host species. The success of staphylococci as pathogens is due in part to their ability to mitigate endogenous and exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress. Endogenous oxidative stress is a consequence of life in an aerobic environment; whereas, exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress are often due to the bacteria’s interaction with host immune systems. To overcome the deleterious effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress, staphylococci have evolved protection, detoxification, and repair mechanisms that are controlled by a network of regulators. In this review, we summarize the cellular targets of oxidative stress, the mechanisms by which staphylococci sense oxidative stress and damage, oxidative stress protection and repair mechanisms, and regulation of the oxidative stress response. When possible, special attention is given to how the oxidative stress defense mechanisms help staphylococci control oxidative stress in the host.

  16. Erythropoietin and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling; Shang, Yan Chen

    2008-05-01

    Unmitigated oxidative stress can lead to diminished cellular longevity, accelerated aging, and accumulated toxic effects for an organism. Current investigations further suggest the significant disadvantages that can occur with cellular oxidative stress that can lead to clinical disability in a number of disorders, such as myocardial infarction, dementia, stroke, and diabetes. New therapeutic strategies are therefore sought that can be directed toward ameliorating the toxic effects of oxidative stress. Here we discuss the exciting potential of the growth factor and cytokine erythropoietin for the treatment of diseases such as cardiac ischemia, vascular injury, neurodegeneration, and diabetes through the modulation of cellular oxidative stress. Erythropoietin controls a variety of signal transduction pathways during oxidative stress that can involve Janus-tyrosine kinase 2, protein kinase B, signal transducer and activator of transcription pathways, Wnt proteins, mammalian forkhead transcription factors, caspases, and nuclear factor kappaB. Yet, the biological effects of erythropoietin may not always be beneficial and may be poor tolerated in a number of clinical scenarios, necessitating further basic and clinical investigations that emphasize the elucidation of the signal transduction pathways controlled by erythropoietin to direct both successful and safe clinical care.

  17. Role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in stress-induced depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Wang; Shucheng An

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulated evidence indicates an important role for hippocampal dendrite atrophy in development of depression, while brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) participates in hippocampal dendrite growth. OBJECTIVE: To discuss the role of BDNF and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in chronic and unpredictable stress-induced depression and the pathogenesis of depression.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized, controlled animal experiment. The experiment was carried out from October 2006 to May 2007 at the Department of Animal Physiology, College of Life Science, Shaanxi Normal University.MATERIALS: Thirty-seven male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250-300 g at the beginning of the experiment were obtained from Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Xi'an, China). BDNF antibody and nNOS antibody were provided by Santa Cruz (USA). K252a (BDNF inhibitor) and 7-NI (nNOS inhibitor) were provided by Sigma (USA). METHODS: Animals were randomly divided into five groups: Control group, chronic unpredicted mild stress (CUMS) group, K252a group, K252a+7-NI group and 7-NI+CUMS group. While the Control, K252a and K252a+7-NI groups of rats not subjected to stress had free access to food and water, other groups of rats were subjected to nine stressors randomly applied for 21 days, with each stressor applied 2-3 times. On days 1, 7, 14 and 21 during CUMS, rats received microinjection of 1 μL of physiological saline in the Control and CUMS groups, 1 μL of K252a in the K252a group, 1 μL of K252a and 7-NI in the K252a+7-NI group, and 1 μL of 7-NI in the 7-NI+CUMS group. We observed a variety of alterations in sucrose preference, body weight change, open field test and forced swimming test, and observed the expression of BDNF and nNOS in rat hippocampus by immunohistochemistry;RESULTS: Compared with the Control group, the behavior of the CUMS rats was significantly depressed, the expression of BDNF decreased (P < 0.01) but the expression of n

  18. Caffeine prevents d-galactose-induced cognitive deficits, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Faheem; Ali, Tahir; Ullah, Najeeb; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-11-01

    d-galactose has been considered a senescent model for age-related neurodegenerative disease. It induces oxidative stress which triggers memory impairment, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Caffeine act as anti-oxidant and has been used in various model of neurodegenerative disease. Nevertheless, the effect of caffeine against d-galactose aging murine model of age-related neurodegenerative disease elucidated. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of caffeine against d-galactose. We observed that chronic treatment of caffeine (3 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally (i.p) for 60 days) improved memory impairment and synaptic markers (Synaptophysin and PSD95) in the d-galactose treated rats. Chronic caffeine treatment reduced the oxidative stress via the reduction of 8-oxoguanine through immunofluorescence in the d-galactose-treated rats. Consequently caffeine treatment suppressed stress kinases p-JNK. Additionally, caffeine treatment significantly reduced the d-galactose-induced neuroinflammation through alleviation of COX-2, NOS-2, TNFα and IL-1β. Furthermore we also analyzed that caffeine reduced cytochrome C, Bax/Bcl2 ratio, caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP-1 level. Moreover by evaluating the immunohistochemical results of Nissl and Fluro-Jade B staining showed that caffeine prevented the neurodegeneration in the d-galactose-treated rats. Our results showed that caffeine prevents the d-galactose-induced oxidative stress and consequently alleviated neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration; and synaptic dysfunction and memory impairment. Therefore, we could suggest that caffeine might be a dietary anti-oxidant agent and a good candidate for the age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Reduction in traumatic brain injury-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and calcium entry in rat hippocampus by melatonin: Possible involvement of TRPM2 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yürüker, Vehbi; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Şenol, Nilgün

    2015-02-01

    Melatonin, which is a very effective reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, acts through a direct reaction with free radicals. Ca(2+) entry induced by traumatic brain injury (TBI) has deleterious effects on human hippocampal function. TRPM2 is a Ca(2+) permeable non-selective channel in hippocampal neurons, and its activation of during oxidative stress has been linked to cell death. Despite the importance of oxidative stress in TBI, its role in apoptosis and Ca(2+) entry in TBI is poorly understood. Therefore, we tested the effects of melatonin on apoptosis, oxidative stress, and Ca(2+) entry through the TRPM2 channel in the hippocampal neurons of TBI-induced rats. Thirty-two rats were divided into the following four groups: control, melatonin, TBI, and TBI + melatonin groups. Melatonin (5 mg/kg body weight) was intraperitoneally given to animals in the melatonin group and the TBI + melatonin group after 1 h of brain trauma. Hippocampal neurons were freshly isolated from the four groups, incubated with a nonspecific TRPM2 blocker (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, 2-APB), and then stimulated with cumene hydroperoxide. Apoptosis, caspase-3, caspase-9, intracellular ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and intracellular free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) values were high in the TBI group, and low in the TBI + melatonin group. The [Ca(2+)]i concentration was decreased in the four groups by 2-APB. In our TBI experimental model, TRPM2 channels were involved in Ca(2+) entry-induced neuronal death, and the negative modulation of the activity of this channel by melatonin pretreatment may account for the neuroprotective activity of TRPM2 channels against oxidative stress, apoptosis, and Ca(2+) entry.

  20. Acute hypercapnic hyperoxia stimulates reactive species production in the caudal solitary complex of rat brain slices but does not induce oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Dean, Jay B

    2016-12-01

    Central CO2 chemoreceptive neurons in the caudal solitary complex (cSC) are stimulated by hyperoxia via a free radical mechanism. Hyperoxia has been shown to increase superoxide and nitric oxide in the cSC, but it remains unknown how changes in Pco2 during hyperoxia affect the production of O2-dependent reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) downstream that can lead to increased levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress, cellular excitability, and, potentially, dysfunction. We used real-time fluorescence microscopy in rat brain slices to determine how hyperoxia and hypercapnic acidosis (HA) modulate one another in the production of key RONS, as well as colorimetric assays to measure levels of oxidized and nitrated lipids and proteins. We also examined the effects of CO2 narcosis and hypoxia before euthanasia and brain slice harvesting, as these neurons are CO2 sensitive and hypothesized to employ CO2/H(+) mechanisms that exacerbate RONS production and potentially oxidative stress. Our findings show that hyperoxia ± HA increases the production of peroxynitrite and its derivatives, whereas increases in Fenton chemistry are most prominent during hyperoxia + HA. Using CO2 narcosis before euthanasia modulates cellular sensitivity to HA postmortem and enhances the magnitude of the peroxynitrite pathway, but blunts the activity of Fenton chemistry. Overall, hyperoxia and HA do not result in increased production of markers of oxidative and nitrosative stress as expected. We postulate this is due to antioxidant and proteosomal removal of damaged lipids and proteins to maintain cell viability and avoid death during protracted hyperoxia.

  1. Effect of acute administration of L-tyrosine on oxidative stress parameters in brain of young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macêdo, Livia G R P; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Vieira, Júlia S; Olegário, Natália; Gonçalves, Renata C; Vuolo, Francieli S; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-12-01

    Tyrosinemia type II, also known as Richner-Hanhart syndrome, is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of hepatic cytosolic tyrosine aminotransferase, and is associated with neurologic and development difficulties in numerous patients. Considering that the mechanisms underlying the neurological dysfunction in hypertyrosinemic patients are poorly known and that studies demonstrated that high concentrations of tyrosine provoke oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo in the cerebral cortex of rats, in the present study we investigate the oxidative stress parameters (enzymatic antioxidant defenses, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and protein carbonyl content) in cerebellum, hippocampus and striatum of 30-old-day rats after acute administration of L-tyrosine. Our results demonstrated that the acute administration of L-tyrosine increased the thiobarbituric acid reactive species levels in hippocampus and the carbonyl levels in cerebellum, hippocampus and striatum. In addition, acute administration of L-tyrosine significantly decreased superoxide dismutase activity in cerebellum, hippocampus and striatum, while catalase was increased in striatum. In conclusion, the oxidative stress may contribute, along with other mechanisms, to the neurological dysfunction characteristic of hypertyrosinemia and the administration of antioxidants may be considered as a potential adjuvant therapy for tyrosinemia, especially type II.

  2. Enhanced behavioral response by decreasing brain oxidative stress to 6-hydroxy-l-nicotine in Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Stefan, Marius; Brandsch, Roderich; Mihasan, Marius

    2015-03-30

    6-Hydroxy-l-nicotine (6HLN) is a nicotine metabolite resulted from nicotine degradation within Arthrobacter nicotinovorans with positive effects on spatial memory and oxidative stress damage. In the present study, the effects of 6HLN on spatial memory performance were assessed in scopolamine-treated rats. Scopolamine-induced memory impairments were observed, as measured by the Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks. Decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase along with decrease of total content of reduced glutathione were observed in the rat hippocampal homogenates of scopolamine-treated animals as compared with control. Production of malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) significantly increased in the rat hippocampal homogenates of scopolamine-treated animals as compared with control, as a consequence of impaired antioxidant enzymes activities. Additionally, in scopolamine-treated rats 6HLN significantly improved memory formation and decreased oxidative stress, suggesting memory-enhancing and antioxidant effects. Therefore, our results suggest that administration of 6HLN ameliorates scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  3. Inhibition of cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress in brain by dietary inclusion of red dye extracts from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboh, Ganiya; Akomolafe, Toyin L; Adetuyi, Abayomi O

    2010-10-01

    The stem of sorghum is used as color additives in cooking meals and taken as beverages when steeped or boiled in water as folklore for the management of anemia and some other diseases. This study sought to assess the antioxidant and neuroprotective potentials of red dye extract from sorghum stem on cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress in rat brain. Wistar strain albino rats were fed diet supplemented with the red dye (0.5% and 1.0% inclusion) for 14 days. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in average feed intake and weight gain of rats fed the basal diet and the red dye-supplemented diet. However, intraperitoneal administration of cyclophosphamide (75 mg/kg of body weight) 24 hours prior the termination of the experiment caused a significant (P brain malondialdehyde (MDA) content and serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase in those rats fed diet without the dye supplement, whereas there was a significant decrease (P brain MDA content and serum enzyme activities in rats fed diet with the dye in a concentration-dependent manner. The protective effect of the red dye against cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress could be attributed to the high phenolic content (56.2%) and antioxidant activities of the red dye as typified by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging ability, reducing properties, and Fe(2+) chelating ability. Therefore, dietary inclusion of the red dye from sorghum stem could be harnessed in the management of neurodegenerative diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  4. Oxidative stress effects of thinner inhalation

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Thinners are chemical mixtures used as industrial solvents. Humans can come into contact with thinner by occupational exposure or by intentional inhalation abuse. Thinner sniffing causes damage to the brain, kidney, liver, lung, and reproductive system. We discuss some proposed mechanism by which thinner induces damage. Recently, the induction of oxidative stress has been suggested as a possible mechanism of damage. This paper reviews the current evidence for oxidative stress effects induced ...

  5. An investigation of the neuroprotective effects of Curcumin in a model of Homocysteine - induced oxidative stress in the rat’s brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ataie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "n  "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Aging is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of them. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages and modulate intracellular signaling, ultimately leading to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. In this study, the possible antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of the natural polyphenolic antioxidant compound, curcumin against homocysteine (Hcy neurotoxicity was investigated. "nMethods: Curcumin (5, 15, 45 mg/kg was injected intraperitonealy (i.p. once daily for a period of 10 days beginning 5 days prior to Hcy (0.2 μmol/μl intracerebroventricular (i.c.v injection in rats. Biochemical and behavioral studies, including passive avoidance learning and locomotor activity tests were studied 24 hrs after the last curcumin or its vehicle injection. The cell density of hippocampus layers and apoptosis in rats' hippocampi by immunohistochical methods were also studied. Results and major conclusion:Results indicated that Hcy could induce lipid peroxidation and increase Malondialdehyde (MDA and Super Oxide Anion (SOA levels in rat's brain.Additionally, Hcy impaired memory retention in passive avoidance learning test. However, curcumin decreased MDA and SOA levels significantly and improved learning and memory in rats. On the other hand Hcy could induce cell death and apoptosis in rats' hippocampi which was inhibited by curcumin. These results suggest that Hcy may induce lipid peroxidation in rat's brain. and polyphenol treatment (curcumin improves learning and memory deficits by protecting the nervous system against Oxidative stress.

  6. Expression of c-fos and oxidative stress on brain of rats reared on food from mercury-selenium coexisting mining area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jin-ping; HU Wei-xuan; LIU Xiao-jie; ZHENG Min; SHI Wei; WANG Wen-hua

    2006-01-01

    Wanshan mercury mine is the largest mercury deposit in Guizhou Province of China, but there were few reports on mercury toxic effect in the mining area. In order to study the neurotoxicity of food from Wanshan mercury mine area and probe into the effect of food from Wanshan mercury miner area on the changes of brain oxidative damage and expression of c-fos gene. The rats were exposed to mercury contaminated food for 20 d. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD),GSH-peroxidase (GSH-px) and Glutathione (GSH) in rat brain was measured, and the effect of mercury contaminated rice on the expression of c-fos mRNA in rat brain and the expression of c-FOS protein in cortex, hippocampus were observed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemical methods. The results showed the levels of GSH, MDA,SOD and of GSH-dependent enzymes in the rat brain changed between exposure groups and control group; The mercury polluted rice induced significantly the expression of c-fos mRNA; the c-FOS positive cells in hippocampus and cortex of exposure groups were significant different from control group (P<0.01). It could be concluded that oxidative stress signals could contribute to the induction of immediate early genes (IEGs); free radicals and their by-products might not only cause oxidative damage, but also influenced gene expression; IEGs c-fos participated in the toxicity process of brain injury by mercury polluted food.

  7. Neuroprotective role of hydroalcoholic extract of Vitis vinifera against aluminium-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, B V S; Sudhakar, M; Anisha, M

    2014-03-01

    The present study was designed to examine the protective potential of hydroalcoholic extract of Vitis vinifera in ameliorating the alterations induced by aluminium (Al) on behavioural and neurochemical indices. Al was given orally (100mg/kg b.wt./day) whereas V. vinifera extract was administered through diet (400mg/kg, p.o.) to rats for a total duration of 45 days. Passive avoidance and open field tests revealed significant alterations in the short-term memory and cognitive behaviour in rats treated with Al. Further, locomotor as well as muscular activities were also found to be significantly affected. Co-administration of V. vinifera extract with Al caused significant improvement in the short-term memory, cognition, anxiety, locomotion and muscular activity. Al exposure led to a significant decrease in the acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain, increase in serum glucose, TG, TC, ALP and ALT. Anti-oxidant parameters-reduced glutathione, catalase and glutathione reductase levels were also found to be significantly decreased but the levels of lipid peroxidation was significantly increased in brain following Al treatment. V. vinifera extract supplementation to Al treated animals caused a significant improvement in the activity of enzyme acetylcholinesterase which was altered by Al. Serum glucose, TG, TC, ALP and ALT were brought back to normal levels. Further, V. vinifera extract when given along with Al was also able to regulate the levels of Anti-oxidant parameters in brain and the values were found close to the normal controls. Histopathological studies revealed neurodegeneration and vacuolated cytoplasm after Al treatment. Therefore, the study strengthens the hypothesis that V. vinifera extract can be used as a neuroprotectant during Al induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Comparative study on the inhibitory effect of caffeic and chlorogenic acids on key enzymes linked to Alzheimer's disease and some pro-oxidant induced oxidative stress in rats' brain-in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Agunloye, Odunayo M; Akinyemi, Ayodele J; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O; Adefegha, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    This study sought to investigate and compare the interaction of caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and some pro-oxidants (FeSO(4), sodium nitroprusside and quinolinic acid) induced oxidative stress in rat brain in vitro. The result revealed that caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid inhibited AChE and BChE activities in dose-dependent manner; however, caffeic acid had a higher inhibitory effect on AChE and BChE activities than chlorogenic acid. Combination of the phenolic acids inhibited AChE and BChE activities antagonistically. Furthermore, pro-oxidants such as, FeSO(4), sodium nitroprusside and quinolinic acid caused increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of the brain which was significantly decreased dose-dependently by the phenolic acids. Inhibition of AChE and BChE activities slows down acetylcholine and butyrylcholine breakdown in the brain. Therefore, one possible mechanism through which the phenolic acids exert their neuroprotective properties is by inhibiting AChE and BChE activities as well as preventing oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. However, esterification of caffeic acid with quinic acid producing chlorogenic acid affects these neuroprotective properties.

  9. Attenuation of lead-induced oxidative stress in rat brain, liver, kidney and blood of male Wistar rats by Moringa oleifera seed powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaga, Manoj Kumar; Daughtry, Lucius K; Jones, Angelica C; Yallapragada, Prabhakara Rao; Rajanna, Sharada; Rajanna, Bettaiya

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera is a tree belonging to Moringaceae family and its leaves and seeds are reported to have ameliorative effects against metal toxicity. In the present investigation, M. oleifera seed powder was tested against lead-induced oxidative stress and compared against meso-2, 3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) treatment. Male Wistar rats (100-120 g) were divided into four groups: control (2000 ppm of sodium acetate for 2 weeks), exposed (2000 ppm of lead acetate for 2 weeks), Moringa treated (500 mg/kg for 7 days after lead exposure), and DMSA treated (90 mg/kg for 7 days after lead exposure). After exposure and treatment periods, rats were sacrificed and the brain was separated into cerebellum, hippocampus, frontal cortex, and brain stem; liver, kidney, and blood were also collected. The data indicated a significant (poleifera restored all the parameters back to control, tissue-specifically, and also showed improvement in restoration better than DMSA treatment, indicating reduction of the negative effects of lead-induced oxidative stress.

  10. [Influence of tissue-specific superoxide dismutase genes expression in brain cells on Drosophila melanogaster sensitivity to oxidative stress and viability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitushynska, M V; Matiytsiv, N P; Chernyk, Y

    2015-01-01

    The study has shown that both functional gene knockout Sodl and Sod2 and their overexpression in neurons and glial tissue increase the sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster to oxidative stress (OS) conditions. The lowest survival rate was only 20.5% in insects with Sod2 knockout in neurons. Comparative analysis of the survival curves showed that adults with altered tissue-specific expression of the studied genes had reduced average and maximum life span. Under OS conditions induced by 5% hydrogen peroxide the life spans of wild type Oregon R and transgenic insects were significantly reduced. Altered Sod gene expression in glial tissue leads to degenerative changes in Drosophila brain at the young age. During the aging of insects and the action of pro-oxidants increasing of neurodegenerative phenotype is observed.

  11. Increase in Blood-Brain Barrier Perrmeability, Oxidative Stress, and Activated Microglia in a Rat Model of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    3 X 3 min), followed by dipping in ict> cold water. The sections were exposed to Kodax BioMax Autoradiography Film (Kodak, Rochester, NY) for 55...days. All films were developed using a Kodak D-19 developer and analyzed in NIH Image v1.59 on a Power Macintosh connected to a Sony XC-77 CCD...matic brain injury in rats: an evJluation of sckcted measurcs. J Neuro- trauma 18:1207-1216. Hastings TG. 2tlO<J. The role of dopamine oxidation in

  12. Effects of Xylopia aethiopica (Annonaceae) fruit methanol extract on gamma-radiation-induced oxidative stress in brain of adult male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaramoye, O A; Popoola, Bosede O; Farombi, E O

    2010-09-01

    Xylopia aethiopica (XA) (Annonaceae) possesses great nutritional and medicinal values. This study was designed to investigate the effects of XA fruit methanol extract on oxidative stress in brain of rats exposed to whole body gamma-radiation (5 Gy). Vitamin C (VC) served as standard antioxidant. Forty-four rats were divided into 4 groups of 11 rats each. One group served as control, two different groups were treated with XA and VC (250 mg/kg), 6 weeks before and 8 weeks after irradiation, and fourth group was only irradiated. Rats were sacrificed 1 and 8 weeks after irradiation. The antioxidant status, viz. Lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-s-transferase (GST) and glutathione (GSH) were estimated. Results indicate a significant increase (p < 0.05) in levels of brain LPO after irradiation. LPO increased by 90% and 151%, after 1 and 8 weeks of irradiation, respectively. Irradiation caused significant (p < 0.05) decreases in levels of GSH and GST by 61% and 43% after 1 week and, 75% and 73%, respectively, after 8 weeks of exposure. CAT and SOD levels were decreased by 62% and 68%, respectively, after 8 weeks of irradiation. Treatment with XA and VC ameliorated the radiation-induced decreases in antioxidant status of the animals. These suggest that XA could have beneficial effect by inhibiting oxidative damage in brain of exposed rats.

  13. Oxidative stress & male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-04-01

    The male factor is considered a major contributory factor to infertility. Apart from the conventional causes for male infertility such as varicocoele, cryptorchidism, infections, obstructive lesions, cystic fibrosis, trauma, and tumours, a new and important cause has been identified: oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in the body. It is a powerful mechanism that can lead to sperm damage, deformity and eventually, male infertility. This review discusses the physiological need for ROS and their role in normal sperm function. It also highlights the mechanism of production and the pathophysiology of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system and enumerate the benefits of incorporating antioxidants in clinical and experimental settings.

  14. Protective effects of melatonin against 12C6+ beam irradiation-induced oxidative stress and DNA injury in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. H.; Zhang, H.; Wang, X. Y.; Yang, R.; Liu, B.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, W. P.; Feng, H. Y.; Xue, L. G.; Hao, J. F.; Niu, B. T.; Wang, Z. H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to estimate the protective effects of melatonin against radiation-induced brain damages in mice induced by heavy ion beams. Kun-Ming mice were randomly divided into five groups: normal control group, irradiation control group, and three different doses of melatonin (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) treated groups. Apart from the normal control group, the other four groups were exposed to whole-body 4.0 Gy carbon ion beam irradiation (approximately 0.5 Gy/min) after i.p. administration of normal saline or melatonin 1 h before irradiation. The oxidative redox status of brain tissue was assessed by measurement of malondiadehyde (MDA) levels, total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), cytosolic superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD, SOD1) and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, SOD2) activities at 8 h after irradiation. DNA damages were determined using the Comet assay and apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were detected by flow cytometric analyses. A dramatic dose-dependent decrease in MDA levels, tail moment, rates of tailing cells, and apoptosis, and a dose-dependent increase in T-SOD and SOD2 activities, in brain tissues in the melatonin-treated groups were detected compared with the irradiation only group. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the percentage of brain cells in the G0/G1 phase decreased significantly, while those in the S and G2/M stage increased dramatically, with mice pretreated with melatonin compared to the irradiation control group. These data indicate that melatonin has protective effects against irradiation-induced brain injury, and that its underlying protective mechanisms may relate to modulation of oxidative stress induced by heavy ionirradiation.

  15. Effects of 900-MHz electromagnetic field emitted from cellular phone on brain oxidative stress and some vitamin levels of guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral, Ismail; Mert, Handan; Mert, Nihat; Deger, Yeter; Yoruk, Ibrahim; Yetkin, Ayşen; Keskin, Siddik

    2007-09-12

    This study was designed to demonstrate the effects of 900-MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted from cellular phone on brain tissue and also blood malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), retinol (vitamin A), vitamin D(3) and tocopherol (vitamin E) levels, and catalase (CAT) enzyme activity of guinea pigs. Fourteen male guinea pigs, weighing 500-800 g were randomly divided into one of two experimental groups: control and treatment (EMF-exposed), each containing seven animals. Animals in treatment group were exposed to 890- to 915-MHz EMF (217-Hz pulse rate, 2-W maximum peak power, SAR 0.95 w/kg) of a cellular phone for 12 h/day (11-h 45-min stand-by and 15-min spiking mode) for 30 days. Control guinea pigs were housed in a separate room without exposing EMF of a cellular phone. Blood samples were collected through a cardiac puncture and brains were removed after decapitation for the biochemical analysis at the end of the 30 days of experimental period. It was found that the MDA level increased (P0.05) in the brain tissues of EMF-exposed guinea pigs. In addition, MDA, vitamins A, D(3) and E levels, and CAT enzyme activity increased (Pelectromagnetic field emitted from cellular phone might produce oxidative stress in brain tissue of guinea pigs. However, more studies are needed to demonstrate whether these effects are harmful or/and affect the neural functions.

  16. Mdivi-1 Alleviates Early Brain Injury After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats, Possibly via Inhibition of Drp1-Activated Mitochondrial Fission and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei; Li, Yuchen; Zhu, Shiyi; Wang, Chunlei; Dai, Jiaxing; Zhang, Guang; Zheng, Bingjie; Xu, Shancai; Wang, Ligang; Zhang, Tongyu; Zhou, PeiQuan; Zhang, John H; Shi, Huaizhang

    2017-02-16

    Mdivi-1 is a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial fission protein, Drp1, and can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Previous studies have shown that Mdivi-1 improves neurological outcomes after ischemia, seizures and trauma but it remains unclear whether Mdivi-1 can attenuate early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We thus investigated the therapeutic effect of Mdivi-1 on early brain injury following SAH. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham; SAH; SAH + vehicle; and SAH + Mdivi-1. The SAH model was induced by standard intravascular perforation and all of the rats were subsequently sacrificed 24 h after SAH. Mdivi-1 (1.2 mg/kg) was administered to rats 30 min after SAH. We found that Mdivi-1 markedly improved neurologic deficits, alleviated brain edema and BBB permeability, and attenuated apoptotic cell death. Mdivi-1 also significantly reduced the expression of cleaved caspase-3, Drp1 and p-Drp1((Ser616)), attenuated the release of Cytochrome C from mitochondria, inhibited excessive mitochondrial fission, and restored the ultra-structure of mitochondria. Furthermore, Mdivi-1 reduced levels of MDA, 3-NT, and 8-OHdG, and improved SOD activity. Taken together, our data suggest that Mdivi-1 exerts neuroprotective effects against cell death induced by SAH and the underlying mechanism may be inhibition of Drp1-activated mitochondrial fission and oxidative stress.

  17. Oxidative stress in myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem.

  18. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch-Morell Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem.

  19. 中枢氧化应激对心血管疾病的影响%Brain Oxidative Stress Contributing to Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任晓霞; 康玉明

    2009-01-01

    The imbalance between reactive oxygen species formation and antioxidant defenses in favor of reactive oxygen species contributes to potential detrimental effects of reactive oxygen species-oxidative stress. The major reactive oxygen species molecules include oxygen free radical, lipid peroxidation, superoxide, etc. Superoxide is necessary for normal cellular function. Recent studies indicate that superoxide (and associated reactive oxygen species) generated by NAD(P)H oxidase in nonphagocytic cells plays an important role in both health and disease conditions. In addition, oxidative stress induced by excess superoxide may influence the homeostasis of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus contributing to cardiovascular diseases. It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus tightly correlates with cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure and hypertension. However, the mechanisms responsible for oxidative stress contributing to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases are still poorly understood. This review summarizes the mechanisms of brain oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases.%氧化应激为各种原因导致机体内氧化与抗氧化之间平衡失调,活性氧簇(包括:含氧自由基、脂质过氧化物、超氧化物等)产生过多,而使机体处于促氧化状态.超氧化物对于正常细胞功能是必不可少的.现证实,在非吞噬细胞中由NAD(P)H氧化酶催化所产生的超氧化物(及相关的活性氧簇)对机体健康和疾病的发生发展有很大影响.在中枢神经系统中,过多超氧化物引起的氧化应激会影响心血管中枢稳态进而引发各种心血管疾病.尽管现在已知中枢氧化应激与心力衰竭、高血压等多种心血管疾病密切相关,但对其相关机制却报道甚少,现就此做一综述.

  20. 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine from Arthrobacter nicotinovorans sustain spatial memory formation by decreasing brain oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Stefan, Marius; Brandsch, Roderich; Mihasan, Marius

    2013-03-01

    Male Wistar rats were subjected to chronic 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine treatment (6HLN, 0.3 mg/kg, i.p., seven consecutive days) and their memory performance was studied by means of Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks. 6HLN significantly increased spontaneous alternations in Y-maze task and working memory in radial arm-maze task, suggesting effects on short-term memory, without affecting long-term memory, explored by reference memory in radial arm-maze task. In addition, 6HLN increased antioxidant enzymes activity and decreased production of lipid peroxidation, suggesting antioxidant effects. Also, the linear regression between behavioral measures and oxidative stress markers resulted in significant correlations. Therefore, positive effects of 6HLN on spatial memory may occur by antioxidant actions.

  1. Oxidative Stress and Anxiety: Relationship and Cellular Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaouad Bouayed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available High O2 consumption, modest antioxidant defenses and a lipid-rich constitution make the brain highly vulnerable to redox imbalances. Oxidative damage in the brain causes nervous system impairment. Recently, oxidative stress has also been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and high anxiety levels. The findings which establish a link between oxidative stress and pathological anxiety have inspired a number of other recent studies focusing on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety and also on a possible causal relationship between cellular oxidative stress and emotional stress. This review examines the recent discoveries made on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety levels and the putative role of oxidative stress in genesis of anxiety. We discuss the different opinions and questions that exist in the field and review the methodological approaches that are being used to determine a causal relationship between oxidative and emotional stress.

  2. Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Bailey, Damian M

    2011-01-01

    Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress may prove the molecular basis underlying brain dysfunction in sepsis. In the current review, we describe how sepsis-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) trigger lipid peroxidation chain reactions throughout the cerebrovasculature and surrounding...

  3. Effect of exposure and withdrawal of 900-MHz-electromagnetic waves on brain, kidney and liver oxidative stress and some biochemical parameters in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragy, Merhan Mamdouh

    2015-01-01

    Increasing use of mobile phones in daily life with increasing adverse effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR), emitted from mobile on some physiological processes, cause many concerns about their effects on human health. Therefore, this work was designed to study the effects of exposure to mobile phone emits 900-MHz EMR on the brain, liver and kidney of male albino rats. Thirty male adult rats were randomly divided into four groups (10 each) as follows: control group (rats without exposure to EMR), exposure group (exposed to 900-MHz EMR for 1 h/d for 60 d) and withdrawal group (exposed to 900-MHz electromagnetic wave for 1 h/d for 60 d then left for 30 d without exposure). EMR emitted from mobile phone led to a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and significant decrease total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels in brain, liver and kidneys tissues. The sera activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), urea, creatinine and corticosterone were significantly increased (p electromagnetic field emitting from mobile phone might produce impairments in some biochemicals changes and oxidative stress in brain, liver and renal tissue of albino rats. These alterations were corrected by withdrawal.

  4. Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells decreases oxidative stress, apoptosis, and hippocampal damage in brain of a spontaneous stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calió, Michele Longoni; Marinho, Darci Sousa; Ko, Gui Mi; Ribeiro, Renata Rodrigues; Carbonel, Adriana Ferraz; Oyama, Lila Missae; Ormanji, Milene; Guirao, Tatiana Pinoti; Calió, Pedro Luiz; Reis, Luciana Aparecida; Simões, Manuel de Jesus; Lisbôa-Nascimento, Telma; Ferreira, Alice Teixeira; Bertoncini, Clélia Rejane Antônio

    2014-05-01

    Stroke is the most common cause of motor disabilities and is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Adult stem cells have been shown to be effective against neuronal degeneration through mechanisms that include both the recovery of neurotransmitter activity and a decrease in apoptosis and oxidative stress. We chose the lineage stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) as a model for stem cell therapy. SHRSP rats can develop such severe hypertension that they generally suffer a stroke at approximately 1 year of age. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) decrease apoptotic death and oxidative stress in existing SHRSP brain tissue. The results of qRT-PCR assays showed higher levels of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 gene in the MSC-treated animals, compared with untreated. Our study also showed that superoxide, apoptotic cells, and by-products of lipid peroxidation decreased in MSC-treated SHRSP to levels similar those found in the animal controls, Wistar Kyoto rats. In addition, we saw a repair of morphological damage at the hippocampal region after MSC transplantation. These data suggest that MSCs have neuroprotective and antioxidant potential in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

  5. Prenatal methylmercury exposure hampers glutathione antioxidant system ontogenesis and causes long-lasting oxidative stress in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringari, James; Nunes, Adriana K C; Franco, Jeferson L; Bohrer, Denise; Garcia, Solange C; Dafre, Alcir L; Milatovic, Dejan; Souza, Diogo O; Rocha, João B T; Aschner, Michael; Farina, Marcelo

    2008-02-15

    birth. Even though the cerebral mercury concentration decreased to nearly basal levels at postnatal day 21, GSH levels, GPx and GR activities remained decreased in MeHg-exposed mice, indicating that prenatal exposure to MeHg affects the cerebral GSH antioxidant systems by inducing biochemical alterations that endure even when mercury tissue levels decrease and become indistinguishable from those noted in pups born to control dams. This study is the first to show that prenatal exposure to MeHg disrupts the postnatal development of the glutathione antioxidant system in the mouse brain, pointing to an additional molecular mechanism by which MeHg induces pro-oxidative damage in the developing CNS. Moreover, our experimental observation corroborates previous reports on the permanent functional deficits observed after prenatal MeHg exposure.

  6. The 2013 Discovery Award from the Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine: Selected Discoveries from the Butterfield Laboratory of Oxidative Stress and Its Sequelae in Brain in Cognitive Disorders Exemplified by Alzheimer Disease and Chemotherapy Induced Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D. Allan

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective review on discoveries of the roles of oxidative stress in brain of subjects with Alzheimer disease (AD) and animal models thereof as well as brain from animal models of chemotherapy induced cognitive impairment (CICI) results from the author receiving the 2013 Discovery Award from the Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine. The paper reviews our laboratory's discovery of: protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation in AD brain regions rich in amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) but not in Aβ-poor cerebellum; redox proteomics as a means to identify oxidatively modified brain proteins in AD and its earlier forms that are consistent with the pathology, biochemistry, and clinical presentation of these disorders; how Aβ in in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies can lead to oxidative modification of key proteins that also are oxidatively modified in AD brain; the role of the single methionine residue of Aβ(1-42) in these processes; and some of the potential mechanisms in the pathogenesis and progression of AD. CICI affects a significant fraction of the 14 million American cancer survivors, and due to diminished cognitive function, reduced quality of life of the persons with CICI (called “chemobrain” by patients) often results. A proposed mechanism for CICI employed the prototypical ROS-generating and non-blood brain barrier (BBB)-penetrating chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (Dox, also called adriamycin, ADR). Because of the quinone moiety within the structure of Dox, this agent undergoes redox cycling to produce superoxide free radical peripherally. This, in turn, leads to oxidative modification of the key plasma protein, Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1). Oxidized ApoA1 leads to elevated peripheral TNFα, a pro-inflammatory cytokine that crosses the BBB to induce oxidative stress in brain parenchyma that affects negatively brain mitochondria. This subsequently leads to apoptotic cell death resulting in CICI. This review outlines aspects of CICI consistent

  7. Fibroblast growth factor 21 protects mouse brain against D-galactose induced aging via suppression of oxidative stress response and advanced glycation end products formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinhang; Bai, Fuliang; Wang, Wenfei; Liu, Yaonan; Yuan, Qingyan; Qu, Susu; Zhang, Tong; Tian, Guiyou; Li, Siming; Li, Deshan; Ren, Guiping

    2015-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a hormone secreted predominantly in the liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. Recently, it has been reported that FGF21-Transgenic mice can extend their lifespan compared with wild type counterparts. Thus, we hypothesize that FGF21 may play some roles in aging of organisms. In this study d-galactose (d-gal)-induced aging mice were used to study the mechanism that FGF21 protects mice from aging. The three-month-old Kunming mice were subcutaneously injected with d-gal (180mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) for 8weeks and administered simultaneously with FGF21 (1, 2 or 5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)). Our results showed that administration of FGF21 significantly improved behavioral performance of d-gal-treated mice in water maze task and step-down test, reduced brain cell damage in the hippocampus, and attenuated the d-gal-induced production of MDA, ROS and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). At the same time, FGF21 also markedly renewed the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and total anti-oxidation capability (T-AOC), and decreased the enhanced total cholinesterase (TChE) activity in the brain of d-gal-treated mice. The expression of aldose reductase (AR), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and member-anchored receptor for AGEs (RAGE) declined significantly after FGF21 treatment. Furthermore, FGF21 suppressed inflamm-aging by inhibiting IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. The expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, decreased significantly. In conclusion, these results suggest that FGF21 protects the aging mice brain from d-gal-induced injury by attenuating oxidative stress damage and decreasing AGE formation.

  8. Obesity in aging exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption, neuroinflammation, and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus: effects on expression of genes involved in beta-amyloid generation and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Koller, Akos; Szalai, Gabor; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2014-10-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity has deleterious effects on the brain and cognitive function in the elderly population. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote cognitive decline remain unclear. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced cerebromicrovascular damage and neuroinflammation, we compared young (7 months) and aged (24 months) high fat diet-fed obese C57BL/6 mice. Aging exacerbated obesity-induced systemic inflammation and blood-brain barrier disruption, as indicated by the increased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased presence of extravasated immunoglobulin G in the hippocampus, respectively. Obesity-induced blood-brain barrier damage was associated with microglia activation, upregulation of activating Fc-gamma receptors and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased oxidative stress. Treatment of cultured primary microglia with sera derived from aged obese mice resulted in significantly more pronounced microglia activation and oxidative stress, as compared with treatment with young sera. Serum-induced activation and oxidative stress were also exacerbated in primary microglia derived from aged animals. Hippocampal expression of genes involved in regulation of the cellular amyloid precursor protein-dependent signaling pathways, beta-amyloid generation, and the pathogenesis of tauopathy were largely unaffected by obesity in aged mice. Collectively, obesity in aging is associated with a heightened state of systemic inflammation, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption. The resulting neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus likely contribute to the significant cognitive decline observed in aged obese animals.

  9. Obesity in Aging Exacerbates Blood–Brain Barrier Disruption, Neuroinflammation, and Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Hippocampus: Effects on Expression of Genes Involved in Beta-Amyloid Generation and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Koller, Akos; Szalai, Gabor; Sonntag, William E.; Csiszar, Anna

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity has deleterious effects on the brain and cognitive function in the elderly population. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote cognitive decline remain unclear. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced cerebromicrovascular damage and neuroinflammation, we compared young (7 months) and aged (24 months) high fat diet–fed obese C57BL/6 mice. Aging exacerbated obesity-induced systemic inflammation and blood–brain barrier disruption, as indicated by the increased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased presence of extravasated immunoglobulin G in the hippocampus, respectively. Obesity-induced blood–brain barrier damage was associated with microglia activation, upregulation of activating Fc-gamma receptors and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased oxidative stress. Treatment of cultured primary microglia with sera derived from aged obese mice resulted in significantly more pronounced microglia activation and oxidative stress, as compared with treatment with young sera. Serum-induced activation and oxidative stress were also exacerbated in primary microglia derived from aged animals. Hippocampal expression of genes involved in regulation of the cellular amyloid precursor protein–dependent signaling pathways, beta-amyloid generation, and the pathogenesis of tauopathy were largely unaffected by obesity in aged mice. Collectively, obesity in aging is associated with a heightened state of systemic inflammation, which exacerbates blood–brain barrier disruption. The resulting neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus likely contribute to the significant cognitive decline observed in aged obese animals. PMID:24269929

  10. Melatonin reduces traumatic brain injur y-induced oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex and blood of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nilgnenol; Mustafa Nazrolu

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals induced by traumatic brain injury have deleterious effects on the function and antioxidant vitamin levels of several organ systems including the brain. Melatonin possesses antioxidant effect on the brain by maintaining antioxidant enzyme and vitamin levels. We in-vestigated the effects of melatonin on antioxidant ability in the cerebral cortex and blood of traumatic brain injury rats. Results showed that the cerebral cortex β-carotene, vitamin C, vita-min E, reduced glutathione, and erythrocyte reduced glutathione levels, and plasma vitamin C level were decreased by traumatic brain injury whereas they were increased following melatonin treatment. In conclusion, melatonin seems to have protective effects on traumatic brain inju-ry-induced cerebral cortex and blood toxicity by inhibiting free radical formation and supporting antioxidant vitamin redox system.

  11. Neuropharmacological evaluation of a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (6g on chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced changes in behavioural and brain oxidative stress parameters in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shvetank Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate a novel 5 HT 3 receptor antagonist (6g on chronic stress induced changes in behavioural and brain oxidative stress parameter in mice. A complicated relationship exists among stressful stimuli, body′s reaction to stress and the onset of clinical depression. Chronic unpredictable stressors can produce a situation similar to human depression, and such animal models can be used for the preclinical evaluation of antidepressants. Materials and Methods: In the present study, a novel and potential 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist (4-benzylpiperazin-1-yl(3-methoxyquinoxalin-2-yl methanone (6g with good Log P (3.08 value and pA 2 (7.5 values, synthesized in our laboratory was investigated to study the effects on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS-induced behavioural and biochemical alterations in mice. Mice were subjected to different stress paradigms daily for a period of 28 days to induce depressive-like behaviour. Results: The results showed that CUMS caused depression-like behaviour in mice, as indicated by the significant (P < 0.05 decrease in sucrose consumption and locomotor activity and increase in immobility the forced swim test. In addition, it was found that lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels were significantly (P < 0.05 increased, whereas glutathione levels, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities decreased in brain tissue of CUMS-treated mice. ′6g′ (1 and 2 mg/kg, p.o., 21 days and fluoxetine treatment (20 mg/kg, p.o., 21 days significantly (P < 0.05 reversed the CUMS-induced behavioural (increased immobility period, reduced sucrose preference and decreased locomotor activity and biochemical (increased lipid peroxidation; decreased glutathione levels, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. However fluoxetine treatment (20 mg/kg, p.o., 21 days significantly decreased the nitrite level in the brain while ′6g′ (1 and 2 mg/kg, p.o., 21 days did not show significant (P < 0

  12. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Weon Yi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1 has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonism prevents renal damage and the oxidative stress and inflammatory processes affecting the brains of stroke-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelosa, Paolo; Banfi, Cristina; Gianella, Anita; Brioschi, Maura; Pignieri, Alice; Nobili, Elena; Castiglioni, Laura; Cimino, Mauro; Tremoli, Elena; Sironi, Luigi

    2010-11-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that chronic kidney disease is a significant risk for cardiovascular events and stroke regardless of traditional risk factors. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists on the tissue damage affecting salt-loaded spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats ( SHRSPs), an animal model that develops a complex pathology characterized by systemic inflammation, hypertension, and proteinuria and leads to end-organ injury (initially renal and subsequently cerebral). Compared with the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, the PPARα ligands fenofibrate and clofibrate significantly increased survival (p damage, and glomerular sclerosis, reduced the number of ED-1-positive cells and collagen accumulation, and decreased the renal expression of interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor β, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1. It also prevented the plasma and urine accumulation of acute-phase and oxidized proteins, suggesting that the protection induced by PPARα agonists was at least partially caused by their anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. The results of this study demonstrate that PPAR agonism has beneficial effects on spontaneous brain and renal damage in SHRSPs by inhibiting systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, and they support carrying out future studies aimed at evaluating the effect of PPARα agonists on proteinuria and clinical outcomes in hypertensive patients with renal disease at increased risk of stroke.

  14. Detraining differentially preserved beneficial effects of exercise on hypertension: effects on blood pressure, cardiac function, brain inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepmala Agarwal

    Full Text Available AIMS: This study sought to investigate the effects of physical detraining on blood pressure (BP and cardiac morphology and function in hypertension, and on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (PICs and AIC and oxidative stress within the brain of hypertensive rats. METHODS AND RESULTS: Hypertension was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by delivering AngiotensinII for 42 days using implanted osmotic minipumps. Rats were randomized into sedentary, trained, and detrained groups. Trained rats underwent moderate-intensity exercise (ExT for 42 days, whereas, detrained groups underwent 28 days of exercise followed by 14 days of detraining. BP and cardiac function were evaluated by radio-telemetry and echocardiography, respectively. At the end, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN was analyzed by Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot. ExT in AngII-infused rats caused delayed progression of hypertension, reduced cardiac hypertrophy, and improved diastolic function. These results were associated with significantly reduced PICs, increased AIC (interleukin (IL-10, and attenuated oxidative stress in the PVN. Detraining did not abolish the exercise-induced attenuation in MAP in hypertensive rats; however, detraining failed to completely preserve exercise-mediated improvement in cardiac hypertrophy and function. Additionally, detraining did not reverse exercise-induced improvement in PICs in the PVN of hypertensive rats; however, the improvements in IL-10 were abolished. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that although 2 weeks of detraining is not long enough to completely abolish the beneficial effects of regular exercise, continuing cessation of exercise may lead to detrimental effects.

  15. Piracetam improves mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Uta; Scherping, Isabel; Hauptmann, Susanne; Schuessel, Katin; Eckert, Anne; Müller, Walter E

    2006-01-01

    1.--Mitochondrial dysfunction including decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced ATP production represents a common final pathway of many conditions associated with oxidative stress, for example, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and aging. 2.--Since the cognition-improving effects of the standard nootropic piracetam are usually more pronounced under such pathological conditions and young healthy animals usually benefit little by piracetam, the effect of piracetam on mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress was investigated using PC12 cells and dissociated brain cells of animals treated with piracetam. 3.--Piracetam treatment at concentrations between 100 and 1000 microM improved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production of PC12 cells following oxidative stress induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and serum deprivation. Under conditions of mild serum deprivation, piracetam (500 microM) induced a nearly complete recovery of mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Piracetam also reduced caspase 9 activity after SNP treatment. 4.--Piracetam treatment (100-500 mg kg(-1) daily) of mice was also associated with improved mitochondrial function in dissociated brain cells. Significant improvement was mainly seen in aged animals and only less in young animals. Moreover, the same treatment reduced antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) in aged mouse brain only, which are elevated as an adaptive response to the increased oxidative stress with aging. 5.--In conclusion, therapeutically relevant in vitro and in vivo concentrations of piracetam are able to improve mitochondrial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress and/or aging. Mitochondrial stabilization and protection might be an important mechanism to explain many of piracetam's beneficial effects in elderly patients.

  16. Oxidative and nitrosative stress in ammonia neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowrońska, Marta; Albrecht, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Increased ammonia accumulation in the brain due to liver dysfunction is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Fatal outcome of rapidly progressing (acute) HE is mainly related to cytotoxic brain edema associated with astrocytic swelling. An increase of brain ammonia in experimental animals or treatment of cultured astrocytes with ammonia generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the target tissues, leading to oxidative/nitrosative stress (ONS). In cultured astrocytes, ammonia-induced ONS is invariably associated with the increase of the astrocytic cell volume. Interrelated mechanisms underlying this response include increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis which is partly coupled to the activation of NMDA receptors and increased generation of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase. ONS and astrocytic swelling are further augmented by excessive synthesis of glutamine (Gln) which impairs mitochondrial function following its accumulation in there and degradation back to ammonia ("the Trojan horse" hypothesis). Ammonia also induces ONS in other cell types of the CNS: neurons, microglia and the brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC). ONS in microglia contributes to the central inflammatory response, while its metabolic and pathophysiological consequences in the BCEC evolve to the vasogenic brain edema associated with HE. Ammonia-induced ONS results in the oxidation of mRNA and nitration/nitrosylation of proteins which impact intracellular metabolism and potentiate the neurotoxic effects. Simultaneously, ammonia facilitates the antioxidant response of the brain, by activating astrocytic transport and export of glutathione, in this way increasing the availability of precursors of neuronal glutathione synthesis.

  17. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by living organisms as a result of normal cellular metabolism and environmental factors, such as air pollutants or cigarette smoke. ROS are highly reactive molecules and can damage cell structures such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins and alter their functions. The shift in the balance between oxidants and antioxidants in favor of oxidants is termed “oxidative stress.” Regulation of reducing and oxidizing (redox) state i...

  18. Endothelial cells derived from the blood-brain barrier and islets of Langerhans differ in their response to the effects of bilirubin on oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime eKapitulnik

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB is a neurotoxic degradation product of heme. Its toxic effects include induction of apoptosis, and ultimately neuronal cell death. However, at low concentrations, UCB is a potent antioxidant that may protect cells and tissues against oxidative stress by neutralizing toxic metabolites such as reactive oxygen species (ROS. High glucose levels (hyperglycemia generate reactive metabolites. Endothelial cell dysfunction, an early vascular complication in diabetes, has been associated with hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Both glucose and UCB are substrates for transport proteins in microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In the current study we show that UCB (1-40 M induces apoptosis and reduces survival of bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain endothelial cell line which serves as an in vitro model of the BBB. These deleterious effects of UCB were enhanced in the presence of high glucose (25 mM levels. Interestingly, the bEnd3 cells exhibited an increased sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of UCB when compared to the MS1 microcapillary endothelial cell line. MS1 cells originate from murine pancreatic islets of Langherans, and are devoid of the barrier characteristics of BBB-derived endothelial cells. ROS production was increased in both bEnd3 and MS1 cells exposed to high glucose, as compared with cells exposed to normal (5.5 mM glucose levels. While UCB (0.1-40 M did not alter ROS production in cells exposed to normal glucose, relatively low ('physiological' UCB concentrations (0.1-5 M attenuated ROS generation in both cell lines exposed to high glucose levels. Most strikingly, higher UCB concentrations (20-40 M increased ROS generation in bEnd3 cells exposed to high glucose, but not in similarly treated MS1 cells. These results may be of critical importance for understanding the vulnerability of the BBB endothelium upon exposure to increasing UCB levels under hyperglycemic conditions.

  19. Impaired inflammatory response and increased oxidative stress and neurodegeneration after brain injury in interleukin-6-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Giralt, M; Carrasco, J;

    2000-01-01

    showed higher levels of MDA, NITT, and iNOS than did normal mice. Concomitantly, in IL-6KO mice the number of apoptotic neurons was significantly increased as judged by TUNEL staining, and regeneration of the tissue was delayed relative to normal mice. The changes in neuronal tissue damage and in brain...

  20. Oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikam, Shashikant; Nikam, Padmaja; Ahaley, S K; Sontakke, Ajit V

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the cascade, leading to dopamine cell degeneration in Parkinson's disease. However, oxidative stress is intimately linked to other components of the degenerative process, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, nitric oxide toxicity and inflammation. It is therefore difficult to determine whether oxidative stress leads to or is a consequence of, these events. Oxidative stress was assessed by estimating lipid peroxidation product in the form of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, nitric oxide in the form of nitrite & nitrate. Enzymatic antioxidants in the form of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin and non enzymatic antioxidant vitamins e.g. vitamin E and C in either serum or plasma or erythrocyte in 40 patients of Parkinson's disease in the age group 40-80 years. Trace elements e.g. copper, zinc and selenium were also estimated. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide levels were Significantly high but superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin, vitamin-E, vitamin-C, copper, zinc and selenium levels were significantly low in Parkinson's disease when compared with control subjects. Present study showed that elevated oxidative stress may be playing a role in dopaminergic neuronal loss in substentia nigra pars compacta and involved in pathogenesis of the Parkinson's disease.

  1. Evaluation of Some Biochemical Parameters and Brain Oxidative Stress in Experimental Rats Exposed Chronically to Silver Nitrate and the Protective Role of Vitamin E and Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroui, Mouna; Kechrid, Zine

    2016-01-01

    Due to undesirable hazardous interactions with biological systems, this investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effect of chronic exposure to silver on certain biochemical and some oxidative stress parameters with histopathological examination of brain, as well as the possible protective role of selenium and/or vitamin E as nutritional supplements. Thirty six male rats were divided into six groups of six each: the first group used as a control group. Group II given both vitamin E (400 mg/kg) of diet and selenium (Se) (1 mg/L) in their drinking water. Group III given silver as silver nitrate (AgNO3) (20 mg/L). Group IV given vitamin E and AgNO3. Group V given both AgNO3 and selenium. Group VI given AgNO3, vitamin E and Se. The animals were in the same exposure conditions for 3 months. According to the results which have been obtained; there was an increase in serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lipase activities and cholesterol level, a decrease in serum total protein, calcium and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in Ag-intoxicated rats. Moreover, the findings showed that Ag+ ions affected antioxidant defense system by decreasing superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and increasing vitamin E concentration with a high level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in brain tissue. The histological examination also exhibited some nervous tissue alterations including hemorrhage and cytoplasm vacuolization. However, the co-administration of selenium and/or vitamin E ameliorated the biochemical parameters and restored the histological alterations. In conclusion, this study indicated that silver could cause harmful effects in animal body and these effects can be more toxic in high concentrations or prolonged time exposure to this metal. However, selenium and vitamin E act as powerful antioxidants which may exercise adverse effect against the toxicity of this metal.

  2. An investigation of the effect of thiamine pyrophosphate on cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in rat brain tissue compared with thiamine: thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate effects on cisplatin neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, M I; Cayir, A; Cetin, N; Suleyman, H; Siltelioglu Turan, I; Tan, H

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) at dosages of 10 and 20 mg/kg on oxidative stress induced in rat brain tissue with cisplatin and compared this with thiamine. Cisplatin neurotoxicity represents one of the main restrictions on the drug being given in effective doses. Oxidative stress is considered responsible for cisplatin toxicity. Our results showed that cisplatin increased the levels of oxidant parameters such as lipid peroxidation (thio barbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS)) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in brain tissue and suppressed the effects of antioxidants such as total glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). TPP, especially at a dosage of 20 mg/kg, significantly reduced TBARS and MPO levels that increase with cisplatin administration compared with the thiamine group, while TPP significantly increases GSH and SOD levels. In addition, the level of 8-Gua (guanine), a product of DNA damage, was 1.7 ± 0.12 8-hydroxyl guanine (8-OH Gua)/105 Gua in brain tissue in the control group receiving cisplatin, compared with 0.97 ± 0.03 8-OH Gua/105 Gua in the thiamine pyrophosphate (20 mg/kg) group and 1.55 ± 0.11 8-OH Gua/105 Gua in the thiamine (20 mg/kg) group. These results show that thiamine pyrophosphate significantly prevents oxidative damage induced by cisplatin in brain tissue, while the protective effect of thiamine is insignificant.

  3. Comorbidity between depression and inflammatory bowel disease explained by immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress; tryptophan catabolite; and gut-brain pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Subero, Marta; Anderson, George; Kanchanatawan, Buranee; Berk, Michael; Maes, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The nature of depression has recently been reconceptualized, being conceived as the clinical expression of activated immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways, including tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT), autoimmune, and gut-brain pathways. IO&NS pathways are similarly integral to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The increased depression prevalence in IBD associates with a lower quality of life and increased morbidity in IBD, highlighting the role of depression in modulating the pathophysiology of IBD.This review covers data within such a wider conceptualization that better explains the heightened co-occurrence of IBD and depression. Common IO&NS underpinning between both disorders is evidenced by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, eg, interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 trans-signalling; Th-1- and Th-17-like responses; neopterin and soluble IL-2 receptor levels; positive acute phase reactants (haptoglobin and C-reactive protein); lowered levels of negative acute phase reactants (albumin, transferrin, zinc) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β); increased O&NS with damage to lipids, proteinsm and DNA; increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and inducible NO synthase; lowered plasma tryptophan but increased TRYCAT levels; autoimmune responses; and increased bacterial translocation. As such, heightened IO&NS processes in depression overlap with the biological underpinnings of IBD, potentially explaining their increased co-occurrence. This supports the perspective that there is a spectrum of IO&NS disorders that includes depression, both as an emergent comorbidity and as a contributor to IO&NS processes. Such a frame of reference has treatment implications for IBD when "comorbid" with depression.

  4. Vitamin E loaded resveratrol nanoemulsion for brain targeting for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease by reducing oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangeni, Rudra; Sharma, Shrestha; Mustafa, Gulam; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula

    2014-12-01

    Resveratrol, a potent natural antioxidant, possesses a wide range of pharmacological activities, but its oral bioavailability is very low due to its extensive hepatic and presystemic metabolism. The aim of the present study was to formulate a kinetically stable nanoemulsion (o/w) using vitamin E:sefsol (1:1) as the oil phase, Tween 80 as the surfactant and Transcutol P as the co-surfactant for the better management of Parkinson’s disease. The nanoemulsion was prepared by a spontaneous emulsification method, followed by high-pressure homogenization. Ternary phase diagrams were constructed to locate the area of nanoemulsion. The prepared formulations were studied for globule size, zeta potential, refractive index, viscosity, surface morphology and in vitro and ex vivo release. The homogenized formulation, which contained 150 mg ml-1 of resveratrol, showed spherical globules with an average globule diameter of 102 ± 1.46 nm, a least poly dispersity index of 0.158 ± 0.02 and optimal zeta potential values of -35 ± 0.02. The cumulative percentage drug release for the pre-homogenized resveratrol suspension, pre-homogenized nanoemulsion and post-homogenized nanoemulsion were 24.18 ± 2.30%, 54.32 ± 0.95% and 88.57 ± 1.92%, respectively, after 24 h. The ex vivo release also showed the cumulative percentage drug release of 85.48 ± 1.34% at 24 h. The antioxidant activity determined by using a DPPH assay showed high scavenging efficiency for the optimized formulation. Pharmacokinetic studies showed the higher concentration of the drug in the brain (brain/blood ratio: 2.86 ± 0.70) following intranasal administration of the optimized nanoemulsion. Histopathological studies showed decreased degenerative changes in the resveratrol nanoemulsion administered groups. The levels of GSH and SOD were significantly higher, and the level of MDA was significantly lower in the resveratrol nanoemulsion treated group.

  5. Effect of stress on structural brain asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Petr; Vales, Karel; Stuchlik, Ales; Cermakova, Pavla; Mrzilkova, Jana; Koutela, Antonella; Kutova, Martina

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that stressful events may affect the brain not only as a whole, but also in multiple laterality aspects. The present review is aimed at discussing the effect of stress and stress hormones on structural brain asymmetry. Differences and crossroads of functional and structural asymmetry are briefly mentioned throughout the document. The first part of this review summarizes major findings in the field of structural brain asymmetries in animals and humans from the evolutionary perspective. Additionally, effect of stress on animals is discussed generally. The second part then explores asymmetrical effects of stress on structural changes of principal brain areas - amygdala, hippocampus, neocortex, diencephalon, basal forebrain and basal ganglia from the point of normal lateralization, steroids, trauma and genetic factors. At the end we present hypothesis why stress appears to have asymmetrical effects on lateralized brain structures.

  6. Region-specific changes in activities of cell death-related proteases and nitric oxide metabolism in rat brain in a chronic unpredictable stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishkina, Anna; Rukhlenko, Alexey; Stepanichev, Mikhail; Levshina, Irina; Pasikova, Natalia; Onufriev, Mikhail; Moiseeva, Yulia; Piskunov, Alexey; Gulyaeva, Natalia

    2012-12-01

    Effects of a chronic combined unpredictable stress on activities of two cell death-related proteases, calpain and cathepsin B, were studied along with indices of nitrergic system in rat brain structures. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 2-week-long combined stress (combination of unpaired flash light and moderate footshock associated with a white noise session). Stress resulted in a significant loss in the body and thymus weight and increased defecation in the open field test, though neither motor and exploratory activity, nor plasma corticosterone differed from the respective control levels. Decreased calpain activity and increased cathepsin B activity were demonstrated in the hippocampus of stressed rats (previously we have shown that caspase-3 activity was significantly suppressed in the brain of rats subjected to same type of stress). A significant reduction in the number of NOS-containing neurons was accompanied by a chronic stressinduced decline in NOS activity in the neocortex. Similar changes were observed in the hippocampus. However, levels of NO metabolites were elevated in both structures. Thus, stress-induced structural modifications in the brain may be mediated by disturbances in the nitrergic system and increased lysosomal proteolysis.

  7. Antioxidant and iron-binding properties of curcumin, capsaicin, and S-allylcysteine reduce oxidative stress in rat brain homogenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairam, Amichand; Fogel, Ronen; Daya, Santy; Limson, Janice L

    2008-05-14

    Research demonstrates that antioxidants and metal chelators may be of beneficial use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated the antioxidant and metal-binding properties of curcumin, capsaicin, and S-allylcysteine, which are major components found in commonly used dietary spice ingredients turmeric, chilli, and garlic, respectively. The DPPH assay demonstrates that these compounds readily scavenge free radicals. These compounds significantly curtail iron- (Fe2+) and quinolinic acid (QA)-induced lipid peroxidation and potently scavenge the superoxide anion generated by 1 mM cyanide in rat brain homogenate. The ferrozine assay was used to measure the extent of Fe2+ chelation, and electrochemistry was employed to measure the Fe3+ binding activity of curcumin, capsaicin, and S-allylcysteine. Both assays demonstrate that these compounds bind Fe2+ and Fe3+ and prevent the redox cycling of iron, suggesting that this may be an additional method through which these agents reduce Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation. This study demonstrates the antioxidant and metal-binding properties of these spice ingredients, and it is hereby postulate that these compounds have important implications in the prevention or treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD.

  8. Apoptosis and oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Elena; Formichi, Patrizia; Battisti, Carla; Federico, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders affect almost 30 million individuals leading to disability and death. These disorders are characterized by pathological changes in disease-specific areas of the brain and degeneration of distinct neuron subsets. Despite the differences in clinical manifestations and neuronal vulnerability, the pathological processes appear similar, suggesting common neurodegenerative pathways. Apoptosis seems to play a key role in the progression of several neurologic disorders like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as demonstrated by studies on animal models and cell lines. On the other hand, research on human brains reported contradictory results. However, many dying neurons have been detected in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases, and these conditions are often associated with significant cell loss accompanied by typical morphological features of apoptosis such as chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, and activation of cysteine-proteases, caspases. Cell death and neurodegenerative conditions have been linked to oxidative stress and imbalance between generation of free radicals and antioxidant defenses. Multiple sclerosis, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases have been associated with reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. Here we present an overview of the involvement of neuronal apoptosis and oxidative stress in the most important neurodegenerative diseases, mainly focusing the attention on several genetic disorders, discussing the interaction between primary genetic abnormalities and the apoptotic pathways.

  9. Stress, stress hormones, and the behavioral neurobiology of brain plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohus, B; Luiten, PGM; Beldhuis, HJA; vanderZee, EA; Roozendaal, B; Douma, B; Ishikawa, K; McGaugh, JL; Sakata, H

    1996-01-01

    Efforts have long been directed toward studying stress-induced alterations via stress hormones on brain excitability and synaptic plasticity as inferred from combined behavioral, electrophysiological, and immunohistochemical cellular/molecular observations. Kindling of the brain in the rat serves as

  10. Mitochondrial oxidative stress causes hyperphosphorylation of tau.

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    Simon Melov

    Full Text Available Age-related neurodegenerative disease has been mechanistically linked with mitochondrial dysfunction via damage from reactive oxygen species produced within the cell. We determined whether increased mitochondrial oxidative stress could modulate or regulate two of the key neurochemical hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD: tau phosphorylation, and beta-amyloid deposition. Mice lacking superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 die within the first week of life, and develop a complex heterogeneous phenotype arising from mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Treatment of these mice with catalytic antioxidants increases their lifespan and rescues the peripheral phenotypes, while uncovering central nervous system pathology. We examined sod2 null mice differentially treated with high and low doses of a catalytic antioxidant and observed striking elevations in the levels of tau phosphorylation (at Ser-396 and other phospho-epitopes of tau in the low-dose antioxidant treated mice at AD-associated residues. This hyperphosphorylation of tau was prevented with an increased dose of the antioxidant, previously reported to be sufficient to prevent neuropathology. We then genetically combined a well-characterized mouse model of AD (Tg2576 with heterozygous sod2 knockout mice to study the interactions between mitochondrial oxidative stress and cerebral Ass load. We found that mitochondrial SOD2 deficiency exacerbates amyloid burden and significantly reduces metal levels in the brain, while increasing levels of Ser-396 phosphorylated tau. These findings mechanistically link mitochondrial oxidative stress with the pathological features of AD.

  11. Mitochondrial oxidative stress causes hyperphosphorylation of tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melov, Simon; Adlard, Paul A; Morten, Karl; Johnson, Felicity; Golden, Tamara R; Hinerfeld, Doug; Schilling, Birgit; Mavros, Christine; Masters, Colin L; Volitakis, Irene; Li, Qiao-Xin; Laughton, Katrina; Hubbard, Alan; Cherny, Robert A; Gibson, Brad; Bush, Ashley I

    2007-06-20

    Age-related neurodegenerative disease has been mechanistically linked with mitochondrial dysfunction via damage from reactive oxygen species produced within the cell. We determined whether increased mitochondrial oxidative stress could modulate or regulate two of the key neurochemical hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD): tau phosphorylation, and beta-amyloid deposition. Mice lacking superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) die within the first week of life, and develop a complex heterogeneous phenotype arising from mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Treatment of these mice with catalytic antioxidants increases their lifespan and rescues the peripheral phenotypes, while uncovering central nervous system pathology. We examined sod2 null mice differentially treated with high and low doses of a catalytic antioxidant and observed striking elevations in the levels of tau phosphorylation (at Ser-396 and other phospho-epitopes of tau) in the low-dose antioxidant treated mice at AD-associated residues. This hyperphosphorylation of tau was prevented with an increased dose of the antioxidant, previously reported to be sufficient to prevent neuropathology. We then genetically combined a well-characterized mouse model of AD (Tg2576) with heterozygous sod2 knockout mice to study the interactions between mitochondrial oxidative stress and cerebral Ass load. We found that mitochondrial SOD2 deficiency exacerbates amyloid burden and significantly reduces metal levels in the brain, while increasing levels of Ser-396 phosphorylated tau. These findings mechanistically link mitochondrial oxidative stress with the pathological features of AD.

  12. Mechanism of Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

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    Sonia Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological tissues require oxygen to meet their energetic demands. However, the consumption of oxygen also results in the generation of free radicals that may have damaging effects on cells. The brain is particularly vulnerable to the effects of reactive oxygen species due to its high demand for oxygen, and its abundance of highly peroxidisable substrates. Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance in the redox state of the cell, either by overproduction of reactive oxygen species, or by dysfunction of the antioxidant systems. Oxidative stress has been detected in a range of neurodegenerative disease, and emerging evidence from in vitro and in vivo disease models suggests that oxidative stress may play a role in disease pathogenesis. However, the promise of antioxidants as novel therapies for neurodegenerative diseases has not been borne out in clinical studies. In this review, we critically assess the hypothesis that oxidative stress is a crucial player in common neurodegenerative disease and discuss the source of free radicals in such diseases. Furthermore, we examine the issues surrounding the failure to translate this hypothesis into an effective clinical treatment.

  13. Ethanolic extract of Astragali radix and Salviae radix prohibits oxidative brain injury by psycho-emotional stress in whisker removal rat model.

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    Hyeong-Geug Kim

    Full Text Available Myelophil, an ethanolic extract of Astragali Radix and Salviae Radix, has been clinically used to treat chronic fatigue and stress related disorders in South Korea. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of Myelophil on a whisker removal-induced psycho-emotional stress model. SD rats were subjected to whisker removal after oral administration of Myelophil or ascorbic acid for consecutive 4 days. Whisker removal considerably increased total reactive oxygen species in serum levels as well as cerebral cortex and hippocampal regions in brain tissues. Lipidperoxidation levels were also increased in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus regions, and brain tissue injuries as shown in histopathology and immunohistochemistry. However, Myelophil significantly ameliorated these alterations, and depletion of glutathione contents in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus regions respectively. Serum levels of corticosterone and adrenaline were notably altered after whisker removal stress, whereas these abnormalities were significantly normalized by pre-treatment with Myelophil. The NF-κB was notably activated in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus after whisker removal stress, while it was efficiently blocked by pre-treatment with Myelophil. Myelophil also significantly normalizes alterations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6 and interferon-γ in both gene expressions and protein levels. These results suggest that Myelophil has protective effects on brain damages in psycho-emotional stress, and the underlying mechanisms involve regulation of inflammatory proteins, especially NF-κB modulation.

  14. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  15. Arsenic and nicotine co-exposure lead to some synergistic effects on oxidative stress and apoptotic markers in young rat blood, liver, kidneys and brain

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    Anshu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic and nicotine exposure has been a major health concern globally. Individually both these toxicants increase the risk to various diseases including cancers. However, limited information exists on the co-exposure. In this study, we evaluate the effects of their individual and combined exposure and if co-exposure to these toxicants might have a synergism or antagonism. Male rats were exposed to a very low dose of arsenic (25 ppm in drinking water or nicotine (0.25 mg/kg, sub-cutaneously for a period of 5 months and post exposure various biochemical variables indicative of oxidative stress and apoptosis evaluated. Almost all glutathione linked enzymes showed marked alteration in individual as well as co-exposure treated groups. While serum creatinine and apoptosis indicator, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH were significantly increased in both treatments, an additive effect was noted in co-exposure group. A similar trend was also seen in brain and liver but not in kidneys. Gene expression studies showed marked reduction in catalase, Cu-Zn SOD, GST, there was a significant up regulation in Bax, caspase 3 in various tissues along with urinary 8-OHdG levels, indicative of DNA damage and apoptosis. Interestingly, a decrease in liver arsenic concentration was noted in co-exposed group compared to arsenic alone exposed group. In conclusion, the present study suggests that arsenic and nicotine exhibited significant toxicity during individual exposure whereas co-exposure to these toxins showed variable conditions (indicative of both synergism and antagonism in male rats.

  16. Oxidative stress and Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesa, Javier; Trigo-Damas, Ines; Quiroga-Varela, Anna; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice R.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurological disease that is associated with a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of the brain. The molecular mechanisms underlying the loss of these neurons still remain elusive. Oxidative stress is thought to play an important role in dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Complex I deficiencies of the respiratory chain account for the majority of unfavorable neuronal degeneration in PD. Environmental factors, such as neurotoxins, pesticides, insecticides, dopamine (DA) itself, and genetic mutations in PD-associated proteins contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction which precedes reactive oxygen species formation. In this mini review, we give an update of the classical pathways involving these mechanisms of neurodegeneration, the biochemical and molecular events that mediate or regulate DA neuronal vulnerability, and the role of PD-related gene products in modulating cellular responses to oxidative stress in the course of the neurodegenerative process. PMID:26217195

  17. Hemoglobin oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, S.; Ortalli, I.; Pedrazzi, G. [University of Parma, Istituto di Scienze Fisiche, INFM-Udr Parma (Italy); Passeri, G. [University of Parma, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Scienze Biomediche (Italy); Piccolo, P. [University of Parma, Istituto di Clinica chirurgica Generale, Toracica e Vascolare (Italy)

    2000-07-15

    Venous blood obtained from healthy donors and from patients suffering from breast cancer have been treated with acetylphenylhydrazine (APH) for different time. Moessbauer spectra of the packed red cells have been recorded and compared. The largest difference occurs after 50 min of treatment with APH where the patient samples show a broad spectral pattern indicating an advanced hemoglobin oxidation. These results may have some relevance in early cancer diagnosis.

  18. Electromagnetic Fields, Oxidative Stress, and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Consales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic fields (EMFs originating both from both natural and manmade sources permeate our environment. As people are continuously exposed to EMFs in everyday life, it is a matter of great debate whether they can be harmful to human health. On the basis of two decades of epidemiological studies, an increased risk for childhood leukemia associated with Extremely Low Frequency fields has been consistently assessed, inducing the International Agency for Research on Cancer to insert them in the 2B section of carcinogens in 2001. EMFs interaction with biological systems may cause oxidative stress under certain circumstances. Since free radicals are essential for brain physiological processes and pathological degeneration, research focusing on the possible influence of the EMFs-driven oxidative stress is still in progress, especially in the light of recent studies suggesting that EMFs may contribute to the etiology of neurodegenerative disorders. This review synthesizes the emerging evidences about this topic, highlighting the wide data uncertainty that still characterizes the EMFs effect on oxidative stress modulation, as both pro-oxidant and neuroprotective effects have been documented. Care should be taken to avoid methodological limitations and to determine the patho-physiological relevance of any alteration found in EMFs-exposed biological system.

  19. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs.

  20. The Role of Flavonoids on Oxidative Stress in Epilepsy

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    Tâmara Coimbra Diniz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds. Oxidative stress can result from excessive free-radical production and it is likely implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the initiation and progression of epileptogenesis. Flavonoids can protect the brain from oxidative stress. In the central nervous system (CNS several flavonoids bind to the benzodiazepine site on the GABAA-receptor resulting in anticonvulsive effects. Objective. This review provides an overview about the role of flavonoids in oxidative stress in epilepsy. The mechanism of action of flavonoids and its relation to the chemical structure is also discussed. Results/Conclusions. There is evidence that suggests that flavonoids have potential for neuroprotection in epilepsy.

  1. Uptake and metabolism of iron oxide nanoparticles in brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petters, Charlotte; Irrsack, Ellen; Koch, Michael; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are used for various applications in biomedicine, for example as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, for cell tracking and for anti-tumor treatment. However, IONPs are also known for their toxic effects on cells and tissues which are at least in part caused by iron-mediated radical formation and oxidative stress. The potential toxicity of IONPs is especially important concerning the use of IONPs for neurobiological applications as alterations in brain iron homeostasis are strongly connected with human neurodegenerative diseases. Since IONPs are able to enter the brain, potential adverse consequences of an exposure of brain cells to IONPs have to be considered. This article describes the pathways that allow IONPs to enter the brain and summarizes the current knowledge on the uptake, the metabolism and the toxicity of IONPs for the different types of brain cells in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Hemoglobin oxidative stress in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rovere, F; Granata, A; Broccio, M; Zirilli, A; Broccio, G

    1995-01-01

    The role played by free radicals in carcinogenesis and their relationships with antioxidant pool and cancer have already been shown. Free radicals induce increased membrane permeability through membrane lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and histamine release from mast cells. Free radicals also cause oxyhemoglobin oxidative stress which increases methemoglobin and hemichromes. For this reason, we studied the in vitro formation of methemoglobin at 0' and 90', dosed following the HPLC method, after oxidative stress of blood by means of acetylphenylhydrazine in 40 subjects with cancer and 40 healthy donors. The results showed that methemoglobin formation was highly significant in tumors as compared to controls (P < 0.0001). The statistical analyses we carried out showed that metHb formation is not affected by age, sex, smoking habit, red blood cell number, Hb, Ht or tumor staging. This makes us believe that free radicals alter erythrocyte membrane permeability and predenaturate oxyhemoglobin so that erythrocyte membrane becomes more susceptible to new oxidative stress. This caused the abnormal response we found. Our results clearly underline the role played by free radicals in tumorous disease and provide a successful and easy method to detect early, even in a pre-clinical stage, the presence of tumorous alterations in the human body.

  3. The Selfish Brain: Stress and Eating Behavior

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    Achim ePeters

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The brain occupies a special hierarchical position in human energy metabolism. If cerebral homeostasis is threatened, the brain behaves in a "selfish" manner by competing for energy resources with the body. Here we present a logistic approach, which is based on the principles of supply and demand known from economics. In this "cerebral supply chain" model, the brain constitutes the final consumer. In order to illustrate the operating mode of the cerebral supply chain, we take experimental data which allow to assess the supply, demand and need of the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress. The experimental results show that the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress actively demands energy from the body, in order to cover its increased energy needs. The data demonstrate that the stressed brain uses a mechanism referred to as "cerebral insulin suppression" to limit glucose fluxes into peripheral tissue (muscle, fat and to enhance cerebral glucose supply. Furthermore psychosocial stress elicits a marked increase in eating behavior in the post-stress phase. Subjects ingested more carbohydrates without any preference for sweet ingredients. These experimentally observed changes of cerebral demand, supply and need are integrated into a logistic framework describing the supply chain of the selfish brain.

  4. The selfish brain: stress and eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Achim; Kubera, Britta; Hubold, Christian; Langemann, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The brain occupies a special hierarchical position in human energy metabolism. If cerebral homeostasis is threatened, the brain behaves in a "selfish" manner by competing for energy resources with the body. Here we present a logistic approach, which is based on the principles of supply and demand known from economics. In this "cerebral supply chain" model, the brain constitutes the final consumer. In order to illustrate the operating mode of the cerebral supply chain, we take experimental data which allow assessing the supply, demand and need of the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress. The experimental results show that the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress actively demands energy from the body, in order to cover its increased energy needs. The data demonstrate that the stressed brain uses a mechanism referred to as "cerebral insulin suppression" to limit glucose fluxes into peripheral tissue (muscle, fat) and to enhance cerebral glucose supply. Furthermore psychosocial stress elicits a marked increase in eating behavior in the post-stress phase. Subjects ingested more carbohydrates without any preference for sweet ingredients. These experimentally observed changes of cerebral demand, supply and need are integrated into a logistic framework describing the supply chain of the selfish brain.

  5. Methane oxidation needs less stressed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqi; Smaill, Simeon J; Clinton, Peter W

    2013-12-01

    Methane oxidation rates in soil are liable to be reduced by plant stress responses to climate change. Stressed plants exude ethylene into soil, which inhibits methane oxidation when present in the soil atmosphere. Here we discuss opportunities to use 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase to manage methane oxidation by regulating plant stress responses.

  6. Social support, stress and the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Stephanie M; Cheng, Yen-Pi; Fingerman, Karen L; Schnyer, David M

    2016-07-01

    Social support benefits health and well-being in older individuals, however the mechanism remains poorly understood. One proposal, the stress-buffering hypothesis states social support 'buffers' the effects of stress on health. Alternatively, the main effect hypothesis suggests social support independently promotes health. We examined the combined association of social support and stress on the aging brain. Forty healthy older adults completed stress questionnaires, a social network interview and structural MRI to investigate the amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex circuitry, which is implicated in social and emotional processing and negatively affected by stress. Social support was positively correlated with right medial prefrontal cortical thickness while amygdala volume was negatively associated with social support and positively related to stress. We examined whether the association between social support and amygdala volume varied across stress level. Stress and social support uniquely contribute to amygdala volume, which is consistent with the health benefits of social support being independent of stress.

  7. The brain mineralocorticoid receptor and stress resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Heegde, Freija; De Rijk, Roel H.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.

    2015-01-01

    Stress exposure activates the HPA-axis and results in the release of corticosteroids which bind to two receptor types in the brain: the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While the role of the GR in stress reactivity has been extensively studied, the MR has receive

  8. Kinetics of the neuroinflammation-oxidative stress correlation in rat brain following the injection of fibrillar amyloid-beta onto the hippocampus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; Valdivia-Velázquez, Miguel; Acosta-Martínez, J Pablo; Ortiz, Genaro G

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe-following the injection of a single intracerebral dose of fibrillar amyloid-beta(1-40) in vivo-some correlations between proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress indicators in function of time, as well as how these variables fit in a regression model. We found a positive, significant correlation between interleukin (IL)-1beta or IL-6 and the activity of the glutathione peroxidase enzyme (GSH-Px), but IL-1beta or IL-6 maintained a strong, negative correlation with the lipid peroxidation (LPO). The first 12 h marked a positive correlation between IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), but starting from the 36 h, this relationship became negative. We found also particular patterns of behavior through the time for IL-1beta, nitrites and IL-6, with parallel or sequential interrelationships. Results shows clearly that, in vivo, the fibrillar amyloid-beta (Abeta) disrupts the oxidative balance and initiate a proinflammatory response, which in turn feeds the oxidative imbalance in a coordinated, sequential way. This work contributes to our understanding of the positive feedbacks, focusing the "cytokine cycle" along with the oxidative stress mediators in a complex, multicellular, and interactive environment.

  9. Skin aging and oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sayeeda Ahsanuddin; Minh Lam; Baron, Elma D.

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging occurs through two main pathways, intrinsic and extrinsic. These pathways have significant interaction in contributing to the aging phenotype, which includes skin laxity, wrinkling, pigmentation irregularities, and the appearance of neoplastic skin lesions. Here, we review the critical role that oxidative stress plays in skin aging, including its effects on signaling pathways involved in skin matrix formation and degradation, proteasome activity, as well as DNA structure. Furthermo...

  10. Oral treatment with the herbal formula B401 protects against aging-dependent neurodegeneration by attenuating oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brain of R6/2 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang SE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sheue-Er Wang,1,2 Ching-Lung Lin,1 Chih-Hsiang Hsu,1 Shuenn-Jyi Sheu,3 Chung-Hsin Wu1 1Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, 2Department of Pathological Inspection, Saint Paul’s Hospital, Taoyuan, 3Brion Research Institute of Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Neurodegeneration is characterized by progressive neurological deficits due to selective neuronal loss in the nervous system. Huntington’s disease (HD is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder. Neurodegeneration in HD patients shows aging-dependent pattern. Our previous study has suggested that a herbal formula B401 may have neuroprotective effects in the brains of R6/2 mice. Objective: To clarify possible mechanisms for neurodegeneration, which improves the understanding the aging process. This study focuses on clarifying neurodegenerative mechanisms and searching potential therapeutic targets in HD patients. Methods: The oxidative stress and apoptosis were compared in the brain tissue between R6/2 HD mice with and without oral B401 treatment. Expressions of proteins for oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brain tissue of R6/2 HD mice were examined by using immunostaining and Western blotting techniques. Results: R6/2 HD mice with oral B401 treatment significantly reduced reactive oxygen species levels in the blood, but markedly increased expressions of superoxide dismutase 2 in the brain tissue. Furthermore, R6/2 HD mice with oral B401 treatment significantly increased expressions of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, but significantly reduced expressions of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax, calpain, and caspase-3 in the brain tissue. Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence that the herbal formula B401 can remedy for aging-dependent neurodegeneration of R6/2 mice via suppressing oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brain. We suggest that the herbal formula B401 can be developed as a potential health supplement for ameliorating aging

  11. Oxidative stress and glycemic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriello, A

    2000-02-01

    Oxidative stress is an acknowledged pathogenetic mechanism in diabetic complications. Hyperglycemia is a widely known cause of enhanced free radical concentration, whereas oxidative stress involvement in glycemic regulation is still debated. Glucose transport is a cascade of events starting from the interaction of insulin with its own receptor at the plasma membrane and ending with intracellular glucose metabolism. In this complex series of events, each step plays an important role and can be inhibited by a negative effect of oxidative stress. Several studies show that an acute increase in the blood glucose level may impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in living organisms. The mechanisms through which acute hyperglycemia exerts these effects may be identified in the production of free radicals. It has been suggested that insulin resistance may be accompanied by intracellular production of free radicals. In adipocytes cultured in vitro, insulin increases the production of hydrogen peroxide, which has been shown to mimic the action of insulin. These data allow us to hypothesize that a vicious circle between hyperinsulinemia and free radicals could be operating: insulin resistance might cause elevated plasma free radical concentrations, which, in turn, might be responsible for a deterioration of insulin action, with hyperglycemia being a contributory factor. Data supporting this hypothesis are available. Vitamin E improves insulin action in healthy, elderly, and non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Similar results can be obtained by vitamin C administration.

  12. Protective effects of arginine on fetal brain under maternal immobilization stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Enanat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Arginine by regulating the biological activity of the brain plays an important role in reducing stress. Today's, stress is one of the century disease that created many problem.  This study conducted to determine the protective effect of arginine on nitric oxide levels in maternal fetal brain tissue under stress. Methods: Twenty pregnant Wistar rats (200-250 gr were randomly divided into four groups. With and without stress groups received arginine (200 mg/kg intraperitoneal from 5 – 20 days of pregnancies. Control with and sham without stress received 2 ml of normal saline. The pregnant rats were anesthetized by ketamine (100 mg/kg on the day 20 then the fetuses removed and weighed. Twenty five brain of fetal brain rat from each group were chosen for measuring of forebrain thickness and brain volume. Another 25 brain were chosen for measuring of nitric oxide. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA. Results: Nitric oxide Levels reduced in stress rats treated with arginine compared to control group (P<0.05. The mean thickness of forebrain and hippicampal formation decreased in stress rats versus unstressed, but was not significant. The mean weight decreased significantly in stress group compared to the unstressed group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Arginine could protect the brain tissue and fetal weight by reducing the level of oxidative stress in the pregnant rats.

  13. Oxidative stress involving changes in Nrf2 and ER stress in early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Sandra I; Costa, Rui O; Ferreira, Ildete L; Santana, Isabel; Caldeira, Gladys L; Padovano, Carmela; Fonseca, Ana C; Baldeiras, Inês; Cunha, Catarina; Letra, Liliana; Oliveira, Catarina R; Pereira, Cláudia M F; Rego, Ana Cristina

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression. In this study we analyzed whether oxidative stress involving changes in Nrf2 and ER stress may constitute early events in AD pathogenesis by using human peripheral blood cells and an AD transgenic mouse model at different disease stages. Increased oxidative stress and increased phosphorylated Nrf2 (p(Ser40)Nrf2) were observed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Moreover, we observed impaired ER Ca2+ homeostasis and increased ER stress markers in PBMCs from MCI individuals and mild AD patients. Evidence of early oxidative stress defense mechanisms in AD was substantiated by increased p(Ser40)Nrf2 in 3month-old 3xTg-AD male mice PBMCs, and also with increased nuclear Nrf2 levels in brain cortex. However, SOD1 protein levels were decreased in human MCI PBMCs and in 3xTg-AD mice brain cortex; the latter further correlated with reduced SOD1 mRNA levels. Increased ER stress was also detected in the brain cortex of young female and old male 3xTg-AD mice. We demonstrate oxidative stress and early Nrf2 activation in AD human and mouse models, which fails to regulate some of its targets, leading to repressed expression of antioxidant defenses (e.g., SOD-1), and extending to ER stress. Results suggest markers of prodromal AD linked to oxidative stress associated with Nrf2 activation and ER stress that may be followed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  14. Oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueping Chen; Chunyan Guo; Jiming Kong

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are constantly produced in aerobic organisms as by-products of normal oxygen metabolism and include free radicals such as superoxide anion (O2-) and hydroxyl radical (OH-), and non-radical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The mitochondrial respiratory chain and enzymatic reactions by various enzymes are endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species. Exogenous reactive oxygen species -inducing stressors include ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and divergent oxidizing chemicals. At low concentrations, reactive oxygen species serve as an important second messenger in cell signaling; however, at higher concentrations and long-term exposure, reactive oxygen species can damage cellular macromolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipids, which leads to necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Oxidative stress is a condition of imbalance between reactive oxygen species formation and cellular antioxidant capacity due to enhanced ROS generation and/or dysfunction of the antioxidant system. Biochemical alterations in these macromolecular components can lead to various pathological conditions and human diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are morphologically featured by progressive cell loss in specific vulnerable neuronal cells, often associated with cytoskeletal protein aggregates forming inclusions in neurons and/or glial cells. Deposition of abnormal aggregated proteins and disruption of metal ions homeostasis are highly associated with oxidative stress. The main aim of this review is to present as much detailed information as possible that is available on various neurodegenerative disorders and their connection with oxidative stress. A variety of therapeutic strategies designed to address these pathological processes are also described. For the future therapeutic direction, one specific pathway that involves the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 is receiving considerable attention.

  15. Oxidative stress and hepatitis C virus

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The disproportionate imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and body’s ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates is referred to as oxidative stress. Several biological processes as well as infectious agents, physiological or environmental stress, and perturbed antioxidant response can promote oxidative stress. Oxidative stress usually happens when cells are exposed to more electrically charged reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 or O2-. The cells’ ...

  16. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geon Ha; Kim, Jieun E; Rhie, Sandy Jeong; Yoon, Sujung

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress is induced by an imbalanced redox states, involving either excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or dysfunction of the antioxidant system. The brain is one of organs especially vulnerable to the effects of ROS because of its high oxygen demand and its abundance of peroxidation-susceptible lipid cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress plays a central role in a common pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Antioxidant therapy has been suggested for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, although the results with regard to their efficacy of treating neurodegenerative disease have been inconsistent. In this review, we will discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and in vivo measurement of an index of damage by oxidative stress. Moreover, the present knowledge on antioxidant in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and future directions will be outlined.

  17. Periodontal treatment decreases plasma oxidized LDL level and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Naofumi; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Ekuni, Daisuke; Yamanaka, Reiko; Morita, Manabu

    2011-12-01

    Periodontitis induces excessive production of reactive oxygen species in periodontal lesions. This may impair circulating pro-oxidant/anti-oxidant balance and induce the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in blood. The purpose of this study was to monitor circulating oxidized LDL and oxidative stress in subjects with chronic periodontitis following non-surgical periodontal treatment. Plasma levels of oxidized LDL and oxidative stress in 22 otherwise healthy non-smokers with chronic periodontitis (mean age 44.0 years) were measured at baseline and at 1 and 2 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. At baseline, chronic periodontitis patients had higher plasma levels of oxidized LDL and oxidative stress than healthy subjects (p surgical periodontal treatment were effective in decreasing oxLDL, which was positively associated with a reduction in circulating oxidative stress.

  18. Management of oxidative stress by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirulis, Judith T; Scott, J Ashley; Ross, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current research on oxidative stress in eukaryotic microalgae and the antioxidant compounds microalgae utilize to control oxidative stress. With the potential to exploit microalgae for the large-scale production of antioxidants, interest in how microalgae manage oxidative stress is growing. Microalgae can experience increased levels of oxidative stress and toxicity as a result of environmental conditions, metals, and chemicals. The defence mechanisms for microalgae include antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and glutathione reductase, as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant molecules such as phytochelatins, pigments, polysaccharides, and polyphenols. Discussed herein are the 3 areas the literature has focused on, including how conditions stress microalgae and how microalgae respond to oxidative stress by managing reactive oxygen species. The third area is how beneficial microalgae antioxidants are when administered to cancerous mammalian cells or to rodents experiencing oxidative stress.

  19. The brain mineralocorticoid receptor and stress resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Heegde, Freija; De Rijk, Roel H; Vinkers, Christiaan H

    2015-02-01

    Stress exposure activates the HPA-axis and results in the release of corticosteroids which bind to two receptor types in the brain: the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While the role of the GR in stress reactivity has been extensively studied, the MR has received less attention. Nevertheless, pioneering in-depth studies over the past two decades have shown the importance of the brain MR in the processing of stressful information. Moreover, a membrane-bound MR mediating the rapid effects of cortisol was recently discovered. This review summarizes how the MR may play a role in stress resilience. Both preclinical and clinical studies suggest that the MR is an important stress modulator and influences basal as well as stress-induced HPA-axis activity, stress appraisal, and fear-related memories. These MR effects are mediated by both genomic and non-genomic MRs and appear to be at least partially sex-dependent. Moreover, the majority of studies indicate that high MR functionality or expression may confer resilience to traumatic stress. This has direct clinical implications. First, increasing activity or expression of brain MRs may prevent or reverse symptoms of stress-related depression. Second, individuals with a relatively low MR functionality may possess an increased stress susceptibility for depression. Nevertheless, the number of clinical MR studies is currently limited. In conclusion, the recent emergence of the MR as a putative stress resilience factor is important and may open up new avenues for the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders.

  20. Peripheral inflammation increases seizure susceptibility via the induction of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Ying-Hao; Lin, Yu-Te; Wu, Chih-Wei J.; Chao, Yung-Mei; Alice Y W Chang; Chan, Julie Y H

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroinflammation with activation of microglia and production of proinflammatory cytokines in the brain plays an active role in epileptic disorders. Brain oxidative stress has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Damage in the hippocampus is associated with temporal lobe epilepsy, a common form of epilepsy in human. Peripheral inflammation may exacerbate neuroinflammation and brain oxidative stress. This study examined the impact of peripheral inflammation on seizu...

  1. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Csányi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine.

  2. Oxidative Stress and HPV Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico De Marco

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Extensive experimental work has conclusively demonstrated that infection with certain types of human papillomaviruses, the so-called high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV, represent a most powerful human carcinogen. However, neoplastic growth is a rare and inappropriate outcome in the natural history of HPV, and a number of other events have to concur in order to induce the viral infection into the (very rare neoplastic transformation. From this perspective, a number of putative viral, host, and environmental co-factors have been proposed as potential candidates. Among them oxidative stress (OS is an interesting candidate, yet comparatively underexplored. OS is a constant threat to aerobic organisms being generated during mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, as well as during inflammation, infections, ionizing irradiation, UV exposure, mechanical and chemical stresses. Epithelial tissues, the elective target for HPV infection, are heavily exposed to all named sources of OS. Two different types of cooperative mechanisms are presumed to occur between OS and HPV: I The OS genotoxic activity and the HPV-induced genomic instability concur independently to the generation of the molecular damage necessary for the emergence of neoplastic clones. This first mode is merely a particular form of co-carcinogenesis; and II OS specifically interacts with one or more molecular stages of neoplastic initiation and/or progression induced by the HPV infection. This manuscript was designed to summarize available data on this latter hypothesis. Experimental data and indirect evidences on promoting the activity of OS in viral infection and viral integration will be reviewed. The anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenetic role of NO (nitric oxide and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase will be discussed together with the OS/HPV cooperation in inducing cancer metabolism adaptation. Unexplored/underexplored aspects of the OS interplay with the HPV-driven carcinogenesis

  3. Metal dyshomeostasis and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenough, Mark A; Camakaris, James; Bush, Ashley I

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and is defined by two pathological hallmarks; the accumulation of aggregated amyloid beta and excessively phosphorylated Tau proteins. The etiology of Alzheimer's disease progression is still debated, however, increased oxidative stress is an early and sustained event that underlies much of the neurotoxicity and consequent neuronal loss. Amyloid beta is a metal binding protein and copper, zinc and iron promote amyloid beta oligomer formation. Additionally, copper and iron are redox active and can generate reactive oxygen species via Fenton (and Fenton-like chemistry) and the Haber-Weiss reaction. Copper, zinc and iron are naturally abundant in the brain but Alzheimer's disease brain contains elevated concentrations of these metals in areas of amyloid plaque pathology. Amyloid beta can become pro-oxidant and when complexed to copper or iron it can generate hydrogen peroxide. Accumulating evidence suggests that copper, zinc, and iron homeostasis may become perturbed in Alzheimer's disease and could underlie an increased oxidative stress burden. In this review we discuss oxidative/nitrosative stress in Alzheimer's disease with a focus on the role that metals play in this process. Recent studies have started to elucidate molecular links with oxidative/nitrosative stress and Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we discuss metal binding compounds that are designed to cross the blood brain barrier and restore metal homeostasis as potential Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

  4. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Morales-González

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6; other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS. Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx, was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO, and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease.

  5. Oxidative stress in neonatology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutinati, M; Pantaleo, M; Roncetti, M; Piccinno, M; Rizzo, A; Sciorsci, R L

    2014-02-01

    Free radicals are highly reactive oxidizing agents containing one or more unpaired electrons. Both in human and veterinary neonathology, it is generally accepted that oxidative stress functions as an important catalysator of neonatal disease. Soon after birth, many sudden physiological and environmental conditions make the newborn vulnerable for the negative effects of oxidative stress, which potentially can impair neonatal vitality. As a clinician, it is important to have in depth knowledge about factors affecting maternal/neonatal oxidative status and the cascades of events that enrol when the neonate is subjected to oxidative stress. This report aims at providing clinicians with an up-to-date review about oxidative stress in neonates across animal species. It will be emphasized which handlings and treatments that are applied during neonatal care or resuscitation can actually impose oxidative stress upon the neonate. Views and opinions about maternal and/or neonatal antioxydative therapy will be shared.

  6. The central mechanism underlying hypertension: a review of the roles of sodium ions, epithelial sodium channels, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, oxidative stress and endogenous digitalis in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hakuo; Yoshika, Masamichi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Nishimura, Masato

    2011-11-01

    The central nervous system has a key role in regulating the circulatory system by modulating the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, pituitary hormone release, and the baroreceptor reflex. Digoxin- and ouabain-like immunoreactive materials were found >20 years ago in the hypothalamic nuclei. These factors appeared to localize to the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei and the nerve fibers at the circumventricular organs and supposed to affect electrolyte balance and blood pressure. The turnover rate of these materials increases with increasing sodium intake. As intracerebroventricular injection of ouabain increases blood pressure via sympathetic activation, an endogenous digitalis-like factor (EDLF) was thought to regulate cardiovascular system-related functions in the brain, particularly after sodium loading. Experiments conducted mainly in rats revealed that the mechanism of action of ouabain in the brain involves sodium ions, epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), all of which are affected by sodium loading. Rats fed a high-sodium diet develop elevated sodium levels in their cerebrospinal fluid, which activates ENaCs. Activated ENaCs and/or increased intracellular sodium in neurons activate the RAAS; this releases EDLF in the brain, activating the sympathetic nervous system. The RAAS promotes oxidative stress in the brain, further activating the RAAS and augmenting sympathetic outflow. Angiotensin II and aldosterone of peripheral origin act in the brain to activate this cascade, increasing sympathetic outflow and leading to hypertension. Thus, the brain Na(+)-ENaC-RAAS-EDLF axis activates sympathetic outflow and has a crucial role in essential and secondary hypertension. This report provides an overview of the central mechanism underlying hypertension and discusses the use of antihypertensive agents.

  7. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Vaisbich

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nephropathic cystinosis (NC is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods: The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results: We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p Conclusion: An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients.

  8. Impact of Oxidative Stress in Fetal Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren P. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine stress induces increased risk of adult disease through fetal programming mechanisms. Oxidative stress can be generated by several conditions, such as, prenatal hypoxia, maternal under- and overnutrition, and excessive glucocorticoid exposure. The role of oxidant molecules as signaling factors in fetal programming via epigenetic mechanisms is discussed. By linking oxidative stress with dysregulation of specific target genes, we may be able to develop therapeutic strategies that protect against organ dysfunction in the programmed offspring.

  9. Radical-free biology of oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Free radical-induced macromolecular damage has been studied extensively as a mechanism of oxidative stress, but large-scale intervention trials with free radical scavenging antioxidant supplements show little benefit in humans. The present review summarizes data supporting a complementary hypothesis for oxidative stress in disease that can occur without free radicals. This hypothesis, which is termed the “redox hypothesis,” is that oxidative stress occurs as a consequence of disruption of thi...

  10. Brain protein oxidation in age-related neurodegenerative disorders that are associated with aggregated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D A; Kanski, J

    2001-07-15

    Protein oxidation, one of a number of brain biomarkers of oxidative stress, is increased in several age-related neurodegenerative disorders or animal models thereof, including Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, prion disorders, such as Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, and alpha-synuclein disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia. Each of these neurodegenerative disorders is associated with aggregated proteins in brain. However, the relationship among protein oxidation, protein aggregation, and neurodegeneration remain unclear. The current rapid progress in elucidation of mechanisms of protein oxidation in neuronal loss should provide further insight into the importance of free radical oxidative stress in these neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Time-dependent effects of training on cardiovascular control in spontaneously hypertensive rats: role for brain oxidative stress and inflammation and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo S Masson

    Full Text Available Baroreflex dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation, important hallmarks of hypertension, are attenuated by exercise training. In this study, we investigated the relationships and time-course changes of cardiovascular parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-oxidant profiles within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Basal values and variability of arterial pressure and heart rate and baroreflex sensitivity were measured in trained (T, low-intensity treadmill training and sedentary (S SHR at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8. Paraventricular nucleus was used to determine reactive oxygen species (dihydroethidium oxidation products, HPLC, NADPH oxidase subunits and pro-inflammatory cytokines expression (Real time PCR, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 expression (Western blotting, NF-κB content (electrophoretic mobility shift assay and cytokines immunofluorescence. SHR-S vs. WKY-S (Wistar Kyoto rats as time control showed increased mean arterial pressure (172±3 mmHg, pressure variability and heart rate (358±7 b/min, decreased baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability, increased p47phox and reactive oxygen species production, elevated NF-κB activity and increased TNF-α and IL-6 expression within the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus. Two weeks of training reversed all hypothalamic changes, reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and normalized baroreflex sensitivity (4.04±0.31 vs. 2.31±0.19 b/min/mmHg in SHR-S. These responses were followed by increased vagal component of heart rate variability (1.9-fold and resting bradycardia (-13% at the 4th week, and, by reduced vasomotor component of pressure variability (-28% and decreased mean arterial pressure (-7% only at the 8th week of training. Our findings indicate that independent of the high pressure levels in SHR, training promptly restores baroreflex function by disrupting the positive feedback between high oxidative stress and increased pro

  12. Antisense oligonucleotide against GSK-3β in brain of SAMP8 mice improves learning and memory and decreases oxidative stress: Involvement of transcription factor Nrf2 and implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Susan A; Ripley, Jessica L; Sultana, Rukhsana; Zhang, Zhaoshu; Niehoff, Michael L; Platt, Thomas L; Murphy, M Paul; Morley, John E; Kumar, Vijaya; Butterfield, D Allan

    2014-02-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β is a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in the pathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including the heightened levels of neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid-beta (Aβ), and neurodegeneration. In this study we used 12-month-old SAMP8 mice, an AD model, to examine the effects GSK-3β may cause regarding the cognitive impairment and oxidative stress associated with AD. To suppress the level of GSK-3β, SAMP8 mice were treated with an antisense oligonucleotide (GAO) directed at this kinase. We measured a decreased level of GSK-3β in the cortex of the mice, indicating the success of the antisense treatment. Learning and memory assessments of the SAMP8 mice were tested post-antisense treatment using an aversive T-maze and object recognition test, both of which observably improved. In cortex samples of the SAMP8 mice, decreased levels of protein carbonyl and protein-bound HNE were measured, indicating decreased oxidative stress. Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to increase the level of many antioxidants, including glutathione-S transferase (GST), and is negatively regulated by the activity of GSK-3β. Our results indicated the increased nuclear localization of Nrf2 and level of GST, suggesting the increased activity of the transcription factor as a result of GSK-3β suppression, consistent with the decreased oxidative stress observed. Consistent with the improved learning and memory, and consistent with GSK-3b being a tau kinase, we observed decreased tau phosphorylation in brain of GAO-treated SAMP8 mice compared to that of RAO-treated SAMP8 mice. Lastly, we examined the ability of GAO to cross the blood-brain barrier and determined it to be possible. The results presented in this study demonstrate that reducing GSK-3 with a phosphorothionated antisense against GSK-3 improves learning and memory, reduces oxidative stress, possibly coincident with increased

  13. Morphine as a Potential Oxidative Stress-Causing Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrabalova, Jitka; Drastichova, Zdenka; Novotny, Jiri

    2013-11-01

    Morphine exhibits important pharmacological effects for which it has been used in medical practice for quite a long time. However, it has a high addictive potential and can be abused. Long-term use of this drug can be connected with some pathological consequences including neurotoxicity and neuronal dysfunction, hepatotoxicity, kidney dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, most studies examining the impact of morphine have been aimed at determining the effects induced by chronic morphine exposure in the brain, liver, cardiovascular system and macrophages. It appears that different tissues may respond to morphine diversely and are distinctly susceptible to oxidative stress and subsequent oxidative damage of biomolecules. Importantly, production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species induced by morphine, which have been observed under different experimental conditions, can contribute to some pathological processes, degenerative diseases and organ dysfunctions occurring in morphine abusers or morphine-treated patients. This review attempts to provide insights into the possible relationship between morphine actions and oxidative stress.

  14. Less Stress : Oxidative stress and glutathione kinetics in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Rook (Denise)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDue to immature antioxidant defenses, preterm infants are at susceptible to oxidative stress, which is associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity and periventricular leukomalacia. The general aim of this thesis was to study oxidative stress in preterm infants

  15. Evaluating experimental cerebral malaria using oxidative stress indicator OKD48 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takashi; Iwawaki, Takao; Akai, Ryoko; Suzue, Kazutomo; Hirai, Makoto; Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Okada, Hiroko; Hisaeda, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    Cerebral malaria is a fatal complication of malaria. Conventional methods for evaluating experimental cerebral malaria have several drawbacks. Therefore, we aimed to develop an easy-to-use method for evaluating experimental cerebral malaria using OKD48 (Keap1-dependent Oxidative stress Detector, No-48-luciferase) mice to evaluate oxidative stress. OKD48 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA strain (PbA) suffered from experimental cerebral malaria and oxidative stress was successfully detected in the brains of living OKD48 mice developing experimental cerebral malaria. Oxidative stress in the brain was dependent on the development of experimental cerebral malaria, as prevention of experimental cerebral malaria did not elicit oxidative stress. We provide a novel evaluation method for experimental cerebral malaria using oxidative stress indicator OKD48 mice.

  16. Oxidative stress in primary glomerular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markan, Suchita; Kohli, Harbir Singh; Sud, Kamal;

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure.......To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure....

  17. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism in the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; de Castro Ghizoni, Cristiane Vizioli; Bersani Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Comar, Jurandir Fernando

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative status of the brain of arthritic rats, based mainly on the observation that arthritis induces a pronounced oxidative stress in the liver of arthritis rats and that morphological alterations have been reported to occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis were used. These animals presented higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the total brain homogenate (25% higher) and in the mitochondria (+55%) when compared to healthy rats. The nitrite plus nitrate contents, nitric oxide (NO) markers, were also increased in both mitochondria (+27%) and cytosol (+14%). Arthritic rats also presented higher levels of protein carbonyl groups in the total homogenate (+43%), mitochondria (+69%) and cytosol (+145%). Arthritis caused a diminution of oxygen consumption in isolated brain mitochondria only when ascorbate was the electron donor. The disease diminished the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity by 55%, but increased the transmembrane potential by 16%. The pro-oxidant enzyme xanthine oxidase was 150%, 110% and 283% higher, respectively, in the brain homogenate, mitochondria and cytosol of arthritic animals. The same occurred with the calcium-independent NO-synthase activity that was higher in the brain homogenate (90%) and cytosol (122%) of arthritic rats. The catalase activity, on the other hand, was diminished by arthritis in all cellular fractions (between 30 and 40%). It is apparent that the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis presents a pronounced oxidative stress and a significant injury to lipids and proteins, a situation that possibly contributes to the brain symptoms of the arthritis disease.

  18. Oxidative stress response in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Soares Netto

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress response in plants is still poorly understood in comparison with the correspondent phenomenon in bacteria, yeast and mammals. For instance, nitric oxide is assumed to play various roles in plants although no nitric oxide synthase gene has yet been isolated. This research reports the results of a search of the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for homologous sequences involved in the oxidative stress response. I have not found any gene similar to nitric oxide synthase in the SUCEST database although an alternative pathway for nitric oxide synthesis was proposed. I have also found several genes involved in antioxidant defense, e.g. metal chelators, low molecular weight compounds, antioxidant enzymes and repair systems. Ascorbate (vitamin C is a key antioxidant in plants because it reaches high concentrations in cells and is a substrate for ascorbate peroxidase, an enzyme that I found in different isoforms in the SUCEST database. I also found many enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of low molecular weight antioxidants, which may be potential targets for genetic manipulation. The engineering of plants for increased vitamin C and E production may lead to improvements in the nutritional value and stress tolerance of sugarcane. The components of the antioxidant defense system interact and their synthesis is probably closely regulated. Transcription factors involved in regulation of the oxidative stress response in bacteria, yeast and mammals differ considerably among themselves and when I used them to search the SUCEST database only genes with weak similarities were found, suggesting that these transcription regulators are not very conserved. The involvement of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants in plant defense against pathogens is also discussed.A resposta ao estresse oxidativo não é bem conhecida em plantas como em bactérias, leveduras e humanos. Por exemplo, assume-se que óxido nítrico tem várias fun

  19. Anticholinesterase Toxicity and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Milatovic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticholinesterase compounds, organophosphates (OPs and carbamates (CMs are commonly used for a variety of purposes in agriculture and in human and veterinary medicine. They exert their toxicity in mammalian system primarily by virtue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition at the synapses and neuromuscular junctions, leading into the signs of hypercholinergic preponderance. However, the mechanism(s involved in brain/muscle damage appear to be linked with alteration in antioxidant and the scavenging system leading to free radical-mediated injury. OPs and CMs cause excessive formation of F2-isoprostanes and F4-neuroprostanes, in vivo biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and of citrulline, a marker of NO/NOS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS generation. In addition, during the course of these excitatory processes and inhibition of AChE, a high rate of ATP consumption, coupled with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, compromise the cell's ability to maintain its energy levels and excessive amounts of ROS and RNS may be generated. Pretreatment with N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist memantine, in combination with atropine sulfate, provides significant protection against inhibition of AChE, increases of ROS/RNS, and depletion of high-energy phosphates induced by DFP/carbofuran. Similar antioxidative effects are observed with a spin trapping agent, phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN or chain breaking antioxidant vitamin E. This review describes the mechanisms involved in anticholinesterase-induced oxidative/nitrosative injury in target organs of OPs/CMs, and protection by various agents.

  20. Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne Tofte; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup; Nielsen, Torben Kjær;

    2016-01-01

    in mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and II and might thereby reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that simvastatin may reduce oxidative stress in humans in vivo. We conducted a randomized, double......-blinded, placebo-controlled study in which subjects were treated with either 40 mg of simvastatin or placebo for 14 days. The endpoints were six biomarkers for oxidative stress, which represent intracellular oxidative stress to nucleic acids, lipid peroxidation and plasma antioxidants, that were measured in urine...... in parallel with the reduction in plasma cholesterol. In healthy young male volunteers, short-term simvastatin treatment, which considerably reduces cholesterol, does not lead to a clinically relevant reduction in a panel of measures of oxidative stress. Whether simvastatin has effects on oxidative stress...

  1. Ameliorating Role of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE Against Methotrexate-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Sciatic Nerve, Spinal Cord and Brain Stem Tissues of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul Uzar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Methotrexate (MTX-associated neurotoxicity is an important clinical problem in cancer patients, but the mechanisms of MTX-induced neurotoxicity are not yet known exactly. The aims of this study were (1 to investigate the possible role of malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and catalase (CAT in the pathogenesis of MTX-induced neurotoxicity and (2 to determine whether there is a putative protective effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE on MTX-induced neurotoxicity in the spinal cord, brainstem and sciatic nerve of rats. METHODS: A total of 19 adult Wistar male rats were divided into three experimental groups. Group I, control group; Group II, MTX-treated group; and Group III, MTX + CAPE-treated group. MTX was administered to the MTX and MTX + CAPE groups intraperitoneally (IP with a single dose of 20 mg/kg on the second day of the experiment. CAPE was administered to the MTX + CAPE group IP with a dose of 10 μmol/kg for 7 days. RESULTS: In the sciatic nerve and spinal cord tissue, CAT and GSH-Px activities were increased in the MTX group in comparison with the control group. CAPE treatment with MTX significantly decreased CAT and GSH-Px activities in the neuronal tissues of rats in comparison with the MTX group. In the spinal cord and brainstem tissues, SOD activity in the MTX group was decreased in comparison with the control group, but in the sciatic nerve, there was no significant difference. In the spinal cord and brainstem of rats, SOD activity was increased in the CAPE + MTX group when compared with the MTX group. The level of MDA was higher in the MTX group than in the control group. CAPE administration with MTX injection caused a significant decrease in MDA level when compared with the MTX group. CONCLUSION: These results reveal that MTX increases oxidative stress in the sciatic nerve, spinal cord and brainstem of rats and that CAPE has a preventive effect on the

  2. A STUDY OF OXIDATIVE STRESS IN DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Rao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Non - enzymatic free radical mediated oxidation of biological molecules, membranes and tissues is associated with a variety of pathological events such as cancer, aging and diabetes mellitus . [1] Increased oxidative stress is seen in both types of diabetes me llitus namely type 1 and type 2, irrespective of duration, complications and treatment. In diabetes mellitus, oxidative stress seems primarily due to both an increased plasma free radical concentration and a sharp decline in antioxidant defences . [1] Among the causes of enhanced free radical production, hyperglycemia and hyper insulinemia seem to play a major role , [2,3] Hyperglycemia is the more easily modifiable factor among the two and good glycemic control can reduce the oxidative stress. Controversy pers ists regarding the other possible mechanisms of increased oxidative stress in diabetes and whether oxidative stress normalizes with adequate metabolic control alone. The role of oxidative stress and diabetic complications has been extensively investigated. Oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the genesis of both macro and micro angiopathy [4,5] Prospective trials are now underway addressing the controversial issues of possible role of pharmacological antioxidants in preventing or at least de laying the onset of diabetic complications.

  3. Metal-related oxidative stress in birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivula, Miia J., E-mail: miikoi@utu.f [Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Eeva, Tapio, E-mail: teeva@utu.f [Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland)

    2010-07-15

    Metals can cause oxidative stress by increasing the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which render antioxidants incapable of defence against growing amounts of free radicals. Metal toxicity is related to their oxidative state and reactivity with other compounds. Our aim is to review the mechanisms on how metals cause oxidative stress and what is known about metal-induced oxidative stress in wildlife. Taking birds as model organisms, we summarize the mechanisms responsible for antioxidant depletion and give a view of how to detect metal-induced oxidative stress in birds by using different biomarkers. The mechanisms producing the harmful effects of oxidative stress are complex with different biomolecular mechanisms associated with ecotoxicological and ecological aspects. The majority of the studies concerning metals and ROS related to oxidative stress have focused on the biomolecular level, but little is known about the effects at the cellular level or at the level of individuals or populations. - Free-living birds can be used as effective indicators of metal-induced oxidative stress.

  4. Caregiver stress in traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Aims\\ud Many patients experience physical, behavioural, cognitive and emotional problems following traumatic brain injury (TBI). They may require continuing care for many years, most of which is provided by informal caregivers, such as spouses, parents, or other family members. The caregiving role is associated with a range of adverse effects including anxiety, depression, poor physical health and lowered quality of life. This article explores issues around caregiver stress; highlighting inte...

  5. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarasi Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes, of protein oxidation (carbonylated proteins, tyrosine derivatives, of oxidative damage of DNA, and other biomarkers (glutathione level, metallothioneins, myeloperoxidase activity are the most used oxidative stress markers. Diseases caused by oxidative stress can be prevented with antioxidants. In human body are several enzymes with antioxidant capacity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and spin traps. Antioxidants are synthetized in the organism (glutathione or arrive in the body by nutrition (ascorbic acid, vitamin E, carotenoids, flavonoids, resveratrol, xanthones. Different therapeutic strategies to reduce oxidative stress with the use of synthetic molecules such as nitrone-based antioxidants (phenyl-α-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN, 2,4-disulphophenyl- N-tert-butylnitrone (NXY-059, stilbazulenyl nitrone (STAZN, which scavenge a wide variety of free radical species, increase endogenous antioxidant levels and inhibits free radical generation are also tested in animal models.

  6. Oxidative stress in the neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, R; Palomino, N; Robles, A

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the oxidative state of term and preterm neonates at the moment of birth and during the first days of life, and the influence of exposure to oxygen on the premature neonates.A total of 20 neonates were selected. Group A: 10 healthy full-term neonates, and Group B: 10 preterm neonates with no other pathology associated, requiring oxygen therapy. Venous samples were taken in cord at 3 and 72 h in Group A, and in cord at 3, 24 and 72 h and 7 days in Group B.Hydroperoxides, Q10 coenzyme (Co Q10) and alpha-tocopherol were measured within the erythrocyte membrane. Levels of hydroperoxides present in erythrocyte membrane were higher than normal both in Group A and in Group B at birth. This increase was greater in the group of premature neonates. Levels of alpha-tocopherol at birth increase significantly at 72 h in term neonates. Among the premature newborns, alpha-tocopherol levels are two to three times lower at birth and do not rise to higher levels as in the term neonate group. Fall in levels of Co Q10 in erythrocyte membranes is observed, and perhaps is due to the role of Co Q10 in maintaining the pool of reduced tocopherol. At birth, the neonate presents an increase of markers of oxidative stress and a decrease of their antioxidant defenses. This difference is greater as gestational age decreases. The application of oxygen therapy resulted in these levels which remain low throughout the study period.

  7. Methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits improves memory impairment by decreasing brain oxidative stress in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Noumedem, Jaurès A; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Kuete, Victor; Mihasan, Marius

    2014-04-01

    The present study analyzed the possible memory-enhancing and antioxidant proprieties of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum L. fruits (50 and 100 mg/kg, orally, for 21 days) in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The memory-enhancing effects of the plant extract were studied by means of in vivo (Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using superoxide dismutase-, catalase-, glutathione peroxidase-specific activities and the total content of reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl levels. The amyloid beta(1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of spontaneous alternations percentage within Y-maze task and increase of working memory and reference memory errors within radial arm-maze task. Administration of the plant extract significantly improved memory performance and exhibited antioxidant potential. Our results suggest that the plant extract ameliorates amyloid beta(1-42)-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  8. Today’s oxidative stress markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Czerska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress represents a situation where there is an imbalance between the reactive oxygen species (ROS and the availability and the activity of antioxidants. This balance is disturbed by increased generation of free radicals or decreased antioxidant activity. It is very important to develop methods and find appropriate biomarkers that may be used to assess oxidative stress in vivo. It is significant because appropriate measurement of such stress is necessary in identifying its role in lifestyle-related diseases. Previously used markers of oxidative stress, such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS or malondialdehyde (MDA, are progressively being supplemented by new ones, such as isoprostanes (IsoPs and their metabolites or allantoin. This paper is focusing on the presentation of new ones, promising markers of oxidative stress (IsoPs, their metabolites and allantoin, taking into account the advantage of those markers over markers used previously. Med Pr 2015;66(3:393–405

  9. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Ozsurekci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases.

  10. Clinical Relevance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frijhoff, Jeroen; Winyard, Paul G; Zarkovic, Neven;

    2015-01-01

    SIGNIFICANCE: Oxidative stress is considered to be an important component of various diseases. A vast number of methods have been developed and used in virtually all diseases to measure the extent and nature of oxidative stress, ranging from oxidation of DNA to proteins, lipids, and free amino...... acids. RECENT ADVANCES: An increased understanding of the biology behind diseases and redox biology has led to more specific and sensitive tools to measure oxidative stress markers, which are very diverse and sometimes very low in abundance. CRITICAL ISSUES: The literature is very heterogeneous....... It is often difficult to draw general conclusions on the significance of oxidative stress biomarkers, as only in a limited proportion of diseases have a range of different biomarkers been used, and different biomarkers have been used to study different diseases. In addition, biomarkers are often measured...

  11. An Antioxidant Phytotherapy to Rescue Neuronal Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of ischemic neuronal injury. A Chinese herbal formula composed of Poria cocos (Chinese name: Fu Ling, Atractylodes macrocephala (Chinese name: Bai Zhu and Angelica sinensis (Chinese names: Danggui, Dong quai, Donggui; Korean name: Danggwi (FBD, has been proved to be beneficial in the treatment of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R.This study was carried out to evaluate the protective effect of FBD against neuronal oxidative stress in vivo and in vitro. Rat I/R were established by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO for 1 h, followed by 24 h reperfusion. MCAO led to significant depletion in superoxide dismutase and glutathione and rise in lipid peroxidation (LPO and nitric oxide in brain. The neurological deficit and brain infarction were also significantly elevated by MCAO as compared with sham-operated group. All the brain oxidative stress and damage were significantly attenuated by 7 days pretreatment with the aqueous extract of FBD (250 mg kg−1, p.o.. Moreover, cerebrospinal fluid sampled from FBD-pretreated rats protected PC12 cells against oxidative insult induced by 0.2 mM hydrogen peroxide, in a concentration and time-dependent manner (IC50 10.6%, ET50 1.2 h. However, aqueous extract of FBD just slightly scavenged superoxide anion radical generated in xanthine–xanthine oxidase system (IC50 2.4 mg ml−1 and hydroxyl radical generated in Fenton reaction system (IC50 3.6 mg ml−1. In conclusion, FBD was a distinct antioxidant phytotherapy to rescue neuronal oxidative stress, through blocking LPO, restoring endogenous antioxidant system, but not scavenging free radicals.

  12. Oxidative stress and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Y

    2000-02-01

    Research in the field of molecular biology has helped to provide a better understanding of both the cascade of biochemical events that occurs with Alzheimer disease (AD) and the heterogeneous nature of the disease. One hypothesis that accounts for both the heterogeneous nature of AD and the fact that aging is the most obvious risk factor is that free radicals are involved. The probability of this involvement is supported by the fact that neurons are extremely sensitive to attacks by destructive free radicals. Furthermore, lesions are present in the brains of AD patients that are typically associated with attacks by free radicals (eg, damage to DNA, protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and advanced glycosylation end products), and metals (eg, iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum) are present that have catalytic activity that produce free radicals. beta-Amyloid is aggregated and produces more free radicals in the presence of free radicals; beta-amyloid toxicity is eliminated by free radical scavengers. Apolipoprotein E is subject to attacks by free radicals, and apolipoprotein E peroxidation has been correlated with AD. In contrast, apolipoprotein E can act as a free radical scavenger and this behavior is isoform dependent. AD has been linked to mitochondrial anomalies affecting cytochrome-c oxidase, and these anomalies may contribute to the abnormal production of free radicals. Finally, many free radical scavengers (eg, vitamin E, selegeline, and Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761) have produced promising results in relation to AD, as has desferrioxamine-an iron-chelating agent-and antiinflammatory drugs and estrogens, which also have an antioxidant effect.

  13. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.;

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  14. Resveratrol Protects the Brain of Obese Mice from Oxidative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha D. Rege

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene is a polyphenolic phytoalexin that exerts cardioprotective, neuroprotective, and antioxidant effects. Recently it has been shown that obesity is associated with an increase in cerebral oxidative stress levels, which may enhance neurodegeneration. The present study evaluates the neuroprotective action of resveratrol in brain of obese (ob/ob mice. Resveratrol was administered orally at the dose of 25 mg kg−1 body weight daily for three weeks to lean and obese mice. Resveratrol had no effect on body weight or blood glucose levels in obese mice. Lipid peroxides were significantly increased in brain of obese mice. The enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and nonenzymatic antioxidants tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and glutathione were decreased in obese mice brain. Administration of resveratrol decreased lipid peroxide levels and upregulated the antioxidant activities in obese mice brain. Our findings indicate a neuroprotective effect of resveratrol by preventing oxidative damage in brain tissue of obese mice.

  15. Oxidative stress and the ageing endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Salvioli, Stefano; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Ageing is a process characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-related diseases and death. Several hundred theories have attempted to explain this phenomenon. One of the most popular is the 'oxidative stress theory', originally termed the 'free radical theory'. The endocrine system seems to have a role in the modulation of oxidative stress; however, much less is known about the role that oxidative stress might have in the ageing of the endocrine system and the induction of age-related endocrine diseases. This Review outlines the interactions between hormones and oxidative metabolism and the potential effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine organs. Many different mechanisms that link oxidative stress and ageing are discussed, all of which converge on the induction or regulation of inflammation. All these mechanisms, including cell senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction and microRNA dysregulation, as well as inflammation itself, could be targets of future studies aimed at clarifying the effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine glands.

  16. Fipronil insecticide toxicology: oxidative stress and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Martínez, María Aránzazu; Wu, Qinghua; Ares, Irma; Martínez-Larrañaga, María Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-11-01

    Fipronil (FIP) is widely used across the world as a broad-spectrum phenylpyrazole insecticide and veterinary drug. FIP was the insecticide to act by targeting the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor and has favorable selective toxicity towards insects rather than mammals. However, because of accidental exposure, incorrect use of FIP or widespread FIP use leading to the contamination of water and soil, there is increasing evidence that FIP could cause a variety of toxic effects on animals and humans, such as neurotoxic, hepatotoxic, nephrotoxic, reproductive, and cytotoxic effects on vertebrate and invertebrates. In the last decade, oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the various toxicities induced by FIP. To date, few reviews have addressed the toxicity of FIP in relation to oxidative stress. The focus of this article is primarily intended to summarize the progress in research associated with oxidative stress as a possible mechanism for FIP-induced toxicity as well as metabolism. The present review reports that studies have been conducted to reveal the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress as a result of FIP treatment and have correlated them with various types of toxicity. Furthermore, the metabolism of FIP was also reviewed, and during this process, various CYP450 enzymes were involved and oxidative stress might occur. The roles of various compounds in protecting against FIP-induced toxicity based on their anti-oxidative effects were also summarized to further understand the role of oxidative stress in FIP-induced toxicity.

  17. Brain stimulation in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Vladan; Sher, Leo; Lapidus, Kyle A B; Mindes, Janet; A Golier, Julia; Yehuda, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex, heterogeneous disorder that develops following trauma and often includes perceptual, cognitive, affective, physiological, and psychological features. PTSD is characterized by hyperarousal, intrusive thoughts, exaggerated startle response, flashbacks, nightmares, sleep disturbances, emotional numbness, and persistent avoidance of trauma-associated stimuli. The efficacy of available treatments for PTSD may result in part from relief of associated depressive and anxiety-related symptoms in addition to treatment of core symptoms that derive from reexperiencing, numbing, and hyperarousal. Diverse, heterogeneous mechanisms of action and the ability to act broadly or very locally may enable brain stimulation devices to address PTSD core symptoms in more targeted ways. To achieve this goal, specific theoretical bases derived from novel, well-designed research protocols will be necessary. Brain stimulation devices include both long-used and new electrical and magnetic devices. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) have both been in use for decades; transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetic seizure therapy (MST), deep brain stimulation (DBS), transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) have been developed recently, over approximately the past twenty years. The efficacy of brain stimulation has been demonstrated as a treatment for psychiatric and neurological disorders such as anxiety (CES), depression (ECT, CES, rTMS, VNS, DBS), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (DBS), essential tremor, dystonia (DBS), epilepsy (DBS, VNS), Parkinson Disease (DBS), pain (CES), and insomnia (CES). To date, limited data on brain stimulation for PTSD offer only modest guidance. ECT has shown some efficacy in reducing comorbid depression in PTSD patients but has not been demonstrated to improve most core PTSD symptoms. CES and VNS have shown some efficacy in

  18. Oxidative stress and bivalves: a proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B McDonagh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bivalves are of major importance in aquatic ecology, aquaculture, are widely used as sentinel species in environmental toxicology and show remarkable plasticity to molecular oxygen. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS arising from molecular oxygen can cause oxidative stress and this is also a consequence of exposure to many common environmental pollutants. Indices of oxidative stress have therefore found favor as biomarkers of exposure and effect in environmental toxicology. However, there is a growing body of literature on the use of discovery-led proteomics methods to detect oxidative stress in bivalves. This is because proteins absorb up to 70 % of ROS leading to complication of the proteome. This article explores the background to these developments and assesses the practice and future potential of proteomics in the study of oxidative stress in bivalves.

  19. LINK BETWEEN OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-fang Li; Jian Li

    2007-01-01

    Many studies on oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and antioxidant treatment have shown that increased oxidative stress may accelerate the development of diabetic complications through the excessive glucose and free fatty acids metabolism in diabetic and insulin-resistant states. Many pathogenic mechanisms such as insulin receptor substrate phosphorylation are involved in insulin resistance induced by oxidative stress. And antioxidant treatments can show benefits in animal models of diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance. However, negative evidence from large clinical trials suggests that new and more powerful antioxidants need to be studied to demonstrate whether antioxidants can be effective in treating diabetic complications. Furthermore, it appears that oxidative stress is only one of the factors contributing to diabetic complications. Thus, antioxidant treatment would most likely be more effective if it were coupled with other treatments for diabetic complications.

  20. Chaperones, but not oxidized proteins, are ubiquitinated after oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästle, Marc; Reeg, Sandra; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina;

    2012-01-01

    After oxidative stress proteins which are oxidatively modified are degraded by the 20S proteasome. However, several studies documented an enhanced ubiquitination of yet unknown proteins. Since ubiqutination is a prerequisite for degradation by the 26S proteasome in an ATP-dependent manner......, we were able to confirm an increase of ubiquitinated proteins 16h upon oxidative stress. Therefore, we isolated ubiquitinated proteins from hydrogen peroxide treated cells, as well as from control and lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, treated cells, and identified some......, ubiquitinated proteins confirm the thesis that ubiquitination upon oxidative stress is no random process to degrade the mass of oxidized proteins, but concerns a special group of functional proteins....

  1. Role of Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Kumar, Binod; Koul, Sweaty; Maroni, Paul; Koul, Hari K.

    2009-01-01

    As prostate cancer and aberrant changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) become more common with aging, ROS signaling may play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy. Increased ROS, otherwise known as oxidative stress, is a result of either increased ROS generation or a loss of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Oxidative stress is associated with several pathological conditions including inflammation and infection. ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism ...

  2. Oxidative stress and bivalves: a proteomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Bivalves are of major importance in aquatic ecology, aquaculture, are widely used as sentinel species in environmental toxicology and show remarkable plasticity to molecular oxygen. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) arising from molecular oxygen can cause oxidative stress and this is also a consequence of exposure to many common environmental pollutants. Indices of oxidative stress have therefore found favor as biomarkers of exposure and effect in environmental toxicology. However, there i...

  3. Mechanisms of oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljkovic, Z; Gokce, N; Loscalzo, J

    2003-01-01

    The endothelium regulates vascular homoeostasis through local elaboration of mediators that modulate vascular tone, platelet adhesion, inflammation, fibrinolysis, and vascular growth. Impaired vascular function contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes. There is growing pathophysiological evidence that increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress participates in proatherogenic mechanisms of vascular dysfunction and atherothrombosis. In this review, the role of oxidative stress in mechanisms of vascular dysfunction is discussed, and potential antioxidant strategies are reviewed. PMID:12743334

  4. The effects of stress on glutamatergic transmission in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Hou, Gonglin

    2015-01-01

    Stress leads to detrimental effects on brain functions and results in various diseases. Recent studies highlight the involvement of glutamatergic transmission in pathogenesis of depressive behaviors and fears. Acute stress generates different impacts on the excitatory transmission compared to chronic stress. Different neuromodulators and epigenetic factors also participate in the alteration of synaptic transmission and the regulation of synaptic plasticity. Restoration of the glutamatergic transmission in stress-affected brain areas therefore provides novel directions of therapeutic interventions against stress.

  5. Moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation results in blood-brain barrier breakdown via oxidative stress-dependent tight-junction protein disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph M Zehendner

    Full Text Available Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS and blood-brain barrier (BBB integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC. BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF, MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1 and claudin 5 (Cl5, decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role

  6. Moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation results in blood-brain barrier breakdown via oxidative stress-dependent tight-junction protein disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehendner, Christoph M; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M; Angamo, Eskedar A; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in this

  7. Acute heat stress induces oxidative stress in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai; Decuypere, Eddy; Buyse, Johan

    2006-05-01

    The stress responses and possible oxidative damage in plasma, liver and heart were investigated in broiler chickens acutely exposed to high temperature. Eighty 5-week old broiler chickens were exposed to 32 degrees C for 6h. The extent of lipid peroxidation, activities of superoxide dismutase and total antioxidant power in plasma, liver and heart tissues were investigated. Meanwhile, the blood metabolites such as glucose, urate, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, corticosterone, ceruloplasmin and creatine kinase were measured before and after 3 and 6h of heat exposure. The results showed that oxidative stress could be induced in 5-week old broiler chickens by acute heat exposure (32 degrees C, 6h). The results suggest that the elevated body temperature can induce the metabolic changes that are involved in the induction of oxidative stress. The liver is more susceptible to oxidative stress than heart during acute heat exposure in broiler chickens. The oxidative stress should be considered as part of the stress response of broiler chickens to heat exposure.

  8. IL-6 deficiency leads to reduced metallothionein-I+II expression and increased oxidative stress in the brain stem after 6-aminonicotinamide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Hidalgo, J

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) deficiency on brain inflammation and the accompanying bone marrow (BM) leukopoiesis and spleen immune reaction after systemic administration of a niacin antagonist, 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN), which causes both astroglial degeneration/cell death...... in brain stem gray matter areas and BM toxicity. In both normal and genetically IL-6-deficient mice (IL-6 knockout (IL-6KO) mice), the extent of astroglial degeneration/cell death in the brain stem was similar as determined from disappearance of GFAP immunoreactivity. In 6-AN-injected normal mice reactive...... astrocytosis encircled gray matter areas containing astroglial degeneration/cell death, which were infiltrated by several macrophages and some T-lymphocytes. Reactive astrocytes and a few macrophages increased significantly the antioxidants metallothionein-I+II (MT-I+II) and moderately the MT-III isoform. In 6...

  9. Is brain copper deficiency in Alzheimer's, Lewy body, and Creutzfeldt Jakob diseases the common key for a free radical mechanism and oxidative stress-induced damage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloncle, Roger; Guillard, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's (AD), Lewy body (LBD), and Creutzfeldt Jakob (CJD) diseases, similar pathological hallmarks have been described, one of which is brain deposition of abnormal protease-resistant proteins. For these pathologies, copper bound to proteins is able to protect against free radicals by reduction from cupric Cu++ to cupreous Cu+. We have previously demonstrated in bovine brain homogenate that free radicals produce proteinase K-resistant prion after manganese is substituted for copper. Since low brain copper levels have been described in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, in substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease, and in various brain regions in AD, LBD, and CJD, a mechanism has been proposed that may underlie the neurodegenerative processes that occur when copper protection against free radicals is impaired. In peptide sequences, the alpha acid proton near the peptide bond is highly mobile and can be pulled out by free radicals. It will produce a trivalent α-carbon radical and induce a free radical chain process that will generate a D-amino acid configuration in the peptide sequence. Since only L-amino acids are physiologically present in mammalian (human) proteins, it may be supposed that only physiological L-peptides can be recycled by physiological enzymes such as proteases. If a D-amino acid is found in the peptide sequence subsequent to deficient copper protection against free radicals, it will not be recognized and might alter the proteasome L-amino acid recycling from brain peptides. In the brain, there will result an accumulation of abnormal protease-resistant proteins such as those observed in AD, LBD, and CJD.

  10. Oxidative Stress and Anesthesia in Diabetic Patients

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    Peivandi Yazdi A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Free radical and peroxide production lead to intracellular damage. On the other hand, free radicals are used by the human immune system to defend against pathogens. The aging process could be limited by oxidative stress in the short term. Chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM are full-stress conditions in which remarkable metabolic functional destructions might happen. There is strong evidence regarding antioxidant impairment in diabetes. Performing a particular method for anesthesia in diabetic patients might prevent or modify excessive free radical formation and oxidative stress. It seems that prescribing antioxidant drugs could promote wound healing in diabetics.  

  11. Pathogenesis of Chronic Hyperglycemia: From Reductive Stress to Oxidative Stress

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    Liang-Jun Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic overnutrition creates chronic hyperglycemia that can gradually induce insulin resistance and insulin secretion impairment. These disorders, if not intervened, will eventually be followed by appearance of frank diabetes. The mechanisms of this chronic pathogenic process are complex but have been suggested to involve production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress. In this review, I highlight evidence that reductive stress imposed by overflux of NADH through the mitochondrial electron transport chain is the source of oxidative stress, which is based on establishments that more NADH recycling by mitochondrial complex I leads to more electron leakage and thus more ROS production. The elevated levels of both NADH and ROS can inhibit and inactivate glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, respectively, resulting in blockage of the glycolytic pathway and accumulation of glycerol 3-phospate and its prior metabolites along the pathway. This accumulation then initiates all those alternative glucose metabolic pathways such as the polyol pathway and the advanced glycation pathways that otherwise are minor and insignificant under euglycemic conditions. Importantly, all these alternative pathways lead to ROS production, thus aggravating cellular oxidative stress. Therefore, reductive stress followed by oxidative stress comprises a major mechanism of hyperglycemia-induced metabolic syndrome.

  12. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

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    Namrata eChaudhari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS. Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturb fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways has been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and others. In this review we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress and mitochondrial signaling events which further induce or exacerbate ER stress.

  13. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis in brain endothelial cells lengthens S-phase transit time in the cell cycle: Implications for proliferation in recovery from oxidative stress and endothelial cell damage

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    Carmina Buşu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress-induced decrease in tissue or systemic glutathione (GSH and damage to the vascular endothelium of the blood-brain barrier such as occurs in diabetes or stroke will have important implications for brain homeostasis. Endothelial proliferation or repair is crucial to preserving barrier function. Cell proliferation has been associated with increased intracellular GSH, but the kinetic and distribution of GSH during cell cycle is poorly understood. Here, we determined the influence of cellular GSH status on the early dynamics of nuclear-to-cytosol (N-to-C GSH distribution (6-h interval during proliferation in a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (IHEC. Control IHECs exhibited two peak S-phases of the cell cycle at 48 and 60 h post seeding that temporally corresponded to peak nuclear GSH levels and expression of cdk1, the S-to-G2-to-M checkpoint controller, suggesting a link between cell cycle progression and nuclear GSH. Sustained inhibition of GSH synthesis delayed S-to-G2/M cell transition; cell arrest in the S-phase was correlated with decreased total nuclear GSH and increased nuclear expressions of chk2/phospho-chk2 and GADPH. The temporal correspondence of nuclear chk2 activation and GAPDH expression with S-phase prolongation is consistent with enhanced DNA damage response and extended time for DNA repair. Strikingly, when GSH synthesis was restored, cell transit time through S-phase remained delayed. Significantly, total nuclear GSH remained depressed, indicating a time lag between restored cellular GSH synthetic capacity and recovery of the nuclear GSH status. Interestingly, despite a delay in cell cycle recovery, nuclear expressions of chk2/phospho-chk2 and GAPDH resembled those of control cells. This means that restoration of nuclear DNA integrity preceded normalization of the cell cycle. The current results provide important insights into GSH control of endothelial proliferation with implications for cell

  14. Brain stimulation in posttraumatic stress disorder

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    Vladan Novakovic

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a complex, heterogeneous disorder that develops following trauma and often includes perceptual, cognitive, affective, physiological, and psychological features. PTSD is characterized by hyperarousal, intrusive thoughts, exaggerated startle response, flashbacks, nightmares, sleep disturbances, emotional numbness, and persistent avoidance of trauma-associated stimuli. The efficacy of available treatments for PTSD may result in part from relief of associated depressive and anxiety-related symptoms in addition to treatment of core symptoms that derive from reexperiencing, numbing, and hyperarousal. Diverse, heterogeneous mechanisms of action and the ability to act broadly or very locally may enable brain stimulation devices to address PTSD core symptoms in more targeted ways. To achieve this goal, specific theoretical bases derived from novel, well-designed research protocols will be necessary. Brain stimulation devices include both long-used and new electrical and magnetic devices. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES have both been in use for decades; transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, magnetic seizure therapy (MST, deep brain stimulation (DBS, transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS, and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS have been developed recently, over approximately the past twenty years. The efficacy of brain stimulation has been demonstrated as a treatment for psychiatric and neurological disorders such as anxiety (CES, depression (ECT, CES, rTMS, VNS, DBS, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD (DBS, essential tremor, dystonia (DBS, epilepsy (DBS, VNS, Parkinson Disease (DBS, pain (CES, and insomnia (CES. To date, limited data on brain stimulation for PTSD offer only modest guidance. ECT has shown some efficacy in reducing comorbid depression in PTSD patients but has not been demonstrated to improve most core PTSD symptoms. CES and VNS have shown some efficacy in

  15. Suppression of ERK phosphorylation through oxidative stress is involved in the mechanism underlying sevoflurane-induced toxicity in the developing brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yufune, Shinya; Satoh, Yasushi; Akai, Ryosuke; Yoshinaga, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Endo, Shogo; Kazama, Tomiei

    2016-01-01

    In animal models, neonatal exposure to general anesthetics significantly increased neuronal apoptosis with subsequent behavioral deficits in adulthood. Although the underlying mechanism is largely unknown, involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) is speculated since ERK phosphorylation is decreased by neonatal anesthetic exposure. Importance of ERK phosphorylation for neuronal development is underscored by our recent finding that transient suppression of ERK phosphorylation during the neonatal period significantly increased neuronal apoptosis and induced behavioral deficits. However, it is still unknown as to what extent decreased ERK phosphorylation contributes to the mechanism underlying anesthetic-induced toxicity. Here we investigated the causal relationship of decreased ERK phosphorylation and anesthetic-induced toxicity in the developing brain. At postnatal day 6 (P6), mice were exposed to sevoflurane (2%) or the blood-brain barrier-penetrating MEK inhibitor, α-[amino[(4-aminophenyl)thio]methylene]-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzeneacetonitrile (SL327) (50 mg/kg). Transient suppression of ERK phosphorylation by an intraperitoneal injection of SL327 at P6 significantly increased apoptosis similar to sevoflurane-induced apoptosis. Conversely, SL327 administration at P14 or P21 did not induce apoptosis, even though ERK phosphorylation was inhibited. Restoring ERK phosphorylation by administration of molecular hydrogen ameliorated sevoflurane-induced apoptosis. Together, our results strongly suggests that suppressed ERK phosphorylation is critically involved in the mechanism underlying anesthetic-induced toxicity in the developing brain. PMID:26905012

  16. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress.

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    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2015-10-23

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  17. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

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    Yosuke Kayama

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF. HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  18. Diabetic Neuropathy and Oxidative Stress: Therapeutic Perspectives

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    Asieh Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy (DN is a widespread disabling disorder comprising peripheral nerves' damage. DN develops on a background of hyperglycemia and an entangled metabolic imbalance, mainly oxidative stress. The majority of related pathways like polyol, advanced glycation end products, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, hexosamine, and protein kinase c all originated from initial oxidative stress. To date, no absolute cure for DN has been defined; although some drugs are conventionally used, much more can be found if all pathophysiological links with oxidative stress would be taken into account. In this paper, although current therapies for DN have been reviewed, we have mainly focused on the links between DN and oxidative stress and therapies on the horizon, such as inhibitors of protein kinase C, aldose reductase, and advanced glycation. With reference to oxidative stress and the related pathways, the following new drugs are under study such as taurine, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, protein kinase C inhibitor (ruboxistaurin, aldose reductase inhibitors (fidarestat, epalrestat, ranirestat, advanced glycation end product inhibitors (benfotiamine, aspirin, aminoguanidine, the hexosamine pathway inhibitor (benfotiamine, inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (nicotinamide, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (trandolapril. The development of modern drugs to treat DN is a real challenge and needs intensive long-term comparative trials.

  19. The impact of oxidative stress on hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trüeb, R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and a biological system's ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. They are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges, while the body possesses endogenous defense mechanisms. With age, production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defense mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the aging phenotype. While the role of oxidative stress has been widely discussed in skin aging, little focus has been placed on its impact on hair condition. Moreover, most literature on age-related hair changes focuses on alopecia, but it is equally important that the hair fibers that emerge from the scalp exhibit significant age-related changes that have equal impact on the overall cosmetic properties of hair. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the pre-emerging fiber include: oxidative metabolism, smoking, UVR, and inflammation from microbial, pollutant, or irritant origins. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the post-emerging fiber include: UVR (enhanced by copper), chemical insults, and oxidized scalp lipids. The role of the dermatologist is recognition and treatment of pre- and post-emerging factors for lifetime scalp and hair health.

  20. Oxidative Stress in Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Sources, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Targets

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    Xin Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is associated with the highest mortality and morbidity despite only constituting approximately 10–15% of all strokes. Complex underlying mechanisms consisting of cytotoxic, excitotoxic, and inflammatory effects of intraparenchymal blood are responsible for its highly damaging effects. Oxidative stress (OS also plays an important role in brain injury after ICH but attracts less attention than other factors. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the metabolite axis of hemoglobin-heme-iron is the key contributor to oxidative brain damage after ICH, although other factors, such as neuroinflammation and prooxidases, are involved. This review will discuss the sources, possible molecular mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets of OS in ICH.

  1. Apolipoprotein D is involved in the mechanisms regulating protection from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganfornina, Maria D; Do Carmo, Sonia; Lora, Jose M; Torres-Schumann, Sonia; Vogel, Marci; Allhorn, Maria; González, Constancio; Bastiani, Michael J; Rassart, Eric; Sanchez, Diego

    2008-08-01

    Many nervous system pathologies are associated with increased levels of apolipoprotein D (ApoD), a lipocalin also expressed during normal development and aging. An ApoD homologous gene in Drosophila, Glial Lazarillo, regulates resistance to stress, and neurodegeneration in the aging brain. Here we study for the first time the protective potential of ApoD in a vertebrate model organism. Loss of mouse ApoD function increases the sensitivity to oxidative stress and the levels of brain lipid peroxidation, and impairs locomotor and learning abilities. Human ApoD overexpression in the mouse brain produces opposite effects, increasing survival and preventing the raise of brain lipid peroxides after oxidant treatment. These observations, together with its transcriptional up-regulation in the brain upon oxidative insult, identify ApoD as an acute response protein with a protective and therefore beneficial function mediated by the control of peroxidated lipids.

  2. Cerebrolysin protects against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and neurodegeneration

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    Abdel-Salam OME

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Omar ME Abdel-Salam,1 Nadia A Mohammed,2 Eman R Youness,2 Yasser A Khadrawy,3 Enayat A Omara,4 Amany A Sleem51Department of Toxicology and Narcotics, 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, 3Department of Physiology, 4Department of Pathology, 5Department of Pharmacology, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo, EgyptAbstract: We investigated the effect of cerebrolysin, a peptide mixture used for promoting memory and recovery from cerebral stroke, on the development of oxidative stress and nigrostriatal cell injury induced by rotenone administration in rats. Rotenone 1.5 mg/kg was given subcutaneously three times weekly either alone or in combination with cerebrolysin at 21.5, 43, or 86 mg/kg. Rats were euthanized 14 days after starting the rotenone injection. Lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione (GSH, nitric oxide (nitrite concentrations, paraoxonase 1 (PON1, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE activities – as well as the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 – were measured in the brain. Histopathology, tyrosine hydroxylase, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry were also performed. Rotenone caused a significantly elevated oxidative stress and proinflammatory response in the different brain regions. Malondialdehyde and nitric oxide concentrations were significantly increased, while GSH markedly decreased in the cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and in the rest of the brain. PON1 and AChE activities significantly decreased with respect to the control levels after rotenone application. Striatal Bcl-2 was significantly decreased while MCP-1 increased following rotenone injection. Rotenone caused prominent iNOS, TNF-α, and caspase-3 immunostaining in the striatum and resulted in markedly decreased tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra and striatum. Cerebrolysin coadministered with

  3. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Guo; Li Sun; Xueping Chen; Danshen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. Al these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating or amplifying neuronal dysfunction and triggering neurodegeneration. This paper summarizes the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage to the onset of neurodegenerative eases and discusses strategies to modify mitochondrial dysfunction that may be attractive thera-peutic interventions for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Drug-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

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    Damian G. Deavall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are a byproduct of normal metabolism and have roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Species include oxygen radicals and reactive nonradicals. Mechanisms exist that regulate cellular levels of ROS, as their reactive nature may otherwise cause damage to key cellular components including DNA, protein, and lipid. When the cellular antioxidant capacity is exceeded, oxidative stress can result. Pleiotropic deleterious effects of oxidative stress are observed in numerous disease states and are also implicated in a variety of drug-induced toxicities. In this paper, we examine the nature of ROS-induced damage on key cellular targets of oxidative stress. We also review evidence implicating ROS in clinically relevant, drug-related side effects including doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage, azidothymidine-induced myopathy, and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  5. Oxidative stress and an altered methionine metabolism in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, S; Spilker, K; Kurth, C; Degner, D; Quintela-Schneider, M; Javaheripour, K; Rüther, E; Kornhuber, J; Wiltfang, J

    2000-11-03

    The exact mechanism of brain atrophy in patients with chronic alcoholism remains unknown. There is growing evidence that chronic alcoholism is associated with oxidative stress and with a derangement in sulphur amino acid metabolism (e.g. ethanol-induced hyperhomocysteinemia). Furthermore, it has been reported that homocysteine induces neuronal cell death by stimulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors as well as by producing free radicals. To further evaluate this latter hypothesis we analysed serum levels of both homocysteine and markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) in alcoholic patients who underwent withdrawal from alcohol. Homocysteine and malondialdehyde were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in serum samples of 35 patients (active drinkers). There was a significant correlation (Pbrain shrinkage.

  6. Biomarkers of oxidative stress in antioxidant therapy

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    Wilfredo Mañon Rossi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are used regularly in medical practice to provide objective markers of health status of a person, as well as the physiological response of the body to a pharmacological therapeutic intervention. In the specific case of the use of antioxidant products (antioxidant therapy, it is necessary to measure both biomarkers of oxidative stress level of the person as those that are specific to a physiological or pathological progression of a disease disorder. This paper describes the main biomarkers of oxidative general and specific stress as well as laboratory techniques, which should be taken into account when measuring the effectiveness of antioxidant therapies.

  7. Oxidative stress in development: nature or nurture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennery, Phyllis A

    2010-10-15

    An unavoidable consequence of aerobic respiration is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These may negatively impact development. Nevertheless, a certain amount of oxidative stress is required to allow for the normal progression of embryonic and fetal growth. Alterations in placental oxidative stress results in altered placental function and ultimately altered fetal growth and/or developmental programming leading to long-term consequences into adulthood. This article reviews the role of redox in fetal development and will focus on how developmental programming is influenced by the fetal and placental redox state as well as discuss potential therapeutic interventions.

  8. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Erhan; Akalin, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women.Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated.Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status markers.Our results suggest that young obese, otherwise healthy, women show findings of early periodontal disease (gingival inflammation) compared with age-matched healthy lean women, and that local/periodontal oxidative stress generated by obesity seems to be associated with periodontal disease.

  9. Induction of oxidative stress and oxidative damage in rat glial cells by acrylonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamendulis, L M; Jiang, J; Xu, Y; Klaunig, J E

    1999-08-01

    Chronic treatment of rats with acrylonitrile (ACN) resulted in a dose-related increase in glial cell tumors (astrocytomas). While the exact mechanism(s) for ACN-induced carcinogenicity remains unresolved, non-genotoxic and possibly tumor promotion modes of action appear to be involved in the induction of glial tumors. Recent studies have shown that ACN induced oxidative stress selectively in rat brain in a dose-responsive manner. The present study examined the ability of ACN to induce oxidative stress in a rat glial cell line, a target tissue, and in cultured rat hepatocytes, a non-target tissue of ACN carcinogenicity. Glial cells and hepatocytes were treated for 1, 4 and 24 h with sublethal concentrations of ACN. ACN induced an increase in oxidative DNA damage, as evidenced by increased production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) in glial cells but not in rat hepatocytes. Hydroxyl radical formation following ACN treatment was also selectively increased in glial cells. Following 1 and 4 h of ACN exposure, the levels of the non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione, as well as the activities of the enzymatic antioxidants catalase and superoxide dismutase were significantly decreased in the rat glial cells. Lipid peroxidation and the activity of glutathione peroxidase were not affected by ACN treatment in rat glial cells. No changes in any of these biomarkers of oxidative stress were observed in hepatocytes treated with ACN. These data indicate that ACN selectively induced oxidative stress in rat glial cells.

  10. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress

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    Leonardo Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1–7, all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions.

  11. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1–7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  12. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1-7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions.

  13. Peroxisomes,oxidative stress,and inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanley; R; Terlecky; Laura; J; Terlecky; Courtney; R; Giordano

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are intracellular organelles mediating a wide variety of biosynthetic and biodegradative reactions.Included among these are the metabolism of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive species,molecules whose levels help define the oxidative state of cells.Loss of oxidative equilibrium in cells of tissues and organs potentiates inflammatory responses which can ultimately trigger human disease.The goal of this article is to review evidence for connections between peroxisome function,oxidative stress,and inflammation in the context of human health and degenerative disease.Dysregulated points in this nexus are identified and potential remedial approaches are presented.

  14. Role of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Mediators in Gliomas

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    Alfredo Conti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors of the central nervous system. Despite relevant progress in conventional treatments, the prognosis of such tumors remains almost invariably dismal. The genesis of gliomas is a complex, multistep process that includes cellular neoplastic transformation, resistance to apoptosis, loss of control of the cell cycle, angiogenesis, and the acquisition of invasive properties. Among a number of different biomolecular events, the existence of molecular connections between inflammation and oxidative stress pathways and the development of this cancer has been demonstrated. In particular, the tumor microenvironment, which is largely orchestrated by inflammatory molecules, is an indispensable participant in the neoplastic process, promoting proliferation, survival and migration of such tumors. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interferon-gamma, as well as chemokines and prostaglandins, are synthesized by resident brain cells and lymphocytes invading the affected brain tissue. Key mediators of cancer progression include nuclear factor-kappaB, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and specific microRNAs. The collective activity of these mediators is largely responsible for a pro-tumorigenic response through changes in cell proliferation, cell death, cellular senescence, DNA mutation rates, DNA methylation and angiogenesis. We provide a general overview of the connection between specific inflammation and oxidative stress pathway molecules and gliomas. The elucidation of specific effects and interactions of these factors may provide the opportunity for the identification of new target molecules leading to improved diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Melatonin Improves Outcomes of Heatstroke in Mice by Reducing Brain Inflammation and Oxidative Damage and Multiple Organ Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Tian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here that when untreated mice underwent heat stress, they displayed thermoregulatory deficit (e.g., animals display hypothermia during room temperature exposure, brain (or hypothalamic inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment (e.g., decreased plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic hormone and corticosterone during heat stress, multiple organ dysfunction or failure, and lethality. Melatonin therapy significantly reduced the thermoregulatory deficit, brain inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment, multiple organ dysfunction, and lethality caused by heat stroke. Our data indicate that melatonin may improve outcomes of heat stroke by reducing brain inflammation, oxidative damage, and multiple organ dysfunction.

  16. Good stress, bad stress and oxidative stress: insights from anticipatory cortisol reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; O'Donovan, Aoife; Wolkowitz, Owen M; Dhabhar, Firdaus S; Su, Yali; Epel, Elissa

    2013-09-01

    Chronic psychological stress appears to accelerate biological aging, and oxidative damage is an important potential mediator of this process. However, the mechanisms by which psychological stress promotes oxidative damage are poorly understood. This study investigates the theory that cortisol increases in response to an acutely stressful event have the potential to either enhance or undermine psychobiological resilience to oxidative damage, depending on the body's prior exposure to chronic psychological stress. In order to achieve a range of chronic stress exposure, forty-eight post-menopausal women were recruited in a case-control design that matched women caring for spouses with dementia (a chronic stress model) with similarly aged control women whose spouses were healthy. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing perceived stress over the previous month and provided fasting blood. Three markers of oxidative damage were assessed: 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2α) (IsoP), lipid peroxidation, 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-oxoG) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), reflecting oxidative damage to RNA/DNA respectively. Within approximately one week, participants completed a standardized acute laboratory stress task while salivary cortisol responses were measured. The increase from 0 to 30 min was defined as "peak" cortisol reactivity, while the increase from 0 to 15 min was defined as "anticipatory" cortisol reactivity, representing a cortisol response that began while preparing for the stress task. Women under chronic stress had higher 8-oxoG, oxidative damage to RNA (pcortisol reactivity would mediate the relationship between perceived stress and elevated oxidative stress damage, but only among women under chronic stress. Consistent with this model, bootstrapped path analysis found significant indirect paths from perceived stress to 8-oxoG and IsoP (but not 8-OHdG) via anticipatory cortisol reactivity, showing the expected relations among chronically stressed

  17. Genetics of Oxidative Stress in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azahara I. Rupérez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a multifactorial disease characterized by the excessive accumulation of fat in adipose tissue and peripheral organs. Its derived metabolic complications are mediated by the associated oxidative stress, inflammation and hypoxia. Oxidative stress is due to the excessive production of reactive oxygen species or diminished antioxidant defenses. Genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant defense system genes, could alter the efficacy of these enzymes and, ultimately, the risk of obesity; thus, studies investigating the role of genetic variations in genes related to oxidative stress could be useful for better understanding the etiology of obesity and its metabolic complications. The lack of existing literature reviews in this field encouraged us to gather the findings from studies focusing on the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant enzymes, oxidative stress-producing systems and transcription factor genes concerning their association with obesity risk and its phenotypes. In the future, the characterization of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in obese patients could contribute to the development of controlled antioxidant therapies potentially beneficial for the treatment of obesity-derived metabolic complications.

  18. Methylglyoxal promotes oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Cristina M; Matafome, Paulo; Crisóstomo, Joana; Rodrigues, Lisa; Fernandes, Rosa; Pereira, Paulo; Seiça, Raquel M

    2012-05-01

    Modern diets can cause modern diseases. Research has linked a metabolite of sugar, methylglyoxal (MG), to the development of diabetic complications, but the exact mechanism has not been fully elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate whether MG could directly influence endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammation in Wistar and Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, an animal model of type 2 diabetes. Wistar and GK rats treated with MG in the drinking water for 3 months were compared with the respective control rats. The effects of MG were investigated on NO-dependent vasorelaxation in isolated rat aortic arteries from the different groups. Insulin resistance, NO bioavailability, glycation, a pro-inflammatory biomarker monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular oxidative stress were also evaluated. Methylglyoxal treated Wistar rats significantly reduced the efficacy of NO-dependent vasorelaxation (pMethylglyoxal treated GK rats significantly aggravated endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, AGEs accumulation and diminished NO bioavailability when compared with control GK rats. These results indicate that methylglyoxal induced endothelial dysfunction in normal Wistar rats and aggravated the endothelial dysfunction present in GK rats. The mechanism is at least in part by increasing oxidative stress and/or AGEs formation with a concomitant increment of inflammation and a decrement in NO bioavailability. The present study provides further evidence for methylglyoxal as one of the causative factors in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and development of macrovascular diabetic complication.

  19. The effects of aging and oxidative stress on psychomotor and cognitive behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Decrements in motor and cognitive function occur in aging, possibly due to oxidative stress-induced damage to the brain. Declines in antioxidant defense mechanisms have been postulated as a causative factor in these age-related decrements, however a clear link between oxidative stress (OS) and behavioral changes in aging has yet to be established. This review shows that age-validated psychomotor and cognitive tests are sensitive to behavioral deficits under different models of OS, including: ...

  20. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea W.U. Busch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms.

  1. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Aging and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Teixeira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biologic aging is a process, and oxidative stress theory, which is one of the most accepted biological theories for aging, states that oxidative stress causes cumulative damage to mitochondrial DNA resulting in cellular senescence. Dementia is a neurodegenerative disorder whose major risk factor is aging. Although the exact neuronal lesion mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders, including dementia, are not yet known, most recent studies suggest oxidative stress and mitochondrial dynamics’ role in the process.Objective: Literature review on the role of oxidative stress’ role in aging and dementia.Methods: Literature review of selected arti-cles and books deemed relevant by the authors, supplemented by Medline/Pubmed database search using combinations of the following key-words: “oxidative stress”, “de-mentia”, “aging” and “pathogenesis”, published between 1950 and 2013. References of the selected articles and books were also considered.Results: In the last five years new research has been undertaken that enlightens the relation between oxidative stress and aging. One of the considered hypotheses states that during aging, the homeostatic regulation of biogenesis, dynamics and autophagic turnover of mitochondria disturbs their functioning, resulting in cellular senescence. Consequently, the oxidative burden may reach a critical threshold above which apoptosis is triggered, leading to irreversible mitochondrial derangement and cellular death. Although the exact neuronal lesion mechanisms underlying dementias are not known, multiple studies have consistently found increased oxidative damage in brain of patients with Alzheimer disease and recent data suggests involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in dementia processes, such as in aging.Conclusions: Most recent studies suggest the role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dynamics’ in aging and dementia, either directly or

  2. Oxidative stress in benign prostate hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaiou, N; Mabed, D; Lobaccaro, J M; Lahouel, M

    2016-02-01

    To assess the status of oxidative stress in benign prostate hyperplasia, a very common disease in older men which constitutes a public health problem in Jijel, prostate tissues were obtained by transvesical adenomectomy from 10 men with benign prostate hyperplasia. We measured the cytosolic levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) and cytosolic enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase. The development of benign prostate hyperplasia is accompanied by impaired oxidative status by increasing levels of MDA, depletion of GSH concentrations and a decrease in the activity of all the antioxidant enzymes studied. These results have allowed us to understand a part of the aetiology of benign prostate hyperplasia related to oxidative stress.

  3. Low ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in gulo(-/-) mice during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona E; Meredith, M Elizabeth; Dawes, Sean M; Saskowski, Jeanette L; May, James M

    2010-08-19

    Vitamin C (ascorbic acid, AA) depletion during prenatal and postnatal development can lead to oxidative stress in the developing brain and other organs. Such damage may lead to irreversible effects on later brain function. We studied the relationship between AA deficiency and oxidative stress during development in gulonolactone oxidase (gulo) knockout mice that are unable to synthesize their own ascorbic acid. Heterozygous gulo(+/-) mice can synthesize AA and typically have similar tissue levels to wild-type mice. Gulo(+/-) dams were mated with gulo(+/-) males to provide offspring of each possible genotype. Overall, embryonic day 20 (E20) and postnatal day 1 (P1) pups were protected against oxidative stress by sufficient AA transfer during pregnancy. On postnatal day 10 (P10) AA levels were dramatically lower in liver and cerebellum in gulo(-/-) mice and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly increased. In postnatal day 18 pups (P18) AA levels decreased further in gulo(-/-) mice and oxidative stress was observed in the accompanying elevations in MDA in liver, and F(2)-isoprostanes in cortex. Further, total glutathione levels were higher in gulo(-/-) mice in cortex, cerebellum and liver, indicating that a compensatory antioxidant system was activated. These data show a direct relationship between AA level and oxidative stress in the gulo(-/-) mice. They reinforce the critical role of ascorbic acid in preventing oxidative stress in the developing brain in animals that, like humans, cannot synthesize their own AA.

  4. Effect of Hemin on Brain Alterations and Neuroglobin Expression in Water Immersion Restraint Stressed Rats

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    Merhan Ragy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, the heme oxygenase (HO system has been reported to be very active and its modulation seems to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Hemin as HO-1 inducer has been shown to attenuate neuronal injury so the goal of this study was to assess the effect of hemin therapy on the acute stress and how it would modulate neurological outcome. Thirty male albino rats were divided into three groups: control group and stressed group with six-hour water immersion restraint stress (WIRS and stressed group, treated with hemin, in which each rat received a single intraperitoneal injection of hemin at a dose level of 50 mg/kg body weight at 12 hours before exposure to WIRS. Stress hormones, oxidative stress markers, malondialdehyde (MDA, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC were measured and expressions of neuroglobin and S100B mRNA in brain tissue were assayed. Our results revealed that hemin significantly affects brain alterations induced by acute stress and this may be through increased expression of neuroglobin and through antioxidant effect. Hemin decreased blood-brain barrier damage as it significantly decreased the expression of S100B. These results suggest that hemin may be an effective therapy for being neuroprotective against acute stress.

  5. Total anesthesia, rats brain surgery, nitric oxide (NO) and free radicals

    OpenAIRE

    Jelenković Ankica V.; Jovanović Marina; Ninković Milica; Maksimović M.; Bošković Bogdan

    2005-01-01

    It is expected that clinical recovery after surgically induced brain trauma is followed by molecular and biochemical restitution. Seven days after surgery, we investigated whether the plastic cannula implanted in the left brain ventricle of adult Wistar rats (n = 6-7), performed in pentobarbital anesthesia, could influence oxidative stress elements (superoxide anion and lipid peroxidation), as well as the antioxidative system (superoxide dismuthase-SOD). Also, we investigated whether nitric o...

  6. Oxidative stress response in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Elida G; Jesuino, Rosália Santos Amorim; Dantas, Alessandra da Silva; Brígido, Marcelo de Macedo; Felipe, Maria Sueli S

    2005-06-30

    Survival of pathogenic fungi inside human hosts depends on evasion from the host immune system and adaptation to the host environment. Among different insults that Paracoccidioides brasiliensis has to handle are reactive oxygen and nitrogen species produced by the human host cells, and by its own metabolism. Knowing how the parasite deals with reactive species is important to understand how it establishes infection and survives within humans. The initiative to describe the P. brasiliensis transcriptome fostered new approaches to study oxidative stress response in this organism. By examining genes related to oxidative stress response, one can evaluate the parasite's ability to face this condition and infer about possible ways to overcome this ability. We report the results of a search of the P. brasiliensis assembled expressed sequence tag database for homologous sequences involved in oxidative stress response. We described several genes coding proteins involved in antioxidant defense, for example, catalase and superoxide dismutase isoenzymes, peroxiredoxin, cytochrome c peroxidase, glutathione synthesis enzymes, thioredoxin, and the transcription factors Yap1 and Skn7. The transcriptome analysis of P. brasiliensis reveals a pathogen that has many resources to combat reactive species. Besides characterizing the antioxidant defense system in P. brasiliensis, we also compared the ways in which different fungi respond to oxidative damage, and we identified the basic features of this response.

  7. Tobacco smoking and oxidative stress to DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Pernille Kempel; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress to DNA from smoking was investigated in one randomized smoking cessation study and in 36 cohort studies from excretion of urinary 8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). Meta-analysis of the 36 cohort studies showed smoking associated with a 15.7% (95% CL 11.0:20.3, p ....0001) increased oxidative stress to DNA, in agreement with the reduction of oxidative stress to DNA found in the smoking cessation study. Meta-analysis of the 22 studies that used chromatography methodology on 1709 persons showed a significant 29.3% increase in smokers (95% CL 17.3;41.3), but meta-analysis of 14...... studies on 3668 persons using ELISA methodology showed a non-significant effect of 8.7% [95% CL −1.2;18.6]. Tobacco smoke induces oxidative damage to DNA; however, this is not detected with ELISA methodology. Currently, the use of existing ELISA methodology to measure urinary excretion of 8-oxo-7...

  8. Effect of progesterone on phosphamidon-induced impairment of memory and oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit K; Bhattacharya, Swapan K; Khanna, Naresh; Tripathi, Ashok K; Arora, Tarun; Mehta, Ashish K; Mehta, Kapil D; Joshi, Vikas

    2011-10-01

    Progesterone (a neurosteroid) is an important modulator of the nervous system functioning. Organophosphorus pesticides like phosphamidon have been shown to adversely affect memory and induce oxidative stress on both acute and chronic exposure. The present study was therefore designed to investigate the effects of progesterone (PROG) on phosphamidon-induced modulation of cognitive function and oxidative stress in rats. Cognitive function was assessed using step-down latency (SDL) on a passive avoidance apparatus and transfer latency (TL) on an elevated plus maze. Oxidative stress was assessed by examining the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) and non-protein thiols (NP-SH) in isolated homogenized whole brain samples. The results showed a significant reduction in SDL and prolongation of TL in the phosphamidon (1.74 mg/kg/d; p.o.) treated group at weeks 6 and 8 as compared to the control group. Two weeks treatment with PROG (15 mg/kg/d; i.p.) antagonized the effect of phosphamidon on SDL as well as TL. Phosphamidon alone produced a significant increase in the brain TBARS levels and decrease in the brain NP-SH levels. Treatment with PROG (15 mg/kg/d; i.p.) attenuated the effect of phosphamidon on oxidative stress. Together, the results showed that progesterone attenuated the cognitive dysfunction and increased oxidative stress induced by phosphamidon in the brain.

  9. Oxidative stress and the high altitude environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Krzeszowiak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years there has been considerable interest in mountain sports, including mountaineering, owing to the general availability of climbing clothing and equipment as well trainings and professional literature. This raised a new question for the environmental and mountain medicine: Is mountaineering harmful to health? Potential hazards include the conditions existing in the alpine environment, i.e. lower atmospheric pressure leading to the development of hypobaric hypoxia, extreme physical effort, increased UV radiation, lack of access to fresh food, and mental stress. A reasonable measure of harmfulness of these factors is to determine the increase in the level of oxidative stress. Alpine environment can stimulate the antioxidant enzyme system but under specific circumstances it may exceed its capabilities with simultaneous consumption of low-molecular antioxidants resulting in increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. This situation is referred to as oxidative stress. Rapid and uncontrolled proliferation of reactive oxygen species leads to a number of adverse changes, resulting in the above-average damage to the lipid structures of cell membranes (peroxidation, proteins (denaturation, and nucleic acids. Such situation within the human body cannot take place without resultant systemic consequences. This explains the malaise of people returning from high altitude and a marked decrease in their physical fitness. In addition, a theory is put forward that the increase in the level of oxidative stress is one of the factors responsible for the onset of acute mountain sickness (AMS. However, such statement requires further investigation because the currently available literature is inconclusive. This article presents the causes and effects of development of oxidative stress in the high mountains.

  10. Ethanol- and/or Taurine-Induced Oxidative Stress in Chick Embryos

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    Emily J. Berning

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Because taurine alleviates ethanol- (EtOH- induced lipid peroxidation and liver damage in rats, we asked whether exogenous taurine could alleviate EtOH-induced oxidative stress in chick embryos. Exogenous EtOH (1.5 mmol/Kg egg or 3 mmol/Kg egg, taurine (4 μmol/Kg egg, or EtOH and taurine (1.5 mmol EtOH and 4 μmol taurine/Kg egg or 3 mmol EtOH and 4 μmol taurine/Kg egg were injected into fertile chicken eggs during the first three days of embryonic development (E0–2. At 11 days of development (midembryogenesis, serum taurine levels and brain caspase-3 activities, homocysteine (HoCys levels, reduced glutathione (GSH levels, membrane fatty acid composition, and lipid hydroperoxide (LPO levels were measured. Early embryonic EtOH exposure caused increased brain apoptosis rates (caspase-3 activities; increased brain HoCys levels; increased oxidative-stress, as measured by decreased brain GSH levels; decreased brain long-chain polyunsaturated levels; and increased brain LPO levels. Although taurine is reported to be an antioxidant, exogenous taurine was embryopathic and caused increased apoptosis rates (caspase-3 activities; increased brain HoCys levels; increased oxidative-stress (decreased brain GSH levels; decreased brain long-chain polyunsaturated levels; and increased brain LPO levels. Combined EtOH and taurine treatments also caused increased apoptosis rates and oxidative stress.

  11. Attenuation of Oxidative Damage by Boerhaavia diffusa L. Against Different Neurotoxic Agents in Rat Brain Homogenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyappan, Prathapan; Palayyan, Salin Raj; Kozhiparambil Gopalan, Raghu

    2016-01-01

    Due to a high rate of oxidative metabolic activity in the brain, intense production of reactive oxygen metabolite occurs, and the subsequent generation of free radicals is implicated in the pathogenesis of traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, and ischemia as well as chronic neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, protective effects of polyphenol rich ethanolic extract of Boerhaavia diffusa (BDE), a neuroprotective edible medicinal plant against oxidative stress induced by different neurotoxic agents, were evaluated. BDE was tested against quinolinic acid (QA), 3-nitropropionic acid (NPA), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and Fe (II)/EDTA complex induced oxidative stress in rat brain homogenates. QA, NPA, SNP, and Fe (II)/EDTA treatment caused an increased level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in brain homogenates along with a decline in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. BDE treatment significantly decreased the production of TBARS (p tissues. Therefore, B. diffusa had high antioxidant potential that could inhibit the oxidative stress induced by different neurotoxic agents in brain. Since many of the neurological disorders are associated with free radical injury, these data may imply that B. diffusa, functioning as an antioxidant agent, may be beneficial for reducing various neurodegenerative complications.

  12. Oxidative stress and anti-oxidative mobilization in burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Arti; Parihar, Mordhwaj S; Milner, Stephen; Bhat, Satyanarayan

    2008-02-01

    A severe burn is associated with release of inflammatory mediators which ultimately cause local and distant pathophysiological effects. Mediators including Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) are increased in affected tissue, which are implicated in pathophysiological events observed in burn patients. The purpose of this article is to understand the role of oxidative stress in burns, in order to develop therapeutic strategies. All peer-reviewed, original and review articles published in the English language literature relevant to the topic of oxidative stress in burns in animals and human subjects were selected for this review and the possible roles of ROS and RNS in the pathophysiology of burns are discussed. Both increased xanthine oxidase and neutrophil activation appear to be the oxidant sources in burns. Free radicals have been found to have beneficial effects on antimicrobial action and wound healing. However following a burn, there is an enormous production of ROS which is harmful and implicated in inflammation, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, immunosuppression, infection and sepsis, tissue damage and multiple organ failure. Thus clinical response to burn is dependent on the balance between production of free radicals and its detoxification. Supplementation of antioxidants in human and animal models has proven benefit in decreasing distant organ failure suggesting a cause and effect relationship. We conclude that oxidative damage is one of the mechanisms responsible for the local and distant pathophysiological events observed after burn, and therefore anti-oxidant therapy might be beneficial in minimizing injury in burned patients.

  13. Oxidative stress and stress signaling: menace of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loren E WOLD; Asli F CEYLAN-ISIK; Jun REN

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in the diabetic population and is currently one of the leading causes of death in the United States and other industrialized countries. The health care expenses associated with cardiovascular disease are staggering, reaching more than US$350 billion in 2003. The risk factors for cardiovascular disease include high fat/cholesterol levels,alcoholism, smoking, genetics, environmental factors and hypertension, which are commonly used to gauge an individual's risk of cardiovascular disease and to track their progress during therapy. Most recently, these factors have become important in the early prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative stress, the imbalance between reactive oxygen species production and breakdown by endogenous antioxidants, has been implicated in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure and diabetes-associated heart dysfunction (diabetic cardiomyopathy). Antioxidant therapy has shown promise in preventing the development of diabetic heart complications. This review focuses on recent advances in oxidative stress theory and antioxidant therapy in diabetic cardiomyopathy, with an emphasis on the stress signaling pathways hypothesized to be involved. Many of these stress signaling pathways lead to activation of reactive oxygen species, major players in the development and progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of sildenafil against oxidative stress and memory dysfunction in mice exposed to noise stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikandaner, Hu Erxidan; Park, So Young; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Shi Nae; Yang, Dong Won

    2017-02-15

    Noise exposure has been well characterized as an environmental stressor, and is known to have auditory and non-auditory effects. Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors affect memory and hippocampus plasticity through various signaling cascades which are regulated by cGMP. In this study, we investigated the effects of sildenafil on memory deficiency, neuroprotection and oxidative stress in mice caused by chronic noise exposure. Mice were exposed to noise for 4h every day up to 14days at 110dB SPL of noise level. Sildenafil (15mg/kg) was orally administered 30min before noise exposure for 14days. Behavioral assessments were performed using novel object recognition (NOR) test and radial arm maze (RAM) test. Higher levels of memory dysfunction and oxidative stress were observed in noise alone-induced mice compared to control group. Interestingly, sildenafil administration increased memory performance, decreased oxidative stress, and increased neuroprotection in the hippocampus region of noise alone-induced mice likely through affecting memory related pathways such as cGMP/PKG/CREB and p25/CDK5, and induction of free radical scavengers such as SOD1, SOD2, SOD3, Prdx5, and catalase in the brain of stressed mice.

  15. Tyrosine promotes oxidative stress in cerebral cortex of young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgaravatti, Angela M; Vargas, Bethânia A; Zandoná, Bernardo R; Deckmann, Kátia B; Rockenbach, Francieli J; Moraes, Tarsila B; Monserrat, José M; Sgarbi, Mirian B; Pederzolli, Carolina D; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Wajner, Moacir; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo

    2008-10-01

    Tyrosine accumulates in inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism, especially in tyrosinemia type II, where tyrosine levels are highly elevated in tissues and physiological fluids of affected patients. In tyrosinemia type II, high levels of tyrosine are correlated with eyes, skin and central nervous system disturbances. Considering that the mechanisms of brain damage in these disorders are poorly known, in the present study, we investigated whether oxidative stress is elicited by l-tyrosine in cerebral cortex homogenates of 14-day-old Wistar rats. The in vitro effect of 0.1-4.0mM l-tyrosine was studied on the following oxidative stress parameters: total radical-trapping antioxidant potential (TRAP), total antioxidant reactivity (TAR), ascorbic acid content, reduced glutathione (GSH) content, spontaneous chemiluminescence, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), thiol-disulfide redox state (SH/SS ratio), protein carbonyl content, formation of DNA-protein cross-links, and the activities of the enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). TRAP, TAR, ascorbic acid content, SH/SS ratio and CAT activity were significantly diminished, while formation of DNA-protein cross-link was significantly enhanced by l-tyrosine in vitro. In contrast, l-tyrosine did not affect the other parameters of oxidative stress evaluated. These results indicate that l-tyrosine decreases enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses, changes the redox state and stimulates DNA damage in cerebral cortex of young rats in vitro. This suggests that oxidative stress may represent a pathophysiological mechanism in tyrosinemic patients, in which this amino acid accumulates.

  16. Oxidative Stress in Autism: Elevated Cerebellar 3-nitrotyrosine Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Sajdel-Sulkowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that oxidative stress and/or mercury compounds play an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. This study compared for the first time the cerebellar levels of the oxidative stress marker 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT, mercury (Hg and the antioxidant selenium (Se levels between control and autistic subjects. Tissue homogenates were prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors from the frozen cerebellar tissue of control (n=10; mean age, 15.5 years; mean PMI, 15.5 hours and autistic (n=9; mean age 12.1 years; mean PMI, 19.3 hours subjects. The concentration of cerebellar 3-NT, determined by ELISA, in controls ranged from 13.69 to 49.04 pmol g-1 of tissue; the concentration of 3-NT in autistic cases ranged from 3.91 to 333.03 pmol g-1 of tissue. Mean cerebellar 3-NT was elevated in autism by 68.9% and the increase was statistically significant (p=0.045. Cerebellar Hg, measured by atomic absorption spectrometry ranged from 0.9 to 35 pmol g-1 tissue in controls (n=10 and from 3.2 to 80.7 pmol g-1 tissue in autistic cases (n=9; the 68.2% increase in cerebellar Hg was not statistically significant. However, there was a positive correlation between cerebellar 3-NT and Hg levels (r=0.7961, p=0.0001. A small decrease in cerebellar Se levels in autism, measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy, was not statistically significant but was accompanied by a 42.9% reduction in the molar ratio of Se to Hg in the autistic cerebellum. While preliminary, the results of the present study add elevated oxidative stress markers in brain to the growing body of data reflecting greater oxidative stress in autism.

  17. Sex, stress and the brain: interactive actions of hormones on the developing and adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, B S

    2014-12-01

    The brain is a target of steroid hormone actions that affect brain architecture, molecular and neurochemical processes, behavior and neuroprotection via both genomic and non-genomic actions. Estrogens have such effects throughout the brain and this article provides an historical and current view of how this new view has come about and how it has affected the study of sex differences, as well as other areas of neuroscience, including the effects of stress on the brain.

  18. Study of Oxidative Stress in Vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Vitiligo is an idiopathic, acquired, circumscribed, hypomelanotic skin disorder, characterized by milky white patches of different sizes and shapes. It is due to the destruction of melanocytes resulting in the absence of pigment production of the skin and mucosal surfaces. Oxidative stress has been implicated in pathophysiology of vitiligo. To study the activity of blood Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in vitiligo patients. A case–control study was conducted in whi...

  19. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Udensi K. Udensi; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the a...

  20. Piracetam improves mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction including decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced ATP production represents a common final pathway of many conditions associated with oxidative stress, for example, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and aging.Since the cognition-improving effects of the standard nootropic piracetam are usually more pronounced under such pathological conditions and young healthy animals usually benefit little by piracetam, the effect of piracetam on mitochondrial dysfunction fol...

  1. Oxidative stress and male reproductive health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Aitken

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the major causes of defective sperm function is oxidative stress, which not only disrupts the integrity of sperm DNA but also limits the fertilizing potential of these cells as a result of collateral damage to proteins and lipids in the sperm plasma membrane. The origins of such oxidative stress appear to involve the sperm mitochondria, which have a tendency to generate high levels of superoxide anion as a prelude to entering the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Unfortunately, these cells have very little capacity to respond to such an attack because they only possess the first enzyme in the base excision repair (BER pathway, 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1. The latter successfully creates an abasic site, but the spermatozoa cannot process the oxidative lesion further because they lack the downstream proteins (APE1, XRCC1 needed to complete the repair process. It is the responsibility of the oocyte to continue the BER pathway prior to initiation of S-phase of the first mitotic division. If a mistake is made by the oocyte at this stage of development, a mutation will be created that will be represented in every cell in the body. Such mechanisms may explain the increase in childhood cancers and other diseases observed in the offspring of males who have suffered oxidative stress in their germ line as a consequence of age, environmental or lifestyle factors. The high prevalence of oxidative DNA damage in the spermatozoa of male infertility patients may have implications for the health of children conceivedin vitro and serves as a driver for current research into the origins of free radical generation in the germ line.

  2. The Selfish Brain: Stress and Eating Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Achim; Kubera, Britta; Hubold, Christian; Langemann, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The brain occupies a special hierarchical position in human energy metabolism. If cerebral homeostasis is threatened, the brain behaves in a “selfish” manner by competing for energy resources with the body. Here we present a logistic approach, which is based on the principles of supply and demand known from economics. In this “cerebral supply chain” model, the brain constitutes the final consumer. In order to illustrate the operating mode of the cerebral supply chain, we take experimental dat...

  3. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

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    Taifeng Zhuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women.

  4. Propolis attenuates oxidative injury in brain and lung of nitric oxide synthase inhibited rats

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    Zeliha Selamoglu-Talas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The blocking of nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity may reason vasoconstriction with formation of reactive oxygen species. Propolis has biological and pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant. The aim of this study was to examine the antioxidant effects of propolis which natural product on biochemical parameters in brain and lung tissues of acute nitric oxide synthase inhibited rats by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME.Methods: Rats have been received L-NAME (40 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, NOS inhibitor for 15 days to produce hypertension and propolis (200mg/kg, by gavage the lastest 5 of 15 days.Results: There  were  the  increase  (P<0.001  in  the  malondialdehyde  levels  in  the  L-NAME treatment groups when compared to control rats, but the decrease (P<0.001 in the catalase activities in both brain and lung tissues. There were statistically changes (P<0.001 in these parameters of L-NAME+propolis treated rats as compared with L-NAME-treated group.Conclusion: The application of L-NAME to the Wistar rats resulted in well developed oxidative stress. Also, propolis may influence endothelial NO production. Identification of such compounds and characterisation of their cellular actions may increase our knowledge of the regulation of endothelial NO production and could provide valuable clues for the prevention or treatment of hypertensive diseases and oxidative stress.

  5. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials.

  6. Update on the oxidative stress theory of aging: does oxidative stress play a role in aging or healthy aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Adam B; Richardson, Arlan; Pérez, Viviana I

    2010-03-01

    The oxidative stress theory of aging predicts that manipulations that alter oxidative stress/damage will alter aging. The gold standard for determining whether aging is altered is life span, i.e., does altering oxidative stress/damage change life span? Mice with genetic manipulations in their antioxidant defense system designed to directly address this prediction have, with few exceptions, shown no change in life span. However, when these transgenic/knockout mice are tested using models that develop various types of age-related pathology, they show alterations in progression and/or severity of pathology as predicted by the oxidative stress theory: increased oxidative stress accelerates pathology and reduced oxidative stress retards pathology. These contradictory observations might mean that (a) oxidative stress plays a very limited, if any, role in aging but a major role in health span and/or (b) the role that oxidative stress plays in aging depends on environment. In environments with minimal stress, as expected under optimal husbandry, oxidative damage plays little role in aging. However, under chronic stress, including pathological phenotypes that diminish optimal health, oxidative stress/damage plays a major role in aging. Under these conditions, enhanced antioxidant defenses exert an "antiaging" action, leading to changes in life span, age-related pathology, and physiological function as predicted by the oxidative stress theory of aging.

  7. Oxidative stress and regulation of Pink1 in zebrafish (Danio rerio.

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    Madhusmita Priyadarshini

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress-mediated neuronal dysfunction is characteristic of several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD. The enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH catalyzes the formation of L-DOPA, the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of dopamine. A lack of dopamine in the striatum is the most characteristic feature of PD, and the cause of the most dominant symptoms. Loss of function mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase (PINK1 gene cause autosomal recessive PD. This study explored the basic mechanisms underlying the involvement of pink1 in oxidative stress-mediated PD pathology using zebrafish as a tool. We generated a transgenic line, Tg(pink1:EGFP, and used it to study the effect of oxidative stress (exposure to H2O2 on pink1 expression. GFP expression was enhanced throughout the brain of zebrafish larvae subjected to oxidative stress. In addition to a widespread increase in pink1 mRNA expression, mild oxidative stress induced a clear decline in tyrosine hydroxylase 2 (th2, but not tyrosine hydroxylase 1 (th1 expression, in the brain of wild-type larvae. The drug L-Glutathione Reduced (LGR has been associated with anti-oxidative and possible neuroprotective properties. Administration of LGR normalized the increased fluorescence intensity indicating pink1 transgene expression and endogenous pink1 mRNA expression in larvae subjected to oxidative stress by H2O2. In the pink1 morpholino oliogonucleotide-injected larvae, the reduction in the expression of th1 and th2 was partially rescued by LGR. The pink1 gene is a sensitive marker of oxidative stress in zebrafish, and LGR effectively normalizes the consequences of mild oxidative stress, suggesting that the neuroprotective effects of pink1 and LGR may be significant and useful in drug development.

  8. Role of oxidative stress in female reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Gupta, Sajal; Sharma, Rakesh K

    2005-07-14

    In a healthy body, ROS (reactive oxygen species) and antioxidants remain in balance. When the balance is disrupted towards an overabundance of ROS, oxidative stress (OS) occurs. OS influences the entire reproductive lifespan of a woman and even thereafter (i.e. menopause). OS results from an imbalance between prooxidants (free radical species) and the body's scavenging ability (antioxidants). ROS are a double-edged sword - they serve as key signal molecules in physiological processes but also have a role in pathological processes involving the female reproductive tract. ROS affect multiple physiological processes from oocyte maturation to fertilization, embryo development and pregnancy. It has been suggested that OS modulates the age-related decline in fertility. It plays a role during pregnancy and normal parturition and in initiation of preterm labor. Most ovarian cancers appear in the surface epithelium, and repetitive ovulation has been thought to be a causative factor. Ovulation-induced oxidative base damage and damage to DNA of the ovarian epithelium can be prevented by antioxidants. There is growing literature on the effects of OS in female reproduction with involvement in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, free radical-induced birth defects and other situations such as abortions. Numerous studies have shown that OS plays a role in the pathophysiology of infertility and assisted fertility. There is some evidence of its role in endometriosis, tubal and peritoneal factor infertility and unexplained infertility. This article reviews the role OS plays in normal cycling ovaries, follicular development and cyclical endometrial changes. It also discusses OS-related female infertility and how it influences the outcomes of assisted reproductive techniques. The review comprehensively explores the literature for evidence of the role of oxidative stress in conditions such as abortions, preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, fetal embryopathies, preterm

  9. Role of oxidative stress in female reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rakesh K

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a healthy body, ROS (reactive oxygen species and antioxidants remain in balance. When the balance is disrupted towards an overabundance of ROS, oxidative stress (OS occurs. OS influences the entire reproductive lifespan of a woman and even thereafter (i.e. menopause. OS results from an imbalance between prooxidants (free radical species and the body's scavenging ability (antioxidants. ROS are a double-edged sword – they serve as key signal molecules in physiological processes but also have a role in pathological processes involving the female reproductive tract. ROS affect multiple physiological processes from oocyte maturation to fertilization, embryo development and pregnancy. It has been suggested that OS modulates the age-related decline in fertility. It plays a role during pregnancy and normal parturition and in initiation of preterm labor. Most ovarian cancers appear in the surface epithelium, and repetitive ovulation has been thought to be a causative factor. Ovulation-induced oxidative base damage and damage to DNA of the ovarian epithelium can be prevented by antioxidants. There is growing literature on the effects of OS in female reproduction with involvement in the pathophsiology of preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, free radical-induced birth defects and other situations such as abortions. Numerous studies have shown that OS plays a role in the pathoysiology of infertility and assisted fertility. There is some evidence of its role in endometriosis, tubal and peritoneal factor infertility and unexplained infertility. This article reviews the role OS plays in normal cycling ovaries, follicular development and cyclical endometrial changes. It also discusses OS-related female infertility and how it influences the outcomes of assisted reproductive techniques. The review comprehensively explores the literature for evidence of the role of oxidative stress in conditions such as abortions, preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, fetal

  10. Pathway and mechanism of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Current hypotheses of pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been proposed, including formation of free radicals, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory processes, genetic factors, environmental impact factors, apoptosis, and so on. Especially, oxidative stress plays an essential role in AD pathogenesis by the function of linking agent. Oxidative stress in AD mainly includes lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA oxidation. Lipid peroxidation plays a key role in the development and progression of AD. Protein oxidation is an important mechanism in AD. Oxidative damage to DNA may plays an important role in aging and AD.

  11. Renal Dopamine Receptors, Oxidative Stress, and Hypertension

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    Ines Armando

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine, which is synthesized in the kidney, independent of renal nerves, plays an important role in the regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance and systemic blood pressure. Lack of any of the five dopamine receptor subtypes (D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R, and D5R results in hypertension. D1R, D2R, and D5R have been reported to be important in the maintenance of a normal redox balance. In the kidney, the antioxidant effects of these receptors are caused by direct and indirect inhibition of pro-oxidant enzymes, specifically, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH oxidase, and stimulation of anti-oxidant enzymes, which can also indirectly inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. Thus, stimulation of the D2R increases the expression of endogenous anti-oxidants, such as Parkinson protein 7 (PARK7 or DJ-1, paraoxonase 2 (PON2, and heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2, all of which can inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. The D5R decreases NADPH oxidase activity, via the inhibition of phospholipase D2, and increases the expression of HO-1, another antioxidant. D1R inhibits NADPH oxidase activity via protein kinase A and protein kinase C cross-talk. In this review, we provide an overview of the protective roles of a specific dopamine receptor subtype on renal oxidative stress, the different mechanisms involved in this effect, and the role of oxidative stress and impairment of dopamine receptor function in the hypertension that arises from the genetic ablation of a specific dopamine receptor gene in mice.

  12. Renal dopamine receptors, oxidative stress, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Santiago; Villar, Van Anthony; Jose, Pedro A; Armando, Ines

    2013-08-27

    Dopamine, which is synthesized in the kidney, independent of renal nerves, plays an important role in the regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance and systemic blood pressure. Lack of any of the five dopamine receptor subtypes (D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R, and D5R) results in hypertension. D1R, D2R, and D5R have been reported to be important in the maintenance of a normal redox balance. In the kidney, the antioxidant effects of these receptors are caused by direct and indirect inhibition of pro-oxidant enzymes, specifically, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH) oxidase, and stimulation of anti-oxidant enzymes, which can also indirectly inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. Thus, stimulation of the D2R increases the expression of endogenous anti-oxidants, such as Parkinson protein 7 (PARK7 or DJ-1), paraoxonase 2 (PON2), and heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2), all of which can inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. The D5R decreases NADPH oxidase activity, via the inhibition of phospholipase D2, and increases the expression of HO-1, another antioxidant. D1R inhibits NADPH oxidase activity via protein kinase A and protein kinase C cross-talk. In this review, we provide an overview of the protective roles of a specific dopamine receptor subtype on renal oxidative stress, the different mechanisms involved in this effect, and the role of oxidative stress and impairment of dopamine receptor function in the hypertension that arises from the genetic ablation of a specific dopamine receptor gene in mice.

  13. Diabetes and Alzheimer Disease, Two Overlapping Pathologies with the Same Background: Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rosales-Corral

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several oxidative stress-related pathways interconnecting Alzheimer’s disease and type II diabetes, two public health problems worldwide. Coincidences are so compelling that it is attractive to speculate they are the same disorder. However, some pathological mechanisms as observed in diabetes are not necessarily the same mechanisms related to Alzheimer’s or the only ones related to Alzheimer’s pathology. Oxidative stress is inherent to Alzheimer’s and feeds a vicious cycle with other key pathological features, such as inflammation and Ca2+ dysregulation. Alzheimer’s pathology by itself may lead to insulin resistance in brain, insulin resistance being an intervening variable in the neurodegenerative disorder. Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance from diabetes, overlapping with the Alzheimer’s pathology, aggravate the progression of the neurodegenerative processes, indeed. But the same pathophysiological background is behind the consequences, oxidative stress. We emphasize oxidative stress and its detrimental role in some key regulatory enzymes.

  14. Diabetes and Alzheimer Disease, Two Overlapping Pathologies with the Same Background: Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien; Reiter, Russel J.

    2015-01-01

    There are several oxidative stress-related pathways interconnecting Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes, two public health problems worldwide. Coincidences are so compelling that it is attractive to speculate they are the same disorder. However, some pathological mechanisms as observed in diabetes are not necessarily the same mechanisms related to Alzheimer's or the only ones related to Alzheimer's pathology. Oxidative stress is inherent to Alzheimer's and feeds a vicious cycle with other key pathological features, such as inflammation and Ca2+ dysregulation. Alzheimer's pathology by itself may lead to insulin resistance in brain, insulin resistance being an intervening variable in the neurodegenerative disorder. Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance from diabetes, overlapping with the Alzheimer's pathology, aggravate the progression of the neurodegenerative processes, indeed. But the same pathophysiological background is behind the consequences, oxidative stress. We emphasize oxidative stress and its detrimental role in some key regulatory enzymes. PMID:25815110

  15. Oxidative modification of lipoic acid by HNE in Alzheimer disease brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita S. Hardas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is an age-related neurodegenerative disease characterized by the presence of three pathological hallmarks: synapse loss, extracellular senile plaques (SP and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs. The major component of SP is amyloid β-peptide (Aβ, which has been shown to induce oxidative stress. The AD brain shows increased levels of lipid peroxidation products, including 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE. HNE can react covalently with Cys, His, or Lys residues on proteins, altering structure and function of the latter. In the present study we measured the levels of the HNE-modified lipoic acid in brain of subjects with AD and age-matched controls. Lipoic acid is a key co-factor for a number of proteins including pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, key complexes for cellular energetics. We observed a significant decrease in the levels of HNE-lipoic acid in the AD brain compared to that of age-matched controls. To investigate this phenomenon further, the levels and activity of lipoamide dehydrogenase (LADH were measured in AD and control brains. Additionally, LADH activities were measured after in-vitro HNE-treatment to mice brains. Both LADH levels and activities were found to be significantly reduced in AD brain compared to age-matched control. HNE-treatment also reduced the LADH activity in mice brain. These data are consistent with a two-hit hypothesis of AD: oxidative stress leads to lipid peroxidation that, in turn, causes oxidative dysfunction of key energy-related complexes in mitochondria, triggering neurodegeneration. This study is consonant with the notion that lipoic acid supplementation could be a potential treatment for the observed loss of cellular energetics in AD and potentiate the antioxidant defense system to prevent or delay the oxidative stress in and progression of this devastating dementing disorder.

  16. Oxidative stress and antioxidant vitamins in leprosy

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    Sangeeta B. Trimbake

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy is a disease of great antiquity and it still continues to be a significant public health problem in few countries including India .Of the various mechanisms that influence the pathogenesis of leprosy, oxidative stress is important which occurs due to derangement in the balance between ROS and natural antioxidants. Hence this study attempted to assess the oxidative stress and antioxidant status in terms of MDA and vitamin E, vitamin C respectively in leprosy. Methods: Hundred untreated leprosy patients (50 PB and 50 MB were studied and compared with 50 healthy controls. Serum Malondialdehyde (MDA and vitamin E, vitamin C was measured by spectrophotometric method. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA was measured as an indicator of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status was assessed by estimating serum vitamin E and vitamin C levels. Results: Significant rise in serum MDA (P <0.001 in both PB and MB leprosy was seen when compared with controls. The vitamin E level was significantly decreased in both PB and MB leprosy patients as compared to controls. The vitamin C level was significantly decrease (P<0.001 in MB leprosy patients as compared to controls. Conclusions: Elevated MDA levels indicate oxidative stress in leprosy patients, denoting its crucial involvement in the pathogenesis and tissue damage in leprosy. Hence MDA levels can be used to monitor prognosis, treatment and control of leprosy. Decreased vitamin E, C levels in leprosy can be improved by oral vitamin E, C supplementation. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(3.000: 226-229

  17. The point about oxidative stress in molluscs

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    H Manduzio

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available In the normal metabolism of the aerobic cell, oxygen is used for various biochemical reactions.Because of its two lone electrons of parallel spins, the molecular oxygen is stable. However, oxygengenerates Reactive Oxygenated Species or ROS by successive transfer of electrons. The ROS have astrong reactivity and can potentially interact with all other cellular components (lipids, proteins, DNA.They are at the origin of oxidations in chain by creating radicals. The cell has antioxidant systemswhich limit the effects of the ROS. These systems are composed of enzymes such as glutathionereductase, glutathione peroxidase, etc., and molecules of nonenzymatic nature like the reducedglutathione or vitamins. The production and the destruction of the radicals of oxygen coexist in a weakbalance. If this balance is broken in favour of the ROS, an oxidative stress is generated. Xenobioticscould influence this balance by catalysing production of ROS.

  18. Protective effect of melatonin on propoxur-induced impairment of memory and oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kapil D; Mehta, Ashish K; Halder, Sumita; Khanna, Naresh; Tripathi, Ashok K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2014-06-01

    Propoxur (a carbamate pesticide) has been shown to adversely affect memory and induce oxidative stress on both acute and chronic exposure. This study was designed to explore the modulation of the effects of propoxur over cognitive function by melatonin (MEL). Cognitive function was assessed using step-down latency (SDL) on a passive avoidance apparatus, and transfer latency (TL) on an elevated plus maze. Oxidative stress was assessed by examining brain malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and catalase (CAT) activity. A significant reduction in SDL and prolongation of TL was observed for the propoxur (10 mg/kg/d; p.o.) treated group at weeks 6 and 7 when compared with control. One week treatment with MEL (50 mg/kg/d; i.p.) antagonized the effect of propoxur on SDL, as well as TL. Propoxur produced a statistically significant increase in the brain MDA levels and decrease in the brain GSH levels and CAT activity. Treatment with MEL attenuated the effect of propoxur on oxidative stress. The results of the present study thus show that MEL has the potential to attenuate cognitive dysfunction and oxidative stress induced by toxicants like propoxur in the brain.

  19. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays.

  20. Flavonoids and oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotibrán, América Nitxin Castañeda; Ordaz-Téllez, María Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Arnaiz, Rosario

    2011-11-27

    Flavonoids are a family of antioxidants that are widely represented in fruits, vegetables, dry legumes, and chocolate, as well as in popular beverages, such as red wine, coffee, and tea. The flavonoids chlorogenic acid, kaempferol, quercetin and quercetin 3β-d-glycoside were investigated for genotoxicity using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART). This test makes use of two recessive wing cell markers: multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare (flr(3)), which are mutations located on the left arm of chromosome 3 of Drosophila melanogaster and are indicative of both mitotic recombination and various types of mutational events. In order to test the antioxidant capacities of the flavonoids, experiments were conducted with various combinations of oxidants and polyphenols. Oxidative stress was induced using hydrogen peroxide, the Fenton reaction and paraquat. Third-instar transheterozygous larvae were chronically treated for all experiments. The data obtained in this study showed that, at the concentrations tested, the flavonoids did not induce somatic mutations or recombination in D. melanogaster with the exception of quercetin, which proved to be genotoxic at only one concentration. The oxidants hydrogen peroxide and the Fenton reaction did not induce mutations in the wing somatic assay of D. melanogaster, while paraquat and combinations of flavonoids produced significant numbers of small single spots. Quercetin 3β-d-glycoside mixed with paraquat was shown to be desmutagenic. Combinations of the oxidants with the other flavonoids did not show any antioxidant activity.

  1. Oxidative stress and antioxidants: Distress or eustress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Etsuo

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing consensus that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are not just associated with various pathologies, but that they act as physiological redox signaling messenger with important regulatory functions. It is sometimes stated that "if ROS is a physiological signaling messenger, then removal of ROS by antioxidants such as vitamins E and C may not be good for human health." However, it should be noted that ROS acting as physiological signaling messenger and ROS removed by antioxidants are not the same. The lipid peroxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol induce adaptive response and enhance defense capacity against subsequent oxidative insults, but it is unlikely that these lipid peroxidation products are physiological signaling messenger produced on purpose. The removal of ROS and inhibition of lipid peroxidation by antioxidants should be beneficial for human health, although it has to be noted also that they may not be an effective inhibitor of oxidative damage mediated by non-radical oxidants. The term ROS is vague and, as there are many ROS and antioxidants which are different in chemistry, it is imperative to explicitly specify ROS and antioxidant to understand the effects and role of oxidative stress and antioxidants properly.

  2. Oxidative stress tolerance of early stage diabetic endothelial progenitor cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Sukmawati

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Primitive BM-EPCs showed vasculogenic dysfunction in early diabetes. However the oxidative stress is not denoted as the major initiating factor of its cause. Our results suggest that primitive BM-KSL cell has the ability to compensate oxidative stress levels in early diabetes by increasing the expression of anti-oxidative enzymes.

  3. Biocompatibility of implantable materials: An oxidative stress viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouthuy, Pierre-Alexis; Snelling, Sarah J B; Dakin, Stephanie G; Milković, Lidija; Gašparović, Ana Čipak; Carr, Andrew J; Žarković, Neven

    2016-12-01

    Oxidative stress occurs when the production of oxidants surpasses the antioxidant capacity in living cells. Oxidative stress is implicated in a number of pathological conditions such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases but it also has crucial roles in the regulation of cellular activities. Over the last few decades, many studies have identified significant connections between oxidative stress, inflammation and healing. In particular, increasing evidence indicates that the production of oxidants and the cellular response to oxidative stress are intricately connected to the fate of implanted biomaterials. This review article provides an overview of the major mechanisms underlying the link between oxidative stress and the biocompatibility of biomaterials. ROS, RNS and lipid peroxidation products act as chemo-attractants, signalling molecules and agents of degradation during the inflammation and healing phases. As chemo-attractants and signalling molecules, they contribute to the recruitment and activation of inflammatory and healing cells, which in turn produce more oxidants. As agents of degradation, they contribute to the maturation of the extracellular matrix at the healing site and to the degradation of the implanted material. Oxidative stress is itself influenced by the material properties, such as by their composition, their surface properties and their degradation products. Because both cells and materials produce and react with oxidants, oxidative stress may be the most direct route mediating the communication between cells and materials. Improved understanding of the oxidative stress mechanisms following biomaterial implantation may therefore help the development of new biomaterials with enhanced biocompatibility.

  4. 半夏厚朴汤抗抑郁作用--改善脑内氧化应激水平%Antidepressant-like Effects of Banxia Houpu Decoction by Improving the State of Oxidative Stress in the Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马占强; 李瑞鹏; 李月碧; 傅强; 瞿融; 马世平

    2014-01-01

    目的:通过观察半夏厚朴汤对慢性应激抑郁模型大鼠行为学和氧化应激的影响,研究半夏厚朴汤抗抑郁的机制。方法:采用强迫游泳实验、开野实验、糖水偏好实验,研究半夏厚朴汤对慢性应激抑郁模型大鼠的抗抑郁作用,并通过UPLC-T-QMS系统检测其大鼠脑内单胺类神经递质的含量,部分动物取其海马制备海马匀浆,Western blotting检测超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、丙二醛(MDA)。结果:与空白组相比,模型组大鼠糖水消耗量显著下降,强迫游泳不动时间显著延长,交叉次数、直立次数显著减少;海马内去甲肾上腺素、5-羟色胺含量显著降低。与模型组相比,半夏厚朴汤组糖水消耗量显著升高,强迫游泳不动时间显著缩短。半夏厚朴汤组显著增加大鼠脑内去甲肾上腺素和5-羟色胺含量。Western blotting检测结果显示,与模型组比较,半夏厚朴汤组显著升高SOD水平,显著降低MDA水平。结论:半夏厚朴汤能明显改善慢性应激所致的大鼠抑郁行为,其机制可能与上调海马内去甲肾上腺素、5-羟色胺水平,增强机体抗氧化应激能力有关。%Objectiv e: To study the anti-depression mechanism of Banxia Houpu Decoction. Methods:Rat models were established by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), sucrose consumption, open-field and forced swimming tests were used to observe the behavior of the model rats. UPLC-T-QMS was used to analyze the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters. Western blotting detected the levels of superoxide dis-mutase(SOD) and malondialdehyde(MDA) in brain. Results: Compared with the normal group, the frequency of crossing and standing and the consumption of sucrose water in the depressive disorder rats decreased significantly, the duration of immobility in forced swimming test increased significantly, the contents of 5-HT and NA reduced. Compared with the model group, the

  5. Protective effects of endomorphins, endogenous opioid peptides in the brain, on human low density lipoprotein oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xin; Xue, Li-Ying; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Qian-Yu; Chen, Qiang

    2006-03-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are associated with oxidative stress. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) exists in the brain and is especially sensitive to oxidative damage. Oxidative modification of LDL has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, protecting LDL from oxidation may be essential in the brain. The antioxidative effects of endomorphin 1 (EM1) and endomorphin 2 (EM2), endogenous opioid peptides in the brain, on LDL oxidation has been investigated in vitro. The peroxidation was initiated by either copper ions or a water-soluble initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH). Oxidation of the LDL lipid moiety was monitored by measuring conjugated dienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and the relative electrophoretic mobility. Low density lipoprotein oxidative modifications were assessed by evaluating apoB carbonylation and fragmentation. Endomorphins markedly and in a concentration-dependent manner inhibited Cu2+ and AAPH induced the oxidation of LDL, due to the free radical scavenging effects of endomorphins. In all assay systems, EM1 was more potent than EM2 and l-glutathione, a major intracellular water-soluble antioxidant. We propose that endomorphins provide protection against free radical-induced neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Oxidative stress: Biomarkers and novel therapeutic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling; Shang, Yan Chen

    2010-03-01

    Oxidative stress significantly impacts multiple cellular pathways that can lead to the initiation and progression of varied disorders throughout the body. It therefore becomes imperative to elucidate the components and function of novel therapeutic strategies against oxidative stress to further clinical diagnosis and care. In particular, both the growth factor and cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) and members of the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs) may offer the greatest promise for new treatment regimens since these agents and the cellular pathways they oversee cover a range of critical functions that directly influence progenitor cell development, cell survival and degeneration, metabolism, immune function, and cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, both EPO and FoxOs function not only as therapeutic targets, but also as biomarkers of disease onset and progression, since their cellular pathways are closely linked and overlap with several unique signal transduction pathways. However, biological outcome with EPO and FoxOs may sometimes be both unexpected and undesirable that can raise caution for these agents and warrant further investigations. Here we present the exciting as well as complicated role EPO and FoxOs possess to uncover the benefits as well as the risks of these agents for cell biology and clinical care in processes that range from stem cell development to uncontrolled cellular proliferation.

  7. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiao-Xin; Duan, Xing; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway.

  8. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xin Dai

    Full Text Available Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway.

  9. [Selenium and oxidative stress in cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorozhanskaia, É G; Sviridova, S P; Dobrovol'skaia, M M; Zybrikhina, G N; Kashnia, Sh R

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the features of violations of free-radical processes in blood serum of 94 untreated cancer patients with different localization of the tumor (cancer of the stomach, colon, breast, ovarian, hemoblastoses) were determined selenium levels and indicators of oxidative stress (sum of metabolites of nitrogen--NOx, the level of superoxide dismutase--Cu/ZnSOD and malondiialdehyde-MDA, and the activity of catalase). In addition, 40 patients with malignant liver disease and clinical signs of liver failure in the early postoperative period was carried out a comparative evaluation of the efficacy of selenium-containing drug "Selenaze" (sodium selenite pentahydrate). It was found that selenium levels in cancer patients by 25-30% below the norm of 110-120 mg/l at a rate of 73.0 +/- 2.6 mg/l. Low levels of NOx was detected in patients with all tumor localizations (22.1 +/- 1.1 microM, with normal range 28.4 +/- 0.9 microM). The exceptions were patients with extensive malignant process in the liver, in which the NOx levels were significantly higher than normal (p selenium levels by 10-12%, which was accompanied by a decrease in the content of SOD and NOx, and contributed to earlier recovery of detoxic and synthetic liver function. These findings point to an intensification of oxidative stress and metabolic disorders in the malignant process, which is the basis for metabolic correction.

  10. Vascular oxidant stress and inflammation in hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Louisa; Weiss, Norbert

    2007-11-01

    Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine are a metabolic risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease, as shown in numerous clinical studies that linked elevated homocysteine levels to de novo and recurrent cardiovascular events. High levels of homocysteine promote oxidant stress in vascular cells and tissue because of the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which have been strongly implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. In particular, ROS have been shown to cause endothelial injury, dysfunction, and activation. Elevated homocysteine stimulates proinflammatory pathways in vascular cells, resulting in leukocyte recruitment to the vessel wall, mediated by the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells and circulating monocytes and neutrophils, in the infiltration of leukocytes into the arterial wall mediated by increased secretion of chemokines, and in the differentiation of monocytes into cholesterol-scavenging macrophages. Furthermore, it stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells followed by the production of extracellular matrix. Many of these events involve redox-sensitive signaling events, which are promoted by elevated homocysteine, and result in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. In this article, we review current knowledge about the role of homocysteine on oxidant stress-mediated vascular inflammation during the development of atherosclerosis.

  11. Nutritionally Mediated Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

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    Alexandra Muñoz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many sources of nutritionally mediated oxidative stress that trigger inflammatory cascades along short and long time frames. These events are primarily mediated via NFκB. On the short-term scale postprandial inflammation is characterized by an increase in circulating levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and is mirrored on the long-term by proinflammatory gene expression changes in the adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of obese individuals. Specifically the upregulation of CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β, CXCL2/MIP-2α, and CXCL3/MIP-2β is noted because these changes have been observed in both adipocytes and PBMC of obese humans. In comparing numerous human intervention studies it is clear that pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory consumption choices mediate gene expression in humans adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Arachidonic acid and saturated fatty acids (SFAs both demonstrate an ability to increase pro-inflammatory IL-8 along with numerous other inflammatory factors including IL-6, TNFα, IL-1β, and CXCL1 for arachidonic acid and IGB2 and CTSS for SFA. Antioxidant rich foods including olive oil, fruits, and vegetables all demonstrate an ability to lower levels of IL-6 in PBMCs. Thus, dietary choices play a complex role in the mediation of unavoidable oxidative stress and can serve to exacerbate or dampen the level of inflammation.

  12. A Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling Protein in Oxidative Stress Tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ow, David W.; Song, Wen

    2003-03-26

    Plants for effective extraction of toxic metals and radionuclides must tolerate oxidative stress. To identify genes that enhance oxidative stress tolerance, an S. pombe cDNA expression plasmid library was screened for the ability to yield hypertolerant colonies. Here, we report on the properties of one gene that confers hypertolerance to cadmium and oxidizing chemicals. This gene appears to be conserved in other organisms as homologous genes are found in human, mouse, fruitfly and Arabidopsis. The fruitfly and Arabidopsis genes likewise enhance oxidative stress tolerance in fission yeast. During oxidative stress, the amount of mRNA does not change, but protein fusions to GFP relocate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The same pattern is observed with the Arabidopsis homologue-GFP fusion protein. This behavior suggests a signaling role in oxidative stress tolerance and these conserved proteins may be targets for engineering stress tolerant plants for phytoremediation.

  13. Chasing great paths of Helmut Sies "Oxidative Stress".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majima, Hideyuki J; Indo, Hiroko P; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Matsui, Hirofumi; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J; Ozawa, Toshihiko; St Clair, Daret K

    2016-04-01

    Prof. Dr. Helmut Sies is a pioneer of "Oxidative Stress", and has published over 18 papers with the name of "Oxidative Stress" in the title. He has been Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics" for many years, and is a former Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Free Radical Research". He has clarified our understanding of the causes of chronic developing diseases, and has studied antioxidant factors. In this article, importance of "Oxidative Stress" and our mitochondrial oxidative stress studies; roles of mitochondrial ROS, effects of vitamin E and its homologues in oxidative stress-related diseases, effects of antioxidants in vivo and in vitro, and a mitochondrial superoxide theory for oxidative stress diseases and aging are introduced, and some of our interactions with Helmut are described, congratulating and appreciating his great path.

  14. Oxidative stress action in cellular aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Cristine de Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Various theories try to explain the biological aging by changing the functions and structure of organic systems and cells. During lifetime, free radicals in the oxidative stress lead to lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, homeostasis imbalance, chemical residues formation, gene mutations in DNA, dysfunction of certain organelles, and the arise of diseases due to cell death and/or injury. This review describes the action of oxidative stress in the cells aging process, emphasizing the factors such as cellular oxidative damage, its consequences and the main protective measures taken to prevent or delay this process. Tests with antioxidants: vitamins A, E and C, flavonoids, carotenoids and minerals, the practice of caloric restriction and physical exercise, seeking the beneficial effects on human health, increasing longevity, reducing the level of oxidative stress, slowing the cellular senescence and origin of certain diseases, are discussed.Diferentes teorias tentam explicar o envelhecimento biológico através da alteração das funções e estrutura dos sistemas orgânicos e células. Ao longo da vida, os radicais livres presentes no estresse oxidativo conduzem à peroxidação dos lipídios das membranas celulares, desequilíbrio da homeostase, formação de resíduos químicos, mutações gênicas no DNA, disfunção de certas organelas, bem como ao surgimento de doenças devido à lesão e/ou morte celular. Nesta revisão descreve-se a ação do estresse oxidativo no processo de envelhecimento das células, enfatizando fatores como os danos oxidativos celulares, suas conseqüências e as principais medidas protetoras adotadas para se prevenir ou retardar este processo. Testes com antioxidantes: vitaminas A, E e C, flavonóides, carotenóides e minerais; a prática de restrição calórica e exercícios físicos, que buscam efeitos benéficos sobre a saúde humana, aumentando a longevidade, reduzindo o nível de estresse oxidativo

  15. Oxidative stress in marine environments: biochemistry and physiological ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress-the production and accumulation of reduced oxygen intermediates such as superoxide radicals, singlet oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals-can damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. Many disease processes of clinical interest and the aging process involve oxidative stress in their underlying etiology. The production of reactive oxygen species is also prevalent in the world's oceans, and oxidative stress is an important component of the stress response in marine organisms exposed to a variety of insults as a result of changes in environmental conditions such as thermal stress, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or exposure to pollution. As in the clinical setting, reactive oxygen species are also important signal transduction molecules and mediators of damage in cellular processes, such as apoptosis and cell necrosis, for marine organisms. This review brings together the voluminous literature on the biochemistry and physiology of oxidative stress from the clinical and plant physiology disciplines with the fast-increasing interest in oxidative stress in marine environments.

  16. Perinatal Oxidative Stress May Affect Fetal Ghrelin Levels in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong-Cheng Luo; Jean-François Bilodeau; Anne Monique Nuyt; Fraser, William D; Pierre Julien; Francois Audibert; Lin Xiao; Carole Garofalo; Emile Levy

    2015-01-01

    In vitro cell model studies have shown that oxidative stress may affect beta-cell function. It is unknown whether oxidative stress may affect metabolic health in human fetuses/newborns. In a singleton pregnancy cohort (n = 248), we studied maternal (24–28 weeks gestation) and cord plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress [malondialdehyde (MDA), F2-isoprostanes] in relation to fetal metabolic health biomarkers including cord plasma glucose-to-insulin ratio (an indicator of insulin sensitivity), p...

  17. Alterations in magnesium and oxidative status during chronic emotional stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernak, I; Savic, V; Kotur, J; Prokic, V; Kuljic, B; Grbovic, D; Veljovic, M

    2000-03-01

    Magnesium and oxidative status were investigated in young volunteers exposed to chronic stress (political intolerance, awareness of potential military attacks, permanent stand-by duty and reduced holidays more than 10 years) or subchronic stress consisting of everyday mortal danger in military actions lasting more than 3 months. Significant decreases in plasma ionized Mg2+, total Mg and ionized Ca2+ concentrations were found in both groups. Similarly, both study groups exhibited oxidative stress as assessed by increased plasma superoxide anions and malondialdehyde and modified antioxidant defense. There were no significant differences between the two stress groups. A negative correlation between magnesium balance and oxidative stress was observed suggesting that the same etiological factor (chronic stress) initiate decreases in both free and total magnesium concentrations and simultaneously increase oxidative stress intensity. These findings support the need for magnesium supplementation with antioxidant vitamins for people living in conditions of chronic stress.

  18. Oxidative stress reduces levels of dysbindin-1A via its PEST domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Mei-Yi Alicia; Lo, Yew-Long; Talbot, Konrad; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from the generation of reactive oxygen species has been proposed as an etiological factor in schizophrenia. The present study tests the hypothesis that oxidative stress can affect levels of dysbindin-1A, encoded by Dtnbp1, a genetic risk factor for schizophrenia, via its PEST domain. In vitro studies on SH-SY5Y cells indicate that oxidative stress triggers proteasomal degradation of dysbindin-1A, and that this requires interactions with its PEST domain, which may be a TRIM32 target. We specifically found (a) that oxidative stress induced in SH-SY5Y cells by 500 µM hydrogen peroxide reduced levels of full-length dysbindin-1, but did not reduce levels of that protein lacking its PEST domain and (b) that levels of full-length dysbindin-1, but not dysbindin-1 lacking its PEST domain, were higher in cells treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Oxidative stress thus emerges as the first known cellular factor regulating dysbindin-1 isoforms with PEST domains. These findings are consistent with the previously noted fact that phosphorylation of PEST domains often marks proteins for proteasomal degradation, and raises the possibility that treatments reducing oxidative stress in the brain, especially during development, may lower schizophrenia risk.

  19. Oxidative stress and inflammation in liver carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Olaya

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Inflammation is a common response in the human liver. It is involved in chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, steatosis, ischemiareperfusion damage, hepatocarcinomas and in the development of metastasis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS production is part of the inflammatory processes. It is implicated in many physiological and pathological situations and can induce mutations in key cancer genes. Normally, this process is prevented by DNA repair enzymatic systems that maintain sequence fidelity during DNA replication. However, overproduction of free radicals in chronic inflammatory diseases is thought to saturate the ability of the cell to repair DNA damage prior to replications. Inflammation-induced genetic damage is not unique to the liver, and it might contribute to the development of mutations in several organs. An example is the chronic inflammatory response in ulcerative colitis that ultimately could lead to neoplasia.

    There is compelling evidence to suggest that most known environmental risk factors for HCC development lead to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Indeed, hepatitis C virus (HCV, alcohol and hepatitis B virus (HBV have all been associated with oxidative stress. Direct production of oxidative stress by HCV core protein has been shown. A link between oxidative stress and liver pathogenesis is also supported by the successful use of antioxidant therapy to treat liver injury caused by chronic HCV infection, although it is not currently used for effective therapy. Ethanol metabolism via the alcohol dehydrogenase pathway and microsomal ethanol oxidizing system contribute substantially to the production of acetaldehyde and generation of ROS. HBx via its association with mitochondria has been shown to induce oxidative stress which in turn leads to activation of a

  20. Mitochondrial alterations, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verri, M; Pastoris, O; Dossena, M; Aquilani, R; Guerriero, F; Cuzzoni, G; Venturini, L; Ricevuti, G; Bongiorno, A I

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial disorder characterized by the progressive deterioration of neuronal networks. The primary cause and sequence of its progression are only partially understood but abnormalities in folding and accumulation of insoluble proteins such as beta-amyloid and Tau-protein are both associated with the pathogenesis of AD. Mitochondria play a crucial role in cell survival and death, and changes in mitochondrial structure and/or function are related to many human diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that compromised mitochondrial function contributes to the aging process and thus may increase the risk of AD. Dysfunctional mitochondria contribute to reactive oxygen species which can lead to extensive macromolecule oxidative damage and the progression of amyloid pathology. Oxidative stress and amyloid toxicity leave neurons chemically vulnerable. The mitochondrial toxicity induced by beta-amyloid is still not clear but may include numerous mechanisms, such as the increased permeability of mitochondrial membranes, the disruption of calcium homeostasis, the alteration of oxidative phosphorylation with a consequent overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Other mechanisms have been associated with the pathophysiology of AD. Inflammatory changes are observed in AD brain overall, particularly at the amyloid deposits, which are rich in activated microglia. Once stimulated, the microglia release a wide variety of pro-inflammatory mediators including cytokines, complement components and free radicals, all of which potentially contribute to further neuronal dysfunction and eventually death. Clinically, novel approaches to visualize early neuroinflammation in the human brain are needed to improve the monitoring and control of therapeutic strategies that target inflammatory and other pathological mechanisms. Similarly, there is growing interest in developing agents that modulate mitochondrial function.

  1. Biphasic regulation of lysosomal exocytosis by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Sreeram; Peña, Karina A; Chu, Charleen T; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress drives cell death in a number of diseases including ischemic stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of how cells recover from oxidative stress is likely to lead to better treatments for stroke and other diseases. The recent evidence obtained in several models ties the process of lysosomal exocytosis to the clearance of protein aggregates and toxic metals. The mechanisms that regulate lysosomal exocytosis, under normal or pathological conditions, are only beginning to emerge. Here we provide evidence for the biphasic effect of oxidative stress on lysosomal exocytosis. Lysosomal exocytosis was measured using the extracellular levels of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase (ß-hex). Low levels or oxidative stress stimulated lysosomal exocytosis, but inhibited it at high levels. Deletion of the lysosomal ion channel TRPML1 eliminated the stimulatory effect of low levels of oxidative stress. The inhibitory effects of oxidative stress appear to target the component of lysosomal exocytosis that is driven by extracellular Ca(2+). We propose that while moderate oxidative stress promotes cellular repair by stimulating lysosomal exocytosis, at high levels oxidative stress has a dual pathological effect: it directly causes cell damage and impairs damage repair by inhibiting lysosomal exocytosis. Harnessing these adaptive mechanisms may point to pharmacological interventions for diseases involving oxidative proteotoxicity or metal toxicity.

  2. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Mancini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4 to triiodothyronine (T3 in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  3. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Antonio; Di Segni, Chantal; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Silvestrini, Andrea; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  4. Oxidative stress, free radicals and protein peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    Primary free radicals generated under oxidative stress in cells and tissues produce a cascade of reactive secondary radicals, which attack biomolecules with efficiency determined by the reaction rate constants and target concentration. Proteins are prominent targets because they constitute the bulk of the organic content of cells and tissues and react readily with many of the secondary radicals. The reactions commonly lead to the formation of carbon-centered radicals, which generally convert in vivo to peroxyl radicals and finally to semistable hydroperoxides. All of these intermediates can initiate biological damage. This article outlines the advantages of the application of ionizing radiations to studies of radicals, with particular reference to the generation of desired radicals, studies of the kinetics of their reactions and correlating the results with events in biological systems. In one such application, formation of protein hydroperoxides in irradiated cells was inhibited by the intracellular ascorbate and glutathione.

  5. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  6. Strategies for Reducing or Preventing the Generation of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Poljsak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of oxidative stress could be achieved in three levels: by lowering exposure to environmental pollutants with oxidizing properties, by increasing levels of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants, or by lowering the generation of oxidative stress by stabilizing mitochondrial energy production and efficiency. Endogenous oxidative stress could be influenced in two ways: by prevention of ROS formation or by quenching of ROS with antioxidants. However, the results of epidemiological studies where people were treated with synthetic antioxidants are inconclusive and contradictory. Recent evidence suggests that antioxidant supplements (although highly recommended by the pharmaceutical industry and taken by many individuals do not offer sufficient protection against oxidative stress, oxidative damage or increase the lifespan. The key to the future success of decreasing oxidative-stress-induced damage should thus be the suppression of oxidative damage without disrupting the wellintegrated antioxidant defense network. Approach to neutralize free radicals with antioxidants should be changed into prevention of free radical formation. Thus, this paper addresses oxidative stress and strategies to reduce it with the focus on nutritional and psychosocial interventions of oxidative stress prevention, that is, methods to stabilize mitochondria structure and energy efficiency, or approaches which would increase endogenous antioxidative protection and repair systems.

  7. Oxidative stress decreases with elevation in the lizard Psammodromus algirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguera, Senda; Zamora-Camacho, Francisco J; Trenzado, Cristina E; Sanz, Ana; Moreno-Rueda, Gregorio

    2014-06-01

    Oxidative stress is considered one of the main ecological and evolutionary forces. Several environmental stressors vary geographically and thus organisms inhabiting different sites face different oxidant environments. Nevertheless, there is scarce information about how oxidative damage and antioxidant defences vary geographically in animals. Here we study how oxidative stress varies from lowlands (300-700 m asl) to highlands (2200-2500 m asl) in the lizard Psammodromus algirus. To accomplish this, antioxidant enzymatic activity (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione transferase, DT-diaphorase) and lipid peroxidation were assayed in tissue samples from the lizards' tail. Lipid peroxidation was higher in individuals from lowlands than from highlands, indicating higher oxidative stress in lowland lizards. These results suggest that environmental conditions are less oxidant at high elevations with respect to low ones. Therefore, our study shows that oxidative stress varies geographically, which should have important consequences for our understanding of geographic variation in physiology and life-history of organisms.

  8. Oxidative stress and iron imbalance in Alzheimer disease: how rust became the fuss!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease has gone from epiphenomena to phenomena. This transition, from disregarded to accepted theory, started in the early-mid 1990s and was accelerated by a number of reports in the literature showing that redox-active sources of transition metals, such as iron, were increased in the brain at early stages of disease. As such, it became apparent that not only was there damage but, more importantly, the machinery to exact such damage was ever present. In this review, the author chronicles his personal perspective on the past, present, and future of oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

  9. Effect of glutathione on brain nitric oxide levels in an experimental epilepsy mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aylin Akcali; Sadrettin Pence; Naciye Kurtul; Mehmet Bosnak; Munife Neyal

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Glutathione, known as one of the compounds of antioxidant defense, has been shown to inhibit convulsions. Nitric oxide has a proconvulsant effect on a pentylenetetrazole-induced animal model. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of glutathione administration on nitric oxide levels in brain regions of convulsive and kindling pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure models. DESIGN, TIME, AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, animal experiment. The study was performed at the Department of Physiology, Gaziantep University and Department of Chemistry-Biochemistry, Kahramamaras Sutcu Imam University in 2006.MATERIALS: Pentylenetetrazole and glutathione were purchased from Sigma, USA. METHODS: A total of 80 mice were assigned to 8 groups (n=10): normal control, saline control (1 mL normal saline), convulsive pentylenetetrazole (single intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole, 60 mg/kg), convulsive pentylenetrazole plus glutathione (single administration of 60 mg/kg pentylenetetrazole and 200 mg/kg glutathione), five-dose glutathione (intraperitoneal injection of 200 mg/kg glutathione respectively at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days), single-dose glutathione (single administration of 200 mg/kg glutathione), pentylenetetrazole kindling (intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole of 40 mg/kg at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days), and pentylenetetrazole kindling plus glutathione group (intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg/kg pentylenetetrazole and 200 mg/kg glutathione respectively at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All mice were sacrificed 1 hour after the last administration. Brain nitric oxide levels were determined by spectrophotometry. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in nitric oxide levels between the normal control, saline control, five-dose glutathione, and single-dose glutathione groups (P>0.05). Nitric oxide levels in the cerebral hemisphere and

  10. Protective effect of bacoside-A against morphine-induced oxidative stress in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sumathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of bacoside-A the active principle isolated from the plant Bacopa monniera against oxidative damage induced by morphine in rat brain. Morphine intoxicated rats received 10-160 mg/kg b.w. of morphine hydrochloride intraperitoneally for 21 days. Bacoside-A pretreated rats were administered with bacoside-A (10 mg/kg b.w/day orally, 2 h before the injection of morphine for 21 days. Pretreatment with bacoside-A has shown to possess a significant protective role against morphine induced brain oxidative damage in the antioxidant status (total reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and lipid peroxidation and membrane bound ATP-ases(Na + /K + ATPase. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ ATPases activities in rat. The results of the present study indicate that bacoside-A protects the brain from oxidative stress induced by morphine.

  11. Protective Effect of Bacoside-A against Morphine-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, T; Nathiya, V C; Sakthikumar, M

    2011-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of bacoside-A the active principle isolated from the plant Bacopa monniera against oxidative damage induced by morphine in rat brain. Morphine intoxicated rats received 10-160 mg/kg b.w. of morphine hydrochloride intraperitoneally for 21 days. Bacoside-A pretreated rats were administered with bacoside-A (10 mg/kg b.w/day) orally, 2 h before the injection of morphine for 21 days. Pretreatment with bacoside-A has shown to possess a significant protective role against morphine induced brain oxidative damage in the antioxidant status (total reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and lipid peroxidation) and membrane bound ATP-ases(Na(+)/K(+)ATPase. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ATPases) activities in rat. The results of the present study indicate that bacoside-A protects the brain from oxidative stress induced by morphine.

  12. Oxidative stress in atherosclerosis and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankin, V Z; Lisina, M O; Arzamastseva, N E; Konovalova, G G; Nedosugova, L V; Kaminnyi, A I; Tikhaze, A K; Ageev, F T; Kukharchuk, V V; Belenkov, Yu N

    2005-07-01

    We measured the content of lipid peroxides in plasma LDL from patients with chronic CHD not accompanied by hypercholesterolemia; CHD and hypercholesterolemia; type 2 diabetes mellitus and decompensation of carbohydrate metabolism; and CHD, circulatory insufficiency, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (without hypercholesterolemia). The content of lipid peroxides in LDL isolated from blood plasma by differential ultracentrifugation in a density gradient was estimated by a highly specific method with modifications (reagent Fe(2+) xylene orange and triphenylphosphine as a reducing agent for organic peroxides). The content of lipid peroxides in LDL from patients was much higher than in controls (patients without coronary heart disease and diabetes). Hypercholesterolemia and diabetes can be considered as factors promoting LDL oxidation in vivo. Our results suggest that stimulation of lipid peroxidation in low-density lipoproteins during hypercholesterolemia and diabetes is associated with strong autooxidation of cholesterol and glucose during oxidative and carbonyl (aldehyde) stress, respectively. These data illustrate a possible mechanism of the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  13. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Manasa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platelets were stored for 12 days at 22°C. OS markers such as aggregation, superoxides, reactive oxygen species, glucose, pH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes were assessed. OS increased during storage as indicated by increments in aggregation, superoxides, pH, conjugate dienes, and superoxide dismutase and decrements in glucose and catalase. Thus, platelets could endure OS till 6 days during storage, due to the antioxidant defense system. An evident increase in OS was observed from day 8 of storage, which can diminish the platelet efficacy. The present study provides an insight into the gradual changes occurring during platelet storage. This lays the foundation towards new possibilities of employing various antioxidants as additives in storage solutions.

  14. In pursuit of resilience: stress, epigenetics, and brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Bruce S

    2016-06-01

    The brain is the central organ for adaptation to experiences, including stressors, which are capable of changing brain architecture as well as altering systemic function through neuroendocrine, autonomic, immune, and metabolic systems. Because the brain is the master regulator of these systems, as well as of behavior, alterations in brain function by chronic stress can have direct and indirect effects on cumulative allostatic overload, which refers to the cost of adaptation. There is much new knowledge on the neural control of systemic physiology and the feedback actions of physiologic mediators on brain regions regulating higher cognitive function, emotional regulation, and self-regulation. The healthy brain has a considerable capacity for resilience, based upon its ability to respond to interventions designed to open "windows of plasticity" and redirect its function toward better health. As a result, plasticity-facilitating treatments should be given within the framework of a positive behavioral intervention; negative experiences during this window may even make matters worse. Indeed, there are no magic bullets and drugs cannot substitute for targeted interventions that help an individual become resilient, of which mindfulness-based stress reduction and meditation are emerging as useful tools.

  15. Blood and Oxidative Stress (BOS): Soyuz mission "Eneide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Adorni, Laura; Montorfano, Gigliola; Negroni, Manuela; Zava, Stefania; Berra, Bruno

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this experiment was to assay astronaut antioxidant status, to analyse red blood cell membrane composition of astronauts prior and after flight and to study the correlation with oxidative stress that erythrocytes have undergone due to space radiations. Results obtained from this single case study, indicate that during a short time flight, erythrocytes decrease their antioxidant defences, to counteract oxidative stress.

  16. Curcumin alleviates oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daverey, Amita; Agrawal, Sandeep K

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in various neurodegenerative diseases, thus alleviating oxidative stress is a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention and/or prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, alleviation of oxidative stress through curcumin is investigated in A172 (human glioblastoma cell line) and HA-sp (human astrocytes cell line derived from the spinal cord) astrocytes. H2O2 was used to induce oxidative stress in astrocytes (A172 and HA-sp). Data show that H2O2 induces activation of astrocytes in dose- and time-dependent manner as evident by increased expression of GFAP in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24 and 12h respectively. An upregulation of Prdx6 was also observed in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24h of H2O2 treatment as compared to untreated control. Our data also showed that curcumin inhibits oxidative stress-induced cytoskeleton disarrangement, and impedes the activation of astrocytes by inhibiting upregulation of GFAP, vimentin and Prdx6. In addition, we observed an inhibition of oxidative stress-induced inflammation, apoptosis and mitochondria fragmentation after curcumin treatment. Therefore, our results suggest that curcumin not only protects astrocytes from H2O2-induced oxidative stress but also reverses the mitochondrial damage and dysfunction induced by oxidative stress. This study also provides evidence for protective role of curcumin on astrocytes by showing its effects on attenuating reactive astrogliosis and inhibiting apoptosis.

  17. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  18. FREE RADICALS, REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES, OXIDATIVE STRESSES AND THEIR CLASSIFICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushchak, V I

    2015-01-01

    The phrases "free radicals" and "reactive oxygen species" (ROS) are frequently used interchangeably although this is not always correct. This article gives a brief description of two mentioned oxygen forms. During the first two-three decades after ROS discovery in biological systems (1950-1970 years) they were considered only as damaging agents, but later their involvement in organism protection and regulation of the expression of certain genes was found. The physiological state of increased steady-state ROS level along with certain physiological effects has been called oxidative stress. This paper describes ROS homeostasis and provides several classifications of oxidative stresses. The latter are based on time-course and intensity principles. Therefore distinguishing between acute and chronic stresses on the basis of the dynamics, and the basal oxidative stress, low intensity oxidative stress, strong oxidative stress, and finally a very strong oxidative stress based on the intensity of the action of the inductor of the stress are described. Potential areas of research include the development of this field with complex classification of oxidative stresses, an accurate identification of cellular targets of ROS action, determination of intracellular spatial and temporal distribution of ROS and their effects, deciphering the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell response to ROS attacks, and their participation in the normal cellular functions, i.e. cellular homeostasis and its regulation.

  19. Oxidative stress associated with exercise, psychological stress and life-style factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, P; Wallin, H; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a cellular or physiological condition of elevated concentrations of reactive oxygen species that cause molecular damage to vital structures and functions. Several factors influence the susceptibility to oxidative stress by affecting the antioxidant status or free oxygen radical...... generation. Here, we review the effect of alcohol, air pollution, cigarette smoke, diet, exercise, non-ionizing radiation (UV and microwaves) and psychological stress on the development of oxidative stress. Regular exercise and carbohydrate-rich diets seem to increase the resistance against oxidative stress....... Air pollution, alcohol, cigarette smoke, non-ionizing radiation and psychological stress seem to increase oxidative stress. Alcohol in lower doses may act as an antioxidant on low density lipoproteins and thereby have an anti-atherosclerotic property....

  20. Neuromodulatory Effects of Hesperidin in Mitigating Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ashafaq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has been implicated in pathogenesis of streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetes mellitus and its complication in central nervous system (CNS. Recent studies have provided insights on antioxidants and their emergence as potential therapeutic and nutraceutical. The present study examined the hypothesis that hesperidin (HP ameliorates oxidative stress and may be a limiting factor in the extent of CNS complication following diabetes. To test this hypothesis rats were divided into four groups: control, diabetic, diabetic-HP treated, and vehicle for HP treatment group. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single injection of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight. Three days after STZ injection, HP was given (50 mg/kg b.wt. orally once daily for four weeks. The results of the present investigation suggest that the significant elevated levels of oxidative stress markers were observed in STZ-treated animals, whereas significant depletion in the activity of nonenzymatic antioxidants and enzymatic antioxidants was witnessed in diabetic rat brain. Neurotoxicity biomarker activity was also altered significantly. HP treatment significantly attenuated the altered levels of oxidative stress and neurotoxicity biomarkers. Our results demonstrate that HP exhibits potent antioxidant and neuroprotective effects on the brain tissue against the diabetic oxidative damage in STZ-induced rodent model.

  1. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  2. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  3. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaviya, Rama [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  4. The role of oxidative stress in alcoholic liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Tatjana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Oxidative stress plays an important role in pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury. The main source of free oxygen species is cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase, which can be induced by ethanol. Role of cytochrome P4502E1 in ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species produced by this enzyme are more important in intracellular oxidative damage compared to species derived from activated phagocytes. Free radicals lead to lipid peroxidation, enzymatic inactivation and protein oxidation. Role of mitochondria in alcohol-induced oxidative stress. Production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species is increased, and glutathione content is decreased in chronically ethanolfed animals. Oxidative stress in mitochondria leads to mitochondrial DNA damage and has a dual effect on apoptosis. Role of Kupffer cells in alcohol-induced liver injury. Chronic ethanol consumption is associated with increased release of endotoxin from gut lumen into portal circulation. Endotoxin activates Kupffer cells, which then release proinflammatory cytokines and oxidants. Role of neutrophils in alcohol-induced liver injury. Alcoholic liver injury leads to the accumulation of neutrophils, which release reactive oxygen species and lysosomal enzymes and contribute to hepatocyte damage and necrosis. Role of nitric oxide in alcohol-induced oxidative stress. High amounts of nitric oxide contribute to the oxidative damage, mainly by generating peroxynitrites. Role of antioxidants in ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Chronic ethanol consumption is associated with reduced liver glutathione and α-tocopherol level and with reduced superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity. Conclusion. Oxidative stress in alcoholic liver disease is a consequence of increased production of oxidants and decreased antioxidant defense in the liver.

  5. Oxidative stress response after laparoscopic versus conventional sigmoid resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Michael Tvilling; Kücükakin, Bülent; Lykkesfeldt, Jens;

    2012-01-01

    Surgery is accompanied by a surgical stress response, which results in increased morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress is a part of the surgical stress response. Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery may result in reduced oxidative stress compared with open surgery. Nineteen patients...... scheduled for sigmoid resection were randomly allocated to open or laparoscopic sigmoid resection in a double-blind, prospective clinical trial. Three biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, ascorbic acid, and dehydroascorbic acid) were measured at 6 different time points (preoperatively......, 1 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h postoperatively). There were no statistical significant differences between laparoscopic and open surgery for any of the 3 oxidative stress parameters. Malondialdehyde was reduced 1 hour postoperatively (P...

  6. Protective mechanisms of Cucumis sativus in diabetes-related models of oxidative stress and carbonyl stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himan Heidari

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: It can be concluded that C. sativus has protective effects in diabetes complications and can be considered a safe and suitable candidate for decreasing the oxidative stress and carbonyl stress that is typically observed in diabetes mellitus.

  7. Isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion attenuates oxidative and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A Sosunov

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates that in mice subjected to hypoxia-ischemia (HI brain injury isoflurane anesthesia initiated upon reperfusion limits a release of mitochondrial oxidative radicals by inhibiting a recovery of complex-I dependent mitochondrial respiration. This significantly attenuates an oxidative stress and reduces the extent of HI brain injury. Neonatal mice were subjected to HI, and at the initiation of reperfusion were exposed to isoflurane with or without mechanical ventilation. At the end of HI and isoflurane exposure cerebral mitochondrial respiration, H2O2 emission rates were measured followed by an assessment of cerebral oxidative damage and infarct volumes. At 8 weeks after HI navigational memory and brain atrophy were assessed. In vitro, direct effect of isoflurane on mitochondrial H2O2 emission was compared to that of complex-I inhibitor, rotenone. Compared to controls, 15 minutes of isoflurane anesthesia inhibited recovery of the compex I-dependent mitochondrial respiration and decreased H2O2 production in mitochondria supported with succinate. This was associated with reduced oxidative brain injury, superior navigational memory and decreased cerebral atrophy compared to the vehicle-treated HI-mice. Extended isoflurane anesthesia was associated with sluggish recovery of cerebral blood flow (CBF and the neuroprotection was lost. However, when isoflurane anesthesia was supported with mechanical ventilation the CBF recovery improved, the event associated with further reduction of infarct volume compared to HI-mice exposed to isoflurane without respiratory support. Thus, in neonatal mice brief isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion limits mitochondrial release of oxidative radicals and attenuates an oxidative stress. This novel mechanism contributes to neuroprotective action of isoflurane. The use of mechanical ventilation during isoflurane anesthesia counterbalances negative effect of isoflurane anesthesia on

  8. Tat-HSP22 inhibits oxidative stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death by regulation of the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyo Sang; Kim, Dae Won; Shin, Min Jea; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Son, Ora; Cho, Sung-Woo; Kim, Duk-Soo; Yu, Yeon Hee; Lee, Keun Wook; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2017-01-04

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the progression of various neuronal diseases including ischemia. Heat shock protein 22 (HSP22) is known to protect cells against oxidative stress. However, the protective effects and mechanisms of HSP22 in hippocampal neuronal cells under oxidative stress remain unknown. In this study, we determined whether HSP22 protects against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in HT-22 using Tat-HSP22 fusion protein. We found that Tat-HSP22 transduced into HT-22 cells and that H2O2-induced cell death, oxidative stress, and DNA damage were significantly reduced by Tat-HSP22. In addition, Tat-HSP22 markedly inhibited H2O2-induced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax expression levels, while Bcl-2 expression levels were increased in HT-22 cells. Further, we showed that Tat-HSP22 transduced into animal brain and inhibited cleaved-caspase-3 expression levels as well as significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal cell death in the CA1 region of animals in the ischemic animal model. In the present study, we demonstrated that transduced Tat-HSP22 attenuates oxidative stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death through the mitochondrial signaling pathway and plays a crucial role in inhibiting neuronal cell death, suggesting that Tat-HSP22 protein may be used to prevent oxidative stress-related brain diseases including ischemia.

  9. Oxidative stress and psychological functioning among medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Rani Srivastava; Jyoti Batra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has gained attention recently in behavioral medicine and has been reported to be associated with various psychological disturbances and their prognoses. Objectives: Study aims to evaluate the oxidative stress (malonylaldehyde (MDA) levels) and its relation with psychological factors (dimensions of personality, levels of anxiety, stress, and depression) among medical/paramedical students of 1 st and 3 rd year). Materials and Methods: A total of 150 students; 75 fro...

  10. Diaphragmatic Breathing Reduces Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Daniele Martarelli; Mario Cocchioni; Stefania Scuri; Pierluigi Pompei

    2011-01-01

    Diaphragmatic breathing is relaxing and therapeutic, reduces stress, and is a fundamental procedure of Pranayama Yoga, Zen, transcendental meditation and other meditation practices. Analysis of oxidative stress levels in people who meditate indicated that meditation correlates with lower oxidative stress levels, lower cortisol levels and higher melatonin levels. It is known that cortisol inhibits enzymes responsible for the antioxidant activity of cells and that melatonin is a strong antioxid...

  11. EFFECTS OF CHRONIC STRESS ON THE ACTIVITIES OF SOD, GSH-Px AND MDA LEVEL IN FEMALE RATS' BRAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莹; 杨东伟; 谢雯; 庞炜; 蒋马莉; 韩太真

    2002-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of chronic emotional stress on the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and malonialdehyde (MDA) level in female rats' brain. Methods The rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group (group N), emotional stress group (group E), emotional stress + pregnancy group (group E+P) and regularly drinking group (group R). Emotional stress in rats was induced by training rats with empty drinking bottles. Having been finished the stress procedure, the brain was taken out and homogenized. Then the activities of SOD, GSH-Px and MDA level were measured. Results Compared to group N, both the activities of SOD in brain tissues of group E and group E+P were significantly decreased (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively) while the MDA level increased (P<0.05). However, the extent of changes in group E+P was more obvious than that in E. GSH-Px activities in E+P and E were significantly changed. However, the GSH-Px activity in E+P was decreased (P<0.05) while the activity in E increased (P<0.05).Conclusion The chronic emotional stress can reduce the antioxidative system by decreasing the antioxidative enzyme activity and potentiating the lipid peroxidation in the brain. It is also suggested that the combination of emotional stress and pregnancy can augment the oxidative damage in rats' brain.

  12. Oxidative damage to rat brain in iron and copper overloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacco-Sebio, Rosario; Ferrarotti, Nidia; Saporito-Magriñá, Christian; Semprine, Jimena; Fuda, Julián; Torti, Horacio; Boveris, Alberto; Repetto, Marisa G

    2014-08-01

    This study reports on the acute brain toxicity of Fe and Cu in male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 g) that received 0 to 60 mg kg(-1) (ip) FeCl2 or CuSO4. Brain metal contents and time-responses were determined for rat survival, in situ brain chemiluminescence and phospholipid and protein oxidation products. Metal doses hyperbolically defined brain metal content. Rat survival was 91% and 60% after Fe and Cu overloads. Brain metal content increased from 35 to 114 μg of Fe per g and from 3.6 to 34 μg of Cu per g. Brain chemiluminescence (10 cps cm(-2)) increased 3 and 2 times after Fe and Cu overloads, with half maximal responses (C50) of 38 μg of Fe per g of brain and 15 μg of Cu per g of brain, and with half time responses (t1/2) of 12 h for Fe and 20 h for Cu. Phospholipid peroxidation increased by 56% and 31% with C50 of 40 μg of Fe per g and 20 μg of Cu per g and with t1/2 of 9 h and 14 h. Protein oxidation increased by 45% for Fe with a C50 of 40 μg of Fe per g and 18% for Cu with a C50 of 10 μg of Cu per g and a t1/2 of 12 h for both metals. Fe and Cu brain toxicities are likely mediated by Haber-Weiss type HO˙ formation with subsequent oxidative damage.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of ROS production and oxidative stress in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsholme, Philip; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Keane, Kevin Noel; Carlessi, Rodrigo; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem

    2016-12-15

    Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are known to be associated with the development of metabolic diseases, including diabetes. Oxidative stress, an imbalance between oxidative and antioxidative systems of cells and tissues, is a result of over production of oxidative-free radicals and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS). One outcome of excessive levels of ROS is the modification of the structure and function of cellular proteins and lipids, leading to cellular dysfunction including impaired energy metabolism, altered cell signalling and cell cycle control, impaired cell transport mechanisms and overall dysfunctional biological activity, immune activation and inflammation. Nutritional stress, such as that caused by excess high-fat and/or carbohydrate diets, promotes oxidative stress as evident by increased lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonylation and decreased antioxidant status. In obesity, chronic oxidative stress and associated inflammation are the underlying factors that lead to the development of pathologies such as insulin resistance, dysregulated pathways of metabolism, diabetes and cardiovascular disease through impaired signalling and metabolism resulting in dysfunction to insulin secretion, insulin action and immune responses. However, exercise may counter excessive levels of oxidative stress and thus improve metabolic and inflammatory outcomes. In the present article, we review the cellular and molecular origins and significance of ROS production, the molecular targets and responses describing how oxidative stress affects cell function including mechanisms of insulin secretion and action, from the point of view of possible application of novel diabetic therapies based on redox regulation.

  14. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel by iptakalim normalizes stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behaviour by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Jie; Zhao, Zhan; Yang, Dan-Dan; Cao, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Ling; Ji, Juan; Gu, Jun; Huang, Ji-Ye; Sun, Xiu-Lan

    2017-02-01

    Stress-induced disturbance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is strongly implicated in incidence of mood disorders. A heightened neuroinflammatory response and oxidative stress play a fundamental role in the dysfunction of the HPA axis. We have previously demonstrated that iptakalim (Ipt), a new ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channel opener, could prevent oxidative injury and neuroinflammation against multiple stimuli-induced brain injury. The present study was to demonstrate the impacts of Ipt in stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behavior. We employed 2 stress paradigms: 8 weeks of continuous restraint stress (chronic restraint stress, CRS) and 2h of restraint stress (acute restraint stress, ARS), to mimic both chronic stress and severe acute stress. Prolonged (4 weeks) and short-term (a single injection) Ipt treatment was administered 30min before each stress paradigm. We found that HPA axis was altered after stress, with different responses to CRS (lower ACTH and CORT, higher AVP, but normal CRH) and ARS (higher CRH, ACTH and CORT, but normal AVP). Both prolonged and short-term Ipt treatment normalized stress-induced HPA axis disorders and abnormal behaviors in mice. CRS and ARS up-regulated mRNA levels of inflammation-related molecules (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and TLR4) and oxidative stress molecules (gp91phox, iNOS and Nrf2) in the mouse hypothalamus. Double immunofluorescence showed CRS and ARS increased microglia activation (CD11b and TNFα) and oxidative stress in neurons (NeuN and gp91phox), which were alleviated by Ipt. Therefore, the present study reveals that Ipt could prevent against stress-induced HPA axis disorders and depressive behavior by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in the hypothalamus.

  15. Is Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles the Cascades of Oxidative Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bin; Zhang, YanLi; Liu, Jia; Feng, XiaoLi; Zhou, Ting; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, metallic (metal or metal oxide) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in many fields such as cosmetics, the food and building industries, and bio-medical instruments. Widespread applications of metallic NP-based products increase the health risk associated with human exposures. Studies revealed that the brain, a critical organ that consumes substantial amounts of oxygen, is a primary target of metallic NPs once they are absorbed into the body. Oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, and the inflammatory response are believed to be the main mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs. Other studies have disclosed that antioxidant pretreatment or co-treatment can reverse the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species, up-regulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing the proportion of apoptotic cells, and suppressing the inflammatory response. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs might involve a cascade of events following NP-induced OS. However, additional research is needed to determine whether NP-induced OS plays a central role in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlations among neurotoxic mechanisms and to improve the bio-safety of metallic NP-based products.

  16. Enhanced Phospholipase A2 Group 3 Expression by Oxidative Stress Decreases the Insulin-Degrading Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Daishi; Nishida, Yoichiro; Nishina, Tomoko; Mogushi, Kaoru; Tajiri, Mio; Ishibashi, Satoru; Ajioka, Itsuki; Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Murayama, Shigeo; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative damage in specific regions of the brain is associated with selective neurodegeneration. We previously reported that Alzheimer disease (AD) model mice showed decreased insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) levels in the cerebrum and accelerated phenotypic features of AD when crossbred with alpha-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (Ttpa-/-) mice. To further investigate the role of chronic oxidative stress in AD pathophysiology, we performed DNA microarray analysis using young and aged wild-type mice and aged Ttpa-/- mice. Among the genes whose expression changed dramatically was Phospholipase A2 group 3 (Pla2g3); Pla2g3 was identified because of its expression profile of cerebral specific up-regulation by chronic oxidative stress in silico and in aged Ttpa-/- mice. Immunohistochemical studies also demonstrated that human astrocytic Pla2g3 expression was significantly increased in human AD brains compared with control brains. Moreover, transfection of HEK293 cells with human Pla2g3 decreased endogenous IDE expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show a key role of Pla2g3 on the reduction of IDE, and suggest that cerebrum specific increase of Pla2g3 is involved in the initiation and/or progression of AD.

  17. Enhanced Phospholipase A2 Group 3 Expression by Oxidative Stress Decreases the Insulin-Degrading Enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daishi Yui

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative damage in specific regions of the brain is associated with selective neurodegeneration. We previously reported that Alzheimer disease (AD model mice showed decreased insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE levels in the cerebrum and accelerated phenotypic features of AD when crossbred with alpha-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (Ttpa-/- mice. To further investigate the role of chronic oxidative stress in AD pathophysiology, we performed DNA microarray analysis using young and aged wild-type mice and aged Ttpa-/- mice. Among the genes whose expression changed dramatically was Phospholipase A2 group 3 (Pla2g3; Pla2g3 was identified because of its expression profile of cerebral specific up-regulation by chronic oxidative stress in silico and in aged Ttpa-/- mice. Immunohistochemical studies also demonstrated that human astrocytic Pla2g3 expression was significantly increased in human AD brains compared with control brains. Moreover, transfection of HEK293 cells with human Pla2g3 decreased endogenous IDE expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show a key role of Pla2g3 on the reduction of IDE, and suggest that cerebrum specific increase of Pla2g3 is involved in the initiation and/or progression of AD.

  18. Neurotoxicity induced by arsenic in Gallus Gallus: Regulation of oxidative stress and heat shock protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Houjuan; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic, a naturally occurring heavy metal pollutant, is one of the functioning risk factors for neurological toxicity in humans. However, little is known about the effects of arsenic on the nervous system of Gallus Gallus. To investigate whether arsenic induce neurotoxicity and influence the oxidative stress and heat shock proteins (Hsps) response in chickens, seventy-two 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were treated with different doses of arsenic trioxide (As2O3). The histological changes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and the expressions of Hsps were detected. Results showed slightly histology changes were obvious in the brain tissues exposure to arsenic. The activities of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) were decreased compared to the control, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was increased gradually along with increase in diet-arsenic. The mRNA levels of Hsps and protein expressions of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were up-regulated. These results suggested that sub-chronic exposure to arsenic induced neurotoxicity in chickens. Arsenic exposure disturbed the balance of oxidants and antioxidants. Increased heat shock response tried to protect chicken brain tissues from tissues damage caused by oxidative stress. The mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by arsenic include oxidative stress and heat shock protein response in chicken brain tissues.

  19. Oxidative stress and Kawasaki disease: how is oxidative stress involved from the acute stage to the chronic stage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahata, Tomoyo; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are closely related. Further, oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathology of inflammation-based Kawasaki disease. An excessive in vivo production of reactive oxygen species increases oxidative stress in the body, which triggers an endless vicious spiral of inflammation reactions and reactive oxygen metabolites. This presumably forms diffuse vasculitis in the acute phase. Acute inflammation and oxidative stress can be rapidly controlled by treatments; however, they may remain for a long time. This has recently been identified as a problem in the chronic phase of Kawasaki disease. Generally, the presence of vascular inflammation and oxidative stress impairs blood vessels, leading to the onset of atherosclerosis, which is a widely recognized risk. The current discussion focuses on whether the same is valid for blood vessels in the chronic phase of Kawasaki disease.

  20. Baicalein Promotes Neuronal and Behavioral Recovery After Intracerebral Hemorrhage Via Suppressing Apoptosis, Oxidative Stress and Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ning; Wei, Yinghai; Li, Binru; Pang, Linlin

    2017-01-21

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is an important public health problem in neurology, which is not only associated with high mortality but also leading to disability. Yet no satisfactory treatment has been developed. The secondary injury that resulted from a number of self-destructive processes such as neuroinflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress, is the key factor contributing to ICH-induced brain damage. Baicalein has been proved to improve neuronal functional recovery in rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage and ischemic brain damage. To investigate the effect of baicalein on ICH and its underlying mechanism, a collagenase-induced ICH rat model was performed. Baicalein treatment significantly decreased neurological severity score at day 1 and 3 after ICH injury. Our results showed that the lesion volume, the brain water content, the expression levels of four pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-4 and IL-6 and TNF-α) and the numbers of apoptotic cells were reduced significantly in ICH rats receiving baicalein treatment, especially in 50 mg/kg baicalein-treated group. Moreover, baicalein increased SOD and GSH-Px activities and down-regulated MDA level of brain tissues in rats. These results suggested that the therapeutic efficacy of baicalein on repairing brain damage is probably caused by suppressing apoptosis, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Baicalein could be developed into a novel drug for clinical treatment of ICH and ICH-related brain injuries.

  1. Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in induction of apoptosis and inflammatory response in brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Ramovatar; Kumar, Sumit; Paulraj, R.

    2015-01-01

    The ever increasing applications of engineered nanoparticles in 21st century cause serious concern about its potential health risks on living being. Regulatory health risk assessment of such particles has become mandatory for the safe use of nanomaterials in consumer products and medicines. In order to study the mechanism underlying the effects of nano-TiO2 (TiO2 nanoparticles) on the brain, wistar rats were administrated intravenously with various doses of nano-TiO2 (21 nm) through the caudal vein, once a week for 4 weeks and different parameters such as bioaccumulation of nano-TiO2, oxidative stress-mediated response, level of inflammatory markers such as NF-κB (p65), HSP 60, p38, nitric oxide, IFN-γ and TNF-α, and level of neurochemicals in brain as well as DNA damage and expression of apoptosis markers (p53, Bax, Bcl-2, and cyto c) were evaluated. Results show that the concentration of nano-TiO2 in the brain increased with increasing the doses of nano-TiO2. Oxidative stress and injury of the brain occurred as nano-TiO2 appeared to trigger a cascade of reactions such as inflammation, lipid peroxidation, decreases the activities of antioxidative enzymes and melatonin level, the reduction of glutamic acid, downregulated levels of acetylcholinesterase activities, and the increase in caspase-3 activity (a biomarker of apoptosis), DNA fragmentation, and apoptosis. It may be concluded that nano-TiO2 induces oxidative stress that leads to activation of inflammatory cytokines and an alteration in the level of neurotransmitters resulted in the induction of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis.

  2. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system.

  3. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress and diabetic mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waiho eTang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance 1. DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR [ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21], a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes NADPH-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis and myocardium (heart failure leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in 2. In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications.

  4. Computer diagnosis in cardiology: Oxidative stress hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Virtual scanning is one of the emerging technologies in complementary medicine practice. The diagnostic principle is hinged on perception and ultra weak light emission, while the treatment options associated with it includes diet, flash light, exercise and relaxation. However, a mechanism that links the diagnostic and treatment principles has yet to be elucidated. Aims: The objective here is to further explanation of oxidative stress concept as the biochemical basis of the technology. Materials and Methods: Using available literature and basic science textbook, the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenalin axis as neuro-endocrine physiological system that is strongly linked to the rate of alterations in biochemical processes through to cardiovascular complications is articulated. Results: The hypothesis brings to fore the potential of using the alterations in biochemical processes associated with cognition as tool to validate the Virtual Scanning technology for possible incorporation into clinical practice. Or vice versa to use Virtual Scanning technology to determine the chemiluminescence-related biochemical changes resulting from pathologies that could benefit from relaxation, light therapy, exercise and antioxidant nutrition. Conclusions: This article advances the applicability of cognitive test procedure for indication of the disease(s affecting heart function. The implication for some laboratory indices that are already available in clinical practice is highlighted. Investigation of this hypothesis will help provide clear link between plausible mechanism and the theory proposed.

  5. Computer diagnosis in cardiology: Oxidative stress hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Virtual scanning is one of the emerging technologies in complementary medicine practice. The diagnostic principle is hinged on perception and ultra weak light emission, while the treatment options associated with it includes diet, flash light, exercise and relaxation. However, a mechanism that links the diagnostic and treatment principles has yet to be elucidated. Aims: The objective here is to further explanation of oxidative stress concept as the biochemical basis of the technology. Materials and Methods: Using available literature and basic science textbook, the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenalin axis as neuro-endocrine physiological system that is strongly linked to the rate of alterations in biochemical processes through to cardiovascular complications is articulated. Results: The hypothesis brings to fore the potential of using the alterations in biochemical processes associated with cognition as tool to validate the Virtual Scanning technology for possible incorporation into clinical practice. Or vice versa to use Virtual Scanning technology to determine the chemiluminescence-related biochemical changes resulting from pathologies that could benefit from relaxation, light therapy, exercise and antioxidant nutrition. Conclusions: This article advances the applicability of cognitive test procedure for indication of the disease(s affecting heart function. The implication for some laboratory indices that are already available in clinical practice is highlighted. Investigation of this hypothesis will help provide clear link between plausible mechanism and the theory proposed.

  6. Oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage in psychological stress states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Both non-pathological psychological stress states and mental disorders are associated with molecular, cellular and epidemiological signs of accelerated aging. Oxidative stress on nucleic acids is a critical component of cellular and organismal aging, and a suggested pathogenic mechanism in several...... age-related somatic disorders. The overall aim of the PhD project was to investigate the relation between psychopathology, psychological stress, stress hormone secretion and oxidatively generated DNA and RNA damage, as measured by the urinary excretion of markers of whole-body DNA/RNA oxidation (8......-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo, respectively). The main hypothesis was that psychological stress states are associated with increased DNA/RNA damage from oxidation. In a study of 40 schizophrenia patients and 40 healthy controls matched for age and gender, we found that 8-oxodG/8-oxoGuo excretion was increased...

  7. [Oxidative stress in patients on regular hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostálová, J; Galandáková, A; Strebl, P; Zadražil, J

    2012-06-01

    Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis are methods of blood purification, which partially replaced excretory renal function in patients with chronic renal failure, which was depleted regime, dietary and pharmaco-therapeutic remedy, and who are not eligible for kidney transplantation. Both two methods are accompanied by increased oxidative stress. In peritoneal dialysis particularly the composition of dialysis solution contributes to oxidative stress. In extracorporeal hemodialysis the oxidative stress is associated with the character of hemodialysis membranes, non-specific loss of low molecular weight antioxidants, activation of leukocytes (oxidative burst), feroteraphy, supplementation with low molecular weight antioxidants and other factors. To improve and maintain the quality of life of dialysis patients, the continuous monitoring of oxidative stress-related parameters as non-traditional risk factors for cardiovascular complications development is suitable.

  8. [Experimental and clinical aspects of oxidative stress and redox regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hajime

    2003-02-01

    Although excess amounts of oxidative stress damage proteins and nucleotides, small amounts of oxidative stress transduce intracellular signals for cellular activation, differentiation and proliferation. Reduction/oxidation(redox) regulation is defined as a biological response to maintain homeostasis against oxidative stress. Thioredoxin, a 12 kD small protein with a redox-active dithiol/disulfide in the conserved active site: -Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-, is a key molecule for redox regulation as well as glutathione(GSH). Thioredoxin is induced by a variety of oxidative stresses and secreted from cells. Thioredoxin plays crucial roles as a redox-regulator of intracellular signal transduction and as a radical scavenger. Plasma levels of thioredoxin are good biomarkers for oxidative stress. Thioredoxin-transgenic mice are more resistant to cerebral infarction, infection or inflammation and survive longer than control mice. Administration of thioredoxin may have a good potential for anti-aging and anti-stress effects. Redox regulation mechanisms by thioredoxin and other thioredoxin family members will clarify the pathophysiology of oxidative stress-associated disorders.

  9. Chronic oxidative stress after irradiation: an unproven hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Samuel R; Cohen, Eric P

    2012-01-01

    Injury and organ failure after irradiation of late-responding tissues is a substantial problem in radiation oncology and a major threat after accidental or belligerent exposures. The mechanisms of injury may include death of clonogens, vascular injury, activation of cytokine networks, and/or chronic oxidative stress. Knowledge of mechanisms may guide optimal use of mitigators. The hypothesis of chronic oxidative stress as a mechanism of late radiation injury has received much attention. We review herein the published evidence for chronic oxidative stress in vivo, and for use of antioxidants as mitigators of normal tissue radiation injury. We conclude that there is only indirect evidence for chronic oxidative stress after irradiation, and there are only limited published reports of mitigation by antioxidants. We did not find a differentiation of persistent markers of oxidative stress from an ongoing production of oxygen radicals. It is thus unproven that chronic oxidative stress plays a major role in causing radiation injury and organ failure in late-responding tissues. Further investigation is justified, to identify persistent oxidative stress and to identify optimal mitigators of radiation injury. PMID:23245910

  10. Oxidative stress and metabolic disorders: Pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Vibha; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Rakesh K; Palle, Komaraiah; Yadav, Umesh C S

    2016-03-01

    Increased body weight and metabolic disorder including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications together constitute metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome involves multitude of factors. A number of studies however indicate, with some conformity, that oxidative stress along with chronic inflammatory condition pave the way for the development of metabolic diseases. Oxidative stress, a state of lost balance between the oxidative and anti-oxidative systems of the cells and tissues, results in the over production of oxidative free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS generated could attack the cellular proteins, lipids and nucleic acids leading to cellular dysfunction including loss of energy metabolism, altered cell signalling and cell cycle control, genetic mutations, altered cellular transport mechanisms and overall decreased biological activity, immune activation and inflammation. In addition, nutritional stress such as that caused by high fat high carbohydrate diet also promotes oxidative stress as evident by increased lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonylation, and decreased antioxidant system and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. These changes lead to initiation of pathogenic milieu and development of several chronic diseases. Studies suggest that in obese person oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are the important underlying factors that lead to development of pathologies such as carcinogenesis, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases through altered cellular and nuclear mechanisms, including impaired DNA damage repair and cell cycle regulation. Here we discuss the aspects of metabolic disorders-induced oxidative stress in major pathological conditions and strategies for their prevention and therapy.

  11. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98% on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  12. Oxidative stress and psychological functioning among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress has gained attention recently in behavioral medicine and has been reported to be associated with various psychological disturbances and their prognoses. Objectives: Study aims to evaluate the oxidative stress (malonylaldehyde (MDA levels and its relation with psychological factors (dimensions of personality, levels of anxiety, stress, and depression among medical/paramedical students of 1 st and 3 rd year. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 students; 75 from 1 st year (2010-2011 and75 from 3 rd year (2009-2010; of medical and paramedical background were assessed on level of MDA (oxidative stress and personality variables, that is, level of anxiety, stress, and depression. These psychological variables were correlated with the level of their oxidative stress. Results: Findings revealed that both groups are influenced by oxidative stress and their psychological variables are also compatible in order to confirm their vulnerabilities to stress. Conclusions: Stress in 3 rd year students was significantly higher and it was noted that it adversely affects the psychological parameters. Hence, special attention on mental health aspect in these students may be given.

  13. Protective Effect of Total Flavonoids from Alpinia officinarum Hance on Brain and Kidney Oxidative Stress in Mice Exposed to Lead Acetate%高良姜总黄酮对铅中毒致小鼠脑、肾氧化应激的保护作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏道宗; 金相国; 陆超; 徐丽萍; 孙瑶婷

    2013-01-01

    [目的]探讨高良姜总黄酮(Total flavonoids from Alpinia officinarum Hance,TFAO)对铅中毒小鼠脑、肾脏氧化应激的保护作用。[方法]60只小鼠分为正常组,模型组,阳性组,TFAO低、中、高剂量组。通过腹腔注射醋酸铅建立铅中毒模型,灌胃给予受试物。实验结束后,测定小鼠体重、脏器指数,血液及组织铅浓度,脑、肾氧化应激参数,如还原型谷胱甘肽(glutathione,GSH)、丙二醛(malondialdehyde,MDA)、谷胱甘肽过氧化物酶(glutathione peroxidase,GSH-Px)、超氧化物歧化酶(superoxide dismutase,SOD)、过氧化氢酶(catalase,CAT)等指标。[结果]高浓度TFAO对小鼠血液及组织中铅含量有明显降低作用,且未造成其他必需元素如锌的流失。与模型组相比较,TFAO可显著增加小鼠脑、肾GSH含量和抗氧化酶活性,并能显著降低MDA水平。[结论] TFAO可通过提高铅中毒小鼠组织中抗氧化酶的活性,改善脂质过氧化,从而发挥其对铅诱导的脑、肾氧化应激的保护效应。%[Objective] To investigate the protective effect of total flavonoids from Alpinia officinarum Hance(TFAO) on lead acetate induced oxidative stress in brain and kidney of mice. [Methods] Al 60 mice were randomly divided into 6 groups:normal control group, lead group, positive control group, lead+TFAO(100, 300, 500 mg·kg-1) groups. Mice except normal control group received intraperitoneal injections of lead acetate every other day, and dif-ferent test substances were administrated to mice oral y once a day. After the last dose was administrated, the body weight, viscera index, lead and zinc con-tents in blood, brain and kidney, oxidative stress parameters such as glutathione(GSH), glutathione peroxidase(GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase(SOD), cata-lase(CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in brain and kidney were determined. [Results] TFAO in high dose (500 mg·kg-1 could lower the lead

  14. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-guo Jiang; Shi-li Jin; Gong-ying Li; Qing-qing Li; Zhi-ruo Li; Hong-xia Ma; Chuan-jun Zhuo; Rong-huan Jiang; Min-jie Ye

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry andin situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no signiifcant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our ifndings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  15. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-guo Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no significant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our findings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  16. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-Guo; Jin, Shi-Li; Li, Gong-Ying; Li, Qing-Qing; Li, Zhi-Ruo; Ma, Hong-Xia; Zhuo, Chuan-Jun; Jiang, Rong-Huan; Ye, Min-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no significant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our findings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  17. Effect of cerebrolysin on dopaminergic neurodegeneration of rat with oxidative stress induced by 3-nitropropionic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón Guzmán, David; Brizuela, Norma Osnaya; Ortíz Herrera, Maribel; Hernández García, Ernestina; Barragán Mejía, Gerardo; Juárez Olguín, Hugo; Valenzuela Peraza, Armando; Attilus, Jonas; Labra Ruíz, Norma

    2016-09-01

    The study tested the hypothesis that cerebrolysin protects the brain from free radicals in rats treated with 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA). To address this hypothesis, the levels of dopamine (DA) and some oxidative stress biomarkers were measured after administration of 3-NPA. Young male Fischer rats were treated for three days with cerebrolysin, 3-NPA or both substances. Their brains were extracted, and DA, lipid peroxidation (LP), glutathione (GSH), calcium, and H2O2 were measured using validated methods. In the cortex, hemispheres and cerebellum/medulla oblongata of the group treated with cerebrolysin and 3-NPA, the levels of DA and LP decreased. In addition, calcium and H2O2 levels decreased in the hemispheres of the same group, while GSH increased in cortex. The increased dopamine metabolism due to the administration of cerebrolysin led to increased formation of radical species and oxidative stress, especially when free radicals were generated by 3-NPA.

  18. Effect of cerebrolysin on dopaminergic neurodegeneration of rat with oxidative stress induced by 3-nitropropionic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderón Guzmán David

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study tested the hypothesis that cerebrolysin protects the brain from free radicals in rats treated with 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA. To address this hypothesis, the levels of dopamine (DA and some oxidative stress biomarkers were measured after administration of 3-NPA. Young male Fischer rats were treated for three days with cerebrolysin, 3-NPA or both substances. Their brains were extracted, and DA, lipid peroxidation (LP, glutathione (GSH, calcium, and H2O2 were measured using validated methods. In the cortex, hemispheres and cerebellum/medulla oblongata of the group treated with cerebrolysin and 3-NPA, the levels of DA and LP decreased. In addition, calcium and H2O2 levels decreased in the hemispheres of the same group, while GSH increased in cortex. The increased dopamine metabolism due to the administration of cerebrolysin led to increased formation of radical species and oxidative stress, especially when free radicals were generated by 3-NPA.

  19. Oxidative metabolism of cocaine: comparison of brain and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benuck, M; Reith, M E; Sershen, H; Wiener, H L; Lajtha, A

    1989-01-01

    Norcocaine (NC) and N-hydroxynorcocaine (NHNC), products of the oxidative metabolism of cocaine, were examined in plasma, brain, and liver of mice injected intraperitoneally with cocaine. Plasma levels of NHNC were altered in vivo by inhibiting esterase activity with diazinon and chloral hydrate or activating esterase activity with phenobarbital, and activating the microsomal P-450 system with phenobarbital. Changes in plasma concentrations of NHNC resulted in similar changes in brain, which were often different from those in liver. After intracisternal administration of cocaine to mice, no appreciable amount of NC or NHNC could be detected in brain; the same results were obtained upon intracisternal and intraventricular administration to rats. Microsomal preparations from mouse brain were found to be considerably less active than those from liver in converting NC to NHNC. We conclude that the cerebral oxidative metabolism of cocaine is not appreciable and that most of the NC and NHNC found in the brain after systemic cocaine administration is derived from plasma rather than formed centrally by brain microsomal enzymes.

  20. Reversal of propoxur-induced impairment of memory and oxidative stress by 4'-chlorodiazepam in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kapil Dev; Garg, Gobind Rai; Mehta, Ashish K; Arora, Tarun; Sharma, Amit K; Khanna, Naresh; Tripathi, Ashok K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2010-01-01

    Carbamate pesticides like propoxur have been shown to adversely affect memory and induce oxidative stress on both acute and chronic exposure. The present study was designed to explore the modulation of the effects of propoxur over cognitive function by progesterone (PROG) and 4'-chlorodiazepam (4CD). Cognitive function was assessed using step-down latency (SDL) on a passive avoidance apparatus, transfer latency (TL) on a plus maze and spatial navigation test on Morris water maze. Oxidative stress was assessed by examining brain malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and catalase (CAT) activity. A significant reduction in SDL and prolongation of TL and spatial navigation test was found for the propoxur (10 mg/kg/d; p.o.) treated group at weeks 6 and 7 as compared with control. One-week treatment with 4CD (0.5 mg/kg/d; i.p.) antagonized the effect of propoxur on SDL, spatial navigation test as well as TL; whereas, PROG failed to modulate this effect at a dose of 15 mg/kg/d, i.p. Propoxur produced a statistically significant increase in the brain MDA levels and decrease in the brain GSH levels and CAT activity. Treatment with 4CD at the above dose attenuated the effect of propoxur on oxidative stress whereas PROG (15 mg/kg/d; i.p.) failed to influence the same. The results of the present study thus show that 4-CD has the potential to attenuate cognitive dysfunction and oxidative stress induced by toxicants like propoxur in the brain.

  1. Effects of Cannabis sativa extract on haloperidol-induced catalepsy and oxidative stress in the mice

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M.E.; El-Din M. Gaafar, Alaa; El Sayed El-Shamarka, Marawa; Salem, Neveen A.

    2012-01-01

    Haloperidol is a classic antipsychotic drug known for its propensity to cause extrapyramidal symptoms due to blockade of dopamine D2 receptors in the striatum. Interest in medicinal uses of cannabis is growing. Cannabis sativa has been suggested as a possible adjunctive in treatment of Parkinson's disease. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated administration of an extract of Cannabis sativa on catalepsy and brain oxidative stress induced by haloperidol administration i...

  2. Bisecting GlcNAc modification stabilizes BACE1 protein under oxidative stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Nakano, Miyako; Kitazume, Shinobu; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi C; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1) is a protease essential for amyloid-β (Aβ) production in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 protein is known to be up-regulated by oxidative stress-inducing stimuli but the mechanism for this up-regulation still needs to be clarified. We have recently found that BACE1 is modified with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-III (GnT-III, encoded by the Mgat3 gene) and that GnT-III deficiency reduces Aβ-plaque formation in the brain by accelerating lysosomal degradation of BACE1. Therefore, we hypothesized that bisecting GlcNAc would stabilize BACE1 protein on oxidative stress. In the present study, we first show that Aβ deposition in the mouse brain induces oxidative stress, together with an increase in levels of BACE1 and bisecting GlcNAc. Furthermore, prooxidant treatment induces expression of BACE1 protein in wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), whereas it reduces BACE1 protein in GnT-III (Mgat3) knock-out MEFs by accelerating lysosomal degradation of BACE1. We purified BACE1 from Neuro2A cells and performed LC/ESI/MS analysis for BACE1-derived glycopeptides and mapped bisecting GlcNAc-modified sites on BACE1. Point mutations at two N-glycosylation sites (Asn(153) and Asn(223)) abolish the bisecting GlcNAc modification on BACE1. These mutations almost cancelled the enhanced BACE1 degradation seen in Mgat3(-/-) MEFs, indicating that bisecting GlcNAc on BACE1 indeed regulates its degradation. Finally, we show that traumatic brain injury-induced BACE1 up-regulation is significantly suppressed in the Mgat3(-/-) brain. These results highlight the role of bisecting GlcNAc in oxidative stress-induced BACE1 expression and offer a novel glycan-targeted strategy for suppressing Aβ generation.

  3. Critical role of NADPH oxidase in neuronal oxidative damage and microglia activation following traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Guang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in the pathology of traumatic brain injury. Mitochondria are thought to be the major source of the damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS following TBI. However, recent work has revealed that the membrane, via the enzyme NADPH oxidase can also generate the superoxide radical (O(2(-, and thereby potentially contribute to the oxidative stress following TBI. The current study thus addressed the potential role of NADPH oxidase in TBI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results revealed that NADPH oxidase activity in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 region increases rapidly following controlled cortical impact in male mice, with an early peak at 1 h, followed by a secondary peak from 24-96 h after TBI. In situ localization using oxidized hydroethidine and the neuronal marker, NeuN, revealed that the O(2(- induction occurred in neurons at 1 h after TBI. Pre- or post-treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin markedly inhibited microglial activation and oxidative stress damage. Apocynin also attenuated TBI-induction of the Alzheimer's disease proteins β-amyloid and amyloid precursor protein. Finally, both pre- and post-treatment of apocynin was also shown to induce significant neuroprotection against TBI. In addition, a NOX2-specific inhibitor, gp91ds-tat was also shown to exert neuroprotection against TBI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As a whole, the study demonstrates that NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide production exhibit a biphasic elevation in the hippocampus and cortex following TBI, which contributes significantly to the pathology of TBI via mediation of oxidative stress damage, microglial activation, and AD protein induction in the brain following TBI.

  4. A meta-analysis of oxidative stress markers in schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been identified as a possible element in the neuropathological processes of schizophrenia(SCZ).Alteration of oxidative stress markers has been reported in SCZ studies,but with inconsistent results.To evaluate the risk of oxidative stress to schizophrenia,a meta-analysis was conducted,including five markers of oxidative stress [thiobarbituric reactive substances(TBARS),nitric oxide(NO),catalase(CAT),glutathione peroxidase(GP) and superoxide dismutase(SOD)] in SCZ patients versus healthy controls.This study showed that TBARS and NO significantly increased in SCZ,while SOD activity significantly decreased in the disorganized type of SCZ patients.No significant effect size was found for the activities of GP and CAT in SCZ patients(P>0.05).Egger’s regression test observed no significant publication bias across the oxidative stress markers,but found high heterogeneities in all the 5 markers.The subgroup analysis suggested that the ethnicity,sample size of patients and sample sources may contribute to the heterogeneity of the results for TBARS,NO and SOD.The result further demonstrated the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  5. Crosstalk between oxidative and nitrosative stress and arterial stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozos, Ioana; Luca, Constantin Tudor

    2017-02-01

    Arterial stiffness, the expression of reduced arterial elasticity, is an effective predictor of cardiovascular disorders. Oxidative stress is an imbalance between exposure to toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant systems. The increase in reactive nitrogen species (RNS) is termed nitrosative stress. We review the main mechanisms and products linking arterial stiffness with oxidative and nitrosative stress in several disorders, focusing on recent experimental and clinical data, and the mechanisms explaining benefits of antioxidant therapy. Oxidative and nitrosative stress play important roles in arterial stiffness elevation in several disorders, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, obesity, peripheral arterial disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, thalassemia, Kawasaki disease and malignant disorders. Oxidative and nitrosative stress are responsible for endothelial dysfunction due to uncoupling of the nitric oxide synthase, oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA in vascular endothelial cells, associated with inflammation, arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis. Regular physical exercise, caloric restriction, red wine, statins, sartans, metformin, oestradiol, curcumin and combinations of antioxidant vitamins are therapeutic strategies that may decrease arterial stiffness and oxidative stress thus reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. ROS and RNS represent potential therapeutic targets for preventing progression of arterial stiffness.

  6. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandl, Anita [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Nerlich, Michael [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Angele, Peter, E-mail: Peter.Angele@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  7. Oxidative Stress Induced Mitochondrial Failure and Vascular Hypoperfusion as a Key Initiator for the Development of Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Bragin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction may be a principal underlying event in aging, including age-associated brain degeneration. Mitochondria provide energy for basic metabolic processes. Their decay with age impairs cellular metabolism and leads to a decline of cellular function. Alzheimer disease (AD and cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs are two leading causes of age-related dementia. Increasing evidence strongly supports the theory that oxidative stress, largely due to reactive oxygen species (ROS, induces mitochondrial damage, which arises from