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Sample records for brain mri study

  1. Brain activation studies with PET and functional MRI

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    Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Fukui Medical Univ., Matsuoka (Japan). Biomedical Imaging Research Center; Sadato, Norihiro [Okazaki National Research Inst., Aichi (Japan). National Inst. for Physiological Sciences

    2002-01-01

    Application of PET and functional MRI in brain activation studies is reviewed. 3D-PET images obtained repeatedly after intravenous injection of about 370 MBq of H{sub 2}{sup 15}O can detect a faint blood flow change in the brain. Functional MRI can also detect the blood flow change in the brain due to blood oxygen level-dependent effect. Echo-planar imaging is popular in MRI with 1.5 or 3 T. Images are analyzed by statistical parametric mapping with correction of cerebral regions, anatomical normalization and statistics. PET data give the blood flow change by the H{sub 2}{sup 15}O incorporation into the brain and MRI data, by the scarce tissue oxygen consumption despite the change. Actual images during the cognition task-performance and of frequent artifacts are given. PET is suitable for studies of brain functions like sensibility and emotion and functional MRI, like cortex functions and clinical practices in identification of functional regions prior to surgery and evaluation of functional recovery of damaged brain. (K.H.)

  2. Studying brain organization via spontaneous fMRI signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Jonathan D; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Petersen, Steven E

    2014-11-19

    In recent years, some substantial advances in understanding human (and nonhuman) brain organization have emerged from a relatively unusual approach: the observation of spontaneous activity, and correlated patterns in spontaneous activity, in the "resting" brain. Most commonly, spontaneous neural activity is measured indirectly via fMRI signal in subjects who are lying quietly in the scanner, the so-called "resting state." This Primer introduces the fMRI-based study of spontaneous brain activity, some of the methodological issues active in the field, and some ways in which resting-state fMRI has been used to delineate aspects of area-level and supra-areal brain organization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multimodal MRI Study of Human Brain Connectivity: Cognitive Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sala Llonch, Roser

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This thesis has been elaborated as a compendium of 6 research studies, in which we have used a variety of methods related with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with the objective to characterize brain connectivity and its relationship with cognition in young and aged subjects and in preclinical Alzheimers Disease (AD). Brain Connectivity refers to any pattern of links connecting different areas of the brain. It can be stud­ied at its functional level, by using functional MR...

  4. Longitudinal MRI studies of brain morphometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skimminge, Arnold Jesper Møller

    High resolution MR images acquired at multiple time points of the brain allow quantification of localized changes induced by external factors such as maturation, ageing or disease progression/recovery. High-dimensional warping of such MR images incorporates changes induced by external factors int...

  5. Volumetric MRI study of the intrauterine growth restriction fetal brain

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    Polat, A.; Barlow, S.; Ber, R.; Achiron, R.; Katorza, E. [Tel Aviv University, Sackler School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer (Israel)

    2017-05-15

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a pathologic fetal condition known to affect the fetal brain regionally and associated with future neurodevelopmental abnormalities. This study employed MRI to assess in utero regional brain volume changes in IUGR fetuses compared to controls. Retrospectively, using MRI images of fetuses at 30-34 weeks gestational age, a total of 8 brain regions - supratentorial brain and cavity, cerebral hemispheres, temporal lobes and cerebellum - were measured for volume in 13 fetuses with IUGR due to placental insufficiency and in 21 controls. Volumes and their ratios were assessed for difference using regression models. Reliability was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between two observers. In both groups, all structures increase in absolute volume during that gestation period, and the rate of cerebellar growth is higher compared to that of supratentorial structures. All structures' absolute volumes were significantly smaller for the IUGR group. Cerebellar to supratentorial ratios were found to be significantly smaller (P < 0.05) for IUGR compared to controls. No other significant ratio differences were found. ICC showed excellent agreement. The cerebellar to supratentorial volume ratio is affected in IUGR fetuses. Additional research is needed to assess this as a radiologic marker in relation to long-term outcome. (orig.)

  6. Volumetric MRI study of the intrauterine growth restriction fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, A; Barlow, S; Ber, R; Achiron, R; Katorza, E

    2017-05-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a pathologic fetal condition known to affect the fetal brain regionally and associated with future neurodevelopmental abnormalities. This study employed MRI to assess in utero regional brain volume changes in IUGR fetuses compared to controls. Retrospectively, using MRI images of fetuses at 30-34 weeks gestational age, a total of 8 brain regions-supratentorial brain and cavity, cerebral hemispheres, temporal lobes and cerebellum-were measured for volume in 13 fetuses with IUGR due to placental insufficiency and in 21 controls. Volumes and their ratios were assessed for difference using regression models. Reliability was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between two observers. In both groups, all structures increase in absolute volume during that gestation period, and the rate of cerebellar growth is higher compared to that of supratentorial structures. All structures' absolute volumes were significantly smaller for the IUGR group. Cerebellar to supratentorial ratios were found to be significantly smaller (P IUGR compared to controls. No other significant ratio differences were found. ICC showed excellent agreement. The cerebellar to supratentorial volume ratio is affected in IUGR fetuses. Additional research is needed to assess this as a radiologic marker in relation to long-term outcome. • IUGR is a pathologic fetal condition affecting the brain • IUGR is associated with long-term neurodevelopmental abnormalities; fetal characterization is needed • This study aimed to evaluate regional brain volume differences in IUGR • Cerebellar to supratentorial volume ratios were smaller in IUGR fetuses • This finding may play a role in long-term development of IUGR fetuses.

  7. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease.

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    Meijer, Frederick J A; Goraj, Bozena

    2014-06-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to exclude other pathology. Possibly, brain MRI at higher magnetic field strengths could provide new diagnostic markers. In recent years, new imaging techniques such as susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), diffusion (tensor) MRI, magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), and functional MRI (f-MRI) have been applied to patient cohorts with PD to improve understanding of pathophysiologic changes, including functional connectivity. These advanced MRI techniques hold promise to provide additional diagnostic markers for early stage PD, as demonstrated by diffusional changes in the orbital-frontal region in the pre-motor phase of PD. Whether these advanced MRI techniques provide new diagnostic markers for early stage PD, remains a debate. Standardization of scanning protocols and post-processing methods, and validation of diagnostic criteria is crucial for these advanced MRI techniques. For this, well designed prospective clinical cohort studies are needed.

  8. Low-field MRI for studies of human pulmonary physiology and traumatic brain injury

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    Wilson, Alyssa; Devience, Stephen; Rosen, Matthew; Walsworth, Ronald

    2011-05-01

    We describe recent progress on the development of an open-access low-magnetic-field MRI system for studies of human pulmonary physiology and traumatic brain injury. Low-field MRI benefits from reduced magnetic susceptibility effects and can provide high-resolution images of the human body when used with hyperpolarized media such as 3He and 129Xe.

  9. EEG-fMRI integration for the study of human brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, João; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2014-11-15

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have proved to be extremely valuable tools for the non-invasive study of human brain function. Moreover, due to a notable degree of complementarity between the two modalities, the combination of EEG and fMRI data has been actively sought in the last two decades. Although initially focused on epilepsy, EEG-fMRI applications were rapidly extended to the study of healthy brain function, yielding new insights into its underlying mechanisms and pathways. Nevertheless, EEG and fMRI have markedly different spatial and temporal resolutions, and probe neuronal activity through distinct biophysical processes, many aspects of which are still poorly understood. The remarkable conceptual and methodological challenges associated with EEG-fMRI integration have motivated the development of a wide range of analysis approaches over the years, each relying on more or less restrictive assumptions, and aiming to shed further light on the mechanisms of brain function along with those of the EEG-fMRI coupling itself. Here, we present a review of the most relevant EEG-fMRI integration approaches yet proposed for the study of brain function, supported by a general overview of our current understanding of the biophysical mechanisms coupling the signals obtained from the two modalities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  11. Brain activity and perceived exertion during cycling exercise: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Eduardo B; Okano, Alexandre H; De Guio, François; Schabort, Elske J; Min, Li Li; Basset, Fabien A; Stein, Dan J; Noakes, Timothy D

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the equipment and techniques available to assess brain function during dynamic exercise are limited, which has restricted our knowledge of how the brain regulates exercise. This study assessed the brain areas activated during cycling by making use of a novel cycle ergometer, constructed to measure functional MRI (fMRI) brain images during dynamic exercise. Furthermore, we compared brain activation at different levels of ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) generated during the exercise. Seven healthy adults performed cycling exercise in a novel MRI compatible cycle ergometer while undergoing brain  fMRI. Participants completed a cycling block protocol comprising six trials of 2 min cycling with 16-s intervals between trials. Participants reported their RPE every minute through an audio link. The MRI cycling ergometer transferred the torque generated on the ergometer through a cardan system to a cycling ergometer positioned outside the MRI room. For data analysis, the effects of cycling as opposed to rest periods were examined after motion correction. The multiparticipant analysis revealed in particular the activation of the cerebellar vermis and precentral and postcentral gyrus when periods of cycling versus rest were compared. Single participant analysis in four participants revealed that activation of the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus occurred in cycling blocks perceived as 'hard' compared with exercise blocks that were less demanding. The present study offers a new approach to assess brain activation during dynamic cycling exercise, and suggests that specific brain areas could be involved in the sensations generating the rating of perceived exertion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Evidence of a Christmas spirit network in the brain: functional MRI study

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    Hougaard, Anders; Lindberg, Ulrich; Arngrim, Nanna; Larsson, Henrik B W; Olesen, Jes; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Ashina, Messoud; Haddock, Bryan T

    2015-01-01

    Objective?To detect and localise the Christmas spirit in the human brain. Design?Single blinded, cross cultural group study with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Setting?Functional imaging unit and department of clinical physiology, nuclear medicine and PET in Denmark. Participants?10 healthy people from the Copenhagen area who routinely celebrate Christmas and 10 healthy people living in the same area who have no Christmas traditions. Main outcome measures?Brain activation uniqu...

  13. fMRI during natural sleep as a method to study brain function during early childhood.

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    Redcay, Elizabeth; Kennedy, Daniel P; Courchesne, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Many techniques to study early functional brain development lack the whole-brain spatial resolution that is available with fMRI. We utilized a relatively novel method in which fMRI data were collected from children during natural sleep. Stimulus-evoked responses to auditory and visual stimuli as well as stimulus-independent functional networks were examined in typically developing 2-4-year-old children. Reliable fMRI data were collected from 13 children during presentation of auditory stimuli (tones, vocal sounds, and nonvocal sounds) in a block design. Twelve children were presented with visual flashing lights at 2.5 Hz. When analyses combined all three types of auditory stimulus conditions as compared to rest, activation included bilateral superior temporal gyri/sulci (STG/S) and right cerebellum. Direct comparisons between conditions revealed significantly greater responses to nonvocal sounds and tones than to vocal sounds in a number of brain regions including superior temporal gyrus/sulcus, medial frontal cortex and right lateral cerebellum. The response to visual stimuli was localized to occipital cortex. Furthermore, stimulus-independent functional connectivity MRI analyses (fcMRI) revealed functional connectivity between STG and other temporal regions (including contralateral STG) and medial and lateral prefrontal regions. Functional connectivity with an occipital seed was localized to occipital and parietal cortex. In sum, 2-4 year olds showed a differential fMRI response both between stimulus modalities and between stimuli in the auditory modality. Furthermore, superior temporal regions showed functional connectivity with numerous higher-order regions during sleep. We conclude that the use of sleep fMRI may be a valuable tool for examining functional brain organization in young children.

  14. Change in brain and lesion volumes after CEE therapies: the WHIMS-MRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Laura H; Espeland, Mark A; Hogan, Patricia E; Resnick, Susan M; Bryan, R Nick; Robinson, Jennifer G; Goveas, Joseph S; Davatzikos, Christos; Kuller, Lewis H; Williamson, Jeff D; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Shumaker, Sally A

    2014-02-04

    To determine whether smaller brain volumes in older women who had completed Women's Health Initiative (WHI)-assigned conjugated equine estrogen-based hormone therapy (HT), reported by WHI Memory Study (WHIMS)-MRI, correspond to a continuing increased rate of atrophy an average of 6.1 to 7.7 years later in WHIMS-MRI2. A total of 1,230 WHI participants were contacted: 797 (64.8%) consented, and 729 (59%) were rescanned an average of 4.7 years after the initial MRI scan. Mean annual rates of change in total brain volume, the primary outcome, and rates of change in ischemic lesion volumes, the secondary outcome, were compared between treatment groups using mixed-effect models with adjustment for trial, clinical site, age, intracranial volumes, and time between MRI measures. Total brain volume decreased an average of 3.22 cm(3)/y in the active arm and 3.07 cm(3)/y in the placebo arm (p = 0.53). Total ischemic lesion volumes increased in both arms at a rate of 0.12 cm(3)/y (p = 0.88). Conjugated equine estrogen-based postmenopausal HT, previously assigned at WHI baseline, did not affect rates of decline in brain volumes or increases in brain lesion volumes during the 4.7 years between the initial and follow-up WHIMS-MRI studies. Smaller frontal lobe volumes were observed as persistent group differences among women assigned to active HT compared with placebo. Women with a history of cardiovascular disease treated with active HT, compared with placebo, had higher rates of accumulation in white matter lesion volume and total brain lesion volume. Further study may elucidate mechanisms that explain these findings.

  15. Correction For Pulse Height Variability Reduces Physiological Noise in Functional MRI When Studying Spontaneous Brain Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houdt, P.J.; Ossenblok, P.P.W.; Boon, P.A.J.M.; Leijten, F.S.S.; Velis, D.N.; Stam, C.J.; de Munck, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    EEG correlated functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) allows the delineation of the areas corresponding to spontaneous brain activity, such as epileptiform spikes or alpha rhythm. A major problem of fMRI analysis in general is that spurious correlations may occur because fMRI signals are not only correlated with

  16. Biocytin-derived MRI contrast agent for longitudinal brain connectivity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anurag; Schüz, Almut; Engelmann, Jörn; Beyerlein, Michael; Logothetis, Nikos K; Canals, Santiago

    2011-10-19

    To investigate the connectivity of brain networks noninvasively and dynamically, we have developed a new strategy to functionalize neuronal tracers and designed a biocompatible probe that can be visualized in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, the multimodal design used allows combined ex vivo studies with microscopic spatial resolution by conventional histochemical techniques. We present data on the functionalization of biocytin, a well-known neuronal tract tracer, and demonstrate the validity of the approach by showing brain networks of cortical connectivity in live rats under MRI, together with the corresponding microscopic details, such as fibers and neuronal morphology under light microscopy. We further demonstrate that the developed molecule is the first MRI-visible probe to preferentially trace retrograde connections. Our study offers a new platform for the development of multimodal molecular imaging tools of broad interest in neuroscience, that capture in vivo the dynamics of large scale neural networks together with their microscopic characteristics, thereby spanning several organizational levels.

  17. Longitudinal fMRI studies: Exploring brain plasticity and repair in MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzinger, Christian; Pinter, Daniela; Rocca, Maria A; De Luca, John; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Audoin, Bertrand; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has greatly advanced our understanding of cerebral functional changes occurring in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, most of our knowledge regarding brain plasticity and repair in MS as evidenced by fMRI has been extrapolated from cross-sectional studies across different phenotypes of the disease. This topical review provides an overview of this research, but also highlights limitations of existing fMRI studies with cross-sectional design. We then review the few existing longitudinal fMRI studies and discuss the feasibility and constraints of serial fMRI in individuals with MS. We further emphasize the potential to track fMRI changes in evolving disease and the insights this may give in terms of mechanisms of adaptation and repair, focusing on serial fMRI to monitor response to disease-modifying therapies or rehabilitation interventions. Finally, we offer recommendations for designing future research studies to overcome previous methodological shortcomings. © The Author(s), 2015.

  18. Brain Reorganization in Patients with Brachial Plexus Injury: A Longitudinal Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeharu Yoshikawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess plastic changes of the sensorimotor cortex (SMC in patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Twenty patients with traumatic BPI underwent fMRI using blood oxygen level-dependent technique with echo-planar imaging before the operation. Sixteen patients underwent their second fMRI at approximately one year after injury. The subjects performed two tasks: a flexion-extension task of the affected elbow and a task of the unaffected elbow. After activation, maps were generated, the number of significantly activated voxels in SMC contralateral to the elbow movement in the affected elbow task study (Naf and that in the unaffected task study (Nunaf were counted. An asymmetry index (AI was calculated, where AI=(Naf−Nunaf/(Naf+Nunaf. Ten healthy volunteers were also included in this fMRI study. The AI of the first fMRI of the patients with BPI was significantly lower than that of the healthy subjects (P=0.035. The AI of the second fMRI significantly decreased compared with that of the first fMRI (P=0.045. Brain reorganization associates with peripheral nervous changes after BPI and after operation for functional reconstruction.

  19. Oxytocin, brain physiology, and functional connectivity: a review of intranasal oxytocin fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethlehem, Richard A I; van Honk, Jack; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2013-07-01

    In recent years the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has become one of the most studied peptides of the human neuroendocrine system. Research has shown widespread behavioural effects and numerous potential therapeutic benefits. However, little is known about how OT triggers these effects in the brain. Here, we discuss some of the physiological properties of OT in the human brain including the long half-life of neuropeptides, the diffuse projections of OT throughout the brain and interactions with other systems such as the dopaminergic system. These properties indicate that OT acts without clear spatial and temporal specificity. Therefore, it is likely to have widespread effects on the brain's intrinsic functioning. Additionally, we review studies that have used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) concurrently with OT administration. These studies reveal a specific set of 'social' brain regions that are likely to be the strongest targets for OT's potential to influence human behaviour. On the basis of the fMRI literature and the physiological properties of the neuropeptide, we argue that OT has the potential to not only modulate activity in a set of specific brain regions, but also the functional connectivity between these regions. In light of the increasing knowledge of the behavioural effects of OT in humans, studies of the effects of OT administration on brain function can contribute to our understanding of the neural networks in the social brain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The power of using functional fMRI on small rodents to study brain pharmacology and disease

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    Jonckers, Elisabeth; Shah, Disha; Hamaide, Julie; Verhoye, Marleen; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI), stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI), and pharmacological MRI (phMRI). Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sensory stimulation and/or a pharmacological challenge. The first part of this review describes the physiological basis of BOLD fMRI and the hemodynamic response on which the MRI contrast is based. Specific emphasis goes to possible effects of anesthesia and the animal’s physiological conditions on neural activity and the hemodynamic response. The second part of this review describes applications of the aforementioned techniques in pharmacologically induced, as well as in traumatic and transgenic disease models and illustrates how multiple fMRI methods can be applied successfully to evaluate different aspects of a specific disorder. For example, fMRI techniques can be used to pinpoint the neural substrate of a disease beyond previously defined hypothesis-driven regions-of-interest. In addition, fMRI techniques allow one to dissect how specific modifications (e.g., treatment, lesion etc.) modulate the functioning of specific brain areas (st-fMRI, phMRI) and how functional connectivity (rsfMRI) between several brain regions is affected, both in acute and extended time frames. Furthermore, fMRI techniques can be used to assess/explore the efficacy of novel treatments in depth, both in fundamental research as well as in preclinical settings. In conclusion, by describing several exemplary studies, we aim to highlight the advantages of functional MRI in exploring the acute and long-term effects of pharmacological substances and/or pathology on brain functioning along with several methodological

  1. Does bracing influence brain activity during knee movement: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Youri; Vingerhoets, Guy; Pattyn, Els; Rombaut, Lies; Witvrouw, Erik

    2010-08-01

    Studies have shown that proprioceptive inputs during active and passive arm movements are processed in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex and supplementary motor area of the brain. At which level of the central nervous system proprioceptive signals coming from the knee are regulated remains to be elucidated. In order to investigate whether there is a detectable difference in brain activity when various proprioceptive inputs are exerted at the knee, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used. fMRI in 13 healthy, right leg-dominant female volunteers compared brain activation during flexion-extension movements of the right knee under three different conditions: with application of a tight knee brace, with application of a moderate tight knee sleeve, and without application of a brace or sleeve. Brain activation was detected in the primary sensorimotor cortex (left and right paracentral lobule) and in the left superior parietal lobule of the brain. There was a significantly higher level of brain activation with the application of the brace and sleeve, respectively, compared to the condition without a brace or sleeve. A significantly higher cortical activation was also seen when comparing the braced condition with the condition when a sleeve was applied. The results suggest that peripheral proprioceptive input to the knee joint by means of a brace or sleeve seems to influence brain activity during knee movement. The results of this study also show that the intensity of brain activation during knee movement can be influenced by the intensity of proprioceptive stimulation at the joint.

  2. Studies on the reliability of high-field intra-operative MRI in brain glioma resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jun SONG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the reliability of high-field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging(iMRI in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.Method One hundred and thirty-one cases of brain glioma(69 males and 62 females,aged from 7 to 79 years with mean of 39.6 years hospitalized from Nov.2009 to Aug.2010 were involved in present study.All the patients were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging(MRI before the operation.The tumors were resected under conventional navigation microscope,and the high-field iMRI was used for all the patients when the operators considered the tumor was satisfactorily resected,while the residual tumor was difficult to detect under the microscope,but resected after being revealed by high-field iMRI.Histopathological examination was performed.The patients without residual tumors recieved high-field MRI scan at day 4 or 5 after operation to evaluate the accuracy of high-field iMRI during operation.Results High quality intra-operative images were obtained by using high-field iMRI.Twenty-eight cases were excluded because their residual tumors were not resected due to their location too close to functional area.Combined with the results of intra-operative histopathological examination and post-operative MRI at the early recovery stage,the sensitivity of high-field iMRI in residual tumor diagnosis was 98.0%(49/50,the specificity was 94.3%(50/53,and the accuracy was 96.1%(99/103.Conclusion High-quality intra-operative imaging could be acquired by high-field iMRI,which maybe used as a safe and reliable method in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.

  3. EKG-based detection of deep brain stimulation in fMRI studies.

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    Fiveland, Eric; Madhavan, Radhika; Prusik, Julia; Linton, Renee; Dimarzio, Marisa; Ashe, Jeffrey; Pilitsis, Julie; Hancu, Ileana

    2017-08-02

    To assess the impact of synchronization errors between the assumed functional MRI paradigm timing and the deep brain stimulation (DBS) on/off cycling using a custom electrocardiogram-based triggering system METHODS: A detector for measuring and predicting the on/off state of cycling deep brain stimulation was developed and tested in six patients in office visits. Three-electrode electrocardiogram measurements, amplified by a commercial bio-amplifier, were used as input for a custom electronics box (e-box). The e-box transformed the deep brain stimulation waveforms into transistor-transistor logic pulses, recorded their timing, and propagated it in time. The e-box was used to trigger task-based deep brain stimulation functional MRI scans in 5 additional subjects; the impact of timing accuracy on t-test values was investigated in a simulation study using the functional MRI data. Following locking to each patient's individual waveform, the e-box was shown to predict stimulation onset with an average absolute error of 112 ± 148 ms, 30 min after disconnecting from the patients. The subsecond accuracy of the e-box in predicting timing onset is more than adequate for our slow varying, 30-/30-s on/off stimulation paradigm. Conversely, the experimental deep brain stimulation onset prediction accuracy in the absence of the e-box, which could be off by as much as 4 to 6 s, could significantly decrease activation strength. Using this detector, stimulation can be accurately synchronized to functional MRI acquisitions, without adding any additional hardware in the MRI environment. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. The spinning dancer illusion and spontaneous brain fluctuations: an fMRI study.

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    Bernal, Byron; Guillen, Magno; Marquez, Juan Camilo

    2014-01-01

    The brain activation associated with the Spinning Dancer Illusion, a cognitive visual illusion, is not entirely known. Inferences from other study modalities point to the involvement of the dorso-parieto-occipital areas in the spontaneous switchings of perception in other bistable non-kinetic illusions. fMRI is a mature technique used to investigate the brain responses associated with mental changes. Resting-state fMRI is a novel technique that may help ascertain the effects of spontaneous brain changes in the top-down regulation of visual perception. The purpose of this report is to describe the brain activation associated with the subjective illusory changes of perception of a kinetic bistable stimulus. We hypothesize that there is a relationship between the perception phases with the very slow cortical spontaneous fluctuations, recently described. A single normal subject who was trained to produce voluntarily perception phase switches underwent a series of fMRI studies whose blocks were either defined post-hoc or accordingly with a predefined timeline to assess spontaneous and voluntarily evoked visual perception switches, respectively. Correlation of findings with resting-state fMRI and independent component analysis of the task series was sought. Phases of the rotation direction were found associated with right parietal activity. Independent component analysis of the task series and their comparison with basal resting-state components suggest that this activity is related to one of the very slow spontaneous brain fluctuations. The spontaneous fluctuations of the cortical activity may explain the subjective changes in perception of direction of the Spinning Dancer Illusion. This observation is a proof-of-principle, suggesting that the spontaneous brain oscillations may influence top-down sensory regulation.

  5. Body growth and brain development in premature babies: an MRI study

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    Tzarouchi, Loukia C.; Zikou, Anastasia; Kosta, Paraskevi; Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Drougia, Aikaterini; Andronikou, Styliani [University of Ioannina, Intensive Care Unit, Child Health Department, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Astrakas, Loukas G. [University of Ioannina, Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2014-03-15

    Prematurity and intrauterine growth restriction are associated with neurodevelopmental disabilities. To assess the relationship between growth status and regional brain volume (rBV) and white matter microstructure in premature babies at around term-equivalent age. Premature infants (n= 27) of gestational age (GA): 29.8 ± 2.1 weeks, with normal brain MRI scans were studied at corrected age: 41.2 ± 1.4 weeks. The infants were divided into three groups: 1) appropriate for GA at birth and at the time of MRI (AGA), 2) small for GA at birth with catch-up growth at the time of MRI (SGA{sub a}) and 3) small for GA at birth with failure of catch-up growth at the time of MRI (SGA{sub b}). The T1-weighted images were segmented into 90 rBVs using the SPM8/IBASPM and differences among groups were assessed. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was measured bilaterally in 15 fiber tracts and its relationship to GA and somatometric measurements was explored. Lower rBV was observed in SGA{sub b} in superior and anterior brain areas. A positive correlation was demonstrated between FA and head circumference and body weight. Body weight was the only significant predictor for FA (P< 0.05). In premature babies, catch-up growth is associated with regional brain volume catch-up at around term-equivalent age, starting from the brain areas maturing first. Body weight seems to be a strong predictor associated with WM microstructure in brain areas related to attention, language, cognition, memory and executing functioning. (orig.)

  6. Brain Abnormalities in Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles Type 1: A Multimodal MRI Imaging Study.

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    Miao, Wen; Man, Fengyuan; Wu, Shaoqin; Lv, Bin; Wang, Zhenchang; Xian, Junfang; Sabel, Bernhard A; He, Huiguang; Jiao, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    To explore the possible brain structural and functional alterations in congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles type 1 (CFEOM1) patients using multimodal MRI imaging. T1-weighted, diffusion tensor images and functional MRI data were obtained from 9 KIF21A positive patients and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Voxel based morphometry and tract based spatial statistics were applied to the T1-weighted and diffusion tensor images, respectively. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuations and regional homogeneity were used to process the functional MRI data. We then compared these multimodal characteristics between CFEOM1 patients and healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, CFEOM1 patients demonstrated increased grey matter volume in bilateral frontal orbital cortex and in the right temporal pole. No diffusion indices changes were detected, indicating unaffected white matter microstructure. In addition, from resting state functional MRI data, trend of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations increases were noted in the right inferior parietal lobe and in the right frontal cortex, and a trend of ReHo increase (pabnormality of extraocular muscles and their innervating nerves. Future studies should consider the possible correlations between brain morphological/functional findings and clinical data, especially pertaining to eye movements, to obtain more precise answers about the role of brain area changes and their functional consequence in CFEOM1.

  7. A study of brain MRI findings and clinical response of bladder empting failure in brain bladder

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    Miyakoda, Keiichi (Yamashina Aiseikai Hospital, Kyoto (Japan)); Watanabe, Kousuke

    1993-02-01

    In 45 patients (38 males and 7 females; average age:78 years) with brain bladder, who did not have any peripheral neuropathies and spinal disturbance, cerebral findings of MRI (1.5 T) T[sub 2] enhanced image were analyzed in comparison with those of 7 control patients with normal urination after BPH operations. Patients with neurogenic bladder were divided into three groups as follows: 33 patients with a chief complaint of urinary disturbance (Group I), 9 patients with urinary incontinence (Group II) and 3 patients with balanced bladder (Group III). High frequency of lacune (24%) of the globus pallidus and low signalling of the corpus striatum (30%) was found in Group I patients, but low frequency in other Group patients and control patients. Furthermore, pathologic changes with various grades in the globus pallidus were observed in 91% of Group I patients. In the treatment of urinary disturbance, a high improvement rate of micturition disorder (77%) was obtained in patients treated with a combination of dantrolene and TURp (TUIbn for females). However, patients who had clear lacune of the globus pallidus showed the low improvement rate. It should be possible that the globus pallidus contributes to control the movement of the external sphincter and the pelvic base muscles as well as other striated muscles. Moreover, lacune was rarely found in the urination center of the brain-stem on MRI. (author).

  8. Brain activity during driving with distraction: an immersive fMRI study

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    Tom A Schweizer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-invasive measurements of brain activity have an important role to play in understanding driving ability. The current study aimed to identify the neural underpinnings of human driving behavior by visualizing the areas of the brain involved in driving under different levels of demand, such as driving while distracted or making left turns at busy intersections. Methods: To capture brain activity during driving, we placed a driving simulator with a fully functional steering wheel and pedals in a 3.0 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI system. To identify the brain areas involved while performing different real-world driving maneuvers, participants completed tasks ranging from simple (right turns to more complex (left turns at busy intersections. To assess the effects of driving while distracted, participants were asked to perform an auditory task while driving analogous to speaking on a hands-free device and driving. Results: A widely distributed brain network was identified, especially when making left turns at busy intersections compared to more simple driving tasks. During distracted driving, brain activation shifted dramatically from the posterior, visual and spatial areas to the prefrontal cortex. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the distracted brain sacrificed areas in the posterior brain important for visual attention and alertness to recruit enough brain resources to perform a secondary, cognitive task. The present findings offer important new insights into the scientific understanding of the neuro-cognitive mechanisms of driving behavior and lay down an important foundation for future clinical research.

  9. Progesterone mediates brain functional connectivity changes during the menstrual cycle - A pilot resting state MRI study

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    Katrin eArelin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in intrinsic brain organization has sparked various innovative approaches to generating comprehensive connectivity-based maps of the human brain. Prior reports point to a sexual dimorphism of the structural and functional human connectome. However, it is uncertain whether subtle changes in sex hormones, as occur during the monthly menstrual cycle, substantially impact the functional architecture of the female brain. Here, we performed eigenvector centrality (EC mapping in 32 longitudinal resting state fMRI scans of a single healthy subject without oral contraceptive use, across four menstrual cycles, and assessed estrogen and progesterone levels. To investigate associations between cycle-dependent hormones and brain connectivity, we performed correlation analyses between the EC maps and the respective hormone levels. On the whole brain level, we found a significant positive correlation between progesterone and EC in the bilateral DLPFC and bilateral sensorimotor cortex. In a secondary region-of-interest analysis, we detected a progesterone-modulated increase in functional connectivity of both bilateral DLPFC and bilateral sensorimotor cortex with the hippocampus. Our results suggest that the menstrual cycle substantially impacts intrinsic functional connectivity, particularly in brain areas associated with contextual memory-regulation, such as the hippocampus. These findings are the first to link the subtle hormonal fluctuations that occur during the menstrual cycle, to significant changes in regional functional connectivity in the hippocampus in a longitudinal design, given the limitation of data acquisition in a single subject. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of such a longitudinal rs-fMRI design and illustrates a means of creating a personalized map of the human brain by integrating potential mediators of brain states, such as menstrual cycle phase.

  10. Quantitative Study of Longitudinal Relaxation (T 1) Contrast Mechanisms in Brain MRI

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    Jiang, Xu

    Longitudinal relaxation (T1) contrast in MRI is important for studying brain morphology and is widely used in clinical applications. Although MRI only detects signals from water hydrogen ( 1H) protons (WPs), T1 contrast is known to be influenced by other species of 1H protons, including those in macromolecules (MPs), such as lipids and proteins, through magnetization transfer (MT) between WPs and MPs. This complicates the use and quantification of T1 contrast for studying the underlying tissue composition and the physiology of the brain. MT contributes to T1 contrast to an extent that is generally dependent on MT kinetics, as well as the concentration and NMR spectral properties of MPs. However, the MP spectral properties and MT kinetics are both difficult to measure directly, as the signal from MPs is generally invisible to MRI. Therefore, to investigate MT kinetics and further quantify T1 contrast, we first developed a reliable way to indirectly measure the MP fraction and their exchange rate with WPs, with minimal dependence on the spectral properties of MPs. For this purpose, we used brief, highpower radiofrequency (RF) NMR excitation pulses to almost completely saturate the magnetization of MPs. Based on this, both MT kinetics and the contribution of MPs to T1 contrast through MT were studied. The thus obtained knowledge allowed us to subsequently infer the spectral properties of MPs by applying low-power, frequencyselective off-resonance RF pulses and measuring the offset-frequency dependent effect of MPs on the WP MRI signal. A two-pool exchange model was used in both cases to account for direct effects of the RF pulse on WP magnetization. Consistent with earlier works using MRI at low-field and post-mortem analysis of brain tissue, our novel measurement approach found that MPs constitute an up to 27% fraction of the total 1H protons in human brain white matter, and their spectrum follows a super-Lorentzian line with a T2 of 9.6+/-0.6 mus and a resonance

  11. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with hemifacial spasm: a resting-state functional MRI study.

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    Ye Tu

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has been used to detect the alterations of spontaneous neuronal activity in various neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, but rarely in hemifacial spasm (HFS, a nervous system disorder. We used resting-state fMRI with regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis to investigate changes in spontaneous brain activity of patients with HFS and to determine the relationship of these functional changes with clinical features. Thirty patients with HFS and 33 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Compared with controls, HFS patients had significantly decreased ReHo values in left middle frontal gyrus (MFG, left medial cingulate cortex (MCC, left lingual gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus (STG and right precuneus; and increased ReHo values in left precentral gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, right brainstem, and right cerebellum. Furthermore, the mean ReHo value in brainstem showed a positive correlation with the spasm severity (r = 0.404, p = 0.027, and the mean ReHo value in MFG was inversely related with spasm severity in HFS group (r = -0.398, p = 0.028. This study reveals that HFS is associated with abnormal spontaneous brain activity in brain regions most involved in motor control and blinking movement. The disturbances of spontaneous brain activity reflected by ReHo measurements may provide insights into the neurological pathophysiology of HFS.

  12. A functional MRI study of the influence of sleep deprivation on digital memory in human brain

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    FAN Shuang-yi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Working for long hours often leads to mental fatigue. There is evidence that mental fatigue is serious damage to cognitive function and behavior of the operator. Revealing the mechanism of continuous operation and sleep deprivation (SD on cognitive function, will help to combat the fatigue caused by continuous operation and to improve capacity of operators. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study focused on the influence of sleep deprivation on digital memory in human brain. Methods Totally 6 healthy subjects underwent a digital memory encoding, maintenance and retrieval session during fMRI scanning before and after 48 h sleep deprivation. Results The digital memory test had the same error rate before and after sleep deprivation (P > 0.05, for all, but the reponse time of seven-number memory was longer after sleep deprivation (P = 0.005. During encoding trials decreased fMRI regions of significant activation between sleep control and sleep deprivation were in left parahippocampal gyrus Brodmann 30, left superior temporal gyrus Brodmann 42, left insular lobe Brodmann 41 and left frontal lobe Brodmann 6. During maintenance trials decreased fMRI regions of significant activation were at left superior temporal gyrus Brodmann 38, left middle temporal gyrus Brodmann 21, left parahippocampus and amygdaloid nucleus Brodmann 30, left middle frontal gyrus Brodmann 47, left lenticular nucleus and thalamus, right lenticular nucleus, left retrosplenial granular cortex Brodmann 30, right retrosplenial granular cortex Brodmann 30, bilateral cingulate gyrus Brodmann 24 and bilateral middle frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus Brodmann 6. During retrieval trials decreased fMRI regions of significantly positive activation were at bilateral hippocampus, right amygdaloid nucleus and inferior parietal lobule Brodmann 40, left precuneus Brodmann 19 and thalamus. Conclusion Different brain regions are activated at different stages of the

  13. Persistent post-traumatic headache vs. migraine: an MRI study demonstrating differences in brain structure.

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    Schwedt, Todd J; Chong, Catherine D; Peplinski, Jacob; Ross, Katherine; Berisha, Visar

    2017-08-22

    The majority of individuals with post-traumatic headache have symptoms that are indistinguishable from migraine. The overlap in symptoms amongst these individuals raises the question as to whether post-traumatic headache has a unique pathophysiology or if head trauma triggers migraine. The objective of this study was to compare brain structure in individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache (i.e. headache lasting at least 3 months following a traumatic brain injury) attributed to mild traumatic brain injury to that of individuals with migraine. Twenty-eight individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury and 28 individuals with migraine underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging on a 3 T scanner. Regional volumes, cortical thickness, surface area and curvature measurements were calculated from T1-weighted sequences and compared between subject groups using ANCOVA. MRI data from 28 healthy control subjects were used to interpret the differences in brain structure between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache. Differences in regional volumes, cortical thickness, surface area and brain curvature were identified when comparing the group of individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache to the group with migraine. Structure was different between groups for regions within the right lateral orbitofrontal lobe, left caudal middle frontal lobe, left superior frontal lobe, left precuneus and right supramarginal gyrus (p comparing the migraine cohort to healthy controls. In conclusion, persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine are associated with differences in brain structure, perhaps suggesting differences in their underlying pathophysiology. Additional studies are needed to further delineate similarities and differences in brain structure and function that are associated with post-traumatic headache and migraine and to determine their specificity for each of the headache types.

  14. Brain activity modification produced by a single radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation pulse: a new tool for neuropsychiatric treatments. Preliminary fMRI study

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    Castagna A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Rinaldi1,2, Vania Fontani1, Alessandro Castagna1 1Department of Neuro-Psycho-Physio Pathology, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, Italy; 2Medical School of Occupational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy Purpose: Radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation technology with its treatment protocols has shown efficacy in various psychiatric disorders. The aim of this work was to highlight the mechanisms by which these positive effects are achieved. The current study was conducted to determine whether a single 500-millisecond radioelectric asymmetric conveyor (REAC brain stimulation pulse (BSP, applied to the ear, can effect a modification of brain activity that is detectable using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers, six females and four males, underwent fMRI during a simple finger-tapping motor task before and after receiving a single 500-millisecond REAC-BSP. Results: The fMRI results indicate that the average variation in task-induced encephalic activation patterns is lower in subjects following the single REAC pulse. Conclusion: The current report demonstrates that a single REAC-BSP is sufficient to modulate brain activity in awake subjects, able to be measured using fMRI. These initial results open new perspectives into the understanding of the effects of weak and brief radio pulses upon brain activity, and provide the basis for further indepth studies using REAC-BSP and fMRI. Keywords: fMRI, brain stimulation, brain modulation, REAC, neuropsychiatric treatments

  15. Brain MRI Findings in Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in 13 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (MDCIC and Fukutin-related protein (FKRP gene mutations were retrospectively reviewed in a study at Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, and European centers.

  16. Mechanism of case processing in the brain: an fMRI study.

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    Satoru Yokoyama

    Full Text Available In sentence comprehension research, the case system, which is one of the subsystems of the language processing system, has been assumed to play a crucial role in signifying relationships in sentences between noun phrases (NPs and other elements, such as verbs, prepositions, nouns, and tense. However, so far, less attention has been paid to the question of how cases are processed in our brain. To this end, the current study used fMRI and scanned the brain activity of 15 native English speakers during an English-case processing task. The results showed that, while the processing of all cases activates the left inferior frontal gyrus and posterior part of the middle temporal gyrus, genitive case processing activates these two regions more than nominative and accusative case processing. Since the effect of the difference in behavioral performance among these three cases is excluded from brain activation data, the observed different brain activations would be due to the different processing patterns among the cases, indicating that cases are processed differently in our brains. The different brain activations between genitive case processing and nominative/accusative case processing may be due to the difference in structural complexity between them.

  17. An fMRI pilot study to evaluate brain activation associated with locomotion adaptation.

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    Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Hollnagel, Christoph; Brügger, Mike; Kollias, Spyros; Riener, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The goal of robotic therapy is to provoke motor plasticity via the application of robotic training strategies. Although robotic haptic guidance is the commonly used motor-training strategy to reduce performance errors while training, research on motor learning has emphasized that errors are a fundamental neural signal that drives motor adaptation. Thus, researchers have proposed robotic therapy algorithms that amplify movement errors rather than decrease them. Studying the particular brain regions involved in learning under different training strategies might help tailoring motor training conditions to the anatomical location of a focal brain insult. In this paper, we evaluate the brain regions involved in locomotion adaptation when training with three different conditions: without robotic guidance, with a random-varying force disturbance, and with repulsive forces proportional to errors. We performed an fMRI pilot study with four healthy subjects who stepped in an fMRI compatible walking robotic device. Subjects were instructed to actively synchronize their left leg with respect to their right leg (passively guided by the robot) while their left leg was affected by any of the three conditions. We observed activation in areas known to be involved in error processing. Although we found that all conditions required the similar cortical network to fulfill the task, we observed a tendency towards more activity in the motor/sensory network as more "challenged" the subjects were. © 2011 IEEE

  18. [fMRI study of the dominant hemisphere for language in patients with brain tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buklina, S B; Podoprigora, A E; Pronin, I N; Shishkina, L V; Boldyreva, G N; Bondarenko, A A; Fadeeva, L M; Kornienko, V N; Zhukov, V Iu

    2013-01-01

    Paper describes a study of language lateralization of patients with brain tumors, measured by preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and comparison results with tumor histology and profile of functional asymmetry. During the study 21 patient underwent fMRI scan. 15 patients had a tumor in the left and 6 in the right hemisphere. Tumors were localized mainly in the frontal, temporal and fronto-temporal regions. Histological diagnosis in 8 cases was malignant Grade IV, in 13 cases--Grade I-III. fMRI study was perfomed on scanner "Signa Exite" with a field strength of 1.5 As speech test reciting the months of the year in reverse order was used. fMRI scan results were compared with the profile of functional asymmetry, which was received with the results of questionnaire Annette and dichotic listening test. Broca's area was found in 7 cases in the left hemisphere, 6 had a tumor Grade I-III. And one patient with glioblastoma had a tumor of the right hemisphere. Broca's area in the right hemisphere was found in 3 patients (2 patients with left sided tumor, and one with right-sided tumor). One patient with left-sided tumor had mild motor aphasia. Bilateral activation in both hemispheres of the brain was observed in 6 patients. All of them had tumor Grade II-III of the left hemisphere. Signs of left-handedness were revealed only in half of these patients. Broca's area was not found in 4 cases. All of them had large malignant tumors Grade IV. One patient couldn't handle program of the research. Results of fMRI scans, questionnaire Annette and dichotic listening test frequently were not the same, which is significant. Bilateral activation in speech-loads may be a reflection of brain plasticity in cases of long-growing tumors. Thus it's important to consider the full range of clinical data in studying the problem of the dominant hemisphere for language.

  19. Motor programme activating therapy influences adaptive brain functions in multiple sclerosis: clinical and MRI study.

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    Rasova, Kamila; Prochazkova, Marie; Tintera, Jaroslav; Ibrahim, Ibrahim; Zimova, Denisa; Stetkarova, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    There is still little scientific evidence for the efficacy of neurofacilitation approaches and their possible influence on brain plasticity and adaptability. In this study, the outcome of a new kind of neurofacilitation approach, motor programme activating therapy (MPAT), was evaluated on the basis of a set of clinical functions and with MRI. Eighteen patients were examined four times with standardized clinical tests and diffusion tensor imaging to monitor changes without therapy, immediately after therapy and 1 month after therapy. Moreover, the strength of effective connectivity was analysed before and after therapy. Patients underwent a 1-h session of MPAT twice a week for 2 months. The data were analysed by nonparametric tests of association and were subsequently statistically evaluated. The therapy led to significant improvement in clinical functions, significant increment of fractional anisotropy and significant decrement of mean diffusivity, and decrement of effective connectivity at supplementary motor areas was observed immediately after the therapy. Changes in clinical functions and diffusion tensor images persisted 1 month after completing the programme. No statistically significant changes in clinical functions and no differences in MRI-diffusion tensor images were observed without physiotherapy. Positive immediate and long-term effects of MPAT on clinical and brain functions, as well as brain microstructure, were confirmed.

  20. High prevalence of brain pathology in violent prisoners: a qualitative CT and MRI scan study.

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    Schiltz, Kolja; Witzel, Joachim G; Bausch-Hölterhoff, Josef; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and extent of brain anomalies in a large sample of incarcerated violent offenders not previously considered neuropsychiatrically ill, in comparison with non-violent offenders and non-offending controls. MRI and CT brain scans from 287 male prison inmates (162 violent and 125 non-violent) not diagnosed as mentally ill before that were obtained due to headache, vertigo or psychological complaints during imprisonment were assessed and compared to 52 non-criminal controls. Brain scans were rated qualitatively with respect to evidence of structural brain damage. Each case received a semiquantitative rating of "normal" (=0), "questionably abnormal" (=1) or "definitely abnormal" (=2) for the lateral ventricles, frontal/parietal cortex and medial temporal structures bilaterally as well as third ventricle. Overall, offenders displayed a significantly higher rate of morphological abnormality, with the violent offenders scoring significantly higher than non-violent offenders and controls. This difference was statistically detectable for frontal/parietal cortex, medial temporal structures, third ventricle and the left but not the right lateral ventricle. The remarkable prevalence of brain pathology in convicted violent prisoners detectable by neuroradiological routine assessment not only highlights the importance of frontal and temporal structures in the control of social, and specifically of violent behaviour, but also raises questions on the legal culpability of violent offenders with brain abnormalities. The high proportion of undetected presence of structural brain damage emphasizes the need that in violent criminals, the comprehensive routine neuropsychiatric assessment usually performed in routine forensic psychiatric expertises should be complemented with brain imaging.

  1. Brain parenchymal damage in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder - A multimodal MRI study

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    Pache, F.; Paul, F. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Zimmermann, H.; Lacheta, A.; Papazoglou, S.; Kuchling, J.; Wuerfel, J.; Brandt, A.U. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Finke, C. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, B. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ruprecht, K. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Scheel, M. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To investigate different brain regions for grey (GM) and white matter (WM) damage in a well-defined cohort of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) patients and compare advanced MRI techniques (VBM, Subcortical and cortical analyses (Freesurfer), and DTI) for their ability to detect damage in NMOSD. We analyzed 21 NMOSD patients and 21 age and gender matched control subjects. VBM (GW/WM) and DTI whole brain (TBSS) analyses were performed at different statistical thresholds to reflect different statistical approaches in previous studies. In an automated atlas-based approach, Freesurfer and DTI results were compared between NMOSD and controls. DTI TBSS and DTI atlas based analysis demonstrated microstructural impairment only within the optic radiation or in regions associated with the optic radiation (posterior thalamic radiation p < 0.001, 6.9 % reduction of fractional anisotropy). VBM demonstrated widespread brain GM and WM reduction, but only at exploratory statistical thresholds, with no differences remaining after correction for multiple comparisons. Freesurfer analysis demonstrated no group differences. NMOSD specific parenchymal brain damage is predominantly located in the optic radiation, likely due to a secondary degeneration caused by ON. In comparison, DTI appears to be the most reliable and sensitive technique for brain damage detection in NMOSD. (orig.)

  2. Structural and Functional MRI Differences in Master Sommeliers: A pilot study on expertise in the brain

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    Sarah Jane Banks

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Our experiences, even as adults, shape our brains. Regional differences have been found in experts, with the regions associated with their particular skill-set. Functional differences have also been noted in brain activation patterns in some experts. This study uses multimodal techniques to assess structural and functional patterns that differ between experts and nonexperts. Sommeliers are experts in wine and thus in olfaction. We assessed differences in Master Sommeliers’ brains, compared with controls, in structure and also in functional response to olfactory and visual judgment tasks. MRI data were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry as well as automated parcellation to assess structural properties, and group differences between tasks were calculated. Results indicate enhanced volume in the right insula and entorhinal cortex, with the cortical thickness of the entorhinal correlating with experience. There were regional activation differences in a large area involving the right olfactory and memory regions, with heightened activation specifically for sommeliers during an olfactory task. Our results indicate that sommeliers’ brains show specialization in the expected regions of the olfactory and memory networks, and also in regions important in integration of internal sensory stimuli and external cues. Overall, these differences suggest that specialized expertise and training might result in enhancements in the brain well into adulthood. This is particularly important given the regions involved, which are the first to be impacted by many neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. CHANGES IN REGIONAL BRAIN ACTIVATION RELATED TO DEPRESSIVE STATE : A 2-YEAR LONGITUDINAL FUNCTIONAL MRI STUDY

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    Opmeer, Esther M.; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Renken, Remco J.; Demenescu, Liliana R.; Woudstra, Saskia; Horst, ter Gert J.; van Buchem, Mark A.; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Veltman, Dick J.; Aleman, Andre

    BackgroundAbnormal brain activations during processing of emotional facial expressions in depressed patients have been demonstrated. We investigated the natural course of brain activation in response to emotional faces in depression, indexed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans

  4. Enhanced brain connectivity in math-gifted adolescents: An fMRI study using mental rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, James; Gavrilescu, Maria; Cunnington, Ross; O'Boyle, Michael W; Egan, Gary F

    2010-12-01

    Mathematical giftedness is a form of intelligence related to enhanced mathematical reasoning that can be tested using a variety of numerical and spatial tasks. A number of neurobiological mechanisms related to exceptional mathematical reasoning ability have been postulated, including enhanced brain connectivity. We aimed to further investigate this possibility by comparing a group of mathematically gifted adolescents with an average math ability control group performing mental rotation of complex three-dimensional block figures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected and differences in intrahemispheric and interhemispheric connectivity between the groups were assessed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The math-gifted showed heightened intrahemispheric frontoparietal connectivity, as well as enhanced interhemispheric frontal connectivity between the dorsolateral prefrontal and premotor cortex. These enhanced connectivity patterns are consistent with previous studies linking increased activation of the frontal and parietal regions with high fluid intelligence, and may be a unique neural characteristic of the mathematically gifted brain.

  5. Brain scale-free properties in awake rest and NREM sleep: a simultaneous EEG/fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xu; Wang, Yulin; Yuan, Hong; Chen, Antao

    2015-03-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies revealed that spontaneous activity in the brain has scale-invariant properties, as indicated by a frequency spectrum that follows a power-law distribution. However, current knowledge about the exact relationship between scaling properties in EEG and fMRI signals is very limited. To address this question, we collected simultaneous EEG-fMRI data in healthy individuals during resting wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. For either of these conditions, we found that both EEG and fMRI power spectra followed a power-law distribution. Furthermore, the EEG and fMRI scaling exponents were highly variable across subjects, and sensitive to the choice of reference and nuisance variables in EEG and fMRI data, respectively. Interestingly, the EEG exponent of the whole brain selectively corresponded to the fMRI exponent of the thalamus during NREM sleep. Together, our findings suggest that scale-free brain activity is characterized by robust temporal structures and behavioral significance. This motivates future studies to unravel its physiological mechanisms, as well as its relevance to behavior.

  6. Alcohol dose effects on brain circuits during simulated driving: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, Shashwath A; Calhoun, Vince D; Astur, Robert S; Turner, Beth M; Ruopp, Kathryn; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2009-04-01

    Driving while intoxicated remains a major public health hazard. Driving is a complex task involving simultaneous recruitment of multiple cognitive functions. The investigators studied the neural substrates of driving and their response to different blood alcohol concentrations (BACs), using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a virtual reality driving simulator. We used independent component analysis (ICA) to isolate spatially independent and temporally correlated driving-related brain circuits in 40 healthy, adult moderate social drinkers. Each subject received three individualized, separate single-blind doses of beverage alcohol to produce BACs of 0.05% (moderate), 0.10% (high), or 0% (placebo). 3 T fMRI scanning and continuous behavioral measurement occurred during simulated driving. Brain function was assessed and compared using both ICA and a conventional general linear model (GLM) analysis. ICA results replicated and significantly extended our previous 1.5T study (Calhoun et al. [2004a]: Neuropsychopharmacology 29:2097-2017). GLM analysis revealed significant dose-related functional differences, complementing ICA data. Driving behaviors including opposite white line crossings and mean speed independently demonstrated significant dose-dependent changes. Behavior-based factors also predicted a frontal-basal-temporal circuit to be functionally impaired with alcohol dosage across baseline scaled, good versus poorly performing drivers. We report neural correlates of driving behavior and found dose-related spatio-temporal disruptions in critical driving-associated regions including the superior, middle and orbito frontal gyri, anterior cingulate, primary/supplementary motor areas, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. Overall, results suggest that alcohol (especially at high doses) causes significant impairment of both driving behavior and brain functionality related to motor planning and control, goal directedness, error monitoring, and memory. 2008 Wiley

  7. Studying brain function with concurrent near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

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    Sassaroli, A.; Tong, Y.; Frederick, B. B.; Renshaw, P. F.; Ehrenberg, B. L.; Fantini, S.

    2005-04-01

    We present concurrent NIRS-fMRI measurements on a human subject during a finger tapping test. The optical data were collected with a frequency domain experimental apparatus (ISS, Inc., Champaign IL) comprising sixteen laser sources at 690 nm, sixteen laser sources at 830 nm and four photomultiplier tube detectors. The lasers were coupled to optical fibers that led the light onto the subject's head. A special optical helmet (fMRI-compatible) with a retractable and resilient set of optical fibers was devised to improve the coupling between the fibers and the scalp. The fMRI data were collected with a 3 Tesla Siemens Trio magnetic resonance scanner and a quadrature birdcage radiofrequency coil. The spatial and temporal comparison of the fMRI and NIRS signals associated with brain activation showed a very good agreement, confirming the role of NIRS as a reliable brain monitor for functional studies.

  8. Decreased activation of subcortical brain areas in the motor fatigue state: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Hou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One aspect of motor fatigue is the exercise-induced reduction of neural activity to voluntarily drive the muscle or muscle group. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides access to investigate the neural activation on the whole brain level and studies observed changes of activation intensity after exercise-induced motor fatigue in the sensorimotor cortex. However, in human, little evidence exists to demonstrate the role of subcortical brain regions in motor fatigue, which is contradict to abundant researches in rodent indicating that during simple movement, the activity of the basal ganglia is modulated by the state of motor fatigue. Thus, in present study, we explored the effect of motor fatigue on subcortical areas in human. A series of fMRI data were collected from 11 healthy subjects while they were executing simple motor tasks in two conditions: before and under the motor fatigue state. The results showed that in both conditions, movements evoked activation volumes in the sensorimotor areas, SMA, cerebellum, thalamus and basal ganglia. Of primary importance are the results that the intensity and size of activation volumes in the subcortical areas (i.e. thalamus and basal ganglia areas are significantly decreased during the motor fatigue state, implying that motor fatigue disturbs the motor control processing in a way that both sensorimotor areas and subcortical brain areas are less active. Further study is needed to clarify how subcortical areas contribute to the overall decreased activity of CNS during motor fatigue state.

  9. Motor-related brain abnormalities in HIV-infected patients. A multimodal MRI study

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    Zhou, Yawen; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Hui; Wei, Yarui; Ali, Rizwan [University of Science and Technology of China, Centers for Biomedical Engineering, Hefei, Anhui (China); Li, Ruili; Li, Hongjun [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Youan Hospital, Beijing (China); Qiu, Bensheng [University of Science and Technology of China, Centers for Biomedical Engineering, Hefei, Anhui (China); Anhui Computer Application Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2017-11-15

    It is generally believed that HIV infection could cause HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) across a broad range of functional domains. Some of the most common findings are deficits in motor control. However, to date no neuroimaging studies have evaluated basic motor control in HIV-infected patients using a multimodal approach. In this study, we utilized high-resolution structural imaging and task-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess brain structure and motor function in a homogeneous cohort of HIV-infected patients. We found that HIV-infected patients had significantly reduced gray matter (GM) volume in cortical regions, which are involved in motor control, including the bilateral posterior insula cortex, premotor cortex, and supramarginal gyrus. Increased activation in bilateral posterior insula cortices was also demonstrated by patients during hand movement tasks compared with healthy controls. More importantly, the reduced GM in bilateral posterior insula cortices was spatially coincident with abnormal brain activation in HIV-infected patients. In addition, the results of partial correlation analysis indicated that GM reduction in bilateral posterior insula cortices and premotor cortices was significantly correlated with immune system deterioration. This study is the first to demonstrate spatially coincident GM reduction and abnormal activation during motor performance in HIV-infected patients. Although it remains unknown whether the brain deficits can be recovered, our findings may yield new insights into neurologic injury underlying motor dysfunction in HAND. (orig.)

  10. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and regional brain volumes: the WHIMS-MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, S M; Espeland, M A; Jaramillo, S A; Hirsch, C; Stefanick, M L; Murray, A M; Ockene, J; Davatzikos, C

    2009-01-13

    To determine whether menopausal hormone therapy (HT) affects regional brain volumes, including hippocampal and frontal regions. Brain MRI scans were obtained in a subset of 1,403 women aged 71-89 years who participated in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS). WHIMS was an ancillary study to the Women's Health Initiative, which consisted of two randomized, placebo-controlled trials: 0.625 mg conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) with or without 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in one daily tablet. Scans were performed, on average, 3.0 years post-trial for the CEE + MPA trial and 1.4 years post-trial for the CEE-Alone trial; average on-trial follow-up intervals were 4.0 years for CEE + MPA and 5.6 years for CEE-Alone. Total brain, ventricular, hippocampal, and frontal lobe volumes, adjusted for age, clinic site, estimated intracranial volume, and dementia risk factors, were the main outcome variables. Compared with placebo, covariate-adjusted mean frontal lobe volume was 2.37 cm(3) lower among women assigned to HT (p = 0.004), mean hippocampal volume was slightly (0.10 cm(3)) lower (p = 0.05), and differences in total brain volume approached significance (p = 0.07). Results were similar for CEE + MPA and CEE-Alone. HT-associated reductions in hippocampal volumes were greatest in women with the lowest baseline Modified Mini-Mental State Examination scores (scores equine estrogens with or without MPA are associated with greater brain atrophy among women aged 65 years and older; however, the adverse effects are most evident in women experiencing cognitive deficits before initiating hormone therapy.

  11. Haptic fMRI: combining functional neuroimaging with haptics for studying the brain's motor control representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Samir; Brantner, Gerald; Aholt, Chris; Kay, Kendrick; Khatib, Oussama

    2013-01-01

    A challenging problem in motor control neuroimaging studies is the inability to perform complex human motor tasks given the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner's disruptive magnetic fields and confined workspace. In this paper, we propose a novel experimental platform that combines Functional MRI (fMRI) neuroimaging, haptic virtual simulation environments, and an fMRI-compatible haptic device for real-time haptic interaction across the scanner workspace (above torso ∼ .65×.40×.20m(3)). We implement this Haptic fMRI platform with a novel haptic device, the Haptic fMRI Interface (HFI), and demonstrate its suitability for motor neuroimaging studies. HFI has three degrees-of-freedom (DOF), uses electromagnetic motors to enable high-fidelity haptic rendering (>350Hz), integrates radio frequency (RF) shields to prevent electromagnetic interference with fMRI (temporal SNR >100), and is kinematically designed to minimize currents induced by the MRI scanner's magnetic field during motor displacement (Tesla fMRI scanner's baseline noise variation (∼.85±.1%). Finally, HFI is haptically transparent and does not interfere with human motor tasks (tested for .4m reaches). By allowing fMRI experiments involving complex three-dimensional manipulation with haptic interaction, Haptic fMRI enables-for the first time-non-invasive neuroscience experiments involving interactive motor tasks, object manipulation, tactile perception, and visuo-motor integration.

  12. Reliability of semiquantitative {sup 18}F-FDG PET parameters derived from simultaneous brain PET/MRI: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, Amarnath, E-mail: drjena2002@yahoo.com [Department of Molecular Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076, Delhi (India); Taneja, Sangeeta, E-mail: s_taneja1974@yahoo.com [Department of Molecular Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076, Delhi (India); Goel, Reema, E-mail: reemagoell@gmail.com [Department of Molecular Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076, Delhi (India); Renjen, Pushpendranath, E-mail: pnrenjen@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076, Delhi (India); Negi, Pradeep, E-mail: pradeepmri@rediffmail.com [Department of Molecular Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076, Delhi (India)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Simultaneous brain PET/MRI faces an important issue of validation of accurate MRI based attenuation correction (AC) method for precise quantitation of brain PET data unlike in PET/CT systems where the use of standard, validated CT based AC is routinely available. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of evaluation of semiquantitative {sup 18}F-FDG PET parameters derived from simultaneous brain PET/MRI using ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences for AC and to assess their agreement with those obtained from PET/CT examination. Methods: Sixteen patients (age range 18–73 years; mean age 49.43 (19.3) years; 13 men 3 women) underwent simultaneous brain PET/MRI followed immediately by PET/CT. Quantitative analysis of brain PET images obtained from both studies was undertaken using Scenium v.1 brain analysis software package. Twenty ROIs for various brain regions were system generated and 6 semiquantitative parameters including maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max), SUV mean, minimum SUV (SUV min), minimum standard deviation (SD min), maximum SD (SD max) and SD from mean were calculated for both sets of PET data for each patient. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were determined to assess agreement between the various semiquantitative parameters for the two PET data sets. Results: Intra-class co-relation between the two PET data sets for SUV max, SUV mean and SD max was highly significant (p < 0.00) for all the 20 predefined brain regions with ICC > 0.9. SD from mean was also found to be statistically significant for all the predefined brain regions with ICC > 0.8. However, SUV max and SUV mean values obtained from PET/MRI were significantly lower compared to those of PET/CT for all the predefined brain regions. Conclusion: PET quantitation accuracy using the MRI based UTE sequences for AC in simultaneous brain PET/MRI is reliable in a clinical setting, being similar to that obtained using PET/CT.

  13. Effects of overnight fasting on working memory-related brain network: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechko, Natalia; Vocke, Sebastian; Habel, Ute; Toygar, Timur; Kuckartz, Lisa; Berthold-Losleben, Mark; Laoutidis, Zacharias G; Orfanos, Stelios; Wassenberg, Annette; Karges, Wölfram; Schneider, Frank; Kohn, Nils

    2015-03-01

    Glucose metabolism serves as the central source of energy for the human brain. Little is known about the effects of blood glucose level (BGL) on higher-order cognitive functions within a physiological range (e.g., after overnight fasting). In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind study, we assessed the impact of overnight fasting (14 h) on brain activation during a working memory task. We sought to mimic BGLs that occur naturally in healthy humans after overnight fasting. After standardized periods of food restriction, 40 (20 male) healthy participants were randomly assigned to receive either glucagon to balance the BGL or placebo (NaCl). A parametric fMRI paradigm, including 2-back and 0-back tasks, was used. Subclinically low BGL following overnight fasting was found to be linked to reduced involvement of the bilateral dorsal midline thalamus and the bilateral basal ganglia, suggesting high sensitivity of those regions to minimal changes in BGLs. Our results indicate that overnight fasting leads to physiologically low levels of glucose, impacting brain activation during working memory tasks even when there are no differences in cognitive performance. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Brain MRI CO2 stress testing: a pilot study in patients with concussion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Alan C Mutch

    Full Text Available There is a real need for quantifiable neuro-imaging biomarkers in concussion. Here we outline a brain BOLD-MRI CO2 stress test to assess the condition.This study was approved by the REB at the University of Manitoba. A group of volunteers without prior concussion were compared to post-concussion syndrome (PCS patients--both symptomatic and recovered asymptomatic. Five 3-minute periods of BOLD imaging at 3.0 T were studied--baseline 1 (BL1--at basal CO2 tension, hypocapnia (CO2 decreased ∼5 mmHg, BL2, hypercapnia (CO2 increased ∼10 mmHg and BL3. Data were processed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM for 1st level analysis to compare each subject's response to the CO2 stress at the p = 0.001 level. A 2nd level analysis compared each PCS patient's response to the mean response of the control subjects at the p = 0.05 level.We report on 5 control subjects, 8 symptomatic and 4 asymptomatic PCS patients. Both increased and decreased response to CO2 was seen in all PCS patients in the 2nd level analysis. The responses were quantified as reactive voxel counts: whole brain voxel counts (2.0±1.6%, p = 0.012 for symptomatic patients for CO2 response controls: 0.49±0.31%, p = 0.053 for asymptomatic patients for CO2 response controls.Quantifiable alterations in regional cerebrovascular responsiveness are present in concussion patients during provocative CO2 challenge and BOLD MRI and not in healthy controls. Future longitudinal studies must aim to clarify the relationship between CO2 responsiveness and individual patient symptoms and outcomes.

  15. Brain MRI CO2 stress testing: a pilot study in patients with concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, W Alan C; Ellis, Michael J; Graham, M Ruth; Wourms, Vincent; Raban, Roshan; Fisher, Joseph A; Mikulis, David; Leiter, Jeffrey; Ryner, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    There is a real need for quantifiable neuro-imaging biomarkers in concussion. Here we outline a brain BOLD-MRI CO2 stress test to assess the condition. This study was approved by the REB at the University of Manitoba. A group of volunteers without prior concussion were compared to post-concussion syndrome (PCS) patients--both symptomatic and recovered asymptomatic. Five 3-minute periods of BOLD imaging at 3.0 T were studied--baseline 1 (BL1--at basal CO2 tension), hypocapnia (CO2 decreased ∼5 mmHg), BL2, hypercapnia (CO2 increased ∼10 mmHg) and BL3. Data were processed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for 1st level analysis to compare each subject's response to the CO2 stress at the p = 0.001 level. A 2nd level analysis compared each PCS patient's response to the mean response of the control subjects at the p = 0.05 level. We report on 5 control subjects, 8 symptomatic and 4 asymptomatic PCS patients. Both increased and decreased response to CO2 was seen in all PCS patients in the 2nd level analysis. The responses were quantified as reactive voxel counts: whole brain voxel counts (2.0±1.6%, p = 0.012 for symptomatic patients for CO2 response controls: 0.49±0.31%, p = 0.053 for asymptomatic patients for CO2 response controls). Quantifiable alterations in regional cerebrovascular responsiveness are present in concussion patients during provocative CO2 challenge and BOLD MRI and not in healthy controls. Future longitudinal studies must aim to clarify the relationship between CO2 responsiveness and individual patient symptoms and outcomes.

  16. The Brain Functional State of Music Creation: an fMRI Study of Composers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Xingxing; He, Hui; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-07-23

    In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the functional networks in professional composers during the creation of music. We compared the composing state and resting state imagery of 17 composers and found that the functional connectivity of primary networks in the bilateral occipital lobe and bilateral postcentral cortex decreased during the composing period. However, significantly stronger functional connectivity appeared between the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the right angular gyrus and the bilateral superior frontal gyrus during composition. These findings indicate that a specific brain state of musical creation is formed when professional composers are composing, in which the integration of the primary visual and motor areas is not necessary. Instead, the neurons of these areas are recruited to enhance the functional connectivity between the ACC and the default mode network (DMN) to plan the integration of musical notes with emotion.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What It ...

  18. Brain correlates of hypnotic paralysis-a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyka, M; Burgmer, M; Lenzen, T; Pioch, R; Dannlowski, U; Pfleiderer, B; Ewert, A W; Heuft, G; Arolt, V; Konrad, C

    2011-06-15

    Hypnotic paralysis has been used since the times of Charcot to study altered states of consciousness; however, the underlying neurobiological correlates are poorly understood. We investigated human brain function during hypnotic paralysis using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), focussing on two core regions of the default mode network and the representation of the paralysed hand in the primary motor cortex. Hypnotic suggestion induced an observable left-hand paralysis in 19 participants. Resting-state fMRI at 3T was performed in pseudo-randomised order awake and in the hypnotic condition. Functional connectivity analyses revealed increased connectivity of the precuneus with the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, angular gyrus, and a dorsal part of the precuneus. Functional connectivity of the medial frontal cortex and the primary motor cortex remained unchanged. Our results reveal that the precuneus plays a pivotal role during maintenance of an altered state of consciousness. The increased coupling of selective cortical areas with the precuneus supports the concept that hypnotic paralysis may be mediated by a modified representation of the self which impacts motor abilities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence of a Christmas spirit network in the brain: functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Anders; Lindberg, Ulrich; Arngrim, Nanna; Larsson, Henrik B W; Olesen, Jes; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Ashina, Messoud; Haddock, Bryan T

    2015-12-16

    To detect and localise the Christmas spirit in the human brain. Single blinded, cross cultural group study with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Functional imaging unit and department of clinical physiology, nuclear medicine and PET in Denmark. 10 healthy people from the Copenhagen area who routinely celebrate Christmas and 10 healthy people living in the same area who have no Christmas traditions. Brain activation unique to the group with Christmas traditions during visual stimulation with images with a Christmas theme. Functional brain scans optimised for detection of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response were performed while participants viewed a series of images with Christmas themes interleaved with neutral images having similar characteristics but containing nothing that symbolises Christmas. After scanning, participants answered a questionnaire about their Christmas traditions and the associations they have with Christmas. Brain activation maps from scanning were analysed for Christmas related activation in the "Christmas" and "non-Christmas" groups individually. Subsequently, differences between the two groups were calculated to determine Christmas specific brain activation. Significant clusters of increased BOLD activation in the sensory motor cortex, the premotor and primary motor cortex, and the parietal lobule (inferior and superior) were found in scans of people who celebrate Christmas with positive associations compared with scans in a group having no Christmas traditions and neutral associations. These cerebral areas have been associated with spirituality, somatic senses, and recognition of facial emotion among many other functions. There is a "Christmas spirit network" in the human brain comprising several cortical areas. This network had a significantly higher activation in a people who celebrate Christmas with positive associations as opposed to a people who have no Christmas traditions and neutral associations. Further

  20. Transient Ischemic Attacks and Presence of an Acute Brain Lesion in Diffusion-Weighted MRI: Study of 50 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Paknejad

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Finding an acute brain lesion by diffusion-weighted (DW MRI upon an episode of transient ischemic attack (TIA is a predictor of imminent stroke in the near future. Therefore, exploring risk factors associated with lesions in DW-MRI of the brain is important in adopting an approach to TIA management. In the current study, we tried to determine the risk factors associated with lesions in DW-MRI of the brain in patients experiencing TIA episodes.Methods: Fifty patients with TIA were recruited consecutively in Sina Hospital, Tehran, Iran, over a 6-month period between July 2008 and January 2009. All of the patients underwent a complete neurological examination and laboratory tests. Brain DW-MRIs were performed for all the patients within 72 hours of a TIA episode.Results: DW-MRI revealed an acute lesion in 16% of the participants. There was a significant correlation between presence of an acute lesion in DW-MRI and TIA duration, history of diabetes mellitus and presence of unilateral facial palsy (P=0.0003, P=0.02 and P=0.008, respectively. Other variables such as age, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, past history of TIA, headache, vertigo, and sensory or visual disturbances had no significant relation with the presence of an acute lesion in DW-MRI.Conclusion: Duration of TIA, presence of diabetes mellitus and unilateral facial palsy are risk factors for an acute lesion in DW-MRI, meaning that patients with such risk factors are at risk for stroke in the near future.

  1. Changes in Brain Activation Induced by the Training of Hypothesis Generation Skills: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong-Ju; Lee, Jun-Ki; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Jeong, Jin-Su

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the learning-related changes in brain activation induced by the training of hypothesis generation skills regarding biological phenomena. Eighteen undergraduate participants were scanned twice with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after training over a period of 2 months. The…

  2. Assessment of brain cognitive functions in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency using resting state functional MRI: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lalit; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Gupta, Pradeep K; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Saha, Indrajit; Garg, Ravindra K

    2016-02-01

    The resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) approach is useful to explore the brain's functional organization in health and disease conditions. In this study, using rsfMRI the alteration in brain due to vitamin B12 deficiency and reversibility of these alterations following therapy was studied. Thirteen patients with clinical and biochemical evidence of vitamin B12 deficiency were recruited in this study. Fifteen age and sex matched healthy controls were also included. Patients and controls were clinically evaluated using neuropsychological test (NPT). The analysis was carried out using regional homogeneity (ReHo) and low frequency oscillations (LFO) of BOLD signals in resting state. Six patients were also evaluated with rsfMRI and NPT after 6 weeks replacement therapy. ReHo values in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency were significantly lower than controls in the entire cerebrum and the brain networks associated with cognition control, i.e., default mode, cingulo-opercular and fronto-parietal network. There was no significant difference using LFO and it did not show significant correlations with NPT scores. ReHo showed significant correlation with NPT scores. All the 6 patients showed increase in ReHo after replacement therapy. We conclude that brain networks associated with cognition control are altered in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency, which partially recover following six weeks of replacement therapy. This is the first study to evaluate the rsfMRI in the light of clinical neuropsychological evaluation in patients. rsfMRI may be used as functional biomarker to assess therapeutic response in vitamin B12 deficiency patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gender differences in brain development in Chinese children and adolescents: a structural MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Jin, Zhen; Chen, Kewei; Peng, Danling; Yao, Li

    2008-03-01

    Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM), this study systematically investigated gender differences in brain development through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 158 Chinese normal children and adolescents aged 7.26 to 22.80 years (mean age 15.03+/-4.70 years, 78 boys and 80 girls). Gender groups were matched for measures of age, handedness, education level. The customized brain templates, including T I-weighted image and gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM)/cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) prior probability maps, were created from all participants. Results showed that the total intracranial volume (TIV), global absolute GM and global WM volume in girls were significantly smaller than those in boys. The hippocampus grew faster in girls than that in boys, but the amygdala grew faster in boys than that in girls. The rate of regional GM decreases with age was steeper in the left superior parietal lobule, bilateral inferior parietal lobule, left precuneus, and bilateral supramarginal gyrus in boys compared to girls, which was possibly related to better spatial processing ability in boys. Regional GM volumes were greater in bilateral superior temporal gyrus, bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle frontal gyrus in girls. Regional WM volumes were greater in the left temporal lobe, right inferior parietal and bilateral middle frontal gyrus in girls. The gender differences in the temporal and frontal lobe maybe be related to better language ability in girls. These findings may aid in understanding the differences in cognitive function between boys and girls.

  4. Consistency of parametric registration in serial MRI studies of brain tumor progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mang, Andreas; Buzug, Thorsten M. [University of Luebeck, Institute of Medical Engineering, Luebeck (Germany); Schnabel, Julia A. [University College London, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Engineering Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); Crum, William R. [University College London, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Centre for Neuro Imaging Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom); Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hawkes, David J. [University College London, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); Camara-Rey, Oscar [University College London, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Center for Computational Imaging and Simulation Technologies in Biomedicine, Barcelona (Spain); Palm, Christoph [Medicine Research Centre Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics 3, Juelich (Germany); Caseiras, Gisele Brasil; Jaeger, H.R. [University College London, Institute of Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    The consistency of parametric registration in multi-temporal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies was evaluated. Serial MRI scans of adult patients with a brain tumor (glioma) were aligned by parametric registration. The performance of low-order spatial alignment (6/9/12 degrees of freedom) of different 3D serial MR-weighted images is evaluated. A registration protocol for the alignment of all images to one reference coordinate system at baseline is presented. Registration results were evaluated for both, multimodal intra-timepoint and mono-modal multi-temporal registration. The latter case might present a challenge to automatic intensity-based registration algorithms due to ill-defined correspondences. The performance of our algorithm was assessed by testing the inverse registration consistency. Four different similarity measures were evaluated to assess consistency. Careful visual inspection suggests that images are well aligned, but their consistency may be imperfect. Sub-voxel inconsistency within the brain was found for allsimilarity measures used for parametric multi-temporal registration. T1-weighted images were most reliable for establishing spatial correspondence between different timepoints. The parametric registration algorithm is feasible for use in this application. The sub-voxel resolution mean displacement error of registration transformations demonstrates that the algorithm converges to an almost identical solution for forward and reverse registration. (orig.)

  5. Circulating Omega‐3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Subclinical Brain Abnormalities on MRI in Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jyrki K.; Siscovick, David S.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Longstreth, William T.; Spiegelman, Donna; Rimm, Eric B.; King, Irena B.; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Background Consumption of tuna or other broiled or baked fish, but not fried fish, is associated with fewer subclinical brain abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated the association between plasma phospholipid omega‐3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), objective biomarkers of exposure, and subclinical brain abnormalities on MRI. Methods and Results In the community‐based Cardiovascular Health Study, 3660 participants aged ≥65 underwent brain MRI in 1992–1994, and 2313 were rescanned 5 years later. MRIs were centrally read by neuroradiologists in a standardized, blinded manner. Participants with recognized transient ischemic attacks or stroke were excluded. Phospholipid PUFAs were measured in stored plasma collected in 1992–1993 and related to cross‐sectional and longitudinal MRI findings. After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratio for having a prevalent subclinical infarct was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.82; P for trend=0.001) in the highest versus lowest long‐chain omega‐3 PUFA quartile. Higher long‐chain omega‐3 PUFA content was also associated with better white matter grade, but not with sulcal or ventricular grades, markers of brain atrophy, or with incident subclinical infarcts. The phospholipid intermediate‐chain omega‐3 PUFA alpha‐linolenic acid was associated only with modestly better sulcal and ventricular grades. However, this finding was not supported in the analyses with alpha‐linolenic acid intake. Conclusions Among older adults, higher phospholipid long‐chain omega‐3 PUFA content was associated with lower prevalence of subclinical infarcts and better white matter grade on MRI. Our results support the beneficial effects of fish consumption, the major source of long‐chain omega‐3 PUFAs, on brain health in later life. The role of plant‐derived alpha‐linolenic acid in brain health requires further investigation. PMID:24113325

  6. Circulating omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and subclinical brain abnormalities on MRI in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jyrki K; Siscovick, David S; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Longstreth, William T; Spiegelman, Donna; Rimm, Eric B; King, Irena B; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2013-10-10

    Consumption of tuna or other broiled or baked fish, but not fried fish, is associated with fewer subclinical brain abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated the association between plasma phospholipid omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), objective biomarkers of exposure, and subclinical brain abnormalities on MRI. In the community-based Cardiovascular Health Study, 3660 participants aged ≥ 65 underwent brain MRI in 1992-1994, and 2313 were rescanned 5 years later. MRIs were centrally read by neuroradiologists in a standardized, blinded manner. Participants with recognized transient ischemic attacks or stroke were excluded. Phospholipid PUFAs were measured in stored plasma collected in 1992-1993 and related to cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI findings. After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratio for having a prevalent subclinical infarct was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.82; P for trend = 0.001) in the highest versus lowest long-chain omega-3 PUFA quartile. Higher long-chain omega-3 PUFA content was also associated with better white matter grade, but not with sulcal or ventricular grades, markers of brain atrophy, or with incident subclinical infarcts. The phospholipid intermediate-chain omega-3 PUFA alpha-linolenic acid was associated only with modestly better sulcal and ventricular grades. However, this finding was not supported in the analyses with alpha-linolenic acid intake. Among older adults, higher phospholipid long-chain omega-3 PUFA content was associated with lower prevalence of subclinical infarcts and better white matter grade on MRI. Our results support the beneficial effects of fish consumption, the major source of long-chain omega-3 PUFAs, on brain health in later life. The role of plant-derived alpha-linolenic acid in brain health requires further investigation.

  7. A reliability study on brain activation during active and passive arm movements supported by an MRI-compatible robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, Natalia; Yu, Ningbo; Brügger, Mike; Villiger, Michael; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Riener, Robert; Kollias, Spyros

    2014-11-01

    In neurorehabilitation, longitudinal assessment of arm movement related brain function in patients with motor disability is challenging due to variability in task performance. MRI-compatible robots monitor and control task performance, yielding more reliable evaluation of brain function over time. The main goals of the present study were first to define the brain network activated while performing active and passive elbow movements with an MRI-compatible arm robot (MaRIA) in healthy subjects, and second to test the reproducibility of this activation over time. For the fMRI analysis two models were compared. In model 1 movement onset and duration were included, whereas in model 2 force and range of motion were added to the analysis. Reliability of brain activation was tested with several statistical approaches applied on individual and group activation maps and on summary statistics. The activated network included mainly the primary motor cortex, primary and secondary somatosensory cortex, superior and inferior parietal cortex, medial and lateral premotor regions, and subcortical structures. Reliability analyses revealed robust activation for active movements with both fMRI models and all the statistical methods used. Imposed passive movements also elicited mainly robust brain activation for individual and group activation maps, and reliability was improved by including additional force and range of motion using model 2. These findings demonstrate that the use of robotic devices, such as MaRIA, can be useful to reliably assess arm movement related brain activation in longitudinal studies and may contribute in studies evaluating therapies and brain plasticity following injury in the nervous system.

  8. Real-time fMRI in neuroscience research and its use in studying the aging brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Rana

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline is a major concern in the aging population. It is normative to experience some deterioration in cognitive abilities with advanced age such as related to memory performance, attention distraction to interference, task switching, and processing speed. However, intact cognitive functioning in old age is important for leading an independent day-to-day life. Thus, studying ways to counteract or delay the onset of cognitive decline in aging is crucial. The literature offers various explanations for the decline in cognitive performance in aging; among those are age-related gray and white matter atrophy, synaptic degeneration, blood flow reduction, neurochemical alterations and change in connectivity patterns with advanced age. An emerging literature on neurofeedback and Brain Computer Interface (BCI reports exciting results supporting the benefits of volitional modulation of brain activity on cognition and behavior. Neurofeedback studies based on real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI have shown behavioral changes in schizophrenia and behavioral benefits in nicotine addiction. This article integrates research on cognitive and brain aging with evidence of brain and behavioral modification due to rtfMRI neurofeedback. We offer a state-of-the-art description of the rtfMRI technique with an eye towards its application in aging. We present preliminary results of a feasibility study exploring the possibility of using rtfMRI to train older adults to volitionally control brain activity. Based on these first findings, we discuss possible implementations of rtfMRI neurofeedback as a novel technique to study and alleviate cognitive decline in healthy and pathological aging.

  9. Real-Time fMRI in Neuroscience Research and Its Use in Studying the Aging Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Mohit; Varan, Andrew Q.; Davoudi, Anis; Cohen, Ronald A.; Sitaram, Ranganatha; Ebner, Natalie C.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive decline is a major concern in the aging population. It is normative to experience some deterioration in cognitive abilities with advanced age such as related to memory performance, attention distraction to interference, task switching, and processing speed. However, intact cognitive functioning in old age is important for leading an independent day-to-day life. Thus, studying ways to counteract or delay the onset of cognitive decline in aging is crucial. The literature offers various explanations for the decline in cognitive performance in aging; among those are age-related gray and white matter atrophy, synaptic degeneration, blood flow reduction, neurochemical alterations, and change in connectivity patterns with advanced age. An emerging literature on neurofeedback and Brain Computer Interface (BCI) reports exciting results supporting the benefits of volitional modulation of brain activity on cognition and behavior. Neurofeedback studies based on real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI) have shown behavioral changes in schizophrenia and behavioral benefits in nicotine addiction. This article integrates research on cognitive and brain aging with evidence of brain and behavioral modification due to rtfMRI neurofeedback. We offer a state-of-the-art description of the rtfMRI technique with an eye towards its application in aging. We present preliminary results of a feasibility study exploring the possibility of using rtfMRI to train older adults to volitionally control brain activity. Based on these first findings, we discuss possible implementations of rtfMRI neurofeedback as a novel technique to study and alleviate cognitive decline in healthy and pathological aging. PMID:27803662

  10. Brain MRI abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica

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    Wang Fei, E-mail: feiwang1973@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Liu Yaou, E-mail: asiaeurope80@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Duan Yunyun, E-mail: duanyun2003@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Li Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Education Ministry Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Disease, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore brain MRI findings in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and to investigate specific brain lesions with respect to the localization of aquaporin-4 (AQP-4). Materials and methods: Forty admitted patients (36 women) who satisfied the 2006 criteria of Wingerchuk et al. for NMO were included in this study. All patients received a neurological examination and MRI scanning including brain and spinal cord. MRIs were classified as normal, nonspecific, multiple sclerosis-like, typical abnormalities. MS-like lesions were too few to satisfy the Barkhof et al. criteria for MS. Confluent lesions involving high AQP-4 regions were considered typical. Non-enhancing deep white matter lesions other than MS-like lesions or typical lesions were classified as nonspecific. Results: Brain MRI lesions were delineated in 12 patients (25%). Four patients (10%) had hypothalamus, brainstem or periventricle lesions. Six (15%) patients were nonspecific, and 2 (5%) patients had multiple sclerosis-like lesions. Conclusion: Brain MRIs are negative in most NMO, and brain lesions do not exclude the diagnosis of NMO. Hypothalamus, brainstem or periventricle lesions, corresponding to high sites of AQP-4 in the brain, are indicative of lesions of NMO.

  11. Interictal brain activity differs in migraine with and without aura: resting state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faragó, Péter; Tuka, Bernadett; Tóth, Eszter; Szabó, Nikoletta; Király, András; Csete, Gergő; Szok, Délia; Tajti, János; Párdutz, Árpád; Vécsei, László; Kincses, Zsigmond Tamás

    2017-12-01

    Migraine is one of the most severe primary headache disorders. The nature of the headache and the associated symptoms during the attack suggest underlying functional alterations in the brain. In this study, we examined amplitude, the resting state fMRI fluctuation in migraineurs with and without aura (MWA, MWoA respectively) and healthy controls. Resting state functional MRI images and T1 high-resolution images were acquired from all participants. For data analysis we compared the groups (MWA-Control, MWA-MWoA, MWoA-Control). The resting state networks were identified by MELODIC. The mean time courses of the networks were identified for each participant for all networks. The time-courses were decomposed into five frequency bands by discrete wavelet decomposition. The amplitude of the frequency-specific activity was compared between groups. Furthermore, the preprocessed resting state images were decomposed by wavelet analysis into five specific frequency bands voxel-wise. The voxel-wise amplitudes were compared between groups by non-parametric permutation test. In the MWA-Control comparison the discrete wavelet decomposition found alterations in the lateral visual network. Higher activity was measured in the MWA group in the highest frequency band (0.16-0.08 Hz). In case of the MWA-MWoA comparison all networks showed higher activity in the 0.08-0.04 Hz frequency range in MWA, and the lateral visual network in in higher frequencies. In MWoA-Control comparison only the default mode network revealed decreased activity in MWoA group in the 0.08-0.04 Hz band. The voxel-wise frequency specific analysis of the amplitudes found higher amplitudes in MWA as compared to MWoA in the in fronto-parietal regions, anterior cingulate cortex and cerebellum. The amplitude of the resting state fMRI activity fluctuation is higher in MWA than in MWoA. These results are in concordance with former studies, which found cortical hyperexcitability in MWA.

  12. Altered small-world efficiency of brain functional networks in acupuncture at ST36: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Chen, Jun; Wang, Jinhui; Liu, Xian; Duan, Xiaohui; Shang, Xiaojing; Long, Yu; Chen, Zhiguang; Li, Xiaofang; Huang, Yan; He, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture in humans can produce clinical effects via the central nervous system. However, the neural substrates of acupuncture's effects remain largely unknown. We utilized functional MRI to investigate the topological efficiency of brain functional networks in eighteen healthy young adults who were scanned before and after acupuncture at the ST36 acupoints (ACUP) and its sham point (SHAM). Whole-brain functional networks were constructed by thresholding temporal correlations matrices of ninety brain regions, followed by a graph theory-based analysis. We showed that brain functional networks exhibited small-world attributes (high local and global efficiency) regardless of the order of acupuncture and stimulus points, a finding compatible with previous studies of brain functional networks. Furthermore, the brain networks had increased local efficiency after ACUP stimulation but there were no significant differences after SHAM, indicating a specificity of acupuncture point in coordinating local information flow over the whole brain. Moreover, significant (Pacupuncture point were detected on nodal degree of the left hippocampus (higher nodal degree at ACUP as compared to SHAM). Using an uncorrected Pacupuncture modulates topological organization of whole-brain functional brain networks and the modulation has point specificity. These findings provide new insights into neuronal mechanism of acupuncture from the perspective of functional integration. Further studies would be interesting to apply network analysis approaches to study the effects of acupuncture treatments on brain disorders.

  13. Prevalence of lateral ventricle asymmetry in brain MRI studies of neurologically normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Mauro; De Risio, Luisa; Newton, Richard; Dennis, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the cerebral lateral ventricles is a common finding in cross-sectional imaging of otherwise normal canine brains and has been assumed to be incidental. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the prevalence of ventricular asymmetry in brain MRI studies of normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Brain MRI archives were searched for 100 neurologically normal dogs (Group 1) and 100 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (Group 2). For each dog, asymmetry of the lateral ventricles was subjectively classified as absent, mild, moderate, and severe based on a consensus of two observers who were unaware of group status. Ventricular areas were measured from transverse T1W images at the level of the interthalamic adhesion. An asymmetry ratio was calculated as the ratio of the larger to smaller ventricular transverse area. There was excellent agreement between subjective assessments of ventricular asymmetry and quantitative assessments using asymmetry ratios (k = 0.995). The prevalence of asymmetry was 38% in Group 1 dogs and 44% in Group 2 dogs. Assymmetry was scored as mild in the majority of Group 2 dogs. There was no significant association between presence/absence and degree of ventricular asymmetry vs. dog group, age, gender, or skull conformation. Findings from the current study supported previously published assumptions that asymmetry of the lateral cerebral ventricles is an incidental finding in MRI studies of the canine brain. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  14. Ex-vivo diffusion MRI reveals microstructural alterations in stress-sensitive brain regions: A chronic mild stress recovery study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Hansen, Brian; Wiborg, Ove

    Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide and causes significant microstructural alterations in stress-sensitive brain regions. However, the potential recovery of these microstructural alterations has not previously been investigated, which we, therefore, set out to do using diffusion...... MRI (d-MRI) in the chronic mild stress (CMS) rat model of depression. This study reveals significant microstructural alterations after 8 weeks of recovery, in the opposite direction to change induced by stress in the acute phase of the experiment. Such findings may be useful in the prognosis...

  15. Brain Activity During Cocaine Craving and Gambling Urges: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, Hedy; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Wexler, Bruce E; Malison, Robert T; Sinha, Rajita; Potenza, Marc N

    2016-01-01

    Although craving states are important to both cocaine dependence (CD) and pathological gambling (PG), few studies have directly investigated neurobiological similarities and differences in craving between these disorders. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess brain activity in 103 participants (30 CD, 28 PG, and 45 controls) while they watched videos depicting cocaine, gambling, and sad scenarios to investigate the neural correlates of craving. We observed a three-way urge type × video type × diagnostic group interaction in self-reported craving, with CD participants reporting strong cocaine cravings to cocaine videos, and PG participants reporting strong gambling urges to gambling videos. Neuroimaging data revealed a diagnostic group × video interaction in anterior cingulate cortex/ventromedial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), activating predominantly to cocaine videos in CD participants, and a more dorsal mPFC region that was most strongly activated for cocaine videos in CD participants, gambling videos in PG participants, and sad videos in control participants. Gender × diagnosis × video interactions identified dorsal mPFC and a region in posterior insula/caudate in which female but not male PG participants showed increased responses to gambling videos. Findings illustrate both similarities and differences in the neural correlates of drug cravings and gambling urges in CD and PG. Future studies should investigate diagnostic- and gender-specific therapies targeting the neural systems implicated in craving/urge states in addictions.

  16. Implications of oxidative stress in the brain plasticity originated by fasting: a BOLD-fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaïch, Rachida; Boujraf, Saïd; Benzagmout, Mohammed; Magoul, Rabia; Maaroufi, Mustapha; Tizniti, Siham

    2017-11-01

    The goal of this study was assessing the intermittent fasting effect on brain plasticity and oxidative stress (OS) using blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD)-functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) approach. Evidences of physiological and molecular phenomena involved in this process are discussed and compared to reported literature. Six fully healthy male non-smokers volunteered in this study. All volunteers were right handed, and have an equilibrated, consistent and healthy daily nutritional habit, and a healthy lifestyle. Participants were allowed consuming food during evening and night time while fasting with self-prohibiting food and liquids during 14 hours/day from sunrise to sunset. All participants underwent identical brain BOLD-fMRI protocol. The images were acquired in the Department of Radiology and Clinical Imaging of the University Hospital of Fez, Fez, Morocco. The anatomical brain and BOLD-fMRIs were acquired using a 1.5-Tesla scanner (Signa, General Electric, Milwaukee, United States). BOLD-fMRI image acquisition was done using single-shot gradient echo echo-planer imaging sequence. BOLD-fMRI paradigm consisted of the motor task where volunteers were asked to perform finger taping of the right hand. Two BOLD-fMRI scan sessions were performed, the first one between the 5th and 10th days preceding the start of fasting and the second between days 25th and 28th of the fasting month. All sessions were performed between 3:30 PM and 5:30 PM. Although individual maps were originated from different individual participants, they cover the same anatomic area in each case. Image processing and statistical analysis were conducted with Statistical Parameter Mapping version 8 (2008, Welcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, London UK). The maximal BOLD signal changes were calculated for each subject in the motor area M1; Activation maps were calculated and overlaid on the anatomical images. Group analysis of the data was performed, and the average volume

  17. Brain MRI Volume Findings in Diabetic Adults With Albuminuria: The ACCORD-MIND Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, Joshua I; Morgan, Timothy M; Murray, Anne M; Bryan, R Nick; Williamson, Jeff D; Schnall, Adrian; Launer, Lenore J

    2016-06-01

    Albuminuria is associated with cognitive impairment in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The brain volume correlates of albuminuria in people with T2DM have not been well investigated. We examined 502 individuals with T2DM (9-12 years duration; mean age ~62 years) who had a brain MRI at baseline and at 40 months. Baseline MRI findings were examined by the presence or absence of albuminuria (≥30mg/g creatinine). Changes in MRI findings were examined by whether albuminuria was persistent, intermittent, or absent during follow-up. At baseline, participants with albuminuria (28.7% of the cohort) had more abnormal white matter volume (AWMV) than participants without albuminuria on unadjusted analysis. This difference was attenuated with adjustment for systolic blood pressure, which was higher in participants with albuminuria than in those without albuminuria. During ~3.5 years of follow-up, participants with persistent albuminuria (15.8%) had a greater increase in new AWMV than participants without albuminuria (59.8%) or those with intermittent albuminuria on unadjusted analysis. This difference was attenuated with adjustment for age and systolic blood pressure. There were no significant differences in gray matter volume and total brain volume between participants with or without albuminuria at baseline or during follow-up. There was no significant effect modification of these findings by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at baseline or change in eGFR during follow-up. In this diabetic cohort, baseline albuminuria and persistent albuminuria were not independently associated with any significant differences in brain volume measurements compared with participants without albuminuria. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Brain responses to social norms: Meta-analyses of fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, Oksana; Arsalidou, Marie

    2017-11-21

    Social norms have a critical role in everyday decision-making, as frequent interaction with others regulates our behavior. Neuroimaging studies show that social-based and fairness-related decision-making activates an inconsistent set of areas, which sometimes includes the anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and others lateral prefrontal cortices. Social-based decision-making is complex and variability in findings may be driven by socio-cognitive activities related to social norms. To distinguish among social-cognitive activities related to social norms, we identified 36 eligible articles in the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature, which we separate into two categories (a) social norm representation and (b) norm violations. The majority of original articles (>60%) used tasks associated with fairness norms and decision-making, such as ultimatum game, dictator game, or prisoner's dilemma; the rest used tasks associated to violation of moral norms, such as scenarios and sentences of moral depravity ratings. Using quantitative meta-analyses, we report common and distinct brain areas that show concordance as a function of category. Specifically, concordance in ventromedial prefrontal regions is distinct to social norm representation processing, whereas concordance in right insula, dorsolateral prefrontal, and dorsal cingulate cortices is distinct to norm violation processing. We propose a neurocognitive model of social norms for healthy adults, which could help guide future research in social norm compliance and mechanisms of its enforcement. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Understanding the continuum of radionecrosis and vascular disorders in the brain following gamma knife irradiation: An MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constanzo, Julie; Masson-Côté, Laurence; Tremblay, Luc; Fouquet, Jérémie P; Sarret, Philippe; Geha, Sameh; Whittingstall, Kevin; Paquette, Benoit; Lepage, Martin

    2017-10-01

    The radiation dose delivered to brain tumors is limited by the possibility to induce vascular damage and necrosis in surrounding healthy tissue. In the present study, we assessed the ability of MRI to monitor the cascade of events occurring in the healthy rat brain after stereotactic radiosurgery, which could be used to optimize the radiation treatment planning. The primary somatosensory forelimb area (S1FL) and the primary motor cortex in the right hemisphere of Fischer rats (n = 6) were irradiated with a single dose of Gamma Knife radiation (Leksell Perfexion, Elekta AG, Stockholm, Sweden). Rats were scanned with a small-animal 7 Tesla MRI scanner before treatment and 16, 21, 54, 82, and 110 days following irradiation. At every imaging session, T2 -weighted (T2 w), Gd-DTPA dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and T2*-weighted ( T2* w) images were acquired to measure changes in fluid content, blood vessel permeability, and structure, respectively. At days 10, 110, and 140, histopathology was performed on brain sections. Locomotion and spatial memory ability were assessed longitudinally by behavioral tests. No vascular changes were initially observed. After 54 days, a small necrotic volume in the white matter below the S1FL, surrounded by an area presenting significant vascular permeability, was revealed. Between 54 and 110 days, the necrotic volume increased and was accompanied by the formation of a ring-like region, where a mixture of necrosis and permeable blood vessels were observed, as confirmed by histology. Behavioral changes were only observed after day 82. Together, DCE-MRI and T2* w images supported by histology provided a coherent picture of the phenomena involved in the formation of new, leaky blood vessels, which was followed by the detection of radionecrosis in a preclinical model of brain irradiation. Magn Reson Med 78:1420-1431, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic

  20. Neonatal brain injury and neuroanatomy of memory processing following very preterm birth in adulthood: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia K Kalpakidou

    Full Text Available Altered functional neuroanatomy of high-order cognitive processing has been described in very preterm individuals (born before 33 weeks of gestation; VPT compared to controls in childhood and adolescence. However, VPT birth may be accompanied by different types of adverse neonatal events and associated brain injury, the severity of which may have differential effects on brain development and subsequent neurodevelopmental outcome. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study to investigate how differing degrees of neonatal brain injury, detected by neonatal ultrasounds, affect the functional neuroanatomy of memory processing in VPT young adults. We used a verbal paired associates learning task, consisting of four encoding, four cued-recall and four baseline condition blocks. To further investigate whether differences in neural activation between the groups were modulated by structural brain changes, structural MRI data were also collected. We studied 12 VPT young adults with a history of periventricular haemorrhage with associated ventricular dilatation, 17 VPT individuals with a history of uncomplicated periventricular haemorrhage, 12 individuals with normal ultrasonographic findings, and 17 controls. Results of a linear trend analysis demonstrated that during completion of the paired associates learning task right frontal and right parietal brain activation decreased as the severity of neonatal brain injury increased. There were no statistically significant between-group differences in on-line task performance and participants' intelligence quotient (IQ at assessment. This pattern of differential activation across the groups was observed particularly in the right middle frontal gyrus during encoding and in the right posterior cingulate gyrus during recall. Structural MRI data analysis revealed that grey matter volume in the right superior temporal gyrus, right cerebellum, left middle temporal gyrus, right globus pallidus and

  1. Neonatal brain injury and neuroanatomy of memory processing following very preterm birth in adulthood: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpakidou, Anastasia K; Allin, Matthew P; Walshe, Muriel; Giampietro, Vincent; Nam, Kie-woo; McGuire, Philip; Rifkin, Larry; Murray, Robin M; Nosarti, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Altered functional neuroanatomy of high-order cognitive processing has been described in very preterm individuals (born before 33 weeks of gestation; VPT) compared to controls in childhood and adolescence. However, VPT birth may be accompanied by different types of adverse neonatal events and associated brain injury, the severity of which may have differential effects on brain development and subsequent neurodevelopmental outcome. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to investigate how differing degrees of neonatal brain injury, detected by neonatal ultrasounds, affect the functional neuroanatomy of memory processing in VPT young adults. We used a verbal paired associates learning task, consisting of four encoding, four cued-recall and four baseline condition blocks. To further investigate whether differences in neural activation between the groups were modulated by structural brain changes, structural MRI data were also collected. We studied 12 VPT young adults with a history of periventricular haemorrhage with associated ventricular dilatation, 17 VPT individuals with a history of uncomplicated periventricular haemorrhage, 12 individuals with normal ultrasonographic findings, and 17 controls. Results of a linear trend analysis demonstrated that during completion of the paired associates learning task right frontal and right parietal brain activation decreased as the severity of neonatal brain injury increased. There were no statistically significant between-group differences in on-line task performance and participants' intelligence quotient (IQ) at assessment. This pattern of differential activation across the groups was observed particularly in the right middle frontal gyrus during encoding and in the right posterior cingulate gyrus during recall. Structural MRI data analysis revealed that grey matter volume in the right superior temporal gyrus, right cerebellum, left middle temporal gyrus, right globus pallidus and right medial

  2. Neonatal Brain Injury and Neuroanatomy of Memory Processing following Very Preterm Birth in Adulthood: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpakidou, Anastasia K.; Allin, Matthew P.; Walshe, Muriel; Giampietro, Vincent; Nam, Kie-woo; McGuire, Philip; Rifkin, Larry; Murray, Robin M.; Nosarti, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Altered functional neuroanatomy of high-order cognitive processing has been described in very preterm individuals (born before 33 weeks of gestation; VPT) compared to controls in childhood and adolescence. However, VPT birth may be accompanied by different types of adverse neonatal events and associated brain injury, the severity of which may have differential effects on brain development and subsequent neurodevelopmental outcome. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to investigate how differing degrees of neonatal brain injury, detected by neonatal ultrasounds, affect the functional neuroanatomy of memory processing in VPT young adults. We used a verbal paired associates learning task, consisting of four encoding, four cued-recall and four baseline condition blocks. To further investigate whether differences in neural activation between the groups were modulated by structural brain changes, structural MRI data were also collected. We studied 12 VPT young adults with a history of periventricular haemorrhage with associated ventricular dilatation, 17 VPT individuals with a history of uncomplicated periventricular haemorrhage, 12 individuals with normal ultrasonographic findings, and 17 controls. Results of a linear trend analysis demonstrated that during completion of the paired associates learning task right frontal and right parietal brain activation decreased as the severity of neonatal brain injury increased. There were no statistically significant between-group differences in on-line task performance and participants' intelligence quotient (IQ) at assessment. This pattern of differential activation across the groups was observed particularly in the right middle frontal gyrus during encoding and in the right posterior cingulate gyrus during recall. Structural MRI data analysis revealed that grey matter volume in the right superior temporal gyrus, right cerebellum, left middle temporal gyrus, right globus pallidus and right medial

  3. Altered brain functions in HIV positive patients free of HIV- associated neurocognitive disorders: A MRI study during unilateral hand movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to investigate the brain activity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients with normal cognition during unilateral hand movement and whether highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART could affect the brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was performed for 60 HIV positive (HIV+ subjects and −42 healthy age-matched right-handed control subjects. Each subject was evaluated by the neuropsychological test and examined with fMRI during left and right hand movement tasks. HIV+ subjects showed greater activation in anterior cingulum, precuneus, occipital lobes, ipsilateral postcentral gyrus and contralateral cerebellum compared with control group during right hand movement task. However, during left hand movement no statistically significant difference was detected between these two groups. HAART medication for HIV+ subjects lowered the increased activity to normal level. Meanwhile patients receiving the regimen of zidovudine, lamivudine and efavirenz showed lower activity at bilateral caudate and ipsilateral inferior frontal gyrus in comparison with subjects receiving other HAART regimens. Therefore, HIV+ subjects demonstrated brain asymmetry in motor cortex, with increased activity present during right hand movement but absent during left hand movement. HAART proves effective in HIV+ subjects even with normal cognition and the specific regimen of HAART could prevent cerebral abnormal functions. Meanwhile, this study validates that during motor tasks, fMRI can detect the brain signal changes prior to the occurrences of other HIV- associated dysfunctions.

  4. Mapping of the brain hemodynamic responses to sensorimotor stimulation in a rodent model: A BOLD fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussida, Salem; Traoré, Amidou S; Durif, Franck

    2017-01-01

    Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent functional MRI (BOLD fMRI) during electrical paw stimulation has been widely used in studies aimed at the understanding of the somatosensory network in rats. However, despite the well-established anatomical connections between cortical and subcortical structures of the sensorimotor system, most of these functional studies have been concentrated on the cortical effects of sensory electrical stimulation. BOLD fMRI study of the integration of a sensorimotor input across the sensorimotor network requires an appropriate methodology to elicit functional activation in cortical and subcortical areas owing to the regional differences in both neuronal and vascular architectures between these brain regions. Here, using a combination of low level anesthesia, long pulse duration of the electrical stimulation along with improved spatial and temporal signal to noise ratios, we provide a functional description of the main cortical and subcortical structures of the sensorimotor rat brain. With this calibrated fMRI protocol, unilateral non-noxious sensorimotor electrical hindpaw stimulation resulted in robust positive activations in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex and bilaterally in the sensorimotor thalamus nuclei, whereas negative activations were observed bilaterally in the dorsolateral caudate-putamen. These results demonstrate that, once the experimental setup allowing necessary spatial and temporal signal to noise ratios is reached, hemodynamic changes related to neuronal activity, as preserved by the combination of a soft anesthesia with a soft muscle relaxation, can be measured within the sensorimotor network. Moreover, the observed responses suggest that increasing pulse duration of the electrical stimulus adds a proprioceptive component to the sensory input that activates sensorimotor network in the brain, and that these activation patterns are similar to those induced by digits paw's movements. These findings may find application in

  5. Mapping of the brain hemodynamic responses to sensorimotor stimulation in a rodent model: A BOLD fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Boussida

    Full Text Available Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent functional MRI (BOLD fMRI during electrical paw stimulation has been widely used in studies aimed at the understanding of the somatosensory network in rats. However, despite the well-established anatomical connections between cortical and subcortical structures of the sensorimotor system, most of these functional studies have been concentrated on the cortical effects of sensory electrical stimulation. BOLD fMRI study of the integration of a sensorimotor input across the sensorimotor network requires an appropriate methodology to elicit functional activation in cortical and subcortical areas owing to the regional differences in both neuronal and vascular architectures between these brain regions. Here, using a combination of low level anesthesia, long pulse duration of the electrical stimulation along with improved spatial and temporal signal to noise ratios, we provide a functional description of the main cortical and subcortical structures of the sensorimotor rat brain. With this calibrated fMRI protocol, unilateral non-noxious sensorimotor electrical hindpaw stimulation resulted in robust positive activations in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex and bilaterally in the sensorimotor thalamus nuclei, whereas negative activations were observed bilaterally in the dorsolateral caudate-putamen. These results demonstrate that, once the experimental setup allowing necessary spatial and temporal signal to noise ratios is reached, hemodynamic changes related to neuronal activity, as preserved by the combination of a soft anesthesia with a soft muscle relaxation, can be measured within the sensorimotor network. Moreover, the observed responses suggest that increasing pulse duration of the electrical stimulus adds a proprioceptive component to the sensory input that activates sensorimotor network in the brain, and that these activation patterns are similar to those induced by digits paw's movements. These findings may

  6. Association of white-matter lesions with brain atrophy markers: the three-city Dijon MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godin, O.; Alperovitch, A.; Tzourio, Ch.; Dufouil, C. [Inserm U708 ' Neuroepidemiology' , Paris (France); Godin, O.; Alperovitch, A.; Tzourio, Ch.; Dufouil, C. [UPMC University Paris 6 (France); Mazoyer, B. [Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France); Maillard, P.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B. [CNRS, CI-NAPS UMR6232 (France); Maillard, P.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B. [CEA, DSV/I2BM/CI-NAPS (France); Maillard, P.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B. [Universite de Caen Basse-Normande (France); Mazoyer, B. [Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Caen, Caen (France)

    2009-07-01

    Background: Brain atrophy and white-matter lesions (WML) are common features at cerebral MRI of both normal and demented elderly people. In a population-based study of 1, 792 elderly subjects aged 65-80 years, free of dementia, who had a cerebral MRI at entry, we investigated the relationship between WML volume and brain atrophy markers estimated by hippocampal, gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. Methods: An automated algorithm of detection and quantification of WML was developed, and voxel-based morphometry methods were used to estimate GM, CSF and hippocampal volumes. To evaluate the relation between those volumes and WML load, we used analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression models adjusting for potential confounders and total intracranial volumes. Results: Age was highly correlated with WML load and all brain atrophy markers. Total WML volume was negatively associated with both GM ({beta} = -0.03, p {<=} 0.0001) and hippocampal volumes ({beta} = -0.75, p = 0.0009) and positively with CSF volumes (beta 0.008, p = 0.02) after controlling for sex, age, education level, hypertension and apolipoprotein E genotype. Evidence for a relationship between brain atrophy markers and WML was stronger for periventricular WML. We found that the relationship between WML and hippocampal volumes was independent of other brain tissue volumes. Conclusion: These results suggest that, in the brain of non demented elderly subjects, degenerative processes and vascular changes co-occur and are related independently of vascular risk factors. (authors)

  7. Contribution of routine brain MRI to the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism: a 3-year prospective follow-up study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Aerts, M.B.; Abdo, W.F.; Prokop, M.; Borm, G.F.; Esselink, R.A.J.; Goraj, B.M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    Various signs on routine brain MRI can help differentiate between Parkinson's disease (PD) and the various forms of atypical parkinsonism (AP). Here, we evaluate what routine brain MRI contributes to the clinical diagnosis, in both early and advanced disease stages. We performed a prospective

  8. Mild cognitive impairment and fMRI studies of brain functional connectivity: the state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farràs-Permanyer, Laia; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan; Peró-Cebollero, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    In the last 15 years, many articles have studied brain connectivity in Mild Cognitive Impairment patients with fMRI techniques, seemingly using different connectivity statistical models in each investigation to identify complex connectivity structures so as to recognize typical behavior in this type of patient. This diversity in statistical approaches may cause problems in results comparison. This paper seeks to describe how researchers approached the study of brain connectivity in MCI patients using fMRI techniques from 2002 to 2014. The focus is on the statistical analysis proposed by each research group in reference to the limitations and possibilities of those techniques to identify some recommendations to improve the study of functional connectivity. The included articles came from a search of Web of Science and PsycINFO using the following keywords: f MRI, MCI, and functional connectivity. Eighty-one papers were found, but two of them were discarded because of the lack of statistical analysis. Accordingly, 79 articles were included in this review. We summarized some parts of the articles, including the goal of every investigation, the cognitive paradigm and methods used, brain regions involved, use of ROI analysis and statistical analysis, emphasizing on the connectivity estimation model used in each investigation. The present analysis allowed us to confirm the remarkable variability of the statistical analysis methods found. Additionally, the study of brain connectivity in this type of population is not providing, at the moment, any significant information or results related to clinical aspects relevant for prediction and treatment. We propose to follow guidelines for publishing fMRI data that would be a good solution to the problem of study replication. The latter aspect could be important for future publications because a higher homogeneity would benefit the comparison between publications and the generalization of results. PMID:26300802

  9. Mild cognitive impairment and fMRI studies of brain functional connectivity: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia eFarràs-Permanyer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last fifteen years, many articles have studied brain connectivity in Mild Cognitive Impairment patients with fMRI techniques, seemingly using different connectivity statistical models in each investigation to identify complex connectivity structures so as to recognize typical behavior in this type of patient. This diversity in statistical approaches may cause problems in results comparison. This paper seeks to describe how researchers approached the study of brain connectivity in MCI patients using fMRI techniques from 2002 to 2014.The focus is on the statistical analysis proposed by each research group in reference to the limitations and possibilities of those techniques to identify some recommendations to improve the study of functional connectivity. The included articles came from a search of Web of Science and PsycINFO using the following keywords: fMRI, MCI and functional connectivity. Eighty-one papers were found, but 2 of them were discarded because of the lack of statistical analysis. Accordingly, 79 articles were included in this review. We summarized some parts of the articles, including the goal of every investigation, the cognitive paradigm and methods used, brain regions involved, use of ROI analysis and statistical analysis, emphasizing on the connectivity estimation model used in each investigation. The present analysis allowed us to confirm the remarkable variability of the statistical analysis methods found. Additionally, the study of brain connectivity in this type of population is not providing, at the moment, any significant information or results related to clinical aspects relevant for prediction and treatment. We propose to follow guidelines for publishing fMRI data that would be a good solution to the problem of study replication. The latter aspect could be important for future publications because a higher homogeneity would benefit the comparison between publications and the generalization of results.

  10. Calcitonin gene-related peptide modulates heat nociception in the human brain - An fMRI study in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Becerra, Lino; Larsson, Henrik B.W.

    2016-01-01

    blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the brain by functional MRI after infusion of CGRP in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of 27 healthy volunteers. BOLD-signals were recorded in response to noxious heat stimuli in the V1-area of the trigeminal nerve. In addition, we...... measured BOLD-signals after injection of sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D antagonist). Results: Brain activation to noxious heat stimuli following CGRP infusion compared to baseline resulted in increased BOLD-signal in insula and brainstem, and decreased BOLD-signal in the caudate nuclei, thalamus and cingulate...

  11. Pathological and incidental findings on brain MRI in a single-center study of 229 consecutive girls with early or precocious puberty.

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    Signe Sloth Mogensen

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Central precocious puberty may result from organic brain lesions, but is most frequently of idiopathic origin. Clinical or biochemical factors which could predict a pathological brain MRI in girls with CPP have been searched for. With the recent decline in age at pubertal onset among US and European girls, it has been suggested that only girls with CPP below 6 years of age should have brain MRI performed. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of brain MRI in girls referred with early signs of puberty in relation to age at presentation as well as clinical and biochemical parameters. METHOD: A single-center study of 229 consecutive girls with early or precocious puberty who had brain imaging performed. We evaluated medical history, clinical and biochemical factors, and four groups were defined based on the outcome of their MRI. RESULTS: Thirteen out of 208 (6.3% girls with precocious puberty, but no other sign of CNS symptoms, had a pathological brain MRI. Importantly, all 13 girls were above 6 years of age, and 6 girls were even 8-9 years old. Twenty girls (9.6% had incidental findings on brain MRI. Furthermore, 21 girls had known CNS pathology at time of evaluation. Basal LH was significantly higher in girls with newly diagnosed CNS pathology compared to girls with a non-pathological MRI (p = 0.025; no cut of value was found as values overlapped. CONCLUSION: A high frequency of 6-8 year old girls with precocious puberty in our study had a pathological brain MRI, which could not be predicted from any clinical nor biochemical parameters. Thus, we believe that girls with precocious pubertal development of central origin before 8 years of age should continue to be examined by a brain MRI.

  12. Mapping altered brain connectivity and its clinical associations in adult moyamoya disease: A resting-state functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazumata, Ken; Tha, Khin Khin; Uchino, Haruto; Ito, Masaki; Nakayama, Naoki; Abumiya, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    Detection of subtle ischemic injuries in moyamoya disease may enable optimization of timing of revascularization surgery, and could potentially improve functional outcomes. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) is widely used to study functional organization of the brain, but it remains unclear whether rs-fMRI could elucidate distinct characteristics in moyamoya disease. Here, we aimed to determine changes in a conventional rs-fMRI measure and analyze any associations with clinical symptoms and cerebral hemodynamics. Thirty-one adults with moyamoya disease and 25 adult controls underwent rs-fMRI, in which we measured brain connectivity via temporal correlations of low-frequency BOLD signals. We identified the extent of between-group differences with multivoxel pattern analysis. Seed-based analysis was performed to determine associations with vascular lesions, symptoms, and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). There was significantly altered connectivity in the precentral gyrus, operculo-insular region, precuneus, cingulate cortex, and middle frontal gyrus in moyamoya disease. There was reduced connectivity in the left insula, left precuneus, right precentral, and right middle frontal regions, which form part of the salience, default mode, motor, and central executive networks, respectively. Patients with ischemic motor-related symptoms showed significantly decreased connectivity in precentral homotopic regions compared with those without, while there were no differences in vascular lesions or rCBF. Connectivity between the right occipital and left hippocampus was significantly associated with cognitive performance and posterior cerebral artery involvement. Our results demonstrate distinct alterations in the temporal correlations of low-frequency BOLD signals, predominantly in resting-state networks in moyamoya disease. Additionally, rs-fMRI measures were associated with ischemic motor-related symptoms and cognitive performance in the

  13. Altered small-world efficiency of brain functional networks in acupuncture at ST36: a functional MRI study.

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    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acupuncture in humans can produce clinical effects via the central nervous system. However, the neural substrates of acupuncture's effects remain largely unknown. RESULTS: We utilized functional MRI to investigate the topological efficiency of brain functional networks in eighteen healthy young adults who were scanned before and after acupuncture at the ST36 acupoints (ACUP and its sham point (SHAM. Whole-brain functional networks were constructed by thresholding temporal correlations matrices of ninety brain regions, followed by a graph theory-based analysis. We showed that brain functional networks exhibited small-world attributes (high local and global efficiency regardless of the order of acupuncture and stimulus points, a finding compatible with previous studies of brain functional networks. Furthermore, the brain networks had increased local efficiency after ACUP stimulation but there were no significant differences after SHAM, indicating a specificity of acupuncture point in coordinating local information flow over the whole brain. Moreover, significant (P<0.05, corrected by false discovery rate approach effects of only acupuncture point were detected on nodal degree of the left hippocampus (higher nodal degree at ACUP as compared to SHAM. Using an uncorrected P<0.05, point-related effects were also observed in the anterior cingulate cortex, frontal and occipital regions while stimulation-related effects in various brain regions of frontal, parietal and occipital cortex regions. In addition, we found that several limbic and subcortical brain regions exhibited point- and stimulation-related alterations in their regional homogeneity (P<0.05, uncorrected. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that acupuncture modulates topological organization of whole-brain functional brain networks and the modulation has point specificity. These findings provide new insights into neuronal mechanism of acupuncture from the perspective of functional

  14. Functional abnormalities in normally appearing athletes following mild traumatic brain injury: a functional MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobounov, Semyon M.; Zhang, K.; Pennell, D.; Ray, W.; Johnson, B.; Sebastianelli, W.

    2010-01-01

    Memory problems are one of the most common symptoms of sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), known as concussion. Surprisingly, little research has examined spatial memory in concussed athletes given its importance in athletic environments. Here, we combine functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a virtual reality (VR) paradigm designed to investigate the possibility of residual functional deficits in recently concussed but asymptomatic individuals. Specifically, we report performance of spatial memory navigation tasks in a VR environment and fMRI data in 15 athletes suffering from MTBI and 15 neurologically normal, athletically active age matched controls. No differences in performance were observed between these two groups of subjects in terms of success rate (94 and 92%) and time to complete the spatial memory navigation tasks (mean = 19.5 and 19.7 s). Whole brain analysis revealed that similar brain activation patterns were observed during both encoding and retrieval among the groups. However, concussed athletes showed larger cortical networks with additional increases in activity outside of the shared region of interest (ROI) during encoding. Quantitative analysis of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal revealed that concussed individuals had a significantly larger cluster size during encoding at parietal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and right hippocampus. In addition, there was a significantly larger BOLD signal percent change at the right hippocampus. Neither cluster size nor BOLD signal percent change at shared ROIs was different between groups during retrieval. These major findings are discussed with respect to current hypotheses regarding the neural mechanism responsible for alteration of brain functions in a clinical setting. PMID:20039023

  15. Brain fMRI study of crave induced by cue pictures in online game addicts (male adolescents).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yueji; Ying, Huang; Seetohul, Ravi M; Xuemei, Wang; Ya, Zheng; Qian, Li; Guoqing, Xu; Ye, Sun

    2012-08-01

    To study crave-related cerebral regions induced by game figure cues in online game addicts. fMRI brain imaging was done when the subjects were shown picture cues of the WoW (World of Warcraft, Version: 4.1.014250) game. 10 male addicts of WoW were selected as addicts' group, and 10 other healthy male non-addicts who were matched by age, were used as non-game addicts' group. All volunteers participated in fMRI paradigms. WoW associated cue pictures and neutral pictures were shown. We examined functional cerebral regions activated by the pictures with 3.0 T Philips MRI. The imaging signals' database was analyzed by SPM5. The correlation between game craving scores and different image results were assessed. When the game addicts watch the pictures, some brain areas show increased signal activity namely: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, bilateral temporal cortex, cerebellum, right inferior parietal lobule, right cuneus, right hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, left caudate nucleus. But in these same brain regions we did not observe remarkable activities in the control group. Differential image signal densities of the addict group were subtracted from the health control group, results of which were expressed in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, inferior parietal lobe and inferior temporal gyrus, cerebellum, right insular and the right angular gyrus. The increased imaging signal densities were significant and positively correlated with the craving scale scores in the bilateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and right inferior parietal lobe. Craving of online game addicts was successfully induced by game cue pictures. Crave related brain areas are: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and right inferior parietal lobe. The brain regions are overlapped with cognitive and emotion related processing brain areas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Preliminary pilot fMRI study of neuropostural optimization with a noninvasive asymmetric radioelectric brain stimulation protocol in functional dysmetria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mura M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Marco Mura1, Alessandro Castagna2, Vania Fontani2, Salvatore Rinaldi21Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari, 2Rinaldi Fontani Institute – Department of Neuro Psycho Physical Optimization, Florence, ItalyPurpose: This study assessed changes in functional dysmetria (FD and in brain activation observable by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during a leg flexion-extension motor task following brain stimulation with a single radioelectric asymmetric conveyer (REAC pulse, according to the precisely defined neuropostural optimization (NPO protocol.Population and methods: Ten healthy volunteers were assessed using fMRI conducted during a simple motor task before and immediately after delivery of a single REAC-NPO pulse. The motor task consisted of a flexion-extension movement of the legs with the knees bent. FD signs and brain activation patterns were compared before and after REAC-NPO.Results: A single 250-millisecond REAC-NPO treatment alleviated FD, as evidenced by patellar asymmetry during a sit-up motion, and modulated activity patterns in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum, during the performance of the motor task.Conclusion: Activity in brain areas involved in motor control and coordination, including the cerebellum, is altered by administration of a REAC-NPO treatment and this effect is accompanied by an alleviation of FD.Keywords: motor behavior, motor control, cerebellum, dysmetria, functional dysmetria, fluctuating asymmetry

  17. Adaptive modulation of adult brain gray and white matter to high altitude: structural MRI studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate brain structural alterations in adult immigrants who adapted to high altitude (HA. Voxel-based morphometry analysis of gray matter (GM volumes, surface-based analysis of cortical thickness, and Tract-Based Spatial Statistics analysis of white matter fractional anisotropy (FA based on MRI images were conducted on 16 adults (20-22 years who immigrated to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (2300-4400 m for 2 years. They had no chronic mountain sickness. Control group consisted of 16 matched sea level subjects. A battery of neuropsychological tests was also conducted. HA immigrants showed significantly decreased GM volumes in the right postcentral gyrus and right superior frontal gyrus, and increased GM volumes in the right middle frontal gyrus, right parahippocampal gyrus, right inferior and middle temporal gyri, bilateral inferior ventral pons, and right cerebellum crus1. While there was some divergence in the left hemisphere, surface-based patterns of GM changes in the right hemisphere resembled those seen for VBM analysis. FA changes were observed in multiple WM tracts. HA immigrants showed significant impairment in pulmonary function, increase in reaction time, and deficit in mental rotation. Parahippocampal and middle frontal GM volumes correlated with vital capacity. Superior frontal GM volume correlated with mental rotation and postcentral GM correlated with reaction time. Paracentral lobule and frontal FA correlated with mental rotation reaction time. There might be structural modifications occurred in the adult immigrants during adaptation to HA. The changes in GM may be related to impaired respiratory function and psychological deficits.

  18. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  19. Brain correlates of aesthetic expertise: A parametric fMRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ulrich; Skov, Martin; Christensen, Mark Schram

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that acquired expertise influences aesthetic judgments. In this paradigm we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study aesthetic judgments of visually presented architectural stimuli and control-stimuli (faces) for a group of architects and a grou...

  20. Brain Correlates of Aesthetic Expertise: A Parametric fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ulrich; Skov, Martin; Christensen, Mark Schram; Nygaard, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that acquired expertise influences aesthetic judgments. In this paradigm we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study aesthetic judgments of visually presented architectural stimuli and control-stimuli (faces) for a group of architects and a group of non-architects. This design allowed us to test…

  1. Cardiovascular health in young adulthood and structural brain MRI in midlife: The CARDIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancks, Michael P; Allen, Norrina B; Dubey, Prachi; Launer, Lenore J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Reis, Jared P; Sidney, Stephen; Yano, Yuichiro; Schreiner, Pamela J

    2017-08-15

    To examine the association between the American Heart Association (AHA) Life's Simple 7 (LS7) metric and brain structure. We determined cardiovascular health (CVH) according to the AHA LS7, assigning 0, 1, or 2 points for meeting poor, intermediate, or ideal criteria for the 7 components (range 0-14) at baseline (aged 18-30 years in 1985-1986) and year 25 follow-up examination for 518 participants of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) brain MRI substudy. Visit-based CVH score and average score was assessed in relation to percent of intracranial volume of normal tissue of the whole brain, gray matter, and white matter, and abnormal tissue volume of white matter at year 25 using multivariable linear, logistic, and quantile regression, after adjustment for age, sex, race, field center, educational attainment, and alcohol consumption. Mean percentage of whole brain volume, normal gray matter, and normal white matter was 81.3% (±2.5), 42.9% (±2.0), and 38.4% (±2.0). Greater CVH score at baseline (per each additional point at year 0: 0.1%, 95% confidence limits 0.01-0.3; p brain volume (per each additional point in average score: 0.2%, 95% confidence limits 0.04-0.3; p gray or white matter volume or abnormal white matter volume. Maintaining ideal levels of cardiovascular health, determined by the LS7, in young adulthood is associated with greater whole brain volume in middle age but not regional differences in structure. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Preliminary evaluation of a brain PET insertable to MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gyuseng [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 South (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 South (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung; An, Hyun Joon [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 South (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin Ho [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 South (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Wook; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Kyeongjin; Lim, Kyung Taek; Cho, Minsik [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 South (Korea, Republic of); Sul, Woo Suk [National NanoFab Center, Deajeon, 305-806 South (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoungtaek; Kim, Hyunduk [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 South (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-29

    There is a new trend of the medical image that diagnoses a brain disease as like Alzheimer dementia. The first qualified candidate is a PET-MRI fusion modality because MRI is a more powerful anatomic diagnosis tool than other modalities. In our study, in order to solve the high magnetic field from MRI, the development was consisted with four main items such as photo-sensor, PET scanner, MRI head-coil and attenuation correction algorithm development.

  3. MRI of perinatal brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Mary; Allsop, Joanna [Imperial College, Robert Steiner MR Unit, Perinatal Imaging, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Martinez Biarge, Miriam [La Paz University Hospital, Dept of Neonatology, Madrid (Spain); Counsell, Serena [Imperial College, Robert Steiner MR Unit, Neonatal Medicine, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Cowan, Frances [Imperial College, Dept of Paediatrics, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    MRI is invaluable in assessing the neonatal brain following suspected perinatal injury. Good quality imaging requires adaptations to both the hardware and the sequences used for adults or older children. The perinatal and postnatal details often predict the pattern of lesions sustained and should be available to aid interpretation of the imaging findings. Perinatal lesions, the pattern of which can predict neurodevelopmental outcome, are at their most obvious on conventional imaging between 1 and 2 weeks from birth. Very early imaging during the first week may be useful to make management decisions in ventilated neonates but brain abnormalities may still be subtle using conventional sequences. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is very useful for the early identification of ischaemic tissue in the neonatal brain but may underestimate the final extent of injury, particularly basal ganglia and thalamic lesions. MR imaging is an excellent predictor of outcome following perinatal brain injury and can therefore be used as a biomarker in interventional trials designed to reduce injury and improve neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  4. Attempts at memory control induce dysfunctional brain activation profiles in Generalized Anxiety Disorder: An exploratory fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwadkar, Vaibhav A; Re, Marta; Cecchetto, Filippo; Garzitto, Marco; Piccin, Sara; Bonivento, Carolina; Maieron, Marta; D'Agostini, Serena; Balestrieri, Matteo; Brambilla, Paolo

    2017-08-30

    Suppression of aversive memories through memory control has historically been proposed as a central psychological defense mechanism. Inability to suppress memories is considered a central psychological trait in several psychiatric disorders, including Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). Yet, few studies have attempted the focused identification of dysfunctional brain activation profiles when patients with Generalized Anxiety Disorders attempt memory control. Using a well-characterized behavioral paradigm we studied brain activation profiles in a group of adult GAD patients and well-matched healthy controls (HC). Participants learned word-association pairs before imaging. During fMRI when presented with one word of the pair, they were instructed to either suppress memory of, or retrieve the paired word. Subsequent behavioral testing indicated both GAD and HC were able to engage in the task, but attempts at memory control (suppression or retrieval) during fMRI revealed vastly different activation profiles. GAD were characterized by substantive hypo-activation signatures during both types of memory control, with effects particularly strong during suppression in brain regions including the dorsal anterior cingulate and the ventral prefrontal cortex. Attempts at memory control in GAD fail to engage brain regions to the same extent HC, providing a putative neuronal signature for a well-established psychological characteristic of the illness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Motion correction in MRI of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godenschweger, F; Kägebein, U; Stucht, D; Yarach, U; Sciarra, A; Yakupov, R; Lüsebrink, F; Schulze, P; Speck, O

    2016-01-01

    Subject motion in MRI is a relevant problem in the daily clinical routine as well as in scientific studies. Since the beginning of clinical use of MRI, many research groups have developed methods to suppress or correct motion artefacts. This review focuses on rigid body motion correction of head and brain MRI and its application in diagnosis and research. It explains the sources and types of motion and related artefacts, classifies and describes existing techniques for motion detection, compensation and correction and lists established and experimental approaches. Retrospective motion correction modifies the MR image data during the reconstruction, while prospective motion correction performs an adaptive update of the data acquisition. Differences, benefits and drawbacks of different motion correction methods are discussed. PMID:26864183

  6. Brain iron accumulation in Wilson disease: a post mortem 7 Tesla MRI - histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, P; Bahn, E; Litwin, T; Jabłonka-Salach, K; Łuciuk, A; Huelnhagen, T; Madai, V I; Dieringer, M A; Bulska, E; Knauth, M; Niendorf, T; Sobesky, J; Paul, F; Schneider, S A; Czlonkowska, A; Brück, W; Wegner, C; Wuerfel, J

    2017-10-01

    In Wilson disease (WD), T2/T2*-weighted (T2*w) MRI frequently shows hypointensity in the basal ganglia that is suggestive of paramagnetic deposits. It is currently unknown whether this hypointensity is related to copper or iron deposition. We examined the neuropathological correlates of this MRI pattern, particularly in relation to iron and copper concentrations. Brain slices from nine WD and six control cases were investigated using a 7T-MRI system. High-resolution T2*w images were acquired and R2* parametric maps were reconstructed using a multigradient recalled echo sequence. R2* was measured in the globus pallidus (GP) and the putamen. Corresponding histopathological sections containing the lentiform nucleus were examined using Turnbull iron staining, and double staining combining Turnbull with immunohistochemistry for macrophages or astrocytes. Quantitative densitometry of the iron staining as well as copper and iron concentrations were measured in the GP and putamen and correlated with R2* values. T2*w hypointensity in the GP and/or putamen was apparent in WD cases and R2* values correlated with quantitative densitometry of iron staining. In WD, iron and copper concentrations were increased in the putamen compared to controls. R2* was correlated with the iron concentration in the GP and putamen, whereas no correlation was observed for the copper concentration. Patients with more pronounced pathological severity in the putamen displayed increased iron concentration, which correlated with an elevated number of iron-containing macrophages. T2/T2*w hypointensity observed in vivo in the basal ganglia of WD patients is related to iron rather than copper deposits. © 2016 British Neuropathological Society.

  7. Linking graph features of anatomical architecture to regional brain activity: A multi-modal MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tien-Wen; Xue, Shao-Wei

    2017-06-09

    Previous empirical research has treated regional neural responses and network architecture separately. However, anecdotal reports have suggested a close relationship between the two. This study aims to investigate the influence of structural connectivity on regional spontaneous activities. Datasets of structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI), resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) of 36 right-handed healthy subjects (average age 27.4) were selected from the NKI Rockland sample. In the sMRI data, the cerebral cortex was parcellated into 70 regions of interest (ROIs) according to an anatomical atlas. Two indices were calculated from rs-fMRI for each ROI: the regional homogeneity (ReHo) and the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF). Diffusion tensor imaging was computed from DWI and was converted to tractography. Four graph indices of structural connectivity were retrieved from the tractography results and the 70 ROIs, as follows: nodal degree, clustering coefficient, local efficiency and betweenness centrality. ReHo values were significantly correlated with all 4 graph features, whereas ALFF values were significantly correlated with nodal degrees and clustering coefficients. Both ReHo and ALFF tended to increase with segregation (clustering coefficient and local efficiency) and decrease with centrality (nodal degree and betweenness centrality). Though derived from local spontaneous activities, ReHo and ALFF may reflect the network properties of the underlying anatomical architecture. The results supported the hypothesis that the properties of the network structure may shape the regional neural response profiles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effects of Audiovisual Inputs on Solving the Cocktail Party Problem in the Human Brain: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanqing; Wang, Fangyi; Chen, Yongbin; Cichocki, Andrzej; Sejnowski, Terrence

    2017-09-25

    At cocktail parties, our brains often simultaneously receive visual and auditory information. Although the cocktail party problem has been widely investigated under auditory-only settings, the effects of audiovisual inputs have not. This study explored the effects of audiovisual inputs in a simulated cocktail party. In our fMRI experiment, each congruent audiovisual stimulus was a synthesis of 2 facial movie clips, each of which could be classified into 1 of 2 emotion categories (crying and laughing). Visual-only (faces) and auditory-only stimuli (voices) were created by extracting the visual and auditory contents from the synthesized audiovisual stimuli. Subjects were instructed to selectively attend to 1 of the 2 objects contained in each stimulus and to judge its emotion category in the visual-only, auditory-only, and audiovisual conditions. The neural representations of the emotion features were assessed by calculating decoding accuracy and brain pattern-related reproducibility index based on the fMRI data. We compared the audiovisual condition with the visual-only and auditory-only conditions and found that audiovisual inputs enhanced the neural representations of emotion features of the attended objects instead of the unattended objects. This enhancement might partially explain the benefits of audiovisual inputs for the brain to solve the cocktail party problem. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Differential brain responses to cries of infants with autistic disorder and typical development: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuti, Paola; Caria, Andrea; Esposito, Gianluca; De Pisapia, Nicola; Bornstein, Marc H; de Falco, Simona

    2012-01-01

    This study used fMRI to measure brain activity during adult processing of cries of infants with autistic disorder (AD) compared to cries of typically developing (TD) infants. Using whole brain analysis, we found that cries of infants with AD compared to those of TD infants elicited enhanced activity in brain regions associated with verbal and prosodic processing, perhaps because altered acoustic patterns of AD cries render them especially difficult to interpret, and increased activity in brain regions associated with emotional processing, indicating that AD cries also elicit more negative feelings and may be perceived as more aversive and/or arousing. Perceived distress engendered by AD cries related to increased activation in brain regions associated with emotional processing. This study supports the hypothesis that cry is an early and meaningful anomaly displayed by children with AD. It could be that cries associated with AD alter parent-child interactions much earlier than the time that reliable AD diagnosis normally occurs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Brain-machine interface via real-time fMRI: preliminary study on thought-controlled robotic arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Hwan; Ryu, Jeongwon; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Cho, Zang-Hee; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2009-01-23

    Real-time functional MRI (rtfMRI) has been used as a basis for brain-computer interface (BCI) due to its ability to characterize region-specific brain activity in real-time. As an extension of BCI, we present an rtfMRI-based brain-machine interface (BMI) whereby 2-dimensional movement of a robotic arm was controlled by the regulation (and concurrent detection) of regional cortical activations in the primary motor areas. To do so, the subjects were engaged in the right- and/or left-hand motor imagery tasks. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal originating from the corresponding hand motor areas was then translated into horizontal or vertical robotic arm movement. The movement was broadcasted visually back to the subject as a feedback. We demonstrated that real-time control of the robotic arm only through the subjects' thought processes was possible using the rtfMRI-based BMI trials.

  11. Detecting social-cognitive deficits after traumatic brain injury: An ALE meta-analysis of fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hui; Jacobsen, Andre; Chen, Ziqian; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can result in significant social dysfunction, which is represented by impairment to social-cognitive abilities (i.e. social cognition, social attention/executive function and communication). This study is aimed to explore brain networks mediating the social dysfunction after TBI and its underlying mechanisms. We performed a quantitative meta-analysis using the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of social-cognitive abilities following TBI. Sixteen studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria resulting in a total of 190 patients with TBI and 206 controls enrolled in the ALE meta-analysis. The temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were the specific regions that social cognition predominantly engaged. The cingulate gyrus, frontal gyrus and inferior parietal lobule were the main regions related to social attention/executive functions. Communication dysfunction, especially related to language deficits, was found to show greater activation of the temporal gyrus and fusiform gyrus in TBI. The current ALE meta-analytic findings provide evidence that patients have significant social-cognitive disabilities following TBI. The relatively limited pool of literature and the varied fMRI results from published studies indicate that social-cognitive abilities following TBI is an area that would greatly benefit from further investigation.

  12. Automatic Analysis of Brain Tissue and Structural Connectivity in MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Boer (Renske)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractStudies of the brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide insights in physiology and pathology that can eventually aid clinical diagnosis and therapy monitoring. MRI data acquired in these studies can be difficult, as well as laborious, to interpret and analyze by

  13. General and selective brain connectivity alterations in essential tremor: A resting state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Mueller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although essential tremor is the most common movement disorder, there is little knowledge about the pathophysiological mechanisms of this disease. Therefore, we explored brain connectivity based on slow spontaneous fluctuations of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal in patients with essential tremor (ET. A cohort of 19 ET patients and 23 healthy individuals were scanned in resting condition using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. General connectivity was assessed by eigenvector centrality (EC mapping. Selective connectivity was analyzed by correlations of the BOLD signal between the preselected seed regions and all the other brain areas. These measures were then correlated with the tremor severity evaluated by the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale (FTMTS. Compared to healthy subjects, ET patients were found to have lower EC in the cerebellar hemispheres and higher EC in the anterior cingulate and in the primary motor cortices bilaterally. In patients, the FTMTS score correlated positively with the EC in the putamen. In addition, the FTMTS score correlated positively with selective connectivity between the thalamus and other structures (putamen, pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA, parietal cortex, and between the pre-SMA and the putamen. We observed a selective coupling between a number of areas in the sensorimotor network including the basal ganglia and the ventral intermediate nucleus of thalamus, which is widely used as neurosurgical target for tremor treatment. Finally, ET was marked by suppression of general connectivity in the cerebellum, which is in agreement with the concept of ET as a disorder with cerebellar damage.

  14. General and selective brain connectivity alterations in essential tremor: A resting state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Karsten; Jech, Robert; Hoskovcová, Martina; Ulmanová, Olga; Urgošík, Dušan; Vymazal, Josef; Růžička, Evžen

    2017-01-01

    Although essential tremor is the most common movement disorder, there is little knowledge about the pathophysiological mechanisms of this disease. Therefore, we explored brain connectivity based on slow spontaneous fluctuations of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal in patients with essential tremor (ET). A cohort of 19 ET patients and 23 healthy individuals were scanned in resting condition using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). General connectivity was assessed by eigenvector centrality (EC) mapping. Selective connectivity was analyzed by correlations of the BOLD signal between the preselected seed regions and all the other brain areas. These measures were then correlated with the tremor severity evaluated by the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale (FTMTS). Compared to healthy subjects, ET patients were found to have lower EC in the cerebellar hemispheres and higher EC in the anterior cingulate and in the primary motor cortices bilaterally. In patients, the FTMTS score correlated positively with the EC in the putamen. In addition, the FTMTS score correlated positively with selective connectivity between the thalamus and other structures (putamen, pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), parietal cortex), and between the pre-SMA and the putamen. We observed a selective coupling between a number of areas in the sensorimotor network including the basal ganglia and the ventral intermediate nucleus of thalamus, which is widely used as neurosurgical target for tremor treatment. Finally, ET was marked by suppression of general connectivity in the cerebellum, which is in agreement with the concept of ET as a disorder with cerebellar damage.

  15. Hand grips strength effect on motor function in human brain using fMRI: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S. S.; Mohamad, M.; Syazarina, S. O.; Nafisah, W. Y.

    2014-11-01

    Several methods of motor tasks for fMRI scanning have been evolving from simple to more complex tasks. Motor tasks on upper extremity were applied in order to excite the increscent of motor activation on contralesional and ipsilateral hemispheres in brain. The main objective of this study is to study the different conditions for motor tasks on upper extremity that affected the brain activation. Ten healthy right handed with normal vision (3 male and 7 female, age range=20-30 years, mean=24.6 years, SD=2.21) participated in this study. Prior to the scanning, participants were trained on hand grip tasks using rubber ball and pressure gauge tool outside the scanner. During fMRI session, a block design with 30-s task blocks and alternating 30-s rest periods was employed while participants viewed a computer screen via a back projection-mirror system and instructed to follow the instruction by gripping their hand with normal and strong grips using a rubber ball. Statistical Parametric mapping (SPM8) software was used to determine the brain activation. Both tasks activated the primary motor (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA), dorsal and ventral of premotor cortex area (PMA) in left hemisphere while in right hemisphere the area of primary motor (M1) somatosensory was activated. However, the comparison between both tasks revealed that the strong hand grip showed the higher activation at M1, PMA and SMA on left hemisphere and also the area of SMA on right hemisphere. Both conditions of motor tasks could provide insights the functional organization on human brain.

  16. Brain imaging of analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibition in an experimental human pain model: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maihöfner, Christian; Ringler, Ralf; Herrndobler, Franz; Koppert, Wolfgang

    2007-09-01

    One of the most distressing symptoms of many neuropathic pain syndromes is the enhanced pain sensation to tactile or thermal stimulation (hyperalgesia). In the present study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and explored brain activation patterns during acute impact pain and mechanical hyperalgesia in the human ultraviolet (UV)-B model. To investigate pharmacological modulation, we examined potential differential fMRI correlates of analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects of two intravenous cyclooxygenase inhibitors, i.e. parecoxib and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Fourteen healthy volunteers participated in this double-blinded, randomized and placebo-controlled crossover study. Tactile stimuli and mechanical impact hyperalgesia were tested at the site of a UV-B irradiation and acute mechanical pain was tested at a site distant from the irradiated skin. These measurements were conducted before and 30 min after a 5-min intravenous infusion of either saline (placebo), parecoxib 40 mg or ASA 1000 mg. Acute mechanical pain and mechanical hyperalgesia led to widespread activations of brain areas known to comprise the human pain matrix. Analgesic effects were found in primary (S1) and secondary (S2) somatosensory cortices, parietal association cortex (PA), insula, anterior parts of the cingulate cortex and prefrontal cortices. These brain areas were also modulated under antihyperalgesic conditions. However, we observed a greater drug-induced modulation of mainly PA and inferior frontal cortex during mechanical hyperalgesia; during acute mechanical pain there was a greater modulation of mainly bilateral S2. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that there is a difference in the brain areas modulated by analgesia and antihyperalgesia.

  17. Food and drug cues activate similar brain regions: a meta-analysis of functional MRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, D W; Fellows, L K; Small, D M; Dagher, A

    2012-06-06

    In healthy individuals, food cues can trigger hunger and feeding behavior. Likewise, smoking cues can trigger craving and relapse in smokers. Brain imaging studies report that structures involved in appetitive behaviors and reward, notably the insula, striatum, amygdala and orbital frontal cortex, tend to be activated by both visual food and smoking cues. Here, by carrying out a meta-analysis of human neuro-imaging studies, we investigate the neural network activated by: 1) food versus neutral cues (14 studies, 142 foci) 2) smoking versus neutral cues (15 studies, 176 foci) 3) smoking versus neutral cues when correlated with craving scores (7 studies, 108 foci). PubMed was used to identify cue-reactivity imaging studies that compared brain response to visual food or smoking cues to neutral cues. Fourteen articles were identified for the food meta-analysis and fifteen articles were identified for the smoking meta-analysis. Six articles were identified for the smoking cue correlated with craving analysis. Meta-analyses were carried out using activation likelihood estimation. Food cues were associated with increased blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response in the left amygdala, bilateral insula, bilateral orbital frontal cortex, and striatum. Smoking cues were associated with increased BOLD signal in the same areas, with the exception of the insula. However, the smoking meta-analysis of brain maps correlating cue-reactivity with subjective craving did identify the insula, suggesting that insula activation is only found when craving levels are high. The brain areas identified here are involved in learning, memory and motivation, and their cue-induced activity is an index of the incentive salience of the cues. Using meta-analytic techniques to combine a series of studies, we found that food and smoking cues activate comparable brain networks. There is significant overlap in brain regions responding to conditioned cues associated with natural and drug rewards

  18. Abnormal Baseline Brain Activity in Patients with Pulsatile Tinnitus: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous investigations studying the brain functional activity of the tinnitus patients have indicated that neurological changes are important findings of this kind of disease. However, the pulsatile tinnitus (PT patients were excluded in previous studies because of the totally different mechanisms of the two subtype tinnitus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether altered baseline brain activity presents in patients with PT using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI technique. The present study used unilateral PT patients (n=42 and age-, sex-, and education-matched normal control subjects (n=42 to investigate the changes in structural and amplitude of low-frequency (ALFF of the brain. Also, we analyzed the relationships between these changes with clinical data of the PT patients. Compared with normal controls, PT patients did not show any structural changes. PT patients showed significant increased ALFF in the bilateral precuneus, and bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and decreased ALFF in multiple occipital areas. Moreover, the increased THI score and PT duration was correlated with increased ALFF in precuneus and bilateral IFG. The abnormalities of spontaneous brain activity reflected by ALFF measurements in the absence of structural changes may provide insights into the neural reorganization in PT patients.

  19. Prolonged Repeated Acupuncture Stimulation Induces Habituation Effects in Pain-Related Brain Areas: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanfu; Yang, Jun; Park, Kyungmo; Wu, Hongli; Hu, Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Bu, Junjie; Xu, Chunsheng; Qiu, Bensheng; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2014-01-01

    Most previous studies of brain responses to acupuncture were designed to investigate the acupuncture instant effect while the cumulative effect that should be more important in clinical practice has seldom been discussed. In this study, the neural basis of the acupuncture cumulative effect was analyzed. For this experiment, forty healthy volunteers were recruited, in which more than 40 minutes of repeated acupuncture stimulation was implemented at acupoint Zhusanli (ST36). Three runs of acupuncture fMRI datasets were acquired, with each run consisting of two blocks of acupuncture stimulation. Besides general linear model (GLM) analysis, the cumulative effects of acupuncture were analyzed with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) to find the association between the brain response and the cumulative duration of acupuncture stimulation in each stimulation block. The experimental results showed that the brain response in the initial stage was the strongest although the brain response to acupuncture was time-variant. In particular, the brain areas that were activated in the first block and the brain areas that demonstrated cumulative effects in the course of repeated acupuncture stimulation overlapped in the pain-related areas, including the bilateral middle cingulate cortex, the bilateral paracentral lobule, the SII, and the right thalamus. Furthermore, the cumulative effects demonstrated bimodal characteristics, i.e. the brain response was positive at the beginning, and became negative at the end. It was suggested that the cumulative effect of repeated acupuncture stimulation was consistent with the characteristic of habituation effects. This finding may explain the neurophysiologic mechanism underlying acupuncture analgesia. PMID:24821143

  20. Brain responses to altered auditory feedback during musical keyboard production: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfordresher, Peter Q; Mantell, James T; Brown, Steven; Zivadinov, Robert; Cox, Jennifer L

    2014-03-27

    Alterations of auditory feedback during piano performance can be profoundly disruptive. Furthermore, different alterations can yield different types of disruptive effects. Whereas alterations of feedback synchrony disrupt performed timing, alterations of feedback pitch contents can disrupt accuracy. The current research tested whether these behavioral dissociations correlate with differences in brain activity. Twenty pianists performed simple piano keyboard melodies while being scanned in a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. In different conditions they experienced normal auditory feedback, altered auditory feedback (asynchronous delays or altered pitches), or control conditions that excluded movement or sound. Behavioral results replicated past findings. Neuroimaging data suggested that asynchronous delays led to increased activity in Broca's area and its right homologue, whereas disruptive alterations of pitch elevated activations in the cerebellum, area Spt, inferior parietal lobule, and the anterior cingulate cortex. Both disruptive conditions increased activations in the supplementary motor area. These results provide the first evidence of neural responses associated with perception/action mismatch during keyboard production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Corpus callosum thickness on mid-sagittal MRI as a marker of brain volume: a pilot study in children with HIV-related brain disease and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas [University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cape Town (South Africa); Ackermann, Christelle [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Laughton, Barbara; Cotton, Mark [Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Children' s Hospital, Children' s Infectious Diseases Research Unit, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Tomazos, Nicollette [University of Cape Town, Faculty of Commerce, Department of Management Studies, Cape Town (South Africa); Spottiswoode, Bruce [University of Cape Town, MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, Department of Human Biology, Cape Town (South Africa); Mauff, Katya [University of Cape Town, Department of Statistical Sciences, Cape Town (South Africa); Pettifor, John M. [University of the Witwatersrand, MRC/Wits Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Witwatersrand (South Africa)

    2015-07-15

    Corpus callosum thickness measurement on mid-sagittal MRI may be a surrogate marker of brain volume. This is important for evaluation of diseases causing brain volume gain or loss, such as HIV-related brain disease and HIV encephalopathy. To determine if thickness of the corpus callosum on mid-sagittal MRI is a surrogate marker of brain volume in children with HIV-related brain disease and in controls without HIV. A retrospective MRI analysis in children (<5 years old) with HIV-related brain disease and controls used a custom-developed semi-automated tool, which divided the midline corpus callosum and measured its thickness in multiple locations. Brain volume was determined using volumetric analysis. Overall corpus callosum thickness and thickness of segments of the corpus callosum were correlated with overall and segmented (grey and white matter) brain volume. Forty-four children (33 HIV-infected patients and 11 controls) were included. Significant correlations included overall corpus callosum (mean) and total brain volume (P = 0.05); prefrontal corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02); premotor corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.04) and white matter volume (P = 0.02), premotor corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02) and sensory corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.02). Corpus callosum thickness correlates with brain volume both in HIV-infected patients and controls. (orig.)

  2. Determinants of brain iron in multiple sclerosis A quantitative 3T MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, M.B.; Langkammer, C.; Ropele, S.; Petrovic, K.; Wallner-Blazek, M.; Loitfelder, M.; Jehna, M.; Bachmaier, G.; Schmidt, R.; Enzinger, C.; Fuchs, S.; Fazekas, F.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Abnormal high cerebral iron deposition may be implicated in chronic neurologic disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS). R2* relaxometry has been recently validated in a postmortem study to indicate brain iron accumulation in a quantitative manner. We used this technique to assess

  3. How Does Your Brain See “Living” Circles: A Study of Animacy and Intention Using fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P McAleer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available It is widely reported that the perception of animacy can occur from simple displays of moving shapes with participants attributing such qualities as goals, beliefs, and intentions. Furthermore, via neuroimaging studies, a network of brain areas, including regions of the temporal and frontal lobes, has been shown to process the percept. However, problems exist that prevent the bridging of fMRI studies on the perception of animacy and intention in shapes to the same percept of human movement. First, the issue of prior displays being poorly controlled in terms of low-level visual cues blurs the actual root of the effect. Second, the general use of synthetically generated displays and their relationship to actual human movement: a problem previously addressed in behavioural studies via a systematic reduction of live visual footage of human actors. Therefore, we propose experiments that incorporate both synthetically generated animacy stimuli and displays derived from human motion. Following the classic Tremoulet and Feldman displays, stimuli are created that allow for manipulation of animacy and intent whilst controlling low-level visual cues. These displays are then used in a whole-brain fMRI study to locate neural regions sensitive to the perception of animacy and intention. Finally, within these regions, a region-of-interest analysis is performed to examine the change in brain activation from viewing animacy displays derived from human movement with varying intent (eg, chasing or following. This study develops the relationship between previous animacy literature and the real-world perception of intent.

  4. Migraine with aura and risk of silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities: an MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaist, David; Garde, Ellen; Blaabjerg, Morten; Nielsen, Helle H; Krøigård, Thomas; Østergaard, Kamilla; Møller, Harald S; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Madsen, Camilla G; Iversen, Pernille; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Siebner, Hartwig R; Ashina, Messoud

    2016-07-01

    A small number of population-based studies reported an association between migraine with aura and risk of silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities in females. We investigated these relations in a population-based sample of female twins. We contacted female twins ages 30-60 years identified through the population-based Danish Twin Registry. Based on questionnaire responses, twins were invited to participate in a telephone-based interview conducted by physicians. Headache diagnoses were established according to the International Headache Society criteria. Cases with migraine with aura, their co-twins, and unrelated migraine-free twins (controls) were invited to a brain magnetic resonance imaging scan performed at a single centre. Brain scans were assessed for the presence of infarcts, and white matter hyperintensities (visual rating scales and volumetric analyses) blinded to headache diagnoses. Comparisons were based on 172 cases, 34 co-twins, and 139 control subjects. Compared with control subjects, cases did not differ with regard to frequency of silent brain infarcts (four cases versus one control), periventricular white matter hyperintensity scores [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval): -0.1 (-0.5 to 0.2)] or deep white matter hyperintensity scores [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval): 0.1 (-0.8 to 1.1)] assessed by Scheltens' scale. Cases had a slightly higher total white matter hyperintensity volume compared with controls [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval): 0.17 (-0.08 to 0.41) cm(3)] and a similar difference was present in analyses restricted to twin pairs discordant for migraine with aura [adjusted mean difference 0.21 (-0.20 to 0.63)], but these differences did not reach statistical significance. We found no evidence of an association between silent brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and migraine with aura. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  5. Alteration of Brain Functional Networks in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Linqiong; Zhang, Jiuquan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jingna; Zhang, Ye; Li, Pengyue; Wang, Jian; Qiu, Mingguo

    2015-01-01

    Although alterations of topological organization have previously been reported in the brain functional network of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, the topological properties of the brain network in early-stage PD patients who received antiparkinson treatment are largely unknown. This study sought to determine the topological characteristics of the large-scale functional network in early-stage PD patients. First, 26early-stage PD patients (Hoehn and Yahr stage:1-2) and 30 age-matched normal controls were scanned using resting-state functional MRI. Subsequently, graph theoretical analysis was employed to investigate the abnormal topological configuration of the brain network in early-stage PD patients. We found that both the PD patient and control groups showed small-world properties in their functional brain networks. However, compared with the controls, the early-stage PD patients exhibited abnormal global properties, characterized by lower global efficiency. Moreover, the modular structure and the hub distribution were markedly altered in early-stage PD patients. Furthermore, PD patients exhibited increased nodal centrality, primarily in the bilateral pallidum, the inferior parietal lobule, and the medial superior frontal gyrus, and decreased nodal centrality in the caudate nucleus, the supplementary motor areas, the precentral gyrus, and the middle frontal gyrus. There were significant negative correlations between the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor scores and nodal centralities of superior parietal gyrus. These results suggest that the topological organization of the brain functional network was altered in early-stage PD patients who received antiparkinson treatment, and we speculated that the antiparkinson treatment may affect the efficiency of the brain network to effectively relieve clinical symptoms of PD.

  6. Alteration of Brain Functional Networks in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linqiong Sang

    Full Text Available Although alterations of topological organization have previously been reported in the brain functional network of Parkinson's disease (PD patients, the topological properties of the brain network in early-stage PD patients who received antiparkinson treatment are largely unknown. This study sought to determine the topological characteristics of the large-scale functional network in early-stage PD patients. First, 26early-stage PD patients (Hoehn and Yahr stage:1-2 and 30 age-matched normal controls were scanned using resting-state functional MRI. Subsequently, graph theoretical analysis was employed to investigate the abnormal topological configuration of the brain network in early-stage PD patients. We found that both the PD patient and control groups showed small-world properties in their functional brain networks. However, compared with the controls, the early-stage PD patients exhibited abnormal global properties, characterized by lower global efficiency. Moreover, the modular structure and the hub distribution were markedly altered in early-stage PD patients. Furthermore, PD patients exhibited increased nodal centrality, primarily in the bilateral pallidum, the inferior parietal lobule, and the medial superior frontal gyrus, and decreased nodal centrality in the caudate nucleus, the supplementary motor areas, the precentral gyrus, and the middle frontal gyrus. There were significant negative correlations between the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor scores and nodal centralities of superior parietal gyrus. These results suggest that the topological organization of the brain functional network was altered in early-stage PD patients who received antiparkinson treatment, and we speculated that the antiparkinson treatment may affect the efficiency of the brain network to effectively relieve clinical symptoms of PD.

  7. Brain and behaviour phenotyping of a mouse model of neurofibromatosis type-1: an MRI/DTI study on social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, L I; Cai, Y; Sereno, J V; Gonçalves, S I; Silva, A J; Castelo-Branco, M

    2016-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) is a common neurogenetic disorder and an important cause of intellectual disability. Brain-behaviour associations can be examined in vivo using morphometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to study brain structure. Here, we studied structural and behavioural phenotypes in heterozygous Nf1 mice (Nf1(+/-) ) using T2-weighted imaging MRI and DTI, with a focus on social recognition deficits. We found that Nf1(+/-) mice have larger volumes than wild-type (WT) mice in regions of interest involved in social cognition, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the caudate-putamen (CPu). Higher diffusivity was found across a distributed network of cortical and subcortical brain regions, within and beyond these regions. Significant differences were observed for the social recognition test. Most importantly, significant structure-function correlations were identified concerning social recognition performance and PFC volumes in Nf1(+/-) mice. Analyses of spatial learning corroborated the previously known deficits in the mutant mice, as corroborated by platform crossings, training quadrant time and average proximity measures. Moreover, linear discriminant analysis of spatial performance identified 2 separate sub-groups in Nf1(+/-) mice. A significant correlation between quadrant time and CPu volumes was found specifically for the sub-group of Nf1(+/-) mice with lower spatial learning performance, suggesting additional evidence for reorganization of this region. We found strong evidence that social and spatial cognition deficits can be associated with PFC/CPu structural changes and reorganization in NF1. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  8. Branding and a child's brain: an fMRI study of neural responses to logos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Amanda S; Bruce, Jared M; Black, William R; Lepping, Rebecca J; Henry, Janice M; Cherry, Joseph Bradley C; Martin, Laura E; Papa, Vlad B; Davis, Ann M; Brooks, William M; Savage, Cary R

    2014-01-01

    Branding and advertising have a powerful effect on both familiarity and preference for products, yet no neuroimaging studies have examined neural response to logos in children. Food advertising is particularly pervasive and effective in manipulating choices in children. The purpose of this study was to examine how healthy children's brains respond to common food and other logos. A pilot validation study was first conducted with 32 children to select the most culturally familiar logos, and to match food and non-food logos on valence and intensity. A new sample of 17 healthy weight children were then scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Food logos compared to baseline were associated with increased activation in orbitofrontal cortex and inferior prefrontal cortex. Compared to non-food logos, food logos elicited increased activation in posterior cingulate cortex. Results confirmed that food logos activate some brain regions in children known to be associated with motivation. This marks the first study in children to examine brain responses to culturally familiar logos. Considering the pervasiveness of advertising, research should further investigate how children respond at the neural level to marketing.

  9. The average pathlength map: a diffusion MRI tractography-derived index for studying brain pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Kerstin; Mathias, Jane L; Bigler, Erin D; Brown, Greg; Taylor, Jamie D; Rose, Stephen E

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tractography provides a powerful tool for the assessment of white matter architecture in vivo. Quantitative tractography metrics, such as streamline length, have successfully been used in the study of brain pathology. To date, these studies have relied on a priori knowledge of which tracts are affected by injury or pathology and manual delineation of regions of interest (ROIs) for use as waypoints in tractography. This limits the analyses to specific tracts under investigation and relies on the accurate and consistent placement of ROIs. We present a fully automated technique for the voxel-wise analysis of streamline length within the entire brain, the Average Pathlength Map (APM). We highlight the precision and reproducibility of voxel-wise average streamline length over time, and assess normal variability of pathlength values in a cohort of 43 healthy participants. Additionally, we demonstrate the utility of this approach by performing voxel-wise comparison between pathlength values obtained from a patient with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI, Glasgow Coma Scale Score=7) and those from control participants. Our analysis shows that voxel-wise average pathlength values are comparable to fractional anisotropy (FA) in terms of reproducibility and variability. For the TBI patient, we observed a significant reduction in streamline pathlength in the genu of the corpus callosum and its projections into the frontal lobe. This study demonstrates that the average pathlength map can be used for voxel-based analysis of a quantitative tractography metric within the whole brain, removing both the dependence on a priori knowledge of affected pathways and time-consuming manual delineation of ROIs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Language exposure induced neuroplasticity in the bilingual brain: a follow-up fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Liu; Wang, Junjing; Abutalebi, Jubin; Jiang, Bo; Pan, Ximin; Li, Meng; Gao, Wei; Yang, Yuchen; Liang, Bishan; Lu, Zhi; Huang, Ruiwang

    2015-03-01

    Although several studies have shown that language exposure crucially influence the cerebral representation of bilinguals, the effects of short-term change of language exposure in daily life upon language control areas in bilinguals are less known. To explore this issue, we employed follow-up fMRI to investigate whether differential exposure induces neuroplastic changes in the language control network in high-proficient Cantonese (L1)-Mandarin (L2) early bilinguals. The same 10 subjects underwent twice BOLD-fMRI scans while performing a silent narration task which corresponded to two different language exposure conditions, CON-1 (L1/L2 usage percentage, 50%:50%) and CON-2 (L1/L2 usage percentage, 90%:10%). We report a strong effect of language exposure in areas related to language control for the less exposed language. Interestingly, these significant effects were present after only a 30-day period of differential language exposure. In detail, we reached the following results: (1) the interaction effect of language and language exposure condition was found significantly in the left pars opercularis (BA 44) and marginally in the left MFG (BA 9); (2) in CON-2, increases of activation values in L2 were found significantly in bilateral BA 46 and BA 9, in the left BA44, and marginally in the left caudate; and (3) in CON-2, we found a significant negative correlation between language exposure to L2 and the BOLD activation value specifically in the left ACC. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that even short periods of differential exposure to a given language may induce significant neuroplastic changes in areas responsible for language control. The language which a bilingual is less exposed to and is also less used will be in need of increased mental control as shown by the increased activity of language control areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vivo brain anatomy of adult males with Fragile X syndrome: an MRI study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hallahan, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FraX) is caused by the expansion of a single trinucleotide gene sequence (CGG) on the X chromosome, and is a leading cause of learning disability (mental retardation) worldwide. Relatively few studies, however, have examined the neuroanatomical abnormalities associated with FraX. Of those that are available many included mixed gender populations, combined FraX children and adults into one sample, and employed manual tracing techniques which measures bulk volume of particular regions. Hence, there is relatively little information on differences in grey and white matter content across whole brain. We employed magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain anatomy in 17 adult males with FraX and 18 healthy controls that did not differ significantly in age. Data were analysed using stereology and VBM to compare (respectively) regional brain bulk volume, and localised grey\\/white matter content. Using stereology we found that FraX males had a significant increase in bulk volume bilaterally of the caudate nucleus and parietal lobes and of the right brainstem, but a significant decrease in volume of the left frontal lobe. Our complimentary VBM analysis revealed an increased volume of grey matter in fronto-striatal regions (including bilaterally in the caudate nucleus), and increased white matter in regions extending from the brainstem to the parahippocampal gyrus, and from the left cingulate cortex extending into the corpus callosum. People with FraX have regionally specific differences in brain anatomy from healthy controls with enlargement of the caudate nuclei that persists into adulthood.

  12. Ultra-high magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): a potential examination for deep brain stimulation devices and the limitation study concerning MRI-related heating injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chuan; Li, Jun-Ju; Zhu, Guan-Yu; Shi, Lin; Yang, An-Chao; Jiang, Yin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, the patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices are restricted to undertake 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the guideline. Nevertheless, we conducted an experiment to test pathological change near the leads in different field-strength MRI. Twenty-four male New Zealand rabbits were assigned to Group 1 (G1, n = 6, 7.0T, DBS), Group 2 (G2, n = 6, 3.0T, DBS), Group 3 (G3, n = 6, 1.5T, DBS), and Group 4 (G4, n = 6, 1.5T, paracentesis). DBS leads were implanted in G1, G2 and G3, targeting left nucleus ventralis posterior thalami. Paracentesis was performed in G4. 24 h after MRI scan, all animals were killed for examining pathological alternation (at different distance from lead) via transmission electron microscopy. Our results suggest that the severity of tissue injury correlates with the distance to electrode instead of field strength of MRI. Up to now, the reason for the restriction of MRI indicated no significantly different pathological change.

  13. Cannabis use and memory brain function in adolescent boys: a cross-sectional multicenter fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Gerry; Block, Robert I.; Luijten, Maartje; Ramsey, Nick F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Early-onset cannabis use has been associated with later (ab)use, mental health problems (psychosis, depression) and abnormal development of cognition and brain function. During adolescence ongoing neurodevelopmental maturation and experience shape the neural circuitry underlying complex cognitive functions such as memory and executive control. Prefrontal and temporal regions are critically involved in these functions. Maturational processes leave these brain areas prone to the potentially harmful effects of cannabis use. Method We performed a two-site (US and NL; pooled data) functional MRI study with a cross-sectional design, investigating the effects of adolescent cannabis use on working memory (WM) and associative memory (AM) brain function in twenty-one abstinent but frequent cannabis using boys (age 13 – 19) and compared them with twenty-four non-using peers. Brain activity during WM was assessed before and following rule-based learning (automatization). AM was assessed using a pictorial hippocampal-dependent memory task. Results Cannabis users performed normally on both memory tasks. During WM assessment cannabis users showed excessive activity in prefrontal regions when a task was novel, whereas automatization of the task reduced activity to the same level in users and controls. No effect of cannabis use on AM-related brain function was found. Conclusions In adolescent cannabis users the WM system was overactive during a novel task, suggesting functional compensation. Inefficient WM recruitment was not related to a failure in automatization, but became evident when processing continuously changing information. The results seem to confirm the vulnerability of still developing frontal lobe functioning for early-onset cannabis use. PMID:20494266

  14. Error-related processing following severe traumatic brain injury: an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozda, Christopher N; Larson, Michael J; Kaufman, David A S; Schmalfuss, Ilona M; Perlstein, William M

    2011-10-01

    Continuous monitoring of one's performance is invaluable for guiding behavior towards successful goal attainment by identifying deficits and strategically adjusting responses when performance is inadequate. In the present study, we exploited the advantages of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine brain activity associated with error-related processing after severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). fMRI and behavioral data were acquired while 10 sTBI participants and 12 neurologically-healthy controls performed a task-switching cued-Stroop task. fMRI data were analyzed using a random-effects whole-brain voxel-wise general linear model and planned linear contrasts. Behaviorally, sTBI patients showed greater error-rate interference than neurologically-normal controls. fMRI data revealed that, compared to controls, sTBI patients showed greater magnitude error-related activation in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and an increase in the overall spatial extent of error-related activation across cortical and subcortical regions. Implications for future research and potential limitations in conducting fMRI research in neurologically-impaired populations are discussed, as well as some potential benefits of employing multimodal imaging (e.g., fMRI and event-related potentials) of cognitive control processes in TBI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Surface-Based fMRI-Driven Diffusion Tractography in the Presence of Significant Brain Pathology: A Study Linking Structure and Function in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnington, Ross; Boyd, Roslyn N.; Rose, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography analyses are difficult to perform in the presence of brain pathology. Automated methods that rely on cortical parcellation for structural connectivity studies often fail, while manually defining regions is extremely time consuming and can introduce human error. Both methods also make assumptions about structure-function relationships that may not hold after cortical reorganisation. Seeding tractography with functional-MRI (fMRI) activation is an emerging method that reduces these confounds, but inherent smoothing of fMRI signal may result in the inclusion of irrelevant pathways. This paper describes a novel fMRI-seeded dMRI-analysis pipeline based on surface-meshes that reduces these issues and utilises machine-learning to generate task specific white matter pathways, minimising the requirement for manually-drawn ROIs. We directly compared this new strategy to a standard voxelwise fMRI-dMRI approach, by investigating correlations between clinical scores and dMRI metrics of thalamocortical and corticomotor tracts in 31 children with unilateral cerebral palsy. The surface-based approach successfully processed more participants (87%) than the voxel-based approach (65%), and provided significantly more-coherent tractography. Significant correlations between dMRI metrics and five clinical scores of function were found for the more superior regions of these tracts. These significant correlations were stronger and more frequently found with the surface-based method (15/20 investigated were significant; R2 = 0.43–0.73) than the voxelwise analysis (2 sig. correlations; 0.38 & 0.49). More restricted fMRI signal, better-constrained tractography, and the novel track-classification method all appeared to contribute toward these differences. PMID:27487011

  16. Surface-Based fMRI-Driven Diffusion Tractography in the Presence of Significant Brain Pathology: A Study Linking Structure and Function in Cerebral Palsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee B Reid

    Full Text Available Diffusion MRI (dMRI tractography analyses are difficult to perform in the presence of brain pathology. Automated methods that rely on cortical parcellation for structural connectivity studies often fail, while manually defining regions is extremely time consuming and can introduce human error. Both methods also make assumptions about structure-function relationships that may not hold after cortical reorganisation. Seeding tractography with functional-MRI (fMRI activation is an emerging method that reduces these confounds, but inherent smoothing of fMRI signal may result in the inclusion of irrelevant pathways. This paper describes a novel fMRI-seeded dMRI-analysis pipeline based on surface-meshes that reduces these issues and utilises machine-learning to generate task specific white matter pathways, minimising the requirement for manually-drawn ROIs. We directly compared this new strategy to a standard voxelwise fMRI-dMRI approach, by investigating correlations between clinical scores and dMRI metrics of thalamocortical and corticomotor tracts in 31 children with unilateral cerebral palsy. The surface-based approach successfully processed more participants (87% than the voxel-based approach (65%, and provided significantly more-coherent tractography. Significant correlations between dMRI metrics and five clinical scores of function were found for the more superior regions of these tracts. These significant correlations were stronger and more frequently found with the surface-based method (15/20 investigated were significant; R2 = 0.43-0.73 than the voxelwise analysis (2 sig. correlations; 0.38 & 0.49. More restricted fMRI signal, better-constrained tractography, and the novel track-classification method all appeared to contribute toward these differences.

  17. Brain-Gut Axis Modulation of Acupuncture in Functional Dyspepsia: A Preliminary Resting-State fcMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiliang Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore acupuncture effects on brain functional connectivity in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD. Methods. Eight patients in an acupuncture treatment group and ten healthy adults in the control group participated in the study. Acupuncture effectiveness was evaluated based on changes of the gastrointestinal symptoms, gastric motility measurements, and gastrin levels and comparisons with the control group when appropriate. To investigate functional connectivity changes related to FD and potential modulation after acupuncture, a set of regions of interest (ROIs were selected according to previous fMRI reports of acupuncture. Results. Patients showed significant improvements of FD signs and symptoms after acupuncture treatments. For all of the ROIs, we identified subportions of the networks showing reduced connectivity in patients with FD. Connectivity between the ROIs and corresponding disease targets showed significant improvement after acupuncture treatment (P<0.05 in all ROIs except for right medial temporal lobe-hippocampus and right inferior parietal lobule. Conclusion. Functional connectivity of the brain is changed in patients with FD but approximates that in healthy control after acupuncture treatment. The relief of gastrointestinal signs and symptoms by acupuncture is likely due to the normalization of brain-gut axis associated with FD.

  18. How specialized are writing-specific brain regions? An fMRI study of writing, drawing and oral spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planton, Samuel; Longcamp, Marieke; Péran, Patrice; Démonet, Jean-François; Jucla, Mélanie

    2017-03-01

    Several brain imaging studies identified brain regions that are consistently involved in writing tasks; the left premotor and superior parietal cortices have been associated with the peripheral components of writing performance as opposed to other regions that support the central, orthographic components. Based on a meta-analysis by Planton, Jucla, Roux, and Demonet (2013), we focused on five such writing areas and questioned the task-specificity and hemispheric lateralization profile of the brain response in an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment where 16 right-handed participants wrote down, spelled out orally object names, and drew shapes from object pictures. All writing-related areas were activated by drawing, and some of them by oral spelling, thus questioning their specialization for written production. The graphemic/motor frontal area (GMFA), a subpart of the superior premotor cortex close to Exner's area (Roux et al., 2009), was the only area with a writing-specific lateralization profile, that is, clear left lateralization during handwriting, and bilateral activity during drawing. Furthermore, the relative lateralization and levels of activation in the superior parietal cortex, ventral premotor cortex, ventral occipitotemporal cortex and right cerebellum across the three tasks brought out new evidence regarding their respective contributions to the writing processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Altered Small-World Efficiency of Brain Functional Networks in Acupuncture at ST36: A Functional MRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Liu; Jun Chen; Jinhui Wang; Xian Liu; Xiaohui Duan; Xiaojing Shang; Yu Long; Zhiguang Chen; Xiaofang Li; Yan Huang; Yong He

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acupuncture in humans can produce clinical effects via the central nervous system. However, the neural substrates of acupuncture's effects remain largely unknown. RESULTS: We utilized functional MRI to investigate the topological efficiency of brain functional networks in eighteen healthy young adults who were scanned before and after acupuncture at the ST36 acupoints (ACUP) and its sham point (SHAM). Whole-brain functional networks were constructed by thresholding temporal correl...

  20. Neonatal brain injury and neuroanatomy of memory processing following very preterm birth in adulthood: an fMRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Kalpakidou, A. K.; Allin, M. P.; Walshe, M; Giampietro, V.; Nam, K. W.; McGuire, P.; Rifkin, L; Murray, R. M.; Nosarti, C.

    2012-01-01

    Altered functional neuroanatomy of high-order cognitive processing has been described in very preterm individuals (born before 33 weeks of gestation; VPT) compared to controls in childhood and adolescence. However, VPT birth may be accompanied by different types of adverse neonatal events and associated brain injury, the severity of which may have differential effects on brain development and subsequent neurodevelopmental outcome. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) st...

  1. Neonatal Brain Injury and Neuroanatomy of Memory Processing following Very Preterm Birth in Adulthood: An fMRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kalpakidou, Anastasia K.; Allin, Matthew P.; Muriel Walshe; Vincent Giampietro; Kie-woo Nam; Philip McGuire; Larry Rifkin; Murray, Robin M.; Chiara Nosarti

    2012-01-01

    Altered functional neuroanatomy of high-order cognitive processing has been described in very preterm individuals (born before 33 weeks of gestation; VPT) compared to controls in childhood and adolescence. However, VPT birth may be accompanied by different types of adverse neonatal events and associated brain injury, the severity of which may have differential effects on brain development and subsequent neurodevelopmental outcome. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) st...

  2. Cognition and brain abnormalities on MRI in pituitary patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brummelman, Pauline [Department of Endocrinology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Sattler, Margriet G.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meiners, Linda C. [Department of Radiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Berg, Gerrit van den; Klauw, Melanie M. van der [Department of Endocrinology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Elderson, Martin F. [Department of Endocrinology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); LifeLines Cohort Study and Biobank, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Dullaart, Robin P.F. [Department of Endocrinology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Koerts, Janneke [Department of Clinical and Developmental Neuropsychology, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Werumeus Buning, Jorien, E-mail: j.werumeus.buning@umcg.nl [Department of Endocrinology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Tucha, Oliver [Department of Clinical and Developmental Neuropsychology, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. [Department of Endocrinology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); LifeLines Cohort Study and Biobank, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Beek, André P. van, E-mail: a.p.van.beek@umcg.nl [Department of Endocrinology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Cognitive impairments are frequently observed in treated NFA patients. • NFA patients with cognitive impairments do not show brain abnormalities on MRI more frequently than patients without cognitive impairments. • The absence of brain abnormalities on brain MRI does not exclude impairments of cognition. - Abstract: Purpose: The extent to which cognitive dysfunction is related to specific brain abnormalities in patients treated for pituitary macroadenoma is unclear. Therefore, we compared brain abnormalities seen on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in patients treated for nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma (NFA) with or without impairments in cognitive functioning. Methods: In this cross-sectional design, a cohort of 43 NFA patients was studied at the University Medical Center Groningen. White matter lesions (WMLs), cerebral atrophy, (silent) brain infarcts and abnormalities of the temporal lobes and hippocampi were assessed on pre-treatment and post-treatment MRI scans. Post-treatment cognitive examinations were performed using a verbal memory and executive functioning test. We compared our patient cohort with large reference populations representative of the Dutch population. Results: One or more impairments on both cognitive tests were frequently observed in treated NFA patients. No treatment effects were found with regard to the comparison between patients with and without impairments in executive functioning. Interestingly, in patients with one or more impairments on verbal memory function, treatment with radiotherapy had been given more frequently (74% in the impaired group versus 40% in the unimpaired group, P = 0.025). Patients with or without any brain abnormality on MRI did not differ in verbal memory or executive functioning. Conclusions: Brain abnormalities on MRI are not observed more frequently in treated NFA patients with impairments compared to NFA patients without impairments in verbal memory or executive functioning

  3. Abnormal baseline brain activity in patients with neuromyelitis optica: A resting-state fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yaou [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Liang Peipeng [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); International WIC institute, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100024 (China); Duan Yunyun; Jia Xiuqin; Wang Fei; Yu Chunshui; Qin Wen [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Dong Huiqing; Ye Jing [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Li Kuncheng, E-mail: likuncheng1955@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Recent immunopathologic and MRI findings suggest that tissue damage in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is not limited to spinal cord and optic nerve, but also in brain. Baseline brain activity can reveal the brain functional changes to the tissue damages and give clues to the pathophysiology of NMO, however, it has never been explored by resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). We used regional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) as an index in resting-state fMRI to investigate how baseline brain activity changes in patients with NMO. Methods: Resting-state fMRIs collected from seventeen NMO patients and seventeen age- and sex-matched normal controls were compared to investigate the ALFF difference between the two groups. The relationships between ALFF in regions with significant group differences and the EDSS (Expanded Disability Status Scale), disease duration were further explored. Results: Our results showed that NMO patients had significantly decreased ALFF in precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and lingual gyrus; and increased ALFF in middle frontal gyrus, caudate nucleus and thalamus, compared to normal controls. Moderate negative correlations were found between the EDSS and ALFF in the left middle frontal gyrus (r = -0.436, p = 0.040) and the left caudate (r = -0.542, p = 0.012). Conclusion: The abnormal baseline brain activity shown by resting-state fMRI in NMO is relevant to cognition, visual and motor systems. It implicates a complex baseline brain status of both functional impairments and adaptations caused by tissue damages in these systems, which gives clues to the pathophysiology of NMO.

  4. The Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation for Brain Activation and Alcohol Abstinence Self-Efficacy: Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Ha Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We attempted to investigate whether acupuncture stimulation at HT7 can have an effect on brain activation patterns and alcohol abstinence self-efficacy. Thirty-four right-handed healthy subjects were recruited for this study. They were randomly assigned into two groups: the HT7 (Shenmen group and the LI5 (Yangxi group. Acupuncture stimulation was performed using a block paradigm during fMRI scanning. Additionally, the Korean version of Alcohol Abstinence Self-Efficacy Scale (AASES was used to determine the effect of acupuncture stimulation on self-efficacy to abstain from alcohol use. According to the result of fMRI group analysis, the activation induced by HT7 stimulation was found on the bilateral postcentral gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, claustrum, insula, and anterior lobe of the cerebellum, as well as on the left posterior lobe of the cerebellum (p<0.001, uncorrected. According to the AASES analysis, the interaction effect for gender and treatment was marginally significant (F(1,30=4.152, p=0.050. For female group, the simple main effect of treatment was significant (F(1,11=8.040, p=0.016, indicating that the mean change score was higher in the HT7 stimulation than in the LI5 stimulation. Therefore, our study has provided evidence to support that HT7 stimulation has a positive therapeutic effect on the alcohol-related diseases.

  5. Protracted development of executive and mnemonic brain systems underlying working memory in adolescence: A longitudinal fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Daniel J; Hallquist, Michael N; Luna, Beatriz

    2017-08-15

    Working memory (WM), the ability to hold information on-line to guide planned behavior, improves through adolescence in parallel with continued maturation of critical brain systems supporting cognitive control. Initial developmental neuroimaging studies with one or two timepoints have provided important though varied results limiting our understanding of which and how neural systems change during this transition into mature WM. In this study, we leverage functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) longitudinal data spanning up to 9 years in 129 normally developing individuals to identify which systems demonstrate growth changes that accompany improvements in WM performance. We used a memory guided saccade task that allowed us to probe encoding, pure maintenance, and retrieval neural processes of WM. Consistent with prior research, we found that WM performance continued to improve into the early 20's. fMRI region of interest (ROI) analyses revealed developmental (1) increases in sensorimotor-related (encoding/retrieval) activity in visual cortex from childhood through early adulthood that were associated with WM accuracy and (2) decreases in sustained (maintenance) activity in executive regions from childhood through mid-adolescence that were associated with response latency in childhood and early adolescence. Together these results provide compelling evidence that underlying the maturation of WM is a transition from reliance on executive systems to specialized regions related to the domain of mnemonic requirements of the task leading to optimal performance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. A study of the brain's resting state based on alpha band power, heart rate and fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, J.C.; Goncalves, S.I.; Faes, T.J.C.; Kuijer, J.P.A.; Pouwels, P.J.W.; Heethaar, R.M.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.

    2008-01-01

    Considering that there are several theoretical reasons why fMRI data is correlated to variations in heart rate, these correlations are explored using experimental resting state data. In particular, the possibility is discussed that the "default network", being a brain area that deactivates during

  7. Image processing techniques for quantification and assessment of brain MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijf, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used technique to acquire digital images of the human brain. A variety of acquisition protocols is available to generate images in vivo and noninvasively, giving great opportunities to study the anatomy and physiology of the human brain. In my thesis,

  8. Abnormality of spontaneous brain activities in patients with chronic neck and shoulder pain: A resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cheng-Xin; Ji, Ting-Ting; Song, Hao; Li, Bo; Han, Qiang; Li, Liang; Zhuo, Zhi-Zheng

    2017-02-01

    Objectives Chronic gneck and shoulder pain (CNSP) is a common clinical symptom of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Several studies using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) have reported that most chronic pain diseases are accompanied by structural and functional changes in the brain. However, few rs-fMRI studies have examined CNSP. The current study investigated cerebral structural and functional changes in CNSP patients. Methods In total, 25 CNSP patients and 20 healthy volunteers participated in the study. 3D-T1W and rs-fMRI images were acquired. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was applied to structural images, and regional homogeneity (ReHo) was extracted from rs-fMRI. Statistical analysis was performed on post-processing images and ReHo parameter maps. Results The results revealed no significant differences in brain structure between the two groups. In the patient group, ReHo values were significantly increased in the bilateral middle frontal gyrus and decreased in the left insula, superior frontal gyrus, middle cingulate gyrus, supplementary motor area, right postcentral gyrus, and superior parietal lobule. Conclusions This initial structural and rs-fMRI study of CNSP revealed characteristic features of spontaneous brain activity of CNSP patients. These findings may be helpful for increasing our understanding of the neuropathology of CNSP.

  9. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laveaucoupet, J; Audibert, F; Guis, F; Rambaud, C; Suarez, B; Boithias-Guérot, C; Musset, D

    2001-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the usefulness of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in ischemic brain injury. We report seven cases of fetal brain ischemia prenatally suspected on ultrasound (US) and confirmed by fetal MRI. Sonographic abnormalities included ventricular dilatation (n=3), microcephaly (n=1), twin pregnancy with in utero death of a twin and suspected cerebral lesion in the surviving co-twin (n=3). MRI was performed with a 1.0 T unit using half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences between 28 and 35 weeks of gestation. US and MRI images were compared with pathologic findings or postnatal imaging. MRI diagnosed hydranencephaly (n=1), porencephaly (n=2), multicystic encephalomalacia (n=2), unilateral capsular ischemia (n=1), corpus callosum and cerebral atrophy (n=1). In comparison with US, visualization of fetal brain anomalies was superior with MRI. The present cases demonstrate that MRI is a valuable complementary means of investigation when a brain pathology is discovered or suspected during prenatal US. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Urea cycle disorders: brain MRI and neurological outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bireley, William R. [University of Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Van Hove, Johan L.K. [University of Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Gallagher, Renata C. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Fenton, Laura Z. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Urea cycle disorders encompass several enzyme deficiencies that can result in cerebral damage, with a wide clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to severe. The goal of this study was to correlate brain MRI abnormalities in urea cycle disorders with clinical neurological sequelae to evaluate whether MRI abnormalities can assist in guiding difficult treatment decisions. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with urea cycle disorders and symptomatic hyperammonemia. Brain MRI images were reviewed for abnormalities that correlated with severity of clinical neurological sequelae. Our case series comprises six urea cycle disorder patients, five with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and one with citrullinemia type 1. The observed trend in distribution of brain MRI abnormalities as the severity of neurological sequelae increased was the peri-insular region first, extending into the frontal, parietal, temporal and, finally, the occipital lobes. There was thalamic restricted diffusion in three children with prolonged hyperammonemia. Prior to death, this site is typically reported to be spared in urea cycle disorders. The pattern and extent of brain MRI abnormalities correlate with clinical neurological outcome in our case series. This suggests that brain MRI abnormalities may assist in determining prognosis and helping clinicians with subsequent treatment decisions. (orig.)

  11. 3 Tesla MRI-detected brain lesions after pulmonary vein isolation for atrial fibrillation: results of the MACPAF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, Karl Georg; Koch, Lydia; Herm, Juliane; Kopp, Ute A; Heuschmann, Peter U; Endres, Matthias; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Schirdewan, Alexander; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial catheter ablation (LACA) is an established therapeutic approach to abolish symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF). Based on the prospective MACPAF study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01061931) we report the rate of ischemic brain lesions postablation and their impact on cognitive function. Patients with symptomatic paroxysmal AF were randomized to LACA using the Arctic Front® or the HD Mesh Ablator® catheter. All patients underwent brain MRI at 3 Tesla, neurological, and neuropsychological examinations within 48 hours prior and after the ablation procedure. There was no clinically evident stroke in 37 patients (mean age 62.4 ± 8.4 years; 41% female; median CHADS2 score 1 [IQR 0-2]) after LACA but high-resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) detected new ischemic lesions in 15 (41%) patients after LACA. Four (27%) of the HD Mesh Ablator® patients and 11 (50%) of the Arctic Front® patients suffered a silent ischemic lesion (P = 0.19). In these 15 patients, there was a nonsignificant trend toward lower cardiac ejection fraction (P = 0.07) and AF episodes during LACA (P = 0.09), while activated clotting time levels, number of energy applications, periprocedural electrocardioversion or CHADS(2) score had no impact. Lesion volumes varied from 5 to 150 mm(3) and 1 to 5 lesions were detected per patient. However, acute brain lesions had no effect on cognitive performance immediately after LACA. Of the DWI lesions postablation 82% were not detectable on FLAIR images 6-9 months postablation. According to 3 Tesla high-resolution DWI, ischemic brain lesions after LACA were common but not associated with impaired cognitive function after the ablation procedure. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effect of Observation of Simple Hand Movement on Brain Activations in Patients with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinomais, Mickael; Lignon, Gregoire; Chinier, Eva; Richard, Isabelle; Minassian, Aram Ter; The Tich, Sylvie N'Guyen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to examine and compare brain activation in patients with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) during observation of simple hand movement performed by the paretic and nonparetic hand. Nineteen patients with clinical unilateral CP (14 male, mean age 14 years, 7-21 years) participated…

  13. Quantitative representations of an exaggerated anxiety response in the brain of female spider phobics-a parametric fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zilverstand, Anna; Sorger, Bettina; Kaemingk, Anita; Goebel, R.

    2017-01-01

    We employed a novel parametric spider picture set in the context of a parametric fMRI anxiety provocation study, designed to tease apart brain regions involved in threat monitoring from regions representing an exaggerated anxiety response in spider phobics. For the stimulus set, we systematically

  14. Role of MRI in the evaluation of postchemotherapy brain changes in childhood leukemia: An Egyptian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagat Mansour Khalifa

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Chemotherapy is associated with certain side effects that can be evaluated by utilization of MRI. An elevated degree of suspicion is needed to recognize the radiological features of CNS complications of chemotherapy and familiarity with the imaging findings is essential for proper diagnosis and further treatment of neurological symptoms in pediatric patients with leukemia.

  15. Brain networks involved in haptic and visual identification of facial expressions of emotion: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Ryo; Johnsrude, Ingrid S; Kochiyama, Takanori; Lederman, Susan J

    2010-01-15

    Previous neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies have shown that a cortical network involving the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), inferior parietal lobe (IPL) and cortical areas in and around the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) region is employed in action understanding by vision and audition. However, the brain regions that are involved in action understanding by touch are unknown. Lederman et al. (2007) recently demonstrated that humans can haptically recognize facial expressions of emotion (FEE) surprisingly well. Here, we report a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in which we test the hypothesis that the IFG, IPL and pSTS regions are involved in haptic, as well as visual, FEE identification. Twenty subjects haptically or visually identified facemasks with three different FEEs (disgust, neutral and happiness) and casts of shoes (shoes) of three different types. The left posterior middle temporal gyrus, IPL, IFG and bilateral precentral gyrus were activated by FEE identification relative to that of shoes, regardless of sensory modality. By contrast, an inferomedial part of the left superior parietal lobule was activated by haptic, but not visual, FEE identification. Other brain regions, including the lingual gyrus and superior frontal gyrus, were activated by visual identification of FEEs, relative to haptic identification of FEEs. These results suggest that haptic and visual FEE identification rely on distinct but overlapping neural substrates including the IFG, IPL and pSTS region.

  16. Corpus Callosum Diffusion and Language Lateralization in Patients with Brain Tumors: A DTI and fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantillo, Gabriella; Peck, Kyung K; Arevalo-Perez, Julio; Lyo, John K; Chou, Joanne F; Young, Robert J; Brennan, Nicole Petrovich; Holodny, Andrei I

    2016-01-01

    Examining how left-hemisphere brain tumors might impact both the microstructure of the corpus callosum (CC) as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) values in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) as well as cortical language lateralization measured with functional MRI (fMRI). fMRI tasks (phonemic fluency and verb generation) were performed in order to detect activation in Broca's and Wernicke's area. Twenty patients with left-hemisphere brain tumors were investigated. fMRI results were divided into left dominant (LD), right dominant (RD), or codominant (CD) for language function. DTI was performed to generate FA maps in the anterior and posterior CC. FA values were correlated with the degree of language dominance. Patients who were LD or RD for language in Broca's area had lower FA in the anterior CC than those who were CD for language (median for CD = .72, LD = .66, RD = .65, P brain tumors can cause compensatory codominance, our findings may suggest a mechanism by which interhemispheric transfer is facilitated during plasticity in the presence of a tumor. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  17. Lithium alters brain activation in bipolar disorder in a task- and state-dependent manner: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Sanjay

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is unknown if medications used to treat bipolar disorder have effects on brain activation, and whether or not any such changes are mood-independent. Methods Patients with bipolar disorder who were depressed (n = 5 or euthymic (n = 5 were examined using fMRI before, and 14 days after, being started on lithium (as monotherapy in 6 of these patients. Patients were examined using a word generation task and verbal memory task, both of which have been shown to be sensitive to change in previous fMRI studies. Differences in blood oxygenated level dependent (BOLD magnitude between the pre- and post-lithium results were determined in previously defined regions of interest. Severity of mood was determined by the Hamilton Depression Scale for Depression (HAM-D and the Young mania rating scale (YMRS. Results The mean HAM-D score at baseline in the depressed group was 15.4 ± 0.7, and after 2 weeks of lithium it was 11.0 ± 2.6. In the euthymic group it was 7.6 ± 1.4 and 3.2 ± 1.3 respectively. At baseline mean BOLD signal magnitude in the regions of interest for the euthymic and depressed patients were similar in both the word generation task (1.56 ± 0.10 and 1.49 ± 0.10 respectively and working memory task (1.02 ± 0.04 and 1.12 ± 0.06 respectively. However, after lithium the mean BOLD signal decreased significantly in the euthymic group in the word generation task only (1.56 ± 0.10 to 1.00 ± 0.07, p Conclusion This is the first study to examine the effects of lithium on brain activation in bipolar patients. The results suggest that lithium has an effect on euthymic patients very similar to that seen in healthy volunteers. The same effects are not seen in depressed bipolar patients, although it is uncertain if this lack of change is linked to the lack of major improvements in mood in this group of patients. In conclusion, this study suggests that lithium may have effects on brain activation that are task- and state

  18. Studies of the correlations between morphological brain changes on MRI and computerized EEG changes in schizophrenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Kouzou (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-06-01

    Twenty eight schizophrenic patients, who ranged in age from 21 to 39 years with a mean of 30.2, and 21 age- and sex-matched normal volunteers were studied by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and electroencephalography (EEG). ALl subjects were given informed consent prior to the present study. They were all right-handed. Schizophrenic patients showed a significantly larger ventricular brain ratio (VBR) on the axial and coronal planes as compared with the control. The bilateral anterior horns, left body, left posterior horn of the lateral ventricle and the third ventricle were significantly larger in schizophrenic patients than the control. The middle half of the corpus callosum was smaller in schizophrenic patients than the control. Schizophrenia was more likely associated not only with delta and theta activities in the centro-parieto-occipital regions but also with beta 1 and beta 2 activities in the front-central regions. In schizophrenic patients, however, alpha 2 activity was markedly decreased in all regions. There were significant positive correlations between the total scores for brief psychiatric rating scale (BPRS) and the areas of the left anterior and posterior horns of the lateral ventricle. The total BPRS scores positively correlated with the area of the third ventricle. In addition, positive correlations were significant between delata activity and the area of the left anterior horn of the lateral ventricle, between delta activity and the area of the third ventricle, and between beta 1 activity and the area of left posteior horn of the lateral ventricle. These results suggest that a dilated third ventricle is associated with electrophysiological brain pathology and psychopathology in schizophrenic patients. (N.K.) 76 refs.

  19. Automatic Analysis of Brain Tissue and Structural Connectivity in MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, Renske

    2011-01-01

    textabstractStudies of the brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide insights in physiology and pathology that can eventually aid clinical diagnosis and therapy monitoring. MRI data acquired in these studies can be difficult, as well as laborious, to interpret and analyze by human observers. Moreover, analysis by human observers can hamper the reproducibility by both inter- and intra-observer variability. These studies do, therefore, require accurate and reproducible quantitati...

  20. DIAGNOSTIC ABILITY OF MRI IN CHARACTERISATION OF SUPRATENTORIAL BRAIN TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Sri Sailaja Rednam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Brain tumours arise from the normal constituents of brain and its coverings; 80% of all the intracranial tumours are supratentorial. Imaging plays a crucial function in the management of patients with brain tumours. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has earned recognition as the optimal screening technique for the detection of most intracranial tumours. MRI using conventional Spin-Echo sequences like axial T1, T2 and Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR, coronal T2, sagittal T1, post contrast SE T1 axial, sagittal and coronal sequences were taken which provides inherently illustrious contrast resolution between structural abnormalities and adjacent brain parenchyma and has proved to be more sensitive in identification of focal lesions of the brain. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was conducted in 50 patients who all were clinically suspected of supratentorial brain tumour cases and underwent MRI in the Department of Radiodiagnosis, Konaseema Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Foundation, Amalapuram, during the period of 18 months from July 2015 to December 2016. RESULTS The MRI features of 50 supratentorial tumours were reviewed, out of which 72% were found to be extra-axial tumours and 28% intra-axial tumours. About 48% were found to be glial tumours and 52% were found to be non-glial tumours. CONCLUSION MRI proves to be a valuable modality of imaging in evaluating the characteristics, distribution, location and assessing the extent of various intra- and extra-axial tumours in the supratentorial region.

  1. Human brain functional MRI and DTI visualization with virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Moreland, John; Zhang, Jingyu

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional MRI (fMRI) are two active research areas in neuroimaging. DTI is sensitive to the anisotropic diffusion of water exerted by its macromolecular environment and has been shown useful in characterizing structures of ordered tissues such as the brain white matter, myocardium, and cartilage. The diffusion tensor provides two new types of information of water diffusion: the magnitude and the spatial orientation of water diffusivity inside the tissue. This information has been used for white matter fiber tracking to review physical neuronal pathways inside the brain. Functional MRI measures brain activations using the hemodynamic response. The statistically derived activation map corresponds to human brain functional activities caused by neuronal activities. The combination of these two methods provides a new way to understand human brain from the anatomical neuronal fiber connectivity to functional activities between different brain regions. In this study, virtual reality (VR) based MR DTI and fMRI visualization with high resolution anatomical image segmentation and registration, ROI definition and neuronal white matter fiber tractography visualization and fMRI activation map integration is proposed. Rationale and methods for producing and distributing stereoscopic videos are also discussed.

  2. Neurodegeneration of brain networks in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal lobar degeneration (ALS-FTLD) continuum: evidence from MRI and MEG studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojsi, Francesca; Sorrentino, Pierpaolo; Sorrentino, Giuseppe; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2017-10-27

    Brain imaging techniques, especially those based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG), have been increasingly applied to study multiple large-scale distributed brain networks in healthy people and neurological patients. With regard to neurodegenerative disorders, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), clinically characterized by the predominant loss of motor neurons and progressive weakness of voluntary muscles, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the second most common early-onset dementia, have been proven to share several clinical, neuropathological, genetic, and neuroimaging features. Specifically, overlapping or mildly diverging brain structural and functional connectivity patterns, mostly evaluated by advanced MRI techniques-such as diffusion tensor and resting-state functional MRI (DT-MRI, RS-fMRI)-have been described comparing several ALS and FTLD populations. Moreover, though only pioneering, promising clues on connectivity patterns in the ALS-FTLD continuum may derive from MEG investigations. We will herein overview the current state of knowledge concerning the most advanced neuroimaging findings associated with clinical and genetic patterns of neurodegeneration across the ALS-FTLD continuum, underlying the possibility that network-based approaches may be useful to develop novel biomarkers of disease for adequately designing and monitoring more appropriate treatment strategies.

  3. Evaluation of brain ageing: a quantitative longitudinal MRI study over 7 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracien, Rene-Maxime; Nuernberger, Lucas; Hof, Stephanie-Michelle; Reitz, Sarah C.; Hilker-Roggendorf, Ruediger; Baudrexel, Simon [Goethe University, Department of Neurology, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Goethe University, Brain Imaging Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Hok, Pavel [Goethe University, Department of Neurology, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Goethe University, Brain Imaging Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Palacky University, Department of Neurology, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Rueb, Udo [Goethe University, Dr. Senckenberg Chronomedical Institute, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Steinmetz, Helmuth [Goethe University, Department of Neurology, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Klein, Johannes C. [Goethe University, Department of Neurology, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Goethe University, Brain Imaging Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Oxford (United Kingdom); Deichmann, Ralf [Goethe University, Brain Imaging Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    T1 relaxometry is a promising tool for the assessment of microstructural changes during brain ageing. Previous cross-sectional studies demonstrated increasing T1 values in white and decreasing T1 values in grey matter over the lifetime. However, these findings have not yet been confirmed on the basis of a longitudinal study. In this longitudinal study over 7 years, T1 relaxometry was used to investigate the dynamics of age-related microstructural changes in older healthy subjects. T1 mapping was performed in 17 healthy subjects (range 51-77 years) at baseline and after 7 years. Advanced cortical and white matter segmentation was used to determine mean T1 values in the cortex and white matter. The analysis revealed a decrease of mean cortical T1 values over 7 years, the rate of T1 reduction being more prominent in subjects with higher age. T1 decreases were predominantly localized in the lateral frontal, parietal and temporal cortex. In contrast, mean white matter T1 values remained stable. T1 mapping is shown to be sensitive to age-related microstructural changes in healthy ageing subjects in a longitudinal setting. Data of a cohort in late adulthood and the senescence period demonstrate a decrease of cortical T1 values over 7 years, most likely reflecting decreasing water content and increased iron concentrations. (orig.)

  4. Advance MRI for pediatric brain tumors with emphasis on clinical benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Ra, Young Shin [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Conventional anatomic brain MRI is often limited in evaluating pediatric brain tumors, the most common solid tumors and a leading cause of death in children. Advanced brain MRI techniques have great potential to improve diagnostic performance in children with brain tumors and overcome diagnostic pitfalls resulting from diverse tumor pathologies as well as nonspecific or overlapped imaging findings. Advanced MRI techniques used for evaluating pediatric brain tumors include diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, perfusion imaging, spectroscopy, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging. Because pediatric brain tumors differ from adult counterparts in various aspects, MRI protocols should be designed to achieve maximal clinical benefits in pediatric brain tumors. In this study, we review advanced MRI techniques and interpretation algorithms for pediatric brain tumors.

  5. Pediatric brain MRI in neurofibromatosis type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentzel, Hans-J.; Fitzek, Clemens; Vogt, Susanna; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Kaiser, Werner A. [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena (Germany); Seidel, Joerg; Eichhorn, Annegret; Zintl, Felix [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Pediatrics, Jena (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) is the most common of the phakomatoses, with a prevalence of 1 in 3-4,000. Many organ systems can be affected. In addition to multiple peripheral neurofibromas, NF I predisposed to CNS tumors including optic glioma, astrocytoma and plexiform neurofibroma. The purpose of this pictorial review is to illustrate characteristic brain MR imaging lesions in children with NF I and to give some recommendations about diagnostic imaging procedures in children suffering from NF I. Typical findings in brain MRI are hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted images, so-called unknown bright objects, which may be useful as an additional imaging criterion for NF I. Contrast administration is necessary in MR studies to maximize tumor detection and characterization, to add confidence to the diagnosis of benign probable myelin vacuolization, and to document stability of neoplasm on follow-up examinations. We recommend to perform serial MR imaging in children every 12 months. The frequency of follow-up in children with known brain tumors will vary with the tumor grade, biological activity and treatment. (orig.)

  6. Structural and Functional MRI Differences in Master Sommeliers: A Pilot Study on Expertise in the Brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banks, Sarah J; Sreenivasan, Karthik R; Weintraub, David M; Baldock, Deanna; Noback, Michael; Pierce, Meghan E; Frasnelli, Johannes; James, Jay; Beall, Erik; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Cordes, Dietmar; Leger, Gabriel C

    2016-01-01

    .... Sommeliers are experts in wine and thus in olfaction. We assessed differences in Master Sommeliers' brains, compared with controls, in structure and also in functional response to olfactory and visual judgment tasks...

  7. Biocytin-derived MRI contrast agent for longitudinal brain connectivity studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mishra, Anurag; Schüz, Almut; Engelmann, Jörn; Beyerlein, Michael; Logothetis, Nikos K; Canals, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    .... We present data on the functionalization of biocytin, a well-known neuronal tract tracer, and demonstrate the validity of the approach by showing brain networks of cortical connectivity in live rats...

  8. Tracking brain arousal fluctuations with fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Catie; Leopold, David A.; Schölvinck, Marieke Louise; Mandelkow, Hendrik; Picchioni, Dante; Liu, Xiao; Ye, Frank Q.; Turchi, Janita N.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in brain activity accompanying shifts in vigilance and arousal can interfere with the study of other intrinsic and task-evoked characteristics of brain function. However, the difficulty of tracking and modeling the arousal state during functional MRI (fMRI) typically precludes the assessment of arousal-dependent influences on fMRI signals. Here we combine fMRI, electrophysiology, and the monitoring of eyelid behavior to demonstrate an approach for tracking continuous variations in arousal level from fMRI data. We first characterize the spatial distribution of fMRI signal fluctuations that track a measure of behavioral arousal; taking this pattern as a template, and using the local field potential as a simultaneous and independent measure of cortical activity, we observe that the time-varying expression level of this template in fMRI data provides a close approximation of electrophysiological arousal. We discuss the potential benefit of these findings for increasing the sensitivity of fMRI as a cognitive and clinical biomarker. PMID:27051064

  9. Microvascular brain pathology on high resolution MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veluw, S.J. van

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common finding in the aging human brain and is associated with stroke, cognitive decline, and dementia. On autopsy, SVD encompasses pathological processes affecting small arteries and arterioles. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects the consequences of

  10. Imaging brain microstructure with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B; Nilsson, Markus

    2018-01-01

    This article gives an overview of microstructure imaging of the brain with diffusion MRI and reviews the state of the art. The microstructure-imaging paradigm aims to estimate and map microscopic properties of tissue using a model that links these properties to the voxel scale MR signal. Imaging...

  11. Evaluation of brain ageing: a quantitative longitudinal MRI study over 7 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracien, René-Maxime; Nürnberger, Lucas; Hok, Pavel; Hof, Stephanie-Michelle; Reitz, Sarah C; Rüb, Udo; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Hilker-Roggendorf, Rüdiger; Klein, Johannes C; Deichmann, Ralf; Baudrexel, Simon

    2017-04-01

    T1 relaxometry is a promising tool for the assessment of microstructural changes during brain ageing. Previous cross-sectional studies demonstrated increasing T1 values in white and decreasing T1 values in grey matter over the lifetime. However, these findings have not yet been confirmed on the basis of a longitudinal study. In this longitudinal study over 7 years, T1 relaxometry was used to investigate the dynamics of age-related microstructural changes in older healthy subjects. T1 mapping was performed in 17 healthy subjects (range 51-77 years) at baseline and after 7 years. Advanced cortical and white matter segmentation was used to determine mean T1 values in the cortex and white matter. The analysis revealed a decrease of mean cortical T1 values over 7 years, the rate of T1 reduction being more prominent in subjects with higher age. T1 decreases were predominantly localized in the lateral frontal, parietal and temporal cortex. In contrast, mean white matter T1 values remained stable. T1 mapping is shown to be sensitive to age-related microstructural changes in healthy ageing subjects in a longitudinal setting. Data of a cohort in late adulthood and the senescence period demonstrate a decrease of cortical T1 values over 7 years, most likely reflecting decreasing water content and increased iron concentrations. • T1 mapping is sensitive to age-related microstructural changes in a longitudinal setting. • T1 decreases were predominantly localized in the lateral frontal, parietal and temporal cortex. • The rate of T1 reduction was more prominent in subjects with higher age. • These changes most likely reflect decreasing cortical water and increasing iron concentrations.

  12. Investigating brain responses to section endings in tonal, classical and rhythmic music : an fMRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Brun, Mona

    2010-01-01

    Our overall aim was to examine brain responses to different experiences of time in music with a particular focus on the question of how we experience large-scale music form. The present experiment was aimed at investigating the neural correlates to experiencing section endings in teleological (goal-directed) music as well as in rhythmic (groove-based) music. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on 14 human participants. Comparing transition points to continuous sections of ...

  13. Task modulation of brain responses in visual word recognition as studied using EEG/MEG and fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan eChen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Do task demands change the way we extract information from a stimulus, or only how we use this information for decision making? In order to answer this question for visual word recognition, we used EEG/MEG as well as fMRI to determine the latency ranges and spatial areas in which brain activation to words is modulated by task demands. We presented letter strings in three tasks (lexical decision, semantic decision, silent reading, and measured combined EEG/MEG as well as fMRI responses in two separate experiments. EEG/MEG sensor statistics revealed the earliest reliable task effects at around 150 ms, which were localized, using minimum norm estimates (MNE, to left inferior temporal, right anterior temporal and left precentral gyri. Later task effects (250 ms and 480 ms occurred in left middle and inferior temporal gyri. Our fMRI data showed task effects in left inferior frontal, posterior superior temporal and precentral cortices. Although there was some correspondence between fMRI and EEG/MEG localizations, discrepancies predominated. We suggest that fMRI may be less sensitive to the early short-lived processes revealed in our EEG/MEG data. Our results indicate that task-specific processes start to penetrate word recognition already at 150 ms, suggesting that early word processing is flexible and intertwined with decision making.

  14. Improved T1 mapping by motion correction and template based B1 correction in 3T MRI brain studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Yao, Jianhua; Lee, Christabel; Pang, Yuxi; Baker, Eva; Butman, John; Thomasson, David

    2009-02-01

    Accurate estimation of relaxation time T1 from MRI images is increasingly important for some clinical applications. Low noise, high resolution, fast and accurate T1 maps from MRI images of the brain can be performed using a dual flip angle method. However, accuracy is limited by the scanners ability to deliver the prescribed flip angle due to the B1 inhomogeneity, particularly at high field strengths (e.g. 3T). One of the most accurate methods to correct that inhomogeneity is to acquire a subject-specific B1 map. However, since B1 map acquisition takes up precious scanning time and most retrospective studies do not have B1 map, it would be desirable to perform that correction from a template. For this work a dual repetition time method was used for B1 map acquisition in five normal subjects. Inaccuracies due to misregistration of acquired T1-weighted images were corrected by rigid registration, and the effects of misalignment were compared to those of B1 inhomogeneity. T1-intensity histograms were produced and three-Gaussian curves were fitted for every fully-, partially- and non-corrected histogram in order to estimate and compare the white and gray matter peaks. In addition, in order to reduce the scanning time we designed a template based correction strategy. Images from different subjects were aligned using a twelve-parameter affine registration, and B1 maps were aligned according to that transformation. Recomputed T1 maps showed a significant improvement with respect to non-corrected ones. These results are very promising and have the potential for clinical application.

  15. Altered Topological Properties of Brain Networks in Social Anxiety Disorder: A Resting-state Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongru; Qiu, Changjian; Meng, Yajing; Yuan, Minlan; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Zhengjia; Li, Yuchen; Huang, Xiaoqi; Gong, Qiyong; Lui, Su; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies involving connectome analysis including graph theory have yielded potential biomarkers for mental disorders. In this study, we aimed to investigate the differences of resting-state network between patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and healthy controls (HCs), as well as to distinguish between individual subjects using topological properties. In total, 42 SAD patients and the same number of HCs underwent resting functional MRI, and the topological organization of the whole-brain functional network was calculated using graph theory. Compared with the controls, the patients showed a decrease in 49 positive connections. In the topological analysis, the patients showed an increase in the area under the curve (AUC) of the global shortest path length of the network (Lp) and a decrease in the AUC of the global clustering coefficient of the network (Cp). Furthermore, the AUCs of Lp and Cp were used to effectively discriminate the individual SAD patients from the HCs with high accuracy. This study revealed that the neural networks of the SAD patients showed changes in topological characteristics, and these changes were prominent not only in both groups but also at the individual level. This study provides a new perspective for the identification of patients with SAD. PMID:28266518

  16. Quantitative representations of an exaggerated anxiety response in the brain of female spider phobics-a parametric fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilverstand, Anna; Sorger, Bettina; Kaemingk, Anita; Goebel, Rainer

    2017-06-01

    We employed a novel parametric spider picture set in the context of a parametric fMRI anxiety provocation study, designed to tease apart brain regions involved in threat monitoring from regions representing an exaggerated anxiety response in spider phobics. For the stimulus set, we systematically manipulated perceived proximity of threat by varying a depicted spider's context, size, and posture. All stimuli were validated in a behavioral rating study (phobics n = 20; controls n = 20; all female). An independent group participated in a subsequent fMRI anxiety provocation study (phobics n = 7; controls n = 7; all female), in which we compared a whole-brain categorical to a whole-brain parametric analysis. Results demonstrated that the parametric analysis provided a richer characterization of the functional role of the involved brain networks. In three brain regions-the mid insula, the dorsal anterior cingulate, and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex-activation was linearly modulated by perceived proximity specifically in the spider phobia group, indicating a quantitative representation of an exaggerated anxiety response. In other regions (e.g., the amygdala), activation was linearly modulated in both groups, suggesting a functional role in threat monitoring. Prefrontal regions, such as dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, were activated during anxiety provocation but did not show a stimulus-dependent linear modulation in either group. The results confirm that brain regions involved in anxiety processing hold a quantitative representation of a pathological anxiety response and more generally suggest that parametric fMRI designs may be a very powerful tool for clinical research in the future, particularly when developing novel brain-based interventions (e.g., neurofeedback training). Hum Brain Mapp 38:3025-3038, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Brain network involved in visual processing of movement stimuli used in upper limb robotic training: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nocchi Federico

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of robot-mediated therapy and virtual reality in neurorehabilitation is becoming of increasing importance. However, there is limited information, using neuroimaging, on the neural networks involved in training with these technologies. This study was intended to detect the brain network involved in the visual processing of movement during robotic training. The main aim was to investigate the existence of a common cerebral network able to assimilate biological (human upper limb and non-biological (abstract object movements, hence testing the suitability of the visual non-biological feedback provided by the InMotion2 Robot. Methods A visual functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI task was administered to 22 healthy subjects. The task required observation and retrieval of motor gestures and of the visual feedback used in robotic training. Functional activations of both biological and non-biological movements were examined to identify areas activated in both conditions, along with differential activity in upper limb vs. abstract object trials. Control of response was also tested by administering trials with congruent and incongruent reaching movements. Results The observation of upper limb and abstract object movements elicited similar patterns of activations according to a caudo-rostral pathway for the visual processing of movements (including specific areas of the occipital, temporal, parietal, and frontal lobes. Similarly, overlapping activations were found for the subsequent retrieval of the observed movement. Furthermore, activations of frontal cortical areas were associated with congruent trials more than with the incongruent ones. Conclusions This study identified the neural pathway associated with visual processing of movement stimuli used in upper limb robot-mediated training and investigated the brain’s ability to assimilate abstract object movements with human motor gestures. In both conditions

  18. A Study on the Application of Fuzzy Information Seeded Region Growing in Brain MRI Tissue Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuin-Mu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After long-term clinical trials, MRI has been proven to be used in humans harmlessly, and it is popularly used in medical diagnosis. Although MR is highly sensitive, it provides abundant organization information. Therefore, how to transform the multi-spectral images which is easier to be used for doctor’s clinical diagnosis. In this thesis, the fuzzy bidirectional edge detection method is used to solve conventional SRG problem of growing order in the initial seed stages. In order to overcome the problems of the different regions, although it is the same Euclidean distance for region growing and merging process stages, we present the peak detection method to improve them. The standard deviation target generation process (SDTGP is applied to guarantee the regions merging process does not cause over- or undersegmentation. Experimental results reveal that FISRG segments a multispectral MR image much more effectively than FAST and K-means.

  19. Effects of Scene Properties and Emotional Valence on Brain Activations: A Fixation-Related fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Kuniecki

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Temporal and spatial characteristics of fixations are affected by image properties, including high-level scene characteristics, such as object-background composition, and low-level physical characteristics, such as image clarity. The influence of these factors is modulated by the emotional content of an image. Here, we aimed to establish whether brain correlates of fixations reflect these modulatory effects. To this end, we simultaneously scanned participants and measured their eye movements, while presenting negative and neutral images in various image clarity conditions, with controlled object-background composition. The fMRI data were analyzed using a novel fixation-based event-related (FIBER method, which allows the tracking of brain activity linked to individual fixations. The results revealed that fixating an emotional object was linked to greater deactivation in the right lingual gyrus than fixating the background of an emotional image, while no difference between object and background was found for neutral images. We suggest that deactivation in the lingual gyrus might be linked to inhibition of saccade execution. This was supported by fixation duration results, which showed that in the negative condition, fixations falling on the object were longer than those falling on the background. Furthermore, increase in the image clarity was correlated with fixation-related activity within the lateral occipital complex, the structure linked to object recognition. This correlation was significantly stronger for negative images, presumably due to greater deployment of attention towards emotional objects. Our eye-tracking results are in line with these observations, showing that the chance of fixating an object rose faster for negative images over neutral ones as the level of noise decreased. Overall, our study demonstrated that emotional value of an image changes the way that low and high-level scene properties affect the characteristics of

  20. Clinical applications of 7 T MRI in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolk, Anja G. van der, E-mail: A.G.vanderKolk@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Hendrikse, Jeroen, E-mail: J.Hendrikse@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M., E-mail: J.J.M.Zwanenburg@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Visser, Fredy, E-mail: F.Visser-2@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Luijten, Peter R., E-mail: P.Luijten@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    This review illustrates current applications and possible future directions of 7 Tesla (7 T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the field of brain MRI, in clinical studies as well as clinical practice. With its higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) compared to lower field strengths, high resolution, contrast-rich images can be obtained of diverse pathologies, like multiple sclerosis (MS), brain tumours, aging-related changes and cerebrovascular diseases. In some of these diseases, additional pathophysiological information can be gained compared to lower field strengths. Because of clear depiction of small anatomical details, and higher lesion conspicuousness, earlier diagnosis and start of treatment of brain diseases may become possible. Furthermore, additional insight into the pathogenesis of brain diseases obtained with 7 T MRI could be the basis for new treatment developments. However, imaging at high field comes with several limitations, like inhomogeneous transmit fields, a higher specific absorption rate (SAR) and, currently, extensive contraindications for patient scanning. Future studies will be aimed at assessing the advantages and disadvantages of 7 T MRI over lower field strengths in light of clinical applications, specifically the additional diagnostic and prognostic value of 7 T MRI.

  1. Visioning in the brain: an fMRI study of inspirational coaching and mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Anthony I; Boyatzis, Richard E; Khawaja, Masud S; Passarelli, Angela M; Leckie, Regina L

    2013-01-01

    Effective coaching and mentoring is crucial to the success of individuals and organizations, yet relatively little is known about its neural underpinnings. Coaching and mentoring to the Positive Emotional Attractor (PEA) emphasizes compassion for the individual's hopes and dreams and has been shown to enhance a behavioral change. In contrast, coaching to the Negative Emotional Attractor (NEA), by focusing on externally defined criteria for success and the individual's weaknesses in relation to them, does not show sustained change. We used fMRI to measure BOLD responses associated with these two coaching styles. We hypothesized that PEA coaching would be associated with increased global visual processing and with engagement of the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS), while the NEA coaching would involve greater engagement of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Regions showing more activity in PEA conditions included the lateral occipital cortex, superior temporal cortex, medial parietal, subgenual cingulate, nucleus accumbens, and left lateral prefrontal cortex. We relate these activations to visioning, PNS activity, and positive affect. Regions showing more activity in NEA conditions included medial prefrontal regions and right lateral prefrontal cortex. We relate these activations to SNS activity, self-trait attribution and negative affect.

  2. Mapping human whole-brain structural networks with diffusion MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patric Hagmann

    Full Text Available Understanding the large-scale structural network formed by neurons is a major challenge in system neuroscience. A detailed connectivity map covering the entire brain would therefore be of great value. Based on diffusion MRI, we propose an efficient methodology to generate large, comprehensive and individual white matter connectional datasets of the living or dead, human or animal brain. This non-invasive tool enables us to study the basic and potentially complex network properties of the entire brain. For two human subjects we find that their individual brain networks have an exponential node degree distribution and that their global organization is in the form of a small world.

  3. Moral competence and brain connectivity: a resting-state fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Wi Hoon; Prehn, Kristin; Fang, Zhuo; Korczykowski, Marc; Kable, Joseph W.; Rao, Hengyi; Robertson, Diana C.

    2016-01-01

    Moral competence (MC) refers to the ability to apply certain moral orientations in a consistent and differentiated manner when judging moral issues. People greatly differ in terms of MC, however, little is known about how these differences are implemented in the brain. To investigate this question, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and examined resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) in n=31 individuals with MC scores in the highest 15% of the population and n=33 individuals with MC scores in the lowest 15%, selected from a large sample of 730 Master of Business Administration (MBA) students. Compared to individuals with lower MC, individuals with higher MC showed greater amygdala-ventromedial prefrontal connectivity, which may reflect better ability to cope with emotional conflicts elicited by moral dilemmas. Moreover, individuals with higher MC showed less inter-network connectivity between the amygdalar and fronto-parietal networks, suggesting a more independent operation of these networks. Our findings provide novel insights into how individual differences in moral judgment are associated with RSFC in brain circuits related to emotion processing and cognitive control. PMID:27456537

  4. MRI findings in primary brain lymphoma in immunocompetent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nadhim Younis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Primary brain lymphoma is an extranodal aggressive intracranial neoplasm of lymphocytic origin originating and confined to the brain parenchyma and meninges. It is rare in immune competent patients, but its incidence is increasing. This retrospective study was conducted to record the MRI features of primary brain lymphoma at the time of diagnosis in immunocompetent patients. Methods: Of the 450 patients diagnosed with the brain tumor during a period of five years from 2008 to 2013, the clinical features and MRI findings of 16 cases of pathologically proven to be non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma were studied. All the patients were tested negative for HIV and there was no history of immune suppression drugs or any other chronic illness. All the patients were examined with MRI observing the tumor location, multifocality, signal intensity in different sequences, enhancement patterns, peritumoral edema, the presence of hemorrhage and calcification. Results: Of the 16 patients, including the monofocal and multifocal cases, 30 lesions exhibited. The mean age at diagnosis was 53 years. Nine patients (56.25% found to have a multifocal disease. In more than 75% of lesions, MRI was hypo to iso signal on T1 and T2. Mild to moderate perilesional edema, strong contrast enhancement and restricted diffusion were seen in all cases. The hemorrhagic tumor was noticed in four lesions (13.3%. No calcification and no leptomeningeal lesions were noted. The MRI images in post steroid therapy were studied within one month of treatment. Tumour regression was noticed in 21/30 (70%, stable in 3/30 (10% and progressing in 6/30 (20%. Conclusion: MRI is a reliable imaging technique in the management of patients with primary brain lymphoma. Early accurate diagnosis is crucial to avoid the unnecessary operation and shift patients from extensive surgery to chemoradiotherapy.

  5. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic.

  6. A cross-sectional MRI study of brain regional atrophy and clinical characteristics of temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Applying a cross-sectional design, we set out to further characterize the significance of extrahippocampal brain atrophy in a large sample of \\'sporadic\\' mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE+HS). By evaluating the influence of epilepsy chronicity on structural atrophy, this work represents an important step towards the characterization of MRI-based volumetric measurements as genetic endophenotypes for this condition. METHODS: Using an automated brain segmentation technique, MRI-based volume measurements of several brain regions were compared between 75 patients with \\'sporadic\\' MTLE+HS and 50 healthy controls. Applying linear regression models, we examined the relationship between structural atrophy and important clinical features of MTLE+HS, including disease duration, lifetime number of partial and generalized seizures, and history of initial precipitating insults (IPIs). RESULTS: Significant volume loss was detected in ipsilateral hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, and cerebral white matter (WM). In addition, contralateral hippocampal and bilateral cerebellar grey matter (GM) volume loss was observed in left MTLE+HS patients. Hippocampal, amygdalar, and cerebral WM volume loss correlated with duration of epilepsy. This correlation was stronger in patients with prior IPIs history. Further, cerebral WM, cerebellar GM, and contralateral hippocampal volume loss correlated with lifetime number of generalized seizures. CONCLUSION: Our findings confirm that multiple brain regions beyond the hippocampus are involved in the pathogenesis of MTLE+HS. IPIs are an important factor influencing the rate of regional atrophy but our results also support a role for processes related to epilepsy chronicity. The consequence of epilepsy chronicity on candidate brain regions has important implications on their application as genetic endophenotypes.

  7. Brain MRI findings of neuropsychiatric lupus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang-Wook; Kwon, Bae Ju; Lee, Seung-Ro; Hahm, Chang-Kok; Moon, Won Jin; Jeon, Eui Yong; Bae, Sang-Chul [Hanyang Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    To evaluate the brain MRI findings in patients with neuropsychiatric lupus. In 26 patients (M:F = 2:24 ; aged 9-48 years) in whom the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus was clinically or pathologically proven and in whom neuropsychiatric lupus was also clinically diagnosed, the findings of brain MRI were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were analyzed with regard to the distribution, location, size and number of lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction, the presence of cerebral atrophy, and the extent and degree of brain parenchymal and intravascular enhancement. The most common MRI findings were lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction occurring in 18 patients (69%), and located within deep periventricular white matter (n=10), subcortical white matter (n=8), the cerebral cortex (n=7), basal ganglia (n=7), or brain stem or cerebellum (n=2). The lesions were single (n=3) or multiple (n=15), and in 17 patients were less than 1cm in diameter in regions other than the cerebral cortex. In six of these patients, lesions of 1-4cm in diameter in this region were combined, and one occurred in the cerebral cortex only. Cerebral atrophy was seen in 16 patients (62%), in ten of whom there was no past history of treatment with steroids for more than six months. In 15 patients (58%), contrast-enhanced MR image revealed diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia or intravascular enhancement. In no case were MRI findings normal. The primary mainfestations of neuropsychiatric lupus are multifocal ischemia or infarctions in the cerebral cortex, and subcortical and deep white matter, and the cerebral atrophy. Contrast-enhanced MR images also demonstrated diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia and intravascular enhancement, both thought to be related to the congestion due to the stagnation of cerebral blood flow.

  8. Brain palpation from physiological vibrations using MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Zorgani, Ali; Souchon, Rémi; Dinh, Au-Hoang; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Ménager, Jean-Michel; Lounis, Samir; Rouvière, Olivier; Catheline, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly supposed that noise obscures but does not contain useful information. However, in wave physics and especially, seismology, scientists developed some tools known as “noise correlation” to extract useful information and construct images from the random vibrations of a medium. Living tissues are full of unexploited vibrations as well. In this manuscript, we show that noise correlation techniques in the brain using MRI can conduct to a tomography related to the stiffness that physi...

  9. MRI-based quantification of brain damage in cerebrovascular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bresser, J.H.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Brain diseases can lead to diverse structural abnormalities that can be assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. These abnormalities can be quantified by (semi-)automated techniques. The studies described in this thesis aimed to optimize and apply cerebral quantification techniques in

  10. Patterns of brain activation when mothers view their own child and dog: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke E Stoeckel

    Full Text Available Neural substrates underlying the human-pet relationship are largely unknown. We examined fMRI brain activation patterns as mothers viewed images of their own child and dog and an unfamiliar child and dog. There was a common network of brain regions involved in emotion, reward, affiliation, visual processing and social cognition when mothers viewed images of both their child and dog. Viewing images of their child resulted in brain activity in the midbrain (ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra involved in reward/affiliation, while a more posterior cortical brain activation pattern involving fusiform gyrus (visual processing of faces and social cognition characterized a mother's response to her dog. Mothers also rated images of their child and dog as eliciting similar levels of excitement (arousal and pleasantness (valence, although the difference in the own vs. unfamiliar child comparison was larger than the own vs. unfamiliar dog comparison for arousal. Valence ratings of their dog were also positively correlated with ratings of the attachment to their dog. Although there are similarities in the perceived emotional experience and brain function associated with the mother-child and mother-dog bond, there are also key differences that may reflect variance in the evolutionary course and function of these relationships.

  11. Central pulse pressure is a determinant of heart and brain remodeling in the elderly: a quantitative MRI and PET pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Antoine; van der Gucht, Axel; Guedj, Eric; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Hossu, Gabriela; Mandry, Damien; Morel, Olivier; Perrin, Mathieu; Fay, Renaud; Benetos, Athanase; Joly, Laure

    2015-07-01

    The sustained elevation of blood pressure (BP) and especially of central pulse pressure (cPP) leads to heart and brain damage. This pilot study was aimed to precise the relationships between peripheral and central BP levels, and the remodeling of heart and brain as objectively quantified by cardiac MRI and brain F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET imaging in the elderly. Twenty-eight apparently healthy elderly individuals (66-85 years old, 14 women) were prospectively recruited and allocated into two half groups, one with and one without hypertension, and all were referred for the quantitative determinations of peripheral and central BP using applanation tonometry, indexed left ventricular mass (per m of body surface area) using cardiac MRI, and brain metabolism with a voxel-based analysis of FDG-PET images adjusted for age and sex. Indexed left ventricular mass, reflecting cardiac remodeling, was correlated with the overall pressure variables involving both peripheral and central levels of systolic and pulse pressure (all P ≤ 0.001). By contrast, brain metabolism was significantly correlated with only cPP (P < 0.02). A cPP of at least 50  mmHg was associated with both a lower metabolism in frontal areas (P = 0.005) and a higher indexed left ventricular mass (P = 0.03). This pilot study suggests that, when quantified by MRI and PET imaging, left ventricular mass and brain metabolism of elderly individuals are related to the cPP and to the 50  mmHg threshold, corresponding to what has previously been documented for the risk of cardiovascular event.

  12. Lateralization of Brain Networks and Clinical Severity in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A HARDI Diffusion MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Eugenia; Calderoni, Sara; Gaglianese, Anna; Pannek, Kerstin; Mazzotti, Sara; Rose, Stephen; Scelfo, Danilo; Tosetti, Michela; Muratori, Filippo; Cioni, Giovanni; Guzzetta, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Recent diffusion tensor imaging studies in adolescents and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have reported a loss or an inversion of the typical left-right lateralization in fronto-temporal regions crucial for sociocommunicative skills. No studies explored atypical lateralization in toddlers and its correlation with clinical severity of ASD. We recruited a cohort of 20 subjects aged 36 months or younger receiving a first clinical diagnosis of ASD (15 males; age range 20-36 months). Patients underwent diffusion MRI (High-Angular-Resolution Diffusion Imaging protocol). Data from cortical parcellation were combined with tractography to obtain a connection matrix and diffusion indexes (DI ) including mean fractional anisotropy (DFA ), number of tracts (DNUM ), and total tract length (DTTL ). A laterality index was generated for each measure, and then correlated with the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (ADOS-G) total score. Laterality indexes of DFA were significantly correlated with ADOS-G total scores only in two intrafrontal connected areas (correlation was positive in one case and negative in the other). Laterality indexes of DTTL and DNUM showed significant negative correlations (P < 0.05) in six connected areas, mainly fronto-temporal. This study provides first evidence of a significant correlation between brain lateralization of diffusion indexes and clinical severity in toddlers with a first diagnosis of ASD. Significant correlations mainly involved regions within the fronto-temporal circuits, known to be crucial for sociocommunicative skills. It is of interest that all correlations but one were negative, suggesting an inversion of the typical left-right asymmetry in subjects with most severe clinical impairment. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Indices of adrenal deficiency involved in brain plasticity and functional control reorganization in hemodialysis patients with polysulfone membrane: BOLD-fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaïch, Rachida; Boujraf, Saïd; Benzagmout, Mohammed; Maaroufi, Mustapha; Housni, Abdelkhalek; Batta, Fatima; Tizniti, Siham; Magoul, Rabia; Sqalli, Tarik

    2016-06-01

    This work purpose was to estimate the implication of suspected adrenal function deficiencies, which was influenced by oxidative stress (OS) that are generating brain plasticity, and reorganization of the functional control. This phenomenon was revealed in two-hemodialysis patients described in this paper. Blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) revealed a significant activation of the motor cortex. Hemodialysis seems to originate an inflammatory state of the cerebral tissue reflected by increased OS, while expected to decrease since hemodialysis eliminates free radicals responsible for OS. Considering adrenal function deficiencies, sensitivity to OS and assessed hyponatremia and hypercalcemia, adrenal function deficiencies is strongly suspected in both patients. This probably contributes to amplify brain plasticity and a reorganization of functional control after hemodialysis that is compared to earlier reported studies. Brain plasticity and functional control reorganization was revealed by BOLD-fMRI with a remarkable sensitivity. Brain plastic changes are originated by elevated OS associating indices of adrenal function deficiencies. These results raise important issues about adrenal functional deficiencies impact on brain plasticity in chronic hemodialysis-patients. This motivates more global studies of plasticity induced factors in this category of patients including adrenal functional deficiencies and OS.

  14. Multiresolution texture models for brain tumor segmentation in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Ahmed, Shaheen; Hossen, Jakir

    2011-01-01

    In this study we discuss different types of texture features such as Fractal Dimension (FD) and Multifractional Brownian Motion (mBm) for estimating random structures and varying appearance of brain tissues and tumors in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We use different selection techniques including KullBack - Leibler Divergence (KLD) for ranking different texture and intensity features. We then exploit graph cut, self organizing maps (SOM) and expectation maximization (EM) techniques to fuse selected features for brain tumors segmentation in multimodality T1, T2, and FLAIR MRI. We use different similarity metrics to evaluate quality and robustness of these selected features for tumor segmentation in MRI for real pediatric patients. We also demonstrate a non-patient-specific automated tumor prediction scheme by using improved AdaBoost classification based on these image features.

  15. Integrating MRI brain imaging studies of pre-reading children with current theories of developmental dyslexia: A review and quantitative meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermosten, Maaike; Hoeft, Fumiko; Norton, Elizabeth S

    2016-08-01

    The neurobiological substrates that cause people with dyslexia to experience difficulty in acquiring accurate and fluent reading skills are still largely unknown. Although structural and functional brain anomalies associated with dyslexia have been reported in adults and school-age children, these anomalies may represent differences in reading experience rather than the etiology of dyslexia. Conducting MRI studies of pre-readers at risk for dyslexia is one approach that enables us to identify brain alterations that exist before differences in reading experience emerge. The current review summarizes MRI studies that examine brain differences associated with risk for dyslexia in children before reading instruction and meta-analyzes these studies. In order to link these findings with current etiological theories of dyslexia, we focus on studies that take a modular perspective rather than a network approach. Although some of the observed differences in pre-readers at risk for dyslexia may still be shaped by language experiences during the first years of life, such studies underscore the existence of reading-related brain anomalies prior to reading onset and could eventually lead to earlier and more precise diagnosis and treatment of dyslexia.

  16. Reproducibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI in the study of brain gliomas: a comparison of data obtained using different commercial software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Gian Marco; Castellano, Antonella; Altabella, Luisa; Iadanza, Antonella; Cadioli, Marcello; Falini, Andrea; Anzalone, Nicoletta

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE) are useful tools in the diagnosis and follow-up of brain gliomas; nevertheless, both techniques leave the open issue of data reproducibility. We evaluated the reproducibility of data obtained using two different commercial software for perfusion maps calculation and analysis, as one of the potential sources of variability can be the software itself. DSC and DCE analyses from 20 patients with gliomas were tested for both the intrasoftware (as intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility) and the intersoftware reproducibility, as well as the impact of different postprocessing choices [vascular input function (VIF) selection and deconvolution algorithms] on the quantification of perfusion biomarkers plasma volume (Vp), volume transfer constant (K trans ) and rCBV. Data reproducibility was evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. For all the biomarkers, the intra- and interobserver reproducibility resulted in almost perfect agreement in each software, whereas for the intersoftware reproducibility the value ranged from 0.311 to 0.577, suggesting fair to moderate agreement; Bland-Altman analysis showed high dispersion of data, thus confirming these findings. Comparisons of different VIF estimation methods for DCE biomarkers resulted in ICC of 0.636 for K trans and 0.662 for Vp; comparison of two deconvolution algorithms in DSC resulted in an ICC of 0.999. The use of single software ensures very good intraobserver and interobservers reproducibility. Caution should be taken when comparing data obtained using different software or different postprocessing within the same software, as reproducibility is not guaranteed anymore.

  17. Brain unidentified bright objects ("UBO") in systemic lupus erythematosus: sometimes they come back. A study of microembolism by cMRI and Transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, A; Padovan, M; Azzini, C; De Vito, A; Trotta, F; Govoni, M

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this report are to assess the occurrence of microembolic signals (MES) detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with (NPSLE) and without (SLE) neuropsychiatric involvement, and to verify the correlation between MES, clinical characteristics, especially the patent foramen ovale (PFO), and the presence of punctuate T2-hyperintense white matter lesions (WMHLs) detected by conventional magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI). A TCD registration to detect MES from the middle cerebral artery was carried out in SLE and NPSLE patients after exclusion of aortic and/or carotid atheromatous disease. In all patients conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) and transesophageal echocardiography were performed. Patients were stratified in two groups, with and without WMHLs, and compared. Twenty-three SLE patients (16 NPSLE and seven SLE) were enrolled in the study. Overall MES were detected in 12 patients (52.1%), WHMLs were detectable in 15 patients (13 NPSLE and two SLE) while eight patients had normal cMRI (three NPSLE and five SLE). Matching TCD ultrasound and neuroimaging data, MES were detected in 10 (nine NPSLE and one SLE) out of 15 patients with WHMLs and in only two out of eight patients (two NPSLE and six SLE) with normal cMRI, both with NP involvement. A PFO was confirmed in all cases of MES detection. MES are frequent findings in SLE patients, especially in those with focal WMHLs detected by cMRI and correlating with PFO. These findings should be taken into account and suggest caution in the interpretation of cMRI pictures along with a careful evaluation of MES in patients with cMRI abnormalities that should be included in the workup of SLE patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Pathological and incidental findings on brain MRI in a single-center study of 229 consecutive girls with early or precocious puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Signe Sloth; Aksglaede, Lise; Mouritsen, Annette

    2012-01-01

    Central precocious puberty may result from organic brain lesions, but is most frequently of idiopathic origin. Clinical or biochemical factors which could predict a pathological brain MRI in girls with CPP have been searched for. With the recent decline in age at pubertal onset among US...... and European girls, it has been suggested that only girls with CPP below 6 years of age should have brain MRI performed....

  19. Brain structure differences among male schizophrenic patients with history of serious violent acts: an MRI voxel-based morphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Noriomi; Kashiwagi, Hiroko; Ota, Miho; Ishikawa, Masanori; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Sato, Noriko; Hirabayashi, Naotsugu; Ota, Toshio

    2017-03-21

    The biological underpinnings of serious violent behaviors in patients with schizophrenia remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics of brain morphometry in patients with schizophrenia and a history of serious violent acts, who were being treated under relatively new legislation for offenders with mental illness in Japan where their relevant action should be strongly associated with their mental illness. We also investigated whether morphometric changes would depend on types of serious violent actions or not. Thirty-four male patients with schizophrenia who were hospitalized after committing serious violent acts were compared with 23 male outpatients or inpatients with schizophrenia and no history of violent acts. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with voxel-based morphometry was used to assess gray matter volume. Additionally, patients with violent acts were divided based on whether their relevant actions were premeditated or not. The regional volumes of these two groups were compared to those of the control patient group. Patients with schizophrenia and a history of serious violent acts showed significantly smaller regional volumes of the right inferior temporal area expanded to the middle temporal gyrus and the temporal pole, and the right insular area compared to patients without a history of violence. Patients with premeditated violent acts showed significantly smaller regional volumes of the right inferior temporal area, the right insular area, the left planum polare area including the insula, and the bilateral precuneus area including the posterior cingulate gyrus than those without a history of violence, whereas patients with impulsive violent acts showed significantly smaller volumes of only the right inferior temporal area compared to those without a history of violence. Patients with schizophrenia and a history of serious violent acts showed structural differences in some brain regions compared to those with

  20. Structural and functional correlates of visual field asymmetry in the human brain by diffusion kurtosis MRI and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Caitlin; Ho, Leon C; Murphy, Matthew C; Conner, Ian P; Wollstein, Gadi; Cham, Rakie; Chan, Kevin C

    2016-11-09

    Human visual performance has been observed to show superiority in localized regions of the visual field across many classes of stimuli. However, the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to determine whether the visual information processing in the human brain is dependent on the location of stimuli in the visual field and the corresponding neuroarchitecture using blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion kurtosis MRI, respectively, in 15 healthy individuals at 3 T. In fMRI, visual stimulation to the lower hemifield showed stronger brain responses and larger brain activation volumes than the upper hemifield, indicative of the differential sensitivity of the human brain across the visual field. In diffusion kurtosis MRI, the brain regions mapping to the lower visual field showed higher mean kurtosis, but not fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity compared with the upper visual field. These results suggested the different distributions of microstructural organization across visual field brain representations. There was also a strong positive relationship between diffusion kurtosis and fMRI responses in the lower field brain representations. In summary, this study suggested the structural and functional brain involvements in the asymmetry of visual field responses in humans, and is important to the neurophysiological and psychological understanding of human visual information processing.

  1. Training in the adolescent brain : An fMRI training study on divergent thinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleibeuker, S.W.; Stevenson, C.E.; van der Aar, L.; Overgaauw, S.; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C.; Crone, E.A.

    Prior research suggests that adolescence is a time of enhanced sensitivity for practice and learning. In this study we tested the neural correlates of divergent thinking training in 15-to 16-year-old adolescents relative to an age-matched active control group. All participants performed an

  2. Individual Differences in Mathematical Competence Modulate Brain Responses to Arithmetic Errors: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Daniel; Grabner, Roland H.; Koschutnig, Karl; Reishofer, Gernot; Ebner, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Data from both neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have implicated the left inferior parietal cortex in calculation. Comparatively less attention has been paid to the neural responses associated with the commission of calculation errors and how the processing of arithmetic errors is modulated by individual differences in mathematical…

  3. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhri, Asim F. [Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Siddiqui, Adeel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); St. Jude Children' s Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  4. Value of repeat brain MRI in children with focal epilepsy and negative findings on initial MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Tae Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Jee Hun; Yoo, So Young; Hwang, Sook Min; Lee, Mun Hyang [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the value of repeat brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying potential epileptogenic lesions in children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy. Our Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study and waived the requirement for informed consent. During a 15-year period, 257 children (148 boys and 109 girls) with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy were included. After re-evaluating both initial and repeat MRIs, positive results at repeat MRI were classified into potential epileptogenic lesions (malformation of cortical development and hippocampal sclerosis) and other abnormalities. Contributing factors for improved lesion conspicuity of the initially overlooked potential epileptogenic lesions were analyzed and classified into lesion factors and imaging factors. Repeat MRI was positive in 21% (55/257) and negative in 79% cases (202/257). Of the positive results, potential epileptogenic lesions comprised 49% (27/55) and other abnormalities comprised 11% of the cases (28/257). Potential epileptogenic lesions included focal cortical dysplasia (n = 11), hippocampal sclerosis (n = 10), polymicrogyria (n = 2), heterotopic gray matter (n = 2), microlissencephaly (n = 1), and cortical tumor (n = 1). Of these, seven patients underwent surgical resection. Contributing factors for new diagnoses were classified as imaging factors alone (n = 6), lesion factors alone (n = 2), both (n = 18), and neither (n = 1). Repeat MRI revealed positive results in 21% of the children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy, with 50% of the positive results considered as potential epileptogenic lesions. Enhanced MRI techniques or considering the chronological changes of lesions on MRI may improve the diagnostic yield for identification of potential epileptogenic lesions on repeat MRI.

  5. Convergent Findings of Altered Functional and Structural Brain Connectivity in Individuals with High Functioning Autism: A Multimodal MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sophia; Keeser, Daniel; Samson, Andrea C; Kirsch, Valerie; Blautzik, Janusch; Grothe, Michel; Erat, Okan; Hegenloh, Michael; Coates, Ute; Reiser, Maximilian F; Hennig-Fast, Kristina; Meindl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue changes in autism spectrum disorders seem to be rather subtle and widespread than anatomically distinct. Therefore a multimodal, whole brain imaging technique appears to be an appropriate approach to investigate whether alterations in white and gray matter integrity relate to consistent changes in functional resting state connectivity in individuals with high functioning autism (HFA). We applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) to assess differences in brain structure and function between 12 individuals with HFA (mean age 35.5, SD 11.4, 9 male) and 12 healthy controls (mean age 33.3, SD 9.0, 8 male). Psychological measures of empathy and emotionality were obtained and correlated with the most significant DTI, VBM and fcMRI findings. We found three regions of convergent structural and functional differences between HFA participants and controls. The right temporo-parietal junction area and the left frontal lobe showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values along with decreased functional connectivity and a trend towards decreased gray matter volume. The bilateral superior temporal gyrus displayed significantly decreased functional connectivity that was accompanied by the strongest trend of gray matter volume decrease in the temporal lobe of HFA individuals. FA decrease in the right temporo-parietal region was correlated with psychological measurements of decreased emotionality. In conclusion, our results indicate common sites of structural and functional alterations in higher order association cortex areas and may therefore provide multimodal imaging support to the long-standing hypothesis of autism as a disorder of impaired higher-order multisensory integration.

  6. Convergent Findings of Altered Functional and Structural Brain Connectivity in Individuals with High Functioning Autism: A Multimodal MRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Mueller

    Full Text Available Brain tissue changes in autism spectrum disorders seem to be rather subtle and widespread than anatomically distinct. Therefore a multimodal, whole brain imaging technique appears to be an appropriate approach to investigate whether alterations in white and gray matter integrity relate to consistent changes in functional resting state connectivity in individuals with high functioning autism (HFA. We applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, voxel-based morphometry (VBM and resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI to assess differences in brain structure and function between 12 individuals with HFA (mean age 35.5, SD 11.4, 9 male and 12 healthy controls (mean age 33.3, SD 9.0, 8 male. Psychological measures of empathy and emotionality were obtained and correlated with the most significant DTI, VBM and fcMRI findings. We found three regions of convergent structural and functional differences between HFA participants and controls. The right temporo-parietal junction area and the left frontal lobe showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA values along with decreased functional connectivity and a trend towards decreased gray matter volume. The bilateral superior temporal gyrus displayed significantly decreased functional connectivity that was accompanied by the strongest trend of gray matter volume decrease in the temporal lobe of HFA individuals. FA decrease in the right temporo-parietal region was correlated with psychological measurements of decreased emotionality. In conclusion, our results indicate common sites of structural and functional alterations in higher order association cortex areas and may therefore provide multimodal imaging support to the long-standing hypothesis of autism as a disorder of impaired higher-order multisensory integration.

  7. Age-related changes in brain hemodynamics; A calibrated MRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vis, J B; Hendrikse, J; Bhogal, A

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging signal changes in response to stimuli have been used to evaluate age-related changes in neuronal activity. Contradictory results from these types of experiments have been attributed to differences in cerebral blood...... could potentially be explained by differences in EtCO2 . Regional CMRO2 was lower in older subjects. BOLD studies should take this into account when investigating age-related changes in neuronal activity....... flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2 ). To clarify the effects of these physiological parameters, we investigated the effect of age on baseline CBF and CMRO2 . MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty young (mean ± sd age, 28 ± 3 years), and 45 older subjects (66 ± 4 years) were investigated...

  8. In vitro MRI of brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rados, Marko [Croatian Institute for Brain Research, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Salata 12, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Clinical Hospital Center Zagreb, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Kispaticeva 12, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Judas, Milos [Croatian Institute for Brain Research, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Salata 12, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Kostovic, Ivica [Croatian Institute for Brain Research, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Salata 12, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)]. E-mail: ikostov@hiim.h

    2006-02-15

    In this review, we demonstrate the developmental appearance, structural features, and reorganization of transient cerebral zones and structures in the human fetal brain using a correlative histological and MRI analysis. The analysis of postmortem aldehyde-fixed specimens (age range: 10 postovulatory weeks to term) revealed that, at 10 postovulatory weeks, the cerebral wall already has a trilaminar appearance and consists of: (1) a ventricular zone of high cell-packing density; (2) an intermediate zone; (3) the cortical plate (in a stage of primary consolidation) with high MRI signal intensity. The anlage of the hippocampus is present as a prominent bulging in the thin limbic telencephalon. The early fetal telencephalon impar also contains the first commissural fibers and fornix bundles in the septal area. The ganglionic eminence is clearly visible as an expanded continuation of the proliferative ventricular zone. The basal ganglia showed an initial aggregation of cells. The most massive fiber system is in the hemispheric stalk, which is in continuity with thalamocortical fibers. During the mid-fetal period (15-22 postovulatory weeks), the typical fetal lamination pattern develops and the cerebral wall consists of the following zones: (a) a marginal zone (visible on MRI exclusively in the hippocampus); (b) the cortical plate with high cell-packing density and high MRI signal intensity; (c) the subplate zone, which is the most prominent zone rich in extracellular matrix and with a very low MRI signal intensity; (d) the intermediate zone (fetal 'white matter'); (e) the subventricular zone; (f) the periventricular fiber-rich zone; (g) the ventricular zone. The ganglionic eminence is still a very prominent structure with an intense proliferative activity. During the next period (22-26 postovulatory weeks), there is the developmental peak of transient MRI features, caused by the high content of hydrophyllic extracellular matrix in the subplate zone and the

  9. Functional Brain Activation Differences in Stuttering Identified with a Rapid fMRI Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Torrey; Kraft, Shelly Jo; Choo, Ai Leen; Sharma, Harish; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether brain activity related to the presence of stuttering can be identified with rapid functional MRI (fMRI) sequences that involved overt and covert speech processing tasks. The long-term goal is to develop sensitive fMRI approaches with developmentally appropriate tasks to identify deviant speech…

  10. Functional MRI brain imaging studies using the Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS) in a human volunteer topical capsaicin pain model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Ravikiran; Roberts, Katherine; Papadaki, Anastasia; McRobbie, Donald; Timmers, Maarten; Meert, Theo; Anand, Praveen

    2011-01-01

    Acute application of topical capsaicin produces spontaneous burning and stinging pain similar to that seen in some neuropathic states, with local hyperalgesia. Use of capsaicin applied topically or injected intradermally has been described as a model for neuropathic pain, with patterns of activation in brain regions assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography. The Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS) is a noninvasive clinically practical method of stimulating cutaneous A-delta nociceptors. In this study, topical capsaicin (1%) was applied to the left volar forearm for 15 minutes of twelve adult healthy human volunteers. fMRI scans and a visual analog pain score were recorded during CHEPS stimulation precapsaicin and postcapsaicin application. Following capsaicin application there was a significant increase in visual analog scale (mean ± standard error of the mean; precapsaicin 26.4 ± 5.3; postcapsaicin 48.9 ± 6.0; P < 0.0001). fMRI demonstrated an overall increase in areas of activation, with a significant increase in the contralateral insular signal (mean ± standard error of the mean; precapsaicin 0.434 ± 0.03; postcapsaicin 0.561 ± 0.07; P = 0.047). The authors of this paper recently published a study in which CHEPS-evoked A-delta cerebral potential amplitudes were found to be decreased postcapsaicin application. In patients with neuropathic pain, evoked pain and fMRI brain responses are typically increased, while A-delta evoked potential amplitudes are decreased. The protocol of recording fMRI following CHEPS stimulation after topical application of capsaicin could be combined with recording of evoked potentials to provide a simple, rapid, and robust volunteer model to develop novel drugs for neuropathic pain. PMID:22090805

  11. MRI-based brain structure volumes in temporal lobe epilepsy patients and their unaffected siblings: a preliminary study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Scanlon, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Investigating the heritability of brain structure may be useful in simplifying complicated genetic studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). A preliminary study is presented to determine if volume deficits of candidate brain structures present at a higher rate in unaffected siblings than controls subjects.

  12. Increased frequency of brain pathology in inmates of a high-security forensic institution: a qualitative CT and MRI scan study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Joachim G; Bogerts, Bernhard; Schiltz, Kolja

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to assess whether brain pathology might be more abundant in forensic inpatients in a high-security setting than in non-criminal individuals. By using a previously used reliable approach, we explored the frequency and extent of brain pathology in a large group of institutionalized offenders who had not previously been considered to be suffering from structural brain damage and compare it to healthy, non-offending subjects. MRI and CT brain scans from 148 male inpatients of a high-security mental health institution (offense type: 51 sex, 80 violent, 9 arson, and 8 nonviolent) that were obtained due to headache, vertigo, or psychological complaints during imprisonment were assessed and compared to 52 non-criminal healthy controls. Brain scans were assessed qualitatively with respect to evidence of structural brain damage. Each case received a semiquantitative rating of "normal" (=0), "questionably abnormal" (=1), or "definitely abnormal" (=2) for the lateral ventricles, frontal/parietal cortex, and medial temporal structures bilaterally as well as third ventricle. Forensic inpatients displayed signs of brain damage to a significantly higher degree than healthy controls (p brain regions categorized as definitely abnormal than the non-criminal controls. Within the forensic inpatients, offense type groups did not significantly differ in brain pathology. The astonishingly high prevalence of brain pathology in institutionalized inmates of a high-security mental health institution who previously had not been considered to be suffering from an organic brain syndrome raises questions on whether such neuroradiological assessment might be considered as a routine procedure in newly admitted patients. Furthermore, it highlights that organic changes, detectable under clinical routine conditions, may play a role in the development of legally relevant behavioral disturbances which might be underestimated.

  13. Mapping primary gyrogenesis during fetal development in primate brains: high-resolution in utero structural MRI study of fetal brain development in pregnant baboons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kochunov

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The global and regional changes in the fetal cerebral cortex in primates were mapped during primary gyrification (PG; weeks 17-25 of 26 weeks total gestation. Studying pregnant baboons using high-resolution MRI in utero, measurements included cerebral volume, cortical surface area, gyrification index and length and depth of ten primary cortical sulci. Seven normally developing fetuses were imaged in two animals longitudinally and sequentially. We compared these results to those on PG that from the ferret studies and analyzed them in the context of our recent studies of phylogenetics of cerebral gyrification. We observed that in both primates and non-primates, the cerebrum undergoes a very rapid transformation into the gyrencephalic state, subsequently accompanied by an accelerated growth in brain volume and cortical surface area. However, PG trends in baboons exhibited some critical differences from those observed in ferrets. For example, in baboons, the growth along the long (length axis of cortical sulci was unrelated to the growth along the short (depth axis and far outpaced it. Additionally, the correlation between the rate of growth along the short sulcal axis and heritability of sulcal depth was negative and approached significance (r=-0.60;p<.10, while the same trend for long axis was positive and not significant (p=0.3;p=0.40. These findings, in an animal that shares a highly orchestrated pattern of PG with humans, suggest that ontogenic processes that influence changes in sulcal length and depth are diverse and possibly driven by different factors in primates than in non-primates.

  14. The effect of alcohol consumption on the adolescent brain: A systematic review of MRI and fMRI studies of alcohol-using youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah W. Feldstein Ewing

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Alcohol consumption during adolescence was associated with significant differences in structure and function in the developing human brain. However, this is a nascent field, with several limiting factors (including small sample sizes, cross-sectional designs, presence of confounding factors within many of the reviewed studies, meaning that results should be interpreted in light of the preliminary state of the field. Future longitudinal and large-scale studies are critical to replicate the existing findings, and to provide a more comprehensive and conclusive picture of the effect of alcohol consumption on the developing brain.

  15. Functional MRI during Hippocampal Deep Brain Stimulation in the Healthy Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Vanhove, Christian; Descamps, Benedicte; Dauwe, Ine; van Mierlo, Pieter; Vonck, Kristl; Keereman, Vincent; Raedt, Robrecht; Boon, Paul; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders. The mechanism of action and the effects of electrical fields administered to the brain by means of an electrode remain to be elucidated. The effects of DBS have been investigated primarily by electrophysiological and neurochemical studies, which lack the ability to investigate DBS-related responses on a whole-brain scale. Visualization of whole-brain effects of DBS requires functional imaging techniques such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), which reflects changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses throughout the entire brain volume. In order to visualize BOLD responses induced by DBS, we have developed an MRI-compatible electrode and an acquisition protocol to perform DBS during BOLD fMRI. In this study, we investigate whether DBS during fMRI is valuable to study local and whole-brain effects of hippocampal DBS and to investigate the changes induced by different stimulation intensities. Seven rats were stereotactically implanted with a custom-made MRI-compatible DBS-electrode in the right hippocampus. High frequency Poisson distributed stimulation was applied using a block-design paradigm. Data were processed by means of Independent Component Analysis. Clusters were considered significant when p-values were stimulation intensity. We conclude that simultaneous DBS and fMRI can be used to detect local and whole-brain responses to circuit activation with different stimulation intensities, making this technique potentially powerful for exploration of cerebral changes in response to DBS for both preclinical and clinical DBS. PMID:26193653

  16. MRI Studies in Late-Life Mood Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Andreescu, Carmen; Aizenstein, Howard

    2012-01-01

    There are well-established patterns of structural brain changes associated with aging. The change in brain volume with age and with the diseases of aging presents a particular challenge for MRI studies in the elderly. Structural MRI is important for studies in normal aging, late-life depression, dementia, Alzheimer disease and other cognitive disorders to examine how age-associated changes in neuroanatomy are associated with specific age-related changes in brain function. Functional MRI has b...

  17. Can induced hypothermia be assured during brain MRI in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintermark, Pia [Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Newborn Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Montreal Children' s Hospital, Division of Newborn Medicine, Montreal, QC (Canada); Labrecque, Michelle; Hansen, Anne [Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Newborn Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Warfield, Simon K.; DeHart, Stephanie [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Until now, brain MRIs in asphyxiated neonates who are receiving therapeutic hypothermia have been performed after treatment is complete. However, there is increasing interest in utilizing early brain MRI while hypothermia is still being provided to rapidly understand the degree of brain injury and possibly refine neuroprotective strategies. This study was designed to assess whether therapeutic hypothermia can be maintained while performing a brain MRI. Twenty MRI scans were obtained in 12 asphyxiated neonates while they were treated with hypothermia. The median difference between esophageal temperature on NICU departure and return was 0.1 C (range: -0.8 to 0.8 C). We found that therapeutic hypothermia can be safely and reproducibly maintained during a brain MRI. Hypothermia treatment should not prevent obtaining an early brain MRI if clinically indicated. (orig.)

  18. Brain responses to erotic and other emotional stimuli in breast cancer survivors with and without distress about low sexual desire: a preliminary fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versace, Francesco; Engelmann, Jeffrey M; Jackson, Edward F; Slapin, Aurelija; Cortese, Kristin M; Bevers, Therese B; Schover, Leslie R

    2013-12-01

    Many breast cancer survivors report a loss of sexual desire and arousability, consonant with the new DSM-V category of female sexual interest/arousal disorder. The cause of decreased sexual desire and pleasure after treatment for cancer is unknown. One possibility is that cancer, or treatment for cancer, damages brain circuits that are involved in reward-seeking. To test the hypothesis that brain reward systems are involved in decreased sexual desire in breast cancer survivors, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare brain responses to erotica and other emotional stimuli in two groups of women previously treated for breast cancer with chemotherapy: those who were distressed about a perceived loss of sexual desire and those who may have had low desire, but were not distressed about it. Women distressed about their desire had reduced brain responses to erotica in the anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which are part of the brain reward system. This study is the first to demonstrate, in cancer survivors, that problems with sexual desire/arousability are associated with blunted brain responses to erotica in reward systems. Future research is necessary to determine whether brain responses differ as a result of chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and menopausal status. This may contribute to the development of new, evidence-based interventions for one of the most prevalent and enduring side effects of cancer treatment.

  19. Pre-clinical testing of a phased array ultrasound system for MRI-guided noninvasive surgery of the brain-A primate study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynynen, Kullervo [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)]. E-mail: kullervo@bwh.harvard.edu; McDannold, Nathan [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Clement, Greg [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Jolesz, Ferenc A. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Zadicario, Eyal [InSightec, Inc., Haifa (Israel); Killiany, Ron [Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Moore, Tara [Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Rosen, Douglas [Boston University, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-08-15

    MRI-guided and monitored focused ultrasound thermal surgery of brain through intact skull was tested in three rhesus monkeys. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of skull heating in an animal model with a head shape similar to that of a human. The ultrasound beam was generated by a 512 channel phased array system (Exablate[reg] 3000, InSightec, Haifa, Israel) that was integrated within a 1.5-T MR-scanner. The skin was pre-cooled by degassed temperature controlled water circulating between the array surface and the skin. Skull surface temperature was measured with invasive thermocouple probes. The results showed that by applying surface cooling the skin and skull surface can be protected, and that the brain surface temperature becomes the limiting factor. The MRI thermometry was shown to be useful in detecting the tissue temperature distribution next to the bone, and it should be used to monitor the brain surface temperature. The acoustic intensity values during the 20 s sonications were adequate for thermal ablation in the human brain provided that surface cooling is used.

  20. Sleep Apnea, Sleep Duration and Brain MRI Markers of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Alzheimer's Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela L Lutsey

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature has suggested that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and habitual short sleep duration are linked to poor cognitive function. Neuroimaging studies may provide insight into this relation.We tested the hypotheses that OSA and habitual short sleep duration, measured at ages 54-73 years, would be associated with adverse brain morphology at ages 67-89 years.Included in this analysis are 312 ARIC study participants who underwent in-home overnight polysomnography in 1996-1998 and brain MRI scans about 15 years later (2012-2013. Sleep apnea was quantified by the apnea-hypopnea index and categorized as moderate/severe (≥15.0 events/hour, mild (5.0-14.9 events/hour, or normal (<5.0 events/hour. Habitual sleep duration was categorized, in hours, as <7, 7 to <8, ≥8. MRI outcomes included number of infarcts (total, subcortical, and cortical and white matter hyperintensity (WMH and Alzheimer's disease signature region volumes. Multivariable adjusted logistic and linear regression models were used. All models incorporated inverse probability weighting, to adjust for potential selection bias.At the time of the sleep study participants were 61.7 (SD: 5.0 years old and 54% female; 19% had moderate/severe sleep apnea. MRI imaging took place 14.8 (SD: 1.0 years later, when participants were 76.5 (SD: 5.2 years old. In multivariable models which accounted for body mass index, neither OSA nor abnormal sleep duration were statistically significantly associated with odds of cerebral infarcts, WMH brain volumes or regional brain volumes.In this community-based sample, mid-life OSA and habitually short sleep duration were not associated with later-life cerebral markers of vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. However, selection bias may have influenced our results and the modest sample size led to relatively imprecise associations.

  1. An fMRI study of the differences in brain activity during active ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinastic, Jonathan P; Kautz, Steven A; McGregor, Keith; Gregory, Chris; Bowden, Mark; Benjamin, Michelle B; Kurtzman, Marc; Chang, Yu Ling; Conway, Tim; Crosson, Bruce

    2010-06-01

    Little is known regarding the differences in active cortical and subcortical systems during opposing movements of an agonist-antagonist muscle group. The objective of this study was to characterize the differences in cortical activation during active ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion using functional MRI (fMRI). Eight right-handed healthy adults performed auditorily cued right ankle dorsiflexions and plantarflexions during fMRI. Differences in activity patterns between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion during fMRI were assessed using between- and within-subject voxel-wise t-tests. Results indicated that ankle dorsiflexion recruited significantly more regions in left M1, the supplementary motor area (SMA) bilaterally, and right cerebellum. Both movements activated similar left hemisphere regions in the putamen and thalamus. Dorsiflexion activated additional areas in the right putamen. Results suggest that ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion may be controlled by both shared and independent neural circuitry. This has important implications for functional investigations of gait pathology and how rehabilitation may differentially affect each movement.

  2. Deep Learning vs. Conventional Machine Learning: Pilot Study of WMH Segmentation in Brain MRI with Absence or Mild Vascular Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Febrian Rachmadi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of the use of deep learning algorithms in medical image analysis, we compared performance of deep learning algorithms, namely the deep Boltzmann machine (DBM, convolutional encoder network (CEN and patch-wise convolutional neural network (patch-CNN, with two conventional machine learning schemes: Support vector machine (SVM and random forest (RF, for white matter hyperintensities (WMH segmentation on brain MRI with mild or no vascular pathology. We also compared all these approaches with a method in the Lesion Segmentation Tool public toolbox named lesion growth algorithm (LGA. We used a dataset comprised of 60 MRI data from 20 subjects in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI database, each scanned once every year during three consecutive years. Spatial agreement score, receiver operating characteristic and precision-recall performance curves, volume disagreement score, agreement with intra-/inter-observer reliability measurements and visual evaluation were used to find the best configuration of each learning algorithm for WMH segmentation. By using optimum threshold values for the probabilistic output from each algorithm to produce binary masks of WMH, we found that SVM and RF produced good results for medium to very large WMH burden but deep learning algorithms performed generally better than conventional ones in most evaluations.

  3. Neuropsychological deficits and morphological MRI brain scan abnormalities in apparently health non-encephalopathic patients with cirrhosis; A controlled Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J.W.; De Lacey, G.; Dunk, A.A.; Sinclair, T.S.; Mowat, M.A.G.; Brunt, P.W. (Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Deans, H. (Aberdeen Univ. (UK). Dept. of Medical Physics (United Kingdom)); Crawford, J.R. (Aberdeen University Medical School (United Kingdom). Department of Psychology (United Kingdom)); Besson, J.A.O. (Aberdeen University Medical School (United Kingdom). Department of Mental Health (United Kingdom))

    1989-11-01

    By means of psychometric testing, we have determined the frequency of latent hepatic encephalopathy in a group of 19 cirrhotics with no clinical evidence of encephalopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed in order to determine whether morphological cerebral abnormalities were associated with latent encephalopathy. Nineteen age and educationally matched patient with normal liver function acted as controls. Significant differences (P < 0.05) between cirrhotics and controls were found in tests of short-term visual memory and speed of reaction to light (cirrhotics 326 ( 132 ms vs. controls 225 ) 36 ms), sound (cirrhotics 361 ( 152 ms vs. controls 236 ) 52 ms) and choice (cirrhotics 651 ( 190 ms vs. controls 406 ) 101 ms) stimuli (all values mean S.D.). Reitan trail test performance, however, was similar in both groups. ( Trail A: cirrhotics 43 ( 19 s vs. controls 35 ) 13 s; Trail B: cirrhotics 105 ( 66 s vs. controls 93 ) 36 s.) In patients with cirrhosis, MRI revealed statistically significant increases in the maximum fissure width of right frontal sulci, light and left parietal sulci, inter-hemispheric fissure width and in bicaudafe index. These changes, indicating cerebral atrophy, were largely confined to alcoholics. There was poor correlation between measurements of cerebral morphology and neuropsychological performance, only 10% of associations achieving statistical significance. (author). 2 refs.; 3 figs.; 5 tabs.

  4. Combined MRI and MRS improves pre-therapeutic diagnoses of pediatric brain tumors over MRI alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiroishi, Mark S.; Nelson, Marvin D. [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Moore, Kevin R. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gilles, Floyd H. [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Pathology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio [All Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, St. Petersburg, FL (United States); Blueml, Stefan [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Rudi Schulte Research Institute, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The specific goal of this study was to determine whether the inclusion of MRS had a measureable and positive impact on the accuracy of pre-surgical MR examinations of untreated pediatric brain tumors over that of MRI alone in clinical practice. Final imaging reports of 120 pediatric patients with newly detected brain tumors who underwent combined MRI/MRS examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Final pathology was available in all cases. Group A comprised 60 subjects studied between June 2001 and January 2005, when MRS was considered exploratory and radiologists utilized only conventional MRI to arrive at a diagnosis. For group B, comprising 60 subjects studied between January 2005 and March 2008, the radiologists utilized information from both MRI and MRS. Furthermore, radiologists revisited group A (blind review, time lapse >4 years) to determine whether the additional information from MRS would have altered their interpretation. Sixty-three percent of patients in group A were diagnosed correctly, whereas in 10 % the report was partially correct with the final tumor type mentioned (but not mentioned as most likely tumor), while in 27 % of cases the reports were wrong. For group B, the diagnoses were correct in 87 %, partially correct in 5 %, and incorrect in 8 % of the cases, which is a significant improvement (p < 0.005). Re-review of combined MRI and MRS of group A resulted 87 % correct, 7 % partially correct, and 7 % incorrect diagnoses, which is a significant improvement over the original diagnoses (p < 0.05). Adding MRS to conventional MRI significantly improved diagnostic accuracy in preoperative pediatric patients with untreated brain tumors. (orig.)

  5. Efficacy and toxicity in brain tumor treatment - quantitative Measurements using advanced MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Søren

    2016-01-01

    From the clinical introduction in the 1980s, MRI has grown to become an indispensable brain imaging modality, mainly due to its excellent ability to visualize soft tissues. Morphologically, T1- and T2-weighted brain tumor MRI have been part of routine diagnostic radiology for more than two decades...... was to explore how different advanced MRI techniques could contribute to a higher degree of individualized treatment of brain tumor patients. The thesis is based on three studies in which advanced MRI is used to evaluate the possible role of fMRI in presurgical planning, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI...... and are now being used for presurgical and radiation therapy (RT) planning. More advanced MRI sequences have gained attention. Sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have entered the clinical world concurrently...

  6. Brain effects of computer-assisted cognitive remediation therapy in anorexia nervosa: A pilot fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Timo; Walther, Stephan; Ingenerf, Katrin; Wild, Beate; Hartmann, Mechthild; Weisbrod, Matthias; Weber, Marc-André; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret; Herzog, Wolfgang; Friederich, Hans-Christoph

    2016-03-30

    Poor cognitive-behavioral flexibility is considered a trait marker in anorexia nervosa (AN) that can be improved by cognitive remediation therapy (CRT). The present pilot study aimed at identifying changes in brain function potentially associated with CRT in AN. Data was obtained from a randomized, controlled trial. Twenty-four patients were assessed before and after 30 sessions of either CRT or a non-specific neurocognitive therapy. Voxel-wise analysis of whole brain functional magnetic resonance imaging was applied. Brain activation was measured during response inhibition and task switching. Although results did not reach significance, we found tentative support for CRT-related increases in brain activation in the dorsal putamen during task switching and in the dorsolateral prefrontal, sensorimotor and temporal cortex during response inhibition. These pilot findings provide viable pathways for future research on brain changes underlying CRT in AN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous fMRI-PET of the opioidergic pain system in human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Catana, Ciprian; Hooker, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    MRI and PET provide complementary information for studying brain function. While the potential use of simultaneous MRI/PET for clinical diagnostic and disease staging has been demonstrated recently; the biological relevance of concurrent functional MRI-PET brain imaging to dissect neurochemically...... and striatum related to pain processing, while modality specific brain networks were also found. Co-localized fMRI and PET signal changes in the thalamus were positively correlated suggesting that pain-induced changes in opioid neurotransmission contribute a significant component of the fMRI signal change...... in this region. Simultaneous fMRI-PET provides unique opportunities allowing us to relate specific neurochemical events to functional hemodynamic activation and to investigate the impacts of neurotransmission on neurovascular coupling of the human brain in vivo....

  8. Prematurity and brain perfusion: Arterial spin labeling MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Domenico; Mattei, Peter Angelo; Navarra, Riccardo; Panara, Valentina; Salomone, Rita; Rossi, Andrea; Detre, John A; Caulo, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal brain perfusion is a critical mechanism in neonatal brain injury. The aim of the present study was to compare Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) evaluated with ASL MRI in three groups of neonates: preterms without brain lesions on MRI (PN), preterms with periventricular white matter lesions (PNp) and term neonates with normal MRI (TN). The correlation between CBF and clinical outcome was explored. The institutional review board approved this prospective study and waived informed consent. The perfusion ASL data from 49 consecutive preterm neonates (PN) studied at term-equivalent age and 15 TN were evaluated. Statistically significant differences in gray matter CBF were evaluated by using a linear mixed-model analysis and Mann-Whitney U test. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relation between CBF and neuromotor outcome at 12 months. Comparison of means indicated that the CBF of the whole brain were significantly higher in PN compared to TN (P = 0.011). This difference remained significant when considering the frontal (P = 0.038), parietal (P = 0.002), temporal (P = 0.030), occipital (P = 0.041) and cerebellar (P = 0.010) gray matter. In the PN group, lower CBF in basal ganglia was associated with a worse neuromotor outcome (P = 0.012). ASL MRI demonstrated differences in brain perfusion of the basal ganglia between PN and TN. In PN, a positive correlation between CBF and neuromotor outcome was demonstrated in this area.

  9. Electroencephalography and Brain MRI Patterns in Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabulya, Angela; Lesser, Ronald P; Llinas, Rafael; Kaplan, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Using electroencephalography (EEG) and histology in patients with diffuse encephalopathy, Gloor et al reported that paroxysmal synchronous discharges (PSDs) on EEG required combined cortical gray (CG) and "subcortical" gray (SCG) matter pathology, while polymorphic delta activity (PDA) occurred in patients with white matter pathology. In patients with encephalopathy, we compared EEG findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine if MRI reflected similar pathological EEG correlations. Retrospective case control study of 52 cases with EEG evidence of encephalopathy and 50 controls without evidence of encephalopathy. Review of clinical, EEG and MRI data acquired within 4 days of each other. The most common EEG finding in encephalopathy was background slowing, in 96.1%. We found PSDs in 0% of cases with the combination of CG and SCG abnormalities. Although 13.5% (n=7) had PSDs on EEG; 3 of these had CG and 4 had SCG abnormalities. A total of 73.1% (38/52) had white matter abnormalities-of these 28.9% (11/38) had PDA. PSDs were found with either CG or "SCG" MRI abnormalities and did not require a combination of the two. In agreement with Gloor et al, PDA occurred with white matter MRI abnormalities in the absence of gray matter abnormalities. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2015.

  10. Depletion of brain functional connectivity enhancement leads to disability progression in multiple sclerosis: A longitudinal resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, Anthony; Robinet, Emmanuelle; Guye, Maxime; Rousseau, Celia; Maarouf, Adil; Le Troter, Arnaud; Zaaraoui, Wafaa; Rico, Audrey; Crespy, Lydie; Soulier, Elisabeth; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Pelletier, Jean; Achard, Sophie; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Audoin, Bertrand

    2016-11-01

    The compensatory effect of brain functional connectivity enhancement in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) remains controversial. To characterize the relationships between brain functional connectivity changes and disability progression in RRMS. Long-range connectivity, short-range connectivity, and density of connections were assessed using graph theoretical analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired in 38 RRMS patients (disease duration: 120 ± 32 months) and 24 controls. All subjects were explored at baseline and all patients and six controls 2 years later. At baseline, levels of long-range and short-range brain functional connectivity were higher in patients compared to controls. During the follow-up, decrease in connections' density was inversely correlated with disability progression. Post-hoc analysis evidenced differential evolution of brain functional connectivity metrics in patients according to their level of disability at baseline: while patients with lowest disability at baseline experienced an increase in all connectivity metrics during the follow-up, patients with higher disability at baseline showed a decrease in the connectivity metrics. In these patients, decrease in the connectivity metrics was associated with disability progression. The study provides two main findings: (1) brain functional connectivity enhancement decreases during the disease course after reaching a maximal level, and (2) decrease in brain functional connectivity enhancement participates in disability progression. © The Author(s), 2016.

  11. Brain structure differences among male schizophrenic patients with history of serious violent acts: an MRI voxel-based morphometric study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noriomi Kuroki; Hiroko Kashiwagi; Miho Ota; Masanori Ishikawa; Hiroshi Kunugi; Noriko Sato; Naotsugu Hirabayashi; Toshio Ota

    2017-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics of brain morphometry in patients with schizophrenia and a history of serious violent acts, who were being treated under relatively new...

  12. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: brain MRI and MR spectroscopy manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolli, Valentina; Soto Ares, Gustavo; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre [Roger Salengro Hospital, CHRU, Neuroradiology Department, Lille (France); Abou Chahla, Wadih [Jeanne de Flandre Hospital, Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Department, Lille (France); Jissendi-Tchofo, Patrice [University Hospital Saint-Pierre, Radiology Department - Pediatric Neuroradiology Section, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-08-15

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome is a rare inherited metabolic disorder characterized by partial oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, and neurological dysfunction. We present the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings obtained during the accelerated phase of the disorder in an 8-year-old. The brain MRI manifestations at recurrences 15 months and 24 months later are reported as well. (orig.)

  13. Very Early Brain Damage Leads to Remodeling of the Working Memory System in Adulthood: A Combined fMRI/Tractography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froudist-Walsh, Seán; Karolis, Vyacheslav; Caldinelli, Chiara; Brittain, Philip J; Kroll, Jasmin; Rodríguez-Toscano, Elisa; Tesse, Marcello; Colquhoun, Matthew; Howes, Oliver; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Murray, Robin M; Williams, Steven C R; Nosarti, Chiara

    2015-12-02

    The human brain can adapt to overcome injury even years after an initial insult. One hypothesis states that early brain injury survivors, by taking advantage of critical periods of high plasticity during childhood, should recover more successfully than those who suffer injury later in life. This hypothesis has been challenged by recent studies showing worse cognitive outcome in individuals with early brain injury, compared with individuals with later brain injury, with working memory particularly affected. We invited individuals who suffered perinatal brain injury (PBI) for an fMRI/diffusion MRI tractography study of working memory and hypothesized that, 30 years after the initial injury, working memory deficits in the PBI group would remain, despite compensatory activation in areas outside the typical working memory network. Furthermore we hypothesized that the amount of functional reorganization would be related to the level of injury to the dorsal cingulum tract, which connects medial frontal and parietal working memory structures. We found that adults who suffered PBI did not significantly differ from controls in working memory performance. They exhibited less activation in classic frontoparietal working memory areas and a relative overactivation of bilateral perisylvian cortex compared with controls. Structurally, the dorsal cingulum volume and hindrance-modulated orientational anisotropy was significantly reduced in the PBI group. Furthermore there was uniquely in the PBI group a significant negative correlation between the volume of this tract and activation in the bilateral perisylvian cortex and a positive correlation between this activation and task performance. This provides the first evidence of compensatory plasticity of the working memory network following PBI. Copyright © 2015 Froudist-Walsh et al.

  14. Effects of different correlation metrics and preprocessing factors on small-world brain functional networks: a resting-state functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liang

    Full Text Available Graph theoretical analysis of brain networks based on resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. These analyses often involve the selection of correlation metrics and specific preprocessing steps. However, the influence of these factors on the topological properties of functional brain networks has not been systematically examined. Here, we investigated the influences of correlation metric choice (Pearson's correlation versus partial correlation, global signal presence (regressed or not and frequency band selection [slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz versus slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz] on the topological properties of both binary and weighted brain networks derived from them, and we employed test-retest (TRT analyses for further guidance on how to choose the "best" network modeling strategy from the reliability perspective. Our results show significant differences in global network metrics associated with both correlation metrics and global signals. Analysis of nodal degree revealed differing hub distributions for brain networks derived from Pearson's correlation versus partial correlation. TRT analysis revealed that the reliability of both global and local topological properties are modulated by correlation metrics and the global signal, with the highest reliability observed for Pearson's-correlation-based brain networks without global signal removal (WOGR-PEAR. The nodal reliability exhibited a spatially heterogeneous distribution wherein regions in association and limbic/paralimbic cortices showed moderate TRT reliability in Pearson's-correlation-based brain networks. Moreover, we found that there were significant frequency-related differences in topological properties of WOGR-PEAR networks, and brain networks derived in the 0.027-0.073 Hz band exhibited greater reliability than those in the 0.01-0.027 Hz band. Taken together, our results provide direct evidence regarding the influences of correlation metrics

  15. Functional MRI brain imaging studies using the Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS in a human volunteer topical capsaicin pain model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ravikiran Shenoy1, Katherine Roberts1, Anastasia Papadaki2, Donald McRobbie2, Maarten Timmers3, Theo Meert3, Praveen Anand11Peripheral Neuropathy Unit, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London; 2Imaging Sciences Department, Charing Cross Hospital, London, United Kingdom; 3Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Beerse, BelgiumAbstract: Acute application of topical capsaicin produces spontaneous burning and stinging pain similar to that seen in some neuropathic states, with local hyperalgesia. Use of capsaicin applied topically or injected intradermally has been described as a model for neuropathic pain, with patterns of activation in brain regions assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and positron emission tomography. The Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS is a noninvasive clinically practical method of stimulating cutaneous A-delta nociceptors. In this study, topical capsaicin (1% was applied to the left volar forearm for 15 minutes of twelve adult healthy human volunteers. fMRI scans and a visual analog pain score were recorded during CHEPS stimulation precapsaicin and postcapsaicin application. Following capsaicin application there was a significant increase in visual analog scale (mean ± standard error of the mean; precapsaicin 26.4 ± 5.3; postcapsaicin 48.9 ± 6.0; P < 0.0001. fMRI demonstrated an overall increase in areas of activation, with a significant increase in the contralateral insular signal (mean ± standard error of the mean; precapsaicin 0.434 ± 0.03; postcapsaicin 0.561 ± 0.07; P = 0.047. The authors of this paper recently published a study in which CHEPS-evoked A-delta cerebral potential amplitudes were found to be decreased postcapsaicin application. In patients with neuropathic pain, evoked pain and fMRI brain responses are typically increased, while A-delta evoked potential amplitudes are decreased. The protocol of recording fMRI following CHEPS stimulation

  16. Comprehensive brain MRI segmentation in high risk preterm newborns.

    OpenAIRE

    Xintian Yu; Yanjie Zhang; Robert E Lasky; Sushmita Datta; Nehal A Parikh; Ponnada A Narayana

    2010-01-01

    Most extremely preterm newborns exhibit cerebral atrophy/growth disturbances and white matter signal abnormalities on MRI at term-equivalent age. MRI brain volumes could serve as biomarkers for evaluating the effects of neonatal intensive care and predicting neurodevelopmental outcomes. This requires detailed, accurate, and reliable brain MRI segmentation methods. We describe our efforts to develop such methods in high risk newborns using a combination of manual and automated segmentation too...

  17. MRI Brain Activation During Instruction of Dyslexic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten children with dyslexia and 11 normal readers performed tasks of phoneme mapping (assigning sounds to letters and morpheme mapping (relating suffixed words to their roots during fMRI scanning, before and after 28 hours of comprehensive reading instruction, in a study of the effects of reading instruction on brain activation in children with dyslexia at University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

  18. Semiautomatic segmentation and follow-up of multicomponent low-grade tumors in longitudinal brain MRI studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizman, Lior, E-mail: weizmanl@gmail.com [School of Engineering and Computer Science, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Sira, Liat Ben [Department of Radiology, Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 64239 (Israel); Joskowicz, Leo [School of Engineering and Computer Science and The Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences (ELSC), The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Rubin, Daniel L.; Yeom, Kristen W. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Constantini, Shlomi; Shofty, Ben [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Dana Children' s Hospital, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 64239 (Israel); Bashat, Dafna Ben [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 64239 (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Tracking the progression of low grade tumors (LGTs) is a challenging task, due to their slow growth rate and associated complex internal tumor components, such as heterogeneous enhancement, hemorrhage, and cysts. In this paper, the authors show a semiautomatic method to reliably track the volume of LGTs and the evolution of their internal components in longitudinal MRI scans. Methods: The authors' method utilizes a spatiotemporal evolution modeling of the tumor and its internal components. Tumor components gray level parameters are estimated from the follow-up scan itself, obviating temporal normalization of gray levels. The tumor delineation procedure effectively incorporates internal classification of the baseline scan in the time-series as prior data to segment and classify a series of follow-up scans. The authors applied their method to 40 MRI scans of ten patients, acquired at two different institutions. Two types of LGTs were included: Optic pathway gliomas and thalamic astrocytomas. For each scan, a “gold standard” was obtained manually by experienced radiologists. The method is evaluated versus the gold standard with three measures: gross total volume error, total surface distance, and reliability of tracking tumor components evolution. Results: Compared to the gold standard the authors' method exhibits a mean Dice similarity volumetric measure of 86.58% and a mean surface distance error of 0.25 mm. In terms of its reliability in tracking the evolution of the internal components, the method exhibits strong positive correlation with the gold standard. Conclusions: The authors' method provides accurate and repeatable delineation of the tumor and its internal components, which is essential for therapy assessment of LGTs. Reliable tracking of internal tumor components over time is novel and potentially will be useful to streamline and improve follow-up of brain tumors, with indolent growth and behavior.

  19. Altered Brain Functional Connectivity in Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients after Chemotherapy Treatment: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Bromis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC patients have mainly focused on exploring neurocognitive deficits associated with prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI. Little is known about functional brain alterations that might occur due to chemotherapy treatment in this population before PCI is administered. For this reason, we used resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to examine potential functional connectivity disruptions in brain networks, including the Default Mode Network (DMN, the Sensorimotor Network, and the Task-Positive Network (TPN. Nineteen SCLC patients after platinum-based chemotherapy treatment and thirteen controls were recruited in the current study. ROI-to-ROI and Seed-to-Voxel analyses were carried out and revealed functional connectivity deficits in patients within all the networks investigated demonstrating the possible negative effect of chemotherapy in cognitive functions in SCLC populations.

  20. Novel applications of quantitative MRI for the fetal brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clouchoux, Cedric [Children' s National Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Limperopoulos, Catherine [Children' s National Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); McGill University, McConnell Brain Imaging Center, Montreal Neurological Institute, Montreal (Canada); McGill University, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal (Canada); Children' s National Medical Center, Division of Fetal and Transitional Medicine, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The advent of ultrafast MRI acquisitions is offering vital insights into the critical maturational events that occur throughout pregnancy. Concurrent with the ongoing enhancement of ultrafast imaging has been the development of innovative image-processing techniques that are enabling us to capture and quantify the exuberant growth, and organizational and remodeling processes that occur during fetal brain development. This paper provides an overview of the role of advanced neuroimaging techniques to study in vivo brain maturation and explores the application of a range of new quantitative imaging biomarkers that can be used clinically to monitor high-risk pregnancies. (orig.)

  1. Cribriform pattern in brain MRI: A diagnostic clue for mucopolysaccharidoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamick Biswas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS represents a heterogeneous group of inherited lysosomal storage disorders characterised by defective degradation of long-chain complex carbohydrates called glycosoaminoglycans (GAGs. To date, 11 distinct types of MPS have been described, each as a result of deficient enzymatic activity of specific lysosomal hydrolase. The most common types are Hurler and Hunter syndromes. We report a case of a child presenting with macrocephaly, clinically suspected to be due to hydrocephalus. An MRI (3 Tesla brain study demonstrated the cribriform pattern in the brain caused by dilated perivascular spaces, which is a diagnostic clue for the presence of MPS.

  2. Brain Functional Connectivity in Small Cell Lung Cancer Population after Chemotherapy Treatment: an ICA fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromis, K.; Kakkos, I.; Gkiatis, K.; Karanasiou, I. S.; Matsopoulos, G. K.

    2017-11-01

    Previous neurocognitive assessments in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) population, highlight the presence of neurocognitive impairments (mainly in attention processing and executive functioning) in this type of cancer. The majority of these studies, associate these deficits with the Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation (PCI) that patients undergo in order to avoid brain metastasis. However, there is not much evidence exploring cognitive impairments induced by chemotherapy in SCLC patients. For this reason, we aimed to investigate the underlying processes that may potentially affect cognition by examining brain functional connectivity in nineteen SCLC patients after chemotherapy treatment, while additionally including fourteen healthy participants as control group. Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is a functional connectivity measure aiming to unravel the temporal correlation between brain regions, which are called brain networks. We focused on two brain networks related to the aforementioned cognitive functions, the Default Mode Network (DMN) and the Task-Positive Network (TPN). Permutation tests were performed between the two groups to assess the differences and control for familywise errors in the statistical parametric maps. ICA analysis showed functional connectivity disruptions within both of the investigated networks. These results, propose a detrimental effect of chemotherapy on brain functioning in the SCLC population.

  3. Permeability dependence study of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening at distinct pressures and microbubble diameters using DCE-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachos, Fotios; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Konofagou, Elisa

    2011-09-01

    Blood-brain barrier opening using focused ultrasound and microbubbles has been experimentally established as a noninvasive and localized brain drug delivery technique. In this study, the permeability of the opening is assessed in the murine hippocampus after the application of focused ultrasound at three different acoustic pressures and microbubble sizes. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the transfer rates were estimated, yielding permeability maps and quantitative K(trans) values for a predefined region of interest. The volume of blood-brain barrier opening according to the K(trans) maps was proportional to both the pressure and the microbubble diameter. A K(trans) plateau of ∼0.05 min(-1) was reached at higher pressures (0.45 and 0.60 MPa) for the larger sized bubbles (4-5 and 6-8 μm), which was on the same order as the K(trans) of the epicranial muscle (no barrier). Smaller bubbles (1-2 μm) yielded significantly lower permeability values. A small percentage (7.5%) of mice showed signs of damage under histological examination, but no correlation with permeability was established. The assessment of the blood-brain barrier permeability properties and their dependence on both the pressure and the microbubble diameter suggests that K(trans) maps may constitute an in vivo tool for the quantification of the efficacy of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Abnormal Baseline Brain Activity in Drug-Naïve Patients with Tourette Syndrome: A Resting-state fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua eCui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourette Syndrome (TS is a childhood-onset chronic disorder characterized by the presence of multiple motor and vocal tics. This study investigated spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations in TS patients during resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scans. We obtained resting-state fMRI scans from seventeen drug-naïve TS children and fifteen demographically matched healthy children. We computed the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF and fractional ALFF (fALFF of resting-state fMRI data to measure spontaneous brain activity, and assessed the between-group differences in ALFF/fALFF and the relationship between ALFF/fALFF and tic severity scores. Our results showed that the children with TS exhibited significantly decreased ALFF in the posterior cingulate gyrus/precuneus and bilateral parietal gyrus. fALFF was decreased in TS children in the anterior cingulated cortex, bilateral middle and superior frontal cortices and superior parietal lobule, and increased in the left putamen and bilateral thalamus. Moreover, we found significantly positive correlations between fALFF and tic severity scores in the right thalamus. Our study provides empirical evidence for abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in TS patients, which may implicate the underlying neurophysiological mechanism in TS and demonstrate the possibility of applying ALFF/fALFF for clinical TS studies.

  5. Sleep Apnea, Sleep Duration and Brain MRI Markers of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Alzheimer's Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsey, Pamela L; Norby, Faye L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Mosley, Thomas; MacLehose, Richard F; Punjabi, Naresh M; Shahar, Eyal; Jack, Clifford R; Alonso, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of literature has suggested that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and habitual short sleep duration are linked to poor cognitive function. Neuroimaging studies may provide insight into this relation. We tested the hypotheses that OSA and habitual short sleep duration, measured at ages 54-73 years, would be associated with adverse brain morphology at ages 67-89 years. Included in this analysis are 312 ARIC study participants who underwent in-home overnight polysomnography in 1996-1998 and brain MRI scans about 15 years later (2012-2013). Sleep apnea was quantified by the apnea-hypopnea index and categorized as moderate/severe (≥15.0 events/hour), mild (5.0-14.9 events/hour), or normal (sleep duration was categorized, in hours, as sleep study participants were 61.7 (SD: 5.0) years old and 54% female; 19% had moderate/severe sleep apnea. MRI imaging took place 14.8 (SD: 1.0) years later, when participants were 76.5 (SD: 5.2) years old. In multivariable models which accounted for body mass index, neither OSA nor abnormal sleep duration were statistically significantly associated with odds of cerebral infarcts, WMH brain volumes or regional brain volumes. In this community-based sample, mid-life OSA and habitually short sleep duration were not associated with later-life cerebral markers of vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. However, selection bias may have influenced our results and the modest sample size led to relatively imprecise associations.

  6. Meta-analysis of real-time fMRI neurofeedback studies using individual participant data: How is brain regulation mediated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Kirsten; Kopel, Rotem; Sulzer, James; Brühl, Annette B; Berman, Brian D; Linden, David E J; Horovitz, Silvina G; Breimhorst, Markus; Caria, Andrea; Frank, Sabine; Johnston, Stephen; Long, Zhiying; Paret, Christian; Robineau, Fabien; Veit, Ralf; Bartsch, Andreas; Beckmann, Christian F; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Haller, Sven

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of studies using real-time fMRI neurofeedback have demonstrated that successful regulation of neural activity is possible in various brain regions. Since these studies focused on the regulated region(s), little is known about the target-independent mechanisms associated with neurofeedback-guided control of brain activation, i.e. the regulating network. While the specificity of the activation during self-regulation is an important factor, no study has effectively determined the network involved in self-regulation in general. In an effort to detect regions that are responsible for the act of brain regulation, we performed a post-hoc analysis of data involving different target regions based on studies from different research groups. We included twelve suitable studies that examined nine different target regions amounting to a total of 175 subjects and 899 neurofeedback runs. Data analysis included a standard first- (single subject, extracting main paradigm) and second-level (single subject, all runs) general linear model (GLM) analysis of all participants taking into account the individual timing. Subsequently, at the third level, a random effects model GLM included all subjects of all studies, resulting in an overall mixed effects model. Since four of the twelve studies had a reduced field of view (FoV), we repeated the same analysis in a subsample of eight studies that had a well-overlapping FoV to obtain a more global picture of self-regulation. The GLM analysis revealed that the anterior insula as well as the basal ganglia, notably the striatum, were consistently active during the regulation of brain activation across the studies. The anterior insula has been implicated in interoceptive awareness of the body and cognitive control. Basal ganglia are involved in procedural learning, visuomotor integration and other higher cognitive processes including motivation. The larger FoV analysis yielded additional activations in the anterior cingulate

  7. Effects of emotional valence and three-dimensionality of visual stimuli on brain activation: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dores, A R; Almeida, I; Barbosa, F; Castelo-Branco, M; Monteiro, L; Reis, M; de Sousa, L; Caldas, A Castro

    2013-01-01

    Examining changes in brain activation linked with emotion-inducing stimuli is essential to the study of emotions. Due to the ecological potential of techniques such as virtual reality (VR), inspection of whether brain activation in response to emotional stimuli can be modulated by the three-dimensional (3D) properties of the images is important. The current study sought to test whether the activation of brain areas involved in the emotional processing of scenarios of different valences can be modulated by 3D. Therefore, the focus was made on the interaction effect between emotion-inducing stimuli of different emotional valences (pleasant, unpleasant and neutral valences) and visualization types (2D, 3D). However, main effects were also analyzed. The effect of emotional valence and visualization types and their interaction were analyzed through a 3 × 2 repeated measures ANOVA. Post-hoc t-tests were performed under a ROI-analysis approach. The results show increased brain activation for the 3D affective-inducing stimuli in comparison with the same stimuli in 2D scenarios, mostly in cortical and subcortical regions that are related to emotional processing, in addition to visual processing regions. This study has the potential of clarify brain mechanisms involved in the processing of emotional stimuli (scenarios' valence) and their interaction with three-dimensionality.

  8. Mapping brain morphological and functional conversion patterns in amnestic MCI: a voxel-based MRI and FDG-PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morbelli, Silvia [University of Genoa, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Piccardo, Arnoldo; Villavecchia, Giampiero [Galliera Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Dessi, Barbara; Brugnolo, Andrea; Rodriguez, Guido; Nobili, Flavio [University of Genoa, Clinical Neurophysiology Unit, Department of Neurosciences, Ophthalmology and Genetics, Genoa (Italy); Piccini, Alessandra [Cell Biology Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Genoa (Italy); Caroli, Anna [LENITEM - Laboratory of Epidemiology Neuroimaging and Telemedicine, Brescia (Italy); Mario Negri Institute, Medical Imaging Unit, Biomedical Engineering Department, Bergamo (Italy); Frisoni, Giovanni [LENITEM - Laboratory of Epidemiology Neuroimaging and Telemedicine, Brescia (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    To reveal the morphological and functional substrates of memory impairment and conversion to Alzheimer disease (AD) from the stage of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Brain MRI and FDG-PET were performed in 20 patients with aMCI and 12 controls at baseline. During a mean follow-up of about 2 years, 9 patients developed AD (converters), and 11 did not (nonconverters). All images were processed with SPM2. FDG-PET and segmented grey matter (GM) images were compared in: (1) converters versus controls, (2) nonconverters versus controls, and (3) converters versus nonconverters. As compared to controls, converters showed lower GM density in the left parahippocampal gyrus and both thalami, and hypometabolism in the precuneus, posterior cingulate and superior parietal lobule in the left hemisphere. Hypometabolism was found in nonconverters as compared to controls in the left precuneus and posterior cingulated gyrus. As compared to nonconverters, converters showed significant hypometabolism in the left middle and superior temporal gyri. The discordant topography between atrophy and hypometabolism reported in AD is already present at the aMCI stage. Posterior cingulate-precuneus hypometabolism seemed to be an early sign of memory deficit, whereas hypometabolism in the left temporal cortex marked the conversion to AD. (orig.)

  9. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llado, Xavier; Ganiler, Onur; Oliver, Arnau; Marti, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi [University of Girona, Computer Vision and Robotics Group, Girona (Spain); Valls, Laia [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Magnetic Resonance Center, Girona (Spain); Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica de Girona, Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Unit, Girona (Spain); Rovira, Alex [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  10. Imaging tools to study pharmacology: functional MRI on small rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eJonckers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI, stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI, and pharmacological MRI (phMRI. Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sensory stimulation and/or a pharmacological challenge. The first part of this review describes the physiological basis of BOLD fMRI and the hemodynamic response on which the MRI contrast is based. Specific emphasis goes to possible effects of anaesthesia and the animal’s physiological conditions on neural activity and the hemodynamic response. The second part of this review describes applications of the aforementioned techniques in pharmacologically-induced, as well as in traumatic and transgenic disease models and illustrates how multiple fMRI methods can be applied successfully to evaluate different aspects of a specific disorder. For example, fMRI techniques can be used to pinpoint the neural substrate of a disease beyond previously defined hypothesis-driven regions-of-interest (ROIs. In addition, fMRI techniques allow one to dissect how specific modifications (e.g. treatment, lesion etc. modulate the functioning of specific brain areas (st-fMRI, phMRI and how functional connectivity (rsfMRI between several brain regions is affected, both in acute and extended time frames. Furthermore, fMRI techniques can be used to assess/explore the efficacy of novel treatments in depth, both in fundamental research as well as in preclinical settings. In conclusion, by describing several exemplary studies, we aim to highlight the advantages of functional MRI in exploring the acute and long-term effects of pharmacological substances and/or pathology on brain functioning along with

  11. Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms and Related Sex Differences in Brain Structure: An MRI Study in Dutch Twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Braber, A.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Boomsma, D.I.; van t Ent, D.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have indicated abnormalities in cortico-striato- thalamo-cortical circuits in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients, but results have not been consistent. Since there are significant sex differences in human brain anatomy and obsessive-compulsive symptomatology and its

  12. Mapping of functional brain activity in freely behaving rats during voluntary running using manganese-enhanced MRI: implication for longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenko, O; Canals, S; Simanova, I; Beyerlein, M; Murayama, Y; Logothetis, N K

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in basic and clinical research to map the structural and functional organization of the brain. An important need of MR research is for contrast agents that improve soft-tissue contrast, enable visualization of neuronal tracks, and enhance the capacity of MRI to provide functional information at different temporal scales. Unchelated manganese can be such an agent, and manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) can potentially be an excellent technique for localization of brain activity (for review see Silva et al., 2004). Yet, the toxicity of manganese presents a major limitation for employing MEMRI in behavioral paradigms. We have tested systematically the voluntary wheel running behavior of rats after systemic application of MnCl(2) in a dose range of 16-80 mg/kg, which is commonly used in MEMRI studies. The results show a robust dose-dependent decrease in motor performance, which was accompanied by weight loss and decrease in food intake. The adverse effects lasted for up to 7 post-injection days. The lowest dose of MnCl(2) (16 mg/kg) produced minimal adverse effects, but was not sufficient for functional mapping. We have therefore evaluated an alternative method of manganese delivery via osmotic pumps, which provide a continuous and slow release of manganese. In contrast to a single systemic injection, the pump method did not produce any adverse locomotor effects, while achieving a cumulative concentration of manganese (80 mg/kg) sufficient for functional mapping. Thus, MEMRI with such an optimized manganese delivery that avoids toxic effects can be safely applied for longitudinal studies in behaving animals. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Preliminary results of a functional MRI study of brain activation patterns in stuttering and nonstuttering speakers during a lexical access task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomgren, Michael; Nagarajan, Srikantan S; Lee, James N; Li, Tianhao; Alvord, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    An fMRI study examining lexical access and lexical generation in nine non-stuttering and seven stuttering speakers is presented. Lexical access was examined during a word description task that was presented auditorily while subjects "silently" thought of the target words. Participants alternated between four 30-s rest blocks and four 30-s "active" blocks. Activation patterns were assessed utilizing a standard subtraction paradigm, where the activation during the rest blocks was subtracted from the activation during the active blocks. High levels of variability characterized activation patterns within both speaker groups. Group comparisons using random effects statistical analyses did not identify significant differences between the groups when corrected for multiple comparisons. Analyses were subsequently conducted by comparing the trends in the group activation patterns between the speaker groups using fixed (corrected) and random effects (uncorrected) analyses. Non-stuttering control speakers activated primarily left hemisphere cortical speech and language areas while the stuttering speakers appeared to produce more bilateral activation. Discussion of these results focuses on the specific within- and between-hemispheric activation patterns and possible interpretations of these patterns. The reader will learn about: (1) issues related to interpreting brain activation findings in stuttering speakers; (2) the role and neurological substrates of lexical access during speech production in non-stuttering and stuttering speakers; (3) the basics of functional MRI; and (4) the brain activation areas involved during a silent lexical retrieval task in non-stuttering and stuttering speakers.

  14. The highly sensitive brain: an fMRI study of sensory processing sensitivity and response to others' emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Bianca P; Aron, Elaine N; Aron, Arthur; Sangster, Matthew-Donald; Collins, Nancy; Brown, Lucy L

    2014-07-01

    Theory and research suggest that sensory processing sensitivity (SPS), found in roughly 20% of humans and over 100 other species, is a trait associated with greater sensitivity and responsiveness to the environment and to social stimuli. Self-report studies have shown that high-SPS individuals are strongly affected by others' moods, but no previous study has examined neural systems engaged in response to others' emotions. This study examined the neural correlates of SPS (measured by the standard short-form Highly Sensitive Person [HSP] scale) among 18 participants (10 females) while viewing photos of their romantic partners and of strangers displaying positive, negative, or neutral facial expressions. One year apart, 13 of the 18 participants were scanned twice. Across all conditions, HSP scores were associated with increased brain activation of regions involved in attention and action planning (in the cingulate and premotor area [PMA]). For happy and sad photo conditions, SPS was associated with activation of brain regions involved in awareness, integration of sensory information, empathy, and action planning (e.g., cingulate, insula, inferior frontal gyrus [IFG], middle temporal gyrus [MTG], and PMA). As predicted, for partner images and for happy facial photos, HSP scores were associated with stronger activation of brain regions involved in awareness, empathy, and self-other processing. These results provide evidence that awareness and responsiveness are fundamental features of SPS, and show how the brain may mediate these traits.

  15. Human Brain Mapping of Visual Script Familiarity between Phonological and Logographic Language: 3 T Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nambeom Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurolinguistic circuitry for two different scripts of language, such as phonological scripts (PhonoS versus logographic scripts (LogoS (e.g., English versus Chinese, resp., recruits segregated neural pathways according to orthographic regularity (OrthoR. The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of VSF for cortical representation according to different OrthoR to represent Hangul versus Hanja as PhonoS versus LogoS, respectively. A total of 24 right-handed, native Korean undergraduate students with the first language of PhonoS and the second language of LogoS were divided into high- or low-competent groups for L2 of LogoS. The implicit word reading task was performed using Hanja and Hangul scripts during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI acquisition. Fluctuations of fMRI BOLD signal demonstrated that the LogoS was associated with the ventral pathway, whereas PhonoS was associated with the dorsal pathway. By interaction analysis, compared with high-competent group, low-competent group showed significantly greater activation for Hanja than for Hangul reading in the right superior parietal lobule area and the left supplementary motor area, which might be due to neural efficiency such as attention and cognition rather than core neurolinguistic neural demand like OrthoR processing.

  16. Human Brain Mapping of Visual Script Familiarity between Phonological and Logographic Language: 3 T Functional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nambeom; Kim, Jongho; Kang, Chang-Ki; Park, Chan-A; Lim, Mi-Ra; Kim, Young-Bo; Bak, Byung-Gee

    2017-01-01

    Neurolinguistic circuitry for two different scripts of language, such as phonological scripts (PhonoS) versus logographic scripts (LogoS) (e.g., English versus Chinese, resp.), recruits segregated neural pathways according to orthographic regularity (OrthoR). The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of VSF for cortical representation according to different OrthoR to represent Hangul versus Hanja as PhonoS versus LogoS, respectively. A total of 24 right-handed, native Korean undergraduate students with the first language of PhonoS and the second language of LogoS were divided into high- or low-competent groups for L2 of LogoS. The implicit word reading task was performed using Hanja and Hangul scripts during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acquisition. Fluctuations of fMRI BOLD signal demonstrated that the LogoS was associated with the ventral pathway, whereas PhonoS was associated with the dorsal pathway. By interaction analysis, compared with high-competent group, low-competent group showed significantly greater activation for Hanja than for Hangul reading in the right superior parietal lobule area and the left supplementary motor area, which might be due to neural efficiency such as attention and cognition rather than core neurolinguistic neural demand like OrthoR processing.

  17. Automated detection of periventricular veins on 7 T brain MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijf, Hugo J.; Bouvy, Willem H.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Viergever, Max A.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Vincken, Koen L.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is common in elderly persons and a leading cause of cognitive decline, dementia, and acute stroke. With the introduction of ultra-high field strength 7.0T MRI, it is possible to visualize small vessels in the brain. In this work, a proof-of-principle study is conducted to assess the feasibility of automatically detecting periventricular veins. Periventricular veins are organized in a fan-pattern and drain venous blood from the brain towards the caudate vein of Schlesinger, which is situated along the lateral ventricles. Just outside this vein, a region-of- interest (ROI) through which all periventricular veins must cross is defined. Within this ROI, a combination of the vesselness filter, tubular tracking, and hysteresis thresholding is applied to locate periventricular veins. All detected locations were evaluated by an expert human observer. The results showed a positive predictive value of 88% and a sensitivity of 95% for detecting periventricular veins. The proposed method shows good results in detecting periventricular veins in the brain on 7.0T MR images. Compared to previous works, that only use a 1D or 2D ROI and limited image processing, our work presents a more comprehensive definition of the ROI, advanced image processing techniques to detect periventricular veins, and a quantitative analysis of the performance. The results of this proof-of-principle study are promising and will be used to assess periventricular veins on 7.0T brain MRI.

  18. Progression from Vegetative to Minimally Conscious State Is Associated with Changes in Brain Neural Response to Passive Tasks: A Longitudinal Single-Case Functional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaiuolo, Francesco; Cecchetti, Luca; Gibson, Raechelle M; Logi, Fiammetta; Owen, Adrian M; Malasoma, Franco; Cozza, Sabino; Pietrini, Pietro; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be adopted as a complementary tool for bedside observation in the disorders of consciousness (DOC). However, the diagnostic value of this technique is still debated because of the lack of accuracy in determining levels of consciousness within a single patient. Recently, Giacino and colleagues (2014) hypothesized that a longitudinal fMRI evaluation may provide a more informative assessment in the detection of residual awareness. The aim of this study was to measure the correspondence between clinically defined level of awareness and neural responses within a single DOC patient. We used a follow-up fMRI design in combination with a passive speech-processing task. Patient's consciousness was measured through time by using the Coma Recovery Scale. The patient progressed from a vegetative state (VS) to a minimally conscious state (MCS). Patient's task-related neural responses mirrored the clinical change from a VS to an MCS. Specifically, while in an MCS, but not a VS, the patient showed a selective recruitment of the left angular gyrus when he listened to a native speech narrative, as compared to the reverse presentation of the same stimulus. Furthermore, the patient showed an increased response in the language-related brain network and a greater deactivation in the default mode network following his progression to an MCS. Our findings indicate that longitudinal assessment of brain responses to passive stimuli can contribute to the definition of the clinical status in individual patients with DOC and represents an adequate counterpart of the bedside assessment during the diagnostic decision-making process. (JINS, 2016, 22, 620-630).

  19. A Virtual Patient Simulator Based on Human Connectome and 7 T MRI for Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmassar, Giorgio; Angelone, Leonardo M; Makris, Nikos

    This paper presents a virtual model of patients with Deep Brain Stimulation implants. The model is based on Human Connectome and 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data. We envision that the proposed virtual patient simulator will enable radio frequency power dosimetry on patients with deep brain stimulation implants undergoing MRI. Results from the proposed virtual patient study may facilitate the use of clinical MRI instead of computed tomography scans. The virtual patient will be flexible and morphable to relate to patient-specific neurological and psychiatric conditions such as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, which benefit from deep brain stimulation.

  20. Modulation of brain activity by multiple lexical and word form variables in visual word recognition: A parametric fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, Olaf; Davis, Matthew H; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2008-09-01

    Psycholinguistic research has documented a range of variables that influence visual word recognition performance. Many of these variables are highly intercorrelated. Most previous studies have used factorial designs, which do not exploit the full range of values available for continuous variables, and are prone to skewed stimulus selection as well as to effects of the baseline (e.g. when contrasting words with pseudowords). In our study, we used a parametric approach to study the effects of several psycholinguistic variables on brain activation. We focussed on the variable word frequency, which has been used in numerous previous behavioural, electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies, in order to investigate the neuronal network underlying visual word processing. Furthermore, we investigated the variable orthographic typicality as well as a combined variable for word length and orthographic neighbourhood size (N), for which neuroimaging results are still either scarce or inconsistent. Data were analysed using multiple linear regression analysis of event-related fMRI data acquired from 21 subjects in a silent reading paradigm. The frequency variable correlated negatively with activation in left fusiform gyrus, bilateral inferior frontal gyri and bilateral insulae, indicating that word frequency can affect multiple aspects of word processing. N correlated positively with brain activity in left and right middle temporal gyri as well as right inferior frontal gyrus. Thus, our analysis revealed multiple distinct brain areas involved in visual word processing within one data set.

  1. Abacus in the brain: a longitudinal functional MRI study of a skilled abacus user with the right hemispheric lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eTanaka

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The abacus, a traditional physical calculation device, is still widely used in Asian countries. Previous behavioral work has shown that skilled abacus users perform rapid and precise mental arithmetic by manipulating a mental representation of an abacus, which is based on visual imagery. However, its neurophysiological basis remains unclear. Here, we report the case of a patient who was a good abacus user, but transiently lost her mental abacus and superior arithmetic performance after a stroke owing to a right hemispheric lesion including the dorsal premotor cortex and inferior parietal lobule.Functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments were conducted 6 and 13 months after her stroke. In the mental calculation task, her brain activity was shifted from the language-related areas, including Broca’s area and the left dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal lobules, to the visuospatial-related brain areas including the left superior parietal lobule, according to the recovery of her arithmetic abilities. In the digit memory task, activities in the bilateral superior parietal lobule and right visual association cortex were also observed after recovery. The shift of brain activities was consistent with her subjective report that she was able to shift the calculation strategy from linguistic to visuospatial as her mental abacus became stable again. In a behavioral experiment using an interference paradigm, a visual presentation of an abacus picture, but not a human face picture, interfered with the performance of her digit memory, confirming her use of the mental abacus after recovery.This is the first case report on the impairment of the mental abacus by a brain lesion and on recovery-related brain activity. We named this rare case abacus-based acalculia. Together with previous neuroimaging studies, the present result suggests an important role for the dorsal premotor cortex and parietal cortex in the superior arithmetic ability of

  2. Altered brain function in new onset childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy: A resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhanqi; Zou, Dongfang; Mai, Huirong; Yuan, Xiuli; Wang, Lihong; Li, Yue; Liao, Jianxiang; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Guosheng; Zeng, Hongwu; Wen, Feiqiu

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive impairments had been reported in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, what caused the impairments needed to be demonstrated, chemotherapy-related or the disease itself. The primary aim of this exploratory investigation was to determine if there were changes in brain function of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy. In this study, we advanced a measure named regional homogeneity to evaluate the resting-state brain activities, intelligence quotient test was performed at same time. Using regional homogeneity, we first investigated the resting state brain function in patients with new onset childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy, healthy children as control. The decreased ReHo values were mainly founded in the default mode network and left frontal lobe, bilateral inferior parietal lobule, bilateral temporal lobe, bilateral occipital lobe, precentral gyrus, bilateral cerebellum in the newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients compared with the healthy control. While in contrast, increased ReHo values were mainly shown in the right frontal lobe (language area), superior frontal gyrus-R, middle frontal gyrus-R and inferior parietal lobule-R for acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients group. There were no significant differences for intelligence quotient measurements between the acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient group and the healthy control in performance intelligence quotient, verbal intelligence quotient, total intelligence quotient. The altered brain functions are associated with cognitive change and language, it is suggested that there may be cognition impairment before the chemotherapy. Regional homogeneity by functional magnetic resonance image is a sensitive way for early detection on brain damage in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Abacus in the Brain: A Longitudinal Functional MRI Study of a Skilled Abacus User with a Right Hemispheric Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Seki, Keiko; Hanakawa, Takashi; Harada, Madoka; Sugawara, Sho K.; Sadato, Norihiro; Watanabe, Katsumi; Honda, Manabu

    2012-01-01

    The abacus, a traditional physical calculation device, is still widely used in Asian countries. Previous behavioral work has shown that skilled abacus users perform rapid and precise mental arithmetic by manipulating a mental representation of an abacus, which is based on visual imagery. However, its neurophysiological basis remains unclear. Here, we report the case of a patient who was a good abacus user, but transiently lost her “mental abacus” and superior arithmetic performance after a stroke owing to a right hemispheric lesion including the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) and inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments were conducted 6 and 13 months after her stroke. In the mental calculation task, her brain activity was shifted from the language-related areas, including Broca’s area and the left dorsolateral prefrontal and IPLs, to the visuospatial-related brain areas including the left superior parietal lobule (SPL), according to the recovery of her arithmetic abilities. In the digit memory task, activities in the bilateral SPL, and right visual association cortex were also observed after recovery. The shift of brain activities was consistent with her subjective report that she was able to shift the calculation strategy from linguistic to visuospatial as her mental abacus became stable again. In a behavioral experiment using an interference paradigm, a visual presentation of an abacus picture, but not a human face picture, interfered with the performance of her digit memory, confirming her use of the mental abacus after recovery. This is the first case report on the impairment of the mental abacus by a brain lesion and on recovery-related brain activity. We named this rare case “abacus-based acalculia.” Together with previous neuroimaging studies, the present result suggests an important role for the PMd and parietal cortex in the superior arithmetic ability of abacus users. PMID:22969743

  4. Branding and a child’s brain: an fMRI study of neural responses to logos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Jared M.; Black, William R.; Lepping, Rebecca J.; Henry, Janice M.; Cherry, Joseph Bradley C.; Martin, Laura E.; Papa, Vlad B.; Davis, Ann M.; Brooks, William M.; Savage, Cary R.

    2014-01-01

    Branding and advertising have a powerful effect on both familiarity and preference for products, yet no neuroimaging studies have examined neural response to logos in children. Food advertising is particularly pervasive and effective in manipulating choices in children. The purpose of this study was to examine how healthy children’s brains respond to common food and other logos. A pilot validation study was first conducted with 32 children to select the most culturally familiar logos, and to match food and non-food logos on valence and intensity. A new sample of 17 healthy weight children were then scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Food logos compared to baseline were associated with increased activation in orbitofrontal cortex and inferior prefrontal cortex. Compared to non-food logos, food logos elicited increased activation in posterior cingulate cortex. Results confirmed that food logos activate some brain regions in children known to be associated with motivation. This marks the first study in children to examine brain responses to culturally familiar logos. Considering the pervasiveness of advertising, research should further investigate how children respond at the neural level to marketing. PMID:22997054

  5. MRI Segmentation of the Human Brain: Challenges, Methods, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despotović, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important tasks in medical image analysis and is often the first and the most critical step in many clinical applications. In brain MRI analysis, image segmentation is commonly used for measuring and visualizing the brain's anatomical structures, for analyzing brain changes, for delineating pathological regions, and for surgical planning and image-guided interventions. In the last few decades, various segmentation techniques of different accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper we review the most popular methods commonly used for brain MRI segmentation. We highlight differences between them and discuss their capabilities, advantages, and limitations. To address the complexity and challenges of the brain MRI segmentation problem, we first introduce the basic concepts of image segmentation. Then, we explain different MRI preprocessing steps including image registration, bias field correction, and removal of nonbrain tissue. Finally, after reviewing different brain MRI segmentation methods, we discuss the validation problem in brain MRI segmentation. PMID:25945121

  6. A longitudinal observational study of brain atrophy rate reflecting four decades of multiple sclerosis: a comparison of serial 1D, 2D, and volumetric measurements from MRI images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martola, Juha; Zhang, Yi; Aspelin, Peter; Kristoffersen Wiberg, Maria [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Radiology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention, and Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Bergstroem, Jakob [Karolinska Institutet, The Medical Statistics Unit, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Stockholm (Sweden); Fredrikson, Sten; Stawiarz, Leszek; Hillert, Jan [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Neurology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Flodmark, Olof; Lilja, Anders [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Ekbom, Anders [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has a variable progression with an early onset of atrophy. Individual longitudinal radiological evaluations (over decades) are difficult to perform due to the limited availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the past, patients lost in follow-up, and the continuous updating of scanners. We studied a cohort with widespread disease duration at baseline. The observed individual atrophy rates over time of 10 years represented four decades of disease span. Thirty-seven MS patients (age range 24-65 years with disease duration 1-33 years) were consecutively selected and evaluated with MRI at baseline 1995 and in 1996. They were followed up for a decade (mean of 9.25 years, range 7.3-10 years) up to 2003-2005. Brain parenchymal volume and volumes of the supratentorial ventricles were analyzed with semi-automated volumetric measurements at three time points (1995, 1996, and 2003-2005). Volumetric differences were found over shorter periods of time (1-7 months); however, differences vanished by the end of follow-up. A uniform longitudinal decrease in brain volume and increase in ventricle volumes were found. Frontal horn width (1D) correlated strongest to 3D measures. No statistical differences of atrophy rates between MS courses were found. Supratentorial ventricular volumes were associated with disability and this association persisted during follow-up. Despite variable clinical courses, the degenerative effects of MS progression expressed in brain atrophy seem to uniformly progress over longer periods of time. These volumetric changes can be detected using 1D and 2D measurements performed on a routine PACS workstation. (orig.)

  7. Acute caffeine administration impact on working memory-related brain activation and functional connectivity in the elderly: a BOLD and perfusion MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, S; Rodriguez, C; Moser, D; Toma, S; Hofmeister, J; Sinanaj, I; Van De Ville, D; Giannakopoulos, P; Lovblad, K-O

    2013-10-10

    In young individuals, caffeine-mediated blockade of adenosine receptors and vasoconstriction has direct repercussions on task-related activations, changes in functional connectivity, as well as global vascular effects. To date, no study has explored the effect of caffeine on brain activation patterns during highly demanding cognitive tasks in the elderly. This prospective, placebo-controlled crossover design comprises 24 healthy elderly individuals (mean age 68.8 ± 4.0 years, 17 females) performing a 2-back working memory (WM) task in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Analyses include complimentary assessment of task-related activations (general linear model, GLM), functional connectivity (tensorial independent component analysis, TICA), and baseline perfusion (arterial spin labeling). Despite a reduction in whole-brain global perfusion (-22.7%), caffeine-enhanced task-related GLM activation in a local and distributed network is most pronounced in the bilateral striatum and to a lesser degree in the right middle and inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral insula, left superior and inferior parietal lobule as well as in the cerebellum bilaterally. TICA was significantly enhanced (+8.2%) in caffeine versus placebo in a distributed and task-relevant network including the pre-frontal cortex, the supplementary motor area, the ventral premotor cortex and the parietal cortex as well as the occipital cortex (visual stimuli) and basal ganglia. The inverse comparison of placebo versus caffeine had no significant difference. Activation strength of the task-relevant-network component correlated with response accuracy for caffeine yet not for placebo, indicating a selective cognitive effect of caffeine. The present findings suggest that acute caffeine intake enhances WM-related brain activation as well as functional connectivity of blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI in elderly individuals. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative histological validation of diffusion MRI fiber orientation distributions in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leergaard, Trygve B; White, Nathan S; de Crespigny, Alex; Bolstad, Ingeborg; D'Arceuil, Helen; Bjaalie, Jan G; Dale, Anders M

    2010-01-07

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) is widely used to measure microstructural features of brain white matter, but commonly used dMRI measures have limited capacity to resolve the orientation structure of complex fiber architectures. While several promising new approaches have been proposed, direct quantitative validation of these methods against relevant histological architectures remains missing. In this study, we quantitatively compare neuronal fiber orientation distributions (FODs) derived from ex vivo dMRI data against histological measurements of rat brain myeloarchitecture using manual recordings of individual myelin stained fiber orientations. We show that accurate FOD estimates can be obtained from dMRI data, even in regions with complex architectures of crossing fibers with an intrinsic orientation error of approximately 5-6 degrees in these regions. The reported findings have implications for both clinical and research studies based on dMRI FOD measures, and provide an important biological benchmark for improved FOD reconstruction and fiber tracking methods.

  9. Quantitative histological validation of diffusion MRI fiber orientation distributions in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve B Leergaard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion MRI (dMRI is widely used to measure microstructural features of brain white matter, but commonly used dMRI measures have limited capacity to resolve the orientation structure of complex fiber architectures. While several promising new approaches have been proposed, direct quantitative validation of these methods against relevant histological architectures remains missing. In this study, we quantitatively compare neuronal fiber orientation distributions (FODs derived from ex vivo dMRI data against histological measurements of rat brain myeloarchitecture using manual recordings of individual myelin stained fiber orientations. We show that accurate FOD estimates can be obtained from dMRI data, even in regions with complex architectures of crossing fibers with an intrinsic orientation error of approximately 5-6 degrees in these regions. The reported findings have implications for both clinical and research studies based on dMRI FOD measures, and provide an important biological benchmark for improved FOD reconstruction and fiber tracking methods.

  10. Prematurity and brain perfusion: Arterial spin labeling MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Tortora

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: ASL MRI demonstrated differences in brain perfusion of the basal ganglia between PN and TN. In PN, a positive correlation between CBF and neuromotor outcome was demonstrated in this area.

  11. Brain connectivity is altered by extreme physical exercise during non-REM sleep and wakefulness: indications from EEG and fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, D; Gentili, C; Piarulli, A; Laurino, M; Pellegrini, S; Mastorci, F; Bedini, R; Montanaro, D; Sebastiani, L; Gemignani, A

    2016-12-01

    Brain connectivity is associated to behavioral states (e.g. wake, sleep) and modified by physical activity although, to date, it is not clear which components (e.g. hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis hormones, cytokines) associated to the exercise are involved. In this pilot study, we used extreme exercise (UltraTriathlon) as a model to investigate physical-activity-related changes of brain connectivity. We studied post-race brain synchronization during wakefulness and sleep as well as possible correlations between exercise-related cytokines/hormones and synchronization features. For wakefulness, global synchronization was evaluated by estimating from fMRI data (12 athletes) the brain global connectivity (GC). GC increased in several brain regions, mainly related to sensory-motor activity, emotional modulation and response to stress that may foster rapid exchange of information across regions, and reflect post-race internally-focused mental activity or disengagement from previous motor programs. No significant correlations between cytokines/hormones and GC were found. For sleep (8 athletes), synchronization was evaluated by estimating the local-(cortical) and global-related (thalamo- cortical) EEG features associated to the phenomenon of Sleep Slow Oscillations (SSO) of NREM sleep. Results showed that: power of fast rhythms in the baseline preceding the SSO increased in midline and parietal regions; amplitude and duration of SSOs increased, mainly in posterior areas; sigma modulation in the SSO up state decreased. In the post race, IL-10 positively correlated with fast rhythms baseline, SSO rate and positive slope; IL-1ra and cortisol inversely correlated with SSO duration; TNF-α and C-reactive protein positively correlated with fast rhythm modulation in the SSO up state. Sleep results suggest that: arousal during sleep, estimated by baseline fast rhythms, is increased; SSO may be sustained by cortical excitability, linked to anti-inflammatory markers (IL-10

  12. Ultra High Field MRI-Guided Deep Brain Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forstmann, Birte U; Isaacs, Bethany R; Temel, Yasin

    2017-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical treatment for neurological disorders often planned with 1.5-T or 3-T MRI. The clinical efficacy of DBS can be improved using ultrahigh-field (UHF) MRI for planning by increasing the level of precision required for an individualized approach.

  13. Quantitative histological validation of diffusion MRI fiber orientation distributions in the rat brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Trygve B Leergaard; Nathan S White; Alex de Crespigny; Ingeborg Bolstad; Helen D'Arceuil; Jan G Bjaalie; Anders M Dale

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) is widely used to measure microstructural features of brain white matter, but commonly used dMRI measures have limited capacity to resolve the orientation structure of complex fiber architectures. While several promising new approaches have been proposed, direct quantitative validation of these methods against relevant histological architectures remains missing. In this study, we quantitatively compare neuronal fiber orientation distributions (FODs) derived from ex vivo d...

  14. Learning Computational Models of Video Memorability from fMRI Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junwei; Chen, Changyuan; Shao, Ling; Hu, Xintao; Han, Jungong; Liu, Tianming

    2015-08-01

    Generally, various visual media are unequally memorable by the human brain. This paper looks into a new direction of modeling the memorability of video clips and automatically predicting how memorable they are by learning from brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We propose a novel computational framework by integrating the power of low-level audiovisual features and brain activity decoding via fMRI. Initially, a user study experiment is performed to create a ground truth database for measuring video memorability and a set of effective low-level audiovisual features is examined in this database. Then, human subjects' brain fMRI data are obtained when they are watching the video clips. The fMRI-derived features that convey the brain activity of memorizing videos are extracted using a universal brain reference system. Finally, due to the fact that fMRI scanning is expensive and time-consuming, a computational model is learned on our benchmark dataset with the objective of maximizing the correlation between the low-level audiovisual features and the fMRI-derived features using joint subspace learning. The learned model can then automatically predict the memorability of videos without fMRI scans. Evaluations on publically available image and video databases demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  15. fMRI Brain-Computer Interface: A Tool for Neuroscientific Research and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganatha Sitaram

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI-BCI allow volitional control of anatomically specific regions of the brain. Technological advancement in higher field MRI scanners, fast data acquisition sequences, preprocessing algorithms, and robust statistical analysis are anticipated to make fMRI-BCI more widely available and applicable. This noninvasive technique could potentially complement the traditional neuroscientific experimental methods by varying the activity of the neural substrates of a region of interest as an independent variable to study its effects on behavior. If the neurobiological basis of a disorder (e.g., chronic pain, motor diseases, psychopathy, social phobia, depression is known in terms of abnormal activity in certain regions of the brain, fMRI-BCI can be targeted to modify activity in those regions with high specificity for treatment. In this paper, we review recent results of the application of fMRI-BCI to neuroscientific research and psychophysiological treatment.

  16. The Serotonin Receptor 6 Antagonist Idalopirdine and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor Donepezil Have Synergistic Effects on Brain Activity—A Functional MRI Study in the Awake Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig F. Ferris

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The 5-HT6 receptor is a promising target for cognitive disorders, in particular for Alzheimer's disease (AD and other CNS disorders. The high-affinity and selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist idalopirdine (Lu AE58054 is currently in development for mild-moderate AD as adjunct therapy to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs. We studied the effects of idalopirdine alone and in combination with the AChEI donepezil on brain activity using BOLD (Blood Oxygen Level Dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in the awake rat. Idalopirdine (2 mg/kg, i.v. alone had a modest effect on brain activity, resulting in activation of eight brain regions at the peak response. Of these, the cholinergic diagonal band of Broca, the infralimbic cortex, the ventral pallidum, the nucleus accumbens shell, and the magnocellular preoptic area were shared with the effects of donepezil (0.3 mg/kg, i.v.. Donepezil alone activated 19 brain regions at the peak response, including several cortical regions, areas of the septo-hippocampal system and the serotonergic raphe nucleus. When idalopirdine and donepezil were combined, there was a robust stimulation pattern with activation of 36 brain regions spread across the extended-amygdala-, striato-pallidal, and septo-hippocampal networks as well as the cholinergic system. These findings indicate that, whilst idalopirdine and donepezil recruit a number of overlapping regions including one of the forebrain cholinergic nuclei, the synergistic effect of both compounds extends beyond the cholinergic system and the effects of donepezil alone toward recruitment of multiple neural circuits and neurotransmitter systems. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms via which idalopirdine might improve cognition in donepezil-treated AD patients.

  17. Treadmill pre-training ameliorates brain edema in ischemic stroke via down-regulation of aquaporin-4: an MRI study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhijie; Wang, Xiaolou; Wu, Yi; Jia, Jie; Hu, Yongshan; Yang, Xiaojiao; Li, Jianqi; Fan, Mingxia; Zhang, Li; Guo, Jinchun; Leung, Mason C P

    2014-01-01

    Treadmill pre-training can ameliorate blood brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction in ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, its role in ischemic brain edema remains unclear. This study assessed the neuroprotective effects induced by treadmill pre-training, particularly on brain edema in transient middle cerebral artery occluded model. Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to induce stroke was performed on rats after 2 weeks of treadmill pre-training. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the dynamic impairment of cerebral edema after ischemia-reperfusion injury. In addition, measurements of wet and dry brain weight, Evans Blue assay and Garcia scores were performed to investigate the cerebral water content, BBB permeability and neurologic deficit, respectively. Moreover, during ischemia-reperfusion injury, the expression of Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) was detected using immunofluorescence and Western bloting analyses. Treadmill pre-training improved the relative apparent diffusion coefficient (rADC) loss in the ipsilateral cortex and striatum at 1 hour and 2.5 hours after cerebral ischemia. In the treadmill pre-training group, T2W1 values of the ipsilateral cortex and striatum increased less at 7.5 hours, 1 day, and 2 days after stroke while the brain water content decreased at 2 days after ischemia. Regarding the BBB permeability, the semi-quantitative amount of contrast agent leakage of treadmill pre-training group significantly decreased. Less Evans Blue exudation was also observed in treadmill pre-training group at 2 days after stroke. In addition, treadmill pre-training mitigated the Garcia score deficits at 2 days after stroke. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting results showed a significant decrease in the expression of AQP4 after treadmill ischemia following pre-training. Treadmill pre-training may reduce cerebral edema and BBB dysfunction during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury via the down-regulation of AQP4.

  18. The effects of a mid-task break on the brain connectome in healthy participants: A resting-state functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Lim, Julian; Dai, Zhongxiang; Wong, KianFoong; Taya, Fumihiko; Chen, Yu; Li, Junhua; Thakor, Nitish; Bezerianos, Anastasios

    2017-05-15

    Although rest breaks are commonly administered as a countermeasure to reduce mental fatigue and boost cognitive performance, the effects of taking a break on behavior are not consistent. Moreover, our understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms of rest breaks and how they modulate mental fatigue is still rudimentary. In this study, we investigated the effects of receiving a rest break on the topological properties of brain connectivity networks via a two-session experimental paradigm, in which one session comprised four successive blocks of a mentally demanding visual selective attention task (No-rest session), whereas the other contained a rest break between the second and third task blocks (Rest session). Functional brain networks were constructed using resting-state functional MRI data recorded from 20 healthy adults before and after the performance of the task blocks. Behaviorally, subjects displayed robust time-on-task (TOT) declines, as reflected by increasingly slower reaction time as the test progressed and lower post-task self-reported ratings of engagement. However, we did not find a significant effect on task performance due to administering a mid-task break. Compared to pre-task measurements, post-task functional brain networks demonstrated an overall decrease of optimal small-world properties together with lower global efficiency. Specifically, we found TOT-related reduced nodal efficiency in brain regions that mainly resided in the subcortical areas. More interestingly, a significant block-by-session interaction was revealed in local efficiency, attributing to a significant post-task decline in No-rest session and a preserved local efficiency when a mid-task break opportunity was introduced in the Rest session. Taken together, these findings augment our understanding of how the resting brain reorganizes following the accumulation of prolonged task, suggest dissociable processes between the neural mechanisms of fatigue and recovery, and provide

  19. Structural and Functional Brain Repair Studies of PD Models by Novel Neurosurgical, PET and MRI/MRS Methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isacson, Ole

    1999-01-01

    .... We will also compare neurotransplantation with pallidotomy. The current analysis is dependent upon behavioral, PET, MRI/MRS and finally, post-mortem methodology to determine the questions and objectives outlined in this plan...

  20. Structural and Functional Brain Repair Studies of PD Models by Novel Neurosurgical, PET and MRI/MRS Methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isacson, Ole

    2000-01-01

    .... We will also compare neurotransplantation with pallidotomy. The current analysis is dependent upon behavioral, PET, MRI/MRS and finally, post-mortem methodology to determine the questions and objectives outlined in this plan...

  1. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, P.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O. [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Drzezga, A. [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-01-09

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  2. Large-scale directional connections among multi resting-state neural networks in human brain: a functional MRI and Bayesian network modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Chen, Kewei; Fleisher, Adam S; Reiman, Eric M; Yao, Li; Wu, Xia

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the large-scale connectivity among multiple resting-state networks (RSNs) in the human brain. Independent component analysis was first applied to the resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data acquired from 12 healthy young subjects for the separation of RSNs. Four sensory (lateral and medial visual, auditory, and sensory-motor) RSNs and four cognitive (default-mode, self-referential, dorsal and ventral attention) RSNs were identified. Gaussian Bayesian network (BN) learning approach was then used for the examination of the conditional dependencies among these RSNs and the construction of the network-to-network directional connectivity patterns. The BN based results demonstrated that sensory networks and cognitive networks were hierarchically organized. Specially, we found the sensory networks were highly intra-dependent and the cognitive networks were strongly intra-influenced. In addition, the results depicted dominant bottom-up connectivity from sensory networks to cognitive networks in which the self-referential and the default-mode networks might play respectively important roles in the process of resting-state information transfer and integration. The present study characterized the global connectivity relations among RSNs and delineated more characteristics of spontaneous activity dynamics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mapping Numerical Processing, Reading, and Executive Functions in the Developing Brain: An fMRI Meta-Analysis of 52 Studies Including 842 Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houde, Olivier; Rossi, Sandrine; Lubin, Amelie; Joliot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Tracing the connections from brain functions to children's cognitive development and education is a major goal of modern neuroscience. We performed the first meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data obtained over the past decade (1999-2008) on more than 800 children and adolescents in three core systems of cognitive…

  4. Homayoun as a Persian Music Scale on Non-Musician’s Brain: an fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Pouladi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to get to a neurological evaluation of one of the Persian music scales, Homayoun, on brain activation of non-musician subjects. We selected this scale because Homayoun is one of the main scales in Persian classical music which is similar to minor mode in western scales. This study was performed on 19 right handed subjects, Aging 22-31. Here some pices from Homayoun Dastgah are used in both rhythmic and non- rhythmic. The results of this study revealed the brain activities for each of rhythmic and non-rhythmic versions of Homayoun Dastgah. The activated regions for non-rhythmic Homayoun contained: right and left Subcallosal Cortex, left Medial Frontal cortex, left anterior Cingulate Gyrus, left Frontal Pole and for rhythmic Homayoun contained: left Precentral Gyrus, left Precuneous Cortex, left anterior Supramarginal, left Superior Parietal Lobule, left Postcentral Gyrus. Also, we acquired amygdala area in both pieces of music. Based on arousal effects of rhythm and Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis, non-rhythmic Homayoun activates regions related to emotion and thinking while activity of rhythmic Homayoun is related to areas of movement and motion.

  5. Sources and implications of whole-brain fMRI signals in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Jonathan D; Plitt, Mark; Laumann, Timothy O; Martin, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Whole-brain fMRI signals are a subject of intense interest: variance in the global fMRI signal (the spatial mean of all signals in the brain) indexes subject arousal, and psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and autism have been characterized by differences in the global fMRI signal. Further, vigorous debates exist on whether global signals ought to be removed from fMRI data. However, surprisingly little research has focused on the empirical properties of whole-brain fMRI signals. Here we map the spatial and temporal properties of the global signal, individually, in 1000+ fMRI scans. Variance in the global fMRI signal is strongly linked to head motion, to hardware artifacts, and to respiratory patterns and their attendant physiologic changes. Many techniques used to prepare fMRI data for analysis fail to remove these uninteresting kinds of global signal fluctuations. Thus, many studies include, at the time of analysis, prominent global effects of yawns, breathing changes, and head motion, among other signals. Such artifacts will mimic dynamic neural activity and will spuriously alter signal covariance throughout the brain. Methods capable of isolating and removing global artifactual variance while preserving putative "neural" variance are needed; this paper adopts no position on the topic of global signal regression. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Relating resting-state fMRI and EEG whole-brain connectomes across frequency bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligianni, Fani; Centeno, Maria; Carmichael, David W.; Clayden, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Whole brain functional connectomes hold promise for understanding human brain activity across a range of cognitive, developmental and pathological states. So called resting-state (rs) functional MRI studies have contributed to the brain being considered at a macroscopic scale as a set of interacting regions. Interactions are defined as correlation-based signal measurements driven by blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast. Understanding the neurophysiological basis of these measurements is important in conveying useful information about brain function. Local coupling between BOLD fMRI and neurophysiological measurements is relatively well defined, with evidence that gamma (range) frequency EEG signals are the closest correlate of BOLD fMRI changes during cognitive processing. However, it is less clear how whole-brain network interactions relate during rest where lower frequency signals have been suggested to play a key role. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI offers the opportunity to observe brain network dynamics with high spatio-temporal resolution. We utilize these measurements to compare the connectomes derived from rs-fMRI and EEG band limited power (BLP). Merging this multi-modal information requires the development of an appropriate statistical framework. We relate the covariance matrices of the Hilbert envelope of the source localized EEG signal across bands to the covariance matrices derived from rs-fMRI with the means of statistical prediction based on sparse Canonical Correlation Analysis (sCCA). Subsequently, we identify the most prominent connections that contribute to this relationship. We compare whole-brain functional connectomes based on their geodesic distance to reliably estimate the performance of the prediction. The performance of predicting fMRI from EEG connectomes is considerably better than predicting EEG from fMRI across all bands, whereas the connectomes derived in low frequency EEG bands resemble best rs-fMRI connectivity. PMID:25221467

  7. Applications of a novel hemodynamic model to functional brain studies with fNIRS and fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Pierro, Michele L.; Hallacoglu, Bertan; Sassaroli, Angelo; Fantini, Sergio

    2013-03-01

    We report time-domain applications of a new hemodynamic model by Fantini [1] that yields analytic expressions for signals that are measurable with hemodynamic-based neuroimaging techniques such as functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We show how the model can be used to predict the perturbations in cerebral blood volume (CBV), blood flow (CBF), and metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) that account for the initial dip and post-stimulus undershoot that have been reported in the fMRI and fNIRS literature. Furthermore, we have used data from the literature to perform a comparison between measured fNIRS and fMRI signals and the corresponding signals predicted by the new hemodynamic model. Results showed an excellent agreement between the model predictions and the reported measured data.

  8. Volitional regulation of brain responses to food stimuli in overweight and obese subjects: A real-time fMRI feedback study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetter, Maartje S; Malekshahi, Rahim; Birbaumer, Niels; Lührs, Michael; van der Veer, Albert H; Scheffler, Klaus; Spuckti, Sophia; Preissl, Hubert; Veit, Ralf; Hallschmid, Manfred

    2017-05-01

    Obese subjects who achieve weight loss show increased functional connectivity between dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), key areas of executive control and reward processing. We investigated the potential of real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback training to achieve healthier food choices by enhancing self-control of the interplay between these brain areas. We trained eight male individuals with overweight or obesity (age: 31.8 ± 4.4 years, BMI: 29.4 ± 1.4 kg/m 2 ) to up-regulate functional connectivity between the dlPFC and the vmPFC by means of a four-day rt-fMRI neurofeedback protocol including, on each day, three training runs comprised of six up-regulation and six passive viewing trials. During the up-regulation runs of the four training days, participants successfully learned to increase functional connectivity between dlPFC and vmPFC. In addition, a trend towards less high-calorie food choices emerged from before to after training, which however was associated with a trend towards increased covertly assessed snack intake. Findings of this proof-of-concept study indicate that overweight and obese participants can increase functional connectivity between brain areas that orchestrate the top-down control of appetite for high-calorie foods. Neurofeedback training might therefore be a useful tool in achieving and maintaining weight loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Implicit sequence-specific motor learning after sub-cortical stroke is associated with increased prefrontal brain activations: An fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Sean K.; Randhawa, Bubblepreet; Wessel, Brenda; Boyd, Lara A.

    2010-01-01

    Implicit motor learning is preserved after stroke, but how the brain compensates for damage to facilitate learning is unclear. We used a random effects analysis to determine how stroke alters patterns of brain activity during implicit sequence-specific motor learning as compared to general improvements in motor control. Nine healthy participants and 9 individuals with chronic, right focal sub-cortical stroke performed a continuous joystick-based tracking task during an initial fMRI session, over 5 days of practice, and a retention test during a separate fMRI session. Sequence-specific implicit motor learning was differentiated from general improvements in motor control by comparing tracking performance on a novel, repeated tracking sequences during early practice and again at the retention test. Both groups demonstrated implicit sequence-specific motor learning at the retention test, yet substantial differences were apparent. At retention, healthy control participants demonstrated increased BOLD response in left dorsal premotor cortex (BA 6) but decreased BOLD response left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC; BA 9) during repeated sequence tracking. In contrast, at retention individuals with stroke did not show this reduction in DLPFC during repeated tracking. Instead implicit sequence-specific motor learning and general improvements in motor control were associated with increased BOLD response in the left middle frontal gyrus BA 8, regardless of sequence type after stroke. These data emphasize the potential importance of a prefrontal-based attentional network for implicit motor learning after stroke. The present study is the first to highlight the importance of the prefrontal cortex for implicit sequence-specific motor learning after stroke. PMID:20725908

  10. Spatial heterogeneity analysis of brain activation in fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In many brain diseases it can be qualitatively observed that spatial patterns in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD activation maps appear more (diffusively distributed than in healthy controls. However, measures that can quantitatively characterize this spatial distributiveness in individual subjects are lacking. In this study, we propose a number of spatial heterogeneity measures to characterize brain activation maps. The proposed methods focus on different aspects of heterogeneity, including the shape (compactness, complexity in the distribution of activated regions (fractal dimension and co-occurrence matrix, and gappiness between activated regions (lacunarity. To this end, functional MRI derived activation maps of a language and a motor task were obtained in language impaired children with (Rolandic epilepsy and compared to age-matched healthy controls. Group analysis of the activation maps revealed no significant differences between patients and controls for both tasks. However, for the language task the activation maps in patients appeared more heterogeneous than in controls. Lacunarity was the best measure to discriminate activation patterns of patients from controls (sensitivity 74%, specificity 70% and illustrates the increased irregularity of gaps between activated regions in patients. The combination of heterogeneity measures and a support vector machine approach yielded further increase in sensitivity and specificity to 78% and 80%, respectively. This illustrates that activation distributions in impaired brains can be complex and more heterogeneous than in normal brains and cannot be captured fully by a single quantity. In conclusion, heterogeneity analysis has potential to robustly characterize the increased distributiveness of brain activation in individual patients.

  11. Decoupled temporal variability and signal synchronization of spontaneous brain activity in loss of consciousness: An fMRI study in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zirui; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Jinsong; Qin, Pengmin; Wu, Xuehai; Wang, Zhiyao; Dai, Rui; Li, Yuan; Liang, Weimin; Mao, Ying; Yang, Zhong; Zhang, Jianfeng; Wolff, Annemarie; Northoff, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Two aspects of the low frequency fluctuations of spontaneous brain activity have been proposed which reflect the complex and dynamic features of resting-state activity, namely temporal variability and signal synchronization. The relationship between them, especially its role in consciousness, nevertheless remains unclear. Our study examined the temporal variability and signal synchronization of spontaneous brain activity, as well as their relationship during loss of consciousness. We applied an intra-subject design of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) in two conditions: during wakefulness, and under anesthesia with clinical unconsciousness. In addition, an independent group of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) was included in order to test the reliability of our findings. We observed a global reduction in the temporal variability, local and distant brain signal synchronization for subjects during anesthesia. Importantly, we found a link between temporal variability and both local and distant signal synchronizations during wakefulness: the higher the degree of temporal variability, the higher its intra-regional homogeneity and inter-regional functional connectivity. In contrast, this link was broken down under anesthesia, implying a decoupling between temporal variability and signal synchronization; this decoupling was reproduced in patients with DOC. Our results suggest that there exist some as yet unclear physiological mechanisms of consciousness which "couple" the two mathematically independent measures, temporal variability and signal synchronization of spontaneous brain activity. Our findings not only extend our current knowledge of the neural correlates of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness, but have implications for both computational neural modeling and clinical practice, such as in the diagnosis of loss of consciousness in patients with DOC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Serum BDNF correlates with connectivity in the (pre)motor hub in the aging human brain--a resting-state fMRI pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Karsten; Arelin, Katrin; Möller, Harald E; Sacher, Julia; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Luck, Tobias; Riedel-Heller, Steffi; Villringer, Arno; Schroeter, Matthias L

    2016-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been discussed to be involved in plasticity processes in the human brain, in particular during aging. Recently, aging and its (neurodegenerative) diseases have increasingly been conceptualized as disconnection syndromes. Here, connectivity changes in neural networks (the connectome) are suggested to be the most relevant and characteristic features for such processes or diseases. To further elucidate the impact of aging on neural networks, we investigated the interaction between plasticity processes, brain connectivity, and healthy aging by measuring levels of serum BDNF and resting-state fMRI data in 25 young (mean age 24.8 ± 2.7 (SD) years) and 23 old healthy participants (mean age, 68.6 ± 4.1 years). To identify neural hubs most essentially related to serum BDNF, we applied graph theory approaches, namely the new data-driven and parameter-free approach eigenvector centrality (EC) mapping. The analysis revealed a positive correlation between serum BDNF and EC in the premotor and motor cortex in older participants in contrast to young volunteers, where we did not detect any association. This positive relationship between serum BDNF and EC appears to be specific for older adults. Our results might indicate that the amount of physical activity and learning capacities, leading to higher BDNF levels, increases brain connectivity in (pre)motor areas in healthy aging in agreement with rodent animal studies. Pilot results have to be replicated in a larger sample including behavioral data to disentangle the cause for the relationship between BDNF levels and connectivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multivariate segmentation of fMRI for human brain mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Tianhu; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2000-04-01

    fMRI has provided a new option to study cognitive phenomena. Recent developments in medical image processing and analysis allow researchers to study more elaborate cognitive tasks from a wide perspective. These techniques include Statistical Parametric Mapping, Subspace Modeling and Maximum Likelihood Estimation, and Spatio-temporal Analysis using Random Fields. Their common weakness is the assumption of the statistical independence among the image pixels. We have developed a multivariate segmentation method to functional MRI analysis for human brain function study based on the second-order statistics of images. It consists of four steps: (1) detecting the number of the distinctive image regions, (2) generating the scores and determining their rank, (3) forming score plots and clustering in the feature space, (4) projecting clusters from the feature space to the image space to generate object images. We have validated this method on the simulated and fMRI images. The theoretical and experimental results obtained by using this method were in good agreement. The relations between this method and other multivariate image analysis methods are discussed.

  14. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skehan, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Norris, S. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hegarty, J. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owens, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacErlaine, D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    1997-08-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Test-retest reliability of fMRI brain activity during memory-encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Brandt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying hemispheric specialization of memory are not completely understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI can be used to develop and test models of hemispheric specialization. In particular for memory tasks however, the interpretation of fMRI results is often hampered by the low reliability of the data. In the present study we therefore analyzed the test-retest reliability of fMRI brain activation related to an implicit memory encoding task, with a particular focus on brain activity of the medial temporal lobe (MTL. Fifteen healthy subjects were scanned with fMRI on two sessions (average retest interval 35 days using a commonly applied novelty encoding paradigm contrasting known and unknown stimuli. To assess brain lateralization, we used three different stimuli classes that differed in their verbalizability (words, scenes, fractals. Test-retest reliability of fMRI brain activation was assessed by an intraclass-correlation coefficient (ICC, describing the stability of inter-individual differences in the brain activation magnitude over time. We found as expected a left-lateralized brain activation network for the words paradigm, a bilateral network for the scenes paradigm, and predominantly right-hemispheric brain activation for the fractals paradigm. Although these networks were consistently activated in both sessions on the group level, across-subject reliabilities were only poor to fair (ICCs ≤ 0.45. Overall, the highest ICC values were obtained for the scenes paradigm, but only in strongly activated brain regions. In particular the reliability of brain activity of the MTL was poor for all paradigms. In conclusion, for novelty encoding paradigms the interpretation of fMRI results on a single subject level is hampered by its low reliability. More studies are needed to optimize the retest reliability of fMRI activation for memory tasks.

  16. Blood Flow and Brain Function: Investigations of neurovascular coupling using BOLD fMRI at 7 tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siero, J.C.W.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of ultra high field (7 tesla) MRI systems has opened the possibility to probe biological processes of the human body in great detail. Especially for studying brain function using BOLD fMRI there is a large benefit from the increased magnetic field strength. BOLD fMRI is the working horse

  17. Four-year longitudinal performance of a population-based sample of healthy children on a neuropsychological battery: the NIH MRI study of normal brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waber, Deborah P; Forbes, Peter W; Almli, C Robert; Blood, Emily A

    2012-03-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Study of Normal Brain Development is a landmark study in which structural and metabolic brain development and behavior are followed longitudinally from birth to young adulthood in a population-based sample of healthy children. Cross-sectional findings from the neuropsychological test battery have been previously described (Waber et al., 2007). The present report details 4-year longitudinal neuropsychological outcomes for those children who were aged 6 to 18 years at baseline (N = 383), of whom 219 (57.2%) completed all 3 visits. Primary observations were (1) individual children displayed considerable variation in scores across visits on the same measures; (2) income-related differences were more prominent in the longitudinal than in the cross-sectional data; (3) no association between cognitive and behavioral measures and body mass index; and (4) several measures showed practice effects, despite the 2-year interval between visits. These data offer an unparalleled opportunity to observe normative performance and change over time on a set of standard and commonly used neuropsychological measures in a population-based sample of healthy children. They thus provide important background for the use and interpretation of these instruments in both research settings and clinical practice.

  18. Brain activation in teenagers with isolated spelling disorder during tasks involving spelling assessment and comparison of pseudowords. fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowska, Aneta Rita; Francuz, Piotr; Soluch, Paweł; Wolak, Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    The present study aimed at defining the specific traits of brain activation in teenagers with isolated spelling disorder in comparison with good spellers. fMRI examination was performed where the subject's task involved taking a decision 1/whether the visually presented words were spelled correctly or not (the orthographic decision task), and 2/whether the two presented letters strings (pseudowords) were identical or not (the visual decision task). Half of the displays showing meaningful words with an orthographic difficulty contained pairs with both words spelled correctly, and half of them contained one misspelled word. Half of the pseudowords were identical, half of them were not. The participants of the study included 15 individuals with isolated spelling disorder and 14 good spellers, aged 13-15. The results demonstrated that the essential differences in brain activation between teenagers with isolated spelling disorder and good spellers were found in the left inferior frontal gyrus, left medial frontal gyrus and right cerebellum posterior lobe, i.e. structures important for language processes, working memory and automaticity of behaviour. Spelling disorder is not only an effect of language dysfunction, it could be a symptom of difficulties in learning and automaticity of motor and visual shapes of written words, rapid information processing as well as automating use of orthographic lexicon. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rhesus monkey brain development during late infancy and the effect of phencyclidine: a longitudinal MRI and DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cirong; Tian, Xiaoguang; Liu, Huilang; Mo, Yin; Bai, Fan; Zhao, Xudong; Ma, Yuanye; Wang, Jianhong

    2015-02-15

    Early brain development is a complex and rapid process, the disturbance of which may cause the onset of brain disorders. Based on longitudinal imaging data acquired from 6 to 16 months postnatal, we describe a systematic trajectory of monkey brain development during late infancy, and demonstrate the influence of phencyclidine (PCP) on this trajectory. Although the general developmental trajectory of the monkey brain was close to that of the human brain, the development in monkeys was faster and regionally specific. Gray matter volume began to decrease during late infancy in monkeys, much earlier than in humans in whom it occurs in adolescence. Additionally, the decrease of gray matter volume in higher-order association regions (the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes) occurred later than in regions for primary functions (the occipital lobe and cerebellum). White matter volume displayed an increasing trend in most brain regions, but not in the occipital lobe, which had a stable volume. In addition, based on diffusion tensor imaging, we found an increase in fractional anisotropy and a decrease in diffusivity, which may be associated with myelination and axonal changes in white matter tracts. Meanwhile, we tested the influence of 14-day PCP treatment on the developmental trajectories. Such treatment tended to accelerated brain maturation during late infancy, although not statistically significant. These findings provide comparative information for the understanding of primate brain maturation and neurodevelopmental disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Implications of neurovascular uncoupling in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Rebecca W; Hadjiabadi, Darian H; Senarathna, Janaka; Agarwal, Shruti; Thakor, Nitish V; Pillai, Jay J; Pathak, Arvind P

    2017-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) serves as a critical tool for presurgical mapping of eloquent cortex and changes in neurological function in patients diagnosed with brain tumors. However, the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism underlying fMRI assumes that neurovascular coupling remains intact during brain tumor progression, and that measured changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) are correlated with neuronal function. Recent preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that even low-grade brain tumors can exhibit neurovascular uncoupling (NVU), which can confound interpretation of fMRI data. Therefore, to avoid neurosurgical complications, it is crucial to understand the biophysical basis of NVU and its impact on fMRI. Here we review the physiology of the neurovascular unit, how it is remodeled, and functionally altered by brain cancer cells. We first discuss the latest findings about the components of the neurovascular unit. Next, we synthesize results from preclinical and clinical studies to illustrate how brain tumor induced NVU affects fMRI data interpretation. We examine advances in functional imaging methods that permit the clinical evaluation of brain tumors with NVU. Finally, we discuss how the suppression of anomalous tumor blood vessel formation with antiangiogenic therapies can "normalize" the brain tumor vasculature, and potentially restore neurovascular coupling.

  1. Predicting aphasia type from brain damage measured with structural MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yourganov, Grigori; Smith, Kimberly G; Fridriksson, Julius; Rorden, Chris

    2015-12-01

    Chronic aphasia is a common consequence of a left-hemisphere stroke. Since the early insights by Broca and Wernicke, studying the relationship between the loci of cortical damage and patterns of language impairment has been one of the concerns of aphasiology. We utilized multivariate classification in a cross-validation framework to predict the type of chronic aphasia from the spatial pattern of brain damage. Our sample consisted of 98 patients with five types of aphasia (Broca's, Wernicke's, global, conduction, and anomic), classified based on scores on the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB). Binary lesion maps were obtained from structural MRI scans (obtained at least 6 months poststroke, and within 2 days of behavioural assessment); after spatial normalization, the lesions were parcellated into a disjoint set of brain areas. The proportion of damage to the brain areas was used to classify patients' aphasia type. To create this parcellation, we relied on five brain atlases; our classifier (support vector machine - SVM) could differentiate between different kinds of aphasia using any of the five parcellations. In our sample, the best classification accuracy was obtained when using a novel parcellation that combined two previously published brain atlases, with the first atlas providing the segmentation of grey matter, and the second atlas used to segment the white matter. For each aphasia type, we computed the relative importance of different brain areas for distinguishing it from other aphasia types; our findings were consistent with previously published reports of lesion locations implicated in different types of aphasia. Overall, our results revealed that automated multivariate classification could distinguish between aphasia types based on damage to atlas-defined brain areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. PREDICTING APHASIA TYPE FROM BRAIN DAMAGE MEASURED WITH STRUCTURAL MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yourganov, Grigori; Smith, Kimberly G.; Fridriksson, Julius; Rorden, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Chronic aphasia is a common consequence of a left-hemisphere stroke. Since the early insights by Broca and Wernicke, studying the relationship between the loci of cortical damage and patterns of language impairment has been one of the concerns of aphasiology. We utilized multivariate classification in a cross-validation framework to predict the type of chronic aphasia from the spatial pattern of brain damage. Our sample consisted of 98 patients with five types of aphasia (Broca’s, Wernicke’s, global, conduction, and anomic), classified based on scores on the Western Aphasia Battery. Binary lesion maps were obtained from structural MRI scans (obtained at least 6 months poststroke, and within 2 days of behavioural assessment); after spatial normalization, the lesions were parcellated into a disjoint set of brain areas. The proportion of damage to the brain areas was used to classify patients’ aphasia type. To create this parcellation, we relied on five brain atlases; our classifier (support vector machine) could differentiate between different kinds of aphasia using any of the five parcellations. In our sample, the best classification accuracy was obtained when using a novel parcellation that combined two previously published brain atlases, with the first atlas providing the segmentation of grey matter, and the second atlas used to segment the white matter. For each aphasia type, we computed the relative importance of different brain areas for distinguishing it from other aphasia types; our findings were consistent with previously published reports of lesion locations implicated in different types of aphasia. Overall, our results revealed that automated multivariate classification could distinguish between aphasia types based on damage to atlas-defined brain areas. PMID:26465238

  3. Brain Functional Plasticity Driven by Career Experience: A Resting-State fMRI Study of the Seafarer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizhuan Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The functional connectome derived from BOLD resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data represents meaningful functional organizations and a shift between distinct cognitive states. However, the body of knowledge on how the long-term career experience affects the brain’s functional plasticity is still very limited. In this study, we used a dynamic functional connectome characterization (DBFCC model with the automatic target generation process K-Means clustering to explore the functional reorganization property of resting brain states, driven by long-term career experience. Taking sailors as an example, DBFCC generated seventeen reproducibly common atomic connectome patterns (ACP and one reproducibly distinct ACP, i.e., ACP14. The common ACPs indicating the same functional topology of the resting brain state transitions were shared by two control groups, while the distinct ACP, which mainly represented functional plasticity and only existed in the sailors, showed close relationships with the long-term career experience of sailors. More specifically, the distinct ACP14 of the sailors was made up of four specific sub-networks, such as the auditory network, visual network, executive control network, and vestibular function-related network, which were most likely linked to sailing experience, i.e., continuously suffering auditory noise, maintaining balance, locating one’s position in three-dimensional space at sea, obeying orders, etc. Our results demonstrated DBFCC’s effectiveness in revealing the specifically functional alterations modulated by sailing experience and particularly provided the evidence that functional plasticity was beneficial in reorganizing brain’s functional topology, which could be driven by career experience.

  4. Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnada A. Narayana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, magnetization transfer ratio (MTR imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h and at follow-up (~90 days. DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS. Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM. MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI.

  5. Interaction vs. observation: distinctive modes of social cognition in human brain and behavior? A combined fMRI and eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylén, Kristian; Allen, Micah; Hunter, Bjørk K; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Human cognition has usually been approached on the level of individual minds and brains, but social interaction is a challenging case. Is it best thought of as a self-contained individual cognitive process aiming at an "understanding of the other," or should it rather be approached as an collective, inter-personal process where individual cognitive components interact on a moment-to-moment basis to form coupled dynamics? In a combined fMRI and eye-tracking study we directly contrasted these models of social cognition. We found that the perception of situations affording social contingent responsiveness (e.g., someone offering or showing you an object) elicited activations in regions of the right posterior temporal sulcus and yielded greater pupil dilation corresponding to a model of coupled dynamics (joint action). In contrast, the social-cognitive perception of someone "privately" manipulating an object elicited activation in medial prefrontal cortex, the right inferior frontal gyrus and right inferior parietal lobus, regions normally associated with Theory of Mind and with the mirror neuron system. Our findings support a distinction in social cognition between social observation and social interaction, and demonstrate that simple ostensive cues may shift participants' experience, behavior, and brain activity between these modes. The identification of a distinct, interactive mode has implications for research on social cognition, both in everyday life and in clinical conditions.

  6. Interaction versus Observation: distinctive modes of social cognition in human brain and behavior? A combined fMRI and eye-tracking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian eTylen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Human cognition has usually been approached on the level of individual minds and brains, but social interaction is a challenging case. Is it best thought of as a self-contained individual cognitive process aiming at an ‘understanding of the other’, or should it rather be approached as an collective, inter-personal process where individual cognitive components interact on a moment-to-moment basis to form coupled dynamics? In a combined fMRI and eye tracking study we directly contrasted these models of social cognition. We found that the perception of situations affording social contingent responsiveness (e.g. someone offering or showing you an object elicited activations in regions of the right posterior temporal sulcus and yielded greater pupil dilation corresponding to a model of coupled dynamics (joint action. In contrast, the social-cognitive perception of someone ‘privately’ manipulating an object elicited activation in medial prefrontal cortex, the right inferior frontal gyrus and right inferior parietal lobus, regions normally associated with Theory of Mind and with the mirror neuron system. Our findings support a distinction in social cognition between social observation and social interaction, and demonstrate that simple ostensive cues may shift participants’ experience, behavior and brain activity between these modes. The identification of a distinct, interactive mode has implications for research on social cognition, both in everyday life and in clinical conditions.

  7. Brain regional homogeneity changes following transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in cirrhotic patients support cerebral adaptability theory—A resting-state functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Ling; Qi, Rongfeng [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhang, Long Jiang, E-mail: kevinzhlj@163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhong, Jianhui [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Zheng, Gang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Wu, Xingjiang; Fan, Xinxin [Department of General Surgery, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Lu, Guang Ming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The exact neuro-pathophysiological effect of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) on brain function remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the longitudinal brain activity changes in cirrhotic patients with TIPS insertion using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) with regional homogeneity (ReHo) method. Methods: Fifteen cirrhotic patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) planned for TIPS procedure and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Eleven of the 15 patients underwent repeated fMRI examinations at median 7-day following TIPS, 8 patients in median 3-month, and 7 patients in median 1-year follow-up duration, respectively. Regional homogeneity was calculated by the Kendall's coefficient of concordance (KCC) and compared between patients before TIPS and healthy controls with two-sample t test as well as pre-and post-TIPS patients with paired t test. Correlations between the pre- and post-TIPS changes of ReHo and the changes of venous blood ammonia level and number connection test type A (NCT-A)/digit symbol test (DST) scores were calculated by crossing subjects. Results: Compared with healthy controls, 15 cirrhotic patients before TIPS procedure showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes and increased ReHo in the bilateral caudate. Compared with the pre-TIPS patients, 11 post-TIPS patients in the median 7-day follow-up examinations demonstrated decreased ReHo in the medial frontal gyrus (MFG), superior parietal gyrus (SPG), middle/superior temporal gyrus (M/STG), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), caudate, and increased ReHo in the insula. Eight post-TIPS patients in the median 3-month follow-up examinations showed widespread decreased ReHo in the bilateral frontal and parietal lobes, ACC, caudate, and increased ReHo in the insula and precuneus/cuneus. In the median 1-year follow-up studies, seven post-TIPS patients displayed

  8. Learning-based meta-algorithm for MRI brain extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Li; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    Multiple-segmentation-and-fusion method has been widely used for brain extraction, tissue segmentation, and region of interest (ROI) localization. However, such studies are hindered in practice by their computational complexity, mainly coming from the steps of template selection and template-to-subject nonlinear registration. In this study, we address these two issues and propose a novel learning-based meta-algorithm for MRI brain extraction. Specifically, we first use exemplars to represent the entire template library, and assign the most similar exemplar to the test subject. Second, a meta-algorithm combining two existing brain extraction algorithms (BET and BSE) is proposed to conduct multiple extractions directly on test subject. Effective parameter settings for the meta-algorithm are learned from the training data and propagated to subject through exemplars. We further develop a level-set based fusion method to combine multiple candidate extractions together with a closed smooth surface, for obtaining the final result. Experimental results show that, with only a small portion of subjects for training, the proposed method is able to produce more accurate and robust brain extraction results, at Jaccard Index of 0.956 +/- 0.010 on total 340 subjects under 6-fold cross validation, compared to those by the BET and BSE even using their best parameter combinations.

  9. Construction of brain atlases based on a multi-center MRI dataset of 2020 Chinese adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peipeng; Shi, Lin; Chen, Nan; Luo, Yishan; Wang, Xing; Liu, Kai; Mok, Vincent CT; Chu, Winnie CW; Wang, Defeng; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known morphological differences (e.g., brain shape and size) in the brains of populations of different origins (e.g., age and race), the Chinese brain atlas is less studied. In the current study, we developed a statistical brain atlas based on a multi-center high quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset of 2020 Chinese adults (18–76 years old). We constructed 12 Chinese brain atlas from the age 20 year to the age 75 at a 5 years interval. New Chinese brain standard space, coordinates, and brain area labels were further defined. The new Chinese brain atlas was validated in brain registration and segmentation. It was found that, as contrast to the MNI152 template, the proposed Chinese atlas showed higher accuracy in hippocampus segmentation and relatively smaller shape deformations during registration. These results indicate that a population-specific time varying brain atlas may be more appropriate for studies involving Chinese populations. PMID:26678304

  10. A quantitative MRI method for imaging blood-brain barrier leakage in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption is common following traumatic brain injury (TBI. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE MRI can longitudinally measure the transport coefficient Ktrans which reflects BBB permeability. Ktrans measurements however are not widely used in TBI research because it is generally considered to be noisy and possesses low spatial resolution. We improved spatiotemporal resolution and signal sensitivity of Ktrans MRI in rats by using a high-sensitivity surface transceiver coil. To overcome the signal drop off profile of the surface coil, a pre-scan module was used to map the flip angle (B1 field and magnetization (M0 distributions. A series of T1-weighted gradient echo images were acquired and fitted to the extended Kety model with reversible or irreversible leakage, and the best model was selected using F-statistics. We applied this method to study the rat brain one hour following controlled cortical impact (mild to moderate TBI, and observed clear depiction of the BBB damage around the impact regions, which matched that outlined by Evans Blue extravasation. Unlike the relatively uniform T2 contrast showing cerebral edema, Ktrans shows a pronounced heterogeneous spatial profile in and around the impact regions, displaying a nonlinear relationship with T2. This improved Ktrans MRI method is also compatible with the use of high-sensitivity surface coil and the high-contrast two-coil arterial spin-labeling method for cerebral blood flow measurement, enabling more comprehensive investigation of the pathophysiology in TBI.

  11. MRI reveals brain abnormalities in drug-naïve Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Planetta, Peggy J.; McFarland, Nikolaus R.; Okun, Michael S.; Vaillancourt, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Most brain studies of Parkinson’s disease (PD) focus on patients who are already taking anti-parkinsonian medication. This makes it difficult to isolate the effects of disease from those of treatment. We review MRI evidence supporting the hypothesis that early-stage, untreated PD patients have structural and functional abnormalities in the brain, some of which are related to motor symptoms.

  12. Parallel workflow tools to facilitate human brain MRI post-processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaixu eCui

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques are widely applied in human brain studies. To obtain specific brain measures of interest from MRI datasets, a number of complex image post-processing steps are typically required. Parallel workflow tools have recently been developed, concatenating individual processing steps and enabling fully automated processing of raw MRI data to obtain the final results. These workflow tools are also designed to make optimal use of available computational resources and to support the parallel processing of different subjects or of independent processing steps for a single subject. Automated, parallel MRI post-processing tools can greatly facilitate relevant brain investigations and are being increasingly applied. In this review, we briefly summarize these parallel workflow tools and discuss relevant issues.

  13. Accelerated Brain DCE-MRI Using Iterative Reconstruction With Total Generalized Variation Penalty for Quantitative Pharmacokinetic Analysis: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhao; Yin, Fang-Fang; Kirkpatrick, John P; Chang, Zheng

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using undersampled k-space data and an iterative image reconstruction method with total generalized variation penalty in the quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis for clinical brain dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Eight brain dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging scans were retrospectively studied. Two k-space sparse sampling strategies were designed to achieve a simulated image acquisition acceleration factor of 4. They are (1) a golden ratio-optimized 32-ray radial sampling profile and (2) a Cartesian-based random sampling profile with spatiotemporal-regularized sampling density constraints. The undersampled data were reconstructed to yield images using the investigated reconstruction technique. In quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis on a voxel-by-voxel basis, the rate constant Ktrans in the extended Tofts model and blood flow FB and blood volume VB from the 2-compartment exchange model were analyzed. Finally, the quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters calculated from the undersampled data were compared with the corresponding calculated values from the fully sampled data. To quantify each parameter's accuracy calculated using the undersampled data, error in volume mean, total relative error, and cross-correlation were calculated. The pharmacokinetic parameter maps generated from the undersampled data appeared comparable to the ones generated from the original full sampling data. Within the region of interest, most derived error in volume mean values in the region of interest was about 5% or lower, and the average error in volume mean of all parameter maps generated through either sampling strategy was about 3.54%. The average total relative error value of all parameter maps in region of interest was about 0.115, and the average cross-correlation of all parameter maps in region of interest was about 0.962. All investigated pharmacokinetic parameters had no significant differences between the

  14. MRI and brain spect findings in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and normal CT scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carrilho

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available 26 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy clinically documented by several abnormal interictal surface EEGs with typical unitemporal epileptiform activity and a normal CT scan were studied. Interictal99mTC HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI were performed in all subjects. Abnormalities were shown in 61.5% of MRI (n=16 and 65.4% of SPECT (n=17. Hippocampal atrophy associated to a high signal on T2-weighted MRI slices suggesting mesial temporal sclerosis was the main finding (n=12; 75% of abnormal MRI. MRI correlated well to surface EEG in 50% (n=13. There was also a good correlation between MRI and SPECT in 30.7% (n=8. SPECT and EEG were in agreement in 57.7% (n=l5. MRI, SPECT and EEG were congruent in 26.9% (n=7. These results support the usefulness of interictal brain SPECT and MRI in detecting lateralized abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy. On the other hand, in two cases, interictal SPECT correlated poorly with surface EEG. This functional method should not be used isolately in the detection of temporal lobe foci. MRI is more useful than CT as a neuroimaging technique in temporal lobe epilepsy. It may detect small structural lesions and mesial temporal lobe sclerosis which are not easily seen with traditional CT scanning.

  15. Brain plasticity and migraine transformation: fMRI evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovati, Carlo; Giani, Luca; Mele, Francesco; Sinelli, Alessandro; Tien, Thien Trung; Preziosa, Giulia; Mariani, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Chronification transforms episodic migraine into the pathologic chronic form. Biological characteristics of the migrainous brain progressively change, in predisposed subjects, under the repetition of external and internal stimuli. Modifications involve neurons, synapses, neurotransmitters, receptors, connectivity and pain control. f-MRI is a promising way to explore the still unclear biology of this progression. Areas covered: Data included were obtained from the most relevant and updated works available on PubMed about this topic. We summarized the pathophysiology of migraine chronification and of brain plasticity, and we described the different fMRI techniques and their main evidences about migraine transformation. Expert commentary: Functional-MRI has revealed many aspects regarding the peculiarity of the migrainous brain and its tendency toward chronicity but a series of questions are still open: What are the hallmarks of the predisposition to chronification? Which elements are the cause and which the consequence of this process?

  16. MRI Evaluation and Safety in the Developing Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchio, Shannon; Kline-Fath, Beth; Kanal, Emanuel; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of the developing brain has dramatically increased over the last decade. Faster acquisitions and the development of advanced MRI sequences such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), perfusion imaging, functional MR imaging (fMRI), and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), as well as the use of higher magnetic field strengths has made MRI an invaluable tool for detailed evaluation of the developing brain. This article will provide an overview of the use and challenges associated with 1.5T and 3T static magnetic fields for evaluation of the developing brain. This review will also summarize the advantages, clinical challenges and safety concerns specifically related to MRI in the fetus and newborn, including the implications of increased magnetic field strength, logistics related to transporting and monitoring of neonates during scanning, sedation considerations and a discussion of current technologies such as MRI-conditional neonatal incubators and dedicated small-foot print neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) scanners. PMID:25743582

  17. Lying about Facial Recognition: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, S.; Mbwana, J.; Adeyemo, A.; Sawyer, A.; Hailu, A.; VanMeter, J.

    2009-01-01

    Novel deception detection techniques have been in creation for centuries. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a neuroscience technology that non-invasively measures brain activity associated with behavior and cognition. A number of investigators have explored the utilization and efficiency of fMRI in deception detection. In this study,…

  18. A three-dimensional MRI atlas of the zebra finch brain in stereotaxic coordinates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poirier, Colline; Vellema, Michiel; Verhoye, Marleen

    2008-01-01

    The neurobiology of birdsong, as a model for human speech, is a fast growing area of research in the neurosciences and involves electrophysiological, histological and more recently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches. Many of these studies require the identification and localization...... of different brain areas (nuclei) involved in the sensory and motor control of song. Until now, the only published atlases of songbird brains consisted in drawings based on histological slices of the canary and of the zebra finch brain. Taking advantage of high-magnetic field (7 Tesla) MRI technique, we...

  19. Biomarkers, designs, and interpretations of resting-state fMRI in translational pharmacological research: A review of state-of-the-Art, challenges, and opportunities for studying brain chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van Osch, Matthias J P; Duff, Eugene P; Carbonell, Felix; Nickerson, Lisa D; Becerra, Lino; Dahan, Albert; Evans, Alan C; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Wise, Richard; Zijdenbos, Alex P; van Gerven, Joop M

    2017-04-01

    A decade of research and development in resting-state functional MRI (RSfMRI) has opened new translational and clinical research frontiers. This review aims to bridge between technical and clinical researchers who seek reliable neuroimaging biomarkers for studying drug interactions with the brain. About 85 pharma-RSfMRI studies using BOLD signal (75% of all) or arterial spin labeling (ASL) were surveyed to investigate the acute effects of psychoactive drugs. Experimental designs and objectives include drug fingerprinting dose-response evaluation, biomarker validation and calibration, and translational studies. Common biomarkers in these studies include functional connectivity, graph metrics, cerebral blood flow and the amplitude and spectrum of BOLD fluctuations. Overall, RSfMRI-derived biomarkers seem to be sensitive to spatiotemporal dynamics of drug interactions with the brain. However, drugs cause both central and peripheral effects, thus exacerbate difficulties related to biological confounds, structured noise from motion and physiological confounds, as well as modeling and inference testing. Currently, these issues are not well explored, and heterogeneities in experimental design, data acquisition and preprocessing make comparative or meta-analysis of existing reports impossible. A unifying collaborative framework for data-sharing and data-mining is thus necessary for investigating the commonalities and differences in biomarker sensitivity and specificity, and establishing guidelines. Multimodal datasets including sham-placebo or active control sessions and repeated measurements of various psychometric, physiological, metabolic and neuroimaging phenotypes are essential for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling and interpretation of the findings. We provide a list of basic minimum and advanced options that can be considered in design and analyses of future pharma-RSfMRI studies. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2276-2325, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The

  20. Imaging the premature brain: ultrasound or MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Linda S. de; Benders, Manon J.N.L.; Groenendaal, Floris [UMC Utrecht, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, PO Box 85090, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Neuroimaging of preterm infants has become part of routine clinical care, but the question is often raised on how often cranial ultrasound should be done and whether every high risk preterm infant should at least have one MRI during the neonatal period. An increasing number of centres perform an MRI either at discharge or around term equivalent age, and a few centres have access to a magnet in or adjacent to the neonatal intensive care unit and are doing sequential MRIs. In this review, we try to discuss when best to perform these two neuroimaging techniques and the additional information each technique may provide. (orig.)

  1. Developmental differences in the brain response to unhealthy food cues : An fMRI study of children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, Floor|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375286829; van der Laan, Laura N|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341735051; Charbonnier, Lisette|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41364118X; Viergever, Max A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/108781828; Adan, Roger Ah|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/096757191; Smeets, Paul Am|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817740

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Food cues are omnipresent and may trigger overconsumption. In the past 2 decades, the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically. Because children's brains are still developing, especially in areas important for inhibition, children may be more susceptible than adults to

  2. Incidental use of ecstasy: no evidence for harmful effects on cognitive brain function in a prospective fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Gerry; de Win, Maartje M.; Vervaeke, Hylke K.; Schilt, Thelma; Kahn, Rene S.; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M.; Ramsey, Nick F.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Heavy ecstasy use in humans has been associated with cognitive impairments and changes in cognitive brain function supposedly due to damage to the serotonin system. There is concern that even a single dose of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine may be neurotoxic, but very little is known

  3. Structural and Functional Brain Remodeling during Pregnancy with Diffusion Tensor MRI and Resting-State Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Russell W.; Ho, Leon C.; Zhou, Iris Y.; Gao, Patrick P.; Chan, Kevin C.; Wu, Ed X.

    2015-01-01

    Although pregnancy-induced hormonal changes have been shown to alter the brain at the neuronal level, the exact effects of pregnancy on brain at the tissue level remain unclear. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) were employed to investigate and document the effects of pregnancy on the structure and function of the brain tissues. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley female rats were longitudinally studied at three days before mating (baseline) and seventeen days after mating (G17). G17 is equivalent to the early stage of the third trimester in humans. Seven age-matched nulliparous female rats served as non-pregnant controls and were scanned at the same time-points. For DTI, diffusivity was found to generally increase in the whole brain during pregnancy, indicating structural changes at microscopic levels that facilitated water molecular movement. Regionally, mean diffusivity increased more pronouncedly in the dorsal hippocampus while fractional anisotropy in the dorsal dentate gyrus increased significantly during pregnancy. For rsfMRI, bilateral functional connectivity in the hippocampus increased significantly during pregnancy. Moreover, fractional anisotropy increase in the dentate gyrus appeared to correlate with the bilateral functional connectivity increase in the hippocampus. These findings revealed tissue structural modifications in the whole brain during pregnancy, and that the hippocampus was structurally and functionally remodeled in a more marked manner. PMID:26658306

  4. Structural and Functional Brain Remodeling during Pregnancy with Diffusion Tensor MRI and Resting-State Functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell W Chan

    Full Text Available Although pregnancy-induced hormonal changes have been shown to alter the brain at the neuronal level, the exact effects of pregnancy on brain at the tissue level remain unclear. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI were employed to investigate and document the effects of pregnancy on the structure and function of the brain tissues. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley female rats were longitudinally studied at three days before mating (baseline and seventeen days after mating (G17. G17 is equivalent to the early stage of the third trimester in humans. Seven age-matched nulliparous female rats served as non-pregnant controls and were scanned at the same time-points. For DTI, diffusivity was found to generally increase in the whole brain during pregnancy, indicating structural changes at microscopic levels that facilitated water molecular movement. Regionally, mean diffusivity increased more pronouncedly in the dorsal hippocampus while fractional anisotropy in the dorsal dentate gyrus increased significantly during pregnancy. For rsfMRI, bilateral functional connectivity in the hippocampus increased significantly during pregnancy. Moreover, fractional anisotropy increase in the dentate gyrus appeared to correlate with the bilateral functional connectivity increase in the hippocampus. These findings revealed tissue structural modifications in the whole brain during pregnancy, and that the hippocampus was structurally and functionally remodeled in a more marked manner.

  5. Brain MRI in Congenital Muscular Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 21 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) complicated by cerebral anomalies were analysed from data collected at several Departments of Child Neurology, The Netherlands: Free University Hospital, and Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam; Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam; Leiden University Hospital; Groningen University Hospital; and St Radboud University Hospital, Nijmegen.

  6. Experience of brain checkup by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagawa, Youichi [Self Defence Force Sasebo Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan); Hirata, Fumihiko; Gotoh, Masayuki; Fujita, Kazuyuki; Makiyama, Takao; Ishikawa, Junichiro

    1996-09-01

    We performed head MRI and MR angiography (MRA) to find asymptomatic central nervous system (CNS) diseases and to prevent their development as a group health care. We performed 583 head MRI and MRAs since on March 1991 for the staff lived in Self Defence Force (SDF) Maizuru guard area whose age was 40 years, who reached the retirement age and had the risk factor of the cerebral vascular disease. We found 119 subcortical lesions, 26 asymptomatic cerebral infarctions, 6 unruptured cerebral aneurysm, 2 pituitary adenomas, 4 venous angiomas. For 5 cases of asymptomatic cerebral infarction, we prescribed anti-platelet agglutination drugs, there was no people whose disease became symptomatic. For unruptured cerebral aneurysms and pituitary adenomas, we did operation, everyone attained social rehabilitation. Before equipment of the MRI in SDF Maizuru hospital, 2 ruptured cerebral aneurysms occurs. There were no subarachnoid hemorrhage patient since our challenge started in SDF Maizuru guard area. It is useful to clarify the etiology of CNS disease and for group health care, using head MRI as medical checkup. (author)

  7. Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) -- Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is ...

  8. Resting-state fMRI: a window into human brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Carrillo, Belén; Mackey, Allyson P; Bunge, Silvia A

    2014-10-01

    Although brain plasticity is greatest in the first few years of life, the brain continues to be shaped by experience throughout adulthood. Advances in fMRI have enabled us to examine the plasticity of large-scale networks using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) correlations measured at rest. Resting-state functional connectivity analysis makes it possible to measure task-independent changes in brain function and therefore could provide unique insights into experience-dependent brain plasticity in humans. Here, we evaluate the hypothesis that resting-state functional connectivity reflects the repeated history of co-activation between brain regions. To this end, we review resting-state fMRI studies in the sensory, motor, and cognitive learning literature. This body of research provides evidence that the brain's resting-state functional architecture displays dynamic properties in young adulthood. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Joint brain connectivity estimation from diffusion and functional MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shu-Hsien; Lenglet, Christophe; Parhi, Keshab K.

    2015-03-01

    Estimating brain wiring patterns is critical to better understand the brain organization and function. Anatomical brain connectivity models axonal pathways, while the functional brain connectivity characterizes the statistical dependencies and correlation between the activities of various brain regions. The synchronization of brain activity can be inferred through the variation of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal from functional MRI (fMRI) and the neural connections can be estimated using tractography from diffusion MRI (dMRI). Functional connections between brain regions are supported by anatomical connections, and the synchronization of brain activities arises through sharing of information in the form of electro-chemical signals on axon pathways. Jointly modeling fMRI and dMRI data may improve the accuracy in constructing anatomical connectivity as well as functional connectivity. Such an approach may lead to novel multimodal biomarkers potentially able to better capture functional and anatomical connectivity variations. We present a novel brain network model which jointly models the dMRI and fMRI data to improve the anatomical connectivity estimation and extract the anatomical subnetworks associated with specific functional modes by constraining the anatomical connections as structural supports to the functional connections. The key idea is similar to a multi-commodity flow optimization problem that minimizes the cost or maximizes the efficiency for flow configuration and simultaneously fulfills the supply-demand constraint for each commodity. In the proposed network, the nodes represent the grey matter (GM) regions providing brain functionality, and the links represent white matter (WM) fiber bundles connecting those regions and delivering information. The commodities can be thought of as the information corresponding to brain activity patterns as obtained for instance by independent component analysis (ICA) of fMRI data. The concept of information

  10. Comparison of unsupervised classification methods for brain tumor segmentation using multi-parametric MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sauwen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor segmentation is a particularly challenging task in high-grade gliomas (HGGs, as they are among the most heterogeneous tumors in oncology. An accurate delineation of the lesion and its main subcomponents contributes to optimal treatment planning, prognosis and follow-up. Conventional MRI (cMRI is the imaging modality of choice for manual segmentation, and is also considered in the vast majority of automated segmentation studies. Advanced MRI modalities such as perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI have already shown their added value in tumor tissue characterization, hence there have been recent suggestions of combining different MRI modalities into a multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI approach for brain tumor segmentation. In this paper, we compare the performance of several unsupervised classification methods for HGG segmentation based on MP-MRI data including cMRI, DWI, MRSI and PWI. Two independent MP-MRI datasets with a different acquisition protocol were available from different hospitals. We demonstrate that a hierarchical non-negative matrix factorization variant which was previously introduced for MP-MRI tumor segmentation gives the best performance in terms of mean Dice-scores for the pathologic tissue classes on both datasets.

  11. Comparison of unsupervised classification methods for brain tumor segmentation using multi-parametric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauwen, N; Acou, M; Van Cauter, S; Sima, D M; Veraart, J; Maes, F; Himmelreich, U; Achten, E; Van Huffel, S

    2016-01-01

    Tumor segmentation is a particularly challenging task in high-grade gliomas (HGGs), as they are among the most heterogeneous tumors in oncology. An accurate delineation of the lesion and its main subcomponents contributes to optimal treatment planning, prognosis and follow-up. Conventional MRI (cMRI) is the imaging modality of choice for manual segmentation, and is also considered in the vast majority of automated segmentation studies. Advanced MRI modalities such as perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) have already shown their added value in tumor tissue characterization, hence there have been recent suggestions of combining different MRI modalities into a multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) approach for brain tumor segmentation. In this paper, we compare the performance of several unsupervised classification methods for HGG segmentation based on MP-MRI data including cMRI, DWI, MRSI and PWI. Two independent MP-MRI datasets with a different acquisition protocol were available from different hospitals. We demonstrate that a hierarchical non-negative matrix factorization variant which was previously introduced for MP-MRI tumor segmentation gives the best performance in terms of mean Dice-scores for the pathologic tissue classes on both datasets.

  12. Spontaneous Slow Fluctuation of EEG Alpha Rhythm Reflects Activity in Deep-Brain Structures: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Omata

    Full Text Available The emergence of the occipital alpha rhythm on brain electroencephalogram (EEG is associated with brain activity in the cerebral neocortex and deep brain structures. To further understand the mechanisms of alpha rhythm power fluctuation, we performed simultaneous EEGs and functional magnetic resonance imaging recordings in human subjects during a resting state and explored the dynamic relationship between alpha power fluctuation and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD signals of the brain. Based on the frequency characteristics of the alpha power time series (APTS during 20-minute EEG recordings, we divided the APTS into two components: fast fluctuation (0.04-0.167 Hz and slow fluctuation (0-0.04 Hz. Analysis of the correlation between the MRI signal and each component revealed that the slow fluctuation component of alpha power was positively correlated with BOLD signal changes in the brain stem and the medial part of the thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex, while the fast fluctuation component was correlated with the lateral part of the thalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, but not the brain stem. In summary, these data suggest that different subcortical structures contribute to slow and fast modulations of alpha spectra on brain EEG.

  13. Learning-related changes of brain activation in the visual ventral stream: an fMRI study of mirror reading skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Tsukiura, Takashi; Mochizuki, Satoshi; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2006-11-29

    A previous neuroimaging study has indicated that the visual dorsal stream may contribute to accurate reading of mirror-reversed words. However, the role of the visual ventral stream in the learning of mirror reading skill remains ambiguous. In the present fMRI study, we investigated learning-related changes in brain activation in the visual ventral stream in a mirror reading task. Subjects participated in three successive runs of the mirror reading task, in each of which they were asked to read mirror-reversed words and normal words as accurately and as quickly as possible. The behavioral data for the mirror reading condition showed significant improvement in reaction time but not in performance accuracy across the three runs. The activation data showed different learning-associated patterns related to the right and left visual ventral streams. On the right side, activity related to the reading of mirror stimuli was significantly greater than that related to normal stimuli in the first run only, whereas on the left side it was greater in all runs. Additional correlation analysis between response time data and percentage signal changes only in the mirror reading condition showed significant correlation on the right visual ventral stream in the first run only, whereas that on the left visual ventral stream was found only in the third run. The dissociable response between the right and left visual ventral streams may reflect learning-related changes in reading strategy and may be critical in improving the speed of reading mirror-reversed words.

  14. Comparison of ApoE-related brain connectivity differences in early MCI and normal aging populations: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Faye; Koo, Bang-Bon; Killiany, Ronald

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) scans from subjects with early mild cognitive impairment (EMCI) and control subjects to study functional network connectivity. The scans were acquired by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We used genetic data from the ADNI database to further subdivide the EMCI and control groups into genotype groups with or without the Apolipoprotein E allele e4 (APOE e4). Region of interest (ROI)-to-ROI resting-state functional connectivity was measured using Freesurfer and the Functional Connectivity Toolbox for Matlab (CONN). In our analysis, we compared whole-brain ROI connectivity strength and ROI-to-ROI functional network connectivity strength between EMCI, control and genotype subject groups. We found that the ROI network properties were disrupted in EMCI and APOE e4 carrier groups. Notably, we show that (1) EMCI disrupts functional connectivity strength in many important functionally-linked areas; (2) APOE e4 disrupts functional connectivity strength in similar areas to EMCI; and (3) the differences in functional connectivity between groups shows a multifactor contribution to functional network dysfunction along the trajectory leading to dementia.

  15. Imaging brain microstructure with diffusion MRI: practicality and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B; Nilsson, Markus; Zhang, Hui

    2017-11-29

    This article gives an overview of microstructure imaging of the brain with diffusion MRI and reviews the state of the art. The microstructure-imaging paradigm aims to estimate and map microscopic properties of tissue using a model that links these properties to the voxel scale MR signal. Imaging techniques of this type are just starting to make the transition from the technical research domain to wide application in biomedical studies. We focus here on the practicalities of both implementing such techniques and using them in applications. Specifically, the article summarizes the relevant aspects of brain microanatomy and the range of diffusion-weighted MR measurements that provide sensitivity to them. It then reviews the evolution of mathematical and computational models that relate the diffusion MR signal to brain tissue microstructure, as well as the expanding areas of application. Next we focus on practicalities of designing a working microstructure imaging technique: model selection, experiment design, parameter estimation, validation, and the pipeline of development of this class of technique. The article concludes with some future perspectives on opportunities in this topic and expectations on how the field will evolve in the short-to-medium term. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Diffusion MRI at 25: exploring brain tissue structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Denis; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2012-06-01

    Diffusion MRI (or dMRI) came into existence in the mid-1980s. During the last 25 years, diffusion MRI has been extraordinarily successful (with more than 300,000 entries on Google Scholar for diffusion MRI). Its main clinical domain of application has been neurological disorders, especially for the management of patients with acute stroke. It is also rapidly becoming a standard for white matter disorders, as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can reveal abnormalities in white matter fiber structure and provide outstanding maps of brain connectivity. The ability to visualize anatomical connections between different parts of the brain, non-invasively and on an individual basis, has emerged as a major breakthrough for neurosciences. The driving force of dMRI is to monitor microscopic, natural displacements of water molecules that occur in brain tissues as part of the physical diffusion process. Water molecules are thus used as a probe that can reveal microscopic details about tissue architecture, either normal or in a diseased state. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Robust brain parcellation using sparse representation on resting-state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Caspers, Svenja; Fan, Lingzhong; Fan, Yong; Song, Ming; Liu, Cirong; Mo, Yin; Roski, Christian; Eickhoff, Simon; Amunts, Katrin; Jiang, Tianzi

    2015-11-01

    Resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) has been widely used to segregate the brain into individual modules based on the presence of distinct connectivity patterns. Many parcellation methods have been proposed for brain parcellation using rs-fMRI, but their results have been somewhat inconsistent, potentially due to various types of noise. In this study, we provide a robust parcellation method for rs-fMRI-based brain parcellation, which constructs a sparse similarity graph based on the sparse representation coefficients of each seed voxel and then uses spectral clustering to identify distinct modules. Both the local time-varying BOLD signals and whole-brain connectivity patterns may be used as features and yield similar parcellation results. The robustness of our method was tested on both simulated and real rs-fMRI datasets. In particular, on simulated rs-fMRI data, sparse representation achieved good performance across different noise levels, including high accuracy of parcellation and high robustness to noise. On real rs-fMRI data, stable parcellation of the medial frontal cortex (MFC) and parietal operculum (OP) were achieved on three different datasets, with high reproducibility within each dataset and high consistency across these results. Besides, the parcellation of MFC was little influenced by the degrees of spatial smoothing. Furthermore, the consistent parcellation of OP was also well corresponding to cytoarchitectonic subdivisions and known somatotopic organizations. Our results demonstrate a new promising approach to robust brain parcellation using resting-state fMRI by sparse representation.

  18. MRI of fetal acquired brain lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: daniela.prayer@meduniwien.ac.at; Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Witzani, Linde [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Helmer, Hanns [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Dietrich, Wolfgang [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Eppel, Wolfgang [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Langer, Martin [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    Acquired fetal brain damage is suspected in cases of destruction of previously normally formed tissue, the primary cause of which is hypoxia. Fetal brain damage may occur as a consequence of acute or chronic maternal diseases, with acute diseases causing impairment of oxygen delivery to the fetal brain, and chronic diseases interfering with normal, placental development. Infections, metabolic diseases, feto-fetal transfusion syndrome, toxic agents, mechanical traumatic events, iatrogenic accidents, and space-occupying lesions may also qualify as pathologic conditions that initiate intrauterine brain damage. MR manifestations of acute fetal brain injury (such as hemorrhage or acute ischemic lesions) can easily be recognized, as they are hardly different from postnatal lesions. The availability of diffusion-weighted sequences enhances the sensitivity in recognizing acute ischemic lesions. Recent hemorrhages are usually readily depicted on T2 (*) sequences, where they display hypointense signals. Chronic fetal brain injury may be characterized by nonspecific changes that must be attributable to the presence of an acquired cerebral pathology. The workup in suspected acquired fetal brain injury also includes the assessment of extra-CNS organs that may be affected by an underlying pathology. Finally, the placenta, as the organ that mediates oxygen delivery from the maternal circulation to the fetus, must be examined on MR images.

  19. Brain MRI tumor image fusion combined with Shearlet and wavelet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changjiang; Fang, Mingchao

    2017-11-01

    In order to extract the effective information in different modalities of the tumor region in brain Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images, we propose a brain MRI tumor image fusion method combined with Shearlet and wavelet transform. First, the source images are transformed into Shearlet domain and wavelet domain. Second, the low frequency component of Shearlet domain is fused by Laplace pyramid decomposition. Then the low-frequency fusion image is obtained through inverse Shearlet transform. Third, the high frequency subimages in wavelet domain are fused. Then the high-frequency fusion image is obtained through inverse wavelet transform. Finally, the low-frequency fusion image and high-frequency fusion image are summated to get the final fusion image. Through experiments conducted on 10 brain MRI tumor images, the result shown that the proposed fusion algorithm has the best fusion effect in the evaluation indexes of spatial frequency, edge strength and average gradient. The main spatial frequency of 10 images is 29.22, and the mean edge strength and average gradient is 103.77 and 10.42. Compared with different fusion methods, we find that the proposed method effectively fuses the information of multimodal brain MRI tumor images and improves the clarity of the tumor area well.

  20. Cribriform pattern in brain MRI: A diagnostic clue for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To date, 11 distinct types of MPS have been described, each as a result of deficient enzymatic activity of specific lysosomal hydrolase. The most common types are Hurler and Hunter syndromes. We report a case of a child presenting with macrocephaly, clinically suspected to be due to hydrocephalus. An MRI (3 Tesla) brain ...

  1. Quantitative MRI of the human brain at 7 tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polders, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the implementation of quantitative MR methods in the human brain at 7 T. By highlighting the drawbacks and advantages of the increased field strength, the use of 7 T MRI for quantitative measurements in clinical research was demonstrated. Inhomogeneities in the transmitted RF

  2. Novel whole brain segmentation and volume estimation using quantitative MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, J. [Linkoeping University, Radiation Physics, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Imaging Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); SyntheticMR AB, Linkoeping (Sweden); Warntjes, J.B.M. [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Imaging Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); SyntheticMR AB, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University and Department of Clinical Physiology UHL, County Council of Oestergoetland, Clinical Physiology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden); Lundberg, P. [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Imaging Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University and Department of Radiation Physics UHL, County Council of Oestergoetland, Radiation Physics, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University and Department of Radiology UHL, County Council of Oestergoetland, Radiology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2012-05-15

    Brain segmentation and volume estimation of grey matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) are important for many neurological applications. Volumetric changes are observed in multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and in normal aging. A novel method is presented to segment brain tissue based on quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R{sub 1}, the transverse relaxation rate R{sub 2} and the proton density, PD. Previously reported qMRI values for WM, GM and CSF were used to define tissues and a Bloch simulation performed to investigate R{sub 1}, R{sub 2} and PD for tissue mixtures in the presence of noise. Based on the simulations a lookup grid was constructed to relate tissue partial volume to the R{sub 1}-R{sub 2}-PD space. The method was validated in 10 healthy subjects. MRI data were acquired using six resolutions and three geometries. Repeatability for different resolutions was 3.2% for WM, 3.2% for GM, 1.0% for CSF and 2.2% for total brain volume. Repeatability for different geometries was 8.5% for WM, 9.4% for GM, 2.4% for CSF and 2.4% for total brain volume. We propose a new robust qMRI-based approach which we demonstrate in a patient with MS. (orig.)

  3. Brain palpation from physiological vibrations using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorgani, Ali; Souchon, Rémi; Dinh, Au-Hoang; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Ménager, Jean-Michel; Lounis, Samir; Rouvière, Olivier; Catheline, Stefan

    2015-10-20

    We present a magnetic resonance elastography approach for tissue characterization that is inspired by seismic noise correlation and time reversal. The idea consists of extracting the elasticity from the natural shear waves in living tissues that are caused by cardiac motion, blood pulsatility, and any muscle activity. In contrast to other magnetic resonance elastography techniques, this noise-based approach is, thus, passive and broadband and does not need any synchronization with sources. The experimental demonstration is conducted in a calibrated phantom and in vivo in the brain of two healthy volunteers. Potential applications of this "brain palpation" approach for characterizing brain anomalies and diseases are foreseen.

  4. Altered Brain Functional Connectome in Migraine with and without Restless Legs Syndrome: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chi Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMigraine is frequently comorbid with restless legs syndrome (RLS, both displaying functional connectivity (FC alterations in multiple brain networks, although the neurological basis of this association is unknown.MethodsWe performed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and network-wise analysis of FC in migraine patients with and without RLS and healthy controls (CRL. Network-based statistics (NBS and composite FC matrix analyses were performed to identify the patterns of FC changes. Correlation analyses were performed to identify associations between alterations in FC and clinical profiles.ResultsNBS results revealed that both migraine patients with and without RLS exhibited lower FC than CRL in the dorsal attention, salience, default mode, cingulo-opercular, visual, frontoparietal, auditory, and sensory/somatomotor networks. Further composite FC matrix analyses revealed differences in FC of the salience, default mode to subcortical and frontoparietal, auditory to salience, and memory retrieval networks between migraine patients with and without RLS. There was a trend toward a negative association between RLS severity and cross-network abnormalities in the default mode to subcortical network.DiscussionMigraine patients with and without RLS exhibit disruptions of brain FC. Such findings suggest that these disorders are associated with differential neuropathological mechanisms and may aid in the future development of neuroimaging-driven biomarkers for these conditions.

  5. What can the brain teach us about winemaking? An fMRI study of alcohol level preferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Frost

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, wine makers have been producing wines with a higher alcohol content, assuming that they are more appreciated by consumers. To test this hypothesis, we used functional magnetic imaging to compare reactions of human subjects to different types of wine, focusing on brain regions critical for flavor processing and food reward. Participants were presented with carefully matched pairs of high- and low-alcohol content red wines, without informing them of any of the wine attributes. Contrary to expectation, significantly greater activation was found for low-alcohol than for high-alcohol content wines in brain regions that are sensitive to taste intensity, including the insula as well as the cerebellum. Wines were closely matched for all physical attributes except for alcohol content, thus we interpret the preferential response to the low-alcohol content wines as arising from top-down modulation due to the low alcohol content wines inducing greater attentional exploration of aromas and flavours. The findings raise intriguing possibilities for objectively testing hypotheses regarding methods of producing a highly complex product such as wine.

  6. Clinical validation of synthetic brain MRI in children: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Hollie; Leach, James L.; Jones, Blaise V.; Care, Marguerite; Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Merrow, Arnold C.; Alvarado, Enrique; Serai, Suraj D. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of synthetic MR sequences generated through post-acquisition processing of a single sequence measuring inherent R1, R2, and PD tissue properties compared with sequences acquired conventionally as part of a routine clinical pediatric brain MR exam. Thirty-two patients underwent routine clinical brain MRI with conventional and synthetic sequences acquired (22 abnormal). Synthetic axial T1, T2, and T2 fluid attenuation inversion recovery or proton density-weighted sequences were made to match the comparable clinical sequences. Two exams for each patient were de-identified. Four blinded reviewers reviewed eight patients and were asked to generate clinical reports on each exam (synthetic or conventional) at two different time points separated by a mean of 33 days. Exams were rated for overall and specific finding agreement (synthetic/conventional and compared to gold standard consensus review by two senior reviewers with knowledge of clinical report), quality, and diagnostic confidence. Overall agreement between conventional and synthetic exams was 97%. Agreement with consensus readings was 84% (conventional) and 81% (synthetic), p = 0.61. There were no significant differences in sensitivity, specificity, or accuracy for specific imaging findings involving the ventricles, CSF, brain parenchyma, or vasculature between synthetic or conventional exams (p > 0.05). No significant difference in exam quality, diagnostic confidence, or noise/artifacts was noted comparing studies with synthetic or conventional sequences. Diagnostic accuracy and quality of synthetically generated sequences are comparable to conventionally acquired sequences as part of a standard pediatric brain exam. Further confirmation in a larger study is warranted. (orig.)

  7. Once-weekly 22microg subcutaneous IFN-beta-1a in secondary progressive MS: a 3-year follow-up study on brain MRI measurements and serum MMP-9 levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, X; Kuusisto, H; Dastidar, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of weekly injected subcutaneous interferon (IFN)-beta-1a 22 microg on the extent of brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the level of serum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). SUBJECTS...... AND METHODS: All the 28 Finnish patients participating in the Nordic multicentre trial on the clinical efficacy of weekly IFN-beta-1a (Rebif) 22 microg in SPMS were studied neurologically and by volumetric MRI during a 3-year follow-up. The levels of MMP-9 in serum were measured over the 3-year study. RESULTS......: There was no obvious effect on the number of contrast medium-enhancing lesions, the volume of T1 or T2 lesions or level of serum MMP-9, nor was any effect detected on the relapse rate and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Brain atrophy progression was not affected by the treatment. CONCLUSION: The lack...

  8. Wilson's disease: two treatment modalities. Correlations to pretreatment and posttreatment brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiros da Costa, Maria do Desterro [Federal University of Paraiba, Movement Disorders Unit, Paraiba (Brazil); Spitz, Mariana; Bacheschi, Luiz Alberto; Barbosa, Egberto Reis [University of Sao Paulo, Movement Disorders Unit, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Leite, Claudia Costa; Lucato, Leandro Tavares [University of Sao Paulo, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on Wilson's disease (WD) show lack of correlations between neurological and neuroimaging features. Long-term follow-up reports with sequential brain MRI in patients with neurological WD comparing different modalities of treatment are scarce. Eighteen patients with neurological WD underwent pretreatment and posttreatment brain MRI scans to evaluate the range of abnormalities and the evolution along these different periods. All patients underwent at least two MRI scans at different intervals, up to 11 years after the beginning of treatment. MRI findings were correlated with clinical picture, clinical severity, duration of neurological symptoms, and treatment with two different drugs. Patients were divided into two groups according to treatment: d-penicillamine (D-P), zinc (Zn), and Zn after the onset of severe intolerance to D-P. MRI scans before treatment showed, in all patients, hypersignal intensity lesions on T2- and proton-density-weighted images bilaterally and symmetrically at basal nuclei, thalamus, brain stem, cerebellum, brain cortex, and brain white matter. The most common neurological symptoms were: dysarthria, parkinsonism, dystonia, tremor, psychiatric disturbances, dysphagia, risus sardonicus, ataxia, chorea, and athetosis. From the neurological point of view, there was no difference on the evolution between the group treated exclusively with D-P and the one treated with Zn. Analysis of MRI scans with longer intervals after the beginning of treatment depicted a trend for neuroimaging worsening, without neurological correspondence, among patients treated with Zn. Neuroimaging pattern of evolution was more favorable for the group that received exclusively D-P. (orig.)

  9. MRI studies in late-life mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreescu, Carmen; Aizenstein, Howard

    2012-01-01

    There are well-established patterns of structural brain changes associated with aging. The change in brain volume with age and with the diseases of aging presents a particular challenge for MRI studies in the elderly. Structural MRI is important for studies in normal aging, late-life depression, dementia, Alzheimer disease and other cognitive disorders to examine how age-associated changes in neuroanatomy are associated with specific age-related changes in brain function. Functional MRI has been a major advance for the fields of cognitive and affective neuroscience by allowing investigators to test theories of the underlying neural pathways controlling cognitive and emotional processes. In this chapter, we will review the contribution of MRI studies to late-life mood and anxiety disorders: major depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety disorders in late-life.

  10. PET/MRI for Oncologic Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rausch, Ivo; Rischka, Lucas; Ladefoged, Claes N

    2017-01-01

    by Siemens Healthcare). As a reference, AC maps were derived from patient-specific CT images (CTref). PET data were reconstructed using standard settings after AC with all 4 AC methods. We report changes in diagnosis for all brain tumor patients and the following relative differences values (RDs...... of the whole brain and 10 anatomic regions segmented on MR images.Results:For brain tumor imaging (A and B), the standard PET-based diagnosis was not affected by any of the 3 MR-AC methods. For A, the average RDs of SUVmeanwere -10%, -4%, and -3% and of the VOIs 1%, 2%, and 7% for DIXON, UTE, and BD......, respectively.Conclusion:The diagnostic reading of PET/MR patients with brain tumors did not change with the chosen AC method. Quantitative accuracy of SUVs was clinically acceptable for UTE- and BD-AC for group A, whereas for group B BD was in accordance with CTref. Nevertheless, for the quantification...

  11. Effects of incentives, age, and behavior on brain activation during inhibitory control: A longitudinal fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Paulsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated changes in brain function supporting inhibitory control under age-controlled incentivized conditions, separating age- and performance-related activation in an accelerated longitudinal design including 10- to 22-year-olds. Better inhibitory control correlated with striatal activation during neutral trials, while Age X Behavior interactions in the striatum indicated that in the absence of extrinsic incentives, younger subjects with greater reward circuitry activation successfully engage in greater inhibitory control. Age was negatively correlated with ventral amygdala activation during Loss trials, suggesting that amygdala function more strongly mediates bottom-up processing earlier in development when controlling the negative aspects of incentives to support inhibitory control. Together, these results indicate that with development, reward-modulated cognitive control may be supported by incentive processing transitions in the amygdala, and from facilitative to obstructive striatal function during inhibitory control.

  12. Collimator design for a multipinhole brain SPECT insert for MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Audenhaege, Karen; Van Holen, Roel; Vanhove, Christian; Vandenberghe, Stefaan [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Ghent University-iMinds Medical IT, MEDISIP-IBiTech, De Pintelaan 185 block B/5, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is an important clinical tool, with unique tracers for studying neurological diseases. Nowadays, most commercial SPECT systems are combined with x-ray computed tomography (CT) in so-called SPECT/CT systems to obtain an anatomical background for the functional information. However, while CT images have a high spatial resolution, they have a low soft-tissue contrast, which is an important disadvantage for brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on the other hand, has a very high soft-tissue contrast and does not involve extra ionizing radiation. Therefore, the authors designed a brain SPECT insert that can operate inside a clinical MRI. Methods: The authors designed and simulated a compact stationary multipinhole SPECT insert based on digital silicon photomultiplier detector modules, which have shown to be MR-compatible and have an excellent intrinsic resolution (0.5 mm) when combined with a monolithic 2 mm thick LYSO crystal. First, the authors optimized the different parameters of the SPECT system to maximize sensitivity for a given target resolution of 7.2 mm in the center of the field-of-view, given the spatial constraints of the MR system. Second, the authors performed noiseless simulations of two multipinhole configurations to evaluate sampling and reconstructed resolution. Finally, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared the SPECT insert with a clinical system with ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) fan beam collimators, based on contrast-to-noise ratio and a visual comparison of a Hoffman phantom with a 9 mm cold lesion. Results: The optimization resulted in a stationary multipinhole system with a collimator radius of 150.2 mm and a detector radius of 172.67 mm, which corresponds to four rings of 34 diSPM detector modules. This allows the authors to include eight rings of 24 pinholes, which results in a system volume sensitivity of 395 cps/MBq. Noiseless simulations

  13. Brain activation by short-term nicotine exposure in anesthetized wild-type and beta2-nicotinic receptors knockout mice: a BOLD fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, S.V.; Changeux, J.P.; Granon, S. [Unite de Neurobiologie Integrative du Systeme Cholinergique, URA CNRS 2182, Institut Pasteur, Departement de Neuroscience, 25 rue du Dr Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Amadon, A.; Giacomini, E.; Le Bihan, D. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, 4 place du general Leclerc, 91400 Orsay (France); Wiklund, A. [Section of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Rationale: The behavioral effects of nicotine and the role of the beta2-containing nicotinic receptors in these behaviors are well documented. However, the behaviors altered by nicotine rely on the functioning on multiple brain circuits where the high-affinity {beta}2-containing nicotinic receptors ({beta}2*nAChRs) are located. Objectives We intend to see which brain circuits are activated when nicotine is given in animals naive for nicotine and whether the {beta}2*nAChRs are needed for its activation of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in all brain areas. Materials and methods: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the brain activation evoked by nicotine (1 mg/kg delivered at a slow rate for 45 min) in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice and {beta}2 knockout (KO) mice. Results: Acute nicotine injection results in a significant increased activation in anterior frontal, motor, and somatosensory cortices and in the ventral tegmental area and the substantia nigra. Anesthetized mice receiving no nicotine injection exhibited a major decreased activation in all cortical and subcortical structures, likely due to prolonged anesthesia. At a global level, {beta}2 KO mice were not rescued from the globally declining BOLD signal. However, nicotine still activated regions of a meso-cortico-limbic circuit likely via {alpha}7 nicotinic receptors. Conclusions: Acute nicotine exposure compensates for the drop in brain activation due to anesthesia through the meso-cortico-limbic network via the action of nicotine on {beta}2*nAChRs. The developed fMRI method is suitable for comparing responses in wild-type and mutant mice. (authors)

  14. Pediatric brain MRI. Pt. 2. Advanced techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Mai-Lan; Campeau, Norbert G.; Welker, Kirk M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Ngo, Thang D. [Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States); Udayasankar, Unni K. [University of Arizona, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Pediatric neuroimaging is a complex and specialized field that uses magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as the workhorse for diagnosis. MR protocols should be tailored to the specific indication and reviewed by the supervising radiologist in real time. Targeted advanced imaging sequences can be added to provide information regarding tissue microstructure, perfusion, metabolism and function. In part 2 of this review, we highlight the utility of advanced imaging techniques for superior evaluation of pediatric neurologic disease. We focus on the following techniques, with clinical examples: phase-contrast imaging, perfusion-weighted imaging, vessel wall imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, task-based functional MRI and MR spectroscopy. (orig.)

  15. Dosimetric study of different radiotherapy planning approaches for hippocampal avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) based on fused CT and MRI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bu-Hai; Hua, Wei; Gu, Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Li, Jun; Liu, Li-Qin; Huang, Yu-Xiang

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics for hippocampal avoidance (HA) between the treatment plans based on fused CT and MRI imaging during whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) pertaining to: (1) 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), (2) dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT), and (3) RapidArc for patients with brain metastases. In our study, HA was defined as hippocampus beyond 5 mm, and planning target volume (PTV) was obtained subtracting HA volume from the volume of whole brain. There were 10 selected patients diagnosed with brain metastases receiving WBRT. These patients received plans for 3D-CRT (two fields), dIMRT (seven non-coplanar fields) and RapidArc (dual arc). The prescribed dose 30 Gy in 10 fractions was delivered to the whole-brain clinical target volume of patients. On the premise of meeting the clinical requirements, we compared target dose distribution, target coverage (TC), homogeneity index (HI), dose of organs at risk (OARs), monitor units (MU) and treatment time between the above three radiotherapy plans. V90 %, V95 % and TC of PTV for 3D-CRT plan were lowest of the three plans. V90 %, V95 % and HI of PTV in RapidArc plan were superior to the other two plans. TC of PTV in RapidArc plan was similar with dIMRT plan (P > 0.05). 3D-CRT was the optimal plan in the three plans for hippocampal protection. The median dose (Dmedian) and the maximum doses (Dmax) of hippocampus in 3D-CRT were 4.95, 10.87 Gy, which were lowest among the three planning approaches (P plans pertain to no significant difference (P > 0.05). When WBRT (30 Gy,10F) was equivalent to single dose 2 Gy,NTDmean of hippocampus in 3D-CRT, dIMRT and RapidArc were reduced to 3.60, 8.47, 8.20 Gy2, respectively. In addition, compared with dIMRT, MU of RapidArc was reduced and the treatment time was shortened by nearly 25 %. All three radiotherapy planning approaches in our study can meet the clinical requirements of HA. Although TC in 3D

  16. Comparison of CT and MRI brain tumor imaging using a canine glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, H T; Clanton, J A; Wilson, R E; Tulipan, N B

    1988-01-01

    A canine gliosarcoma model was used to study the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast enhancement in defining the histologic margins of brain tumors. The effectiveness of this technique was compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) using iodinated contrast enhancement. Cultured canine gliosarcoma cells were injected into the left hemisphere of adult mongrel dogs. The dogs developed brain tumors and progressive clinical signs. Serial MRI with and without gadolinium diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid was compared to serial CT with and without sodium iothalamate obtained on the same days. After the final scans, animals were sacrificed; the brains were removed and processed for routine histopathologic study. All tumors were visualized with contrast-enhanced MRI which proved most sensitive. Gadolinium di-ethylene triamine penta-acetic acid caused bright enhancement of tumors in a distribution that consistently corresponded to areas of pathologically proved tumor infiltration. Gross and microscopic autopsy findings correlated better with MRI than with CT which tended to produce poorer resolution and underrepresent the size of viable tumor. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is more accurate than unenhanced MRI, unenhanced CT, or enhanced CT in defining the histologic margins of tumors.

  17. Automated Ischemic Lesion Segmentation in MRI Mouse Brain Data after Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Inge A; Khmelinskii, Artem; Dzyubachyk, Oleh; de Jong, Sebastiaan; Rieff, Nathalie; Wermer, Marieke J H; Hoehn, Mathias; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become increasingly important in ischemic stroke experiments in mice, especially because it enables longitudinal studies. Still, quantitative analysis of MRI data remains challenging mainly because segmentation of mouse brain lesions in MRI data heavily relies on time-consuming manual tracing and thresholding techniques. Therefore, in the present study, a fully automated approach was developed to analyze longitudinal MRI data for quantification of ischemic lesion volume progression in the mouse brain. We present a level-set-based lesion segmentation algorithm that is built using a minimal set of assumptions and requires only one MRI sequence (T2) as input. To validate our algorithm we used a heterogeneous data set consisting of 121 mouse brain scans of various age groups and time points after infarct induction and obtained using different MRI hardware and acquisition parameters. We evaluated the volumetric accuracy and regional overlap of ischemic lesions segmented by our automated method against the ground truth obtained in a semi-automated fashion that includes a highly time-consuming manual correction step. Our method shows good agreement with human observations and is accurate on heterogeneous data, whilst requiring much shorter average execution time. The algorithm developed here was compiled into a toolbox and made publically available, as well as all the data sets.

  18. Spontaneous Brain Activity Did Not Show the Effect of Violent Video Games on Aggression: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Pan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A great many of empirical researches have proved that longtime exposure to violent video game can lead to a series of negative effects. Although research has focused on the neural basis of the correlation between violent video game and aggression, little is known whether the spontaneous brain activity is associated with violent video game exposure. To address this question, we measured the spontaneous brain activity using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. We used the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF and fractional ALFF (fALFF to quantify spontaneous brain activity. The results showed there is no significant difference in ALFF, or fALFF, between violent video game group and the control part, indicating that long time exposure to violent video games won’t significantly influence spontaneous brain activity, especially the core brain regions such as execution control, moral judgment and short-term memory. This implies the adverse impact of violent video games is exaggerated.

  19. Brain CT and MRI findings of a long-term case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoshiba, Kazunori; Ota, Kohei; Komatsuzaki, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Itsuro; Maruyama, Shoichi

    1987-11-01

    Our study involved a long-term case (ten years) of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The case began with a 23 year-old experiencing visual deterioration. During the course of his illness, amnesia, autism and abnormal behavior were observed without any myoclonus. On the electroencephalogram, periodic synclonous discharge was shown in the early stage of his illness and subsequently disappeared. The brain CT and the MRI disclosed diffuse lesions in both cortical and subcortical areas of the cerebral hemispheres. The location and spread of lesions were more clearly revealed by the MRI than the brain CT. These findings suggest that the MRI is more useful than the brain CT in the diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  20. Unraveling the multiscale structural organization and connectivity of the human brain: the role of diffusion MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eBastiani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The structural architecture and the anatomical connectivity of the human brain show different organizational principles at distinct spatial scales. Histological staining and light microscopy techniques have been widely used in classical neuroanatomical studies to unravel brain organization. Using such techniques is a laborious task performed on 2-dimensional histological sections by skilled anatomists possibly aided by semi-automated algorithms. With the recent advent of modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast mechanisms, cortical layers and columns can now be reliably identified and their structural properties quantified post mortem. These developments are allowing the investigation of neuroanatomical features of the brain at a spatial resolution that could be interfaced with that of histology. Diffusion MRI and tractography techniques, in particular, have been used to probe the architecture of both white and gray matter in three dimensions. Combined with mathematical network analysis, these techniques are increasingly influential in the investigation of the macro-, meso- and microscopic organization of brain connectivity and anatomy, both in vivo and ex vivo. Diffusion MRI-based techniques in combination with histology approaches can therefore support the endeavor of creating multimodal atlases that take into account the different spatial scales or levels on which the brain is organized. The aim of this review is to illustrate and discuss the structural architecture and the anatomical connectivity of the human brain at different spatial scales and how recently developed diffusion MRI techniques can help investigate these.

  1. Developmental differences in the brain response to unhealthy food cues: an fMRI study of children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, Floor; van der Laan, Laura N; Charbonnier, Lisette; Viergever, Max A; Adan, Roger Ah; Smeets, Paul Am

    2016-12-01

    Food cues are omnipresent and may trigger overconsumption. In the past 2 decades, the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically. Because children's brains are still developing, especially in areas important for inhibition, children may be more susceptible than adults to tempting food cues. We examined potential developmental differences in children's and adults' responses to food cues to determine how these responses relate to weight status. We included 27 children aged 10-12 y and 32 adults aged 32-52 y. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired during a food-viewing task in which unhealthy and healthy food pictures were presented. Children had a stronger activation in the left precentral gyrus than did adults in response to unhealthy compared with healthy foods. In children, unhealthy foods elicited stronger activation in the right inferior temporal and middle occipital gyri, left precentral gyrus, bilateral opercular part of the inferior frontal gyrus, left hippocampus, and left middle frontal gyrus. Adults had stronger activation in the bilateral middle occipital gyrus and the right calcarine sulcus for unhealthy compared with healthy foods. Children with a higher body mass index (BMI) had lower activation in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex while viewing unhealthy compared with healthy foods. In adults there was no correlation between BMI and neural response to unhealthy compared with healthy foods. Unhealthy foods might elicit more attention both in children and in adults. Children had stronger activation while viewing unhealthy compared with healthy foods in areas involved in reward, motivation, and memory. Furthermore, children activated a motivation and reward area located in the motor cortex more strongly than did adults in response to unhealthy foods. Finally, children with a higher BMI had less activation in inhibitory areas in response to unhealthy foods, which may mean they are more susceptible to tempting

  2. Quantifying brain microstructure with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikov, Dmitry S.; Jespersen, Sune N.; Kiselev, Valerij G.

    2016-01-01

    We review, systematize and discuss models of diffusion in neuronal tissue, by putting them into an overarching physical context of coarse-graining over an increasing diffusion length scale. From this perspective, we view research on quantifying brain microstructure as occurring along the three ma...

  3. Wallerian degeneration of brain: MRI and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Hsopital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    Wallerian degeneration is well known as the anterograde degeneration of axon and their accompanying myelin sheath from injury to the proximal portion of the axon or its cell body. The most common cause of wallerian degeneration is cerebral infarction. Authors experienced three patients with old hemispheric infarct with typical wallerian degeneration in the brain stem, which was demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in two cases and CT in one case. This report demonstrates the wallerian degeneration in the corticospinal tract in on the MRI and CT with the brief review of literatures.

  4. Safety of a dedicated brain MRI protocol in patients with a vagus nerve stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Jeroen C; Melis, Gerrit I; Gebbink, Tineke A; de Kort, Gérard A P; Leijten, Frans S S

    2014-11-01

    Although implanted metallic devices constitute a relative contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, the safety of brain imaging in a patient with a vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) is classified as "conditional," provided that specific manufacturer guidelines are followed when a transmit and receive head coil is used at 1.5 or 3.0 Tesla. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of performing brain MRI scans in patients with the VNS. From September 2009 until November 2011, 101 scans were requested in 73 patients with the VNS in The Netherlands. Patients were scanned according to the manufacturer's guidelines. No patient reported any side effect, discomfort, or pain during or after the MRI scan. In one patient, a lead break was detected based on device diagnostics after the MRI-scan. However, because no system diagnostics had been performed prior to MR scanning in this patient, it is unclear whether MR scanning was responsible for the lead break. The indication for most scans was epilepsy related. Twenty-six scans (26%) were part of a (new) presurgical evaluation and could probably better have been performed prior to VNS implantation. Performing brain MRI scans in patients with an implanted VNS is safe when a modified MRI protocol is followed. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. MRI: A method to detect minor brain damage following coronary bypass surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vik, A.; Brubakk, A.O. (Trondheim Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering); Rinck, P.A. (Trondheim Univ. (Norway). MR Center); Sande, E.; Levang, O.W. (Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway). Dept. of Surgery); Sellevold, O. (Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway). Dept. of Anaesthesiology)

    1991-10-01

    In order to assess the occurrence of minor focal brain lesions after coronary bypass surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used. Nine male patients (age 42-63) with angina pectoris were investigated at 0.5 Tesla. The investigation was performed one to seven weeks prior to the operation and one month after the operation. Before surgery, the images demonstrated more than five high intensity spots in the white matter of the brain in all but two patients. No additional spots were found after operation. This pilot study indicates that it might be difficult to use MRI to detect minor parenchymal lesions after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (orig.).

  6. Association between α-Klotho and Deep White Matter Lesions in the Brain: A Pilot Case Control Study Using Brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Nagato; Ozaki, Etsuko; Mizuno, Toshiki; Ihara, Masafumi; Mizuno, Shigeto; Koyama, Teruhide; Matsui, Daisuke; Watanabe, Isao; Akazawa, Kentaro; Takeda, Kazuo; Takada, Akihiro; Inaba, Masaaki; Yamada, Shinsuke; Motoyama, Koka; Takeshita, Wakiko; Iwai, Komei; Hashiguchi, Kanae; Kobayashi, Daiki; Kondo, Masaki; Tamura, Aiko; Yamada, Kei; Nakagawa, Masanori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki

    2018-01-01

    The anti-aging protein, α-Klotho, may be involved in cognitive decline and has potential as a surrogate marker that reflects dementia. However, the role of α-Klotho in the brain has not been sufficiently investigated. Here, we investigated the association between α-Klotho and cognitive decline that is associated with cerebral deep white matter lesions (DWMLs). Two hundred-eighty participants (187 males and 93 females, mean age: 70.8 years old) were evaluated for DWMLs, and the Fazekas scale (Grade) was assessed following brain magnetic resonance imaging. A questionnaire concerning lifestyle and neuropsychological tests was administered, and their associations with the blood α-Klotho level were retrospectively investigated. The α-Klotho level was 685.1 pg/mL in Grade 0 (68 subjects), 634.1 in G1 (134), 596.0 in G2 (62), and 571.6 in G3 (16), showing that the level significantly decreased with advanced grades. Significant correlations were noted between the α-Klotho level and higher brain function tests including the Mini-Mental State Examination and word fluency tests (p percentile value of the level in the G0 group (400 pg/mL) or lower was defined as a low α-Klotho level, the odds ratio of the high-grade G3 group was 2.9 (95% confidence interval: 1.4-7.8) (after correction for age, sex, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease), which was significant. A reduced blood α-Klotho level was correlated with grading of cerebral DWMLs and was accompanied by cognitive decline as an independent risk factor. The α-Klotho level may serve as a useful clinical index of vascular cognitive impairment.

  7. MRI patterns of atrophy and hypoperfusion associations across brain regions in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Duygu; Rosen, Howard; Miller, Bruce L; Weiner, Michael W; Schuff, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides various imaging modes to study the brain. We tested the benefits of a joint analysis of multimodality MRI data in combination with a large-scale analysis that involved simultaneously all image voxels using joint independent components analysis (jICA) and compared the outcome to results using conventional voxel-by-voxel unimodality tests. Specifically, we designed a jICA to decompose multimodality MRI data into independent components that explain joint variations between the image modalities as well as variations across brain regions. We tested the jICA design on structural and perfusion-weighted MRI data from 12 patients diagnosed with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and 12 cognitively normal elderly individuals. While unimodality analyses showed widespread brain atrophy and hypoperfusion in the patients, jICA further revealed two significant joint components of variations between atrophy and hypoperfusion across brain regions. The 1st joint component revealed associated brain atrophy and hypoperfusion predominantly in the right brain hemisphere in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, and the 2nd joint component revealed greater atrophy relative to hypoperfusion affecting predominantly the left hemisphere in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. The patterns are consistent with the clinical symptoms of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia that relate to asymmetric compromises of the left and right brain hemispheres. The joint components also revealed that that structural alterations can be associated with physiological alterations in spatially separated but potentially connected brain regions. Finally, jICA outperformed voxel-by-voxel unimodal tests significantly in terms of an effect size, separating the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia patients from the controls. Taken together, the results demonstrate the benefit of multimodality MRI in conjunction with jICA for mapping

  8. Assessment of hemodialysis impact by Polysulfone membrane on brain plasticity using BOLD-fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaïch, R; Boujraf, S; Housni, A; Maaroufi, M; Batta, F; Magoul, R; Sqalli, T; Errasfa, M; Tizniti, S

    2015-03-12

    Hemodialysis (HD) is considered the most common alternative for overcoming renal failure. Studies have shown the involvement of HD membrane in the genesis of oxidative stress (OS) which has a direct impact on the brain tissue and is expected to be involved in brain plasticity and also reorganization of brain function control. The goal of this paper was to demonstrate the sensitivity of the blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) to characterize the OS before and after the HD session. Twelve male patient-volunteers following chronic HD for more than 6months were recruited among 86 HD-patients. All patients underwent identical assessment immediately before and after the full HD-session. This consisted of full biological assessment, including malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant activity (TAOA); and brain BOLD-fMRI using the motor paradigm in block-design. Functional BOLD-fMRI maps of motor area M1 were obtained from the HD patient before and after the hemodialysis session, important decrease in the intensity of brain activation of the motor area after HD, and important increase of the size of the volume of brain activation were observed, these changes are reflecting brain plasticity that is well correlated to OS levels. Individual patients MDA and TAOA before and after the hemodialysis sessions demonstrated a clear and systematic increase of the OS after HD (P-value=0.03). Correlation of BOLD-fMRI maximal signal intensity and volume of activated cortical brain area behaviors to MDA and total TAOA were close to 1. OS is systematically increased in HD-patients after the HD-process. Indeed, the BOLD-fMRI shows a remarkable sensitivity to brain plasticity studied cortical areas. Our results confirm the superiority of the BOLD-fMRI quantities compared to the biological method used for assessing the OS while not being specific, and reflect the increase in OS generated by the HD. BOLD-fMRI is expected to be a suitable tool

  9. Functional brain activation differences in stuttering identified with a rapid fMRI sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Shelly Jo; Choo, Ai Leen; Sharma, Harish; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether brain activity related to the presence of stuttering can be identified with rapid functional MRI (fMRI) sequences that involved overt and covert speech processing tasks. The long-term goal is to develop sensitive fMRI approaches with developmentally appropriate tasks to identify deviant speech motor and auditory brain activity in children who stutter closer to the age at which recovery from stuttering is documented. Rapid sequences may be preferred for individuals or populations who do not tolerate long scanning sessions. In this report, we document the application of a picture naming and phoneme monitoring task in three minute fMRI sequences with adults who stutter (AWS). If relevant brain differences are found in AWS with these approaches that conform to previous reports, then these approaches can be extended to younger populations. Pairwise contrasts of brain BOLD activity between AWS and normally fluent adults indicated the AWS showed higher BOLD activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), right temporal lobe and sensorimotor cortices during picture naming and and higher activity in the right IFG during phoneme monitoring. The right lateralized pattern of BOLD activity together with higher activity in sensorimotor cortices is consistent with previous reports, which indicates rapid fMRI sequences can be considered for investigating stuttering in younger participants. PMID:22133409

  10. Pediatric brain MRI. Pt. 1. Basic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Mai-Lan; Campeau, Norbert G.; Welker, Kirk M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Ngo, Thang D. [Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States); Udayasankar, Unni K. [University of Arizona, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Pediatric neuroimaging is a complex and specialized field that uses magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as the workhorse for diagnosis. Standard MR techniques used in adult neuroimaging are suboptimal for imaging in pediatrics because there are significant differences in the child's developing brain. These differences include size, myelination and sulcation. MR protocols need to be tailored to the specific indication and reviewed by the supervising radiologist in real time, and the specialized needs of this population require careful consideration of issues such as scan timing, sequence order, sedation, anesthesia and gadolinium administration. In part 1 of this review, we focus on basic protocol development and anatomical characterization. We provide multiple imaging examples optimized for evaluation of supratentorial and infratentorial brain, midline structures, head and neck, and intracranial vasculature. (orig.)

  11. Functional MRI and intraoperative brain mapping to evaluate brain plasticity in patients with brain tumours and hemiparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roux, F.; Boulanouar, K; Ibarrola, D; Tremoulet, M.; Chollet, F; BERRY, I.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To support the hypothesis about the potential compensatory role of ipsilateral corticofugal pathways when the contralateral pathways are impaired by brain tumours.
METHODS—Retrospective analysis was carried out on the results of functional MRI (fMRI) of a selected group of five paretic patients with Rolandic brain tumours who exhibited an abnormally high ipsilateral/contralateral ratio of activation—that is, movements of the paretic hand activated predominately ...

  12. Alteration of functional connectivity within visuospatial working memory-related brain network in patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zong-xia; Huang, Dong-Hong; Ye, Wei; Chen, Zi-rong; Huang, Wen-li; Zheng, Jin-ou

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the resting-state brain network related to visuospatial working memory (VSWM) in patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy (rTLE). The functional mechanism underlying the cognitive impairment in VSWM was also determined. Fifteen patients with rTLE and 16 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and handedness underwent a 6-min resting-state functional MRI session and a neuropsychological test using VSWM_Nback. The VSWM-related brain network at rest was extracted using multiple independent component analysis; the spatial distribution and the functional connectivity (FC) parameters of the cerebral network were compared between groups. Behavioral data were subsequently correlated with the mean Z-value in voxels showing significant FC difference during intergroup comparison. The distribution of the VSWM-related resting-state network (RSN) in the group with rTLE was virtually consistent with that in the healthy controls. The distribution involved the dorsolateral prefrontal lobe and parietal lobe in the right hemisphere and the partial inferior parietal lobe and posterior lobe of the cerebellum in the left hemisphere (p<0.05, AlphaSim corrected). Between-group differences suggest that the group with rTLE had a decreased FC within the right superior frontal lobe (BA8), right middle frontal lobe, and right ventromedial prefrontal lobe compared with the controls (p<0.05, AlphaSim corrected). The regions of increased FC in rTLE were localized within the right superior frontal lobe (BA11), right superior parietal lobe, and left posterior lobe of the cerebellum (p<0.05, AlphaSim corrected). Moreover, patients with rTLE performed worse than controls in the VSWM_Nback test, and there were negative correlations between ACCmeanRT (2-back) and the mean Z-value in the voxels showing decreased or increased FC in rTLE (p<0.05). The results suggest that the alteration of the VSWM-related RSN might underpin the VSWM impairment in patients with rTLE and

  13. Emotional valence modulates brain functional abnormalities in depression : Evidence from a meta-analysis of fMRI studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewold, Nynke A.; Opmeer, Esther M.; de Jonge, Peter; Aleman, Andre; Costafreda, Sergi G.

    Models describing the neural correlates of biased emotion processing in depression have focused on increased activation of anterior cingulate and amygdala and decreased activation of striatum and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. However, neuroimaging studies investigating emotion processing in

  14. Added value of fetal MRI in fetuses with suspected brain abnormalities on neurosonography : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Martine; Oude Rengerink, K|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375367292; Newsum, Esther A; Reneman, Liesbeth; Majoie, Charles B; Pajkrt, Eva

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the additional diagnostic value of fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in fetuses with suspected brain abnormalities identified with advanced neurosonography (NS). METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed for studies reporting on a comparison between diagnosis

  15. Self-Regulation of Brain Activity in Patients with Postherpetic Neuralgia: A Double-Blind Randomized Study Using Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Yan, Bin; Zhao, Lu; Tong, Li; Dou, Shewei; Xia, Linjie; Wang, Meiyun; Shi, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Background A pilot study has shown that real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) neurofeedback could be an alternative approach for chronic pain treatment. Considering the relative small sample of patients recruited and not strictly controlled condition, it is desirable to perform a replication as well as a double-blinded randomized study with a different control condition in chronic pain patients. Here we conducted a rtfMRI neurofeedback study in a subgroup of pain patients – patients with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and used a different sham neurofeedback control. We explored the feasibility of self-regulation of the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) activation in patients with PHN through rtfMRI neurofeedback and regulation of pain perception. Methods Sixteen patients (46–71 years) with PHN were randomly allocated to a experimental group (n = 8) or a control group (n = 8). 2 patients in the control group were excluded for large head motion. The experimental group was given true feedback information from their rACC whereas the control group was given sham feedback information from their posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). All subjects were instructed to perform an imagery task to increase and decrease activation within the target region using rtfMRI neurofeedback. Results Online analysis showed 6/8 patients in the experimental group were able to increase and decrease the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal magnitude during intermittent feedback training. However, this modulation effect was not observed in the control group. Offline analysis showed that the percentage of BOLD signal change of the target region between the last and first training in the experimental group was significantly different from the control group’s and was also significantly different than 0. The changes of pain perception reflected by numerical rating scale (NRS) in the experimental group were significantly different from the control group. However, there existed no significant

  16. To see bruxism: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, S

    2015-01-01

    Since the pathophysiology of bruxism is not clearly understood, there exists no possible treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate the cerebral activation differences between healthy subjects and patients with bruxism on behalf of possible aetiological factors. 12 healthy subjects and 12 patients with bruxism, a total of 24 right-handed female subjects (aged 20-27 years) were examined using functional MRI during tooth-clenching and resting tasks. Imaging was performed with 3.0-T MRI scanner with a 32-channel head coil. Differences in regional brain activity between patients with bruxism and healthy subjects (control group) were observed with BrainVoyager QX 2.8 (Brain Innovation, Maastricht, Netherlands) statistical data analysis program. Activation maps were created using the general linear model: single study and multistudy multisubject for statistical group analysis. This protocol was approved by the ethics committee of medical faculty of Kirikkale University, Turkey (02/04), based on the guidelines set forth in the Declaration of Helsinki. The group analysis revealed a statistically significant increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent signal of three clusters in the control group (pbruxism. Our findings indicate that there was a decrease of cortical activation pattern in patients with bruxism in clenching tasks. This indicates decreased blood flow and activation in regional neuronal activity. Bruxism, as an oral motor disorder concerns dentistry, neurology and psychiatry. These results might improve the understanding and physiological handling of sleep bruxism.

  17. Postictal MRI abnormalities and seizure-induced brain injury: notions to be challenged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Eugenio

    2015-03-01

    This was a bibliographic search to address the quality of evidence in clinical reports supporting the assertion that brain MRI signal abnormalities are a direct consequence of seizures. The search on PubMed was performed by applying the following inclusion criteria: a) original case reports, b) in humans, c) as single case reports or series of patients, d) of visually detected acute MRI signal abnormalities, e) attributable directly to seizures, and f) published in English. Bibliographic references of initially selected publications were reviewed for additional articles. Full texts of selected publications were read for information regarding clinical, EEG, and MRI features. Moreover, claimed evidence supporting seizure-induced excitotoxicity was assessed. The search resulted in 91 publications corresponding to 413 cases. There was a wide range of clinical features and EEG and MRI abnormalities. Premorbid or comorbid conditions were present in many cases, and some of them are potential causes of MRI changes. Claimed evidence for MRI signal abnormalities as a direct consequence of ictal activity was mostly based on the similarity with previous reports, animal models, reversibility, congruent EEG, MRI changes not respecting vascular territories, and ruling out other etiologies. Evidence supporting the notion of seizure-induced excitotoxicity is questionable in the studied reports of postictal MRI abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comprehensive brain MRI segmentation in high risk preterm newborns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xintian Yu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Most extremely preterm newborns exhibit cerebral atrophy/growth disturbances and white matter signal abnormalities on MRI at term-equivalent age. MRI brain volumes could serve as biomarkers for evaluating the effects of neonatal intensive care and predicting neurodevelopmental outcomes. This requires detailed, accurate, and reliable brain MRI segmentation methods. We describe our efforts to develop such methods in high risk newborns using a combination of manual and automated segmentation tools. After intensive efforts to accurately define structural boundaries, two trained raters independently performed manual segmentation of nine subcortical structures using axial T2-weighted MRI scans from 20 randomly selected extremely preterm infants. All scans were re-segmented by both raters to assess reliability. High intra-rater reliability was achieved, as assessed by repeatability and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC range: 0.97 to 0.99 for all manually segmented regions. Inter-rater reliability was slightly lower (ICC range: 0.93 to 0.99. A semi-automated segmentation approach was developed that combined the parametric strengths of the Hidden Markov Random Field Expectation Maximization algorithm with non-parametric Parzen window classifier resulting in accurate white matter, gray matter, and CSF segmentation. Final manual correction of misclassification errors improved accuracy (similarity index range: 0.87 to 0.89 and facilitated objective quantification of white matter signal abnormalities. The semi-automated and manual methods were seamlessly integrated to generate full brain segmentation within two hours. This comprehensive approach can facilitate the evaluation of large cohorts to rigorously evaluate the utility of regional brain volumes as biomarkers of neonatal care and surrogate endpoints for neurodevelopmental outcomes.

  19. Evaluation of Brain and Cervical MRI Abnormality Rates in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus With or Without Neurological Manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Reza Najafizadeh; Hazhir Saberi; Mohammad Hossein Harirchian; Seyed Ahad Hashemi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement has been observed in 14-80% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an appropriate method for evaluating CNS involvement in these patients. Clinical manifestations and MRI findings of CNS lupus should be differentiated from other mimicking diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS).Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of brain and cervical cord MRI lesions...

  20. Added value of fetal MRI in fetuses with suspected brain abnormalities on neurosonography: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Martine; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Newsum, Esther A.; Reneman, Liesbeth; Majoie, Charles B.; Pajkrt, Eva

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the additional diagnostic value of fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in fetuses with suspected brain abnormalities identified with advanced neurosonography (NS). A systematic literature search was performed for studies reporting on a comparison between diagnosis with NS and MRI, in

  1. An adaptive mean-shift framework for MRI brain segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Arnaldo; Greenspan, Hayit

    2009-08-01

    An automated scheme for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain segmentation is proposed. An adaptive mean-shift methodology is utilized in order to classify brain voxels into one of three main tissue types: gray matter, white matter, and Cerebro-spinal fluid. The MRI image space is represented by a high-dimensional feature space that includes multimodal intensity features as well as spatial features. An adaptive mean-shift algorithm clusters the joint spatial-intensity feature space, thus extracting a representative set of high-density points within the feature space, otherwise known as modes. Tissue segmentation is obtained by a follow-up phase of intensity-based mode clustering into the three tissue categories. By its nonparametric nature, adaptive mean-shift can deal successfully with nonconvex clusters and produce convergence modes that are better candidates for intensity based classification than the initial voxels. The proposed method is validated on 3-D single and multimodal datasets, for both simulated and real MRI data. It is shown to perform well in comparison to other state-of-the-art methods without the use of a preregistered statistical brain atlas.

  2. Functional MRI for Assessment of the Default Mode Network in Acute Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Fisher, Patrick M.; Larsen, Vibeke Andrée

    2017-01-01

    Background: Assessment of the default mode network (DMN) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may improve assessment of the level of consciousness in chronic brain injury, and therefore, fMRI may also have prognostic value in acute brain injury. However, fMRI is much m...

  3. Serial cranial ultrasonography or early MRI for detecting preterm brain injury?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Raets, Marlou M A; Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Govaert, Paul; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Reiss, Irwin K M; Smit, Liesbeth S; Lequin, Maarten H; Dudink, Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328865680

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate detection ability and feasibility of serial cranial ultrasonography (CUS) and early MRI in preterm brain injury. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Level III neonatal intensive care unit. PATIENTS: 307 infants, born below 29 weeks of gestation. METHODS: Serial CUS

  4. Morphometric connectivity analysis to distinguish normal, mild cognitive impaired, and Alzheimer subjects based on brain MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erleben, Lene Lillemark; Sørensen, Lauge; Mysling, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates a novel way of looking at the regions in the brain and their relationship as possible markers to classify normal control (NC), mild cognitive impaired (MCI), and Alzheimer Disease (AD) subjects. MRI scans from a subset of 101 subjects from the ADNI study at baseline was used...

  5. An exploratory intervention study suggests clinical benefits of training in chronic stroke to be paralleled by changes in brain activity using repeated fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landsmann B

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Landsmann,1,2 Daniela Pinter,2 Eva Pirker,1,2 Gerald Pichler,3 Walter Schippinger,3 Elisabeth M Weiss,1 Gabriel Mathie,2 Thomas Gattringer,2 Franz Fazekas,2 Christian Enzinger2,4 1Institute of Psychology, University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 2Department of Neurology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 3Albert Schweitzer Clinic Graz, Graz, Austria; 4Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria Purpose: Previous studies demonstrated changes in sensorimotor network activation over time after stroke that have been interpreted as partly compensatory. Locomotor and balance trainings may improve both mobility and cognition even in chronic stroke and thereby impact on cerebral activation patterns. We here aimed at testing these assumptions in an exploratory study to inform subsequent larger intervention studies. Patients and methods: Eight patients (73.3±4.4 years with a chronic lacunar stroke (mean interval 3.7 years after the acute event with a range from 2 to 4 years and residual leg paresis leading to gait disturbance received a guided 5-week training focusing on mobility, endurance, and coordination. Before and afterward, they underwent clinical, neuropsychological, and gait assessments and brain MRI at 3 T including a functional ankle movement paradigm. Sixteen healthy controls (HCs; 68.8±5.4 years followed the same protocol without intervention. Results: After training, patients had improved in mobility, memory, and delayed recall of memory. While cerebral activations in HC remained completely unaltered, patients showed increased activations in the right precentral gyrus, the right and left superior frontal gyri, and the right frontal lobe, with bipedal ankle movements after training. Conclusion: In this exploratory study of chronic stroke, we found not only significant effects of physical training on mobility but also distinct aspects of cognition already with a small number of

  6. Case-control resting-state fMRI study of brain functioning among adolescents with first-episode major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yun; Hao, Lili; Zhang, Xiyan; Zhou, Yan; Li, Jianqi; Zhao, Zhimin; Jiang, Wenqing; DU, Yasong

    2014-08-01

    Adolescent depression results in severe and protracted suffering for affected individuals and their family members, but the underlying mechanism of this disabling condition remains unclear. Compare resting-state brain functioning between first-episode, drug-naïve adolescents with major depressive disorder and matched controls. Fifteen adolescents with major depressive disorder and 16 controls underwent a resting-state fMRI scan performed using a 3T magnetic resonance scanner. The amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) was used to assess resting-state brain function. Adolescents with depression had higher mean (sd) scores on the Children Depression Inventory (CDI) than controls (22.13 [9.21] vs. 9.37 [5.65]). Compared with controls, adolescents with depression had higher ALFF in the posterior cingulate gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus, right insula, right parietal lobe, and right fusiform gyrus; they also exhibited lower ALFF in the bilateral cuneus, the left occipital lobe, and the left medial frontal lobe. Adolescent depression is associated with significant changes in the functioning of several regions of the brain.

  7. Diffusion MRI of the neonate brain: acquisition, processing and analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannek, Kerstin [University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Centre for Advanced Imaging, Brisbane (Australia); Guzzetta, Andrea [IRCCS Stella Maris, Department of Developmental Neuroscience, Calambrone Pisa (Italy); Colditz, Paul B. [University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Perinatal Research Centre, Brisbane (Australia); Rose, Stephen E. [University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Centre for Advanced Imaging, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)

    2012-10-15

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) is a popular noninvasive imaging modality for the investigation of the neonate brain. It enables the assessment of white matter integrity, and is particularly suited for studying white matter maturation in the preterm and term neonate brain. Diffusion tractography allows the delineation of white matter pathways and assessment of connectivity in vivo. In this review, we address the challenges of performing and analysing neonate dMRI. Of particular importance in dMRI analysis is adequate data preprocessing to reduce image distortions inherent to the acquisition technique, as well as artefacts caused by head movement. We present a summary of techniques that should be used in the preprocessing of neonate dMRI data, and demonstrate the effect of these important correction steps. Furthermore, we give an overview of available analysis techniques, ranging from voxel-based analysis of anisotropy metrics including tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to recently developed methods of statistical analysis addressing issues of resolving complex white matter architecture. We highlight the importance of resolving crossing fibres for tractography and outline several tractography-based techniques, including connectivity-based segmentation, the connectome and tractography mapping. These techniques provide powerful tools for the investigation of brain development and maturation. (orig.)

  8. Diffusion MRI of the neonate brain: acquisition, processing and analysis techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Kerstin; Guzzetta, Andrea; Colditz, Paul B; Rose, Stephen E

    2012-10-01

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) is a popular noninvasive imaging modality for the investigation of the neonate brain. It enables the assessment of white matter integrity, and is particularly suited for studying white matter maturation in the preterm and term neonate brain. Diffusion tractography allows the delineation of white matter pathways and assessment of connectivity in vivo. In this review, we address the challenges of performing and analysing neonate dMRI. Of particular importance in dMRI analysis is adequate data preprocessing to reduce image distortions inherent to the acquisition technique, as well as artefacts caused by head movement. We present a summary of techniques that should be used in the preprocessing of neonate dMRI data, and demonstrate the effect of these important correction steps. Furthermore, we give an overview of available analysis techniques, ranging from voxel-based analysis of anisotropy metrics including tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to recently developed methods of statistical analysis addressing issues of resolving complex white matter architecture. We highlight the importance of resolving crossing fibres for tractography and outline several tractography-based techniques, including connectivity-based segmentation, the connectome and tractography mapping. These techniques provide powerful tools for the investigation of brain development and maturation.

  9. Euler Elastica regularized Logistic Regression for whole-brain decoding of fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuncheng; Yao, Li; Song, Sutao; Wen, Xiaotong; Zhao, Xiaojie; Long, Zhiying

    2017-09-25

    Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) methods have been widely applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to decode brain states. Due to the "high features, low samples" in fMRI data, machine learning methods have been widely regularized using various regularizations to avoid overfitting. Both total variation (TV) using the gradients of images and Euler's elastica (EE) using the gradient and the curvature of images are the two popular regulations with spatial structures. In contrast to TV, EE regulation is able to overcome the disadvantage of TV regulation that favored piecewise constant images over piecewise smooth images. In this study, we introduced EE to fMRI-based decoding for the first time and proposed the EE regularized multinomial logistic regression (EELR) algorithm for multi-class classification. We performed experimental tests on both simulated and real fMRI data to investigate the feasibility and robustness of EELR. The performance of EELR was compared with sparse logistic regression (SLR) and TV regularized LR (TVLR). The results showed that EELR was more robustness to noises and showed significantly higher classification performance than TVLR and SLR. Moreover, the forward models and weights patterns revealed that EELR detected larger brain regions that were discriminative to each task and activated by each task than TVLR. The results suggest that EELR not only performs well in brain decoding but also reveals meaningful discriminative and activation patterns. This study demonstrated that EELR showed promising potential in brain decoding and discriminative/activation pattern detection.

  10. An MRI digital brain phantom for validation of segmentation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Bruno; Comerci, Marco; Larobina, Michele; Prinster, Anna; Hornak, Joseph P; Selvan, S Easter; Amato, Umberto; Quarantelli, Mario; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Brunetti, Arturo; Salvatore, Marco

    2011-06-01

    Knowledge of the exact spatial distribution of brain tissues in images acquired by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary to measure and compare the performance of segmentation algorithms. Currently available physical phantoms do not satisfy this requirement. State-of-the-art digital brain phantoms also fall short because they do not handle separately anatomical structures (e.g. basal ganglia) and provide relatively rough simulations of tissue fine structure and inhomogeneity. We present a software procedure for the construction of a realistic MRI digital brain phantom. The phantom consists of hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate (R1), spin-spin relaxation rate (R2), and proton density (PD) values for a 24 × 19 × 15.5 cm volume of a "normal" head. The phantom includes 17 normal tissues, each characterized by both mean value and variations in R1, R2, and PD. In addition, an optional tissue class for multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions is simulated. The phantom was used to create realistic magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brain using simulated conventional spin-echo (CSE) and fast field-echo (FFE) sequences. Results of mono-parametric segmentation of simulations of sequences with different noise and slice thickness are presented as an example of possible applications of the phantom. The phantom data and simulated images are available online at http://lab.ibb.cnr.it/. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Graph theoretical analysis and application of fMRI-based brain network in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Xue-na

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is clinically characterized by impaired memory and many other cognitive functions. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease are not thoroughly understood. In recent years, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI as well as advanced graph theory based network analysis approach, several studies of patients with AD suggested abnormal topological organization in both global and regional properties of functional brain networks, specifically, as demonstrated by a loss of small-world network characteristics. These studies provide novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of AD and could be helpful in developing imaging biomarkers for disease diagnosis. In this paper we introduce the essential concepts of complex brain networks theory, and review recent advances of the study on human functional brain networks in AD, especially focusing on the graph theoretical analysis of small-world network based on fMRI. We also propound the existent problems and research orientation.

  12. The usefulness of brain MRI and CT in the clinical practice of epilepsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Hideki [Jikei Univ., Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Daisan Hospital; Maekawa, Kihei

    1995-09-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the usefulness of brain MRI and CT in the clinical practice of epilepsy. The subjects were 100 epileptic child patients (average age, 13.2{+-}8.2 years) who underwent brain MRI, including 93 patients who also underwent brain CT. Twenty-two abnormal findings were obtained by MRI and 25 by CT. Thirty-nine patients who had complications such as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, or the overlapping disorders showed abnormal findings in a significantly high incidence. No significant correlations existed between the presence or absence of abnormal findings and the disease course after seizures. Patients with symptomatic localization-related epilepsies or cryptogenic and symptomatic generalized epilepsies showed abnormal findings in a significantly high incidence and unfavorable disease course after seizures. In 10 of 28 patients who showed abnormal findings, the abnormal finding site on images were correlated to the focus site on electroencephalograms. In conclusion, brain MRI and CT are essential in the clinical practice of epilepsy, however, we should notice the limitation of these methods. (Y.S.).

  13. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI for working memory of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rana Fayyaz; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Kamel, Nidal; Reza, Faruque; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2016-06-01

    Memory plays an important role in human life. Memory can be divided into two categories, i.e., long term memory and short term memory (STM). STM or working memory (WM) stores information for a short span of time and it is used for information manipulations and fast response activities. WM is generally involved in the higher cognitive functions of the brain. Different studies have been carried out by researchers to understand the WM process. Most of these studies were based on neuroimaging modalities like fMRI, EEG, MEG etc., which use standalone processes. Each neuroimaging modality has some pros and cons. For example, EEG gives high temporal resolution but poor spatial resolution. On the other hand, the fMRI results have a high spatial resolution but poor temporal resolution. For a more in depth understanding and insight of what is happening inside the human brain during the WM process or during cognitive tasks, high spatial as well as high temporal resolution is desirable. Over the past decade, researchers have been working to combine different modalities to achieve a high spatial and temporal resolution at the same time. Developments of MRI compatible EEG equipment in recent times have enabled researchers to combine EEG-fMRI successfully. The research publications in simultaneous EEG-fMRI have been increasing tremendously. This review is focused on the WM research involving simultaneous EEG-fMRI data acquisition and analysis. We have covered the simultaneous EEG-fMRI application in WM and data processing. Also, it adds to potential fusion methods which can be used for simultaneous EEG-fMRI for WM and cognitive tasks.

  14. Assessment of blood–brain barrier disruption using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Heye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing recognition of the importance of blood–brain barrier (BBB disruption in aging, dementia, stroke and multiple sclerosis in addition to more commonly-studied pathologies such as tumors. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI is a method for studying BBB disruption in vivo. We review pathologies studied, scanning protocols and data analysis procedures to determine the range of available methods and their suitability to different pathologies. We systematically review the existing literature up to February 2014, seeking studies that assessed BBB integrity using T1-weighted DCE-MRI techniques in animals and humans in normal or abnormal brain tissues. The literature search provided 70 studies that were eligible for inclusion, involving 417 animals and 1564 human subjects in total. The pathologies most studied are intracranial neoplasms and acute ischemic strokes. There are large variations in the type of DCE-MRI sequence, the imaging protocols and the contrast agents used. Moreover, studies use a variety of different methods for data analysis, mainly based on model-free measurements and on the Patlak and Tofts models. Consequently, estimated KTrans values varied widely. In conclusion, DCE-MRI is shown to provide valuable information in a large variety of applications, ranging from common applications, such as grading of primary brain tumors, to more recent applications, such as assessment of subtle BBB dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Further research is required in order to establish consensus-based recommendations for data acquisition and analysis and, hence, improve inter-study comparability and promote wider use of DCE-MRI.

  15. Can we reduce anesthesia exposure? Neonatal brain MRI: Swaddling vs. sedation, a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Benjamin J; Yudkowitz, Francine S; Lipson, Scott

    2017-05-01

    Neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a diagnostic modality that requires minimal motion to acquire quality images. Sedation or even general anesthesia may be necessary to achieve acceptable scans. There is a growing body of literature, especially in animal studies, that links neurotoxicity with anesthetic exposure to the developing brain. There is no study outlining strategies used by neonatal intensive care units (NICU) to achieve quality MRI images with limited exposure to medications identified as possibly harmful to the developing brain. A 15-question survey was sent to all NICU programs in the United States (US) with fellowship programs. MRI suite. Neonates. None. The programs were queried regarding their preferred method for obtaining MRIs of the brain and how successful they were in obtaining quality images. Of the 96 programs surveyed, 58 responded (response rate of 60%). To obtain brain MRIs, 64%(n=37) used feed and swaddle; 32% (n=19) use sedation; and 3% (n=2) used general anesthesia (GA). Success rate of obtaining quality MRI images varied by technique. In the feed and swaddle group, 81% reported that a failure to obtain useful images occurred 75%. In the sedation and GA group, 100% reported failure to obtain useful images occurred rarely. The majority of NICUs in the US that responded to the survey utilized feed and swaddle as their primary technique for obtaining MRIs of the brain and reported a high success rate. Given the growing concern over the possible neurotoxic effects of anesthetic drugs on the developing brain, more centers should consider this technique as a first line method to obtain brain MRIs, with sedation and GA reserved for failed feed and swaddle attempts and special circumstances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Distribution of hyperpolarized xenon in the brain following sensory stimulation: preliminary MRI findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary L Mazzanti

    Full Text Available In hyperpolarized xenon magnetic resonance imaging (HP (129Xe MRI, the inhaled spin-1/2 isotope of xenon gas is used to generate the MR signal. Because hyperpolarized xenon is an MR signal source with properties very different from those generated from water-protons, HP (129Xe MRI may yield structural and functional information not detectable by conventional proton-based MRI methods. Here we demonstrate the differential distribution of HP (129Xe in the cerebral cortex of the rat following a pain stimulus evoked in the animal's forepaw. Areas of higher HP (129Xe signal corresponded to those areas previously demonstrated by conventional functional MRI (fMRI methods as being activated by a forepaw pain stimulus. The percent increase in HP (129Xe signal over baseline was 13-28%, and was detectable with a single set of pre and post stimulus images. Recent innovations in the production of highly polarized (129Xe should make feasible the emergence of HP (129Xe MRI as a viable adjunct method to conventional MRI for the study of brain function and disease.

  17. Distribution of Hyperpolarized Xenon in the Brain Following Sensory Stimulation: Preliminary MRI Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Mary L.; Walvick, Ronn P.; Zhou, Xin; Sun, Yanping; Shah, Niral; Mansour, Joey; Gereige, Jessica; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2011-01-01

    In hyperpolarized xenon magnetic resonance imaging (HP 129Xe MRI), the inhaled spin-1/2 isotope of xenon gas is used to generate the MR signal. Because hyperpolarized xenon is an MR signal source with properties very different from those generated from water-protons, HP 129Xe MRI may yield structural and functional information not detectable by conventional proton-based MRI methods. Here we demonstrate the differential distribution of HP 129Xe in the cerebral cortex of the rat following a pain stimulus evoked in the animal's forepaw. Areas of higher HP 129Xe signal corresponded to those areas previously demonstrated by conventional functional MRI (fMRI) methods as being activated by a forepaw pain stimulus. The percent increase in HP 129Xe signal over baseline was 13–28%, and was detectable with a single set of pre and post stimulus images. Recent innovations in the production of highly polarized 129Xe should make feasible the emergence of HP 129Xe MRI as a viable adjunct method to conventional MRI for the study of brain function and disease. PMID:21789173

  18. Prenatal brain MRI of fetuses with Zika virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemette-Artur, Prisca [Centre Hospitalier de Polynesie Francaise, Service de Radiologie, Pirae, Tahiti (Country Unknown); Besnard, Marianne [Centre Hospitalier de Polynesie Francaise, Service de Reanimation Neo-natale, Pirae, Tahiti (Country Unknown); Eyrolle-Guignot, Dominique [Centre Hospitalier de Polynesie Francaise, Service d' Obstetrique, Pirae, Tahiti (Country Unknown); Jouannic, Jean-Marie [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Service de Medecine Foetale, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France); Garel, Catherine [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2016-06-15

    An outbreak of Zika virus was observed in French Polynesia in 2013-2014. Maternal Zika virus infection has been associated with fetal microcephaly and severe cerebral damage. To analyze the MRI cerebral findings in fetuses with intrauterine Zika virus infection. We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data. Inclusion criteria comprised cases with (1) estimated conception date between June 2013 and May 2014, (2) available US and MRI scans revealing severe fetal brain lesions and (3) positive polymerase chain reaction for Zika virus in the amniotic fluid. We recorded pregnancy history of Zika virus infection and analyzed US and MRI scans. Three out of 12 cases of severe cerebral lesions fulfilled all inclusion criteria. History of maternal Zika virus infection had been documented in two cases. Calcifications and ventriculomegaly were present at US in all cases. MRI showed micrencephaly (n = 3), low cerebellar biometry (n = 2), occipital subependymal pseudocysts (n = 2), polymicrogyria with laminar necrosis and opercular dysplasia (n = 3), absent (n = 1) or hypoplastic (n = 1) corpus callosum and hypoplastic brainstem (n = 1). Severe cerebral damage was observed in our series, with indirect findings suggesting that the germinal matrix is the principal target for Zika virus. The lesions are very similar to severe forms of congenital cytomegalovirus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections. (orig.)

  19. Prenatal brain MRI of fetuses with Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette-Artur, Prisca; Besnard, Marianne; Eyrolle-Guignot, Dominique; Jouannic, Jean-Marie; Garel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    An outbreak of Zika virus was observed in French Polynesia in 2013-2014. Maternal Zika virus infection has been associated with fetal microcephaly and severe cerebral damage. To analyze the MRI cerebral findings in fetuses with intrauterine Zika virus infection. We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data. Inclusion criteria comprised cases with (1) estimated conception date between June 2013 and May 2014, (2) available US and MRI scans revealing severe fetal brain lesions and (3) positive polymerase chain reaction for Zika virus in the amniotic fluid. We recorded pregnancy history of Zika virus infection and analyzed US and MRI scans. Three out of 12 cases of severe cerebral lesions fulfilled all inclusion criteria. History of maternal Zika virus infection had been documented in two cases. Calcifications and ventriculomegaly were present at US in all cases. MRI showed micrencephaly (n = 3), low cerebellar biometry (n = 2), occipital subependymal pseudocysts (n = 2), polymicrogyria with laminar necrosis and opercular dysplasia (n = 3), absent (n = 1) or hypoplastic (n = 1) corpus callosum and hypoplastic brainstem (n = 1). Severe cerebral damage was observed in our series, with indirect findings suggesting that the germinal matrix is the principal target for Zika virus. The lesions are very similar to severe forms of congenital cytomegalovirus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections.

  20. Structural Image Analysis of the Brain in Neuropsychology Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain provides exceptional image quality for visualization and neuroanatomical classification of brain structure. A variety of image analysis techniques provide both qualitative as well as quantitative methods to relate brain structure with neuropsychological outcome and are reviewed herein. Of particular importance are more automated methods that permit analysis of a broad spectrum of anatomical measures including volume, thickness and shape. The challenge for neuropsychology is which metric to use, for which disorder and the timing of when image analysis methods are applied to assess brain structure and pathology. A basic overview is provided as to the anatomical and pathoanatomical relations of different MRI sequences in assessing normal and abnormal findings. Some interpretive guidelines are offered including factors related to similarity and symmetry of typical brain development along with size-normalcy features of brain anatomy related to function. The review concludes with a detailed example of various quantitative techniques applied to analyzing brain structure for neuropsychological outcome studies in traumatic brain injury.

  1. Changes in Brain Activation Associated with Spontaneous Improvization and Figural Creativity After Design-Thinking-Based Training: A Longitudinal fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggar, Manish; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Bott, Nicholas T; Kienitz, Eliza; Chien, Yin-Hsuan; Hong, Daniel W-C; Liu, Ning; Royalty, Adam; Hawthorne, Grace; Reiss, Allan L

    2017-07-01

    Creativity is widely recognized as an essential skill for entrepreneurial success and adaptation to daily-life demands. However, we know little about the neural changes associated with creative capacity enhancement. For the first time, using a prospective, randomized control design, we examined longitudinal changes in brain activity associated with participating in a five-week design-thinking-based Creative Capacity Building Program (CCBP), when compared with Language Capacity Building Program (LCBP). Creativity, an elusive and multifaceted construct, is loosely defined as an ability to produce useful/appropriate and novel outcomes. Here, we focus on one of the facets of creative thinking-spontaneous improvization. Participants were assessed pre- and post-intervention for spontaneous improvization skills using a game-like figural Pictionary-based fMRI task. Whole-brain group-by-time interaction revealed reduced task-related activity in CCBP participants (compared with LCBP participants) after training in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior/paracingulate gyrus, supplementary motor area, and parietal regions. Further, greater cerebellar-cerebral connectivity was observed in CCBP participants at post-intervention when compared with LCBP participants. In sum, our results suggest that improvization-based creative capacity enhancement is associated with reduced engagement of executive functioning regions and increased involvement of spontaneous implicit processing. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Automated selection of brain regions for real-time fMRI brain-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lührs, Michael; Sorger, Bettina; Goebel, Rainer; Esposito, Fabrizio

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) implemented with real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) use fMRI time-courses from predefined regions of interest (ROIs). To reach best performances, localizer experiments and on-site expert supervision are required for ROI definition. To automate this step, we developed two unsupervised computational techniques based on the general linear model (GLM) and independent component analysis (ICA) of rt-fMRI data, and compared their performances on a communication BCI. Approach. 3 T fMRI data of six volunteers were re-analyzed in simulated real-time. During a localizer run, participants performed three mental tasks following visual cues. During two communication runs, a letter-spelling display guided the subjects to freely encode letters by performing one of the mental tasks with a specific timing. GLM- and ICA-based procedures were used to decode each letter, respectively using compact ROIs and whole-brain distributed spatio-temporal patterns of fMRI activity, automatically defined from subject-specific or group-level maps. Main results. Letter-decoding performances were comparable to supervised methods. In combination with a similarity-based criterion, GLM- and ICA-based approaches successfully decoded more than 80% (average) of the letters. Subject-specific maps yielded optimal performances. Significance. Automated solutions for ROI selection may help accelerating the translation of rt-fMRI BCIs from research to clinical applications.

  3. Using MRI for the assessment of paraoxon-induced brain damage and efficacy of antidotal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Yossi; Eisenkraft, Arik; Krivoy, Amir; Schein, Ophir; Makarovski, Igor; Shrot, Shai; Ramaty, Erez; Shilderman, Eugenia Bloch; Kapon, Joseph; Gilat, Eran; Kadar, Tamar; Maier, Stephan; Daniels, Dianne; Shneor, Ran; Salomon, Sharona; Tamar, Gregori; Last, David; Mardor, Yael

    2012-06-01

    Organophosphate intoxication induces neural toxicity as demonstrated in histological analysis of poisoned animals. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) enables early noninvasive characterization of biological tissues based on their water diffusion characteristics. Our objectives were to study the application of MRI for assessment of paraoxon-induced brain damage and the efficacy of antidotal treatments. Seventy-six rats were poisoned with paraoxon followed by treatment with atropine and obidoxime. The rats were then divided into five treatment groups consisting of midazolam after 1 or 30 min, scopolamine after 1 or 30 min and a no anticonvulsant treatment group. Five untreated rats served as controls. Animals underwent MRI on days 1, 8, 15, 29 and 50 post poisoning. Histological evaluation was performed on representative rat brains. Acute DWMRI effects, such as enhancement of temporal brain regions, and chronic effects such as ventricular enlargement and brain atrophy, depicted on T₂-weighted MRI, were significantly more prominent in late anticonvulsant treatment groups. There was no significant difference between the neuroprotective effects of midazolam and scopolamine as shown by DWMRI. Early MRI abnormalities were found to correlate significantly with histological analysis of samples obtained 15 days post treatment. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the feasibility of using DWMRI for depiction of early cytotoxic response to paraoxon and T₂-weighted MRI for later changes, thus enabling assessment of early/late brain damage as well as treatment efficacy in rats. The ability to depict these changes early and noninvasively may be applied clinically in the acute phase of organophosphate poisoning. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Future potential of MRI-guided focused ultrasound brain surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, Rivka R; Jolesz, Ferenc A

    2010-08-01

    Magnetic resonance image-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) has surfaced as a viable noninvasive image-guided therapeutic method that integrates focused ultrasound (FUS), the therapeutic component, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the image guidance module, into a real-time therapy delivery system with closed-loop control of energy delivery. The main applications for MRgFUS of the brain are thermal ablations for brain tumors and functional neurosurgery, and nonthermal, nonablative uses for disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB) or blood clot and hematoma dissolution by liquification. The disruption of the BBB by FUS can be used for targeted delivery of chemotherapy and other therapeutic agents. MRI is used preoperatively for target definition and treatment planning, intraoperatively for procedure monitoring and control, and postoperatively for validating treatment success. Although challenges still remain, this integrated noninvasive therapy delivery system is anticipated to change current treatment paradigms in neurosurgery and the clinical neurosciences. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. How does brain activation differ in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children, during active and passive movements, and tactile stimulation? An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Winckel, Ann; Klingels, Katrijn; Bruyninckx, Frans; Wenderoth, Nici; Peeters, Ron; Sunaert, Stefan; Van Hecke, Wim; De Cock, Paul; Eyssen, Maria; De Weerdt, Willy; Feys, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to investigate brain activation associated with active and passive movements, and tactile stimulation in 17 children with right-sided unilateral cerebral palsy (CP), compared to 19 typically developing children (TD). The active movements consisted of repetitive opening and closing of the hand. For passive movements, an MRI-compatible robot moved the finger up and down. Tactile stimulation was provided by manually stroking the dorsal surface of the hand with a sponge cotton cloth. In both groups, contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex activation (SM1) was seen for all tasks, as well as additional contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (S1) activation for passive movements. Ipsilateral cerebellar activity was observed in TD children during all tasks, but only during active movements in CP children. Of interest was additional ipsilateral SM1 recruitment in CP during active movements as well as ipsilateral S1 activation during passive movements and tactile stimulation. Another interesting new finding was the contralateral cerebellum activation in both groups during different tasks, also in cerebellar areas not primarily linked to the sensorimotor network. Active movements elicited significantly more brain activation in CP compared to TD children. In both groups, active movements displayed significantly more brain activation compared to passive movements and tactile stimulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MRI-guided brain PET image filtering and partial volume correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jianhua; Chu-Shern Lim, Jason; Townsend, David W.

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) image quantification is a challenging problem due to limited spatial resolution of acquired data and the resulting partial volume effects (PVE), which depend on the size of the structure studied in relation to the spatial resolution and which may lead to over or underestimation of the true tissue tracer concentration. In addition, it is usually necessary to perform image smoothing either during image reconstruction or afterwards to achieve a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Typically, an isotropic Gaussian filtering (GF) is used for this purpose. However, the noise suppression is at the cost of deteriorating spatial resolution. As hybrid imaging devices such as PET/MRI have become available, the complementary information derived from high definition morphologic images could be used to improve the quality of PET images. In this study, first of all, we propose an MRI-guided PET filtering method by adapting a recently proposed local linear model and then incorporate PVE into the model to get a new partial volume correction (PVC) method without parcellation of MRI. In addition, both the new filtering and PVC are voxel-wise non-iterative methods. The performance of the proposed methods were investigated with simulated dynamic FDG brain dataset and 18F-FDG brain data of a cervical cancer patient acquired with a simultaneous hybrid PET/MR scanner. The initial simulation results demonstrated that MRI-guided PET image filtering can produce less noisy images than traditional GF and bias and coefficient of variation can be further reduced by MRI-guided PET PVC. Moreover, structures can be much better delineated in MRI-guided PET PVC for real brain data.

  7. Role of eNOS in water exchange index maintenance-MRI studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atochin, D.; Litvak, M.; Huang, S.; Kim, Y. R.; Huang, P.

    2017-08-01

    Stroke studies employ experimental models of cerebral ischemic and reperfusion injury in rodents. MRI provides valuable supravital data of cerebral blood flow and brain tissue damage. This paper presents MRI applications for cerebral blood flow research in mice lines with impaired nitric oxide production by endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Our data demonstrates that specific modifications of MRI methodology in transgenic mouse models help to evaluate the role of eNOS in the brain-blood barrier function.

  8. MRI of the brain in muscle-eye-brain (MEB) disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valanne, L. (Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Pihko, H. (Dept. of Child Neurology, Children' s Hospital, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Katevuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Turku Univ. Hospital (Finland)); Karttunen, P. (Children' s Hospital, Univ. of Kuopio (Finland)); Somer, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Santavuori, P. (Dept. of Child Neurology, Children' s Hospital, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland))

    1994-08-01

    Muscle-eye-brain (MEB) disease belongs to the spectrum of rare congenital syndromes with migration disorders of the brain and muscular dystrophy, along with the Walker-Warburg syndrome and Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Their features overlap, and differential diagnosis presents some difficulties. We examined the brain of 10 patients with MEB using high-field MRI and found a uniform pattern consisting of a pachygyria-type cortical migration disorder, septal and corpus callosum defects and severe hypoplasia of the pons in 7 of them. (orig.)

  9. Tracking of magnetite labeled nanoparticles in the rat brain using MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira P Martínez Vera

    Full Text Available This study was performed to explore the feasibility of tracing nanoparticles for drug transport in the healthy rat brain with a clinical MRI scanner. Phantom studies were performed to assess the R1 ( =  1/T1 relaxivity of different magnetically labeled nanoparticle (MLNP formulations that were based on biodegradable human serum albumin and that were labeled with magnetite of different size. In vivo MRI measurements in 26 rats were done at 3T to study the effect and dynamics of MLNP uptake in the rat brain and body. In the brain, MLNPs induced T1 changes were quantitatively assessed by T1 relaxation time mapping in vivo and compared to post-mortem results from fluorescence imaging. Following intravenous injection of MLNPs, a visible MLNP uptake was seen in the liver and spleen while no visual effect was seen in the brain. However a histogram analysis of T1 changes in the brain demonstrated global and diffuse presence of MLNPs. The magnitude of these T1 changes scaled with post-mortem fluorescence intensity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of tracking even small amounts of magnetite labeled NPs with a sensitive histogram technique in the brain of a living rodent.

  10. Brain functions after sports-related concussion: insights from event-related potentials and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Nadia; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Bottari, Carolina; Johnston, Karen; Ptito, Alain

    2010-10-01

    The high incidence of concussions in contact sports and their impact on brain functions are a major cause for concern. To improve our understanding of brain functioning after sports-related concussion, advanced functional assessment techniques, namely event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), have been recently used in research studies. Contrary to neuropsychological tests that measure verbal and/or motor responses, ERPs and fMRI assess the neural activities associated with cognitive/behavioral demands, and thus provide access to better comprehension of brain functioning. In fact, ERPs have excellent temporal resolution, and fMRI identifies the involved structures during a task. This article describes ERP and fMRI techniques and reviews the results obtained with these tools in sports-related concussion. Although these techniques are not yet readily available, they offer a unique clinical approach, particularly for complex cases (ie, athletes with multiple concussions, chronic symptoms) and objective measures that provide valuable information to guide management and return-to-play decision making.

  11. Aberrant brain regional homogeneity and functional connectivity in middle-aged T2DM patients: a resting-state functional MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daihong Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM has been associated with cognitive impairment. However, its neurological mechanism remains elusive. Combining regional homogeneity (ReHo and functional connectivity (FC analyses, the present study aimed to investigate brain functional alterations in middle-aged T2DM patients, which could provide complementary information for the neural substrates underlying T2DM-associated brain dysfunction. Twenty-five T2DM patients and 25 healthy controls were involved in neuropsychological testing and structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data acquisition. ReHo analysis was conducted to determine the peak coordinates of brain regions with abnormal local brain activity synchronization. Then, the identified brain regions were considered as seeds, and FC between these brain regions and global voxels was computed. Finally, the potential correlations between the imaging indices and neuropsychological data were also explored. Compared with healthy controls, T2DM patients exhibited higher ReHo values in the anterior cingulate gyrus and lower ReHo in right fusiform gyrus, right precentral gyrus and right medial orbit of the superior frontal gyrus. Considering these areas as seed regions, T2DM patients displayed aberrant FC, mainly in the frontal and parietal lobes. The pattern of FC alterations in T2DM patients was characterized by decreased connectivity and positive to negative or negative to positive converted connectivity. Digital Span Test forward scores revealed significant correlations with the ReHo values of the right precentral gyrus (ρ = 0.527, p = 0.014 and FC between the right fusiform gyrus and middle temporal gyrus (ρ = -0.437, p = 0.048. Our findings suggest that T2DM patients suffer from cognitive dysfunction related to spatially local and remote brain activity synchronization impairment. The patterns of ReHo and FC alterations shed light on the mechanisms underlying T2DM-associated brain

  12. Simple Fully Automated Group Classification on Brain fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honorio, J.; Goldstein, R.; Honorio, J.; Samaras, D.; Tomasi, D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-04-14

    We propose a simple, well grounded classification technique which is suited for group classification on brain fMRI data sets that have high dimensionality, small number of subjects, high noise level, high subject variability, imperfect registration and capture subtle cognitive effects. We propose threshold-split region as a new feature selection method and majority voteas the classification technique. Our method does not require a predefined set of regions of interest. We use average acros ssessions, only one feature perexperimental condition, feature independence assumption, and simple classifiers. The seeming counter-intuitive approach of using a simple design is supported by signal processing and statistical theory. Experimental results in two block design data sets that capture brain function under distinct monetary rewards for cocaine addicted and control subjects, show that our method exhibits increased generalization accuracy compared to commonly used feature selection and classification techniques.

  13. Cortical laminar necrosis in brain infarcts: serial MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siskas, N.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Ioannidis, I.; Charitandi, A.; Dimitriadis, A.S. [Radiology Department, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotele University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2003-05-01

    High-signal cortical lesions are observed on T1-weighted images in cases of brain infarct. Histological examination has demonstrated these to be ''cortical laminar necrosis'', without haemorrhage or calcification. We report serial MRI in this condition in 12 patients with brain infarcts. We looked at high-signal lesions on T1-weighted images, chronological changes in signal intensity and contrast enhancement. High-signal cortical lesions began to appear about 2 weeks after the ictus, were prominent at 1 - 2 months, then became less evident, but occasionally remained for up to 1.5 years. They gave high signal or were isointense on T2-weighted images and did not give low signal at any stage. Contrast enhancement of these lesions was prominent at 1 - 2 months, and less apparent from 3 months, but was seen up to 5 months. (orig.)

  14. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan) Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Hasuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Uchida, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Matsumoto, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Tsukamoto, Y. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Ohno, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Masuda, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven patients with olivary degeneration caused by cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhages were reviewed. In four patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, old haematomas were identified as being located in the dentate nucleus; the contralateral inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense on proton-density- and T2-weighted images. In two patients with pontine haemorrhages, the old haematomas were in the tegmentum and the ipsilateral inferior olivary nuclei, which were hyperintense. In one case of midbrain haemorrhage, the inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense bilaterally. The briefest interval from the ictus to MRI was 2 months. Hypertrophic olivary nuclei were observed only at least 4 months after the ictus. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage should not be confused with ischaemic, neoplastic, or other primary pathological conditions of the medulla. (orig.)

  15. Validating Serum S100B and Neuron-Specific Enolase as Biomarkers for the Human Brain – A Combined Serum, Gene Expression and MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streitbürger, Daniel-Paolo; Arelin, Katrin; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Thiery, Joachim; Steiner, Johann; Villringer, Arno

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Former studies have investigated the potential of serum biomarkers for diseases affecting the human brain. In particular the glial protein S100B, a neuro- and gliotrophin inducing plasticity, seems to be involved in the pathogenesis and treatment of psychiatric diseases such as major depression and schizophrenia. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a specific serum marker for neuronal damage. However, the specificity of these biomarkers for cell type and brain region has not been investigated in vivo until now. Methods We acquired two magnetic resonance imaging parameters sensitive to changes in gray and white matter (T1-weighted/diffusion tensor imaging) and obtained serum S100B and NSE levels of 41 healthy subjects. Additionally, we analyzed whole brain gene expressions of S100B in another male cohort of three subjects using the Allen Brain Atlas. Furthermore, a female post mortal brain was investigated using double immunofluorescence labelling with oligodendrocyte markers. Results We show that S100B is specifically related to white matter structures, namely the corpus callosum, anterior forceps and superior longitudinal fasciculus in female subjects. This effect was observed in fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity – the latest an indicator of myelin changes. Histological data confirmed a co-localization of S100B with oligodendrocyte markers in the human corpus callosum. S100B was most abundantly expressed in the corpus callosum according to the whole genome Allen Human Brain Atlas. In addition, NSE was related to gray matter structures, namely the amygdala. This effect was detected across sexes. Conclusion Our data demonstrates a very high S100B expression in white matter tracts, in particular in human corpus callosum. Our study is the first in vivo study validating the specificity of the glial marker S100B for the human brain, and supporting the assumption that radial diffusivity represents a myelin marker. Our results open a new perspective

  16. Validating serum S100B and neuron-specific enolase as biomarkers for the human brain - a combined serum, gene expression and MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel-Paolo Streitbürger

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Former studies have investigated the potential of serum biomarkers for diseases affecting the human brain. In particular the glial protein S100B, a neuro- and gliotrophin inducing plasticity, seems to be involved in the pathogenesis and treatment of psychiatric diseases such as major depression and schizophrenia. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE is a specific serum marker for neuronal damage. However, the specificity of these biomarkers for cell type and brain region has not been investigated in vivo until now. METHODS: We acquired two magnetic resonance imaging parameters sensitive to changes in gray and white matter (T(1-weighted/diffusion tensor imaging and obtained serum S100B and NSE levels of 41 healthy subjects. Additionally, we analyzed whole brain gene expressions of S100B in another male cohort of three subjects using the Allen Brain Atlas. Furthermore, a female post mortal brain was investigated using double immunofluorescence labelling with oligodendrocyte markers. RESULTS: We show that S100B is specifically related to white matter structures, namely the corpus callosum, anterior forceps and superior longitudinal fasciculus in female subjects. This effect was observed in fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity - the latest an indicator of myelin changes. Histological data confirmed a co-localization of S100B with oligodendrocyte markers in the human corpus callosum. S100B was most abundantly expressed in the corpus callosum according to the whole genome Allen Human Brain Atlas. In addition, NSE was related to gray matter structures, namely the amygdala. This effect was detected across sexes. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrates a very high S100B expression in white matter tracts, in particular in human corpus callosum. Our study is the first in vivo study validating the specificity of the glial marker S100B for the human brain, and supporting the assumption that radial diffusivity represents a myelin marker. Our results

  17. Assessment of cognitive brain function in ecstasy users and contributions of other drugs of abuse : Results from an fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Gerry; de Win, Maartje M. L.; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Schilt, Thelma; Kahn, Rene S.; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M.; Ramsey, Nick F.

    Heavy ecstasy use has been associated with neurocognitive deficits in various behavioral and brain imaging studies. However, this association is not conclusive owing to the unavoidable confounding factor of polysubstance use. The present study, as part of the Netherlands XTC Toxicity study,

  18. Different brain activations between own- and other-race face categorization: an fMRI study using group independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenjuan; Liu, Jiangang; Dai, Ruwei; Feng, Lu; Li, Ling; Tian, Jie

    2014-03-01

    Previous behavioral research has proved that individuals process own- and other-race faces differently. One well-known effect is the other-race effect (ORE), which indicates that individuals categorize other-race faces more accurately and faster than own-race faces. The existed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of the other-race effect mainly focused on the racial prejudice and the socio-affective differences towards own- and other-race face. In the present fMRI study, we adopted a race-categorization task to determine the activation level differences between categorizing own- and other-race faces. Thirty one Chinese participants who live in China with Chinese as the majority and who had no direct contact with Caucasian individual were recruited in the present study. We used the group independent component analysis (ICA), which is a method of blind source signal separation that has proven to be promising for analysis of fMRI data. We separated the entail data into 56 components which is estimated based on one subject using the Minimal Description Length (MDL) criteria. The components sorted based on the multiple linear regression temporal sorting criteria, and the fit regression parameters were used in performing statistical test to evaluate the task-relatedness of the components. The one way anova was performed to test the significance of the component time course in different conditions. Our result showed that the areas, which coordinates is similar to the right FFA coordinates that previous studies reported, were greater activated for own-race faces than other-race faces, while the precuneus showed greater activation for other-race faces than own-race faces.

  19. Prognostic Value of A Qualitative Brain MRI Scoring System After Cardiac Arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, Karen G.; Mlynash, Michael; Jansen, Sofie; Persoon, Suzanne; Eyngorn, Irina; Krasnokutsky, Michael V.; Wijman, Christine A. C.; Fischbein, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSETo develop a qualitative brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system for comatose cardiac arrest patients that can be used in clinical practice. METHODSConsecutive comatose postcardiac arrest patients were prospectively enrolled. Routine MR brain sequences were scored

  20. Computation of an MRI brain atlas from a population of Parkinson’s disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidakis, L.; Papageorgiou, I. E.; Damianou, C.; Psychogios, M. N.; Lingor, P.; von Eckardstein, K.; Hadjidemetriou, S.

    2017-11-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the brain. This study presents an MRI-based brain atlas of PD to characterize associated alterations for diagnostic and interventional purposes. The atlas standardizes primarily the implicated subcortical regions such as the globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra (SN), subthalamic nucleus (STN), caudate nucleus (CN), thalamus (TH), putamen (PUT), and red nucleus (RN). The data were 3.0 T MRI brain images from 16 PD patients and 10 matched controls. The images used were T1-weighted (T 1 w), T2-weighted (T 2 w) images, and Susceptibility Weighted Images (SWI). The T1w images were the reference for the inter-subject non-rigid registration available from 3DSlicer. Anatomic labeling was achieved with BrainSuite and regions were refined with the level sets segmentation of ITK-Snap. The subcortical centers were analyzed for their volume and signal intensity. Comparison with an age-matched control group unravels a significant PD-related T1w signal loss in the striatum (CN and PUT) centers, but approximately a constant volume. The results in this study improve MRI based PD localization and can lead to the development of novel biomarkers.

  1. Evaluation of MRI sequences for quantitative T1 brain mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsialios, P.; Thrippleton, M.; Glatz, A.; Pernet, C.

    2017-11-01

    T1 mapping constitutes a quantitative MRI technique finding significant application in brain imaging. It allows evaluation of contrast uptake, blood perfusion, volume, providing a more specific biomarker of disease progression compared to conventional T1-weighted images. While there are many techniques for T1-mapping there is a wide range of reported T1-values in tissues, raising the issue of protocols reproducibility and standardization. The gold standard for obtaining T1-maps is based on acquiring IR-SE sequence. Widely used alternative sequences are IR-SE-EPI, VFA (DESPOT), DESPOT-HIFI and MP2RAGE that speed up scanning and fitting procedures. A custom MRI phantom was used to assess the reproducibility and accuracy of the different methods. All scans were performed using a 3T Siemens Prisma scanner. The acquired data processed using two different codes. The main difference was observed for VFA (DESPOT) which grossly overestimated T1 relaxation time by 214 ms [126 270] compared to the IR-SE sequence. MP2RAGE and DESPOT-HIFI sequences gave slightly shorter time than IR-SE (~20 to 30ms) and can be considered as alternative and time-efficient methods for acquiring accurate T1 maps of the human brain, while IR-SE-EPI gave identical result, at a cost of a lower image quality.

  2. Brain Activity Unique to Orgasm in Women: An fMRI Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Nan J; Frangos, Eleni; Komisaruk, Barry R

    2017-11-01

    for treatment of orgasmic disorders, including anorgasmia. This is evidently the first fMRI study of orgasm elicited by self- and partner-induced genital stimulation in women. Methodologic solutions to the technical issues posed by excessive head movement and variable latencies to orgasm were successfully applied in the present study, enabling identification of brain regions involved in orgasm. Limitations include the small sample (N = 10), which combined self- and partner-induced stimulation datasets for analysis and which qualify the generalization of our conclusions. Extensive cortical, subcortical, and brainstem regions reach peak levels of activity at orgasm. Wise NJ, Frangos E, Komisaruk BR. Brain Activity Unique to Orgasm in Women: An fMRI Analysis. J Sex Med 2017;14:1380-1391. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Automated template-based brain localization and extraction for fetal brain MRI reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourbier, Sébastien; Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Taimouri, Vahid; Hagmann, Patric; Meuli, Reto; Warfield, Simon K; Bach Cuadra, Meritxell; Gholipour, Ali

    2017-07-15

    Most fetal brain MRI reconstruction algorithms rely only on brain tissue-relevant voxels of low-resolution (LR) images to enhance the quality of inter-slice motion correction and image reconstruction. Consequently the fetal brain needs to be localized and extracted as a first step, which is usually a laborious and time consuming manual or semi-automatic task. We have proposed in this work to use age-matched template images as prior knowledge to automatize brain localization and extraction. This has been achieved through a novel automatic brain localization and extraction method based on robust template-to-slice block matching and deformable slice-to-template registration. Our template-based approach has also enabled the reconstruction of fetal brain images in standard radiological anatomical planes in a common coordinate space. We have integrated this approach into our new reconstruction pipeline that involves intensity normalization, inter-slice motion correction, and super-resolution (SR) reconstruction. To this end we have adopted a novel approach based on projection of every slice of the LR brain masks into the template space using a fusion strategy. This has enabled the refinement of brain masks in the LR images at each motion correction iteration. The overall brain localization and extraction algorithm has shown to produce brain masks that are very close to manually drawn brain masks, showing an average Dice overlap measure of 94.5%. We have also demonstrated that adopting a slice-to-template registration and propagation of the brain mask slice-by-slice leads to a significant improvement in brain extraction performance compared to global rigid brain extraction and consequently in the quality of the final reconstructed images. Ratings performed by two expert observers show that the proposed pipeline can achieve similar reconstruction quality to reference reconstruction based on manual slice-by-slice brain extraction. The proposed brain mask refinement and

  4. Multi-modal analysis of genetically-related subjects using SIFT descriptors in brain MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Kuldeep; Chauvin, Laurent; Toews, Mathew; Colliot, Olivier; Desrosiers, Christian

    2017-01-01

    International audience; So far, fingerprinting studies have focused on identifying features from single-modality MRI data, which capture individual characteristics in terms of brain structure, function, or white matter microstruc-ture. However, due to the lack of a framework for comparing across multiple modalities, studies based on multi-modal data remain elusive. This paper presents a multi-modal analysis of genetically-related subjects to compare and contrast the information provided by va...

  5. Improving Functional MRI Registration Using Whole-Brain Functional Correlation Tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yujia; Yap, Pew-Thian; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Lichi; Feng, Qianjin; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-09-01

    Population studies of brain function with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) largely rely on the accurate inter-subject registration of functional areas. This is typically achieved through registration of the corresponding T1-weighted MR images with more structural details. However, accumulating evidence has suggested that such strategy cannot well-align functional regions which are not necessarily confined by the anatomical boundaries defined by the T1-weighted MR images. To mitigate this problem, various registration algorithms based directly on rs-fMRI data have been developed, most of which have utilized functional connectivity (FC) as features for registration. However, most of the FC-based registration methods usually extract the functional features only from the thin and highly curved cortical grey matter (GM), posing a great challenge in accurately estimating the whole-brain deformation field. In this paper, we demonstrate that the additional useful functional features can be extracted from brain regions beyond the GM, particularly, white-matter (WM) based on rs-fMRI, for improving the overall functional registration. Specifically, we quantify the local anisotropic correlation patterns of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals, modeled by functional correlation tensors (FCTs), in both GM and WM. Functional registration is then performed based on multiple components of the whole-brain FCTs using a multichannel Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (mLDDMM) algorithm. Experimental results show that our proposed method achieves superior functional registration performance, compared with other conventional registration methods.

  6. Altered baseline brain activity in experts measured by amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF: a resting state fMRI study using expertise model of acupuncturists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghao eDong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that expertise modulates evoked brain activity in response to specific stimuli. Recently, researchers have begun to investigate how expertise influences the resting brain. Among these studies, most focused on the connectivity features within/across regions, i.e. connectivity patterns/strength. However, little concern has been given to a more fundamental issue whether or not expertise modulates baseline brain activity. We investigated this question using amplitude of low-frequency (<0.08Hz fluctuation (ALFF as the metric of brain activity and a novel expertise model, i.e. acupuncturists, due to their robust proficiency in tactile perception and emotion regulation. After the psychophysical and behavioral expertise screening procedure, 23 acupuncturists and 23 matched non-acupuncturists (NA were enrolled. Our results explicated higher ALFF for acupuncturists in the left ventral medial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC and the contralateral hand representation of the primary somatosensory area (SI (corrected for multiple comparisons. Additionally, ALFF of VMPFC was negatively correlated with the outcomes of the emotion regulation task (corrected for multiple comparisons. We suggest that our study may reveal a novel connection between the neuroplasticity mechanism and resting state activity, which would upgrade our understanding of the central mechanism of learning. Furthermore, by showing that expertise can affect the baseline brain activity as indicated by ALFF, our findings may have profound implication for functional neuroimaging studies especially those involving expert models, in that difference in baseline brain activity may either smear the spatial pattern of activations for task data or introduce biased results into connectivity-based analysis for resting data.

  7. Use of brain MRI atlases to determine boundaries of age-related pathology: the importance of statistical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, David Alexander; Job, Dominic E; Gonzalez, David Rodriguez; Shenkin, Susan D; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    construction of brain MRI atlases should be selected taking into account the population and aim under study. Parametric methods are generally robust for defining central tendencies, e.g., means, of brain structure. Nonparametric methods are advisable when studying the limits of brain structure in ageing and neurodegenerative disease.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vis, J B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/39133378X; Zwanenburg, J J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/290473683; van der Kleij, L A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413752291; Spijkerman, J M; Biessels, G J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165576367; Hendrikse, J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/266590268; Petersen, E T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T2 of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. METHODS: Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T1-weighted and CSF MRI were

  9. Brain size and white matter content of cerebrospinal tracts determine the upper cervical cord area: evidence from structural brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engl, Christina; Arsic, Milan; Boucard, Christine C.; Biberacher, Viola; Nunnemann, Sabine; Muehlau, Mark [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM-Neuroimaging Center, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Schmidt, Paul [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University Muenchen, Department of Statistics, Munich (Germany); Roettinger, Michael [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Muenchner Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Munich (Germany); Etgen, Thorleif [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Klinikum Traunstein, Department of Neurology, Traunstein (Germany); Koutsouleris, Nikolaos; Meisenzahl, Eva M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Measurement of the upper cervical cord area (UCCA) from brain MRI may be an effective way to quantify spinal cord involvement in neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis. However, knowledge on the determinants of UCCA in healthy controls (HCs) is limited. In two cohorts of 133 and 285 HCs, we studied the influence of different demographic, body-related, and brain-related parameters on UCCA by simple and partial correlation analyses as well as by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) across both cerebral gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM). First, we confirmed the known but moderate effect of age on UCCA in the older cohort. Second, we studied the correlation of UCCA with sex, body height, and total intracranial volume (TIV). TIV was the only variable that correlated significantly with UCCA after correction for the other variables. Third, we studied the correlation of UCCA with brain-related parameters. Brain volume correlated stronger with UCCA than TIV. Both volumes of the brain tissue compartments GM and WM correlated with UCCA significantly. WM volume explained variance of UCCA after correction for GM volume, whilst the opposite was not observed. Correspondingly, VBM did not yield any brain region, whose GM content correlated significantly with UCCA, whilst cerebral WM content of cerebrospinal tracts strongly correlated with UCCA. This latter effect increased along a craniocaudal gradient. UCCA is mainly determined by brain volume as well as by WM content of cerebrospinal tracts. (orig.)

  10. Patch-based generation of a pseudo CT from conventional MRI sequences for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, the information on electron density must be derived from the MRI scan by creating a so-called pseudo computed tomography (pCT). This is a nontrivial task, since the voxel-intensities in an MRI scan are n...... on conventional T1-weighted MRI sequences and without deformable registrations. In our evaluations, the method performed better than existing voxel-based and atlas-based methods and showed a promising potential for RT of the brain based only on MRI.......Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as t