WorldWideScience

Sample records for brain motor control

  1. Efficient foot motor control by Neymar's brain.

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    Naito, Eiichi; Hirose, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    How very long-term (over many years) motor skill training shapes internal motor representation remains poorly understood. We provide valuable evidence that the football brain of Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior (the Brasilian footballer) recruits very limited neural resources in the motor-cortical foot regions during foot movements. We scanned his brain activity with a 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while he rotated his right ankle at 1 Hz. We also scanned brain activity when three other age-controlled professional footballers, two top-athlete swimmers and one amateur footballer performed the identical task. A comparison was made between Neymar's brain activity with that obtained from the others. We found activations in the left medial-wall foot motor regions during the foot movements consistently across all participants. However, the size and intensity of medial-wall activity was smaller in the four professional footballers than in the three other participants, despite no difference in amount of foot movement. Surprisingly, the reduced recruitment of medial-wall foot motor regions became apparent in Neymar. His medial-wall activity was smallest among all participants with absolutely no difference in amount of foot movement. Neymar may efficiently control given foot movements probably by largely conserving motor-cortical neural resources. We discuss this possibility in terms of over-years motor skill training effect, use-dependent plasticity, and efficient motor control.

  2. Efficient foot motor control by Neymar’s brain

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    Eiichi eNaito

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available How very long-term (over many years motor skill training shapes internal motor representation remains poorly understood. We provide valuable evidence that the football brain of Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior (the Brasilian footballer recruits very limited neural resources in the motor-cortical foot regions during foot movements. We scanned his brain activity with a 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI while he rotated his right ankle at 1Hz. We also scanned brain activity when three other age-controlled professional footballers, two top-athlete swimmers and one amateur footballer performed the identical task. A comparison was made between Neymar’s brain activity with that obtained from the others. We found activations in the left medial-wall foot motor regions during the foot movements consistently across all participants. However, the size and intensity of medial-wall activity was smaller in the four professional footballers than in the three other participants, despite no difference in amount of foot movement. Surprisingly, the reduced recruitment of medial-wall foot motor regions became apparent in Neymar. His medial-wall activity was smallest among all participants with absolutely no difference in amount of foot movement. Neymar may efficiently control given foot movements probably by largely conserving motor-cortical neural resources. We discuss this possibility in terms of over-years motor skill training effect, use-dependent plasticity, and efficient motor control.

  3. Brain mechanisms underlying automatic and unconscious control of motor action

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    Kevin eD'ostilio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Are we in command of our motor acts? The popular belief holds that our conscious decisions are the direct causes of our actions. However, overwhelming evidence from neurosciences demonstrates that our actions are instead largely driven by brain processes that unfold outside of our consciousness. To study these brain processes, scientists have used a range of different functional brain imaging techniques and experimental protocols, such as subliminal priming. Here, we review recent advances in the field and propose a theoretical model of motor control that may contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.

  4. Sensorless speed control of switched reluctance motor using brain emotional learning based intelligent controller

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    Dehkordi, Behzad Mirzaeian, E-mail: mirzaeian@eng.ui.ac.i [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Isfahan, Hezar-Jerib St., Postal code 8174673441, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parsapoor, Amir, E-mail: amirparsapoor@yahoo.co [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Isfahan, Hezar-Jerib St., Postal code 8174673441, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moallem, Mehdi, E-mail: moallem@cc.iut.ac.i [Department of Electrical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lucas, Caro, E-mail: lucas@ut.ac.i [Centre of Excellence for Control and Intelligent Processing, Electrical and Computer Engineering Faculty, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    In this paper, a brain emotional learning based intelligent controller (BELBIC) is developed to control the switched reluctance motor (SRM) speed. Like other intelligent controllers, BELBIC is model free and is suitable to control nonlinear systems. Motor parameter changes, operating point changes, measurement noise, open circuit fault in one phase and asymmetric phases in SRM are also simulated to show the robustness and superior performance of BELBIC. To compare the BELBIC performance with other intelligent controllers, Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC) is developed. System responses with BELBIC and FLC are compared. Furthermore, by eliminating the position sensor, a method is introduced to estimate the rotor position. This method is based on Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). The estimator inputs are four phase flux linkages. Suggested rotor position estimator is simulated in different conditions. Simulation results confirm the accurate rotor position estimation in different loads and speeds.

  5. Afferent and efferent activity control in the design of brain computer interfaces for motor rehabilitation.

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    Cho, Woosang; Vidaurre, Carmen; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Birbaumer, Niels; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a cardiovascular accident within the brain resulting in motor and sensory impairment in most of the survivors. A stroke can produce complete paralysis of the limb although sensory abilities are normally preserved. Functional electrical stimulation (FES), robotics and brain computer interfaces (BCIs) have been used to induce motor rehabilitation. In this work we measured the brain activity of healthy volunteers using electroencephalography (EEG) during FES, passive movements, active movements, motor imagery of the hand and resting to compare afferent and efferent brain signals produced during these motor related activities and to define possible features for an online FES-BCI. In the conditions in which the hand was moved we limited the movement range in order to control the afferent flow. Although we observed that there is a subject dependent frequency and spatial distribution of efferent and afferent signals, common patterns between conditions and subjects were present mainly in the low beta frequency range. When averaging all the subjects together the most significant frequency bin comparing each condition versus rest was exactly the same for all conditions but motor imagery. These results suggest that to implement an on-line FES-BCI, afferent brain signals resulting from FES have to be filtered and time-frequency-spatial features need to be used.

  6. Strong Functional Connectivity among Homotopic Brain Areas Is Vital for Motor Control in Unilateral Limb Movement

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    Pengxu Wei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying brain region organization for motor control in humans remains poorly understood. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, right-handed volunteers were tasked to maintain unilateral foot movements on the right and left sides as consistently as possible. We aimed to identify the similarities and differences between brain motor networks of the two conditions. We recruited 18 right-handed healthy volunteers aged 25 ± 2.3 years and used a whole-body 3T system for magnetic resonance (MR scanning. Image analysis was performed using SPM8, Conn toolbox and Brain Connectivity Toolbox. We determined a craniocaudally distributed, mirror-symmetrical modular structure. The functional connectivity between homotopic brain areas was generally stronger than the intrahemispheric connections, and such strong connectivity led to the abovementioned modular structure. Our findings indicated that the interhemispheric functional interaction between homotopic brain areas is more intensive than the interaction along the conventional top–down and bottom–up pathways within the brain during unilateral limb movement. The detected strong interhemispheric horizontal functional interaction is an important aspect of motor control but often neglected or underestimated. The strong interhemispheric connectivity may explain the physiological phenomena and effects of promising therapeutic approaches. Further accurate and effective therapeutic methods may be developed on the basis of our findings.

  7. Motor cortical control of movement speed with implications for brain-machine interface control.

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    Golub, Matthew D; Yu, Byron M; Schwartz, Andrew B; Chase, Steven M

    2014-07-15

    Motor cortex plays a substantial role in driving movement, yet the details underlying this control remain unresolved. We analyzed the extent to which movement-related information could be extracted from single-trial motor cortical activity recorded while monkeys performed center-out reaching. Using information theoretic techniques, we found that single units carry relatively little speed-related information compared with direction-related information. This result is not mitigated at the population level: simultaneously recorded population activity predicted speed with significantly lower accuracy relative to direction predictions. Furthermore, a unit-dropping analysis revealed that speed accuracy would likely remain lower than direction accuracy, even given larger populations. These results suggest that the instantaneous details of single-trial movement speed are difficult to extract using commonly assumed coding schemes. This apparent paucity of speed information takes particular importance in the context of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), which rely on extracting kinematic information from motor cortex. Previous studies have highlighted subjects' difficulties in holding a BMI cursor stable at targets. These studies, along with our finding of relatively little speed information in motor cortex, inspired a speed-dampening Kalman filter (SDKF) that automatically slows the cursor upon detecting changes in decoded movement direction. Effectively, SDKF enhances speed control by using prevalent directional signals, rather than requiring speed to be directly decoded from neural activity. SDKF improved success rates by a factor of 1.7 relative to a standard Kalman filter in a closed-loop BMI task requiring stable stops at targets. BMI systems enabling stable stops will be more effective and user-friendly when translated into clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Motor imaginary-based brain-machine interface design using programmable logic controllers for the disabled.

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    Jeyabalan, Vickneswaran; Samraj, Andrews; Loo, Chu Kiong

    2010-10-01

    Aiming at the implementation of brain-machine interfaces (BMI) for the aid of disabled people, this paper presents a system design for real-time communication between the BMI and programmable logic controllers (PLCs) to control an electrical actuator that could be used in devices to help the disabled. Motor imaginary signals extracted from the brain’s motor cortex using an electroencephalogram (EEG) were used as a control signal. The EEG signals were pre-processed by means of adaptive recursive band-pass filtrations (ARBF) and classified using simplified fuzzy adaptive resonance theory mapping (ARTMAP) in which the classified signals are then translated into control signals used for machine control via the PLC. A real-time test system was designed using MATLAB for signal processing, KEP-Ware V4 OLE for process control (OPC), a wireless local area network router, an Omron Sysmac CPM1 PLC and a 5 V/0.3A motor. This paper explains the signal processing techniques, the PLC's hardware configuration, OPC configuration and real-time data exchange between MATLAB and PLC using the MATLAB OPC toolbox. The test results indicate that the function of exchanging real-time data can be attained between the BMI and PLC through OPC server and proves that it is an effective and feasible method to be applied to devices such as wheelchairs or electronic equipment.

  9. A cerebellar model for predictive motor control tested in a brain-based device.

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    McKinstry, Jeffrey L; Edelman, Gerald M; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2006-02-28

    The cerebellum is known to be critical for accurate adaptive control and motor learning. We propose here a mechanism by which the cerebellum may replace reflex control with predictive control. This mechanism is embedded in a learning rule (the delayed eligibility trace rule) in which synapses onto a Purkinje cell or onto a cell in the deep cerebellar nuclei become eligible for plasticity only after a fixed delay from the onset of suprathreshold presynaptic activity. To investigate the proposal that the cerebellum is a general-purpose predictive controller guided by a delayed eligibility trace rule, a computer model based on the anatomy and dynamics of the cerebellum was constructed. It contained components simulating cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei, and it received input from a middle temporal visual area and the inferior olive. The model was incorporated in a real-world brain-based device (BBD) built on a Segway robotic platform that learned to traverse curved paths. The BBD learned which visual motion cues predicted impending collisions and used this experience to avoid path boundaries. During learning, the BBD adapted its velocity and turning rate to successfully traverse various curved paths. By examining neuronal activity and synaptic changes during this behavior, we found that the cerebellar circuit selectively responded to motion cues in specific receptive fields of simulated middle temporal visual areas. The system described here prompts several hypotheses about the relationship between perception and motor control and may be useful in the development of general-purpose motor learning systems for machines.

  10. Principles of Motor Recovery in Post-Stroke Patients using Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by the Brain-Computer Interface Based on Motor Imagery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolov, A. A.; Húsek, Dušan; Biryukova, E. V.; Bobrov, P.; Mokienko, O.; Alexandrov, A.V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 1 (2017), s. 107-137 ISSN 1210-0552 Grant - others:Russian Ministry of Education and Science(RU) RFMEFI60715X0128 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : brain computer interface * motor imagery * post-stroke and post-traumatic patients * arm and hand exoskeleton * proportional derivative controller * motor synergy * clinical application Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.394, year: 2016

  11. Aging associated changes in the motor control of ankle movements in the brain.

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    Linortner, Patricia; Jehna, Margit; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Matthews, Paul; Schmidt, Reinhold; Fazekas, Franz; Enzinger, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Although age-related gait changes have been well characterized, little is known regarding potential functional changes in central motor control of distal lower limb movements with age. We hypothesized that there are age-related changes in brain activity associated with the control of repetitive ankle movements, an element of gait feasible for study with functional magnetic resonance imaging. We analyzed standardized functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 102 right-foot dominant healthy participants aged 20-83 years for age-associated effects using FSL and a meta-analysis using coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation. For the first time, we have confirmed age-related changes in brain activity with this gait-related movement of the lower limb in a large population. Increasing age correlated strongly with increased movement-associated activity in the cerebellum and precuneus. Given that task performance did not vary with age, we interpret these changes as potentially compensatory for other age-related changes in the sensorimotor network responsible for control of limb function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Intersection between Ocular and Manual Motor Control: Eye–Hand Coordination in Acquired Brain Injury

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    John-Ross Rizzo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic disease processes that lead to cerebral injury can often be clinically challenging diagnostically, prognostically, and therapeutically. Neurodegenerative processes are one such elusive diagnostic group, given their often diffuse and indolent nature, creating difficulties in pinpointing specific structural abnormalities that relate to functional limitations. A number of studies in recent years have focused on eye–hand coordination (EHC in the setting of acquired brain injury (ABI, highlighting the important set of interconnected functions of the eye and hand and their relevance in neurological conditions. These experiments, which have concentrated on focal lesion-based models, have significantly improved our understanding of neurophysiology and underscored the sensitivity of biomarkers in acute and chronic neurological disease processes, especially when such biomarkers are combined synergistically. To better understand EHC and its connection with ABI, there is a need to clarify its definition and to delineate its neuroanatomical and computational underpinnings. Successful EHC relies on the complex feedback- and prediction-mediated relationship between the visual, ocular motor, and manual motor systems and takes advantage of finely orchestrated synergies between these systems in both the spatial and temporal domains. Interactions of this type are representative of functional sensorimotor control, and their disruption constitutes one of the most frequent deficits secondary to brain injury. The present review describes the visually mediated planning and control of eye movements, hand movements, and their coordination, with a particular focus on deficits that occur following neurovascular, neurotraumatic, and neurodegenerative conditions. Following this review, we also discuss potential future research directions, highlighting objective EHC as a sensitive biomarker complement within acute and chronic neurological disease processes.

  13. Virtual and Actual Humanoid Robot Control with Four-Class Motor-Imagery-Based Optical Brain-Computer Interface

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    Kim, Youngmoo E.

    2017-01-01

    Motor-imagery tasks are a popular input method for controlling brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), partially due to their similarities to naturally produced motor signals. The use of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in BCIs is still emerging and has shown potential as a supplement or replacement for electroencephalography. However, studies often use only two or three motor-imagery tasks, limiting the number of available commands. In this work, we present the results of the first four-class motor-imagery-based online fNIRS-BCI for robot control. Thirteen participants utilized upper- and lower-limb motor-imagery tasks (left hand, right hand, left foot, and right foot) that were mapped to four high-level commands (turn left, turn right, move forward, and move backward) to control the navigation of a simulated or real robot. A significant improvement in classification accuracy was found between the virtual-robot-based BCI (control of a virtual robot) and the physical-robot BCI (control of the DARwIn-OP humanoid robot). Differences were also found in the oxygenated hemoglobin activation patterns of the four tasks between the first and second BCI. These results corroborate previous findings that motor imagery can be improved with feedback and imply that a four-class motor-imagery-based fNIRS-BCI could be feasible with sufficient subject training. PMID:28804712

  14. Virtual and Actual Humanoid Robot Control with Four-Class Motor-Imagery-Based Optical Brain-Computer Interface.

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    Batula, Alyssa M; Kim, Youngmoo E; Ayaz, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Motor-imagery tasks are a popular input method for controlling brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), partially due to their similarities to naturally produced motor signals. The use of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in BCIs is still emerging and has shown potential as a supplement or replacement for electroencephalography. However, studies often use only two or three motor-imagery tasks, limiting the number of available commands. In this work, we present the results of the first four-class motor-imagery-based online fNIRS-BCI for robot control. Thirteen participants utilized upper- and lower-limb motor-imagery tasks (left hand, right hand, left foot, and right foot) that were mapped to four high-level commands (turn left, turn right, move forward, and move backward) to control the navigation of a simulated or real robot. A significant improvement in classification accuracy was found between the virtual-robot-based BCI (control of a virtual robot) and the physical-robot BCI (control of the DARwIn-OP humanoid robot). Differences were also found in the oxygenated hemoglobin activation patterns of the four tasks between the first and second BCI. These results corroborate previous findings that motor imagery can be improved with feedback and imply that a four-class motor-imagery-based fNIRS-BCI could be feasible with sufficient subject training.

  15. Transferring brain-computer interfaces beyond the laboratory: successful application control for motor-disabled users.

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    Leeb, Robert; Perdikis, Serafeim; Tonin, Luca; Biasiucci, Andrea; Tavella, Michele; Creatura, Marco; Molina, Alberto; Al-Khodairy, Abdul; Carlson, Tom; Millán, José D R

    2013-10-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are no longer only used by healthy participants under controlled conditions in laboratory environments, but also by patients and end-users, controlling applications in their homes or clinics, without the BCI experts around. But are the technology and the field mature enough for this? Especially the successful operation of applications - like text entry systems or assistive mobility devices such as tele-presence robots - requires a good level of BCI control. How much training is needed to achieve such a level? Is it possible to train naïve end-users in 10 days to successfully control such applications? In this work, we report our experiences of training 24 motor-disabled participants at rehabilitation clinics or at the end-users' homes, without BCI experts present. We also share the lessons that we have learned through transferring BCI technologies from the lab to the user's home or clinics. The most important outcome is that 50% of the participants achieved good BCI performance and could successfully control the applications (tele-presence robot and text-entry system). In the case of the tele-presence robot the participants achieved an average performance ratio of 0.87 (max. 0.97) and for the text entry application a mean of 0.93 (max. 1.0). The lessons learned and the gathered user feedback range from pure BCI problems (technical and handling), to common communication issues among the different people involved, and issues encountered while controlling the applications. The points raised in this paper are very widely applicable and we anticipate that they might be faced similarly by other groups, if they move on to bringing the BCI technology to the end-user, to home environments and towards application prototype control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Arm Motor Function Recovery during Rehabilitation with the Use of Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by Brain-Computer Interface: a Patient with Severe Brain Damage].

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    Biryukova, E V; Pavlova, O G; Kurganskaya, M E; Bobrov, P D; Turbina, L G; Frolov, A A; Davydov, V I; Sil'tchenko, A V; Mokienko, O A

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of motor function recovery in a patient with severe brain damage in the course of neurorehabilitation using hand exoskeleton controlled by brain-computer interface. For estimating the motor function of paretic arm, we used the biomechanical analysis of movements registered during the course of rehabilitation. After 15 weekly sessions of hand exoskeleton control, the following results were obtained: a) the velocity profile of goal-directed movements of paretic hand became bell-shaped, b) the patient began to extend and abduct the hand which was flexed and adducted in the beginning of rehabilitation, and c) the patient began to supinate the forearm which was pronated in the beginning of rehabilitation. The first result is an evidence of the general improvement of the quality of motor control, while the second and third results prove that the spasticity of paretic arm has decreased.

  17. Haptic fMRI: combining functional neuroimaging with haptics for studying the brain's motor control representation.

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    Menon, Samir; Brantner, Gerald; Aholt, Chris; Kay, Kendrick; Khatib, Oussama

    2013-01-01

    A challenging problem in motor control neuroimaging studies is the inability to perform complex human motor tasks given the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner's disruptive magnetic fields and confined workspace. In this paper, we propose a novel experimental platform that combines Functional MRI (fMRI) neuroimaging, haptic virtual simulation environments, and an fMRI-compatible haptic device for real-time haptic interaction across the scanner workspace (above torso ∼ .65×.40×.20m(3)). We implement this Haptic fMRI platform with a novel haptic device, the Haptic fMRI Interface (HFI), and demonstrate its suitability for motor neuroimaging studies. HFI has three degrees-of-freedom (DOF), uses electromagnetic motors to enable high-fidelity haptic rendering (>350Hz), integrates radio frequency (RF) shields to prevent electromagnetic interference with fMRI (temporal SNR >100), and is kinematically designed to minimize currents induced by the MRI scanner's magnetic field during motor displacement (Tesla fMRI scanner's baseline noise variation (∼.85±.1%). Finally, HFI is haptically transparent and does not interfere with human motor tasks (tested for .4m reaches). By allowing fMRI experiments involving complex three-dimensional manipulation with haptic interaction, Haptic fMRI enables-for the first time-non-invasive neuroscience experiments involving interactive motor tasks, object manipulation, tactile perception, and visuo-motor integration.

  18. Gross motor control

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    Gross motor control is the ability to make large, general movements (such as waving an arm or lifting a ... Gross motor control is a milestone in the development of an infant. Infants develop gross motor control before they ...

  19. Brain-Computer Interface application: auditory serial interface to control a two-class motor-imagery-based wheelchair.

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    Ron-Angevin, Ricardo; Velasco-Álvarez, Francisco; Fernández-Rodríguez, Álvaro; Díaz-Estrella, Antonio; Blanca-Mena, María José; Vizcaíno-Martín, Francisco Javier

    2017-05-30

    Certain diseases affect brain areas that control the movements of the patients' body, thereby limiting their autonomy and communication capacity. Research in the field of Brain-Computer Interfaces aims to provide patients with an alternative communication channel not based on muscular activity, but on the processing of brain signals. Through these systems, subjects can control external devices such as spellers to communicate, robotic prostheses to restore limb movements, or domotic systems. The present work focus on the non-muscular control of a robotic wheelchair. A proposal to control a wheelchair through a Brain-Computer Interface based on the discrimination of only two mental tasks is presented in this study. The wheelchair displacement is performed with discrete movements. The control signals used are sensorimotor rhythms modulated through a right-hand motor imagery task or mental idle state. The peculiarity of the control system is that it is based on a serial auditory interface that provides the user with four navigation commands. The use of two mental tasks to select commands may facilitate control and reduce error rates compared to other endogenous control systems for wheelchairs. Seventeen subjects initially participated in the study; nine of them completed the three sessions of the proposed protocol. After the first calibration session, seven subjects were discarded due to a low control of their electroencephalographic signals; nine out of ten subjects controlled a virtual wheelchair during the second session; these same nine subjects achieved a medium accuracy level above 0.83 on the real wheelchair control session. The results suggest that more extensive training with the proposed control system can be an effective and safe option that will allow the displacement of a wheelchair in a controlled environment for potential users suffering from some types of motor neuron diseases.

  20. Long-Term Stability of Motor Cortical Activity: Implications for Brain Machine Interfaces and Optimal Feedback Control.

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    Flint, Robert D; Scheid, Michael R; Wright, Zachary A; Solla, Sara A; Slutzky, Marc W

    2016-03-23

    The human motor system is capable of remarkably precise control of movements--consider the skill of professional baseball pitchers or surgeons. This precise control relies upon stable representations of movements in the brain. Here, we investigated the stability of cortical activity at multiple spatial and temporal scales by recording local field potentials (LFPs) and action potentials (multiunit spikes, MSPs) while two monkeys controlled a cursor either with their hand or directly from the brain using a brain-machine interface. LFPs and some MSPs were remarkably stable over time periods ranging from 3 d to over 3 years; overall, LFPs were significantly more stable than spikes. We then assessed whether the stability of all neural activity, or just a subset of activity, was necessary to achieve stable behavior. We showed that projections of neural activity into the subspace relevant to the task (the "task-relevant space") were significantly more stable than were projections into the task-irrelevant (or "task-null") space. This provides cortical evidence in support of the minimum intervention principle, which proposes that optimal feedback control (OFC) allows the brain to tightly control only activity in the task-relevant space while allowing activity in the task-irrelevant space to vary substantially from trial to trial. We found that the brain appears capable of maintaining stable movement representations for extremely long periods of time, particularly so for neural activity in the task-relevant space, which agrees with OFC predictions. It is unknown whether cortical signals are stable for more than a few weeks. Here, we demonstrate that motor cortical signals can exhibit high stability over several years. This result is particularly important to brain-machine interfaces because it could enable stable performance with infrequent recalibration. Although we can maintain movement accuracy over time, movement components that are unrelated to the goals of a task (such

  1. Body representations in the human brain revealed by kinesthetic illusions and their essential contributions to motor control and corporeal awareness.

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    Naito, Eiichi; Morita, Tomoyo; Amemiya, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    The human brain can generate a continuously changing postural model of our body. Somatic (proprioceptive) signals from skeletal muscles and joints contribute to the formation of the body representation. Recent neuroimaging studies of proprioceptive bodily illusions have elucidated the importance of three brain systems (motor network, specialized parietal systems, right inferior fronto-parietal network) in the formation of the human body representation. The motor network, especially the primary motor cortex, processes afferent input from skeletal muscles. Such information may contribute to the formation of kinematic/dynamic postural models of limbs, thereby enabling fast online feedback control. Distinct parietal regions appear to play specialized roles in the transformation/integration of information across different coordinate systems, which may subserve the adaptability and flexibility of the body representation. Finally, the right inferior fronto-parietal network, connected by the inferior branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus, is consistently recruited when an individual experiences various types of bodily illusions and its possible roles relate to corporeal awareness, which is likely elicited through a series of neuronal processes of monitoring and accumulating bodily information and updating the body representation. Because this network is also recruited when identifying one's own features, the network activity could be a neuronal basis for self-consciousness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Continuous three-dimensional control of a virtual helicopter using a motor imagery based brain-computer interface.

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    Alexander J Doud

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs allow a user to interact with a computer system using thought. However, only recently have devices capable of providing sophisticated multi-dimensional control been achieved non-invasively. A major goal for non-invasive BCI systems has been to provide continuous, intuitive, and accurate control, while retaining a high level of user autonomy. By employing electroencephalography (EEG to record and decode sensorimotor rhythms (SMRs induced from motor imaginations, a consistent, user-specific control signal may be characterized. Utilizing a novel method of interactive and continuous control, we trained three normal subjects to modulate their SMRs to achieve three-dimensional movement of a virtual helicopter that is fast, accurate, and continuous. In this system, the virtual helicopter's forward-backward translation and elevation controls were actuated through the modulation of sensorimotor rhythms that were converted to forces applied to the virtual helicopter at every simulation time step, and the helicopter's angle of left or right rotation was linearly mapped, with higher resolution, from sensorimotor rhythms associated with other motor imaginations. These different resolutions of control allow for interplay between general intent actuation and fine control as is seen in the gross and fine movements of the arm and hand. Subjects controlled the helicopter with the goal of flying through rings (targets randomly positioned and oriented in a three-dimensional space. The subjects flew through rings continuously, acquiring as many as 11 consecutive rings within a five-minute period. In total, the study group successfully acquired over 85% of presented targets. These results affirm the effective, three-dimensional control of our motor imagery based BCI system, and suggest its potential applications in biological navigation, neuroprosthetics, and other applications.

  3. A binary motor imagery tasks based brain-computer interface for two-dimensional movement control

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    Xia, Bin; Cao, Lei; Maysam, Oladazimi; Li, Jie; Xie, Hong; Su, Caixia; Birbaumer, Niels

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Two-dimensional movement control is a popular issue in brain–computer interface (BCI) research and has many applications in the real world. In this paper, we introduce a combined control strategy to a binary class-based BCI system that allows the user to move a cursor in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Users focus on a single moving vector to control 2D movement instead of controlling vertical and horizontal movement separately. Approach. Five participants took part in a fixed-target experiment and random-target experiment to verify the effectiveness of the combination control strategy under the fixed and random routine conditions. Both experiments were performed in a virtual 2D dimensional environment and visual feedback was provided on the screen. Main results. The five participants achieved an average hit rate of 98.9% and 99.4% for the fixed-target experiment and the random-target experiment, respectively. Significance. The results demonstrate that participants could move the cursor in the 2D plane effectively. The proposed control strategy is based only on a basic two-motor imagery BCI, which enables more people to use it in real-life applications.

  4. Post-stroke Rehabilitation Training with a Motor-Imagery-Based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI)-Controlled Hand Exoskeleton: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial.

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    Frolov, Alexander A; Mokienko, Olesya; Lyukmanov, Roman; Biryukova, Elena; Kotov, Sergey; Turbina, Lydia; Nadareyshvily, Georgy; Bushkova, Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Repeated use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) providing contingent sensory feedback of brain activity was recently proposed as a rehabilitation approach to restore motor function after stroke or spinal cord lesions. However, there are only a few clinical studies that investigate feasibility and effectiveness of such an approach. Here we report on a placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial that investigated whether stroke survivors with severe upper limb (UL) paralysis benefit from 10 BCI training sessions each lasting up to 40 min. A total of 74 patients participated: median time since stroke is 8 months, 25 and 75% quartiles [3.0; 13.0]; median severity of UL paralysis is 4.5 points [0.0; 30.0] as measured by the Action Research Arm Test, ARAT, and 19.5 points [11.0; 40.0] as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment, FMMA. Patients in the BCI group ( n = 55) performed motor imagery of opening their affected hand. Motor imagery-related brain electroencephalographic activity was translated into contingent hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand. In a control group ( n = 19), hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand were independent of brain electroencephalographic activity. Evaluation of the UL clinical assessments indicated that both groups improved, but only the BCI group showed an improvement in the ARAT's grasp score from 0 [0.0; 14.0] to 3.0 [0.0; 15.0] points ( p exoskeleton-assisted physical therapy can improve post-stroke rehabilitation outcomes. Both maximum and mean values of the percentage of successfully decoded imagery-related EEG activity, were higher than chance level. A correlation between the classification accuracy and the improvement in the upper extremity function was found. An improvement of motor function was found for patients with different duration, severity and location of the stroke.

  5. Visuo-motor coordination ability predicts performance with brain-computer interfaces controlled by modulation of sensorimotor rhythms (SMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Hammer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of sensorimotor rhythms (SMR was suggested as a control signal for brain-computer interfaces (BCI. Yet, there is a population of users estimated between 10 to 50% not able to achieve reliable control and only about 20% of users achieve high (80-100% performance. Predicting performance prior to BCI use would facilitate selection of the most feasible system for an individual, thus constitute a practical benefit for the user, and increase our knowledge about the correlates of BCI control. In a recent study, we predicted SMR-BCI performance from psychological variables that were assessed prior to the BCI sessions and BCI control was supported with machine-learning techniques. We described two significant psychological predictors, namely the visuo-motor coordination ability and the ability to concentrate on the task. The purpose of the current study was to replicate these results thereby validating these predictors within a neurofeedback based SMR-BCI that involved no machine learning. Thirty-three healthy BCI novices participated in a calibration session and three further neurofeedback training sessions. Two variables were related with mean SMR-BCI performance: (1 A measure for the accuracy of fine motor skills, i.e. a trade for a person’s visuo-motor control ability and (2 subject’s attentional impulsivity. In a linear regression they accounted for almost 20% in variance of SMR-BCI performance, but predictor (1 failed significance. Nevertheless, on the basis of our prior regression model for sensorimotor control ability we could predict current SMR-BCI performance with an average prediction error of M = 12.07%. In more than 50% of the participants, the prediction error was smaller than 10%. Hence, psychological variables played a moderate role in predicting SMR-BCI performance in a neurofeedback approach that involved no machine learning. Future studies are needed to further consolidate (or reject the present predictors.

  6. Toward brain-actuated car applications: Self-paced control with a motor imagery-based brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Jingsheng; Liu, Yadong; Hu, Dewen

    2016-10-01

    This study presented a paradigm for controlling a car using an asynchronous electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) and presented the experimental results of a simulation performed in an experimental environment outside the laboratory. This paradigm uses two distinct MI tasks, imaginary left- and right-hand movements, to generate a multi-task car control strategy consisting of starting the engine, moving forward, turning left, turning right, moving backward, and stopping the engine. Five healthy subjects participated in the online car control experiment, and all successfully controlled the car by following a previously outlined route. Subject S1 exhibited the most satisfactory BCI-based performance, which was comparable to the manual control-based performance. We hypothesize that the proposed self-paced car control paradigm based on EEG signals could potentially be used in car control applications, and we provide a complementary or alternative way for individuals with locked-in disorders to achieve more mobility in the future, as well as providing a supplementary car-driving strategy to assist healthy people in driving a car. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Contralesional Brain-Computer Interface Control of a Powered Exoskeleton for Motor Recovery in Chronic Stroke Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, David T; Souders, Lauren; Baranyai, Kelly; Leonard, Laura; Schalk, Gerwin; Coker, Robert; Moran, Daniel W; Huskey, Thy; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2017-07-01

    There are few effective therapies to achieve functional recovery from motor-related disabilities affecting the upper limb after stroke. This feasibility study tested whether a powered exoskeleton driven by a brain-computer interface (BCI), using neural activity from the unaffected cortical hemisphere, could affect motor recovery in chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors. This novel system was designed and configured for a home-based setting to test the feasibility of BCI-driven neurorehabilitation in outpatient environments. Ten chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors with moderate-to-severe upper-limb motor impairment (mean Action Research Arm Test=13.4) used a powered exoskeleton that opened and closed the affected hand using spectral power from electroencephalographic signals from the unaffected hemisphere associated with imagined hand movements of the paretic limb. Patients used the system at home for 12 weeks. Motor function was evaluated before, during, and after the treatment. Across patients, our BCI-driven approach resulted in a statistically significant average increase of 6.2 points in the Action Research Arm Test. This behavioral improvement significantly correlated with improvements in BCI control. Secondary outcomes of grasp strength, Motricity Index, and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure also significantly improved. The findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of a BCI-driven neurorehabilitation approach using the unaffected hemisphere in this uncontrolled sample of chronic stroke survivors. They also demonstrate that BCI-driven neurorehabilitation can be effectively delivered in the home environment, thus increasing the probability of future clinical translation. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02552368. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Post-stroke Rehabilitation Training with a Motor-Imagery-Based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI-Controlled Hand Exoskeleton: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Frolov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs providing contingent sensory feedback of brain activity was recently proposed as a rehabilitation approach to restore motor function after stroke or spinal cord lesions. However, there are only a few clinical studies that investigate feasibility and effectiveness of such an approach. Here we report on a placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial that investigated whether stroke survivors with severe upper limb (UL paralysis benefit from 10 BCI training sessions each lasting up to 40 min. A total of 74 patients participated: median time since stroke is 8 months, 25 and 75% quartiles [3.0; 13.0]; median severity of UL paralysis is 4.5 points [0.0; 30.0] as measured by the Action Research Arm Test, ARAT, and 19.5 points [11.0; 40.0] as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment, FMMA. Patients in the BCI group (n = 55 performed motor imagery of opening their affected hand. Motor imagery-related brain electroencephalographic activity was translated into contingent hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand. In a control group (n = 19, hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand were independent of brain electroencephalographic activity. Evaluation of the UL clinical assessments indicated that both groups improved, but only the BCI group showed an improvement in the ARAT's grasp score from 0 [0.0; 14.0] to 3.0 [0.0; 15.0] points (p < 0.01 and pinch scores from 0.0 [0.0; 7.0] to 1.0 [0.0; 12.0] points (p < 0.01. Upon training completion, 21.8% and 36.4% of the patients in the BCI group improved their ARAT and FMMA scores respectively. The corresponding numbers for the control group were 5.1% (ARAT and 15.8% (FMMA. These results suggests that adding BCI control to exoskeleton-assisted physical therapy can improve post-stroke rehabilitation outcomes. Both maximum and mean values of the percentage of successfully decoded imagery-related EEG activity, were higher

  9. [How does the brain control eye movements? Motor and premotor neurons of the brainstem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coubard, O A

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of cognitive and neural architecture and processes that control eye movements has advanced enough to allow precise and quantitative analysis of hitherto unsolved phenomena. In this review, we revisit from a neuropsychological viewpoint Hering vs. Helmholtz' hypotheses on binocular coordination. Specifically, we reexamine the behavior and the neural bases of saccade-vergence movement, to move the gaze in both direction and depth under natural conditions. From the psychophysical viewpoint, neo-Heringian and neo-Helmholtzian authors have accumulated arguments favoring distinct conjugate (for saccades) and disconjugate (for vergence) systems, as well as advocating for monocularly programmed eye movements. From the neurophysiological viewpoint, which reports brain cell recordings during the execution of a given task, neo-Heringian and neo-Helmholtzian physiologists have also provided arguments in favor of both hypotheses at the level of the brainstem premotor circuitry. Bridging the two, we propose that Hering and Helmholtz were both right. The emphasis placed by the latter on adaptive processes throughout life cycle is compatible with the importance of neurobiological constraints pointed out by the former. In the meanwhile, the study of saccade-vergence eye movements recalls how much the psychophysical definition of the task determines the interpretation that is made from neurophysiological data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrophysiological Brain Activity during the Control of a Motor Imagery-Based Brain–Computer Interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolov, A. A.; Aziatskaya, G.A.; Bobrov, P.D.; Luykmanov, R. Kh.; Fedotova, I.R.; Húsek, Dušan; Snášel, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2017), s. 501-511 ISSN 0362-1197 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : brain–computer interface * neurointerface * EEG * motor imagery * EEG rhythm synchronization and desynchronization * independent component analysis * EEG inverse problem * neurorehabilitation Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  11. Effect of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on axial motor control and protective arm responses in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.E.; Allum, J.H.J.; Carpenter, M.G.; Esselink, R.A.J.; Limousin-Dowsey, P.; Honegger, F.; Borm, G.F.; Bloem, B.R.

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic surgical interventions for Parkinson's disease (PD) can considerably improve appendicular motor signs, but their effect on axial motor signs--especially balance control under optimal drug therapy--remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN)

  12. Induction motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  13. Induction motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  14. Motor control for a brushless DC motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, William J. (Inventor); Faulkner, Dennis T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a motor control system for a brushless DC motor having an inverter responsively coupled to the motor control system and in power transmitting relationship to the motor. The motor control system includes a motor rotor speed detecting unit that provides a pulsed waveform signal proportional to rotor speed. This pulsed waveform signal is delivered to the inverter to thereby cause an inverter fundamental current waveform output to the motor to be switched at a rate proportional to said rotor speed. In addition, the fundamental current waveform is also pulse width modulated at a rate proportional to the rotor speed. A fundamental current waveform phase advance circuit is controllingly coupled to the inverter. The phase advance circuit is coupled to receive the pulsed waveform signal from the motor rotor speed detecting unit and phase advance the pulsed waveform signal as a predetermined function of motor speed to thereby cause the fundamental current waveform to be advanced and thereby compensate for fundamental current waveform lag due to motor winding reactance which allows the motor to operate at higher speeds than the motor is rated while providing optimal torque and therefore increased efficiency.

  15. Advanced AC Motor Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmierkowski, M.P. [Institute of Control and Industrial Electronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Warszawa (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    In this paper a review of control methods for high performance PWM inverter-fed induction motor drives is presented. Starting from the description of an induction motor by the help of the space vectors, three basic control strategic are discussed. As first, the most popular Field Oriented Control (FOC) is described. Secondly, the Direct Torque and Flux vector Control (DTFC) method, which - in contrast to FOC - depart from idea of coordinate transformation and analogy with DC motor, is briefly characterized. The last group is based on Feedback Linearization Control (FLC) and can be easy combined with sliding mode control. The simulation and experimental oscillograms that illustrate the performance of the discussed control strategies are shown. (orig.) 35 refs.

  16. Bridging the gap between motor imagery and motor execution with a brain-robot interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert; Fels, Meike; Vukelić, Mathias; Ziemann, Ulf; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    According to electrophysiological studies motor imagery and motor execution are associated with perturbations of brain oscillations over spatially similar cortical areas. By contrast, neuroimaging and lesion studies suggest that at least partially distinct cortical networks are involved in motor imagery and execution. We sought to further disentangle this relationship by studying the role of brain-robot interfaces in the context of motor imagery and motor execution networks. Twenty right-handed subjects performed several behavioral tasks as indicators for imagery and execution of movements of the left hand, i.e. kinesthetic imagery, visual imagery, visuomotor integration and tonic contraction. In addition, subjects performed motor imagery supported by haptic/proprioceptive feedback from a brain-robot-interface. Principal component analysis was applied to assess the relationship of these indicators. The respective cortical resting state networks in the α-range were investigated by electroencephalography using the phase slope index. We detected two distinct abilities and cortical networks underlying motor control: a motor imagery network connecting the left parietal and motor areas with the right prefrontal cortex and a motor execution network characterized by transmission from the left to right motor areas. We found that a brain-robot-interface might offer a way to bridge the gap between these networks, opening thereby a backdoor to the motor execution system. This knowledge might promote patient screening and may lead to novel treatment strategies, e.g. for the rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands...... and contributes importantly to the muscle activity underlying voluntary movements. Regulation of spinal interneurons is used to switch between motor states such as locomotion (reciprocal innervation) and stance (coactivation pattern). Cortical regulation of presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents may focus...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  18. Development of behavioral control: Analysis of performance and motor-related brain potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Radovčić-van de Laar, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation provides a behavioral and electrophysiological analysis of response activation and inhibition to uncover age-related changes in action control. The results indicate suboptimal action control in children and elderly that might cause failure to prevent inappropriate behavior in everyday life situations, especially under increased environmental demands. Over the course of development, people change their focus towards the behavior that appears to be for themselves of the most r...

  19. Electric vehicle motors and controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secunde, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Improved and advanced components being developed include electronically commutated permanent magnet motors of both drum and disk configuration, an unconventional brush commutated motor, and ac induction motors and various controllers. Test results on developmental motors, controllers, and combinations thereof indicate that efficiencies of 90% and higher for individual components, and 80% to 90% for motor/controller combinations can be obtained at rated power. The simplicity of the developmental motors and the potential for ultimately low cost electronics indicate that one or more of these approaches to electric vehicle propulsion may eventually displace presently used controllers and brush commutated dc motors.

  20. Modularity for Motor Control and Motor Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Avella, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    How the central nervous system (CNS) overcomes the complexity of multi-joint and multi-muscle control and how it acquires or adapts motor skills are fundamental and open questions in neuroscience. A modular architecture may simplify control by embedding features of both the dynamic behavior of the musculoskeletal system and of the task into a small number of modules and by directly mapping task goals into module combination parameters. Several studies of the electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from many muscles during the performance of different tasks have shown that motor commands are generated by the combination of a small number of muscle synergies, coordinated recruitment of groups of muscles with specific amplitude balances or activation waveforms, thus supporting a modular organization of motor control. Modularity may also help understanding motor learning. In a modular architecture, acquisition of a new motor skill or adaptation of an existing skill after a perturbation may occur at the level of modules or at the level of module combinations. As learning or adapting an existing skill through recombination of modules is likely faster than learning or adapting a skill by acquiring new modules, compatibility with the modules predicts learning difficulty. A recent study in which human subjects used myoelectric control to move a mass in a virtual environment has tested this prediction. By altering the mapping between recorded muscle activity and simulated force applied on the mass, as in a complex surgical rearrangement of the tendons, it has been possible to show that it is easier to adapt to a perturbation that is compatible with the muscle synergies used to generate hand force than to a similar but incompatible perturbation. This result provides direct support for a modular organization of motor control and motor learning.

  1. Control of synchronous motors

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Synchronous motors are indubitably the most effective device to drive industrial production systems and robots with precision and rapidity. Their control law is thus critical for combining at the same time high productivity to reduced energy consummation. As far as possible, the control algorithms must exploit the properties of these actuators. Therefore, this work draws on well adapted models resulting from the Park's transformation, for both the most traditional machines with sinusoidal field distribution and for machines with non-sinusoidal field distribution which are more and more used in

  2. Randomized controlled trial of web-based multimodal therapy for children with acquired brain injury to improve gross motor capacity and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baque, Emmah; Barber, Lee; Sakzewski, Leanne; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2017-06-01

    To compare efficacy of a web-based multimodal training programme, 'Move it to improve it' (Mitii(TM)), to usual care on gross motor capacity and performance for children with an acquired brain injury. Randomized waitlist controlled trial. Home environment. A total of 60 independently ambulant children (30 in each group), minimum 12 months post-acquired brain injury were recruited and randomly allocated to receive either 20 weeks of Mitii(TM) training (30 minutes/day, six days/week, total 60 hours) immediately, or waitlisted (usual care control group) for 20 weeks. A total of 58 children completed baseline assessments (32 males; age 11 years 11 months ± 2 years 6 months; Gross Motor Function Classification System equivalent I = 29, II = 29). The Mitii(TM) program comprised of gross motor, upper limb and visual perception/cognitive activities. The primary outcome was 30-second, repetition maximum functional strength tests for the lower limb (sit-to-stand, step-ups, half-kneel to stand). Secondary outcomes were the 6-minute walk test, High-level Mobility Assessment Tool, Timed Up and Go Test and habitual physical activity as captured by four-day accelerometry. Groups were equivalent at baseline on demographic and clinical measures. The Mitii(TM) group demonstrated significantly greater improvements on combined score of functional strength tests (mean difference 10.19 repetitions; 95% confidence interval, 3.26-17.11; p = 0.006) compared with the control group. There were no other between-group differences on secondary outcomes. Although the Mitii(TM) programme demonstrated statistically significant improvements in the functional strength tests of the lower limb, results did not exceed the minimum detectable change and cannot be considered clinically relevant for children with an acquired brain injury. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registration Number, ANZCTR12613000403730.

  3. The kinematic portrait of a patient as an objective indicator of motor function in the process of neurorehabilitation with hand exoskeleton controlled by the brain – computer interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Kondur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of biomechanical analysis of the motor function of the arm of poststroke patient in the process of neuroreha bilitation with exoskeleton of the hand controlled by brain – computer interface are presented in this paper. At the beginning and end of the course it was registered the kinematic portrait of the patient– isolated random movements for each of the seven degrees of freedom as the paretic and intact arms.Angular accelerations were taken as an assessment of muscle forces, the number of reverse movements was taken as an assessment of joint spasticity, and the kinematic content of the movement as a description of pathological synergy arising after stroke. These parameters give an objective numerical asses sment of motor function as well as of rehabilitation technology effectiveness.

  4. Brain controlled robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawato, Mitsuo

    2008-06-01

    In January 2008, Duke University and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) publicized their successful control of a brain-machine interface for a humanoid robot by a monkey brain across the Pacific Ocean. The activities of a few hundred neurons were recorded from a monkey's motor cortex in Miguel Nicolelis's lab at Duke University, and the kinematic features of monkey locomotion on a treadmill were decoded from neural firing rates in real time. The decoded information was sent to a humanoid robot, CB-i, in ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories located in Kyoto, Japan. This robot was developed by the JST International Collaborative Research Project (ICORP) as the "Computational Brain Project." CB-i's locomotion-like movement was video-recorded and projected on a screen in front of the monkey. Although the bidirectional communication used a conventional Internet connection, its delay was suppressed below one over several seconds, partly due to a video-streaming technique, and this encouraged the monkey's voluntary locomotion and influenced its brain activity. This commentary introduces the background and future directions of the brain-controlled robot.

  5. Control motor brushless sensorless

    OpenAIRE

    Solchaga Pérez de Lazárraga, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    El proyecto consiste en la creación de un circuito capaz de controlar la velocidad de un motor brushless sensorless. Este tipo de motores eléctricos tienen como característica que no tienen escobillas para cambiar la polaridad del bobinado de su interior y tampoco precisan de un sensor que indique que ha realizado una vuelta. Los motores brushless que son controlados por este tipo de circuitos son específicos para aeronaves no tripuladas y requieren un diseño diferente a un motor brushless pe...

  6. Power control for ac motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, R. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A motor controller employing a triac through which power is supplied to a motor is described. The open circuit voltage appearing across the triac controls the operation of a timing circuit. This timing circuit triggers on the triac at a time following turn off which varies inversely as a function of the amplitude of the open circuit voltage of the triac.

  7. A real-time brain-machine interface combining motor target and trajectory intent using an optimal feedback control design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Williams, Ziv M; Wornell, Gregory W; Hu, Rollin C; Powers, Marissa; Brown, Emery N

    2013-01-01

    Real-time brain-machine interfaces (BMI) have focused on either estimating the continuous movement trajectory or target intent. However, natural movement often incorporates both. Additionally, BMIs can be modeled as a feedback control system in which the subject modulates the neural activity to move the prosthetic device towards a desired target while receiving real-time sensory feedback of the state of the movement. We develop a novel real-time BMI using an optimal feedback control design that jointly estimates the movement target and trajectory of monkeys in two stages. First, the target is decoded from neural spiking activity before movement initiation. Second, the trajectory is decoded by combining the decoded target with the peri-movement spiking activity using an optimal feedback control design. This design exploits a recursive Bayesian decoder that uses an optimal feedback control model of the sensorimotor system to take into account the intended target location and the sensory feedback in its trajectory estimation from spiking activity. The real-time BMI processes the spiking activity directly using point process modeling. We implement the BMI in experiments consisting of an instructed-delay center-out task in which monkeys are presented with a target location on the screen during a delay period and then have to move a cursor to it without touching the incorrect targets. We show that the two-stage BMI performs more accurately than either stage alone. Correct target prediction can compensate for inaccurate trajectory estimation and vice versa. The optimal feedback control design also results in trajectories that are smoother and have lower estimation error. The two-stage decoder also performs better than linear regression approaches in offline cross-validation analyses. Our results demonstrate the advantage of a BMI design that jointly estimates the target and trajectory of movement and more closely mimics the sensorimotor control system.

  8. A real-time brain-machine interface combining motor target and trajectory intent using an optimal feedback control design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam M Shanechi

    Full Text Available Real-time brain-machine interfaces (BMI have focused on either estimating the continuous movement trajectory or target intent. However, natural movement often incorporates both. Additionally, BMIs can be modeled as a feedback control system in which the subject modulates the neural activity to move the prosthetic device towards a desired target while receiving real-time sensory feedback of the state of the movement. We develop a novel real-time BMI using an optimal feedback control design that jointly estimates the movement target and trajectory of monkeys in two stages. First, the target is decoded from neural spiking activity before movement initiation. Second, the trajectory is decoded by combining the decoded target with the peri-movement spiking activity using an optimal feedback control design. This design exploits a recursive Bayesian decoder that uses an optimal feedback control model of the sensorimotor system to take into account the intended target location and the sensory feedback in its trajectory estimation from spiking activity. The real-time BMI processes the spiking activity directly using point process modeling. We implement the BMI in experiments consisting of an instructed-delay center-out task in which monkeys are presented with a target location on the screen during a delay period and then have to move a cursor to it without touching the incorrect targets. We show that the two-stage BMI performs more accurately than either stage alone. Correct target prediction can compensate for inaccurate trajectory estimation and vice versa. The optimal feedback control design also results in trajectories that are smoother and have lower estimation error. The two-stage decoder also performs better than linear regression approaches in offline cross-validation analyses. Our results demonstrate the advantage of a BMI design that jointly estimates the target and trajectory of movement and more closely mimics the sensorimotor control system.

  9. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or motor-control... motor controller for a vital propulsion auxiliary which can be restarted from a central control station...

  10. User Experience May be Producing Greater Heart Rate Variability than Motor Imagery Related Control Tasks during the User-System Adaptation in Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz M; Gutiérrez-Begovich, David A; Argüello-García, Janet; Sepulveda, Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Ricardo A

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) is technology that is developing fast, but it remains inaccurate, unreliable and slow due to the difficulty to obtain precise information from the brain. Consequently, the involvement of other biosignals to decode the user control tasks has risen in importance. A traditional way to operate a BCI system is via motor imagery (MI) tasks. As imaginary movements activate similar cortical structures and vegetative mechanisms as a voluntary movement does, heart rate variability (HRV) has been proposed as a parameter to improve the detection of MI related control tasks. However, HR is very susceptible to body needs and environmental demands, and as BCI systems require high levels of attention, perceptual processing and mental workload, it is important to assess the practical effectiveness of HRV. The present study aimed to determine if brain and heart electrical signals (HRV) are modulated by MI activity used to control a BCI system, or if HRV is modulated by the user perceptions and responses that result from the operation of a BCI system (i.e., user experience). For this purpose, a database of 11 participants who were exposed to eight different situations was used. The sensory-cognitive load (intake and rejection tasks) was controlled in those situations. Two electrophysiological signals were utilized: electroencephalography and electrocardiography. From those biosignals, event-related (de-)synchronization maps and event-related HR changes were respectively estimated. The maps and the HR changes were cross-correlated in order to verify if both biosignals were modulated due to MI activity. The results suggest that HR varies according to the experience undergone by the user in a BCI working environment, and not because of the MI activity used to operate the system.

  11. Alpha oscillatory correlates of motor inhibition in the aged brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene eBoenstrup

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Exerting inhibitory control is a cognitive ability mediated by functions known to decline with age. The goal of this study is to add to the mechanistic understanding of cortical inhibition during motor control in aged brains. Based on behavioral findings of impaired inhibitory control with age we hypothesized that elderly will show a reduced or a lack of EEG alpha-power increase during tasks that require motor inhibition. Since inhibitory control over movements has been shown to rely on prior motor memory formation, we investigated cortical inhibitory processes at two points in time - early after learning and after an overnight consolidation phase and hypothesized an overnight increase of inhibitory capacities. Young and elderly participants acquired a complex finger movement sequence and in each experimental session brain activity during execution and inhibition of the sequence was recorded with multi-channel EEG. We assessed cortical processes of sustained inhibition by means of task-induced changes of alpha oscillatory power. During inhibition of the learned movement, young participants showed a significant alpha power increase at the sensorimotor cortices whereas elderly did not. Interestingly, for both groups, the overnight consolidation phase improved up-regulation of alpha power during sustained inhibition. This points to deficits in the generation and enhancement of local inhibitory mechanisms at the sensorimotor cortices in aged brains. However, the alpha power increase in both groups implies neuroplastic changes that strengthen the network of alpha power generation over time in young as well as elderly brains.

  12. Motor control by precisely timed spike patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Kyle H; Holmes, Caroline M; Vellema, Michiel

    2017-01-01

    that the nervous system uses millisecond-scale variations in the timing of spikes within multispike patterns to control a vertebrate behavior-namely, respiration in the Bengalese finch, a songbird. These findings suggest that a fundamental assumption of current theories of motor coding requires revision.......A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how sequences of action potentials ("spikes") encode information about sensory signals and motor outputs. Although traditional theories assume that this information is conveyed by the total number of spikes fired within a specified time...... whether the information in spike timing actually plays a role in brain function. By examining the activity of individual motor units (the muscle fibers innervated by a single motor neuron) and manipulating patterns of activation of these neurons, we provide both correlative and causal evidence...

  13. Increased motor cortex excitability during motor imagery in brain-computer interface trained subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya eMokienko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motor imagery (MI is the mental performance of movement without muscle activity. It is generally accepted that MI and motor performance have similar physiological mechanisms.Purpose: To investigate the activity and excitability of cortical motor areas during MI in subjects who were previously trained with an MI-based brain-computer interface (BCI.Subjects and methods: Eleven healthy volunteers without neurological impairments (mean age, 36 years; range: 24–68 years were either trained with an MI-based BCI (BCI-trained, n = 5 or received no BCI training (n = 6, controls. Subjects imagined grasping in a blocked paradigm task with alternating rest and task periods. For evaluating the activity and excitability of cortical motor areas we used functional MRI and navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS.Results: fMRI revealed activation in Brodmann areas 3 and 6, the cerebellum, and the thalamus during MI in all subjects. The primary motor cortex was activated only in BCI-trained subjects. The associative zones of activation were larger in non-trained subjects. During MI, motor evoked potentials recorded from two of the three targeted muscles were significantly higher only in BCI-trained subjects. The motor threshold decreased (median = 17% during MI, which was also observed only in BCI-trained subjects.Conclusion: Previous BCI training increased motor cortex excitability during MI. These data may help to improve BCI applications, including rehabilitation of patients with cerebral palsy.

  14. Space Digital Controller for Improved Motor Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Nunes, Samuel; Daras, Gaetan; Dehez, Bruno; Maillard, Christophe; Bekemans, Marc; Michel, Raymond

    2014-08-01

    Performing digital motor control into space equipment is a new challenge. The new DPC (Digital Programmable Controller) is the first chip that we can use as a micro-controller, allowing us to drive motors with digital control schemes. In this paper, the digital control of hybrid stepper motors is considered. This kind of motor is used for solar array rotation and antenna actuation. New digital control technology brings a lot of advantages, allowing an important reduction of thermal losses inside the motor, and a reduction of thermal constraints on power drive electronic components. The opportunity to drive motors with a digital controller also brings many new functionalities like post-failure torque analysis, micro- vibrations and cogging torque reduction, or electro- mechanical damping of solar array oscillations. To evaluate the performance of the system, Field-Oriented Control (FOC) is implemented on a hybrid stepper motor. A test-bench, made of an active load, has been made to emulate the mechanical behaviour of the solar array, by the use of a torsionally-compliant model. The experimental results show that we can drastically reduce electrical power consumption, compared with the currently used open-loop control scheme.

  15. Decoding post-stroke motor function from structural brain imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M. Rondina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical research based on neuroimaging data has benefited from machine learning methods, which have the ability to provide individualized predictions and to account for the interaction among units of information in the brain. Application of machine learning in structural imaging to investigate diseases that involve brain injury presents an additional challenge, especially in conditions like stroke, due to the high variability across patients regarding characteristics of the lesions. Extracting data from anatomical images in a way that translates brain damage information into features to be used as input to learning algorithms is still an open question. One of the most common approaches to capture regional information from brain injury is to obtain the lesion load per region (i.e. the proportion of voxels in anatomical structures that are considered to be damaged. However, no systematic evaluation has yet been performed to compare this approach with using patterns of voxels (i.e. considering each voxel as a single feature. In this paper we compared both approaches applying Gaussian Process Regression to decode motor scores in 50 chronic stroke patients based solely on data derived from structural MRI. For both approaches we compared different ways to delimit anatomical areas: regions of interest from an anatomical atlas, the corticospinal tract, a mask obtained from fMRI analysis with a motor task in healthy controls and regions selected using lesion-symptom mapping. Our analysis showed that extracting features through patterns of voxels that represent lesion probability produced better results than quantifying the lesion load per region. In particular, from the different ways to delimit anatomical areas compared, the best performance was obtained with a combination of a range of cortical and subcortical motor areas as well as the corticospinal tract. These results will inform the appropriate methodology for predicting long term motor outcomes

  16. Improving Control of Two Motor Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toland, Ronald W.

    2004-01-01

    A computer program controls motors that drive translation stages in a metrology system that consists of a pair of two-axis cathetometers. This program is specific to Compumotor Gemini (or equivalent) motors and the Compumotor 6K-series (or equivalent) motor controller. Relative to the software supplied with the controller, this program affords more capabilities and is easier to use. Written as a Virtual Instrument in the LabVIEW software system, the program presents an imitation control panel that the user can manipulate by use of a keyboard and mouse. There are three modes of operation: command, movement, and joystick. In command mode, single commands are sent to the controller for troubleshooting. In movement mode, distance, speed, and/or acceleration commands are sent to the controller. Position readouts from the motors and from position encoders on the translation stages are displayed in marked fields. At any time, the position readouts can be recorded in a file named by the user. In joystick mode, the program yields control of the motors to a joystick. The program sends commands to, and receives data from, the controller via a serial cable connection, using the serial-communication portion of the software supplied with the controller.

  17. Changes in brain activity during action observation and motor imagery: Their relationship with motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Nobuaki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that training utilizing action observation and/or motor imagery improves motor performance. These two techniques are widely used in sports and in the rehabilitation of movement-related disorders. Motor imagery has also been used for brain-machine/computer interfaces (BMI/BCI). During both action observation and motor imagery, motor-related regions such as the premotor cortex and inferior parietal lobule are activated. This is common to actual execution and are involved with the underlying mechanisms of motor learning without execution. Since it is easier to record brain activity during action observation and motor imagery than that during actual sport movements, action observation, and motor imagery of sports skills or complex whole body movements have been utilized to investigate how neural mechanisms differ across the performance spectrum ranging from beginner to expert. However, brain activity during action observation and motor imagery is influenced by task complexity (i.e., simple vs complex movements). Furthermore, temporal changes in brain activity during actual execution along the long time course of motor learning are likely nonlinear and would be different from that during action observation or motor imagery. Activity in motor-related regions during action observation and motor imagery is typically greater in experts than in nonexperts, while the activity during actual execution is often smaller in experts than in nonexperts. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cerebellum and Ocular Motor Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eKheradmand

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An intact cerebellum is a prerequisite for optimal ocular motor performance. The cerebellum fine-tunes each of the subtypes of eye movements so they work together to bring and maintain images of objects of interest on the fovea. Here we review the major aspects of the contribution of the cerebellum to ocular motor control. The approach will be based on structural-functional correlation, combining the effects of lesions and the results from physiologic studies, with the emphasis on the cerebellar regions known to be most closely related to ocular motor function: 1 the flocculus/paraflocculus for high-frequency (brief vestibular responses, sustained pursuit eye movements and gaze-holding, 2 the nodulus/ventral uvula for low-frequency (sustained vestibular responses, and 3 the dorsal oculomotor vermis and its target in the posterior portion of the fastigial nucleus (the fastigial oculomotor region for saccades and pursuit initiation.

  19. Motor power control circuit for ac induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A motor power control of the type which functions by controlling the power factor wherein one of the parameters of power factor current on time is determined by the on time of a triac through which current is supplied to the motor. By means of a positive feedback circuit, a wider range of control is effected.

  20. Electrifying the motor engram: effects of tDCS on motor learning and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Xivry, Jean-Jacques Orban; Shadmehr, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Learning to control our movements accompanies neuroplasticity of motor areas of the brain. The mechanisms of neuroplasticity are diverse and produce what is referred to as the motor engram, i.e. the neural trace of the motor memory. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) alters the neural and behavioral correlates of motor learning, but its precise influence on the motor engram is unknown. In this review, we summarize the effects of tDCS on neural activity and suggest a few key principles: 1) firing rates are increased by anodal polarization and decreased by cathodal polarization, 2) anodal polarization strengthens newly formed associations, and 3) polarization modulates the memory of new/preferred firing patterns. With these principles in mind, we review the effects of tDCS on motor control, motor learning, and clinical applications. The increased spontaneous and evoked firing rates may account for the modulation of dexterity in non-learning tasks by tDCS. The facilitation of new association may account for the effect of tDCS on learning in sequence tasks while the ability of tDCS to strengthen memories of new firing patterns may underlie the effect of tDCS on consolidation of skills. We then describe the mechanisms of neuroplasticity of motor cortical areas and how they might be influenced by tDCS. We end with current challenges for the fields of brain stimulation and motor learning. PMID:25200178

  1. Parkinson's disease rigidity: relation to brain connectivity and motor performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin eBaradaran

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: 1 To determine the brain connectivity pattern associated with clinical rigidity scores in Parkinson's disease (PD and 2 to determine the relation between clinically-assessed rigidity and quantitative metrics of motor performance.Background: Rigidity, the resistance to passive movement, is exacerbated in PD by asking the subject to move the contralateral limb, implying that rigidity involves a distributed brain network. Rigidity mainly affects subjects when they attempt to move; yet the relation between clinical rigidity scores and quantitative aspects of motor performance are unknown.Methods: Ten clinically diagnosed PD patients (off medication and ten controls were recruited to perform an fMRI squeeze-bulb tracking task that included both visually guided and internally guided features. The direct functional connectivity between anatomically defined regions of interest was assessed with Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBNs. Tracking performance was assessed by fitting Linear Dynamical System (LDS models to the motor performance, and was compared to the clinical rigidity scores. A cross-validated Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO regression method was used to determine the brain connectivity network that best predicted clinical rigidity scores.Results: The damping ratio of the LDS models significantly correlated with clinical rigidity scores (p < 10-4. An fMRI connectivity network in subcortical and primary and premotor cortical regions accurately predicted clinical rigidity scores (p < 10-5. Conclusions: A widely distributed cortical/subcortical network is associated with rigidity observed in PD patients, which reinforces the importance of altered functional connectivity in the pathophysiology of PD. PD subjects with higher rigidity scores tend to have less overshoot in their tracking performance, and damping ratio may represent a robust, quantitative marker of the motoric effects of increasing rigidity.

  2. Brain motor functional changes after somatosensory discrimination training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarasso, Elisabetta; Agosta, Federica; Temporiti, Federico; Adamo, Paola; Piccolo, Fabio; Copetti, Massimiliano; Gatti, Roberto; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-08-31

    Somatosensory discrimination training may modulate cognitive processes, such as movement planning and monitoring, which can be useful during active movements. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of somatosensory discrimination training on brain functional activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during motor and sensory tasks in healthy subjects. Thirty-nine healthy young subjects were randomized into two groups: the experimental group underwent somatosensory discrimination training consisting of shape, surface and two-point distance discrimination; and the control group performed a simple object manipulation. At baseline and after 2 weeks of training, subjects underwent sensorimotor evaluations and fMRI tasks consisting of right-hand tactile stimulation, manipulation of a simple object, and complex right-hand motor sequence execution. Right-hand dexterity improved in both groups, but only the experimental group showed improvements in all manual dexterity tests. After training, the experimental group showed: decreased activation of the ipsilateral sensorimotor areas during the tactile stimulation task; increased activation of the contralateral postcentral gyrus and thalamus bilaterally during the manipulation task; and a reduced recruitment of the ipsilateral pre/postcentral gyri and an increased activation of the basal ganglia and cerebellum contralaterally during the complex right-hand motor task. In healthy subjects, sensory discrimination training was associated with lateralization of brain activity in sensorimotor areas during sensory and motor tasks. Further studies are needed to investigate the usefulness of this training in motor rehabilitation of patients with focal lesions in the central nervous system.

  3. Ultra-Compact Motor Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, William T.; Crowell, Adam; Hauptman, Traveler; Pratt, Gill Andrews

    2012-01-01

    This invention is an electronically commutated brushless motor controller that incorporates Hall-array sensing in a small, 42-gram package that provides 4096 absolute counts per motor revolution position sensing. The unit is the size of a miniature hockey puck, and is a 44-pin male connector that provides many I/O channels, including CANbus, RS-232 communications, general-purpose analog and digital I/O (GPIO), analog and digital Hall inputs, DC power input (18-90 VDC, 0-l0 A), three-phase motor outputs, and a strain gauge amplifier. This controller replaces air cooling with conduction cooling via a high-thermal-conductivity epoxy casting. A secondary advantage of the relatively good heat conductivity that comes with ultra-small size is that temperature differences within the controller become smaller, so that it is easier to measure the hottest temperature in the controller with fewer temperature sensors, or even one temperature sensor. Another size-sensitive design feature is in the approach to electrical noise immunity. At a very small size, where conduction paths are much shorter than in conventional designs, the ground becomes essentially isopotential, and so certain (space-consuming) electrical noise control components become unnecessary, which helps make small size possible. One winding-current sensor, applied to all of the windings in fast sequence, is smaller and wastes less power than the two or more sensors conventionally used to sense and control winding currents. An unexpected benefit of using only one current sensor is that it actually improves the precision of current control by using the "same" sensors to read each of the three phases. Folding the encoder directly into the controller electronics eliminates a great deal of redundant electronics, packaging, connectors, and hook-up wiring. The reduction of wires and connectors subtracts substantial bulk and eliminates their role in behaving as EMI (electro-magnetic interference) antennas. A shared

  4. Decreased activation of subcortical brain areas in the motor fatigue state: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Hou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One aspect of motor fatigue is the exercise-induced reduction of neural activity to voluntarily drive the muscle or muscle group. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides access to investigate the neural activation on the whole brain level and studies observed changes of activation intensity after exercise-induced motor fatigue in the sensorimotor cortex. However, in human, little evidence exists to demonstrate the role of subcortical brain regions in motor fatigue, which is contradict to abundant researches in rodent indicating that during simple movement, the activity of the basal ganglia is modulated by the state of motor fatigue. Thus, in present study, we explored the effect of motor fatigue on subcortical areas in human. A series of fMRI data were collected from 11 healthy subjects while they were executing simple motor tasks in two conditions: before and under the motor fatigue state. The results showed that in both conditions, movements evoked activation volumes in the sensorimotor areas, SMA, cerebellum, thalamus and basal ganglia. Of primary importance are the results that the intensity and size of activation volumes in the subcortical areas (i.e. thalamus and basal ganglia areas are significantly decreased during the motor fatigue state, implying that motor fatigue disturbs the motor control processing in a way that both sensorimotor areas and subcortical brain areas are less active. Further study is needed to clarify how subcortical areas contribute to the overall decreased activity of CNS during motor fatigue state.

  5. Motor Control: The Heart of Kinesiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latash, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    This brief review presents the subjective view of the author on the history of motor control and its current state among the subdisciplines of kinesiology. It summarizes the current controversies and challenges in motor control and emphasizes the necessity for an adequate set of notions that would make motor control (and kinesiology) a science.…

  6. Optimization analysis of propulsion motor control efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAI Qingnan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] This paper aims to strengthen the control effect of propulsion motors and decrease the energy used during actual control procedures.[Methods] Based on the traditional propulsion motor equivalence circuit, we increase the iron loss current component, introduce the definition of power matching ratio, calculate the highest efficiency of a motor at a given speed and discuss the flux corresponding to the power matching ratio with the highest efficiency. In the original motor vector efficiency optimization control module, an efficiency optimization control module is added so as to achieve motor efficiency optimization and energy conservation.[Results] MATLAB/Simulink simulation data shows that the efficiency optimization control method is suitable for most conditions. The operation efficiency of the improved motor model is significantly higher than that of the original motor model, and its dynamic performance is good.[Conclusions] Our motor efficiency optimization control method can be applied in engineering to achieve energy conservation.

  7. Control of non-conventional synchronous motors

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Classical synchronous motors are the most effective device to drive industrial production systems and robots with precision and rapidity. However, numerous applications require efficient controls in non-conventional situations. Firstly, this is the case with synchronous motors supplied by thyristor line-commutated inverters, or with synchronous motors with faults on one or several phases. Secondly, many drive systems use non-conventional motors such as polyphase (more than three phases) synchronous motors, synchronous motors with double excitation, permanent magnet linear synchronous motors,

  8. Brain stimulation: Neuromodulation as a potential treatment for motor recovery following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, E; Kinley-Cooper, S K; Weber, R A; Adkins, D L

    2016-06-01

    There is growing evidence that electrical and magnetic brain stimulation can improve motor function and motor learning following brain damage. Rodent and primate studies have strongly demonstrated that combining cortical stimulation (CS) with skilled motor rehabilitative training enhances functional motor recovery following stroke. Brain stimulation following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is less well studied, but early pre-clinical and human pilot studies suggest that it is a promising treatment for TBI-induced motor impairments as well. This review will first discuss the evidence supporting brain stimulation efficacy derived from the stroke research field as proof of principle and then will review the few studies exploring neuromodulation in experimental TBI studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Mirroring pain in the brain : emotional expression versus motor imitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budell, Lesley; Kunz, Miriam; Jackson, Philip L; Rainville, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Perception of pain in others via facial expressions has been shown to involve brain areas responsive to self-pain, biological motion, as well as both performed and observed motor actions. Here, we investigated the involvement of these different regions during emotional and motor mirroring of pain

  10. Neurostimulation to treat brain injury?

    OpenAIRE

    Schonfeld, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    nvt. Universiteit Hasselt & Universiteit Maastricht, Hersenstichting Nederland, Medtronic US traumatic brain injury; controlled cortical impact; animal models; motor impairment; motor cortex, motor cortex stimulation, motor recovery

  11. Robust controllers for variable reluctance motors

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Zribi; Muthana T. Alrifai

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the control problem of variable reluctance motors (VRMs). VRMs are highly nonlinear motors; a model that takes magnetic saturation into account is adopted in this work. Two robust control schemes are developed for the speed control of a variable reluctance motor. The first control scheme guarantees the uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed loop system. The second control scheme guarantees the exponential stability of the closed loop system. Simulation results of t...

  12. One hand clapping: lateralization of motor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin eWelniarz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lateralization of motor control refers to the ability to produce pure unilateral or asymmetric movements. It is required for a variety of coordinated activities, including skilled bimanual tasks and locomotion. Here we discuss the neuroanatomical substrates and pathophysiological underpinnings of lateralized motor outputs. Significant breakthroughs have been made in the past few years by studying the two known conditions characterized by the inability to properly produce unilateral or asymmetric movements, namely human patients with congenital mirror movements and model rodents with a hopping gait. Whereas mirror movements are associated with altered interhemispheric connectivity and abnormal corticospinal projections, abnormal spinal cord interneurons trajectory is responsible for the hopping gait. Proper commissural axon guidance is a critical requirement for these mechanisms. Interestingly, the analysis of these two conditions reveals that the production of asymmetric movements involves similar anatomical and functional requirements but in two different structures: i lateralized activation of the brain or spinal cord through contralateral silencing by cross-midline inhibition; and ii unilateral transmission of this activation, resulting in lateralized motor output.

  13. Coupling brain-machine interfaces with cortical stimulation for brain-state dependent stimulation: enhancing motor cortex excitability for neurorehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza eGharabaghi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Motor recovery after stroke is an unsolved challenge despite intensive rehabilitation training programs. Brain stimulation techniques have been explored in addition to traditional rehabilitation training to increase the excitability of the stimulated motor cortex. This modulation of cortical excitability augments the response to afferent input during motor exercises, thereby enhancing skilled motor learning by long-term potentiation-like plasticity. Recent approaches examined brain stimulation applied concurrently with voluntary movements to induce more specific use-dependent neural plasticity during motor training for neurorehabilitation. Unfortunately, such approaches are not applicable for the many severely affected stroke patients lacking residual hand function. These patients require novel activity-dependent stimulation paradigms based on intrinsic brain activity. Here, we report on such brain state-dependent stimulation (BSDS combined with haptic feedback provided by a robotic hand orthosis. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and haptic feedback to the hand were controlled by sensorimotor desynchronization during motor-imagery and applied within a brain-machine interface environment in one healthy subject and one patient with severe hand paresis in the chronic phase after stroke. BSDS significantly increased the excitability of the stimulated motor cortex in both healthy and post-stroke conditions, an effect not observed in non-BSDS protocols. This feasibility study suggests that closing the loop between intrinsic brain state, cortical stimulation and haptic feedback provides a novel neurorehabilitation strategy for stroke patients lacking residual hand function, a proposal that warrants further investigation in a larger cohort of stroke patients.

  14. Ipsilateral motor pathways after stroke: implications for noninvasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynley V Bradnam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In humans the two cerebral hemispheres have essential roles in controlling the upper limb. The purpose of this article is to draw attention to the potential importance of ipsilateral descending pathways for functional recovery after stroke, and the use of noninvasive brain stimulation (NBS protocols of the contralesional primary motor cortex (M1. Conventionally NBS is used to suppress contralesional M1, and to attenuate transcallosal inhibition onto the ipsilesional M1. There has been little consideration of the fact that contralesional M1 suppression may also reduce excitability of ipsilateral descending pathways that may be important for paretic upper limb control for some patients. One such ipsilateral pathway is the cortico-reticulo-propriospinal pathway (CRPP. In this review we outline a neurophysiological model to explain how contralesional M1 may gain control of the paretic arm via the CRPP. We conclude that the relative importance of the CRPP for motor control in individual patients must be considered before using NBS to suppress contralesional M1. Neurophysiological, neuroimaging and clinical assessments can assist this decision making and facilitate the translation of NBS into the clinical setting.

  15. Neural correlates of disbalanced motor control in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, S; Höfle, O; Federspiel, A; Horn, H; Hügli, S; Wiest, R; Strik, W; Müller, T J

    2012-01-01

    Motor retardation is a common symptom of major depressive disorder (MDD). Despite the existence of various assessment methods, little is known on the pathobiology of motor retardation. We aimed to elucidate aspects of motor control investigating the association of objective motor activity and resting state cerebral blood flow (CBF). Nineteen control subjects and 20 MDD patients were investigated using arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3T in the morning to quantify resting state CBF. Afterwards wrist actigraphy was recorded for 24h. CBF, group and activity level (AL) were entered into a whole brain general linear model. MDD patients had reduced AL. Both groups had linear associations of AL and CBF in bilateral rostral prefrontal cortex. Groups differed in four clusters associated with motor control. In controls a positive association was found in the left caudal cingulate zone (CCZ) and an inverse association in the right external globus pallidus (GPe). MDD patients had positive associations in the right orbitofrontal cortex and inverse associations in the left supplemental motor area. Patients were on antidepressant medication. The pattern of associations between CBF and AL suggest disbalanced motor control in MDD. Findings are in line with the hypothesis of dopamine deficits contributing to motor retardation in MDD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. EEG topographies provide subject-specific correlates of motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirondini, Elvira; Coscia, Martina; Minguillon, Jesus; Millán, José Del R; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Micera, Silvestro

    2017-10-16

    Electroencephalography (EEG) of brain activity can be represented in terms of dynamically changing topographies (microstates). Notably, spontaneous brain activity recorded at rest can be characterized by four distinctive topographies. Despite their well-established role during resting state, their implication in the generation of motor behavior is debated. Evidence of such a functional role of spontaneous brain activity would provide support for the design of novel and sensitive biomarkers in neurological disorders. Here we examined whether and to what extent intrinsic brain activity contributes and plays a functional role during natural motor behaviors. For this we first extracted subject-specific EEG microstates and muscle synergies during reaching-and-grasping movements in healthy volunteers. We show that, in every subject, well-known resting-state microstates persist during movement execution with similar topographies and temporal characteristics, but are supplemented by novel task-related microstates. We then show that the subject-specific microstates' dynamical organization correlates with the activation of muscle synergies and can be used to decode individual grasping movements with high accuracy. These findings provide first evidence that spontaneous brain activity encodes detailed information about motor control, offering as such the prospect of a novel tool for the definition of subject-specific biomarkers of brain plasticity and recovery in neuro-motor disorders.

  17. MotorBrain: A mobile app for the assessment of users' motor performance in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Andrea; Chittaro, Luca; Burigat, Stefano; Budai, Riccardo

    2017-05-01

    Human motor skills or impairments have been traditionally assessed by neurologists by means of paper-and-pencil tests or special hardware. More recently, technologies such as digitizing tablets and touchscreens have offered neurologists new assessment possibilities, but their use has been restricted to a specific medical condition, or to stylus-operated mobile devices. The objective of this paper is twofold. First, we propose a mobile app (MotorBrain) that offers six computerized versions of traditional motor tests, can be used directly by patients (with and without the supervision of a clinician), and aims at turning millions of smartphones and tablets available to the general public into data collection and assessment tools. Then, we carry out a study to determine whether the data collected by MotorBrain can be meaningful for describing aging in human motor performance. A sample of healthy participants (N= 133) carried out the motor tests using MotorBrain on a smartphone. Participants were split into two groups (Young, Old) based on their age (less than or equal to 30 years, greater than or equal to 50 years, respectively). The data collected by the app characterizes accuracy, reaction times, and speed of movement. It was analyzed to investigate differences between the two groups. The app does allow measuring differences in neuromotor performance. Data collected by the app allowed us to assess performance differences due to the aging of the neuromuscular system. Data collected through MotorBrain is suitable to make meaningful distinctions among different kinds of performance, and allowed us to highlight performance differences associated to aging. MotorBrain supports the building of a large database of neuromotor data, which can be used for normative purposes in clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional connectivity between somatosensory and motor brain areas predicts individual differences in motor learning by observing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Heather R; Gribble, Paul L

    2017-08-01

    Action observation can facilitate the acquisition of novel motor skills; however, there is considerable individual variability in the extent to which observation promotes motor learning. Here we tested the hypothesis that individual differences in brain function or structure can predict subsequent observation-related gains in motor learning. Subjects underwent an anatomical MRI scan and resting-state fMRI scans to assess preobservation gray matter volume and preobservation resting-state functional connectivity (FC), respectively. On the following day, subjects observed a video of a tutor adapting her reaches to a novel force field. After observation, subjects performed reaches in a force field as a behavioral assessment of gains in motor learning resulting from observation. We found that individual differences in resting-state FC, but not gray matter volume, predicted postobservation gains in motor learning. Preobservation resting-state FC between left primary somatosensory cortex and bilateral dorsal premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, and primary somatosensory cortex and left superior parietal lobule was positively correlated with behavioral measures of postobservation motor learning. Sensory-motor resting-state FC can thus predict the extent to which observation will promote subsequent motor learning.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We show that individual differences in preobservation brain function can predict subsequent observation-related gains in motor learning. Preobservation resting-state functional connectivity within a sensory-motor network may be used as a biomarker for the extent to which observation promotes motor learning. This kind of information may be useful if observation is to be used as a way to boost neuroplasticity and sensory-motor recovery for patients undergoing rehabilitation for diseases that impair movement such as stroke. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Motor-related brain abnormalities in HIV-infected patients. A multimodal MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yawen; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Hui; Wei, Yarui; Ali, Rizwan [University of Science and Technology of China, Centers for Biomedical Engineering, Hefei, Anhui (China); Li, Ruili; Li, Hongjun [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Youan Hospital, Beijing (China); Qiu, Bensheng [University of Science and Technology of China, Centers for Biomedical Engineering, Hefei, Anhui (China); Anhui Computer Application Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2017-11-15

    It is generally believed that HIV infection could cause HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) across a broad range of functional domains. Some of the most common findings are deficits in motor control. However, to date no neuroimaging studies have evaluated basic motor control in HIV-infected patients using a multimodal approach. In this study, we utilized high-resolution structural imaging and task-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess brain structure and motor function in a homogeneous cohort of HIV-infected patients. We found that HIV-infected patients had significantly reduced gray matter (GM) volume in cortical regions, which are involved in motor control, including the bilateral posterior insula cortex, premotor cortex, and supramarginal gyrus. Increased activation in bilateral posterior insula cortices was also demonstrated by patients during hand movement tasks compared with healthy controls. More importantly, the reduced GM in bilateral posterior insula cortices was spatially coincident with abnormal brain activation in HIV-infected patients. In addition, the results of partial correlation analysis indicated that GM reduction in bilateral posterior insula cortices and premotor cortices was significantly correlated with immune system deterioration. This study is the first to demonstrate spatially coincident GM reduction and abnormal activation during motor performance in HIV-infected patients. Although it remains unknown whether the brain deficits can be recovered, our findings may yield new insights into neurologic injury underlying motor dysfunction in HAND. (orig.)

  20. Applied intelligent control of induction motor drives

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Tze Fun

    2011-01-01

    Induction motors are the most important workhorses in industry. They are mostly used as constant-speed drives when fed from a voltage source of fixed frequency. Advent of advanced power electronic converters and powerful digital signal processors, however, has made possible the development of high performance, adjustable speed AC motor drives.This book aims to explore new areas of induction motor control based on artificial intelligence (AI) techniques in order to make the controller less sensitive to parameter changes. Selected AI techniques are applied for different induction motor control s.

  1. PC Based wireless stepper motor control

    OpenAIRE

    Jamal, Omar; Khan, Shahnawaz; Abideen, Zainul

    2013-01-01

    This project is about making an embedded system in order to control different functionalities of a stepper motor. The main functions of this stepper motor are to control the speed and direction. The whole hardware consists of two parts. One is the transmitter side and the other side is the receiver side. The transmitter side consists of PC, Encoder, a microcontroller and RF (Radio Frequency) transmitter. On the receiver side there is an RF receiver, a decoder, a microcontroller, a motor drive...

  2. Controller for computer control of brushless dc motors. [automobile engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieda, L. S. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A motor speed and torque controller for brushless d.c. motors provides an unusually smooth torque control arrangement. The controller provides a means for controlling a current waveform in each winding of a brushless dc motor by synchronization of an excitation pulse train from a programmable oscillator. Sensing of torque for synchronization is provided by a light beam chopper mounted on the motor rotor shaft. Speed and duty cycle are independently controlled by controlling the frequency and pulse width output of the programmable oscillator. A means is also provided so that current transitions from one motor winding to another is effected without abrupt changes in output torque.

  3. Sliding Controller of Switched Reluctance Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Ghani AISSAOUI

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of sliding mode control for switched reluctance motor (SRM speed. The sliding mode technique finds its stronger justification in the utilization of a robust control law to model uncertainties. A sliding mode controller of the motor speed is then designed and simulated. Digital simulation results shows that the designed sliding speed controller realises a good dynamic behaviour of the motor, a perfect speed tracking with no overshoot and a good rejection of impact loads disturbance. The results of applying the sliding mode controller to a SRM give best performances and high robustness than those obtained by the application of a conventional controller (PI.

  4. Linear Parameter Varying Control of Induction Motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangbæk, Klaus

    The subject of this thesis is the development of linear parameter varying (LPV) controllers and observers for control of induction motors. The induction motor is one of the most common machines in industrial applications. Being a highly nonlinear system, it poses challenging control problems...... for high performance applications. This thesis demonstrates how LPV control theory provides a systematic way to achieve good performance for these problems. The main contributions of this thesis are the application of the LPV control theory to induction motor control as well as various contributions...

  5. Timing and motor control in drumming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia; Grossbach, Michael; Altenmüller, Eckart

    the stick movement becomes increasingly difficult, sometimes resulting in irregularities in timing and/or striking force. Timing irregularities can also be a revealing sign of motor control problems, such as focal dystonia (Jabusch, Vauth & Altenmüller, 2004). The "breakdown" in motor control can therefore...

  6. Motor Control Research Requires Nonlinear Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    The author comments on the original article "The Cinderella of psychology: The neglect of motor control in the science of mental life and behavior," by D. A. Rosenbaum. Rosenbaum draws attention to the study of motor control and evaluates seven possible explanations for why the topic has been relatively neglected. The point of this comment is that…

  7. Fuzzy control of small servo motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maor, Ron; Jani, Yashvant

    1993-01-01

    To explore the benefits of fuzzy logic and understand the differences between the classical control methods and fuzzy control methods, the Togai InfraLogic applications engineering staff developed and implemented a motor control system for small servo motors. The motor assembly for testing the fuzzy and conventional controllers consist of servo motor RA13M and an encoder with a range of 4096 counts. An interface card was designed and fabricated to interface the motor assembly and encoder to an IBM PC. The fuzzy logic based motor controller was developed using the TILShell and Fuzzy C Development System on an IBM PC. A Proportional-Derivative (PD) type conventional controller was also developed and implemented in the IBM PC to compare the performance with the fuzzy controller. Test cases were defined to include step inputs of 90 and 180 degrees rotation, sine and square wave profiles in 5 to 20 hertz frequency range, as well as ramp inputs. In this paper we describe our approach to develop a fuzzy as well as PH controller, provide details of hardware set-up and test cases, and discuss the performance results. In comparison, the fuzzy logic based controller handles the non-linearities of the motor assembly very well and provides excellent control over a broad range of parameters. Fuzzy technology, as indicated by our results, possesses inherent adaptive features.

  8. The emotional motor system and micturition control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, Gert

    2010-01-01

    Micturition is, similar to all other movements of the body, the result of activation of the motor system in the central nervous system. This review explains how the brain and brainstem control micturition. The basic reflex system begins with a distinct cell group called Gert's Nucleus (GN) in the sacral cord. GN receives information about bladder contents via A-delta fibers from the bladder and bladder sphincter and relays this information to the central part of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG), but not to the thalamus. The PAG, in turn, in case of substantial bladder filling, excites the pontine micturition center (PMC), which cell group, via its long descending pathways to the sacral cord, induces micturition. Higher brain regions in prefrontal cortex and limbic system, by means of its projections to the PAG are able to interrupt this basic reflex system. It allows the individual to postpone micturition until time and place are appropriate. Lesions in the pathways from prefrontal cortex and limbic system to the PAG probably cause urge-incontinence in the elderly.

  9. Induction Motor Speed Control Using Fuzzy Logic Controller

    OpenAIRE

    V. Chitra; R. S. Prabhakar

    2008-01-01

    Because of the low maintenance and robustness induction motors have many applications in the industries. The speed control of induction motor is more important to achieve maximum torque and efficiency. Various speed control techniques like, Direct Torque Control, Sensorless Vector Control and Field Oriented Control are discussed in this paper. Soft computing technique – Fuzzy logic is applied in this paper for the speed control of induction motor to achieve maximum torque with minimum loss. T...

  10. Sensorless Commutation Control of Switched Reluctance Motor

    OpenAIRE

    N.H. Mvungi

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses control of commutation of switched reluctance (SR) motor without the use of a physical position detector. Rotor position detection schemes for SR motor based on magnetisation characteristics of the motor use normal excitation or applied current /voltage pulses. The resulting schemes are referred to as passive or active methods respectively. The research effort is in realizing an economical sensorless SR rotor position detector that is accurate, reliable and robust to suit...

  11. Representational Similarity Analysis Reveals Heterogeneous Networks Supporting Speech Motor Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zane; Cusack, Rhodri; Johnsrude, Ingrid

    The everyday act of speaking involves the complex processes of speech motor control. One important feature of such control is regulation of articulation when auditory concomitants of speech do not correspond to the intended motor gesture. While theoretical accounts of speech monitoring posit...... is supported by a complex neural network that is involved in linguistic, motoric and sensory processing. With the aid of novel real-time acoustic analyses and representational similarity analyses of fMRI signals, our data show functionally differentiated networks underlying auditory feedback control of speech....... multiple functional components required for detection of errors in speech planning (e.g., Levelt, 1983), neuroimaging studies generally indicate either single brain regions sensitive to speech production errors, or small, discrete networks. Here we demonstrate that the complex system controlling speech...

  12. How the Emotional Motor System Controls the Pelvic Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, Gert

    2016-10-01

    The brain has two goals: survival of the individual and survival of the species. It ensures that the body resides in safe circumstances and can obtain sufficient drink and food. It also has to produce and protect offspring. Its most important tool is its motor system, which consists of the voluntary and emotional motor systems. To explain how the brain uses its emotional motor system to control the pelvic organs. Anatomic and physiologic data in cats and humans are used to find out how this motor system works and what parts of the brain and brainstem are involved. Main outcome is that the brain control of the pelvic organs is a specific descending system. The pelvic organs are innervated by the sacral parasympathetic motoneurons, which are controlled by a specific group of neurons in the pontine brainstem, the pelvic organ stimulating center (POSC). Through long descending pathways, this POSC generates micturition, defecation, and sexual activities by stimulating different groups of sacral parasympathetic motoneurons. In turn the POSC is driven by the periaqueductal gray (PAG), which receives, through the sacral cord, precise information regarding the situation in all pelvic organs. In addition, the PAG receives instructions from higher brain levels such as the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and various regions of the hypothalamus. Notably, in humans, the most important brain region having access to the PAG is the medial orbitofrontal cortex, which is deactivated in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder. In women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder, deactivation of their medial orbitofrontal cortex produces a decrease in PAG-POSC activation, causing absence of vaginal vasocongestion and lubrication and decreased sexual behavior in general. It often leads to major problems in their personal circumstances. The question is whether new drugs can cure this. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Robust controllers for variable reluctance motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zribi Mohamed

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the control problem of variable reluctance motors (VRMs. VRMs are highly nonlinear motors; a model that takes magnetic saturation into account is adopted in this work. Two robust control schemes are developed for the speed control of a variable reluctance motor. The first control scheme guarantees the uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed loop system. The second control scheme guarantees the exponential stability of the closed loop system. Simulation results of the proposed controllers are presented to illustrate the theoretical developments. The simulations indicate that the proposed controllers work well, and they are robust to changes in the parameters of the motor and to changes in the load.

  14. Energy Optimal Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Flemming

    This thesis deals with energy optimal control of small and medium-size variable speed induction motor drives for especially Heating, Ventilation and Air-Condition (HVAC) applications. Optimized efficiency is achieved by adapting the magnetization level in the motor to the load, and the basic...... purpose is demonstrate how this can be done for low-cost PWM-VSI drives without bringing the robustness of the drive below an acceptable level. Four drives are investigated with respect to energy optimal control: 2.2 kW standard and high-efficiency motor drives, 22 kW and 90 kW standard motor drives....... The method has been to make extensive efficiency measurements within the specified operating area with optimized efficiency and with constant air-gap flux, and to establish reliable converter and motor loss models based on those measurements. The loss models have been used to analyze energy optimal control...

  15. Neural correlates of motor dysfunction in children with traumatic brain injury: exploration of compensatory recruitment patterns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caeyenberghs, K.; Wenderoth, N.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Sunaert, S.; Swinnen, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common form of disability in children. Persistent deficits in motor control have been documented following TBI but there has been less emphasis on changes in functional cerebral activity. In the present study, children with moderate to severe TBI (n = 9) and

  16. Sleep-dependent motor memory plasticity in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M P; Stickgold, R; Alsop, D; Gaab, N; Schlaug, G

    2005-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates a role for sleep in off-line memory processing, specifically in post-training consolidation. In humans, sleep has been shown to trigger overnight learning on a motor-sequence memory task, while equivalent waking periods produce no such improvement. But while the behavioral characteristics of sleep-dependent motor learning become increasingly well characterized, the underlying neural basis remains unknown. Here we present functional magnetic resonance imaging data demonstrating a change in the representation of a motor memory after a night of sleep. Subjects trained on a motor-skill memory and 12 hours later, after either sleep or wake, were retested during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Following sleep relative to wake, regions of increased activation were expressed in the right primary motor cortex, medial prefrontal lobe, hippocampus and left cerebellum; changes that can support faster motor output and more precise mapping of key-press movements. In contrast, signal decreases were identified in parietal cortices, the left insular cortex, temporal pole and fronto-polar region, reflecting a reduced need for conscious spatial monitoring and a decreased emotional task burden. This evidence of an overnight, systems-level change in the representation of a motor memory holds important implications for acquiring real-life skills and in clinical rehabilitation following brain trauma, such as stroke.

  17. Effect of 3G cell phone exposure with computer controlled 2-D stepper motor on non-thermal activation of the hsp27/p38MAPK stress pathway in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Meena, Ramovatar; Nirala, Jayprakash; Kumar, Jitender; Verma, H N

    2014-03-01

    Cell phone radiation exposure and its biological interaction is the present concern of debate. Present study aimed to investigate the effect of 3G cell phone exposure with computer controlled 2-D stepper motor on 45-day-old male Wistar rat brain. Animals were exposed for 2 h a day for 60 days by using mobile phone with angular movement up to zero to 30°. The variation of the motor is restricted to 90° with respect to the horizontal plane, moving at a pre-determined rate of 2° per minute. Immediately after 60 days of exposure, animals were scarified and numbers of parameters (DNA double-strand break, micronuclei, caspase 3, apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, expression of stress-responsive genes) were performed. Result shows that microwave radiation emitted from 3G mobile phone significantly induced DNA strand breaks in brain. Meanwhile a significant increase in micronuclei, caspase 3 and apoptosis were also observed in exposed group (P phone exposure causes a transient increase in phosphorylation of hsp27, hsp70, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), which leads to mitochondrial dysfunction-mediated cytochrome c release and subsequent activation of caspases, involved in the process of radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Study shows that the oxidative stress is the main factor which activates a variety of cellular signal transduction pathways, among them the hsp27/p38MAPK is the pathway of principle stress response. Results conclude that 3G mobile phone radiations affect the brain function and cause several neurological disorders.

  18. Brain volumetric and microstructural correlates of executive and motor performance in aged rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aadhavi eSridharan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aged rhesus macaque exhibits brain atrophy and behavioral deficits similar to normal aging in humans. Here we studied the association between cognitive and motor performance and anatomic and microstructural brain integrity measured with 3T magnetic resonance imaging in aged monkeys. About half of these animals were maintained on moderate calorie restriction, the only intervention shown to delay the aging process in lower animals. T1-weighted anatomic and diffusion tensor images were used to obtain gray matter volume, and fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity, respectively. We tested the extent to which brain health indexed by gray matter volume, fractional anisotropy, and mean diffusivity were related to executive and motor function, and determined the effect of the dietary intervention on this relationship. We hypothesized that fewer errors on the executive function test and faster motor times would be correlated with higher volume, higher fractional anisotropy, and lower mean diffusivity in frontal areas that mediate executive function, and in motor, premotor, subcortical, and cerebellar areas underlying goal-directed motor behaviors. Higher error percentage on a cognitive conceptual shift task was significantly associated with lower gray matter volume in frontal and parietal cortices, and lower fractional anisotropy in major association fiber bundles. Similarly, slower performance time on the motor task was significantly correlated with lower volumetric measures in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar areas and decreased fractional anisotropy in several major association fiber bundles. Notably, performance during the acquisition phase of the hardest level of the motor task was significantly associated with anterior mesial temporal lobe volume. Finally, these brain-behavior correlations for the motor task were attenuated in calorie restricted animals compared to controls, indicating a potential protective effect of the dietary

  19. Association Between Motor Symptoms and Brain Metabolism in Early Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaura, Véronique; Lavisse, Sonia; Payoux, Pierre; Goldman, Serge; Verny, Christophe; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Damier, Philippe; Supiot, Frédéric; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Remy, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Brain hypometabolism is associated with the clinical consequences of the degenerative process, but little is known about regional hypermetabolism, sometimes observed in the brain of patients with clinically manifest Huntington disease (HD). Studying the role of regional hypermetabolism is needed to better understand its interaction with the motor symptoms of the disease. To investigate the association between brain hypometabolism and hypermetabolism with motor scores of patients with early HD. This study started in 2001, and analysis was completed in 2016. Sixty symptomatic patients with HD and 15 healthy age-matched control individuals underwent positron emission tomography to measure cerebral metabolism in this cross-sectional study. They also underwent the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale motor test, and 2 subscores were extracted: (1) a hyperkinetic score, combining dystonia and chorea, and (2) a hypokinetic score, combining bradykinesia and rigidity. Statistical parametric mapping software (SPM5) was used to identify all hypo- and hypermetabolic regions in patients with HD relative to control individuals. Correlation analyses (P < .001, uncorrected) between motor subscores and brain metabolic values were performed for regions with significant hypometabolism and hypermetabolism. Among 60 patients with HD, 22 were women (36.7%), and the mean (SD) age was 44.6 (7.6) years. Of the 15 control individuals, 7 were women (46.7%), and the mean (SD) age was 42.2 (7.3) years. In statistical parametric mapping, striatal hypometabolism was significantly correlated with the severity of all motor scores. Hypermetabolism was negatively correlated only with hypokinetic scores in the cuneus (z score = 3.95, P < .001), the lingual gyrus (z score = 4.31, P < .001), and the crus I/II of the cerebellum (z score = 3.77, P < .001), a region connected to associative cortical areas. More severe motor scores were associated with higher metabolic

  20. Brain Plasticity and Motor Practice in Cognitive Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuyang eCai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available For more than two decades, there have been extensive studies of experience-based neural plasticity exploring effective applications of brain plasticity for cognitive and motor development. Research suggests that human brains continuously undergo structural reorganization and functional changes in response to stimulations or training. From a developmental point of view, the assumption of lifespan brain plasticity has been extended to older adults in terms of the benefits of cognitive training and physical therapy. To summarize recent developments, first, we introduce the concept of neural plasticity from a developmental perspective. Secondly, we note that motor learning often refers to deliberate practice and the resulting performance enhancement and adaptability. We discuss the close interplay between neural plasticity, motor learning and cognitive aging. Thirdly, we review research on motor skill acquisition in older adults with, and without, impairments relative to aging-related cognitive decline. Finally, to enhance future research and application, we highlight the implications of neural plasticity in skills learning and cognitive rehabilitation for the aging population.

  1. Neural correlates of delayed visual-motor performance in children treated for brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockstader, Colleen; Gaetz, William; Bouffet, Eric; Tabori, Uri; Wang, Frank; Bostan, Stefan R; Laughlin, Suzanne; Mabbott, Donald J

    2013-09-01

    Both structural and functional neural integrity is critical for healthy cognitive function and performance. Across studies, it is evident that children who are affected by neurological insult commonly demonstrate impaired cognitive abilities. Children treated with cranial radiation for brain tumours suffer substantial structural damage and exhibit a particularly high correlation between the degree of neural injury and cognitive deficits. However the pathophysiology underlying impaired cognitive performance in this population, and many other paediatric populations affected by neurological injury or disease, is unknown. We wished to investigate the characteristics of neuronal function during visual-motor task performance in a group of children who were treated with cranial radiation for brain tumours. We used Magnetoencephalography to investigate neural function during visual-motor reaction time (RT) task performance in 15 children treated with cranial radiation for Posterior Fossa malignant brain tumours and 17 healthy controls. We found that, relative to controls, the patient group showed: 1) delayed latencies for neural activation in both visual and motor cortices; 2) muted motor responses in the alpha (8-12Hz) and beta (13-29Hz) bandwidths, and 3) potentiated visual and motor responses in the gamma (30-100Hz) bandwidth. Collectively these observations indicate impaired neural processing during visual-motor RT performance in this population and that delays in the speed of visual and motor neuronal processing both contribute to the delays in the behavioural response. As increases in gamma activity are often observed with increases in attention and effort, increased gamma activities in the patient group may reflect compensatory neural activity during task performance. This is the first study to investigate neural function in real-time during cognitive performance in paediatric brain tumour patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Developmental kinesiology: three levels of motor control in the assessment and treatment of the motor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobesova, Alena; Kolar, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Three levels of sensorimotor control within the central nervous system (CNS) can be distinguished. During the neonatal stage, general movements and primitive reflexes are controlled at the spinal and brain stem levels. Analysis of the newborn's spontaneous general movements and the assessment of primitive reflexes is crucial in the screening and early recognition of a risk for abnormal development. Following the newborn period, the subcortical level of the CNS motor control emerges and matures mainly during the first year of life. This allows for basic trunk stabilization, a prerequisite for any phasic movement and for the locomotor function of the extremities. At the subcortical level, orofacial muscles and afferent information are automatically integrated within postural-locomotor patterns. Finally, the cortical (the highest) level of motor control increasingly becomes activated. Cortical control is important for the individual qualities and characteristics of movement. It also allows for isolated segmental movement and relaxation. A child with impaired cortical motor control may be diagnosed with developmental dyspraxia or developmental coordination disorder. Human ontogenetic models, i.e., developmental motor patterns, can be used in both the diagnosis and treatment of locomotor system dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Taking control of the flagellar motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Mathieu; Truchon, Dany; Rainville, Simon

    2008-06-01

    Numerous types of bacteria swim in their environment by rotating long helical filaments. At the base of each filament is a tiny rotary motor called the bacterial flagellar motor. A lot is already known about the structure, assembly and function of this splendid molecular machine of nanoscopic dimensions. Nevertheless many fundamental questions remain open and the study of the flagellar motor is a very exciting area of current research. We are developing an in vitro assay to enable studies of the bacterial flagellar motor in precisely controlled conditions and to gain direct access to the inner components of the motor. We partly squeeze a filamentous E. coli bacterium inside a micropipette, leaving a working flagellar motor outside. We then punch a hole through the cell wall at the end of the bacterium located inside the micropipette using a brief train of ultrashort (~60 fs) laser pulses. This enables us to control the rotation of the motor with an external voltage (for at least 15 minutes). In parallel, new methods to monitor the speed of rotation of the motor in the low load (high speed) regime are being developed using various nanoparticules.

  4. Four quadrant control of induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1991-03-01

    Induction motors are the nation's workhorse, being the motor of choice in most applications due to their simple rugged construction. It has been estimated that 14 to 27 percent of the country's total electricity use could be saved with adjustable speed drives. Until now, induction motors have not been suited well for variable speed or servo-drives, due to the inherent complexity, size, and inefficiency of their variable speed controls. Work at NASA Lewis Research Center on field oriented control of induction motors using pulse population modulation method holds the promise for the desired drive electronics. The system allows for a variable voltage to frequency ratio which enables the user to operate the motor at maximum efficiency, while having independent control of both the speed and torque of an induction motor in all four quadrants of the speed torque map. Multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of machine. The pulse population technique, results to date, and projections for implementation of this existing new motor control technology are discussed.

  5. Sensorimotor rhythm-based brain-computer interface training: the impact on motor cortical responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichiorri, F.; De Vico Fallani, F.; Cincotti, F.; Babiloni, F.; Molinari, M.; Kleih, S. C.; Neuper, C.; Kübler, A.; Mattia, D.

    2011-04-01

    The main purpose of electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is to provide an alternative channel to support communication and control when motor pathways are interrupted. Despite the considerable amount of research focused on the improvement of EEG signal detection and translation into output commands, little is known about how learning to operate a BCI device may affect brain plasticity. This study investigated if and how sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI training would induce persistent functional changes in motor cortex, as assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and high-density EEG. Motor imagery (MI)-based BCI training in naïve participants led to a significant increase in motor cortical excitability, as revealed by post-training TMS mapping of the hand muscle's cortical representation; peak amplitude and volume of the motor evoked potentials recorded from the opponens pollicis muscle were significantly higher only in those subjects who develop a MI strategy based on imagination of hand grasping to successfully control a computer cursor. Furthermore, analysis of the functional brain networks constructed using a connectivity matrix between scalp electrodes revealed a significant decrease in the global efficiency index for the higher-beta frequency range (22-29 Hz), indicating that the brain network changes its topology with practice of hand grasping MI. Our findings build the neurophysiological basis for the use of non-invasive BCI technology for monitoring and guidance of motor imagery-dependent brain plasticity and thus may render BCI a viable tool for post-stroke rehabilitation.

  6. Torque control of switched reluctance motors

    OpenAIRE

    Moron Fernandez, Carlos; Garcia Garcia, Alfonso; Tremps Guerra, Enrique; Somolinos Sanchez, Jose Andres

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the performance of an instantaneous torque control method. The simulation and experimental results illustrate the capability of Switched Reluctance Motors (SRM) being used in the motor drive industry. Based on experimental data, the advantages of this control method and its disadvantages in practical implementation were studied. The model used in the simulation is the linear magnetic model which has the 12/8 structure, the same structure as the experimental switched re...

  7. Theories and control models and motor learning: clinical applications in neuro-rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-de-la-Cuerda, R; Molero-Sánchez, A; Carratalá-Tejada, M; Alguacil-Diego, I M; Molina-Rueda, F; Miangolarra-Page, J C; Torricelli, D

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades there has been a special interest in theories that could explain the regulation of motor control, and their applications. These theories are often based on models of brain function, philosophically reflecting different criteria on how movement is controlled by the brain, each being emphasised in different neural components of the movement. The concept of motor learning, regarded as the set of internal processes associated with practice and experience that produce relatively permanent changes in the ability to produce motor activities through a specific skill, is also relevant in the context of neuroscience. Thus, both motor control and learning are seen as key fields of study for health professionals in the field of neuro-rehabilitation. The major theories of motor control are described, which include, motor programming theory, systems theory, the theory of dynamic action, and the theory of parallel distributed processing, as well as the factors that influence motor learning and its applications in neuro-rehabilitation. At present there is no consensus on which theory or model defines the regulations to explain motor control. Theories of motor learning should be the basis for motor rehabilitation. The new research should apply the knowledge generated in the fields of control and motor learning in neuro-rehabilitation. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Learning control system of lifting machine motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Zimovets

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Process automation control by diagnostic electric motors in operation conditions allows to reduce to a minimum the damage from these consequences due to early detection of defects. The theory of diagnosticof lifting machine motors has not been completely developed yet. In practice, the control of technical state of the motors is mainly performed during scheduled maintenance, which does not reveal to detect originating defects and to prevent significant damage of motors up to their complete failure. The difficulty of obtaining diagnostic information is that the main functional units of electric motors are dependent. This means that physical damage in any unit results in malfunctions of other units. The main way of increasing the efficiency of the automated control system of lifting machine motors is giving it the properties of adaptability on the basis of ideas and methods of machine learning and pattern recognition. To increase the operational reliability and service life of a mine electric lifting machines the article offers an information and machine learning algorithm for extreme functional control systems with electric hyprnspherical classifier. Normalized Shannon entropy measure was used as a criterion for functional efficiency of leaning systems of the functional control.

  9. Backstepping Strategy for Induction Motor Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    2000-01-01

    Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a novel approach to control of induction motors is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear controller for the torque and the amplitude of the field. A combination of nonlinear damping and observer backstepping with a s......Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a novel approach to control of induction motors is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear controller for the torque and the amplitude of the field. A combination of nonlinear damping and observer backstepping...... with a simple flux observer is used in the design. Assuming known motor parameters the design achieves stability with guaranteed region of attraction. It is also shown how a conventional field oriented controller may be obtained by omitting parts of the nonlinear controller....

  10. Brain-Machine Interface Control Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanechi, Maryam M

    2016-12-14

    Motor brain-machine interfaces (BMI) allow subjects to control external devices by modulating their neural activity. BMIs record the neural activity, use a mathematical algorithm to estimate the subject's intended movement, actuate an external device, and provide visual feedback of the generated movement to the subject. A critical component of a BMI system is the control algorithm, termed decoder. Significant progress has been made in the design of BMI decoders in recent years resulting in proficient control in non-human primates and humans. In this review article, we discuss the decoding algorithms developed in the BMI field, with particular focus on recent designs that are informed by closed-loop control ideas. A motor BMI can be modeled as a closed-loop control system, where the controller is the brain, the plant is the prosthetic, the feedback is the biofeedback, and the control command is the neural activity. Additionally, compared to other closed-loop systems, BMIs have various unique properties. Neural activity is noisy and stochastic, and often consists of a sequence of spike trains. Neural representations of movement could be non-stationary and change over time, for example as a result of learning. We review recent decoder designs that take these unique properties into account. We also discuss the opportunities that exist at the interface of control theory, statistical inference, and neuroscience to devise a control-theoretic framework for BMI design and help develop the next-generation BMI control algorithms.

  11. Cerebral motor function in very premature-at-birth adolescents: a brain stimulation exploration of kangaroo mother care effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Cyril; Charpak, Nathalie; Ruiz-Peláez, Juan G; Tessier, Réjean

    2012-10-01

      Given that prematurity has deleterious effects on brain networking development beyond childhood, the study explored whether an early intervention such as Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) in very preterm preemies could have influenced brain motor function up to adolescence.   Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) of 39 adolescents born very prematurely (37 weeks' gestational age, >2500 g) to assess the functional integrity of motor circuits in each hemisphere (motor planning) and between hemispheres (callosal function).   All TMS outcomes were similar between KMC and term adolescents, with typical values as in healthy adults, and better than in Controls. KMC adolescents presented faster conduction times revealing more efficient M1 cell synchronization (p motor pathways in the KMC group suggests that the Kangaroo Mother Care positively influenced the premature brain networks and synaptic efficacy up to adolescence. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  12. Motor imagery based brain-computer interfaces: An emerging technology to rehabilitate motor deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz Maria; Salido-Ruiz, Ricardo Antonio; Ramirez-Mendoza, Ricardo A

    2015-12-01

    When the sensory-motor integration system is malfunctioning provokes a wide variety of neurological disorders, which in many cases cannot be treated with conventional medication, or via existing therapeutic technology. A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a tool that permits to reintegrate the sensory-motor loop, accessing directly to brain information. A potential, promising and quite investigated application of BCI has been in the motor rehabilitation field. It is well-known that motor deficits are the major disability wherewith the worldwide population lives. Therefore, this paper aims to specify the foundation of motor rehabilitation BCIs, as well as to review the recent research conducted so far (specifically, from 2007 to date), in order to evaluate the suitability and reliability of this technology. Although BCI for post-stroke rehabilitation is still in its infancy, the tendency is towards the development of implantable devices that encompass a BCI module plus a stimulation system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stepper motor control that adjusts to motor loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor); Nola, Frank J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method are provided for controlling a stepper motor having a rotor and a multi-phase stator. Sinusoidal command signals define a commanded position of the motor's rotor. An actual position of the rotor is sensed as a function of an electrical angle between the actual position and the commanded position. The actual position is defined by sinusoidal position signals. An adjustment signal is generated using the sinusoidal command signals and sinusoidal position signals. The adjustment signal is defined as a function of the cosine of the electrical angle. The adjustment signal is multiplied by each sinusoidal command signal to generate a corresponding set of excitation signals, each of which is applied to a corresponding phase of the multi-phase stator.

  14. Backstepping Strategy for Induction Motor Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    2000-01-01

    Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a novel approach to control of induction motors is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear controller for the torque and the amplitude of the field. A combination of nonlinear damping and observer backstepping...... with a simple flux observer is used in the design. Assuming known motor parameters the design achieves stability with guaranteed region of attraction. It is also shown how a conventional field oriented controller may be obtained by omitting parts of the nonlinear controller....

  15. Evidence of motor-control difficulties in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, explored through a hierarchical motor-systems perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macoun, Sarah J; Kerns, Kimberly A

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may reflect a disorder of neural systems that regulate motor control. The current study investigates motor dysfunction in children with ADHD using a hierarchical motor-systems perspective where frontal-striatal/"medial" brain systems are viewed as regulating parietal/"lateral" brain systems in a top down manner, to inhibit automatic environmentally driven responses in favor of goal-directed behavior. It was hypothesized that due to frontal-striatal hypoactivation, children with ADHD would have difficulty with higher order motor control tasks felt to be dependent on these systems, yet have preserved general motor function. A total of 63 children-ADHD and matched controls-completed experimental motor tasks that required maintenance of internal motor representations and the ability to inhibit visually driven responses. Children also completed a measure of motor inhibition, and a portion of the sample completed general motor function tasks. On motor tasks that required them to maintain internal motor representations and to inhibit automatic motor responses, children with ADHD had significantly greater difficulty than controls, yet on measures of general motor dexterity, their performance was comparable. Children with ADHD displayed significantly greater intraindividual (subject) variability than controls. Intraindividual variability (IIV) contributed to variations in performance across the motor tasks, but did not account for all of the variance on all tasks. These findings suggest that children with ADHD may be more controlled by external stimuli than by internally represented information, possibly due to dysfunction of the medial motor system. However, it is likely that children with ADHD also display general motor-execution problems (as evidenced by IIV findings), suggesting that atypicalities may extend to both medial and lateral motor systems. Findings are interpreted within the context of contemporary theories

  16. Serotonergic modulation of spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie; Cotel, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine that powerfully modulates spinal motor control by acting on intrasynaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. Here we review the diversity of 5-HT actions on locomotor and motoneuronal activities. Two approaches have been used on in vitro spinal cord preparations: either...... and promotes the excitability of motoneurons, while stronger release inhibits rhythmic activity and motoneuron firing. This latter effect is responsible for central fatigue and secures rotation of motor units....

  17. Efficient Power Amplifier for Motor Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Pulse-width-modulated amplifier supplies high current as efficiently as low current needed for starting and running motor. Key to efficiency of motor-control amplifier is V-channel metal-oxide/semiconductor transistor Q1. Device has low saturation resistance. However, has large gate input capacitance and small margin between its turn-on voltage and maximum allowable gate-to-source voltage. Circuits for output stages overcome limitations of VMOS device.

  18. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I Affects Brain Structure in Prefrontal and Motor Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleger, Burkhard; Draganski, Bogdan; Schwenkreis, Peter; Lenz, Melanie; Nicolas, Volkmar; Maier, Christoph; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls) were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the “non-flipped” data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the “flipped” data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control. PMID:24416397

  19. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Pleger

    Full Text Available The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1 and motor cortex (M1 contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  20. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleger, Burkhard; Draganski, Bogdan; Schwenkreis, Peter; Lenz, Melanie; Nicolas, Volkmar; Maier, Christoph; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls) were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  1. BRAIN-COMPUTER-INTERFACE – SUPPORTED MOTOR IMAGERY TRAININTG FOR PATIENTS WITH HEMIPARESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Mokienko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to assess the feasibility of motor imagery supported brain-computer interface in patients with hemiparesis. 13 patients with central paresis of the hand and 15 healthy volunteers were learning to control EEG-based interface with feedback. No differences on interface control quality were found between patients and healthy subjects. The trainings were accompanied by the desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm. In patients with cortical damage the source of EEG-activity was dislocated.

  2. Open questions in computational motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karniel, Amir

    2011-09-01

    Computational motor control covers all applications of quantitative tools for the study of the biological movement control system. This paper provides a review of this field in the form of a list of open questions. After an introduction in which we define computational motor control, we describe: a Turing-like test for motor intelligence; internal models, inverse model, forward model, feedback error learning and distal teacher; time representation, and adaptation to delay; intermittence control strategies; equilibrium hypotheses and threshold control; the spatiotemporal hierarchy of wide sense adaptation, i.e., feedback, learning, adaptation, and evolution; optimization based models for trajectory formation and optimal feedback control; motor memory, the past and the future; and conclude with the virtue of redundancy. Each section in this paper starts with a review of the relevant literature and a few more specific studies addressing the open question, and ends with speculations about the possible answer and its implications to motor neuroscience. This review is aimed at concisely covering the topic from the author's perspective with emphasis on learning mechanisms and the various structures and limitations of internal models.

  3. Effect of Error Augmentation on Brain Activation and Motor Learning of a Complex Locomotor Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Marchal-Crespo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Up to date, the functional gains obtained after robot-aided gait rehabilitation training are limited. Error augmenting strategies have a great potential to enhance motor learning of simple motor tasks. However, little is known about the effect of these error modulating strategies on complex tasks, such as relearning to walk after a neurologic accident. Additionally, neuroimaging evaluation of brain regions involved in learning processes could provide valuable information on behavioral outcomes. We investigated the effect of robotic training strategies that augment errors—error amplification and random force disturbance—and training without perturbations on brain activation and motor learning of a complex locomotor task. Thirty-four healthy subjects performed the experiment with a robotic stepper (MARCOS in a 1.5 T MR scanner. The task consisted in tracking a Lissajous figure presented on a display by coordinating the legs in a gait-like movement pattern. Behavioral results showed that training without perturbations enhanced motor learning in initially less skilled subjects, while error amplification benefited better-skilled subjects. Training with error amplification, however, hampered transfer of learning. Randomly disturbing forces induced learning and promoted transfer in all subjects, probably because the unexpected forces increased subjects' attention. Functional MRI revealed main effects of training strategy and skill level during training. A main effect of training strategy was seen in brain regions typically associated with motor control and learning, such as, the basal ganglia, cerebellum, intraparietal sulcus, and angular gyrus. Especially, random disturbance and no perturbation lead to stronger brain activation in similar brain regions than error amplification. Skill-level related effects were observed in the IPS, in parts of the superior parietal lobe (SPL, i.e., precuneus, and temporal cortex. These neuroimaging findings

  4. Perinatal Development of the Motor Systems Involved in Postural Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Vinay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor behaviors of some species, such as the rat and the human baby, are quite immature at birth. Here we review recent data on some of the mechanisms underlying the postnatal maturation of posture in the rat, in particular the development of pathways descending from the brain stem and projecting onto the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord. A short-lasting depletion in serotonin affects both posture and the excitability of motoneurons. Here we try to extrapolate to human development and suggest that the abnormalities in motor control observed in childhood—e.g, deficits in motor coordination—might have their roots in the prenatal period, in particular serotonin depletion due to exposure to several environmental and toxicological factors during pregnancy.

  5. Mirroring pain in the brain: emotional expression versus motor imitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Budell

    Full Text Available Perception of pain in others via facial expressions has been shown to involve brain areas responsive to self-pain, biological motion, as well as both performed and observed motor actions. Here, we investigated the involvement of these different regions during emotional and motor mirroring of pain expressions using a two-task paradigm, and including both observation and execution of the expressions. BOLD responses were measured as subjects watched video clips showing different intensities of pain expression and, after a variable delay, either expressed the amount of pain they perceived in the clips (pain task, or imitated the facial movements (movement task. In the pain task condition, pain coding involved overlapping activation across observation and execution in the anterior cingulate cortex, supplementary motor area, inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula, and the inferior parietal lobule, and a pain-related increase (pain vs. neutral in the anterior cingulate cortex/supplementary motor area, the right inferior frontal gyrus, and the postcentral gyrus. The 'mirroring' response was stronger in the inferior frontal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus/superior temporal sulcus during the pain task, and stronger in the inferior parietal lobule in the movement task. These results strongly suggest that while motor mirroring may contribute to the perception of pain expressions in others, interpreting these expressions in terms of pain content draws more heavily on networks involved in the perception of affective meaning.

  6. Mirroring pain in the brain: emotional expression versus motor imitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budell, Lesley; Kunz, Miriam; Jackson, Philip L; Rainville, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Perception of pain in others via facial expressions has been shown to involve brain areas responsive to self-pain, biological motion, as well as both performed and observed motor actions. Here, we investigated the involvement of these different regions during emotional and motor mirroring of pain expressions using a two-task paradigm, and including both observation and execution of the expressions. BOLD responses were measured as subjects watched video clips showing different intensities of pain expression and, after a variable delay, either expressed the amount of pain they perceived in the clips (pain task), or imitated the facial movements (movement task). In the pain task condition, pain coding involved overlapping activation across observation and execution in the anterior cingulate cortex, supplementary motor area, inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula, and the inferior parietal lobule, and a pain-related increase (pain vs. neutral) in the anterior cingulate cortex/supplementary motor area, the right inferior frontal gyrus, and the postcentral gyrus. The 'mirroring' response was stronger in the inferior frontal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus/superior temporal sulcus during the pain task, and stronger in the inferior parietal lobule in the movement task. These results strongly suggest that while motor mirroring may contribute to the perception of pain expressions in others, interpreting these expressions in terms of pain content draws more heavily on networks involved in the perception of affective meaning.

  7. Evolution of brain-computer interfaces: going beyond classic motor physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthardt, Eric C.; Schalk, Gerwin; Roland, Jarod; Rouse, Adam; Moran, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    The notion that a computer can decode brain signals to infer the intentions of a human and then enact those intentions directly through a machine is becoming a realistic technical possibility. These types of devices are known as brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). The evolution of these neuroprosthetic technologies could have significant implications for patients with motor disabilities by enhancing their ability to interact and communicate with their environment. The cortical physiology most investigated and used for device control has been brain signals from the primary motor cortex. To date, this classic motor physiology has been an effective substrate for demonstrating the potential efficacy of BCI-based control. However, emerging research now stands to further enhance our understanding of the cortical physiology underpinning human intent and provide further signals for more complex brain-derived control. In this review, the authors report the current status of BCIs and detail the emerging research trends that stand to augment clinical applications in the future. PMID:19569892

  8. Sensory-motor networks involved in speech production and motor control: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Shebek, Rachel; Hansen, Daniel R; Oya, Hiroyuki; Robin, Donald A; Howard, Matthew A; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2015-04-01

    Speaking is one of the most complex motor behaviors developed to facilitate human communication. The underlying neural mechanisms of speech involve sensory-motor interactions that incorporate feedback information for online monitoring and control of produced speech sounds. In the present study, we adopted an auditory feedback pitch perturbation paradigm and combined it with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings in order to identify brain areas involved in speech production and motor control. Subjects underwent fMRI scanning while they produced a steady vowel sound /a/ (speaking) or listened to the playback of their own vowel production (playback). During each condition, the auditory feedback from vowel production was either normal (no perturbation) or perturbed by an upward (+600 cents) pitch-shift stimulus randomly. Analysis of BOLD responses during speaking (with and without shift) vs. rest revealed activation of a complex network including bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), Heschl's gyrus, precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), Rolandic operculum, postcentral gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Performance correlation analysis showed that the subjects produced compensatory vocal responses that significantly correlated with BOLD response increases in bilateral STG and left precentral gyrus. However, during playback, the activation network was limited to cortical auditory areas including bilateral STG and Heschl's gyrus. Moreover, the contrast between speaking vs. playback highlighted a distinct functional network that included bilateral precentral gyrus, SMA, IFG, postcentral gyrus and insula. These findings suggest that speech motor control involves feedback error detection in sensory (e.g. auditory) cortices that subsequently activate motor-related areas for the adjustment of speech parameters during speaking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Motor priming in virtual reality can augment motor-imagery training efficacy in restorative brain-computer interaction: a within-subject analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourvopoulos, Athanasios; Bermúdez I Badia, Sergi

    2016-08-09

    The use of Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technology in neurorehabilitation provides new strategies to overcome stroke-related motor limitations. Recent studies demonstrated the brain's capacity for functional and structural plasticity through BCI. However, it is not fully clear how we can take full advantage of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying recovery and how to maximize restoration through BCI. In this study we investigate the role of multimodal virtual reality (VR) simulations and motor priming (MP) in an upper limb motor-imagery BCI task in order to maximize the engagement of sensory-motor networks in a broad range of patients who can benefit from virtual rehabilitation training. In order to investigate how different BCI paradigms impact brain activation, we designed 3 experimental conditions in a within-subject design, including an immersive Multimodal Virtual Reality with Motor Priming (VRMP) condition where users had to perform motor-execution before BCI training, an immersive Multimodal VR condition, and a control condition with standard 2D feedback. Further, these were also compared to overt motor-execution. Finally, a set of questionnaires were used to gather subjective data on Workload, Kinesthetic Imagery and Presence. Our findings show increased capacity to modulate and enhance brain activity patterns in all extracted EEG rhythms matching more closely those present during motor-execution and also a strong relationship between electrophysiological data and subjective experience. Our data suggest that both VR and particularly MP can enhance the activation of brain patterns present during overt motor-execution. Further, we show changes in the interhemispheric EEG balance, which might play an important role in the promotion of neural activation and neuroplastic changes in stroke patients in a motor-imagery neurofeedback paradigm. In addition, electrophysiological correlates of psychophysiological responses provide us with valuable information

  10. controlling the motor by means of PC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachman Martin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article familiarise its readers with possibilities of motor control, measuring frequency and transient characteristics on Yaskawa Motor in laboratory conditions using Matlab – Simulink software and its Real Time Target toolbox. Using the Real Time Target toolbox along with MF624 I/O card, we are able to capture, store and submit information on state variables of the motor in real time. The manufacturer of Yaskawa motors does not provide with information about frequency and transient characteristics of current, speed or position loops. In order to verify the mathematical model, it is necessary to measure these characteristics on a specific motor type and use the obtained results to recalculate amplification of individual controllers by means of the mathematical model. Adjusting the current controller is not possible, since the values are fixed by the manufacturer. The manufacturer allows the user of the current controller to choose from 10 pre-set values (from the „softest“ to the „most stiff“. By making the model more accurate, we may perform simulations of various load states that are approaching real ones.

  11. Electroencephalographic Motor Imagery Brain Connectivity Analysis for BCI: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Mahyar; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Noor, Alias Mohd

    2016-06-01

    Recent research has reached a consensus on the feasibility of motor imagery brain-computer interface (MI-BCI) for different applications, especially in stroke rehabilitation. Most MI-BCI systems rely on temporal, spectral, and spatial features of single channels to distinguish different MI patterns. However, no successful communication has been established for a completely locked-in subject. To provide more useful and informative features, it has been recommended to take into account the relationships among electroencephalographic (EEG) sensor/source signals in the form of brain connectivity as an efficient tool of neuroscience. In this review, we briefly report the challenges and limitations of conventional MI-BCIs. Brain connectivity analysis, particularly functional and effective, has been described as one of the most promising approaches for improving MI-BCI performance. An extensive literature on EEG-based MI brain connectivity analysis of healthy subjects is reviewed. We subsequently discuss the brain connectomes during left and right hand, feet, and tongue MI movements. Moreover, key components involved in brain connectivity analysis that considerably affect the results are explained. Finally, possible technical shortcomings that may have influenced the results in previous research are addressed and suggestions are provided.

  12. High-temperature brushless DC motor controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieslewski, Crzegorz; Lindblom, Scott C.; Maldonado, Frank J.; Eckert, Michael Nathan

    2017-05-16

    A motor control system for deployment in high temperature environments includes a controller; a first half-bridge circuit that includes a first high-side switching element and a first low-side switching element; a second half-bridge circuit that includes a second high-side switching element and a second low-side switching element; and a third half-bridge circuit that includes a third high-side switching element and a third; low-side switching element. The motor controller is arranged to apply a pulse width modulation (PWM) scheme to switch the first half-bridge circuit, second half-bridge circuit, and third half-bridge circuit to power a motor.

  13. Using a hybrid brain computer interface and virtual reality system to monitor and promote cortical reorganization through motor activity and motor imagery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez i Badia, S; García Morgade, A; Samaha, H; Verschure, P F M J

    2013-03-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of adult disability with high economical and societal costs. In recent years, novel rehabilitation paradigms have been proposed to address the life-long plasticity of the brain to regain motor function. We propose a hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI)-virtual reality (VR) system that combines a personalized motor training in a VR environment, exploiting brain mechanisms for action execution and observation, and a neuro-feedback paradigm using mental imagery as a way to engage secondary or indirect pathways to access undamaged cortico-spinal tracts. Furthermore, we present the development and validation experiments of the proposed system. More specifically, EEG data on nine naïve healthy subjects show that a simultaneous motor activity and motor imagery paradigm is more effective at engaging cortical motor areas and related networks to a larger extent. Additionally, we propose a motor imagery driven BCI-VR version of our system that was evaluated with nine different healthy subjects. Data show that users are capable of controlling a virtual avatar in a motor imagery training task that dynamically adjusts its difficulty to the capabilities of the user. User self-report questionnaires indicate enjoyment and acceptance of the proposed system.

  14. A quantitative meta-analysis and review of motor learning in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Robert M.; Rottschy, Claudia; Miall, R. Chris; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have improved our understanding of which brain structures are involved in motor learning. Despite this, questions remain regarding the areas that contribute consistently across paradigms with different task demands. For instance, sensorimotor tasks focus on learning novel movement kinematics and dynamics, while serial response time task (SRTT) variants focus on sequence learning. These differing task demands are likely to elicit quantifiably different patterns of neural activity on top of a potentially consistent core network. The current study identified consistent activations across 70 motor learning experiments using activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis. A global analysis of all tasks revealed a bilateral cortical–subcortical network consistently underlying motor learning across tasks. Converging activations were revealed in the dorsal premotor cortex, supplementary motor cortex, primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, superior parietal lobule, thalamus, putamen and cerebellum. These activations were broadly consistent across task specific analyses that separated sensorimotor tasks and SRTT variants. Contrast analysis indicated that activity in the basal ganglia and cerebellum was significantly stronger for sensorimotor tasks, while activity in cortical structures and the thalamus was significantly stronger for SRTT variants. Additional conjunction analyses then indicated that the left dorsal premotor cortex was activated across all analyses considered, even when controlling for potential motor confounds. The highly consistent activation of the left dorsal premotor cortex suggests it is a critical node in the motor learning network. PMID:23194819

  15. Motor Skill Acquisition Promotes Human Brain Myelin Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimal Lakhani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience-dependent structural changes are widely evident in gray matter. Using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, the neuroplastic effect of motor training on white matter in the brain has been demonstrated. However, in humans it is not known whether specific features of white matter relate to motor skill acquisition or if these structural changes are associated to functional network connectivity. Myelin can be objectively quantified in vivo and used to index specific experience-dependent change. In the current study, seventeen healthy young adults completed ten sessions of visuomotor skill training (10,000 total movements using the right arm. Multicomponent relaxation imaging was performed before and after training. Significant increases in myelin water fraction, a quantitative measure of myelin, were observed in task dependent brain regions (left intraparietal sulcus [IPS] and left parieto-occipital sulcus. In addition, the rate of motor skill acquisition and overall change in myelin water fraction in the left IPS were negatively related, suggesting that a slower rate of learning resulted in greater neuroplastic change. This study provides the first evidence for experience-dependent changes in myelin that are associated with changes in skilled movements in healthy young adults.

  16. Sliding Mode Control of Induction Motor Phase Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, R.B.; Hattel, T.; Bork, J

    1995-01-01

    Sliding mode control of induction motor phase currents are investigated through development of two control concepts.......Sliding mode control of induction motor phase currents are investigated through development of two control concepts....

  17. Field oriented control of induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Linda M.; Zinger, Don S.; Roth, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    Induction motors have always been known for their simple rugged construction, but until lately were not suitable for variable speed or servo drives due to the inherent complexity of the controls. With the advent of field oriented control (FOC), however, the induction motor has become an attractive option for these types of drive systems. An FOC system which utilizes the pulse population modulation method to synthesize the motor drive frequencies is examined. This system allows for a variable voltage to frequency ratio and enables the user to have independent control of both the speed and torque of an induction motor. A second generation of the control boards were developed and tested with the next point of focus being the minimization of the size and complexity of these controls. Many options were considered with the best approach being the use of a digital signal processor (DSP) due to its inherent ability to quickly evaluate control algorithms. The present test results of the system and the status of the optimization process using a DSP are discussed.

  18. Lost for emotion words: What motor and limbic brain activity reveals about autism and semantic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Rachel L.; Shtyrov, Yury; Mohr, Bettina; Lombardo, Michael V.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are characterised by deficits in understanding and expressing emotions and are frequently accompanied by alexithymia, a difficulty in understanding and expressing emotion words. Words are differentially represented in the brain according to their semantic category and these difficulties in ASC predict reduced activation to emotion-related words in limbic structures crucial for affective processing. Semantic theories view ‘emotion actions’ as critical for learning the semantic relationship between a word and the emotion it describes, such that emotion words typically activate the cortical motor systems involved in expressing emotion actions such as facial expressions. As ASC are also characterised by motor deficits and atypical brain structure and function in these regions, motor structures would also be expected to show reduced activation during emotion-semantic processing. Here we used event-related fMRI to compare passive processing of emotion words in comparison to abstract verbs and animal names in typically-developing controls and individuals with ASC. Relatively reduced brain activation in ASC for emotion words, but not matched control words, was found in motor areas and cingulate cortex specifically. The degree of activation evoked by emotion words in the motor system was also associated with the extent of autistic traits as revealed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient. We suggest that hypoactivation of motor and limbic regions for emotion word processing may underlie difficulties in processing emotional language in ASC. The role that sensorimotor systems and their connections might play in the affective and social-communication difficulties in ASC is discussed. PMID:25278250

  19. Brain versus Machine Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Carmena

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Octopus, the villain of the movie "Spiderman 2", is a fusion of man and machine. Neuroscientist Jose Carmena examines the facts behind this fictional account of a brain- machine interface

  20. Laterality of brain activity during motor imagery is modulated by the provision of source level neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boe, Shaun; Gionfriddo, Alicia; Kraeutner, Sarah; Tremblay, Antoine; Little, Graham; Bardouille, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    Motor imagery (MI) may be effective as an adjunct to physical practice for motor skill acquisition. For example, MI is emerging as an effective treatment in stroke neurorehabilitation. As in physical practice, the repetitive activation of neural pathways during MI can drive short- and long-term brain changes that underlie functional recovery. However, the lack of feedback about MI performance may be a factor limiting its effectiveness. The provision of feedback about MI-related brain activity may overcome this limitation by providing the opportunity for individuals to monitor their own performance of this endogenous process. We completed a controlled study to isolate neurofeedback as the factor driving changes in MI-related brain activity across repeated sessions. Eighteen healthy participants took part in 3 sessions comprised of both actual and imagined performance of a button press task. During MI, participants in the neurofeedback group received source level feedback based on activity from the left and right sensorimotor cortex obtained using magnetoencephalography. Participants in the control group received no neurofeedback. MI-related brain activity increased in the sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the imagined movement across sessions in the neurofeedback group, but not in controls. Task performance improved across sessions but did not differ between groups. Our results indicate that the provision of neurofeedback during MI allows healthy individuals to modulate regional brain activity. This finding has the potential to improve the effectiveness of MI as a tool in neurorehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined EEG-fNIRS Decoding of Motor Attempt and Imagery for Brain Switch Control: An Offline Study in Patients With Tetraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokland, Y.M.; Spyrou, L.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Eijsvogels, T.M.; Colier, W.N.; Floor-Westerdijk, M.; Vlek, R.; Bruhn, J.; Farquhar, J.D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Combining electrophysiological and hemodynamic features is a novel approach for improving current performance of brain switches based on sensorimotor rhythms (SMR). This study was conducted with a dual purpose: to test the feasibility of using a combined electroencephalogram/functional near-infrared

  2. Combined EEG-fNIRS decoding of motor attempt and imagery for brain switch control: an offline study in patients with tetraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokland, Y.M.; Spyrou, L.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Colier, W.N.J.M.; Floor-Westerdijk, M.J.; Vlek, R.J.; Bruhn, J.; Farquhar, J.D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Combining electrophysiological and hemodynamic features is a novel approach for improving current performance of brain switches based on sensorimotor rhythms (SMR). This study was conducted with a dual purpose: to test the feasibility of using a combined electroencephalogram/functional near-infrared

  3. Control system for bearingless motor-generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kascak, Peter E. (Inventor); Jansen, Ralph H. (Inventor); Dever, Timothy P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A control system for an electromagnetic rotary drive for bearingless motor-generators comprises a winding configuration comprising a plurality of individual pole pairs through which phase current flows, each phase current producing both a lateral force and a torque. A motor-generator comprises a stator, a rotor supported for movement relative to the stator, and a control system. The motor-generator comprises a winding configuration supported by the stator. The winding configuration comprises at least three pole pairs through which phase current flows resulting in three three-phase systems. Each phase system has a first rotor reference frame axis current that produces a levitating force with no average torque and a second rotor reference frame axis current that produces torque.

  4. Brain transcranial direct current stimulation modulates motor excitability in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiaghi, Marco; Velikova, Svetla; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier J; Cursi, Marco; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2010-02-01

    Shortly after the application of weak transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the animal and human brain, changes in corticospinal excitability, which mainly depend on polarity, duration and current density of the stimulation protocol, have been reported. In humans, anodal tDCS has been reported to enhance motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial brain stimulation while cathodal tDCS has been shown to decrease them. Here we investigated the effects produced by tDCS on mice motor cortex. MEPs evoked by transcranial electric stimulation were recorded from forelimbs of 12 C57BL/6 mice, under sevofluorane anaesthesia, before and after (0, 5 and 10 min) anodal and cathodal tDCS (tDCS duration 10 min). With respect to sham condition stimulation (anaesthesia), MEP size was significantly increased immediately after anodal tDCS, and was reduced after cathodal tDCS (approximately 20% vs. sham). Both effects declined towards basal levels in the following 10 min. Although the site and mechanisms of action of tDCS need to be more clearly identified, the directionality of effects of tDCS on mice MEPs is consistent with previous findings in humans. The feasibility of tDCS in mice suggests the potential applicability of this technique to assess the potential therapeutic options of brain polarization in animal models of neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases.

  5. [Effects of motor activity on cognitive performance of patients with traumatic brain injury during dual tasking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Useros-Olmo, A I; Perianez, J A; Miangolarra-Page, J C

    2015-09-01

    The use of dual task paradigms has revealed behavioural interactions between certain motor tasks, like standing or walking, and cognitive tasks when performed simultaneously. Despite the potential relevance of these findings accounting for certain neurological symptoms (i.e., falls), or for the design of new therapeutic interventions, there is few information available about such interaction effects in traumatic brain injury (TBI). To assess the presence of cognitive-motor interactions during dual tasking in TBI patients. Twenty TBI patients and 19 healthy matched controls performed two attentional and two working memory tasks (simple reaction times, complex reaction times, 1-back numeric, 1-back spatial) during dual task conditions, that is, at the same time than one motor task (standing and walking), and during single task conditions (without a motor task). Reaction times were recorded in response to all cognitive tasks. Patients exhibit slower performance than controls in all cognitive tasks (p cognitive-motor interactions during simultaneous execution of motor-working memory tasks in TBI patients are discussed, as well as the potential therapeutic value of dual task paradigms in the rehabilitation of these patients.

  6. Embedded Based DC Motor Speed Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar T.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available An embedded based DC motor speed control system using cygnal microcontroller (C8051F020 has been designed and developed. It is based on frequency domain technique. The principle is opto-coupler senses the speed of the motor in the form of TTL pulses, which is given to F/V (frequency to voltage converter. The output of the F/V converter voltage is fed to an inbuilt 12-bit ADC of cygnal microcontroller. The converted digital value applied in Liner equitation for converting back to frequency and speed is displayed on two lines LCD in RPM. Microcontroller is applied for PID control action to correct error in the form of voltage to the motor through built-in 12-bit D/A converter, PWM circuit, and actuator. The present study discusses the design, development, fabrication, and analysis of cygnal microcontroller based PID logic controller for DC motor speed control systems. Software is developed in ‘C’ language using Si-Lab IDE C-cross compiler. The paper deals with the hardware and software details.

  7. Similar brain networks for detecting visuo-motor and visuo-proprioceptive synchrony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Å; Ellegaard Lund, Torben

    2006-01-01

    The ability to recognize feedback from own movement as opposed to the movement of someone else is important for motor control and social interaction. The neural processes involved in feedback recognition are incompletely understood. Two competing hypotheses have been proposed: the stimulus....... However, no statistically significant difference was found between these sets of activated areas when the active and passive movement conditions were compared. With a posterior probability of 0.95, no brain voxel had a contrast effect above 0.11% of the whole-brain mean signal. These results do...

  8. Similar brain networks for detecting visuo-motor and visuo-propriceptive synchrony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Årup; Lund, Torben Ellegaard

    2006-01-01

    The ability to recognize feedback from own movement as opposed to the movement of someone else is important for motor control and social interaction. The neural processes involved in feedback recognition are incompletely understood. Two competing hypotheses have been proposed: the stimulus....... However, no statistically significant difference was found between these sets of activated areas when the active and passive movement conditions were compared. With a posterior probability of 0.95, no brain voxel had a contrast effect above 0.11% of the whole-brain mean signal. These results do...

  9. Motor control by precisely timed spike patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Kyle H; Holmes, Caroline M; Vellema, Michiel

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how sequences of action potentials ("spikes") encode information about sensory signals and motor outputs. Although traditional theories assume that this information is conveyed by the total number of spikes fired within a specified time...... that the nervous system uses millisecond-scale variations in the timing of spikes within multispike patterns to control a vertebrate behavior-namely, respiration in the Bengalese finch, a songbird. These findings suggest that a fundamental assumption of current theories of motor coding requires revision....

  10. The motor cortical representation of a muscle is not homogeneous in brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jo Armour; Albishi, Alaa; Babikian, Sarine; Asavasopon, Skulpan; Fisher, Beth E; Kutch, Jason J

    2017-09-01

    Functional connectivity patterns of the motor cortical representational area of single muscles have not been extensively mapped in humans, particularly for the axial musculature. Functional connectivity may provide a neural substrate for adaptation of muscle activity in axial muscles that have both voluntary and postural functions. The purpose of this study was to combine brain stimulation and neuroimaging to both map the cortical representation of the external oblique (EO) in primary motor cortex (M1) and supplementary motor area (SMA), and to establish the resting-state functional connectivity associated with this representation. Motor-evoked potentials were elicited from the EO muscle in stimulation locations encompassing M1 and SMA. The coordinates of locations with the largest motor-evoked potentials were confirmed with task-based fMRI imaging during EO activation. The M1 and SMA components of the EO representation demonstrated significantly different resting-state functional connectivity with other brain regions: the SMA representation of the EO muscle was significantly more connected to the putamen and cerebellum, and the M1 representation of the EO muscle was significantly more connected to somatosensory cortex and the superior parietal lobule. This study confirms the representation of a human axial muscle in M1 and SMA, and demonstrates for the first time that different parts of the cortical representation of a human axial muscle have resting-state functional connectivity with distinct brain regions. Future studies can use the brain regions of interest we have identified here to test the association between resting-state functional connectivity and control of the axial muscles.

  11. Mechanosensation and Adaptive Motor Control in Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, John C; Wilson, Rachel I

    2016-10-24

    The ability of animals to flexibly navigate through complex environments depends on the integration of sensory information with motor commands. The sensory modality most tightly linked to motor control is mechanosensation. Adaptive motor control depends critically on an animal's ability to respond to mechanical forces generated both within and outside the body. The compact neural circuits of insects provide appealing systems to investigate how mechanical cues guide locomotion in rugged environments. Here, we review our current understanding of mechanosensation in insects and its role in adaptive motor control. We first examine the detection and encoding of mechanical forces by primary mechanoreceptor neurons. We then discuss how central circuits integrate and transform mechanosensory information to guide locomotion. Because most studies in this field have been performed in locusts, cockroaches, crickets, and stick insects, the examples we cite here are drawn mainly from these 'big insects'. However, we also pay particular attention to the tiny fruit fly, Drosophila, where new tools are creating new opportunities, particularly for understanding central circuits. Our aim is to show how studies of big insects have yielded fundamental insights relevant to mechanosensation in all animals, and also to point out how the Drosophila toolkit can contribute to future progress in understanding mechanosensory processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Arm coordination in octopus crawling involves unique motor control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Guy; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2015-05-04

    To cope with the exceptional computational complexity that is involved in the control of its hyper-redundant arms [1], the octopus has adopted unique motor control strategies in which the central brain activates rather autonomous motor programs in the elaborated peripheral nervous system of the arms [2, 3]. How octopuses coordinate their eight long and flexible arms in locomotion is still unknown. Here, we present the first detailed kinematic analysis of octopus arm coordination in crawling. The results are surprising in several respects: (1) despite its bilaterally symmetrical body, the octopus can crawl in any direction relative to its body orientation; (2) body and crawling orientation are monotonically and independently controlled; and (3) contrasting known animal locomotion, octopus crawling lacks any apparent rhythmical patterns in limb coordination, suggesting a unique non-rhythmical output of the octopus central controller. We show that this uncommon maneuverability is derived from the radial symmetry of the arms around the body and the simple pushing-by-elongation mechanism by which the arms create the crawling thrust. These two together enable a mechanism whereby the central controller chooses in a moment-to-moment fashion which arms to recruit for pushing the body in an instantaneous direction. Our findings suggest that the soft molluscan body has affected in an embodied way [4, 5] the emergence of the adaptive motor behavior of the octopus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. control of a dc motor using fuzzy logic control algorithm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This study sought to establish the impact of a fuzzy logic controller (FLC) and a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller in the control performance of an industrial type DC motor using MATLAB. The fuzzy logic controller was developed on the basis of Mamdani type fuzzy inference system (FIS). The centroid method ...

  14. Posterior–Anterior Brain Maturation Reflected in Perceptual, Motor and Cognitive Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Gerván

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on several postmortem morphometric and in vivo imaging studies it has been postulated that brain maturation roughly follows a caudal to rostral direction. In this study, we linked this maturational pattern to psychological function employing a series of well-established behavioral tasks. We addressed three distinct functions and brain regions with a perceptual (contour integration, CI, motor (finger tapping, FT, and executive control (Navon global–local task. Our purpose was to investigate basic visual integration functions relying on primary visual cortex (V1 in CI; motor coordination function related to primary motor cortex (M1 in FT, and the executive control component, switching, related to the dorsolateral prefrontal region of the brain in the Navon task. 122 volunteer subjects were recruited to participate in this study between the ages of 10 and 20 (females n = 63, males n = 59. Employing conventional statistical methods, we found that 10 and 12 year olds are performing significantly weaker than 20 year olds in all three tasks. In the CI and Navon global–local tasks, even 14 years old perform poorer than adults. We have also investigated the developmental trajectories by fitting sigmoid curves on our data streams. The analysis of the developmental trajectories of the three tasks showed a posterior to anterior pattern in the emergence of the developmental functions with the earliest development in the visual CI task (V1, followed by motor development in the FT task (M1, and cognitive development as measured in the Navon global–local task (DLPC being the slowest. Gender difference was also present in FT task showing an earlier maturation for girls in the motor domain.

  15. Motor-Evoked Potential Confirmation of Functional Improvement by Transplanted Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell in the Ischemic Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Kyu Jang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs on the motor pathway in the transient ischemic rat brain that were transplanted through the carotid artery, measuring motor-evoked potential (MEP in the four limbs muscle and the atlantooccipital membrane, which was elicited after monopolar and bipolar transcortical stimulation. After monopolar stimulation, the latency of MEP was significantly prolonged, and the amplitude was less reduced in the BMSC group in comparison with the control group (<.05. MEPs induced by bipolar stimulation in the left forelimb could be measured in 40% of the BMSC group and the I wave that was not detected in the control group was also detected in 40% of the BMSC group. Our preliminary results imply that BMSCs transplanted to the ischemic rat brain mediate effects on the functional recovery of the cerebral motor cortex and the motor pathway.

  16. The emulation theory of representation: motor control, imagery, and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grush, Rick

    2004-06-01

    The emulation theory of representation is developed and explored as a framework that can revealingly synthesize a wide variety of representational functions of the brain. The framework is based on constructs from control theory (forward models) and signal processing (Kalman filters). The idea is that in addition to simply engaging with the body and environment, the brain constructs neural circuits that act as models of the body and environment. During overt sensorimotor engagement, these models are driven by efference copies in parallel with the body and environment, in order to provide expectations of the sensory feedback, and to enhance and process sensory information. These models can also be run off-line in order to produce imagery, estimate outcomes of different actions, and evaluate and develop motor plans. The framework is initially developed within the context of motor control, where it has been shown that inner models running in parallel with the body can reduce the effects of feedback delay problems. The same mechanisms can account for motor imagery as the off-line driving of the emulator via efference copies. The framework is extended to account for visual imagery as the off-line driving of an emulator of the motor-visual loop. I also show how such systems can provide for amodal spatial imagery. Perception, including visual perception, results from such models being used to form expectations of, and to interpret, sensory input. I close by briefly outlining other cognitive functions that might also be synthesized within this framework, including reasoning, theory of mind phenomena, and language.

  17. Microcontroller Based Closed Loop PMDC Motor Position Control System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Subrata Chattopadhyay; Utpal Chakraborty; Arindam Bhakta; Sagarika Pal

    2009-01-01

    .... Controlling the duty cycle of the PWM signals has been implemented by microcontroller as equivalent to controlling the motor terminal voltage, which in turn adjusts directly the motor rotational movement...

  18. Repetitive peripheral magnetic neurostimulation of multifidus muscles combined with motor training influences spine motor control and chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massé-Alarie, Hugo; Beaulieu, Louis-David; Preuss, Richard; Schneider, Cyril

    2017-03-01

    The study tested whether combining repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (RPMS) and motor training of the superficial multifidus muscle (MF) better improved the corticomotor control of spine than training alone in chronic low back pain (CLBP). Twenty-one participants with CLBP were randomly allocated to [RPMS+training] and [Sham+training] groups for three sessions (S1-S3) over a week where MF was stimulated before training (volitional contraction). Training was also home-practiced twice a day. Changes were tested at S1 and S3 for anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) of MF and semi-tendinosus (ST), MF EMG activation, cortical motor plasticity (transcranial magnetic stimulation) and pain/disability. The RPMS group showed immediate decrease of pain at S1, then improvement of MF activation, ST APA, M1 facilitation, and pain/disability at S3. Changes were larger when brain excitability was lower at baseline. Disability index remained improved one month later. Combining RPMS with training of MF in CLBP impacted motor planning, MF and lumbopelvic spine motor control and pain/disability one week after the onset of protocol. Brain plasticity might have favoured motor learning and improved daily lumbopelvic spine control without pain generation. Clinically, RPMS impacted the function by improving the gains beyond those reached by training alone in CLBP. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Artificial Intelligent Controller for a DC Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavari, Hadi; Ranjbar Noiey, Abolzafl; Minagar, Sara

    The Speed and position control of DC motors is addressed in this paper. An optimal intelligent control scheme is proposed for the system. Preliminary a PID controller is designed using Genetic Algorithms (GA). The proposed controller is implemented by using optimal integral state feedback control with GA and Kalman filter. In the proposed scheme, performance depends on choosing weighting matrices Q and R in the cost function, and accordingly GA is used to find these proper weighting matrices. In order to reduce the control performance degradation due to system parameters variation, a Kalman filter is gained. The performance of the proposed technique (ISF) is compared with PID controller. Computer simulation validates the effectiveness of the proposed scheme even in presence of uncertainties.

  20. Brain Connectomics' Modification to Clarify Motor and Nonmotor Features of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Laura; Mancini, Matteo; Silvestri, Gabriella; Petrucci, Antonio; Masciullo, Marcella; Spanò, Barbara; Torso, Mario; Mastropasqua, Chiara; Giacanelli, Manlio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara; Meola, Giovanni; Bozzali, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The adult form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) presents with paradoxical inconsistencies between severity of brain damage, relative preservation of cognition, and failure in everyday life. This study, based on the assessment of brain connectivity and mechanisms of plasticity, aimed at reconciling these conflicting issues. Resting-state functional MRI and graph theoretical methods of analysis were used to assess brain topological features in a large cohort of patients with DM1. Patients, compared to controls, revealed reduced connectivity in a large frontoparietal network that correlated with their isolated impairment in visuospatial reasoning. Despite a global preservation of the topological properties, peculiar patterns of frontal disconnection and increased parietal-cerebellar connectivity were also identified in patients' brains. The balance between loss of connectivity and compensatory mechanisms in different brain networks might explain the paradoxical mismatch between structural brain damage and minimal cognitive deficits observed in these patients. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of brain abnormalities that fit well with both motor and nonmotor clinical features experienced by patients in their everyday life. The current findings suggest that measures of functional connectivity may offer the possibility of characterizing individual patients with the potential to become a clinical tool.

  1. Brain Connectomics’ Modification to Clarify Motor and Nonmotor Features of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Serra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adult form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 presents with paradoxical inconsistencies between severity of brain damage, relative preservation of cognition, and failure in everyday life. This study, based on the assessment of brain connectivity and mechanisms of plasticity, aimed at reconciling these conflicting issues. Resting-state functional MRI and graph theoretical methods of analysis were used to assess brain topological features in a large cohort of patients with DM1. Patients, compared to controls, revealed reduced connectivity in a large frontoparietal network that correlated with their isolated impairment in visuospatial reasoning. Despite a global preservation of the topological properties, peculiar patterns of frontal disconnection and increased parietal-cerebellar connectivity were also identified in patients’ brains. The balance between loss of connectivity and compensatory mechanisms in different brain networks might explain the paradoxical mismatch between structural brain damage and minimal cognitive deficits observed in these patients. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of brain abnormalities that fit well with both motor and nonmotor clinical features experienced by patients in their everyday life. The current findings suggest that measures of functional connectivity may offer the possibility of characterizing individual patients with the potential to become a clinical tool.

  2. DC motors and servo-motors controlled by Raspberry Pi 2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šustek Michal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The expanding capabilities of today’s microcontrollers and other devices lead to an increased utilization of these technologies in diverse fields. The automation and issue of remote control of moving objects belong to these fields. In this project, a microcontroller Raspberry Pi 2B was chosen for controlling DC motors and servo-motors. This paper provides basic insight into issue of controlling DC motors and servo-motors, connection between Raspberry and other components on breadboard and programming syntaxes for controlling motors in Python programming language.

  3. Cognitive-motor dysfunction after severe traumatic brain injury: A cerebral interhemispheric disconnection syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchook, Adam D; Porges, Eric C; Nadeau, Stephen E; Leon, Susan A; Williamson, John B; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    In most right-handed people, the left hemisphere is dominant for programming the temporal and spatial "how" (praxis) aspects of purposeful skilled movements, and the right hemisphere is dominant for control of the intentional "when" aspects of actions that mediate initiation, persistence, termination, and inhibition. Since the interhemispheric axons of the corpus callosum are especially susceptible to shearing from torsional forces during traumatic brain injury (TBI), the goal of this study was to learn whether participants with a history of severe traumatic brain injury demonstrate three types of cognitive-motor impairments that may result from callosal injury: ideomotor apraxia of the left hand, limb kinetic apraxia of the left hand, and hypokinesia of the right hand in response to left hemispatial stimuli. Nine participants with severe TBI and nine healthy control participants were studied for the presence of ideomotor apraxia, limb kinetic apraxia, and hypokinesia. When compared to the control participants, the participants with TBI revealed ideomotor apraxia and limb kinetic apraxia of the left hand and hypokinesia in response to left-sided visual stimuli when tested with the right hand. TBI appears to cause unilateral disorders of cognitive-motor functions. Future research is needed to understand how these cognitive-motor disorders are related to interhemispheric disconnection most likely induced by injury to the corpus callosum.

  4. The Development of Oral Motor Control and Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Katie

    2006-01-01

    Motor control has long been associated with language skill, in deficits, both acquired and developmental, and in typical development. Most evidence comes from limb praxis however; the link between oral motor control and speech and language has been neglected, despite the fact that most language users talk with their mouths. Oral motor control is…

  5. Learned EEG-based brain self-regulation of motor-related oscillations during application of transcranial electric brain stimulation: Feasibility and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soekadar, S.R.; Witkowski, M.; Garcia Cossio, E.; Birbaumer, N.; Cohen, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) improves motor learning and can affect emotional processing and attention. However, it is unclear whether learned electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-machine interface (BMI) control during tDCS is feasible, how application of

  6. The development of oral motor control and language.

    OpenAIRE

    Alcock, Katherine Jane

    2006-01-01

    Motor control has long been associated with language skill, in deficits, both acquired and developmental, and in typical development. Most evidence comes from limb praxis however; the link between oral motor control and speech and language has been neglected, despite the fact that most language users talk with their mouths. Oral motor control is affected in a variety of developmental disorders, including Down syndrome. However, its development is poorly understood. We investigated oral motor ...

  7. Permanent magnet brushless DC motor drives and controls

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Chang-liang

    2012-01-01

    An advanced introduction to the simulation and hardware implementation of BLDC motor drives A thorough reference on the simulation and hardware implementation of BLDC motor drives, this book covers recent advances in the control of BLDC motor drives, including intelligent control, sensorless control, torque ripple reduction and hardware implementation. With the guidance of the expert author team, readers will understand the principle, modelling, design and control of BLDC motor drives. The advanced control methods and new achievements of BLDC motor drives, of interest to more a

  8. Enhancing Hebbian Learning to Control Brain Oscillatory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekadar, Surjo R; Witkowski, Matthias; Birbaumer, Niels; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2015-09-01

    Sensorimotor rhythms (SMR, 8-15 Hz) are brain oscillations associated with successful motor performance, imagery, and imitation. Voluntary modulation of SMR can be used to control brain-machine interfaces (BMI) in the absence of any physical movements. The mechanisms underlying acquisition of such skill are unknown. Here, we provide evidence for a causal link between function of the primary motor cortex (M1), active during motor skill learning and retention, and successful acquisition of abstract skills such as control over SMR. Thirty healthy participants were trained on 5 consecutive days to control SMR oscillations. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of 3 groups that received either 20 min of anodal, cathodal, or sham transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over M1. Learning SMR control across training days was superior in the anodal tDCS group relative to the other 2. Cathodal tDCS blocked the beneficial effects of training, as evidenced with sham tDCS. One month later, the newly acquired skill remained superior in the anodal tDCS group. Thus, application of weak electric currents of opposite polarities over M1 differentially modulates learning SMR control, pointing to this primary cortical region as a common substrate for acquisition of physical motor skills and learning to control brain oscillatory activity. Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Neuron-specific caveolin-1 overexpression improves motor function and preserves memory in mice subjected to brain trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Junji; Schilling, Jan M; Cui, Weihua; Posadas, Edmund; Sawada, Atsushi; Alas, Basheer; Zemljic-Harpf, Alice E; Fannon-Pavlich, McKenzie J; Mandyam, Chitra D; Roth, David M; Patel, Hemal H; Patel, Piyush M; Head, Brian P

    2017-08-01

    Studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that membrane/lipid rafts and caveolin (Cav) organize progrowth receptors, and, when overexpressed specifically in neurons, Cav-1 augments neuronal signaling and growth and improves cognitive function in adult and aged mice; however, whether neuronal Cav-1 overexpression can preserve motor and cognitive function in the brain trauma setting is unknown. Here, we generated a neuron-targeted Cav-1-overexpressing transgenic (Tg) mouse [synapsin-driven Cav-1 (SynCav1 Tg)] and subjected it to a controlled cortical impact model of brain trauma and measured biochemical, anatomic, and behavioral changes. SynCav1 Tg mice exhibited increased hippocampal expression of Cav-1 and membrane/lipid raft localization of postsynaptic density protein 95, NMDA receptor, and tropomyosin receptor kinase B. When subjected to a controlled cortical impact, SynCav1 Tg mice demonstrated preserved hippocampus-dependent fear learning and memory, improved motor function recovery, and decreased brain lesion volume compared with wild-type controls. Neuron-targeted overexpression of Cav-1 in the adult brain prevents hippocampus-dependent learning and memory deficits, restores motor function after brain trauma, and decreases brain lesion size induced by trauma. Our findings demonstrate that neuron-targeted Cav-1 can be used as a novel therapeutic strategy to restore brain function and prevent trauma-associated maladaptive plasticity.-Egawa, J., Schilling, J. M., Cui, W., Posadas, E., Sawada, A., Alas, B., Zemljic-Harpf, A. E., Fannon-Pavlich, M. J., Mandyam, C. D., Roth, D. M., Patel, H. H., Patel, P. M., Head, B. P. Neuron-specific caveolin-1 overexpression improves motor function and preserves memory in mice subjected to brain trauma. © FASEB.

  10. AMPA receptor-induced local brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling mediates motor recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Andrew N; Overman, Justine J; Zhong, Sheng; Mueller, Rudolf; Lynch, Gary; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2011-03-09

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Recovery after stroke shares similar molecular and cellular properties with learning and memory. A main component of learning-induced plasticity involves signaling through AMPA receptors (AMPARs). We systematically tested the role of AMPAR function in motor recovery in a mouse model of focal stroke. AMPAR function controls functional recovery beginning 5 d after the stroke. Positive allosteric modulators of AMPARs enhance recovery of limb control when administered after a delay from the stroke. Conversely, AMPAR antagonists impair motor recovery. The contributions of AMPARs to recovery are mediated by release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in periinfarct cortex, as blocking local BDNF function in periinfarct cortex blocks AMPAR-mediated recovery and prevents the normal pattern of motor recovery. In contrast to a delayed AMPAR role in motor recovery, early administration of AMPAR agonists after stroke increases stroke damage. These findings indicate that the role of glutamate signaling through the AMPAR changes over time in stroke: early potentiation of AMPAR signaling worsens stroke damage, whereas later potentiation of the same signaling system improves functional recovery.

  11. Non-invasive brain stimulation of motor cortex induces embodiment when integrated with virtual reality feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassolino, M; Franza, M; Bello Ruiz, J; Pinardi, M; Schmidlin, T; Stephan, M A; Solca, M; Serino, A; Blanke, O

    2018-02-20

    Previous evidence highlighted the multisensory-motor origin of embodiment - i.e., the experience of having a body and of being in control of it- and the possibility of experimentally manipulating it. For instance, an illusory feeling of embodiment towards a fake hand can be triggered by providing synchronous visuo-tactile stimulation to the hand of participants and to a fake hand or by asking participants to move their hand and observe a fake hand moving accordingly (rubber hand illusion, RHI). Here we tested whether it is possible to manipulate embodiment not through stimulation of the participant's hand, but by directly tapping into the brain's hand representation via non-invasive brain stimulation. To this aim, we combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to activate the hand corticospinal representation with virtual reality (VR) to provide matching (as contrasted to non-matching) visual feedback, mimicking involuntary hand movements evoked by TMS. We show that the illusory embodiment occurred when TMS pulses were temporally matched with VR feedback, but not when TMS was administered outside primary motor cortex, (M1, over the vertex) or when stimulating M1 at a lower intensity (that did not activate peripheral muscles). Behavioral (questionnaires) and neurophysiological (motor-evoked-potentials, TMS-evoked-movements) measures further indicated that embodiment was not explained by stimulation per se, but depended on the temporal coherence between TMS-induced activation of hand corticospinal representation and the virtual bodily feedback. This reveals that non-invasive brain stimulation may replace the application of external tactile hand cues and motor components related to volition, planning, and anticipation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Rethinking motor lateralization: specialized but complementary mechanisms for motor control of each arm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik K Mutha

    Full Text Available Motor lateralization in humans has primarily been characterized as "handedness", resulting in the view that one arm-hemisphere system is specialized for all aspects of movement while the other is simply a weaker analogue. We have proposed an alternative view that motor lateralization reflects proficiency of each arm for complementary functions that arises from a specialization of each hemisphere for distinct movement control mechanisms. However, before this idea of hemispheric specialization can be accepted, it is necessary to precisely identify these distinct, lateralized mechanisms. Here we show in right-handers that dominant arm movements rely on predictive mechanisms that anticipate and account for the dynamic properties of the arm, while the non-dominant arm optimizes positional stability by specifying impedance around equilibrium positions. In a targeted-reaching paradigm, we covertly and occasionally shifted the hand starting location either orthogonal to or collinear with a particular direction of movement. On trials on which the start positions were shifted orthogonally, we did not notice any strong interlimb differences. However, on trials on which start positions were shifted orthogonally, the dominant arm largely maintained the direction and straightness of its trajectory, while the non-dominant arm deviated towards the previously learned goal position, consistent with the hypothesized control specialization of each arm-hemisphere system. These results bring together two competing theories about mechanisms of movement control, and suggest that they coexist in the brain in different hemispheres. These findings also question the traditional view of handedness, because specialized mechanisms for each arm-hemisphere system were identified within a group of right-handers. It is likely that such hemispheric specialization emerged to accommodate increasing motor complexity during evolution.

  13. A centre for accommodative vergence motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D.

    1973-01-01

    Latencies in accommodation, accommodative-vergence, and pupil-diameter responses to changing accommodation stimuli, as well as latencies in pupil response to light-intensity changes were measured. From the information obtained, a block diagram has been derived that uses the least number of blocks for representing the accommodation, accommodative-vergence, and pupil systems. The signal transmission delays over the various circuits of the model have been determined and compared to known experimental physiological-delay data. The results suggest the existence of a motor center that controls the accommodative vergence and is completely independent of the accommodation system.

  14. Brain plasticity in the motor network is correlated with disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poujois, Aurélia; Schneider, Fabien C; Faillenot, Isabelle; Camdessanché, Jean-Philippe; Vandenberghe, Nadia; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Antoine, Jean-Christophe

    2013-10-01

    To test the influence of functional cerebral reorganization in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on disease progression. Nineteen predominantly right-handed ALS patients and 21 controls underwent clinical evaluation, functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), and diffusion tensor imaging. Patients were clinically re-evaluated 1 year later and followed until death. For fMRI, subjects executed and imagined a simple hand-motor task. Between-group comparisons were performed, and correlations were searched with motor deficit arm Medical Research Council (MRC) score, disease progression ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS), and survival time. By the MRC score, the hand strength was lowered by 12% in the ALS group predominating on the right side in accordance with an abnormal fractional anisotropy (FA) limited to the left corticospinal tract (37.3% reduction vs. controls P < 0.01). Compared to controls, patients displayed overactivations in the controlateral parietal (P < 0.004) and somatosensory (P < 0.004) cortex and in the ipsilateral parietal (P < 0.01) and somatosensory (P < 0.01) cortex to right-hand movement. Movement imagination gave similar results while no difference occurred with left-hand tasks. Stepwise regression analysis corrected for multiple comparisons showed that controlateral parietal activity was inversely correlated with disease progression (R(2) = 0.43, P = 0.001) and ipsilateral somatosensory activations with the severity of the right-arm deficit (R(2) = 0.48, P = 0.001). Cortical Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signal changes occur in the brain of ALS patients during a simple hand-motor task when the motor deficit is still moderate. It is correlated with the rate of disease progression suggesting that brain functional rearrangement in ALS may have prognostic implications. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Theobromine up-regulates cerebral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and facilitates motor learning in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Mitsugu; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Katakura, Masanori; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Tanigami, Hayate; Yachie, Akihiro; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako; Shido, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Theobromine, which is a caffeine derivative, is the primary methylxanthine produced by Theobroma cacao. Theobromine works as a phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor to increase intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). cAMP activates the cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), which is involved in a large variety of brain processes, including the induction of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF supports cell survival and neuronal functions, including learning and memory. Thus, cAMP/CREB/BDNF pathways play an important role in learning and memory. Here, we investigated whether orally administered theobromine could act as a PDE inhibitor centrally and affect cAMP/CREB/BDNF pathways and learning behavior in mice. The mice were divided into two groups. The control group (CN) was fed a normal diet, whereas the theobromine group (TB) was fed a diet supplemented with 0.05% theobromine for 30 days. We measured the levels of theobromine, phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (p-VASP), phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB), and BDNF in the brain. p-VASP was used as an index of cAMP increases. Moreover, we analyzed the performance of the mice on a three-lever motor learning task. Theobromine was detectable in the brains of TB mice. The brain levels of p-VASP, p-CREB, and BDNF were higher in the TB mice compared with those in the CN mice. In addition, the TB mice performed better on the three-lever task than the CN mice did. These results strongly suggested that orally administered theobromine acted as a PDE inhibitor in the brain, and it augmented the cAMP/CREB/BDNF pathways and motor learning in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modular control of movement and posture by the corticospinal alpha-gamma motor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si Li; Xin He; Ning Lan

    2014-01-01

    It is widely assumed that neural control of movement is carried out by the a motor system sufficiently. The role of the γ motor system in movement and posture has not been adequately addressed in motor control studies. Here, we propose a modular control model for movement and posture based on propriospinal neuronal (PN) network and spinal α-γ motor system. In the modular control model, the a and γ motor commands are divided into static and dynamic functions. The static commands are specified by the higher center of brain for posture control, and the dynamic commands for movement generation, respectively. Centrally planned kinematics based on the minimal jerk criterion is conveyed to the periphery via the γ motor system, while centrally programmed bi-phasic burst pattern of muscle activation is relayed to a pair of antagonistic muscles through the a motor system via the PN. Results of simulation showed that elbow kinematics and biceps and triceps activations displayed the similar kinematic and EMG features of fast reaching movement in human. This suggests a hypothesis that the α-γ motor systems can achieve modular control of movement and posture in parallel.

  17. Summary of electric vehicle dc motor-controller tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBrien, E F; Tryon, H B

    1982-09-01

    Available performance data for production motors are usually of marginal value to the electric vehicle designer. To provide at least a partial remedy to this situation, tests of typical dc propulsion motors and controllers were conducted as part of the DOE Electric Vehicle Program. The objectives of this program were to evaluate the differences in the performance of dc motors when operating with chopper-type controllers and when operating on direct current; and to gain an understanding of the interactions between the motor and the controller which cause these differences. Toward this end, motor-controller tests performed by the NASA Lewis Research Center provided some of the first published data that quantified motor efficiency variations for both ripple-free (straight dc) and chopper modes of operation. Test and analysis work at the University of Pittsburgh explored motor-controller relationships in greater depth. And to provide additional data, 3E Vehicles tested two small motors, both on a dynamometer and in a vehicle, and the Eaton Corporation tested larger motors, using sophisticated instrumentation and digital processing techniques. All the motors tested were direct-current types. Of the separately excited types, seven were series wound and two were shunt wound. One self-excited permanent magnet type was also tested. Four of the series wound motors used brush shifting to obtain good commutation. In almost all cases, controller limitations constrained the test envelope so that the full capability of the motors could not be explored.

  18. Integrated-Circuit Controller For Brushless dc Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Dong Tuan

    1994-01-01

    Generic circuit performs commutation-logic and power-switching functions for control of brushless dc motor. Controller includes commutation-logic and associated control circuitry, power supply, and inverters containing power transistors. Major advantages of controller are size, weight, and power consumption can be made less than other brushless-dc-motor controllers.

  19. Controller for a High-Power, Brushless dc Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David J.; Makdad, Terence A.

    1987-01-01

    Driving and braking torques controllable. Control circuit operates 7-kW, 45-lb-ft (61-N-m), three-phase, brushless dc motor in both motor and generator modes. In motor modes, energy from power source is pulse-width modulated to motor through modified "H-bridge" circuit, in generator mode, energy from motor is pulse-width modulated into bank of load resistors to provide variable braking torques. Circuit provides high-resolution torque control in both directions over wide range of speeds and torques. Tested successfully at bus voltages up to 200 Vdc and currents up to 45 A.

  20. The effects of voluntary, involuntary, and forced exercises on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and motor function recovery: a rat brain ischemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stroke rehabilitation with different exercise paradigms has been investigated, but which one is more effective in facilitating motor recovery and up-regulating brain neurotrophic factor (BDNF after brain ischemia would be interesting to clinicians and patients. Voluntary exercise, forced exercise, and involuntary muscle movement caused by functional electrical stimulation (FES have been individually demonstrated effective as stroke rehabilitation intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of these three common interventions on brain BDNF changes and motor recovery levels using a rat ischemic stroke model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One hundred and seventeen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly distributed into four groups: Control (Con, Voluntary exercise of wheel running (V-Ex, Forced exercise of treadmill running (F-Ex, and Involuntary exercise of FES (I-Ex with implanted electrodes placed in two hind limb muscles on the affected side to mimic gait-like walking pattern during stimulation. Ischemic stroke was induced in all rats with the middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion model and fifty-seven rats had motor deficits after stroke. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, rats were arranged to their intervention programs. De Ryck's behavioral test was conducted daily during the 7-day intervention as an evaluation tool of motor recovery. Serum corticosterone concentration and BDNF levels in the hippocampus, striatum, and cortex were measured after the rats were sacrificed. V-Ex had significantly better motor recovery in the behavioral test. V-Ex also had significantly higher hippocampal BDNF concentration than F-Ex and Con. F-Ex had significantly higher serum corticosterone level than other groups. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Voluntary exercise is the most effective intervention in upregulating the hippocampal BDNF level, and facilitating motor recovery. Rats that exercised voluntarily also showed less

  1. 78 FR 20881 - Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 80 RIN 2060-AQ86 Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle... hearings to be held for the proposed rule ``Control of Air Pollution from Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor... 2017, as part of a systems approach to addressing the impacts of motor vehicles and fuels on air...

  2. Carbohydrate in the mouth enhances activation of brain circuitry involved in motor performance and sensory perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Clare E; Byblow, Winston D; Stinear, Cathy M; Gant, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    The presence of carbohydrate in the human mouth has been associated with the facilitation of motor output and improvements in physical performance. Oral receptors have been identified as a potential mode of afferent transduction for this novel form of nutrient signalling that is distinct from taste. In the current study oral exposure to carbohydrate was combined with a motor task in a neuroimaging environment to identify areas of the brain involved in this phenomenon. A mouth-rinsing protocol was conducted whilst carbohydrate (CHO) and taste-matched placebo (PLA) solutions were delivered and recovered from the mouths of 10 healthy volunteers within a double-blind, counterbalanced design. This protocol eliminates post-oral factors and controls for the perceptual qualities of solutions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was used to identify cortical areas responsive to oral carbohydrate during rest and activity phases of a hand-grip motor task. Mean blood-oxygen-level dependent signal change experienced in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex was larger for CHO compared with PLA during the motor task when contrasted with a control condition. Areas of activation associated with CHO exclusively were observed over the primary taste cortex and regions involved in visual perception. Regions in the limbic system associated with reward were also significantly more active with CHO. This is the first demonstration that oral carbohydrate signalling can increase activation within the primary sensorimotor cortex during physical activity and enhance activation of neural networks involved in sensory perception. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Error-related negativity in the skilled brain of pianists reveals motor simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proverbio, Alice Mado; Cozzi, Matteo; Orlandi, Andrea; Carminati, Manuel

    2017-03-27

    Evidences have been provided of a crucial role of multimodal audio-visuomotor processing in subserving the musical ability. In this paper we investigated whether musical audiovisual stimulation might trigger the activation of motor information in the brain of professional pianists, due to the presence of permanent gestures/sound associations. At this aim EEG was recorded in 24 pianists and naive participants engaged in the detection of rare targets while watching hundreds of video clips showing a pair of hands in the act of playing, along with a compatible or incompatible piano soundtrack. Hands size and apparent distance allowed self-ownership and agency illusions, and therefore motor simulation. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and relative source reconstruction showed the presence of an Error-related negativity (ERN) to incongruent trials at anterior frontal scalp sites, only in pianists, with no difference in naïve participants. ERN was mostly explained by an anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) source. Other sources included "hands" IT regions, the superior temporal gyrus (STG) involved in conjoined auditory and visuomotor processing, SMA and cerebellum (representing and controlling motor subroutines), and regions involved in body parts representation (somatosensory cortex, uncus, cuneus and precuneus). The findings demonstrate that instrument-specific audiovisual stimulation is able to trigger error shooting and correction neural responses via motor resonance and mirroring, being a possible aid in learning and rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Neural Mechanism Exploration of Adaptive Motor Control: Dynamical Economic Cell Allocation in the Primary Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Guo, Yangyang; Fan, Jing; Ma, Chaolin; Ma, Xuan; Chen, Xi; He, Jiping

    2017-05-01

    Adaptive flexibility is of significance for the smooth and efficient movements in goal attainment. However, the underlying work mechanism of the cerebral cortex in adaptive motor control still remains unclear. How does the cerebral cortex organize and coordinate the activity of a large population of cells in the implementation of various motor strategies? To explore this issue, single-unit activities from the M1 region and kinematic data were recorded simultaneously in monkeys performing 3D reach-to-grasp tasks with different perturbations. Varying motor control strategies were employed and achieved in different perturbed tasks, via the dynamic allocation of cells to modulate specific movement parameters. An economic principle was proposed for the first time to describe a basic rule for cell allocation in the primary motor cortex. This principle, defined as the Dynamic Economic Cell Allocation Mechanism (DECAM), guarantees benefit maximization in cell allocation under limited neuronal resources, and avoids committing resources to uneconomic investments for unreliable factors with no or little revenue. That is to say, the cells recruited are always preferentially allocated to those factors with reliable return; otherwise, the cells are dispatched to respond to other factors about task. The findings of this study might partially reveal the working mechanisms underlying the role of the cerebral cortex in adaptive motor control, wherein is also of significance for the design of future intelligent brain-machine interfaces and rehabilitation device.

  5. Motor cortical activity changes during neuroprosthetic-controlled object interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, John E; Brane, Lucas; Gaunt, Robert A; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Boninger, Michael L; Collinger, Jennifer L

    2017-12-05

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) controlled prosthetic arms are being developed to restore function to people with upper-limb paralysis. This work provides an opportunity to analyze human cortical activity during complex tasks. Previously we observed that BCI control became more difficult during interactions with objects, although we did not quantify the neural origins of this phenomena. Here, we investigated how motor cortical activity changed in the presence of an object independently of the kinematics that were being generated using intracortical recordings from two people with tetraplegia. After identifying a population-wide increase in neural firing rates that corresponded with the hand being near an object, we developed an online scaling feature in the BCI system that operated without knowledge of the task. Online scaling increased the ability of two subjects to control the robotic arm when reaching to grasp and transport objects. This work suggests that neural representations of the environment, in this case the presence of an object, are strongly and consistently represented in motor cortex but can be accounted for to improve BCI performance.

  6. Motor Control Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Pietro; Shabbott, Britne; Cortés, Juan Camilo

    2012-01-01

    The primary manifestations of Parkinson’s disease are abnormalities of movement, including movement slowness, difficulties with gait and balance, and tremor. We know a considerable amount about the abnormalities of neuronal and muscle activity that correlate with these symptoms. Motor symptoms can also be described in terms of motor control, a level of description that explains how movement variables, such as a limb’s position and speed, are controlled and coordinated. Understanding motor symptoms as motor control abnormalities means to identify how the disease disrupts normal control processes. In the case of Parkinson’s disease, movement slowness, for example, would be explained by a disruption of the control processes that determine normal movement speed. Two long-term benefits of understanding the motor control basis of motor symptoms include the future design of neural prostheses to replace the function of damaged basal ganglia circuits, and the rational design of rehabilitation strategies. This type of understanding, however, remains limited, partly because of limitations in our knowledge of normal motor control. In this article, we review the concept of motor control and describe a few motor symptoms that illustrate the challenges in understanding such symptoms as motor control abnormalities. PMID:22675667

  7. Speed Control of Multiphase Cage Induction Motors Incorporating Supply Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozdowski Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is the control possibility of the multiphase cage induction motors having number of phases greater than 3. These motors have additional properties for speed control that distinguish them from the standard 3 phase motors: operation at various sequences of supplying voltages due to the inverter control and possible operation with few open-circuited phases. For each supply sequence different no load speeds at the same frequency can be obtained. This feature extends the motor application for miscellaneous drive demands including vector or scalar control. This depends mainly on the type of the stator winding for a given number of phases, since the principle of motor operation is based on co-operation of higher harmonics of magnetic field. Examples of operation are presented for a 9-phase motor, though general approach has been discussed. This motor was fed by a voltage source inverter at field oriented control with forced currents. The mathematical model of the motor was reduced to the form incorporating all most important physical features and appropriate for the control law formulation. The operation was illustrated for various supply sequences for “healthy” motor and for the motor operating at one phase broken. The obtained results have shown that parasitic influence of harmonic fields interaction has negligible influence on motor operation with respect to the useful coupling for properly designed stator winding.

  8. Brain activation patterns of motor imagery reflect plastic changes associated with intensive shooting training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeck, Jong-Su; Kim, Yang-Tae; Seo, Jee-Hye; Ryeom, Hun-Kyu; Lee, Jongmin; Choi, Sung-Mook; Woo, Minjung; Kim, Woojong; Kim, Jin Gu; Chang, Yongmin

    2012-09-01

    Evidence from previous studies has suggested that motor imagery and motor action engage overlapping brain systems. As a result of this observation that motor imagery can activate brain regions associated with actual motor movement, motor imagery is expected to enhance motor skill performance and become an underlying principle for physical training in sports and physical rehabilitation. However, few studies have examined the effects of physical training on motor imagery in beginners. Also, differences in neural networks related to motor imagery before and after training have seldom been studied. In the current study, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the question of whether motor imagery can reflect plastic changes of neural correlates associated with intensive training. In fact, motor imagery was used in this study as a tool to assess the brain areas involved in shooting and involved in learning of shooting. We discovered that use of motor imagery resulted in recruitment of widely distributed common cortical areas, which were suggested to play a role in generation and maintenance of mental images before and after 90 h of shooting training. In addition to these common areas, brain activation before and after 90 h of shooting practice showed regionally distinct patterns of activity change in subcortical motor areas. That is, basal ganglia showed increased activity after 90 h of shooting practice, suggesting the occurrence of plastic change in association with gains in performance and reinforcement learning. Therefore, our results suggest that, in order to reach a level of expertise, the brain would change through initial reinforcement of preexistent connections during the training period and then use more focused neural correlates through formation of new connections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2005-09-27

    Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the

  10. Different brain circuits underlie motor and perceptual representations of temporal intervals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bueti, Doemnica; Walsh, Vincent; Frith, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    mechanisms. However, only in the reproduction task was activity observed in a wider cortical network including the right pre- SMA, left middle frontal gyrus, left premotor cortex, with a more reliable activity in the right inferior parietal cortex, left fusiform gyrus, and the right extrastriate visual area...... information when either a motor or a perceptual representation is used. Participants viewed two identical sequences of visual stimuli and used the information differently to perform either a temporal reproduction or a temporal estimation task. By comparing brain activity evoked by these tasks and control...... conditions, we explored commonalities and differences in brain areas involved in reproduction and estimation of temporal intervals. The basal ganglia and the cerebellum were commonly active in both temporal tasks, consistent with suggestions that perception and production of time are subserved by the same...

  11. Microcontroller Based Closed Loop PMDC Motor Position Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata CHATTOPADHYAY

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The position control systems used in different applications need to meet the high performance, accuracy and reliability to achieve the desired output. Microcontrollers can be used as suitable means for meeting these needs. The PMDC motor is a low cost electrical device, which can be used for precise position control system. In the present paper, a DC chopper, driven by a PWM signal has been utilized for position control of a PMDC motor. Controlling the duty cycle of the PWM signals has been implemented by microcontroller as equivalent to controlling the motor terminal voltage, which in turn adjusts directly the motor rotational movement. Experimental characteristics have been reported which revels the satisfactory performance of PMDC motor in position control system. The system has good repeatability and the percentage deviation of position of motor is within tolerable limit.

  12. Training leads to increased auditory brain-computer interface performance of end-users with motor impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, S; Käthner, I; Kübler, A

    2016-02-01

    Auditory brain-computer interfaces are an assistive technology that can restore communication for motor impaired end-users. Such non-visual brain-computer interface paradigms are of particular importance for end-users that may lose or have lost gaze control. We attempted to show that motor impaired end-users can learn to control an auditory speller on the basis of event-related potentials. Five end-users with motor impairments, two of whom with additional visual impairments, participated in five sessions. We applied a newly developed auditory brain-computer interface paradigm with natural sounds and directional cues. Three of five end-users learned to select symbols using this method. Averaged over all five end-users the information transfer rate increased by more than 1800% from the first session (0.17 bits/min) to the last session (3.08 bits/min). The two best end-users achieved information transfer rates of 5.78 bits/min and accuracies of 92%. Our results show that an auditory BCI with a combination of natural sounds and directional cues, can be controlled by end-users with motor impairment. Training improves the performance of end-users to the level of healthy controls. To our knowledge, this is the first time end-users with motor impairments controlled an auditory brain-computer interface speller with such high accuracy and information transfer rates. Further, our results demonstrate that operating a BCI with event-related potentials benefits from training and specifically end-users may require more than one session to develop their full potential. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reorganization of Motor Representations in Patients with Brain Lesions: A Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulubas, Lucia; Sollmann, Nico; Tanigawa, Noriko; Zimmer, Claus; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2018-03-01

    This is an explorative study applying presurgical navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) to investigate the spatial distributions of motor sites to reveal tumor-induced brain plasticity in patients with brain tumors. We analyzed nTMS-based motor maps derived from presurgical mapping of 100 patients with motor eloquently located brain tumors (tumors in the frontal lobe, the precentral gyrus [PrG], the postcentral gyrus [PoG], the remaining parietal lobe, or the temporal lobe). Based on these motor maps, we systematically investigated changes in motor evoked potential (MEP) counts among 4 gyri (PrG, PoG, medial frontal gyrus, and superior frontal gyrus) between subgroups of patients according to the tumor location in order to depict the tumor's influence on reorganization. When comparing patients with different tumor locations, high MEP counts were elicited less frequently by stimulating the PrG in patients with tumors directly affecting the PrG (p motor representations within the primary motor cortex. In contrast, patients with PoG and parietal tumors primarily showed high MEP counts when stimulating the PoG (p motor function from the PrG to adjacent regions but rather leads to a reorganization within anatomical constraints, such as of the PoG. Thus, presurgical nTMS-based motor mapping sensitively depicted the tumor-induced plasticity of the motor cortex.

  14. Recovery of post stroke proximal arm function, driven by complex neuroplastic bilateral brain activation patterns and predicted by baseline motor dysfunction severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana ePundik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Neuroplastic changes that drive recovery of shoulder/elbow function after stoke have been poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between neuroplastic brain changes related to shoulder/elbow movement control in response to treatment and recovery of arm motor function in chronic stroke survivors. Methods: Twenty-three chronic stroke survivors were treated with 12 weeks of arm rehabilitation. Outcome measures included functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI for the shoulder/elbow components of reach and a skilled motor function test (Arm Motor Abilities Test (AMAT, collected before and after treatment.Results: We observed two patterns of neuroplastic changes that were associated with gains in motor function: decreased or increased task-related brain activation. Those with significantly better motor function at baseline exhibited a decrease in brain activation in response to treatment, evident in the ipsilesional primary motor and contralesional supplementary motor regions; in contrast, those with greater baseline motor impairment, exhibited increased brain activation in response to treatment. There was an linear relationship between greater functional gain (AMAT and increased activation in bilateral primary motor, contralesional primary and secondary sensory regions, and contralesional lateral premotor area, after adjusting for baseline AMAT, age, and time since stroke. Conclusions: Recovery of functional reach involves recruitment of several contralesional and bilateral primary motor regions. In response to intensive therapy, the direction of functional brain change (i.e. increase or decrease in task-related brain recruitment for shoulder/elbow reach components depends on baseline level of motor function and may represent either different phases or different strategies of neuroplasticity that drive functional recovery.

  15. Brain effective connectivity during motor-imagery and execution following stroke and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Bajaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain areas within the motor system interact directly or indirectly during motor-imagery and motor-execution tasks. These interactions and their functionality can change following stroke and recovery. How brain network interactions reorganize and recover their functionality during recovery and treatment following stroke are not well understood. To contribute to answering these questions, we recorded blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI signals from 10 stroke survivors and evaluated dynamical causal modeling (DCM-based effective connectivity among three motor areas: primary motor cortex (M1, pre-motor cortex (PMC and supplementary motor area (SMA, during motor-imagery and motor-execution tasks. We compared the connectivity between affected and unaffected hemispheres before and after mental practice and combined mental practice and physical therapy as treatments. The treatment (intervention period varied in length between 14 to 51 days but all patients received the same dose of 60 h of treatment. Using Bayesian model selection (BMS approach in the DCM approach, we found that, after intervention, the same network dominated during motor-imagery and motor-execution tasks but modulatory parameters suggested a suppressive influence of SM A on M1 during the motor-imagery task whereas the influence of SM A on M1 was unrestricted during the motor-execution task. We found that the intervention caused a reorganization of the network during both tasks for unaffected as well as for the affected hemisphere. Using Bayesian model averaging (BMA approach, we found that the intervention improved the regional connectivity among the motor areas during both the tasks. The connectivity between PMC and M1 was stronger in motor-imagery tasks whereas the connectivity from PMC to M1, SM A to M1 dominated in motor-execution tasks. There was significant behavioral improvement (p = 0.001 in sensation and motor movements

  16. Variable Rail Voltage Control of a Brushless DC (BLDC) Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Variable Rail Voltage Control of a Brushless DC (BLDC) Motor by Yuan Chen, Joseph Conroy, and William Nothwang ARL-TR-6308 January 2013...TR-6308 January 2013 Variable Rail Voltage Control of a Brushless DC (BLDC) Motor Yuan Chen, Joseph Conroy, and William Nothwang Sensors...DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Variable Rail Voltage Control of a Brushless DC (BLDC) Motor 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  17. Translating Principles of Neural Plasticity into Research on Speech Motor Control Recovery and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Christy L.; Hoit, Jeannette; Kent, Raymond; Ramig, Lorraine O.; Shrivastav, Rahul; Strand, Edythe; Yorkston, Kathryn; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To review the principles of neural plasticity and make recommendations for research on the neural bases for rehabilitation of neurogenic speech disorders. Method: A working group in speech motor control and disorders developed this report, which examines the potential relevance of basic research on the brain mechanisms involved in neural…

  18. Motor Control of Drosophila Courtship Song

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy R. Shirangi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many animals utilize acoustic signals—or songs—to attract mates. During courtship, Drosophila melanogaster males vibrate a wing to produce trains of pulses and extended tone, called pulse and sine song, respectively. Courtship songs in the genus Drosophila are exceedingly diverse, and different song features appear to have evolved independently of each other. How the nervous system allows such diversity to evolve is not understood. Here, we identify a wing muscle in D. melanogaster (hg1 that is uniquely male-enlarged. The hg1 motoneuron and the sexually dimorphic development of the hg1 muscle are required specifically for the sine component of the male song. In contrast, the motoneuron innervating a sexually monomorphic wing muscle, ps1, is required specifically for a feature of pulse song. Thus, individual wing motor pathways can control separate aspects of courtship song and may provide a “modular” anatomical substrate for the evolution of diverse songs.

  19. Motor Imagery Learning Modulates Functional Connectivity of Multiple Brain Systems in Resting State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Long, Zhiying; Ge, Ruiyang; Xu, Lele; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Background Learning motor skills involves subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the sensory-motor system. This idea was mostly derived from the investigations on motor execution learning which mainly recruits the processing of sensory-motor information. Behavioral evidences demonstrated that motor skills in our daily lives could be learned through imagery procedures. However, it remains unclear whether the modulation of resting-state functional connectivity also exists in the sensory-motor system after motor imagery learning. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a fMRI investigation on motor imagery learning from resting state. Based on previous studies, we identified eight sensory and cognitive resting-state networks (RSNs) corresponding to the brain systems and further explored the functional connectivity of these RSNs through the assessments, connectivity and network strengths before and after the two-week consecutive learning. Two intriguing results were revealed: (1) The sensory RSNs, specifically sensory-motor and lateral visual networks exhibited greater connectivity strengths in precuneus and fusiform gyrus after learning; (2) Decreased network strength induced by learning was proved in the default mode network, a cognitive RSN. Conclusions/Significance These results indicated that resting-state functional connectivity could be modulated by motor imagery learning in multiple brain systems, and such modulation displayed in the sensory-motor, visual and default brain systems may be associated with the establishment of motor schema and the regulation of introspective thought. These findings further revealed the neural substrates underlying motor skill learning and potentially provided new insights into the therapeutic benefits of motor imagery learning. PMID:24465577

  20. Motor imagery learning modulates functional connectivity of multiple brain systems in resting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Long, Zhiying; Ge, Ruiyang; Xu, Lele; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Learning motor skills involves subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the sensory-motor system. This idea was mostly derived from the investigations on motor execution learning which mainly recruits the processing of sensory-motor information. Behavioral evidences demonstrated that motor skills in our daily lives could be learned through imagery procedures. However, it remains unclear whether the modulation of resting-state functional connectivity also exists in the sensory-motor system after motor imagery learning. We performed a fMRI investigation on motor imagery learning from resting state. Based on previous studies, we identified eight sensory and cognitive resting-state networks (RSNs) corresponding to the brain systems and further explored the functional connectivity of these RSNs through the assessments, connectivity and network strengths before and after the two-week consecutive learning. Two intriguing results were revealed: (1) The sensory RSNs, specifically sensory-motor and lateral visual networks exhibited greater connectivity strengths in precuneus and fusiform gyrus after learning; (2) Decreased network strength induced by learning was proved in the default mode network, a cognitive RSN. These results indicated that resting-state functional connectivity could be modulated by motor imagery learning in multiple brain systems, and such modulation displayed in the sensory-motor, visual and default brain systems may be associated with the establishment of motor schema and the regulation of introspective thought. These findings further revealed the neural substrates underlying motor skill learning and potentially provided new insights into the therapeutic benefits of motor imagery learning.

  1. Deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus helps in improving late phase motor planning in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashlesh, Patil; Kumar, Sood Sanjay; Preet, Kochhar Kanwal; Vinay, Goyal

    2017-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus (DBS-STN) is a well-accepted treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) but its effect on motor planning in the disease is yet unclear. This study examines the effect of switching the stimulation ON and OFF on components of bereitschaftspotentials in PD. Scalp bereitschaftspotentials were recorded during self-paced right wrist extensions at Fz, Cz, Pz, C3 and C4 sites in patients on DBS-STN plus medications (DBS-STN group) as treatment modality or on medications only (Med group) and compared with age matched healthy controls. In DBS-STN group, the potentials were recorded in stimulation ON, stimulation OFF, and again after re-switching stimulation ON-2. Offline analysis of potentials was done to calculate peak amplitude, late slope (-500 to 0ms) and early slope (-1500 to -500ms). We observed that the two components of bereitschaftspotentials in stimulation ON state were comparable to those in age matched controls. The late slope was found to be significantly reduced during stimulation OFF as compared to stimulation ON at Cz (pstimulation ON at Cz (pstimulation OFF for fifteen minutes principally affects the late component i.e. the execution part of motor planning; which cannot be reversed by re-switching ON. Thus the chronic and acute effects of switching DBS-STN ON are different and principally affect the later part of motor planning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Association Between Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Genotype and Upper Extremity Motor Outcome After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Jungsoo; Lee, Ahee; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2017-06-01

    The identification of intrinsic factors for predicting upper extremity motor outcome could aid the design of individualized treatment plans in stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors, including intrinsic genetic factors, for upper extremity motor outcome in patients with subacute stroke. A total of 97 patients with subacute stroke were enrolled. Upper limb motor impairment was scored according to the upper limb of Fugl-Meyer assessment score at 3 months after stroke. The prediction of upper extremity motor outcome at 3 months was modeled using various factors that could potentially influence this impairment, including patient characteristics, baseline upper extremity motor impairment, functional and structural integrity of the corticospinal tract, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression models were used to identify the significance of each factor. The independent predictors of motor outcome at 3 months were baseline upper extremity motor impairment, age, stroke type, and corticospinal tract functional integrity in all stroke patients. However, in the group with severe motor impairment at baseline (upper limb score of Fugl-Meyer assessment derived neurotrophic factor genotype was also an independent predictor of upper extremity motor outcome 3 months after stroke. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype may be a potentially useful predictor of upper extremity motor outcome in patients with subacute stroke with severe baseline motor involvement. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Walking, Gross Motor Development, and Brain Functional Connectivity in Infants and Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrus, Natasha; Eggebrecht, Adam T; Todorov, Alexandre; Elison, Jed T; Wolff, Jason J; Cole, Lyndsey; Gao, Wei; Pandey, Juhi; Shen, Mark D; Swanson, Meghan R; Emerson, Robert W; Klohr, Cheryl L; Adams, Chloe M; Estes, Annette M; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Botteron, Kelly N; McKinstry, Robert C; Constantino, John N; Evans, Alan C; Hazlett, Heather C; Dager, Stephen R; Paterson, Sarah J; Schultz, Robert T; Styner, Martin A; Gerig, Guido; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Piven, Joseph; Pruett, John R

    2018-02-01

    Infant gross motor development is vital to adaptive function and predictive of both cognitive outcomes and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, little is known about neural systems underlying the emergence of walking and general gross motor abilities. Using resting state fcMRI, we identified functional brain networks associated with walking and gross motor scores in a mixed cross-sectional and longitudinal cohort of infants at high and low risk for autism spectrum disorder, who represent a dimensionally distributed range of motor function. At age 12 months, functional connectivity of motor and default mode networks was correlated with walking, whereas dorsal attention and posterior cingulo-opercular networks were implicated at age 24 months. Analyses of general gross motor function also revealed involvement of motor and default mode networks at 12 and 24 months, with dorsal attention, cingulo-opercular, frontoparietal, and subcortical networks additionally implicated at 24 months. These findings suggest that changes in network-level brain-behavior relationships underlie the emergence and consolidation of walking and gross motor abilities in the toddler period. This initial description of network substrates of early gross motor development may inform hypotheses regarding neural systems contributing to typical and atypical motor outcomes, as well as neurodevelopmental disorders associated with motor dysfunction. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease: New and Emerging Targets for Refractory Motor and Nonmotor Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative condition characterized by bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity, and postural instability (PI, in addition to numerous nonmotor manifestations. Many pharmacological therapies now exist to successfully treat PD motor symptoms; however, as the disease progresses, it often becomes challenging to treat with medications alone. Deep brain stimulation (DBS has become a crucial player in PD treatment, particularly for patients who have disabling motor complications from medical treatment. Well-established DBS targets include the subthalamic nucleus (STN, the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi, and to a lesser degree the ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM of the thalamus. Studies of alternative DBS targets for PD are ongoing, the majority of which have shown some clinical benefit; however, more carefully designed and controlled studies are needed. In the present review, we discuss the role of these new and emerging DBS targets in treating refractory axial motor symptoms and other motor and nonmotor symptoms (NMS.

  5. performance characteristics of an armature voltage controlled dc motor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    types. To each of these two control arrangements is added an inner current controller loop. Using developed motor equations, the performance characteristics of a test motor are obtained by digital computer analysis. The results show that closed loop operation, with appropriate control gains, give improved speed regulation ...

  6. Assessing motor imagery in brain-computer interface training: Psychological and neurophysiological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Anatoly; Liburkina, Sofya; Yakovlev, Lev; Perepelkina, Olga; Kaplan, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is considered to be a promising cognitive tool for improving motor skills as well as for rehabilitation therapy of movement disorders. It is believed that MI training efficiency could be improved by using the brain-computer interface (BCI) technology providing real-time feedback on person's mental attempts. While BCI is indeed a convenient and motivating tool for practicing MI, it is not clear whether it could be used for predicting or measuring potential positive impact of the training. In this study, we are trying to establish whether the proficiency in BCI control is associated with any of the neurophysiological or psychological correlates of motor imagery, as well as to determine possible interrelations among them. For that purpose, we studied motor imagery in a group of 19 healthy BCI-trained volunteers and performed a correlation analysis across various quantitative assessment metrics. We examined subjects' sensorimotor event-related EEG events, corticospinal excitability changes estimated with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), BCI accuracy and self-assessment reports obtained with specially designed questionnaires and interview routine. Our results showed, expectedly, that BCI performance is dependent on the subject's capability to suppress EEG sensorimotor rhythms, which in turn is correlated with the idle state amplitude of those oscillations. Neither BCI accuracy nor the EEG features associated with MI were found to correlate with the level of corticospinal excitability increase during motor imagery, and with assessed imagery vividness. Finally, a significant correlation was found between the level of corticospinal excitability increase and kinesthetic vividness of imagery (KVIQ-20 questionnaire). Our results suggest that two distinct neurophysiological mechanisms might mediate possible effects of motor imagery: the non-specific cortical sensorimotor disinhibition and the focal corticospinal excitability increase

  7. Motor-related brain activity during action observation: a neural substrate for electrocorticographic brain-computer interfaces after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Collinger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury (SCI, motor commands from the brain are unable to reach peripheral nerves and muscles below the level of the lesion. Action observation, in which a person observes someone else performing an action, has been used to augment traditional rehabilitation paradigms. Similarly, action observation can be used to derive the relationship between brain activity and movement kinematics for a motor-based brain-computer interface (BCI even when the user cannot generate overt movements. BCIs use brain signals to control external devices to replace functions that have been lost due to SCI or other motor impairment. Previous studies have reported congruent motor cortical activity during observed and overt movements using magnetoencephalography (MEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Recent single-unit studies using intracortical microelectrodes also demonstrated that a large number of motor cortical neurons had similar firing rate patterns between overt and observed movements. Given the increasing interest in electrocorticography (ECoG-based BCIs, our goal was to identify whether action observation-related cortical activity could be recorded using ECoG during grasping tasks. Specifically, we aimed to identify congruent neural activity during observed and executed movements in both the sensorimotor rhythm (10-40 Hz and the high-gamma band (65-115 Hz which contains significant movement-related information. We observed significant motor-related high-gamma band activity during action observation in both able-bodied individuals and one participant with a complete C4 SCI. Furthermore, in able-bodied participants, both the low and high frequency bands demonstrated congruent activity between action execution and observation. Our results suggest that action observation could be an effective and critical procedure for deriving the mapping from ECoG signals to intended movement for an ECoG-based BCI system for individuals with

  8. The neurological basis of motor asymmetry following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine brain lesions in the rat: the effect of motor decortication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossman, A R; Sambrook, M A; Gergies, S W; Slater, P

    1977-12-01

    The role of the motor cortex in the mediation of asymmetric movement after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) brain lesions has been examined in the rat. The effect of unilateral and bilateral sensorimotor decortication upon spontaneous and drug (apomorphine and amphetamine)-induced motor asymmetry has been studied following unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the lateral hypothalamus. Both bilateral decortication and unilateral decortication on the side of the 6-OHDA lesion caused a transient reversal of the spontaneous motor asymmetry normally seen in 6-OHDA lesioned animals. Neither unilateral nor bilateral sensorimotor decortication abolished drug-induced turning behaviour. It is postulated that subcortical basal ganglia efferent pathways may be involved in the mediation of motor asymmetry after unilateral 6-OHDA lesions of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection.

  9. From motor cortex to visual cortex: the application of noninvasive brain stimulation to amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Benjamin; Mansouri, Behzad; Koski, Lisa; Hess, Robert F

    2012-04-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation is a technique for inducing changes in the excitability of discrete neural populations in the human brain. A current model of the underlying pathological processes contributing to the loss of motor function after stroke has motivated a number of research groups to investigate the potential therapeutic application of brain stimulation to stroke rehabilitation. The loss of motor function is modeled as resulting from a combination of reduced excitability in the lesioned motor cortex and an increased inhibitory drive from the nonlesioned hemisphere over the lesioned hemisphere. This combination of impaired neural function and pathological suppression resonates with current views on the cause of the visual impairment in amblyopia. Here, we discuss how the rationale for using noninvasive brain stimulation in stroke rehabilitation can be applied to amblyopia, review a proof-of-principle study demonstrating that brain stimulation can temporarily improve amblyopic eye function, and propose future research avenues. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Neural correlates of learning in an electrocorticographic motor-imagery brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Tim M.; Miller, Kai J.; Rao, Rajesh P. N.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    Human subjects can learn to control a one-dimensional electrocorticographic (ECoG) brain-computer interface (BCI) using modulation of primary motor (M1) high-gamma activity (signal power in the 75–200 Hz range). However, the stability and dynamics of the signals over the course of new BCI skill acquisition have not been investigated. In this study, we report 3 characteristic periods in evolution of the high-gamma control signal during BCI training: initial, low task accuracy with corresponding low power modulation in the gamma spectrum, followed by a second period of improved task accuracy with increasing average power separation between activity and rest, and a final period of high task accuracy with stable (or decreasing) power separation and decreasing trial-to-trial variance. These findings may have implications in the design and implementation of BCI control algorithms. PMID:25599079

  11. Predictive Direct Torque Control for Induction Motor Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzaioua, A.; Ouhrouche, M.; Merabet, A.

    2008-06-01

    A predictive control combined with the direct torque control (DTC) to induction motor drive is presented. A new switching strategy is used in DTC, where the constant switching frequency is taken constant, and the speed tracking is done by a predictive controller. The scheme control is applied to induction motor drive in order to perform the dynamic responses of electromagnetic torque, stator flux and speed. A comparison between the PI controller and predictive controller for speed tracking is done. Results of simulation show that the performance of the proposed control scheme for induction motor drive is accurately achieved.

  12. The effect of intravitreal cholinergic drugs on motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Gregory L; Freelance, Christopher B

    2018-02-26

    The retina bears embryological, neurochemical and functional similarities to the circadian and dopamine systems of the brain. Recent studies have shown that the intravitreal injection of minute quantities of L-dopa and of the melatonin receptor antagonist ML-23 have anti-Parkinsonian potential. Furthermore, it has been suggested that light therapy may be potentially useful in treating some aspects of Parkinson's disease (PD) and it is hypothesized that this treatment works via the circadian system. Given that little is known about the mechanism by which such treatments work the present study was designed to examine the role of the acetyl cholinergic system of the retina in gross bodily movement. While IVIT atropine was shown to improve movement in intact rats Cogentin treated rats showed impairment of motor function compared to control rats or to rats treated with any other cholinergic drug. Furthermore, a link between the phase of the light/dark cycle and the efficacy of these drugs in altering movement was demonstrated. These results show that anticholinergic systems in the retina can exert control over movement which has been solely attributed to the function of deep brain structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Traumatic brain injury and automotive design: making motor vehicles safer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirula, Ram; Kaufman, Rob; Tencer, Allan

    2003-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health problem in the United States. Identifying and modifying vehicle designs associated with TBI will have a significant impact on the frequency and severity of TBI in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs). Our objective, therefore, was to identify interior vehicle contact points associated with severe TBI (head Abbreviated Injury Scale score > 3) among drivers and determine the extent to which modifications of these contact points impact the likelihood of severe TBI. We analyzed drivers in MVCs from the 1993 to 2001 National Automotive Sampling System database. The odds of severe TBI with respect to various vehicle contact points were estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Using computer simulation software, the magnitude of driver head deceleration was modeled while manipulating vehicle design features. The potential impact of this design modification on the frequency and hospital charges of TBI cases was estimated. There were 18,313 drivers involved who were victims of TBI, equating to a national sample size of 3,275,472 cases. The most frequent contact point associated with severe TBI was the roof rail (odds ratio, 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.3). Increasing roof rail padding thickness to 5.0 cm reduced the peak acceleration from 700 g to 218 g, which would potentially reduce the attributable number of severe TBI cases per year from 2,730 to 210, thereby reducing annual acute care charges from $136.5 million to $10.5 million US dollars. Contact with the roof rail significantly increases the likelihood of TBI in MVCs. Minor increases in padding at these points may reduce the frequency of severe TBI, which would have a substantial effect on health care costs.

  14. Direct energy converter controllers for switched reluctance motor operation

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Andrew Simon

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing demand for simple motor drives offering high reliability and fault tolerance in applications such as the aerospace actuator industry, with the development of `more electric aircraft'. This thesis presents a motor drive employing a switched reluctance motor, the novel single sided matrix converter, and a novel double band hysteresis based control scheme for control of the converter, implemented using a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The single sided matrix co...

  15. Noninvasive and painless magnetic stimulation of nerves improved brain motor function and mobility in a cerebral palsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamand, Véronique H; Schneider, Cyril

    2014-10-01

    Motor deficits in cerebral palsy disturb functional independence. This study tested whether noninvasive and painless repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation could improve motor function in a 7-year-old boy with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Stimulation was applied over different nerves of the lower limbs for 5 sessions. We measured the concurrent aftereffects of this intervention on ankle motor control, gait (walking velocity, stride length, cadence, cycle duration), and function of brain motor pathways. We observed a decrease of ankle plantar flexors resistance to stretch, an increase of active dorsiflexion range of movement, and improvements of corticospinal control of ankle dorsiflexors. Joint mobility changes were still present 15 days after the end of stimulation, when all gait parameters were also improved. Resistance to stretch was still lower than prestimulation values 45 days after the end of stimulation. This case illustrates the sustained effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation on brain plasticity, motor function, and gait. It suggests a potential impact for physical rehabilitation in cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Finasteride improves motor, EEG, and cellular changes in rat brain in thioacetamide-induced hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenović, Dušan; Hrnčić, Dragan; Petronijević, Nataša; Jevtić, Gordana; Radosavljević, Tatjana; Rašić-Marković, Aleksandra; Puškaš, Nela; Maksić, Nebojša; Stanojlović, Olivera

    2014-11-01

    Neurosteroids are involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This study evaluated the effects of finasteride, inhibitor of neurosteroid synthesis, on motor, EEG, and cellular changes in rat brain in thioacetamide-induced HE. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: 1) control; 2) thioacetamide-treated group, TAA (300 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)); 3) finasteride-treated group, FIN (50 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)); and 4) group treated with FIN and TAA (FIN + TAA). Daily doses of TAA and FIN were administered in three subsequent days intraperitoneally, and in the FIN + TAA group FIN was administered 2 h before every dose of TAA. Motor and reflex activity was determined at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 24 h, whereas EEG activity was registered about 24 h after treatment. The expressions of neuronal (NeuN), astrocytic [glial fibrilary acidic protein (GFAP)], microglial (Iba1), and oligodendrocyte (myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein) marker were determined 24 h after treatment. While TAA decreased all tests, FIN pretreatment (FIN + TAA) significantly improved equilibrium, placement test, auditory startle, head shake reflex, motor activity, and exploratory behavior vs. the TAA group. Vital reflexes (withdrawal, grasping, righting and corneal reflex) together with mean EEG voltage were significantly higher (P EEG changes in TAA-induced HE and completely prevents the development of hepatic coma. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. PMBLDC motor drive with power factor correction controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    George, G.J.; Ramachandran, Rakesh; Arun, N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a boost converter configuration, control scheme and design of single phase power factor controller for permanent magnet brushless DC motor (PMBLDCM) drive. PMBLDC motors are the latest choice of researchers, due to the high efficiency, silent operation, compact size, high...

  18. Postural control and central motor pathway involvement in type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mona Mokhtar El Bardawil

    2013-04-18

    Apr 18, 2013 ... Abstract Background: Postural instability causes limitations in daily activities of diabetic patients. There is paucity of data regarding central motor pathway involvement in these patients and its relation to postural control. Aim: To evaluate postural control and central motor pathway involvement in type 2 ...

  19. Using non-invasive brain stimulation to augment motor training-induced plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascual-Leone Alvaro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Therapies for motor recovery after stroke or traumatic brain injury are still not satisfactory. To date the best approach seems to be the intensive physical therapy. However the results are limited and functional gains are often minimal. The goal of motor training is to minimize functional disability and optimize functional motor recovery. This is thought to be achieved by modulation of plastic changes in the brain. Therefore, adjunct interventions that can augment the response of the motor system to the behavioural training might be useful to enhance the therapy-induced recovery in neurological populations. In this context, noninvasive brain stimulation appears to be an interesting option as an add-on intervention to standard physical therapies. Two non-invasive methods of inducing electrical currents into the brain have proved to be promising for inducing long-lasting plastic changes in motor systems: transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. These techniques represent powerful methods for priming cortical excitability for a subsequent motor task, demand, or stimulation. Thus, their mutual use can optimize the plastic changes induced by motor practice, leading to more remarkable and outlasting clinical gains in rehabilitation. In this review we discuss how these techniques can enhance the effects of a behavioural intervention and the clinical evidence to date.

  20. Using non-invasive brain stimulation to augment motor training-induced plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognini, Nadia; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Fregni, Felipe

    2009-03-17

    Therapies for motor recovery after stroke or traumatic brain injury are still not satisfactory. To date the best approach seems to be the intensive physical therapy. However the results are limited and functional gains are often minimal. The goal of motor training is to minimize functional disability and optimize functional motor recovery. This is thought to be achieved by modulation of plastic changes in the brain. Therefore, adjunct interventions that can augment the response of the motor system to the behavioural training might be useful to enhance the therapy-induced recovery in neurological populations. In this context, noninvasive brain stimulation appears to be an interesting option as an add-on intervention to standard physical therapies. Two non-invasive methods of inducing electrical currents into the brain have proved to be promising for inducing long-lasting plastic changes in motor systems: transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). These techniques represent powerful methods for priming cortical excitability for a subsequent motor task, demand, or stimulation. Thus, their mutual use can optimize the plastic changes induced by motor practice, leading to more remarkable and outlasting clinical gains in rehabilitation. In this review we discuss how these techniques can enhance the effects of a behavioural intervention and the clinical evidence to date.

  1. Controlling assistive machines in paralysis using brain waves and other biosignals

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Rogério de Almeida Ribeiro; Fabricio Lima Brasil; Matthias Witkowski; Farid Shiman; Christian Cipriani; Nicola Vitiello; Maria Chiara Carrozza; Surjo Raphael Soekadar

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which humans can interact with machines significantly enhanced through inclusion of speech, gestures, and eye movements. However, these communication channels depend on a functional motor system. As many people suffer from severe damage of the motor system resulting in paralysis and inability to communicate, the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMI) that translate electric or metabolic brain activity into control signals of external devices promises to overcome this depe...

  2. Speed Control of Induction Motor Using PLC and SCADA System

    OpenAIRE

    Ayman Seksak Elsaid,; Wael A. Mohamed,

    2016-01-01

    Automation or automatic control is the use of various control systems for operating equipment such as machinery, processes in factories, boilers and heat-treating ovens, switching in telephone networks, steering and stabilization of ships, aircraft and other applications with minimal or reduced human intervention. Some processes have been completely automated. The motor speed is controlled via the driver as an open loop control. To make a more precise closed loop control of motor ...

  3. Dynamic Model Based Vector Control of Linear Induction Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    sensorless control is critical for LIM control in some special case. Reference [13] introduces a direct torque and flux control based on space...Industry Applications, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 28, no. 5, pp. 1054–1061, 1992. [4] J. Nash, “ Direct torque control , induction motor vector ...13] C. Lascu, I. Boldea, and F. Blaabjerg, “A modified direct torque control for induction motor sensorless drive,” Industry Applications,

  4. Decoding human motor activity from EEG single trials for a discrete two-dimensional cursor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dandan; Lin, Peter; Fei, Ding-Yu; Chen, Xuedong; Bai, Ou

    2009-08-01

    This study aims to explore whether human intentions to move or cease to move right and left hands can be decoded from spatiotemporal features in non-invasive EEG in order to control a discrete two-dimensional cursor movement for a potential multidimensional brain-computer interface (BCI). Five naïve subjects performed either sustaining or stopping a motor task with time locking to a predefined time window by using motor execution with physical movement or motor imagery. Spatial filtering, temporal filtering, feature selection and classification methods were explored. The performance of the proposed BCI was evaluated by both offline classification and online two-dimensional cursor control. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) and post-movement event-related synchronization (ERS) were observed on the contralateral hemisphere to the hand moved for both motor execution and motor imagery. Feature analysis showed that EEG beta band activity in the contralateral hemisphere over the motor cortex provided the best detection of either sustained or ceased movement of the right or left hand. The offline classification of four motor tasks (sustain or cease to move right or left hand) provided 10-fold cross-validation accuracy as high as 88% for motor execution and 73% for motor imagery. The subjects participating in experiments with physical movement were able to complete the online game with motor execution at an average accuracy of 85.5 ± 4.65%; the subjects participating in motor imagery study also completed the game successfully. The proposed BCI provides a new practical multidimensional method by noninvasive EEG signal associated with human natural behavior, which does not need long-term training.

  5. Decoding human motor activity from EEG single trials for a discrete two-dimensional cursor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dandan; Lin, Peter; Fei, Ding-Yu; Chen, Xuedong; Bai, Ou

    2009-08-01

    This study aims to explore whether human intentions to move or cease to move right and left hands can be decoded from spatiotemporal features in non-invasive EEG in order to control a discrete two-dimensional cursor movement for a potential multidimensional brain-computer interface (BCI). Five naïve subjects performed either sustaining or stopping a motor task with time locking to a predefined time window by using motor execution with physical movement or motor imagery. Spatial filtering, temporal filtering, feature selection and classification methods were explored. The performance of the proposed BCI was evaluated by both offline classification and online two-dimensional cursor control. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) and post-movement event-related synchronization (ERS) were observed on the contralateral hemisphere to the hand moved for both motor execution and motor imagery. Feature analysis showed that EEG beta band activity in the contralateral hemisphere over the motor cortex provided the best detection of either sustained or ceased movement of the right or left hand. The offline classification of four motor tasks (sustain or cease to move right or left hand) provided 10-fold cross-validation accuracy as high as 88% for motor execution and 73% for motor imagery. The subjects participating in experiments with physical movement were able to complete the online game with motor execution at an average accuracy of 85.5 +/- 4.65%; the subjects participating in motor imagery study also completed the game successfully. The proposed BCI provides a new practical multidimensional method by noninvasive EEG signal associated with human natural behavior, which does not need long-term training.

  6. AC electric motors control advanced design techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, Fouad

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of AC motor control lies in the multivariable and nonlinear nature of AC machine dynamics. Recent advancements in control theory now make it possible to deal with long-standing problems in AC motors control. This text expertly draws on these developments to apply a wide range of model-based control designmethods to a variety of AC motors. Contributions from over thirty top researchers explain how modern control design methods can be used to achieve tight speed regulation, optimal energetic efficiency, and operation reliability and safety, by considering online state var

  7. Design of dual DC motor control system based on DSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peicheng; Wang, Suo; Xu, Zengwei; Xiao, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Multi-motor control systems are widely used in actual production and life, such as lifting stages, robots, printing systems. This paper through serial communication between PC and DSP, dual DC motor control system consisting of PC as the host computer, DSP as the lower computer with synchronous PWM speed regulation, commutation and selection functions is designed. It sends digital control instructions with host computer serial debugger to lower computer, to instruct the motor to complete corresponding actions. The hardware and software design of the control system are given, and feasibility and validity of the control system are verified by experiments. The expected design goal is achieved.

  8. PID Fuzzy Logic Controller System for DC Motor Speed Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Samsul Bachri

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A good controller system must have resilience to disturbance and must be able to response quickly and accurately. Problem usually appears when PID controller system was built sensitively hence the system's respon to the disturbance will yield big overshot/undershot then the possibility of  oscillation to be happened is excelsior. When the controller system was built insensitively, the overshot/undershot will be  small but the recovery time will be longer. Hybrid controller system could overcome those problems by combining PID control system with fuzzy logic. The main control of this system is PID controller while the fuzzy logic acts to reduce an overshot/undershot and a recovery time. The fuzzy logic controller is designed with two input error and delta error and one output of the motor speed. The output of fuzzy logic controller should be only half of the PID controller for limiting entirely fuzzy output. This hybrid system design has a better respon time controller system than PID controller without fuzzy logic.

  9. Cognitive Resources Necessary for Motor Control in Older Adults Are Reduced by Walking and Coordination Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godde, Ben; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    We examined if physical exercise interventions were effective to reduce cognitive brain resources recruited while performing motor control tasks in older adults. Forty-three older adults (63-79 years of age) participated in either a walking (n = 17) or a motor coordination (n = 15) intervention (1 year, 3 times per week) or were assigned to a control group (n = 11) doing relaxation and stretching exercises. Pre and post the intervention period, we applied functional MRI to assess brain activation during imagery of forward and backward walking and during counting backwards from 100 as control task. In both experimental groups, activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during imagery of forward walking decreased from pre- to post-test (Effect size: -1.55 and -1.16 for coordination and walking training, respectively; Cohen's d). Regression analysis revealed a significant positive association between initial motor status and activation change in the right DLPFC (R(2) = 0.243, F(3,39) = 4.18, p = 0.012). Participants with lowest motor status at pretest profited most from the interventions. Data suggest that physical training in older adults is effective to free up cognitive resources otherwise needed for the control of locomotion. Training benefits may become particularly apparent in so-called dual-task situations where subjects must perform motor and cognitive tasks concurrently.

  10. DC torque motor actuated anti-lock brake controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, P.D.; Kade, A.

    1989-02-21

    A wheel lock control system is described for limiting the brake pressure applied to the brake of a vehicle wheel traveling over a road surface, the system comprising: an actuator for controlling the brake pressure to the brake of the wheel, the actuator including a torque motor for generating a motor torque in response to motor current to control the applied brake pressure in accordance with the value of the motor torque, the motor torque having a value proportional to the value of the motor current; means for determining the tire torque tending to accelerate the wheel during the application of brake pressure; means for storing the value of motor current corresponding to the maximum determined value of tire torque; means for detecting an incipient wheel lockup condition; and means for establishing the motor current following a detected incipient wheel lockup condition at a value having a predetermined relationship to the stored value of motor current to control the brake pressure at a predetermined braking condition.

  11. FPGA Based Control Method for Three Phase BLDC Motor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suneeta Suneeta; R Srinivasan; Ram Sagar

    2016-01-01

    .... Speed Control of BLDC motor using PIC microcontrollers requires more hardware, and with the availability of FPGA versatile features motivated to develop a cost effective and reliable control with variable speed range...

  12. Control of the Doubly Salient Permanent Magnet Switched Reluctance Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Merrifield, David Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The permanent magnet switched reluctance motor (PMSRM) is hybrid dc motor which has the potential to be more effect than the switched reluctance (SRM) and permanent magnet (PM) motors. The PMSRM has a both a salient rotor and stator with permanent magnets placed directly onto the face of common pole stators. The PMSRM is wound like the SRM and can be controlled by the same family of converters. The addition of permanent magnets creates nonlinearities in both the governing electrical and me...

  13. ARDOLORES: an Arduino based motors control system for DOLORES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Manuel; Ventura, H.; San Juan, J.; Di Fabrizio, L.

    2014-07-01

    We present ARDOLORES a custom made motor control system for the DOLORES instrument in use at the TNG telescope. ARDOLORES replaced the original PMAC based motor control system at a fraction of the cost. The whole system is composed by one master Arduino ONE with its Ethernet shield, to handle the communications with the external world through an Ethernet socket, and by one Arduino ONE with its custom motor shield for each axis to be controlled. The communication between the master and slaves Arduinos is made possible through the I2C bus. Also a Java web-service has been written to control the motors from an higher level and provides an external API for the scientific GUI. The system has been working since January 2012 handling the DOLORES motors and has demonstrated to be stable, reliable, and with easy maintenance in both the hardware and the software parts.

  14. The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) mediates anticipatory motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Vanessa; Weber, Juliane; Pollok, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Flexible and precisely timed motor control is based on functional interaction within a cortico-subcortical network. The left posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is supposed to be crucial for anticipatory motor control by sensorimotor feedback matching. Intention of the present study was to disentangle the specific relevance of the left PPC for anticipatory motor control using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) since a causal link remains to be established. Anodal vs. cathodal tDCS was applied for 10 min over the left PPC in 16 right-handed subjects in separate sessions. Left primary motor cortex (M1) tDCS served as control condition and was applied in additional 15 subjects. Prior to and immediately after tDCS, subjects performed three tasks demanding temporal motor precision with respect to an auditory stimulus: sensorimotor synchronization as measure of anticipatory motor control, interval reproduction and simple reaction. Left PPC tDCS affected right hand synchronization but not simple reaction times. Motor anticipation was deteriorated by anodal tDCS, while cathodal tDCS yielded the reverse effect. The variability of interval reproduction was increased by anodal left M1 tDCS, whereas it was reduced by cathodal tDCS. No significant effects on simple reaction times were found. The present data support the hypothesis that left PPC is causally involved in right hand anticipatory motor control exceeding pure motor implementation as processed by M1 and possibly indicating subjective timing. Since M1 tDCS particularly affects motor implementation, the observed PPC effects are not likely to be explained by alterations of motor-cortical excitability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Four Phases Driver for Stepper Motor Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Morar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents two pulse distributors are remarkable for simplicity, highreliability, multifunctional facilities and a unipolar bilevel R/L- driver circuit for four phases stepper motor.

  16. Robust passivity-based control of switched-reluctance motors

    OpenAIRE

    Loria, Antonio; Espinosa-Pérez, G.; Chumacero, Erik

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We propose a state-feedback controller for switched-reluctance motors as a preliminary step towards the solution of the sensorless control problem (without measurement of rotor variables). We establish global exponential stability. Furthermore, our controller renders the closed-loop system robust to external disturbances that is, input-to-state stable. Although there exist some works on sensorless control of switched-reluctance motors, these consist mainly on ad hoc so...

  17. Sensorless Control of PM Synchronous Motors and Brushless DC Motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montesinos, D.; Galceran, Samuel; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the literature addressing sensorless operation methods of PM brushless machines. The methods explained are state-of-the-art of open and closed loop control strategies. The closed loop review includes those methods based on voltage and current measurements, those me...

  18. ANN Speed Sensorless Fuzzy Control of DRFOC Induction Motor Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna BEN HAMED

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present a full digital implementation of a sensorless speed direct orientation field controlled induction motor drive. Thanks to their advantages, the fuzzy logic is used to control the Squirrel Cage Induction Motor rotor speed and a neural network is used to reconstruct it. Experimental results for a 1kw induction motor are presented and analyzed using a dSpace system with DS1104 controller board based on digital signal processors (DSP. Obtained results demonstrated that the proposed sensorless control scheme is able to obtain high performances.

  19. Klinefelter syndrome has increased brain responses to auditory stimuli and motor output, but not to visual stimuli or Stroop adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Wallentin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY (KS is a genetic syndrome characterized by the presence of an extra X chromosome and low level of testosterone, resulting in a number of neurocognitive abnormalities, yet little is known about brain function. This study investigated the fMRI-BOLD response from KS relative to a group of Controls to basic motor, perceptual, executive and adaptation tasks. Participants (N: KS = 49; Controls = 49 responded to whether the words “GREEN” or “RED” were displayed in green or red (incongruent versus congruent colors. One of the colors was presented three times as often as the other, making it possible to study both congruency and adaptation effects independently. Auditory stimuli saying “GREEN” or “RED” had the same distribution, making it possible to study effects of perceptual modality as well as Frequency effects across modalities. We found that KS had an increased response to motor output in primary motor cortex and an increased response to auditory stimuli in auditory cortices, but no difference in primary visual cortices. KS displayed a diminished response to written visual stimuli in secondary visual regions near the Visual Word Form Area, consistent with the widespread dyslexia in the group. No neural differences were found in inhibitory control (Stroop or in adaptation to differences in stimulus frequencies. Across groups we found a strong positive correlation between age and BOLD response in the brain's motor network with no difference between groups. No effects of testosterone level or brain volume were found. In sum, the present findings suggest that auditory and motor systems in KS are selectively affected, perhaps as a compensatory strategy, and that this is not a systemic effect as it is not seen in the visual system.

  20. Speed Control of Bldc Motor Drive By Using Pid Controllers

    OpenAIRE

    Y.Narendra Kumar,; P.Eswara Rao

    2014-01-01

    This paper mainly deals with the Brushless DC (BLDC) motor speed driving systems have sprouted in various small scale and large scale applications like automobile industries, domestic appliances etc. This leads to the development in Brushless DC motor (BLDCM). The usage of BLDC Motor enhances various performance factors ranging from higher efficiency, higher torque in low-speed range, high power density ,low maintenance and less noise than other motors. The BLDC Motor can act ...

  1. Regaining motor control in musician's dystonia by restoring sensorimotor organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Karin; Butler, Katherine; Williamon, Aaron; Rothwell, John C

    2009-11-18

    Professional musicians are an excellent model of long-term motor learning effects on structure and function of the sensorimotor system. However, intensive motor skill training has been associated with task-specific deficiency in hand motor control, which has a higher prevalence among musicians (musician's dystonia) than in the general population. Using a transcranial magnetic stimulation paradigm, we previously found an expanded spatial integration of proprioceptive input into the hand motor cortex [sensorimotor organization (SMO)] in healthy musicians. In musician's dystonia, however, this expansion was even larger. Whereas motor skills of musicians are likely to be supported by a spatially expanded SMO, we hypothesized that in musician's dystonia this might have developed too far and now disrupts rather than assists task-specific motor control. If so, motor control should be regained by reversing the excessive reorganization in musician's dystonia. Here, we test this hypothesis and show that a 15 min intervention with proprioceptive input (proprioceptive training) restored SMO in pianists with musician's dystonia to the pattern seen in healthy pianists. Crucially, task-specific motor control improved significantly and objectively as measured with a MIDI (musical instrument digital interface) piano, and the amount of behavioral improvement was significantly correlated to the degree of sensorimotor reorganization. In healthy pianists and nonmusicians, the SMO and motor performance remained essentially unchanged. These findings suggest that the differentiation of SMO in the hand motor cortex and the degree of motor control of intensively practiced tasks are significantly linked and finely balanced. Proprioceptive training restored this balance in musician's dystonia to the behaviorally beneficial level of healthy musicians.

  2. A Study on a Brain-Computer Interface for Motor Assist by Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Tadanobu; Takano, Shinya; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Hirobayashi, Shigeki

    In recent times, considerable research has been conducted on the development of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Although there have been several reports on BCIs that assist motor functions by measurement of brain activity in the motor cortex, only a few studies have reported on BCI that assist motor functions by measurement of activity in areas other than the motor cortex. In this study, we experimentally develop a BCI that assists motor functions on the basis of brain activity in the prefrontal cortex. In this BCI system, subjects are shown the labyrinth problem. Concretely, brain activity is measured using fNIRS and the data are acquired in real time. The signal processing module implements low pass filtering of these signals. Further, the pattern classification module used in this system currently is a support vector machine. 22 subjects, both male and female, volunteered to participate in this experiment. 8 of these 22 subjects were able to solve the labyrinth problem. In this experiment, we could not obtain a high distinction. However, these results show that it is possible to develop BCI systems that assist motor functions using information from the prefrontal cortex.

  3. The amygdalo-motor pathway and the control of facial expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin M Gothard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Facial expressions reflect decisions about the perceived meaning of social stimuli emitted by others and the expected socio-emotional outcome of the reciprocating expression. The decision to produce a facial expression emerges from the joint activity of a network of structures that include the amygdala and multiple, interconnected cortical and subcortical motor areas. Reciprocal transformations between sensory and motor signals give rise to distinct brain states that promote, or impede the production of facial expressions. The muscles of the upper and lower face are controlled by anatomically distinct motor areas and thus require distinct patterns of motor commands. Concomitantly multiple areas, including the amygdala, monitor the ongoing overt behavior (the expression of self and the covert, autonomic responses that accompany emotional expressions. Interoceptive signals and visceral states, therefore, should be incorporated into the formalisms of decision making in order account for decisions that govern the receiving-emitting cycle of facial expressions.

  4. Quad-copter UAV BLDC Motor Control: Linear v/s non-linear control maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deep Parikh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some investigations and comparison of using linear versus non-linear static motor-control maps for the speed control of a BLDC (Brush Less Direct Current motors used in quad-copter UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. The motor-control map considered here is the inverse of the static map relating motor-speed output to motor-voltage input for a typical out-runner type Brushless DC Motors (BLDCM.  Traditionally, quad-copter BLDC motor speed control uses simple linear motor-control map defined by the motor-constant specification. However, practical BLDC motors show non-linear characteristic, particularly when operated across wide operating speed-range as is commonly required in quad-copter UAV flight operations. In this paper, our investigations to compare performance of linear versus non-linear motor-control maps are presented. The investigations cover simulation-based and experimental study of BLDC motor speed control systems for  quad-copter vehicle available. First the non-linear map relating rotor RPM to motor voltage for quad-copter BLDC motor is obtained experimentally using an optical speed encoder. The performance of the linear versus non-linear motor-control-maps for the speed control are studied. The investigations also cover study of time-responses for various standard test input-signals e.g. step, ramp and pulse inputs, applied as the reference speed-commands. Also, simple 2-degree of freedom test-bed is developed in our laboratory to help test the open-loop and closed-loop experimental investigations. The non-linear motor-control map is found to perform better in BLDC motor speed tracking control performance and thereby helping achieve better quad-copter roll-angle attitude control.

  5. Brain activation in motor sequence learning is related to the level of native cortical excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissek, Silke; Vallana, Guido S; Güntürkün, Onur; Dinse, Hubert; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cortical excitability may be subject to changes through training and learning. Motor training can increase cortical excitability in motor cortex, and facilitation of motor cortical excitability has been shown to be positively correlated with improvements in performance in simple motor tasks. Thus cortical excitability may tentatively be considered as a marker of learning and use-dependent plasticity. Previous studies focused on changes in cortical excitability brought about by learning processes, however, the relation between native levels of cortical excitability on the one hand and brain activation and behavioral parameters on the other is as yet unknown. In the present study we investigated the role of differential native motor cortical excitability for learning a motor sequencing task with regard to post-training changes in excitability, behavioral performance and involvement of brain regions. Our motor task required our participants to reproduce and improvise over a pre-learned motor sequence. Over both task conditions, participants with low cortical excitability (CElo) showed significantly higher BOLD activation in task-relevant brain regions than participants with high cortical excitability (CEhi). In contrast, CElo and CEhi groups did not exhibit differences in percentage of correct responses and improvisation level. Moreover, cortical excitability did not change significantly after learning and training in either group, with the exception of a significant decrease in facilitatory excitability in the CEhi group. The present data suggest that the native, unmanipulated level of cortical excitability is related to brain activation intensity, but not to performance quality. The higher BOLD mean signal intensity during the motor task might reflect a compensatory mechanism in CElo participants.

  6. A high performance sensorimotor beta rhythm-based brain computer interface associated with human natural motor behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ou; Lin, Peter; Vorbach, Sherry; Floeter, Mary Kay; Hattori, Noriaki; Hallett, Mark

    2008-03-01

    To explore the reliability of a high performance brain-computer interface (BCI) using non-invasive EEG signals associated with human natural motor behavior does not require extensive training. We propose a new BCI method, where users perform either sustaining or stopping a motor task with time locking to a predefined time window. Nine healthy volunteers, one stroke survivor with right-sided hemiparesis and one patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) participated in this study. Subjects did not receive BCI training before participating in this study. We investigated tasks of both physical movement and motor imagery. The surface Laplacian derivation was used for enhancing EEG spatial resolution. A model-free threshold setting method was used for the classification of motor intentions. The performance of the proposed BCI was validated by an online sequential binary-cursor-control game for two-dimensional cursor movement. Event-related desynchronization and synchronization were observed when subjects sustained or stopped either motor execution or motor imagery. Feature analysis showed that EEG beta band activity over sensorimotor area provided the largest discrimination. With simple model-free classification of beta band EEG activity from a single electrode (with surface Laplacian derivation), the online classifications of the EEG activity with motor execution/motor imagery were: >90%/~80% for six healthy volunteers, >80%/~80% for the stroke patient and ~90%/~80% for the ALS patient. The EEG activities of the other three healthy volunteers were not classifiable. The sensorimotor beta rhythm of EEG associated with human natural motor behavior can be used for a reliable and high performance BCI for both healthy subjects and patients with neurological disorders. Significance: The proposed new non-invasive BCI method highlights a practical BCI for clinical applications, where the user does not require extensive training.

  7. Speech motor control and acute mountain sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymerman, Allen; Lieberman, Philip; Hochstadt, Jesse; Rock, Paul B.; Butterfield, Gail E.; Moore, Lorna G.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An objective method that accurately quantifies the severity of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) symptoms is needed to enable more reliable evaluation of altitude acclimatization and testing of potentially beneficial interventions. HYPOTHESIS: Changes in human articulation, as quantified by timed variations in acoustic waveforms of specific spoken words (voice onset time; VOT), are correlated with the severity of AMS. METHODS: Fifteen volunteers were exposed to a simulated altitude of 4300 m (446 mm Hg) in a hypobaric chamber for 48 h. Speech motor control was determined from digitally recorded and analyzed timing patterns of 30 different monosyllabic words characterized as voiced and unvoiced, and as labial, alveolar, or velar. The Environmental Symptoms Questionnaire (ESQ) was used to assess AMS. RESULTS: Significant AMS symptoms occurred after 4 h, peaked at 16 h, and returned toward baseline after 48 h. Labial VOTs were shorter after 4 and 39 h of exposure; velar VOTs were altered only after 4 h; and there were no changes in alveolar VOTs. The duration of vowel sounds was increased after 4 h of exposure and returned to normal thereafter. Only 1 of 15 subjects did not increase vowel time after 4 h of exposure. The 39-h labial (p = 0.009) and velar (p = 0.037) voiced-unvoiced timed separations consonants and the symptoms of AMS were significantly correlated. CONCLUSIONS: Two objective measures of speech production were affected by exposure to 4300 m altitude and correlated with AMS severity. Alterations in speech production may represent an objective measure of AMS and central vulnerability to hypoxia.

  8. Self-Control and the Developing Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarullo, Amanda R.; Obradovic, Jelena; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2009-01-01

    Self-control is a skill that children need to succeed academically, socially, and emotionally. Brain regions essential to self-control are immature at birth and develop slowly throughout childhood. From ages 3 to 6 years, as these brain regions become more mature, children show improved ability to control impulses, shift their attention flexibly,…

  9. A brushless dc spin motor for momentum exchange altitude control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, D.; Rosenlieb, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Brushless dc spin motor is designed to use Hall effect probes as means of revolving rotor position and controlling motor winding currents. This results in 3 to 1 reduction in watt-hours required for wheel acceleration, a 2 to 1 reduction in power to run wheel, and a 10 to 1 reduction in the electronics size and weight.

  10. Regulating Cognitive Control through Approach-Avoidance Motor Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Severine; Holland, Rob W.; van Knippenberg, Ad

    2008-01-01

    In two studies, the regulatory function of approach-avoidance cues in activating cognitive control processes was investigated. It was hypothesized that avoidance motor actions, relative to approach motor actions, increase the recruitment of cognitive resources, resulting in better performance on tasks that draw on these capacities. In Study 1,…

  11. Gestalt Principles in the Control of Motor Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapp, Stuart T.; Jagacinski, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    We argue that 4 fundamental gestalt phenomena in perception apply to the control of motor action. First, a motor gestalt, like a perceptual gestalt, is holistic in the sense that it is processed as a single unit. This notion is consistent with reaction time results indicating that all gestures for a brief unit of action must be programmed prior to…

  12. Distinct brain metabolic patterns separately associated with cognition, motor function, and aging in Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji Hyun; Katako, Audrey; Aljuaid, Maram; Goertzen, Andrew L; Borys, Andrew; Hobson, Douglas E; Kim, Seok Min; Lee, Chong Sik

    2017-12-01

    We explored whether patients with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) show a distinct spatial metabolic pattern that characterizes cognitive deficits in addition to motor dysfunction. Eighteen patients with PDD underwent 3 separate positron emission tomography sessions with [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (for glucose metabolism), fluorinated N-3-fluoropropyl-2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane (for dopamine transporter density) and Pittsburgh compound-B (for beta-amyloid load). We confirmed in PDD versus normal controls, overall hypometabolism in the posterior and prefrontal brain regions accompanied with hypermetabolism in subcortical structures and the cerebellar vermis. A multivariate network analysis then revealed 3 metabolic patterns that are separately associated with cognitive performance (p = 0.042), age (p = 0.042), and motor symptom severity (p = 0.039). The age-related pattern's association with aging was replicated in healthy controls (p = 0.047) and patients with Alzheimer's disease (p = 0.002). The cognition-related pattern's association with cognitive performance was observed, with a trend-level of correlation, in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (p = 0.084) but not in patients with Alzheimer's disease (p = 0.974). We found no association with fluorinated N-3-fluoropropyl-2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane and Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography with patients' cognitive performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional connectivity of the human rostral and caudal cingulate motor areas in the brain resting state at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Christophe [CHNO des Quinze-Vingts, UPMC Paris 6, Service de NeuroImagerie, Paris (France)

    2010-01-15

    Three cingulate motor areas have been described in monkeys, the rostral, dorsal, and ventral cingulate motor areas, and would control limbic-related motor activity. However, little anatomical data are available in human about the functional networks these cingulate areas underlie. Therefore, networks anchored in the rostral and caudal cingulate motor areas (rCMA and cCMA, respectively) were studied in human using functional connectivity during the brain resting state. Since the rCMA and cCMA are located just under the pre-supplementary and supplementary motor areas (pre-SMA and SMA), the pre-SMA- and SMA-centered networks were also studied to ensure that these four circuits were correctly dissociated. Data from 14 right-handed healthy volunteers were acquired at rest and analyzed by region of interest (ROI)-based functional connectivity. The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations of separate ROIs located in rCMA, cCMA, pre-SMA, and SMA were successively used to identify significant temporal correlations with BOLD signal fluctuations of other brain regions. Low-frequency BOLD signal of the CMA was correlated with signal fluctuations in the prefrontal, cingulate, insular, premotor, motor, medial and inferior parietal cortices, putamen and thalamus, and anticorrelated with the default-mode network. rCMA was more in relation with prefrontal, orbitofrontal, and language-associated cortices than cCMA more related to sensory cortex. These cingulate networks were very similar to the pre-SMA- and SMA-centered networks, although pre-SMA and SMA showed stronger correlation with the prefrontal and inferior parietal cortices and with the cerebellum and the superior parietal cortex, respectively. The human cingulate motor areas constitute an interface between sensorimotor, limbic and executive systems, sharing common cortical, striatal, and thalamic relays with the overlying premotor medial areas. (orig.)

  14. Discrete-Time LPV Current Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we apply a new method for gain-scheduled output feedback control of nonlinear systems to current control of an induction motor. The method relies on recently developed controller synthesis results for linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems, where the controller synthesis is formulated...... further complications. The synthesis method is applied to the model, yielding an LPV discrete-time controller. Finally, the efficiency of the control scheme is validated via simulations as well as on the actual induction motor, both in open-loop current control and when an outer speed control loop...

  15. Digital Position Control System of a Motorized Valve in a Process Plant Using Hybrid Stepper Motor as Actuator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Subrata Chattopadhyay; Utpal Chakraborty; Arindam Bhakta; Sagarika Pal

    2009-01-01

    .... Microcontrollers can be used as suitable means for meeting these needs. In the present paper, a position control scheme of a motorized valve has been described using microcontroller-based configuration for controlling stepper motor as actuator...

  16. Non-Invasive Electrical Brain Stimulation Montages for Modulation of Human Motor Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curado, Marco; Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine

    2016-02-04

    Non-invasive electrical brain stimulation (NEBS) is used to modulate brain function and behavior, both for research and clinical purposes. In particular, NEBS can be applied transcranially either as direct current stimulation (tDCS) or alternating current stimulation (tACS). These stimulation types exert time-, dose- and in the case of tDCS polarity-specific effects on motor function and skill learning in healthy subjects. Lately, tDCS has been used to augment the therapy of motor disabilities in patients with stroke or movement disorders. This article provides a step-by-step protocol for targeting the primary motor cortex with tDCS and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), a specific form of tACS using an electrical current applied randomly within a pre-defined frequency range. The setup of two different stimulation montages is explained. In both montages the emitting electrode (the anode for tDCS) is placed on the primary motor cortex of interest. For unilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the contralateral forehead while for bilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the opposite primary motor cortex. The advantages and disadvantages of each montage for the modulation of cortical excitability and motor function including learning are discussed, as well as safety, tolerability and blinding aspects.

  17. Switch Reluctance Motor Control Based on Fuzzy Logic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Aleksandrovsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its intrinsic simplicity and reliability, the switched reluctance motor (SRM has now become a promising candidate for variable-speed drive applications as an alternative induction motor in various industrial application. However, the SRM has the disadvantage of nonlinear characteristic and control. It is suggested to use controller based on fuzzy logic system. Design of FLS controller and simulation model presented.

  18. Nonlinear Control of Induction Motors: A Performance Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    1998-01-01

    A novel approach to control of induction motors based on nonlinear state feedback has previously been presented by the authors. The resulting scheme gives a linearized input-output decoupling of the torque and the amplitude of the field. The proposed approach is used to design controllers...... for the field amplitude and the motor torque. The method is compared with the traditional Rotor Field Oriented Control method as regards variations in rotor resistance an magnetizing inductance...

  19. A variable frequency control for three-phase induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P.

    The speed control of a three-phase induction motor using a microprocessor controller is discussed. The motor is fed from a three-phase inverter, the frequency and voltage of which are controlled by the microprocessor controller. The v/f ratio is kept constant up to the rated frequency, and the voltage is kept constant above the rated frequency. To have satisfactory performance for the motor, the control strategies have to be carefully planned and evaluated. For transient performance of the motor, such as starting and speed changing, the in-rush current has to be minimized. In regard to the steady state performance of the motor, the controller should minimize the torque pulsations and heating of the motor and prevent short circuits of the power source. It is also of interest to compare various modulation techniques with regard to the harmonic losses in the motor and the pulsating torques developed. This comparison will lead to an optimized modulation technique which is suitable for the selected speed range.

  20. Fuzzy adaptive speed control of a permanent magnet synchronous motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Han Ho; Jung, Jin-Woo; Kim, Rae-Young

    2012-05-01

    A fuzzy adaptive speed controller is proposed for a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM). The proposed fuzzy adaptive speed regulator is insensitive to model parameter and load torque variations because it does not need any accurate knowledge about the motor parameter and load torque values. The stability of the proposed control system is also proven. The proposed adaptive speed regulator system is implemented by using a TMS320F28335 floating point DSP. Simulation and experimental results are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed fuzzy adaptive speed controller under uncertainties such as motor parameter and load torque variations using a prototype PMSM drive system.

  1. Listening to musical rhythms recruits motor regions of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joyce L; Penhune, Virginia B; Zatorre, Robert J

    2008-12-01

    Perception and actions can be tightly coupled; but does a perceptual event dissociated from action processes still engage the motor system? We conducted 2 functional magnetic resonance imaging studies involving rhythm perception and production to address this question. In experiment 1, on each trial subjects 1st listened in anticipation of tapping, and then tapped along with musical rhythms. Recruitment of the supplementary motor area, mid-premotor cortex (PMC), and cerebellum was observed during listen with anticipation. To test whether this activation was related to motor planning or rehearsal, in experiment 2 subjects naively listened to rhythms without foreknowledge that they would later tap along with them. Yet, the same motor regions were engaged despite no action-perception connection. In contrast, the ventral PMC was only recruited during action and action-coupled perceptual processes, whereas the dorsal part was only sensitive to the selection of actions based on higher-order rules of temporal organization. These functional dissociations shed light on the nature of action-perception processes and suggest an inherent link between auditory and motor systems in the context of rhythm.

  2. Longitudinal Changes in the Motor Learning-Related Brain Activation Response in Presymptomatic Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtbernd, Florian; Tang, Chris C; Feigin, Andrew; Dhawan, Vijay; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Paulsen, Jane S; Guttman, Mark; Eidelberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive decline, including deficits in motor learning, occurs in the presymptomatic phase of Huntington's disease (HD) and precedes the onset of motor symptoms. Findings from recent neuroimaging studies have linked these deficits to alterations in fronto-striatal and fronto-parietal brain networks. However, little is known about the temporal dynamics of these networks when subjects approach phenoconversion. Here, 10 subjects with presymptomatic HD were scanned with 15O-labeled water at baseline and again 1.5 years later while performing a motor sequence learning task and a kinematically matched control task. Spatial covariance analysis was utilized to characterize patterns of change in learning-related neural activation occurring over time in these individuals. Pattern expression was compared to corresponding values in 10 age-matched healthy control subjects. Spatial covariance analysis revealed significant longitudinal changes in the expression of a specific learning-related activation pattern characterized by increasing activity in the right orbitofrontal cortex, with concurrent reductions in the right medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate regions, the left insula, left precuneus, and left cerebellum. Changes in the expression of this pattern over time correlated with baseline measurements of disease burden and learning performance. The network changes were accompanied by modest improvement in learning performance that took place concurrently in the gene carriers. The presence of increased network activity in the setting of stable task performance is consistent with a discrete compensatory mechanism. The findings suggest that this effect is most pronounced in the late presymptomatic phase of HD, as subjects approach clinical onset.

  3. Motor-Skill Learning in an Insect Inspired Neuro-Computational Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Eleonora; Arena, Paolo; Strauss, Roland; Patané, Luca

    2017-01-01

    In nature, insects show impressive adaptation and learning capabilities. The proposed computational model takes inspiration from specific structures of the insect brain: after proposing key hypotheses on the direct involvement of the mushroom bodies (MBs) and on their neural organization, we developed a new architecture for motor learning to be applied in insect-like walking robots. The proposed model is a nonlinear control system based on spiking neurons. MBs are modeled as a nonlinear recurrent spiking neural network (SNN) with novel characteristics, able to memorize time evolutions of key parameters of the neural motor controller, so that existing motor primitives can be improved. The adopted control scheme enables the structure to efficiently cope with goal-oriented behavioral motor tasks. Here, a six-legged structure, showing a steady-state exponentially stable locomotion pattern, is exposed to the need of learning new motor skills: moving through the environment, the structure is able to modulate motor commands and implements an obstacle climbing procedure. Experimental results on a simulated hexapod robot are reported; they are obtained in a dynamic simulation environment and the robot mimicks the structures of Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:28337138

  4. Motor-Skill Learning in an Insect Inspired Neuro-Computational Control System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Eleonora; Arena, Paolo; Strauss, Roland; Patané, Luca

    2017-01-01

    In nature, insects show impressive adaptation and learning capabilities. The proposed computational model takes inspiration from specific structures of the insect brain: after proposing key hypotheses on the direct involvement of the mushroom bodies (MBs) and on their neural organization, we developed a new architecture for motor learning to be applied in insect-like walking robots. The proposed model is a nonlinear control system based on spiking neurons. MBs are modeled as a nonlinear recurrent spiking neural network (SNN) with novel characteristics, able to memorize time evolutions of key parameters of the neural motor controller, so that existing motor primitives can be improved. The adopted control scheme enables the structure to efficiently cope with goal-oriented behavioral motor tasks. Here, a six-legged structure, showing a steady-state exponentially stable locomotion pattern, is exposed to the need of learning new motor skills: moving through the environment, the structure is able to modulate motor commands and implements an obstacle climbing procedure. Experimental results on a simulated hexapod robot are reported; they are obtained in a dynamic simulation environment and the robot mimicks the structures of Drosophila melanogaster.

  5. Discrete-Time LPV Current Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we apply a new method for gain-scheduled output feedback control of nonlinear systems to current control of an induction motor. The method relies on recently developed controller synthesis results for linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems, where the controller synthesis is formulated...... as a set of linear matrix inequalities with full-block multipliers. A standard nonlinear model of the motor is constructed and written on LPV form. We then show that, although originally developed in continuous time, the controller synthesis results can be applied to a discrete-time model as well without...... further complications. The synthesis method is applied to the model, yielding an LPV discrete-time controller. Finally, the efficiency of the control scheme is validated via simulations as well as on the actual induction motor, both in open-loop current control and when an outer speed control loop...

  6. Preliminary Analysis of Parkinson-like Motor Coordination Abnormityin Brain-specific hS100B Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jialin; Zheng, Fang; Long, Yan; Tong, Liu; Zheng, Yuan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Qin, Chuan

    2017-04-20

    Objective To investigate the role of S100B in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD) and explore the possibility of brain-specific S100B transgenic mice as PD animal model. Methods The hS100B transgenic mice were established. The mice were divided into S100B transgenic group (TG),S100B knockout group (KG),and the non-transgenic control group (CG). Motor coordination ability of mice was measured by the rota-rod and pole-climbing test. The expressions of S100B,dopamine D1 receptor,dopamine D2 receptor,G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)2,GRK5,and tyrosine hydroxylase in brain tissue were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The levels of tyrosine,levodopa,dopamine,and homovanillic acid in brain tissue were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection. Results Compared with CG,the S100B protein expression in brain tissue significantly increased in TG (P0.05). Compared with CG,there was no obvious change of the above indicators in KG (all P>0.05). Conclusion S100B plays an important role in the motor coordination abnormity of PD. The brain-specific S100B transgenic mice can be used in research on the role of S100B gene in the development of PD.

  7. Increased brain cortical activity during parabolic flights has no influence on a motor tracking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stefan; Brümmer, Vera; Mierau, Andreas; Carnahan, Heather; Dubrowski, Adam; Strüder, Heiko K

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies showed that changing forces of gravity as they typically occur during parabolic flights might be responsible for adaptional processes of the CNS. However, until now it has not been differentiated between primary influences of weightlessness and secondary influences due to psycho-physiological factors (e.g., physical or mental strain). With the aim of detecting parabolic flight related changes in central cortical activity, a resting EEG was deduced in 16 subjects before, during and after parabolic flights. After subdividing EEG into alpha-, beta-,delta- and theta-wave bands, an increase in beta-power was noticeable inflight, whereas alpha(1)-power was increased postflight. No changes could be observed for the control group. To control possible effects of cortical activation, a manual tracking task with mirror inversion was performed during either the phase of weightlessness or during the normal gravity phase of a parabolic flight. No differences in performance nor in adaptation could be observed between both groups. A third group, performing under normal and stress-free conditions in a lab showed similar tracking values. We assume that the specific increase in brain activity is a sign of an increase in arousal inflight. This does support previous assumptions of non-specific stressors during parabolic flights and has to be considered as a relevant factor for experiments on central nerve adaptation. Although no influences of stress and/or weightlessness on motor performance and adaptation could be observed, we suggest that an "inflight" control group seems to be more adequate than a laboratory control group to investigate gravity-dependent changes in motor control.

  8. Korea Brain Initiative: Integration and Control of Brain Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sung-Jin; Lee, Haejin; Hur, Eun-Mi; Choe, Youngshik; Koo, Ja Wook; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Lee, Kea Joo; Lim, Hyun-Ho; Sun, Woong; Moon, Cheil; Kim, Kyungjin

    2016-11-02

    This article introduces the history and the long-term goals of the Korea Brain Initiative, which is centered on deciphering the brain functions and mechanisms that mediate the integration and control of brain functions that underlie decision-making. The goal of this initiative is the mapping of a functional connectome with searchable, multi-dimensional, and information-integrated features. The project also includes the development of novel technologies and neuro-tools for integrated brain mapping. Beyond the scientific goals this grand endeavor will ultimately have socioeconomic ramifications that not only facilitate global collaboration in the neuroscience community, but also develop various brain science-related industrial and medical innovations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Broad Application of a Reconfigurable Motor Controller Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An ultra-miniature (<50 grams) high-performance brushless-motor controller, code named 'Puck', has been developed by Barrett for Earth-based mobile-manipulation...

  10. Universal Brushless-DC Motor Controller for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this SBIR is to adapt an initial prototype ultra-miniature high-performance brushless-DC-motor controller, code named 'Puck', for use by NASA across a...

  11. The periaqueductal gray controls brainstem emotional motor systems including respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Respiration is a motor system essential for the survival of the individual and of the species. Because of its vital significance, studies on respiration often assume that breathing takes place independent of other motor systems. However, motor systems generating vocalization, coughing, sneezing, vomiting, as well as parturition, ejaculation, and defecation encompass abdominal pressure control, which involves changes in the respiratory pattern. The mesencephalic periaqueductal gray (PAG) controls all these motor systems. It determines the level setting of the whole body by means of its very strong projections to the ventromedial medullary tegmentum, but it also controls the cell groups that generate vocalization, coughing, sneezing, vomiting, as well as respiration. For this control, the PAG maintains very strong connections with the nucleus retroambiguus, which enables it to control abdominal and intrathoracic pressure. In this same context, the PAG also runs the pelvic organs, bladder, uterus, prostate, seminal vesicles, and the distal colon and rectum via its projections to the pelvic organ stimulating center and the pelvic floor stimulating center. These cell groups, via long descending projections, have direct control of the parasympathetic motoneurons in the sacral cord as well as of the somatic motoneurons in the nucleus of Onuf, innervating the pelvic floor. Respiration, therefore, is not a motor system that functions by itself, but is strongly regulated by the same systems that also control the other motor output systems. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Discrete-Time LPV Current Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we apply a new method for gain-scheduled output feedback control of nonlinear systems to current control of an induction motor. The method relies on recently developed controller synthesis results for linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems, where the controller synthesis is formulated...... as a set of linear matrix inequalities with full-block multipliers. A standard nonlinear model of the motor is then constructed and written on LPV form. We then show that, although originally developed in continuous time, the controller synthesis results can be applied to a discrete-time model as well...... without further complications. The synthesis method is applied to the model, yielding an LPV discrete-time controller. Finally, the efficiency of the control scheme is validated via simulations as well as experimentally on the actual induction motor, both in open-loop current control and when an outer...

  13. A New Torque Control System of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evstratov Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a new approach to control of permanent magnet synchronous motor drive based on the analysis of the electromechanical transformation. The proposed control system provides quick response and low ripple of the motor torque and flux. To synthesis this control system, the authors put the electromagnetic torque and the modulus of stator flux vector as controlled values and use the Lyapunov’s second method. In addition, the stator voltage constriction and ability of low-pass filtration are taken into account. The investigation of the proposed control system has carried out with the simulation and the experimental research which have confirmed that the proposed control system correspond to all above-mentioned control tasks and the permanent magnet synchronous motor controlled under this system may be recommended to use in robotics.

  14. Combined rTMS and virtual reality brain-computer interface training for motor recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, N N; Carey, J; Edelman, B J; Doud, A; Grande, A; Lakshminarayan, K; He, B

    2018-02-01

    Combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with brain-computer interface (BCI) training can address motor impairment after stroke by down-regulating exaggerated inhibition from the contralesional hemisphere and encouraging ipsilesional activation. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI, compared to sham rTMS  +  BCI, on motor recovery after stroke in subjects with lasting motor paresis. Three stroke subjects approximately one year post-stroke participated in three weeks of combined rTMS (real or sham) and BCI, followed by three weeks of BCI alone. Behavioral and electrophysiological differences were evaluated at baseline, after three weeks, and after six weeks of treatment. Motor improvements were observed in both real rTMS  +  BCI and sham groups, but only the former showed significant alterations in inter-hemispheric inhibition in the desired direction and increased relative ipsilesional cortical activation from fMRI. In addition, significant improvements in BCI performance over time and adequate control of the virtual reality BCI paradigm were observed only in the former group. When combined, the results highlight the feasibility and efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI for motor recovery, demonstrated by increased ipsilesional motor activity and improvements in behavioral function for the real rTMS  +  BCI condition in particular. Our findings also demonstrate the utility of BCI training alone, as shown by behavioral improvements for the sham rTMS  +  BCI condition. This study is the first to evaluate combined rTMS and BCI training for motor rehabilitation and provides a foundation for continued work to evaluate the potential of both rTMS and virtual reality BCI training for motor recovery after stroke.

  15. Brains and Brawn: Complex Motor Activities to Maximize Cognitive Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, David

    2015-01-01

    The target articles in this special issue address the timely question of embodied cognition in the classroom, and in particular the potential of this approach to facilitate learning in children. The interest for motor activities within settings that typically give little space to nontraditional content is proof of a shift from a Cartesian…

  16. Differences in Brain Waves of Normal Persons and Stroke Patients during Action Observation and Motor Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghee; Lee, Byounghee; Lee, Hyun Suk; Shin, Kil Ho; Kim, Min Ju; Son, Esther

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in brain waves between action observation and motor imagery of stroke patients and normal subjects, and to compare them. [Methods] Twelve stroke patients and twelve normal persons participated in this research. Each group executed action observation and the motor imagery training for 3 minutes, and before and during each intervention the brain waves were measured for 3 minutes, and the relative alpha power and relative beta power analyzed. [Results] Both normal persons and stroke patients showed significant differences in relative alpha power during action observation, but no significant difference in relative alpha power was found during motor imagery. The relative beta power increased similarly in both groups but it was more significantly different during action observation than during motor imagery. [Conclusion] Both action observation and motor imagery can be used as a therapeutic method for motor learning. However, action observation induces stronger cognitive activity, so for the stroke patients who have difficulty with fine motor representation, action observation might be a more effective therapy.

  17. 75 FR 44948 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Within-the-Scope Determination for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... adopt or attempt to enforce any standard relating to the control of emissions from new motor vehicles or... any other approval relating to the control of emissions from any new motor vehicle or new motor... control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle engines prior to March 30, 1966, if the...

  18. 76 FR 5586 - California State Motor Vehicle and Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Mobile Cargo...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle and Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Mobile Cargo... enforce any standard relating to the control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle... relating to the control of emissions from any new motor vehicle or new motor vehicle engine as condition...

  19. 77 FR 53199 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Advanced Clean Car Program; Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Advanced Clean Car Program; Request... control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle engines subject to this part. No state... crankcase emission standards) for the control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle...

  20. 78 FR 44112 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Urban Buses; Request for Waiver of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Urban Buses; Request for Waiver of... standard relating to the control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle engines subject... control of emissions from any new motor vehicle or new motor vehicle engine as condition precedent to the...

  1. 78 FR 719 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Urban Buses; Request for Waiver of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Urban Buses; Request for Waiver of... standard relating to the control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle engines subject... control of emissions from any new motor vehicle or new motor vehicle engine as condition precedent to the...

  2. Whole brain-based analysis of regional white matter tract alterations in rare motor neuron diseases by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrath, Alexander; Müller, Hans-Peter; Riecker, Axel; Ludolph, Albert C; Sperfeld, Anne-Dorte; Kassubek, Jan

    2010-11-01

    Different motor neuron disorders (MNDs) are mainly defined by the clinical presentation based on the predominance of upper or lower motor neuron impairment and the course of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) mostly serves as a tool to exclude other pathologies, but novel approaches such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have begun to add information on the underlying pathophysiological processes of these disorders in vivo. The present study was designed to investigate three different rare MNDs, i.e., primary lateral sclerosis (PLS, N = 25), hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP, N = 24), and X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy (X-SBMA, N = 20), by use of whole-brain-based DTI analysis in comparison with matched controls. This analysis of white matter (WM) impairment revealed widespread and characteristic patterns of alterations within the motor system with a predominant deterioration of the corticospinal tract (CST) in HSP and PLS patients according to the clinical presentation and also in patients with X-SBMA to a lesser degree, but also WM changes in projections to the limbic system and within distinct areas of the corpus callosum (CC), the latter both for HSP and PLS. In summary, DTI was able to define a characteristic WM pathoanatomy in motor and extra-motor brain areas, such as the CC and the limbic projectional system, for different MNDs via whole brain-based FA assessment and quantitative fiber tracking. Future advanced MRI-based investigations might help to provide a fingerprint-identification of MNDs. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Space motion sickness: The sensory motor controls and cardiovascular correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvestre, Philippe A.; Blaber, Andrew P.; Landrock, Clinton K.

    Background and PurposeSpace motion sickness (SMS) and related symptoms remain a major limiting factor in Space operations. A recent comprehensive literature review [J.R. Lackner, Z. DiZio, Space motion sickness, Experimental Brain Research 175 (2006) 377-399, doi 10.1007/s00221-006-0697-y] concluded that SMS does not represent a unique diagnostic entity, and there is no adequate predictor of SMS' susceptibility and severity. No countermeasure has been found reliable to prevent or treat SMS symptoms onset. Recent neurophysiological findings on sensory-motor controls monitoring [P.A. Souvestre, C. Landrock, Biomedical-performance monitoring and assessment of astronauts by means of an ocular vestibular monitoring system, Acta Astronautica, 60 (4-7) (2007) 313-321, doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2006.08.013] and heart-rate variability (HRV) measurements relationship could explain post-flight orthostatic intolerance (PFOI) in astronauts [A.P. Blaber, R.L. Bondar, M.S. Kassam, Heart rate variability and short duration space flight: relationship to post-flight orthostatic intolerance, BMC Physiology 4 (2004) 6]. These two methodologies are generally overlooked in SMS' analysis. In this paper we present the case for a strong relationship between sensory-motor controls related symptoms, including orthostatic intolerance (OI) and SMS symptoms. MethodsThis paper expands on several previously published papers [J.R. Lackner, Z. DiZio, Space motion sickness, Experimental Brain Research 175 (2006) 377-399, doi 10.1007/s00221-006-0697-y; P.A. Souvestre, C. Landrock, Biomedical-performance monitoring and assessment of astronauts by means of an ocular vestibular monitoring system, Acta Astronautica, 60 (4-7) (2007) 313-321, doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2006.08.013] along with an updated literature review. An analysis of a 10-year period clinical data from trauma patients experiencing postural deficiency syndrome (PDS) show assessment and monitoring techniques which successfully identify trauma

  4. Detection of event-related desynchronization during attempted and imagined movements in tetraplegics for brain switch control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokland, Y.; Vlek, R.; Karaman, B.; Ozin, F.; Thijssen, D.; Eijsvogels, T.M.; Colier, W.N.; Floor-Westerdijk, M.; Bruhn, J.; Farquhar, J.

    2012-01-01

    Motor-impaired individuals such as tetraplegics could benefit from Brain-Computer Interfaces with an intuitive control mechanism, for instance for the control of a neuroprosthesis. Whereas BCI studies in healthy users commonly focus on motor imagery, for the eventual target users, namely patients,

  5. Structural and functional hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis progression in motor- and memory-related brain regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Michael Stoppel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS multiple motor and extra-motor regions display structural and functional alterations. However, their temporal dynamics during disease-progression are unknown. To address this question we employed a longitudinal design assessing motor- and novelty-related brain activity in two fMRI sessions separated by a 3-month interval. In each session, patients and controls executed a Go/NoGo-task, in which additional presentation of novel stimuli served to elicit hippocampal activity. We observed a decline in the patients' movement-related activity during the 3-month interval. Importantly, in comparison to controls, the patients' motor activations were higher during the initial measurement. Thus, the relative decrease seems to reflect a breakdown of compensatory mechanisms due to progressive neural loss within the motor-system. In contrast, the patients' novelty-evoked hippocampal activity increased across 3 months, most likely reflecting the build-up of compensatory processes typically observed at the beginning of lesions. Consistent with a stage-dependent emergence of hippocampal and motor-system lesions, we observed a positive correlation between the ALSFRS-R or MRC-Megascores and the decline in motor activity, but a negative one with the hippocampal activation-increase. Finally, to determine whether the observed functional changes co-occur with structural alterations, we performed voxel-based volumetric analyses on magnetization transfer images in a separate patient cohort studied cross-sectionally at another scanning site. Therein, we observed a close overlap between the structural changes in this cohort, and the functional alterations in the other. Thus, our results provide important insights into the temporal dynamics of functional alterations during disease-progression, and provide support for an anatomical relationship between functional and structural cerebral changes in ALS.

  6. Structural and functional hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis progression in motor- and memory-related brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppel, Christian Michael; Vielhaber, Stefan; Eckart, Cindy; Machts, Judith; Kaufmann, Jörn; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Kollewe, Katja; Petri, Susanne; Dengler, Reinhard; Hopf, Jens-Max; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) multiple motor and extra-motor regions display structural and functional alterations. However, their temporal dynamics during disease-progression are unknown. To address this question we employed a longitudinal design assessing motor- and novelty-related brain activity in two fMRI sessions separated by a 3-month interval. In each session, patients and controls executed a Go/NoGo-task, in which additional presentation of novel stimuli served to elicit hippocampal activity. We observed a decline in the patients' movement-related activity during the 3-month interval. Importantly, in comparison to controls, the patients' motor activations were higher during the initial measurement. Thus, the relative decrease seems to reflect a breakdown of compensatory mechanisms due to progressive neural loss within the motor-system. In contrast, the patients' novelty-evoked hippocampal activity increased across 3 months, most likely reflecting the build-up of compensatory processes typically observed at the beginning of lesions. Consistent with a stage-dependent emergence of hippocampal and motor-system lesions, we observed a positive correlation between the ALSFRS-R or MRC-Megascores and the decline in motor activity, but a negative one with the hippocampal activation-increase. Finally, to determine whether the observed functional changes co-occur with structural alterations, we performed voxel-based volumetric analyses on magnetization transfer images in a separate patient cohort studied cross-sectionally at another scanning site. Therein, we observed a close overlap between the structural changes in this cohort, and the functional alterations in the other. Thus, our results provide important insights into the temporal dynamics of functional alterations during disease-progression, and provide support for an anatomical relationship between functional and structural cerebral changes in ALS.

  7. Simple Motor Control Concept Results High Efficiency at High Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Scott; Engel, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The need for high velocity motors in space applications for reaction wheels and detectors has stressed the limits of Brushless Permanent Magnet Motors (BPMM). Due to inherent hysteresis core losses, conventional BPMMs try to balance the need for torque verses hysteresis losses. Cong-less motors have significantly less hysteresis losses but suffer from lower efficiencies. Additionally, the inherent low inductance in cog-less motors result in high ripple currents or high switching frequencies, which lowers overall efficiency and increases performance demands on the control electronics.However, using a somewhat forgotten but fully qualified technology of Isotropic Magnet Motors (IMM), extremely high velocities may be achieved at low power input using conventional drive electronics. This paper will discuss the trade study efforts and empirical test data on a 34,000 RPM IMM.

  8. Motor-Skill Learning in an Insect Inspired Neuro-Computational Control System

    OpenAIRE

    Arena, Eleonora; Arena, Paolo; Strauss, Roland; Patané, Luca

    2017-01-01

    In nature, insects show impressive adaptation and learning capabilities. The proposed computational model takes inspiration from specific structures of the insect brain: after proposing key hypotheses on the direct involvement of the mushroom bodies (MBs) and on their neural organization, we developed a new architecture for motor learning to be applied in insect-like walking robots. The proposed model is a nonlinear control system based on spiking neurons. MBs are modeled as a nonlinear recur...

  9. From cognitive motor preparation to visual processing: The benefits of childhood fitness to brain health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchicci, M; Pontifex, M B; Drollette, E S; Pesce, C; Hillman, C H; Di Russo, F

    2015-07-09

    The association between a fit body and a fit brain in children has led to a rise of behavioral and neuroscientific research. Yet, the relation of cardiorespiratory fitness on premotor neurocognitive preparation with early visual processing has received little attention. Here, 41 healthy, lower and higher fit preadolescent children were administered a modified version of the Eriksen flanker task while electroencephalography (EEG) and behavioral measures were recorded. Event-related potentials (ERPs) locked to the stimulus onset with an earlier than usual baseline (-900/-800 ms) allowed investigation of both the usual post-stimulus (i.e., the P1, N1 and P2) as well as the pre-stimulus ERP components, such as the Bereitschaftspotential (BP) and the prefrontal negativity (pN component). At the behavioral level, aerobic fitness was associated response accuracy, with higher fit children being more accurate than lower fit children. Fitness-related differences selectively emerged at prefrontal brain regions during response preparation, with larger pN amplitude for higher than lower fit children, and at early perceptual stages after stimulus onset, with larger P1 and N1 amplitudes in higher relative to lower fit children. Collectively, the results suggest that the benefits of being aerobically fit appear at the stage of cognitive preparation prior to stimulus presentation and the behavioral response during the performance of a task that challenges cognitive control. Further, it is likely that enhanced activity in prefrontal brain areas may improve cognitive control of visuo-motor tasks, allowing for stronger proactive inhibition and larger early allocation of selective attention resources on relevant external stimuli. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gestalt principles in the control of motor action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapp, Stuart T; Jagacinski, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    We argue that 4 fundamental gestalt phenomena in perception apply to the control of motor action. First, a motor gestalt, like a perceptual gestalt, is holistic in the sense that it is processed as a single unit. This notion is consistent with reaction time results indicating that all gestures for a brief unit of action must be programmed prior to initiation of any part of the movement. Additional reaction time results related to initiation of longer responses are consistent with processing in terms of a sequence of indivisible motor gestalts. Some actions (e.g., many involving coordination of the hands) can be carried out effectively only if represented as a unitary gestalt. Second, a perceptual gestalt is independent of specific sensory receptors, as evidenced by perceptual constancy. In a similar manner a motor gestalt can be represented independently of specific muscular effectors, thereby allowing motor constancy. Third, just as a perceptual pattern (e.g., a Necker cube) is exclusively structured into only 1 of its possible configurations at any moment in time, processing prior to action is limited to 1 motor gestalt. Fourth, grouping in apparent motion leads to stream segregation in visual and auditory perception; this segregation is present in motor action and is dependent on the temporal rate. We discuss congruence of gestalt phenomena across perception and motor action (a) in relation to a unitary perceptual-motor code, (b) with respect to differences in the role of awareness, and (c) in conjunction with separate neural pathways for conscious perception and motor control. © 2011 American Psychological Association

  11. Implicit sequence-specific motor learning after sub-cortical stroke is associated with increased prefrontal brain activations: An fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Sean K.; Randhawa, Bubblepreet; Wessel, Brenda; Boyd, Lara A.

    2010-01-01

    Implicit motor learning is preserved after stroke, but how the brain compensates for damage to facilitate learning is unclear. We used a random effects analysis to determine how stroke alters patterns of brain activity during implicit sequence-specific motor learning as compared to general improvements in motor control. Nine healthy participants and 9 individuals with chronic, right focal sub-cortical stroke performed a continuous joystick-based tracking task during an initial fMRI session, over 5 days of practice, and a retention test during a separate fMRI session. Sequence-specific implicit motor learning was differentiated from general improvements in motor control by comparing tracking performance on a novel, repeated tracking sequences during early practice and again at the retention test. Both groups demonstrated implicit sequence-specific motor learning at the retention test, yet substantial differences were apparent. At retention, healthy control participants demonstrated increased BOLD response in left dorsal premotor cortex (BA 6) but decreased BOLD response left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC; BA 9) during repeated sequence tracking. In contrast, at retention individuals with stroke did not show this reduction in DLPFC during repeated tracking. Instead implicit sequence-specific motor learning and general improvements in motor control were associated with increased BOLD response in the left middle frontal gyrus BA 8, regardless of sequence type after stroke. These data emphasize the potential importance of a prefrontal-based attentional network for implicit motor learning after stroke. The present study is the first to highlight the importance of the prefrontal cortex for implicit sequence-specific motor learning after stroke. PMID:20725908

  12. Three-dimensional visuo-motor control of saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Bernhard J M

    2013-01-01

    Although the motion of the line of sight is a straightforward consequence of a particular rotation of the eye, it is much trickier to predict the rotation underlying a particular motion of the line of sight in accordance with Listing's law. Helmholtz's notion of the direction-circle together with the notion of primary and secondary reference directions in visual space provide an elegant solution to this reverse engineering problem, which the brain is faced with whenever generating a saccade. To test whether these notions indeed apply for saccades, we analyzed three-dimensional eye movements recorded in four rhesus monkeys. We found that on average saccade trajectories closely matched with the associated direction-circles. Torsional, vertical, and horizontal eye position of saccades scattered around the position predicted by the associated direction-circles with standard deviations of 0.5°, 0.3°, and 0.4°, respectively. Comparison of saccade trajectories with the likewise predicted fixed-axis rotations yielded mean coefficients of determinations (±SD) of 0.72 (±0.26) for torsion, 0.97 (±0.10) for vertical, and 0.96 (±0.11) for horizontal eye position. Reverse engineering of three-dimensional saccadic rotations based on visual information suggests that motor control of saccades, compatible with Listing's law, not only uses information on the fixation directions at saccade onset and offset but also relies on the computation of secondary reference positions that vary from saccade to saccade.

  13. Effects of long-term exercise and low-level inhibition of GABAergic synapses on motor control and the expression of BDNF in the motor related cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takahiro; Ninuma, Shuta; Hayashi, Masataka; Okuda, Akane; Asaka, Tadayoshi; Maejima, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays important roles in neuroplasticity in the brain. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of long-term exercise combined with low-level inhibition of GABAergic synapses on motor control and the expression of BDNF in the motor-related cortex. Methods ICR mice were divided into four groups based on the factors exercise and GABA A receptor inhibition. We administered the GABA A receptor antagonist bicuculline intraperitoneally (0.25 mg/kg). Mice exercised on a treadmill 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Following behavioral tests, BDNF expression in the motor cortex and cerebellar cortex was assayed using RT-PCR and ELISA. Results Exercise increased BDNF protein in the motor cortex and improved motor coordination in the rotarod test either in the presence or absence of bicuculline. BDNF mRNA expression in the motor cortex and muscle coordination in the wire hang test decreased after administration of bicuculline, whereas bicuculline administration increased mRNA and protein expression of BDNF in the cerebellum. Discussion The present study revealed that long-term exercise increased BDNF expression in the motor cortex and facilitated a transfer of motor learning from aerobic exercise to postural coordination. Thus, aerobic exercise is meaningful for conditioning motor learning to rehabilitate patients with central nervous system (CNS) disorders. However, long-term inhibition of GABA A receptors decreased the expression of cortical BDNF mRNA and decreased muscle coordination, despite the increase of BDNF in the cerebellum, suggesting that we have to consider the term of the inhibition of the GABAergic receptor for future clinical application to CNS patients.

  14. Age differences in the motor control of speech: An fMRI study of healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Pascale; Sato, Marc; Deschamps, Isabelle

    2017-05-01

    Healthy aging is associated with a decline in cognitive, executive, and motor processes that are concomitant with changes in brain activation patterns, particularly at high complexity levels. While speech production relies on all these processes, and is known to decline with age, the mechanisms that underlie these changes remain poorly understood, despite the importance of communication on everyday life. In this cross-sectional group study, we investigated age differences in the neuromotor control of speech production by combining behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Twenty-seven healthy adults underwent fMRI while performing a speech production task consisting in the articulation of nonwords of different sequential and motor complexity. Results demonstrate strong age differences in movement time (MT), with longer and more variable MT in older adults. The fMRI results revealed extensive age differences in the relationship between BOLD signal and MT, within and outside the sensorimotor system. Moreover, age differences were also found in relation to sequential complexity within the motor and attentional systems, reflecting both compensatory and de-differentiation mechanisms. At very high complexity level (high motor complexity and high sequence complexity), age differences were found in both MT data and BOLD response, which increased in several sensorimotor and executive control areas. Together, these results suggest that aging of motor and executive control mechanisms may contribute to age differences in speech production. These findings highlight the importance of studying functionally relevant behavior such as speech to understand the mechanisms of human brain aging. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2751-2771, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Genetic variation in the human brain dopamine system influences motor learning and its modulation by L-Dopa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-Fuhrhop, Kristin M; Minton, Brian; Acevedo, Daniel; Shahbaba, Babak; Cramer, Steven C

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine is important to learning and plasticity. Dopaminergic drugs are the focus of many therapies targeting the motor system, where high inter-individual differences in response are common. The current study examined the hypothesis that genetic variation in the dopamine system is associated with significant differences in motor learning, brain plasticity, and the effects of the dopamine precursor L-Dopa. Skilled motor learning and motor cortex plasticity were assessed using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design in 50 healthy adults during two study weeks, one with placebo and one with L-Dopa. The influence of five polymorphisms with established effects on dopamine neurotransmission was summed using a gene score, with higher scores corresponding to higher dopaminergic neurotransmission. Secondary hypotheses examined each polymorphism individually. While training on placebo, higher gene scores were associated with greater motor learning (p = .03). The effect of L-Dopa on learning varied with the gene score (gene score*drug interaction, p = .008): participants with lower gene scores, and thus lower endogenous dopaminergic neurotransmission, showed the largest learning improvement with L-Dopa relative to placebo (plearning (p = .02) and its modulation by L-Dopa (plearning and its modulation by L-Dopa. A polygene score explains differences in L-Dopa effects on learning and plasticity most robustly, thus identifying distinct biological phenotypes with respect to L-Dopa effects on learning and plasticity. These findings may have clinical applications in post-stroke rehabilitation or the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  16. Quantifying the role of motor imagery in brain-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesotti, Silvia; Bassolino, Michela; Serino, Andrea; Bleuler, Hannes; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-04-01

    Despite technical advances in brain machine interfaces (BMI), for as-yet unknown reasons the ability to control a BMI remains limited to a subset of users. We investigate whether individual differences in BMI control based on motor imagery (MI) are related to differences in MI ability. We assessed whether differences in kinesthetic and visual MI, in the behavioral accuracy of MI, and in electroencephalographic variables, were able to differentiate between high- versus low-aptitude BMI users. High-aptitude BMI users showed higher MI accuracy as captured by subjective and behavioral measurements, pointing to a prominent role of kinesthetic rather than visual imagery. Additionally, for the first time, we applied mental chronometry, a measure quantifying the degree to which imagined and executed movements share a similar temporal profile. We also identified enhanced lateralized μ-band oscillations over sensorimotor cortices during MI in high- versus low-aptitude BMI users. These findings reveal that subjective, behavioral, and EEG measurements of MI are intimately linked to BMI control. We propose that poor BMI control cannot be ascribed only to intrinsic limitations of EEG recordings and that specific questionnaires and mental chronometry can be used as predictors of BMI performance (without the need to record EEG activity).

  17. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolie, V.W.

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. The motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The speed error signal is generated by a novel vernier-logic circuit which is drift-free and highly sensitive to small speed changes. The phase error is also computed by digital logic, with adjustable sensitivity around a 0 mid-scale value. The drift error signal, generated by long-term counting of the phase error, is used to compensate for any slow changes in the average friction drag on the motor. An auxillary drift-byte status sensor prevents any disruptive overflow or underflow of the drift-error counter. An adjustable clocked-delay unit is inserted between the controller and the source of the reference pulse train to permit phase alignment of the rotor to any desired offset angle. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of read-only memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  18. Understanding the relationship between brain and upper limb function in children with unilateral motor impairments: A multimodal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Maya; Green, Dido; Rudisch, Julian; Zielinski, Ingar M; Benthem-Muñiz, Marta; Jongsma, Marijtje L A; McClelland, Verity; Steenbergen, Bert; Shiran, Shelly; Ben Bashat, Dafna; Barker, Gareth J

    2018-01-01

    Atypical brain development and early brain injury have profound and long lasting impact on the development, skill acquisition, and subsequent independence of a child. Heterogeneity is present at the brain level and at the motor level; particularly with respect to phenomena of bilateral activation and mirrored movements (MMs). In this multiple case study we consider the feasibility of using several modalities to explore the relationship between brain structure and/or activity and hand function: Electroencephalography (EEG), both structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI, fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), Electromyography (EMG) and hand function assessments. 15 children with unilateral CP (ages: 9.4 ± 2.5 years) undertook hand function assessments and at least two additional neuroimaging and/or neurophysiological procedures: MRI/DTI/fMRI (n = 13), TMS (n = 11), and/or EEG/EMG (n = 8). During the fMRI scans and EEG measurements, a motor task was performed to study cortical motor control activity during simple hand movements. DTI tractography analysis was used to study the corpus-callosum (CC) and cortico-spinal tracts (CST). TMS was used to study cortico-spinal connectivity pattern. Type and range of severity of brain injury was evident across all levels of manual ability with the highest radiological scores corresponded to children poorer manual ability. Evidence of MMs was found in 7 children, mostly detected when moving the affected hand, and not necessarily corresponding to bilateral brain activation. When moving the affected hand, bilateral brain activation was seen in 6/11 children while 3/11 demonstrated unilateral activation in the contralateral hemisphere, and one child demonstrated motor activation predominantly in the supplementary motor area (SMA). TMS revealed three types of connectivity patterns from the cortex to the affected hand: a contralateral (n = 3), an ipsilateral (n = 4

  19. Fuzzy sliding mode controller for doubly fed induction motor speed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show that the FSMC and SMC are robust against internal and external perturbations, but the FSMC is superior to SMC in eliminating chattering phenomena and response time. Keywords: Direct Field-Oriented Control, sliding mode control, fuzzy sliding mode controller, doubly fed induction motor, fuzzy logic ...

  20. Distributed Motor Controller (DMC) for Operation in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Colin M.; Yager, Jeremy A.; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Some, Rafi; Sirota, Allen; Kopf, Ted; Stern, Ryan; Hunter, Don

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an extreme environment capable Distributed Motor Controller (DMC) module suitable for operation with a distributed architecture of future spacecraft systems. This motor controller is designed to be a bus-based electronics module capable of operating a single Brushless DC motor in extreme space environments: temperature (-120 C to +85 C required, -180 C to +100 C stretch goal); radiation (>;20K required, >;100KRad stretch goal); >;360 cycles of operation. Achieving this objective will result in a scalable modular configuration for motor control with enhanced reliability that will greatly lower cost during the design, fabrication and ATLO phases of future missions. Within the heart of the DMC lies a pair of cold-capable Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) that enable its miniaturization and operation in extreme environments. The ASICs are fabricated in the IBM 0.5 micron Silicon Germanium (SiGe) BiCMOS process and are comprised of Analog circuitry to provide telemetry information, sensor interface, and health and status of DMC. The FPGA contains logic to provide motor control, status monitoring and spacecraft interface. The testing and characterization of these ASICs have yielded excellent functionality in cold temperatures (-135 C). The DMC module has demonstrated successful operation of a motor at temperature.

  1. Redundant speed control for brushless Hall effect motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A speed control system for a brushless Hall effect device equipped direct current (D.C.) motor is described. Separate windings of the motor are powered by separate speed responsive power sources. A change in speed, upward or downward, because of the failure of a component of one of the power sources results in a corrective signal being generated in the other power source to supply an appropriate power level and polarity to one winding to cause the motor to be corrected in speed.

  2. Programmable logic controller based synchronous motor excitation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janda Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a 3.5 MW synchronous motor excitation system reconstruction. In the proposed solution programmable logic controller is used to control motor, which drives the turbo compressor. Comparing to some other solutions that are used in similar situations, the proposed solution is superior due to its flexibility and usage of mass-production hardware. Moreover, the implementation of PLC enables easy integration of the excitation system with the other technological processes in the plant as well as in the voltage regulation of 'smart grid' system. Also, implementation of various optimization algorithms can be done comfortably and it does not require additional investment in hardware. Some experimental results that depict excitation current during motor start-up, as well as, measured static characteristics of the motor, were presented.

  3. Fault tolerant vector control of induction motor drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odnokopylov, G.; Bragin, A.

    2014-10-01

    For electric composed of technical objects hazardous industries, such as nuclear, military, chemical, etc. an urgent task is to increase their resiliency and survivability. The construction principle of vector control system fault-tolerant asynchronous electric. Displaying recovery efficiency three-phase induction motor drive in emergency mode using two-phase vector control system. The process of formation of a simulation model of the asynchronous electric unbalance in emergency mode. When modeling used coordinate transformation, providing emergency operation electric unbalance work. The results of modeling transient phase loss motor stator. During a power failure phase induction motor cannot save circular rotating field in the air gap of the motor and ensure the restoration of its efficiency at rated torque and speed.

  4. Chaos Suppression in Fractional Order Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor and PI controlled Induction motor by Extended Back stepping Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Karthikeyan; Karthikeyan, Anitha; Duraisamy, Prakash

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the control of three-dimensional non-autonomous fractional-order model of a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and PI controlled fractional order Induction motor via recursive extended back stepping control technique. A robust generalized weighted controllers are derived to suppress the chaotic oscillations of the fractional order model. As the direct Lyapunov stability analysis of the controller is difficult for a fractional order first derivative, we have derived a new lemma to analyze the stability of the system. Numerical simulations of the proposed chaos suppression methodology are given to prove the analytical results.

  5. Motor Learning and Control Foundations of Kinesiology: Defining the Academic Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischman, Mark G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines the kinesiological foundations of the motor behavior subdisciplines of motor learning and motor control. After defining the components of motor behavior, the paper addresses the undergraduate major and core knowledge by examining several classic textbooks in motor learning and control, as well as a number of contemporary…

  6. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller of switched reluctance motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahour Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of adaptive neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS control for switched reluctance motor (SRM speed. The ANFIS has the advantages of expert knowledge of the fuzzy inference system and the learning capability of neural networks. An adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller of the motor speed is then designed and simulated. Digital simulation results show that the designed ANFIS speed controller realizes a good dynamic behaviour of the motor, a perfect speed tracking with no overshoot and a good rejection of impact loads disturbance. The results of applying the adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller to a SRM give better performance and high robustness than those obtained by the application of a conventional controller (PI.

  7. Personal Computer Based Controller For Switched Reluctance Motor Drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, X.; Krishnan, R.; Adkar, S.; Chandramouli, G.

    1987-10-01

    Th9, switched reluctance motor (SRM) has recently gained considerable attention in the variable speed drive market. Two important factors that have contributed to this are, the simplicity of construction and the possibility of developing low cost con-trollers with minimum number of switching devices in the drive circuits. This is mainly due to the state-of-art of the present digital circuits technology and the low cost of switching devices. The control of this motor drive is under research. Optimized performance of the SRM motor drive is very dependent on the integration of the controller, converter and the motor. This research on system integration involves considerable changes in the control algorithms and their implementation. A Personal computer (PC) based controller is very appropriate for this purpose. Accordingly, the present paper is concerned with the design of a PC based controller for a SRM. The PC allows for real-time microprocessor control with the possibility of on-line system parameter modifications. Software reconfiguration of this controller is easier than a hardware based controller. User friendliness is a natural consequence of such a system. Considering the low cost of PCs, this controller will offer an excellent cost-effective means of studying the control strategies for the SRM drive intop greater detail than in the past.

  8. Whole-brain structural connectivity in dyskinetic cerebral palsy and its association with motor and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester-Plané, Júlia; Schmidt, Ruben; Laporta-Hoyos, Olga; Junqué, Carme; Vázquez, Élida; Delgado, Ignacio; Zubiaurre-Elorza, Leire; Macaya, Alfons; Póo, Pilar; Toro, Esther; de Reus, Marcel A; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Pueyo, Roser

    2017-09-01

    Dyskinetic cerebral palsy (CP) has long been associated with basal ganglia and thalamus lesions. Recent evidence further points at white matter (WM) damage. This study aims to identify altered WM pathways in dyskinetic CP from a standardized, connectome-based approach, and to assess structure-function relationship in WM pathways for clinical outcomes. Individual connectome maps of 25 subjects with dyskinetic CP and 24 healthy controls were obtained combining a structural parcellation scheme with whole-brain deterministic tractography. Graph theoretical metrics and the network-based statistic were applied to compare groups and to correlate WM state with motor and cognitive performance. Results showed a widespread reduction of WM volume in CP subjects compared to controls and a more localized decrease in degree (number of links per node) and fractional anisotropy (FA), comprising parieto-occipital regions and the hippocampus. However, supramarginal gyrus showed a significantly higher degree. At the network level, CP subjects showed a bilateral pathway with reduced FA, comprising sensorimotor, intraparietal and fronto-parietal connections. Gross and fine motor functions correlated with FA in a pathway comprising the sensorimotor system, but gross motor also correlated with prefrontal, temporal and occipital connections. Intelligence correlated with FA in a network with fronto-striatal and parieto-frontal connections, and visuoperception was related to right occipital connections. These findings demonstrate a disruption in structural brain connectivity in dyskinetic CP, revealing general involvement of posterior brain regions with relative preservation of prefrontal areas. We identified pathways in which WM integrity is related to clinical features, including but not limited to the sensorimotor system. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4594-4612, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Divided attention impairs human motor adaptation but not feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jordan A; Thoroughman, Kurt A

    2007-07-01

    When humans experience externally induced errors in a movement, the motor system's feedback control compensates for those errors within the movement. The motor system's predictive control then uses information about those errors to inform future movements. The role of attention in these two distinct motor processes is unclear. Previous experiments have revealed a role for attention in motor learning over the course of many movements; however, these experimental paradigms do not determine how attention influences within-movement feedback control versus across-movement adaptation. Here we develop a dual-task paradigm, consisting of movement and audio tasks, which can differentiate and expose attention's role in these two processes of motor control. Over the course of several days, subjects performed horizontal reaching movements, with and without the audio task; movements were occasionally subjected to transient force perturbations. On movements with a force perturbation, subjects compensated for the force-induced movement errors, and on movements immediately after the force perturbation subjects exhibited adaptation. On every movement trial, subjects performed a two-tone frequency-discrimination task. The temporal specificity of the frequency-discrimination task allowed us to divide attention within and across movements. We find that divided attention did not impair the within-movement feedback control of the arm, but did reduce subsequent movement adaptation. We suggest that the secondary task interfered with the encoding and transformation of errors into changes in predictive control.

  10. Limb versus speech motor control: a conceptual review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Britta; Fuchs, Susanne; Perrier, Pascal; Schöner, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative conceptual review of speech and limb motor control. Speech is essentially cognitive in nature and constrained by the rules of language, while limb movement is often oriented to physical objects. We discuss the issue of intrinsic vs. extrinsic variables underlying the representations of motor goals as well as whether motor goals specify terminal postures or entire trajectories. Timing and coordination is recognized as an area of strong interchange between the two domains. Although coordination among different motor acts within a sequence and coarticulation are central to speech motor control, they have received only limited attention in manipulatory movements. The biomechanics of speech production is characterized by the presence of soft tissue, a variable number of degrees of freedom, and the challenges of high rates of production, while limb movements deal more typically with inertial constraints from manipulated objects. This comparative review thus leads us to identify many strands of thinking that are shared across the two domains, but also points us to issues on which approaches in the two domains differ. We conclude that conceptual interchange between the fields of limb and speech motor control has been useful in the past and promises continued benefit.

  11. Motor Control and Neural Plasticity through Interhemispheric Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Takeuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The corpus callosum, which is the largest white matter structure in the human brain, connects the 2 cerebral hemispheres. It plays a crucial role in maintaining the independent processing of the hemispheres and in integrating information between both hemispheres. The functional integrity of interhemispheric interactions can be tested electrophysiologically in humans by using transcranial magnetic stimulation, electroencephalography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. As a brain structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging has revealed the microstructural connectivity underlying interhemispheric interactions. Sex, age, and motor training in addition to the size of the corpus callosum influence interhemispheric interactions. Several neurological disorders change hemispheric asymmetry directly by impairing the corpus callosum. Moreover, stroke lesions and unilateral peripheral impairments such as amputation alter interhemispheric interactions indirectly. Noninvasive brain stimulation changes the interhemispheric interactions between both motor cortices. Recently, these brain stimulation techniques were applied in the clinical rehabilitation of patients with stroke by ameliorating the deteriorated modulation of interhemispheric interactions. Here, we review the interhemispheric interactions and mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these interactions and propose rehabilitative approaches for appropriate cortical reorganization.

  12. Neural predictors of motor control and impact of visuo-proprioceptive information in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corporaal, Sharissa H A; Gooijers, Jolien; Chalavi, Sima; Cheval, Boris; Swinnen, Stephan P; Boisgontier, Matthieu P

    2017-11-01

    For successful motor control, the central nervous system is required to combine information from the environment and the current body state, which is provided by vision and proprioception respectively. We investigated the relative contribution of visual and proprioceptive information to upper limb motor control and the extent to which structural brain measures predict this performance in youth (n = 40; age range 9-18 years). Participants performed a manual tracking task, adopting in-phase and anti-phase coordination modes. Results showed that, in contrast to older participants, younger participants performed the task with lower accuracy in general and poorer performance in anti-phase than in-phase modes. However, a proprioceptive advantage was found at all ages, that is, tracking accuracy was higher when proprioceptive information was available during both in- and anti-phase modes at all ages. The microstructural organization of interhemispheric connections between homologous dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and the cortical thickness of the primary motor cortex were associated with sensory-specific accuracy of tracking performance. Overall, the findings suggest that manual tracking performance in youth does not only rely on brain regions involved in sensorimotor processing, but also on prefrontal regions involved in attention and working memory. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5628-5647, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Learned EEG-based regulation of motor-related brain oscillations during application of transcranial electric currents: feasibility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjo R Soekadar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS improves motor learning and can influence emotional processing or attention. However, it remained unclear whether learned electroencephalography (EEG-based brain-machine interface (BMI control during tDCS is feasible and how application of transcranial electric currents during BMI control would interfere with feature-extraction of physiological brain signals. Here we tested this combination and evaluated stimulation-dependent artifacts across different EEG frequencies and stability of motor imagery-based BMI control. Approach: Ten healthy volunteers were invited to two BMI-sessions, each comprising two 60-trial blocks. During the trials, modulation of mu-rhythms (8-15Hz associated with motor imagery recorded over C4 was translated into online cursor movements on a computer screen. During block 2, either sham (session A or anodal tDCS (session B was applied at 1mA with the stimulation electrode placed 1cm anterior of C4. Main results: tDCS was associated with a significant signal power increase in the lower frequencies most evident in the signal spectrum of the EEG channel closest to the stimulation electrode. Stimulation-dependent signal power increase exhibited a decay of 12dB per decade, leaving frequencies above 9Hz unaffected. Analysis of BMI control performance did not indicate a difference between blocks and tDCS conditions. Conclusion: Application of tDCS during learned EEG-based self-regulation of brain oscillations above 9Hz is feasible and safe, and might improve applicability of BMI systems in patient populations.

  14. Permanent magnet brushless motor control based on ADRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaokun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Permanent magnet brushless motor is a nonlinear system with multiple variables, the mathematical model of Permanent magnet brushless motor is difficult to establish, and since that the classic PID control is hard to precisely control the motor. Active disturbance rejection control (ADRC technique is a new nonlinear controller which does not depend on the system model. It is starting from the classic PID control, and establishing the loop control system by error negative feedback, the ESO(extended state observer observing system which comes from the observer theory of modern control theory to observe internal and external perturbations. ADRC inherits the advantages of PID with little overshoot, high convergence speed, high accuracy, strong anti-interference ability and other characteristics, and it has a strong disturbance adaptability and robustness as for the uncertainty perturbation and their internal disturbance of control objects. Therefore, This paper attempts to use Active disturbance rejection control(ADRC, in order to improve the control of permanent magnet brushless motor. In this design of control system, the simulation of the system is realized based on MATLAB, and then the discrete control algorithm is transplanted to the embedded system to control the permanent magnet brushless DC motor (PMBLDCM. The control system is implemented on the DSP-F28335 digital signal processor, and the DSP also provides the functions like voltage and current AD sampling, PWM driver generation, speed and rotor position calculation, etc. The simulation and experiment results indicate that, the system has good dynamic performance and anti-disturbance performance.

  15. ON THE ISSUE OF VECTOR CONTROL OF THE ASYNCHRONOUS MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Firago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the issue of one of the widespread types of vector control realization for the asynchronous motors with a short-circuited rotor. Of all more than 20 vector control types known presently, the following are applied most frequently: direct vector control with velocity pickup (VP, direct vector control without VP, indirect vector control with VP and indirect vector control without VP. Despite the fact that the asynchronous-motor indirect vector control without VP is the easiest and most spread, the absence of VP does not allow controlling the motor electromagnetic torque at zero velocity. This is the reason why for electric motor drives of such requirements they utilize the vector control with a velocity transducer. The systems of widest dissemination became the direct and indirect vector control systems with X-axis alignment of the synchronously rotating x–y-coordinate frame along the rotor flux-linkage vector inasmuch as this provides the simplest correlations for controlling variables. Although these two types of vector control are well presented in literature, a number of issues concerning their realization and practical application require further elaboration. These include: the block schemes adequate representation as consisted with the modern realization of vector control and clarification of the analytical expressions for evaluating the regulator parameters.The authors present a technique for evaluating the dynamics of an asynchronous electric motor drive with direct vector control and x-axis alignment along the vector of rotor flux linkage. The article offers a generalized structure of this vector control type with detailed description of its principal blocks: controlling system, frequency converter, and the asynchronous motor.The paper presents a direct vector control simulating model developed in the MatLab environment on the grounds of this structure. The authors illustrate the described technique with the results

  16. Auto-deleting brain machine interface: Error detection using spiking neural activity in the motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Chen, Nir; Stavisky, Sergey D; Kao, Jonathan C; Ryu, Stephen I; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2015-01-01

    Brain machine interfaces (BMIs) aim to assist people with paralysis by increasing their independence and ability to communicate, e.g., by using a cursor-based virtual keyboard. Current BMI clinical trials are hampered by modest performance that causes selection of wrong characters (errors) and thus reduces achieved typing rate. If it were possible to detect these errors without explicit knowledge of the task goal, this could be used to automatically "undo" wrong selections or even prevent upcoming wrong selections. We decoded imminent or recent errors during closed-loop BMI control from intracortical spiking neural activity. In our experiment, a non-human primate controlled a neurally-driven BMI cursor to acquire targets on a grid, which simulates a virtual keyboard. In offline analyses of this closed-loop BMI control data, we identified motor cortical neural signals indicative of task error occurrence. We were able to detect task outcomes (97% accuracy) and even predict upcoming task outcomes (86% accuracy) using neural activity alone. This novel strategy may help increase the performance and clinical viability of BMIs.

  17. Regional brain electrical activity in posttraumatic stress disorder after motor vehicle accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, Sirko; Beauducel, André; Zöllner, Tanja; Maercker, Andreas; Karl, Anke

    2006-11-01

    This study examined whether patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) would show an abnormal pattern of electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha asymmetries, which has been proposed for particular types of anxiety. Patients with PTSD (n = 22) or subsyndromal PTSD (n = 21), traumatized controls without PTSD (non-PTSD with MVA; n = 21), and healthy controls without MVA (n = 23) underwent measurement of EEG activity during baseline and exposure to a neutral, a positive, a negative, and an accident-related picture. Differences in brain asymmetry between groups were observed only during exposure to trauma-related material. PTSD and subsyndromal PTSD patients showed a pattern of enhanced right anterior and posterior activation, whereas non-PTSD with MVA participants showed the opposite pattern. Furthermore, posterior asymmetry in nontraumatized healthy controls varied with gender, with female participants showing a pattern of higher right posterior activation. The results support the hypothesis that symptomatic MVA survivors are characterized by a pattern of right hemisphere activation that is associated with anxious arousal and symptoms of PTSD during processing of trauma-specific information. (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. The Control of Switched Reluctance Motor in Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The control of SRM was discussed: current chopping control, angle position control. This paper presents an inverter circuit and a fuzzy sliding mode control method to minimize the torque fluctuation and noise of the SRM. Based on the experimental results, Using the inverter circuit and fuzzy sliding mode control method can effectively minimize the torque fluctuation and noise of the SRM, For the switched reluctance motor applications in electric vehicles to provide a theoretical basis.

  19. Current and Speed Control of the Switched Reluctance Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Fort

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The papers deals with the problem of the current and speed control of the switched reculttance motor (SRM on the base of the proposed mathematical model of the SRM. The basic types of the controllers are described (proportional controller, PI-controller and controller with the on-line voltage calculation of the mathematical model and the design of their parameters is proposed. Then the comparsion of the simulation and the real drive experimental measurement results is presented.

  20. Brain Computer Interface: Assessment of Spinal Cord Injury Patient towards Motor Movement through EEG application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syam Syahrull Hi-Fi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG associated with motor task have been comprehensively investigated and it can also describe the brain activities while spinal cord injury (SCI patient with para/tetraplegia performing movement with their limbs. This paper reviews on conducted research regarding application of brain computer interface (BCI that offer alternative for neural impairments community such as spinal cord injury patient (SCI which include the experimental design, signal analysis of EEG band signal and data processing methods. The findings claim that the EEG signals of SCI patients associated with movement tasks can be stimulated through mental and motor task. Other than that EEG signal component such as alpha and beta frequency bands indicate significance for analysing the brain activity of subjects with SCI during movements.

  1. Direct Torque Control of Matrix Converter Fed Induction Motor Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAGADEESAN Karpagam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Direct TorqueControl (DTC of induction motor drive using matrixconverters. DTC is a high performance motor controlscheme with fast torque and flux responses. However,the main disadvantage of conventional DTC iselectromagnetic torque ripple. In this paper, directtorque control for Induction Motors using MatrixConverters is analysed and points out the problem ofthe electromagnetic torque ripple which is one of themost important drawbacks of the Direct TorqueControl. Besides, the matrix converter is a single-stageac-ac power conversion device without dc-link energystorage elements. Matrix converter (MC may becomea good alternative to voltage-source inverter (VSI.This work combines the advantages of the matrixconverter with those of the DTC technique, generatingthe required voltage vectors under unity input powerfactor operation. Simulation results demonstrates theeffectiveness of the torque control.

  2. Remote Traumatic Brain Injury Is Associated with Motor Dysfunction in Older Military Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Raquel C; Peltz, Carrie B; Kenney, Kimbra; Covinsky, Kenneth E; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Yaffe, Kristine

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been identified as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). Motor dysfunction among TBI-exposed elders without PD has not been well characterized. We sought to determine whether remote TBI is a risk factor for motor dysfunction on exam and functionally relevant motor dysfunction in day-to-day life among independently living elders without PD. This is a cross-sectional cohort study of independently living retired military veterans aged 50 or older with (n = 78) and without (n = 85) prior TBI-all without diagnosed PD. To characterize multidimensional aspects of motor function on exam, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) Motor Examination was performed by a board-certified neurologist and used to calculate a modified UPDRS (mUPDRS) global motor score and four domain scores (tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and posture/gait). Functionally relevant motor dysfunction was assessed via self-report of falls within the past year. In analyses adjusted for demographics and comorbidities that differed between groups, compared with veterans without TBI, those with moderate-to-severe TBI were more likely to have fallen in past year (33% vs. 14%, risk ratio 2.5 [95% confidence interval 1.1-5.4]), had higher (worse) mUPDRS global motor (p = .03) and posture/gait scores (p = .02), but not higher tremor (p = .70), rigidity (p = .21), or bradykinesia scores (p = .22). Mild TBI was not associated with worse motor function. Remote moderate-to-severe TBI is a risk factor for motor dysfunction-defined as recent falls and impaired posture/gait-among older veterans. TBI-exposed older adults may be ideal candidates for aggressive fall-screening and prevention strategies.

  3. Effect of motor dynamics on nonlinear feedback robot arm control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Li, Zuofeng; Bejczy, Antal K.; Yun, Xiaoping

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear feedback robot controller that incorporates the robot manipulator dynamics and the robot joint motor dynamics is proposed. The manipulator dynamics and the motor dynamics are coupled to obtain a third-order-dynamic model, and differential geometric control theory is applied to produce a linearized and decoupled robot controller. The derived robot controller operates in the robot task space, thus eliminating the need for decomposition of motion commands into robot joint space commands. Computer simulations are performed to verify the feasibility of the proposed robot controller. The controller is further experimentally evaluated on the PUMA 560 robot arm. The experiments show that the proposed controller produces good trajectory tracking performances and is robust in the presence of model inaccuracies. Compared with a nonlinear feedback robot controller based on the manipulator dynamics only, the proposed robot controller yields conspicuously improved performance.

  4. Implementation of a new fuzzy vector control of induction motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafa, Souad; Larabi, Abdelkader; Barazane, Linda; Manceur, Malik; Essounbouli, Najib; Hamzaoui, Abdelaziz

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new approach to control an induction motor using type-1 fuzzy logic. The induction motor has a nonlinear model, uncertain and strongly coupled. The vector control technique, which is based on the inverse model of the induction motors, solves the coupling problem. Unfortunately, in practice this is not checked because of model uncertainties. Indeed, the presence of the uncertainties led us to use human expertise such as the fuzzy logic techniques. In order to maintain the decoupling and to overcome the problem of the sensitivity to the parametric variations, the field-oriented control is replaced by a new block control. The simulation results show that the both control schemes provide in their basic configuration, comparable performances regarding the decoupling. However, the fuzzy vector control provides the insensitivity to the parametric variations compared to the classical one. The fuzzy vector control scheme is successfully implemented in real-time using a digital signal processor board dSPACE 1104. The efficiency of this technique is verified as well as experimentally at different dynamic operating conditions such as sudden loads change, parameter variations, speed changes, etc. The fuzzy vector control is found to be a best control for application in an induction motor. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Using Brain Oscillations and Corticospinal Excitability to Understand and Predict Post-Stroke Motor Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Thibaut

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available What determines motor recovery in stroke is still unknown and finding markers that could predict and improve stroke recovery is a challenge. In this study, we aimed at understanding the neural mechanisms of motor function recovery after stroke using neurophysiological markers by means of cortical excitability (transcranial magnetic stimulation—TMS and brain oscillations (electroencephalography—EEG. In this cross-sectional study, 55 subjects with chronic stroke (62 ± 14 yo, 17 women, 32 ± 42 months post-stroke were recruited in two sites. We analyzed TMS measures (i.e., motor threshold—MT—of the affected and unaffected sides and EEG variables (i.e., power spectrum in different frequency bands and different brain regions of the affected and unaffected hemispheres and their correlation with motor impairment as measured by Fugl-Meyer. Multiple univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to identify the predictors of good motor function. A significant interaction effect of MT in the affected hemisphere and power in beta bandwidth over the central region for both affected and unaffected hemispheres was found. We identified that motor function positively correlates with beta rhythm over the central region of the unaffected hemisphere, while it negatively correlates with beta rhythm in the affected hemisphere. Our results suggest that cortical activity in the affected and unaffected hemisphere measured by EEG provides new insights on the association between high-frequency rhythms and motor impairment, highlighting the role of an excess of beta in the affected central cortical region in poor motor function in stroke recovery.

  6. A brain-computer interface controlled mail client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Wang, Cong

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a brain-computer interface (BCI) based mail client. This system is controlled by hybrid features extracted from scalp-recorded electroencephalographic (EEG). We emulate the computer mouse by the motor imagery-based mu rhythm and the P300 potential. Furthermore, an adaptive P300 speller is included to provide text input function. With this BCI mail client, users can receive, read, write mails, as well as attach files in mail writing. The system has been tested on 3 subjects. Experimental results show that mail communication with this system is feasible.

  7. Sensorless speed control of a switched reluctance motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wei Min

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation presents a sensorless rotor position detection technique for a switched reluctance motor (SRM). The effectiveness of other SRM sensorless rotor position detection techniques found in a literature review are evaluated and compared to this technique. Finite element analysis is used to determine the magnetic flux profile in the motor for a few shapes of the stator and rotor poles. An algorithm that uses this position sensing technique to control the motor speed is described. Magnetic flux linkage profile of a SRM is measured. A model of the SRM is developed by curve fitting this data. Some relations between model equations are found. Computer simulation results are obtained using this model. The results are compared to measurements taken with an oscilloscope. Comparison shows the results predicted by the model correlates to those measured from the motor.

  8. Functional Neuroimaging of Motor Control inParkinson’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M; Eickhoff, Simon B; Løkkegaard, Annemette

    2014-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has been widely used to study the activation patterns of the motor network in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), but these studies have yielded conflicting results. This meta-analysis of previous neuroimaging studies was performed to identify patterns of abnormal...... movement-related activation in PD that were consistent across studies. We applied activation likelihood estimation (ALE) of functional neuroimaging studies probing motor function in patients with PD. The meta-analysis encompassed data from 283 patients with PD reported in 24 functional neuroimaging studies...... and yielded consistent alterations in neural activity in patients with PD. Differences in cortical activation between PD patients and healthy controls converged in a left-lateralized fronto-parietal network comprising the presupplementary motor area, primary motor cortex, inferior parietal cortex...

  9. [Surgical treatment of eloquent brain area tumors using neurophysiological mapping of the speech and motor areas and conduction tracts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, A A; Korotchenko, E N; Ivanova, D S; Pedyash, N V; Teplykh, B A

    To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative neurophysiological mapping in removing eloquent brain area tumors (EBATs). Sixty five EBAT patients underwent surgical treatment using intraoperative neurophysiological mapping at the Pirogov National Medical and Surgical Center in the period from 2014 to 2015. On primary neurological examination, 46 (71%) patients were detected with motor deficits of varying severity. Speech disorders were diagnosed in 17 (26%) patients. Sixteen patients with concomitant or isolated lesions of the speech centers underwent awake surgery using the asleep-awake-asleep protocol. Standard neurophysiological monitoring included transcranial stimulation as well as motor and, if necessary, speech mapping. The motor and speech areas were mapped with allowance for the preoperative planning data (obtained with a navigation station) synchronized with functional MRI. In this case, a broader representation of the motor and speech centers was revealed in 12 (19%) patients. During speech mapping, no speech disorders were detected in 7 patients; in 9 patients, stimulation of the cerebral cortex in the intended surgical area induced motor (3 patients), sensory (4), and amnesic (2) aphasia. In the total group, we identified 11 patients in whom the tumor was located near the internal capsule. Upon mapping of the conduction tracts in the internal capsule area, the stimulus strength during tumor resection was gradually decreased from 10 mA to 5 mA. Tumor resection was stopped when responses retained at a stimulus strength of 5 mA, which, when compared to the navigation data, corresponded to a distance of about 5 mm to the internal capsule. Completeness of tumor resection was evaluated (contrast-enhanced MRI) in all patients on the first postoperative day. According to the control MRI data, the tumor was resected totally in 60% of patients, subtotally in 24% of patients, and partially in 16% of patients. In the early postoperative period, the development or

  10. Nonlinear control of permanent magnet synchronous motor driving a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a non-linear control of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) fed by a PWM voltage source inverter. To improve the performance of this control technique, the input-output linearization technique is proposed for a system driving a mechanical load with two masses. In order to ensure a steady ...

  11. Pneumatic motor speed control by trajectory tracking fuzzy logic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 2 August 2008; revised 21 October 2009; accepted 5 November 2009. Abstract. In this study, trajectory tracking fuzzy logic controller (TTFLC) is proposed for the speed control of a pneumatic motor (PM). A third order trajectory is defined to determine the trajectory function that has to be tracked by the PM speed.

  12. Pneumatic motor speed control by trajectory tracking fuzzy logic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, trajectory tracking fuzzy logic controller (TTFLC) is proposed for the speed control of a pneumatic motor (PM). A third order trajectory is defined to determine the trajectory function that has to be tracked by the PM speed. Genetic algorithm (GA) is used to find the TTFLC boundary values of membership functions ...

  13. Design and Comparison Direct Torque Control Techniques for Induction Motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Kazmierkowski, Marian P.; Zelechowski, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a comparison of two significant control methods of induction motor are presented. The first one is a classical Direct Torque and Flux Control (DTC) and is compared with a scheme, which uses Space Vector Modulator (DTC-SVM). A comparison in respect to dynamic and steady state...

  14. Postural control and central motor pathway involvement in type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Postural instability causes limitations in daily activities of diabetic patients. There is paucity of data regarding central motor pathway involvement in these patients and its relation to postural control. Aim: To evaluate postural control and centralmotor pathway involvement in type 2 diabetic patients. Subjects and ...

  15. Application of Fuzzy Logic in Control of Switched Reluctance Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Brandstetter

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The flux linkage of switched reluctance motor (SRM depends on the stator current and position between the rotor and stator poles. The fact determines that during control of SRM current with the help of classical PI controllers in a wide regulation range unsatisfied results occur. The main reasons of the mentioned situation are big changes of the stator inductance depending on the stator current and rotor position. In a switched reluctance motor the stator phase inductance is a non-linear function of the stator phase current and rotor position. Fuzzy controller and fuzzy logic are generally non-linear systems; hence they can provide better performance in this case. Fuzzy controller is mostly presented as a direct fuzzy controller or as a system, which realizes continued changing parameters of other controller, so-called fuzzy supervisor. Referring to the usage of fuzzy logic as a supervisor of conventional PI controller in control of SRM possible improvement occurs.

  16. A modern neuroscience approach to chronic spinal pain: combining pain neuroscience education with cognition-targeted motor control training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Jo; Meeus, Mira; Cagnie, Barbara; Roussel, Nathalie A; Dolphens, Mieke; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Danneels, Lieven

    2014-05-01

    Chronic spinal pain (CSP) is a severely disabling disorder, including nontraumatic chronic low back and neck pain, failed back surgery, and chronic whiplash-associated disorders. Much of the current therapy is focused on input mechanisms (treating peripheral elements such as muscles and joints) and output mechanisms (addressing motor control), while there is less attention to processing (central) mechanisms. In addition to the compelling evidence for impaired motor control of spinal muscles in patients with CSP, there is increasing evidence that central mechanisms (ie, hyperexcitability of the central nervous system and brain abnormalities) play a role in CSP. Hence, treatments for CSP should address not only peripheral dysfunctions but also the brain. Therefore, a modern neuroscience approach, comprising therapeutic pain neuroscience education followed by cognition-targeted motor control training, is proposed. This perspective article explains why and how such an approach to CSP can be applied in physical therapist practice.

  17. Interfaz cerebro computador basada en P300 para la comunicación alternativa: estudio de caso en dos adolescentes en situación de discapacidad motora [P300 based Brain Computer Interface for alternative communication: a case study with two teenagers with motor disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Cossio, E.; Fernandez, C.; Gaviria, M.E.; Palacio, C.; Alvaran, L.; Torres Villa, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Brain computer interface systems use brain signals to enable the control of external devices, such as: wheelchairs, communicators, neuro-prosthesis, among others; in people with severe motor disabilities. In this study two young men with motor disabilities were trained to learn how to control a

  18. Robust linear parameter varying induction motor control with polytopic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Khamari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a robust controller for an induction motor which is represented as a linear parameter varying systems. To do so linear matrix inequality (LMI based approach and robust Lyapunov feedback controller are associated. This new approach is related to the fact that the synthesis of a linear parameter varying (LPV feedback controller for the inner loop take into account rotor resistance and mechanical speed as varying parameter. An LPV flux observer is also synthesized to estimate rotor flux providing reference to cited above regulator. The induction motor is described as a polytopic model because of speed and rotor resistance affine dependence their values can be estimated on line during systems operations. The simulation results are presented to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed approach where robustness stability and high performances have been achieved over the entire operating range of the induction motor.

  19. Speed Sensorless Variable Structure Torque Control of Induction Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Jezernik, Karel; Šabanović, Asif; Rodič, Miran

    2010-01-01

    Induction motor speed sensorless torque control, which allows operation at low and zero speed, optimizing both torque response and efficiency, is proposed. The control is quite different than the conventional field-oriented or direct torque controls. A new discontinuous stator current FPGA based controller and rotor flux observer based on sliding mode and Lyapunov theory are developed, analyzed and experimentally verified. A smooth transition into the field weakening region and the full utili...

  20. Speed Control of Switched Reluctance Motor Using Fuzzy Sliding Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAHOUR, A.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fuzzy logic controller (FLC is designed, based on the similarity between the FLC and the sliding mode control (SMC, for a class of nonlinear system to tackle the nonlinear control problems with modelling uncertainties, plant parameters variations and external disturbances. The proposed scheme gives fast dynamic response with no overshoot and zero steady-state error. To show the validity and the effectiveness of the control method, simulations are performed for the speed control of a switched reluctance motor. The simulation results show that the controller designed is more effective than the conventional sliding mode controller in enhancing the robustness of control systems with high accuracy.

  1. Rapid Control Prototyping Plataform for Didactic Plant Motor DC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Bazán-Orobio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a design, implementation and validation of a Rapid Control Prototype platform for a plant based on a DC motor is proposed. This low-cost prototype provides of an electronic card (with a motor DC and sensors manipulated by PC with free software tools using Linux, Scilab / Scicos and RTAI-Lab. This RCP System allows developing speed -position control trainings by using different types of PID industrial controllers with anti – wind up and bump less transfer schemes. We develop a speed control application structured in four steps: identification, controller design, simulation and real time control, where there are pedagogical advantages of a platform that not only allows simulation but also real-time control of a plant.

  2. Discrete Current Control Strategy of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A control strategy of permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs, which is different from the traditional vector control (VC and direct torque control (DTC, is proposed. Firstly, the circular rotating magnetic field is analyzed on the simplified model and discredited into stepping magnetic field. The stepping magnetomotive force will drive the rotor to run as the stepping motor. Secondly, the stator current orientation is used to build the control model instead of rotor flux orientation. Then, the discrete current control strategy is set and adopted in positioning control. Three methods of the strategy are simulated in computer and tested on the experiment platform of PMSM. The control precision is also verified through the experiment.

  3. Recasting brain-machine interface design from a physical control system perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Chase, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    With the goal of improving the quality of life for people suffering from various motor control disorders, brain-machine interfaces provide direct neural control of prosthetic devices by translating neural signals into control signals. These systems act by reading motor intent signals directly from the brain and using them to control, for example, the movement of a cursor on a computer screen. Over the past two decades, much attention has been devoted to the decoding problem: how should recorded neural activity be translated into the movement of the cursor? Most approaches have focused on this problem from an estimation standpoint, i.e., decoders are designed to return the best estimate of motor intent possible, under various sets of assumptions about how the recorded neural signals represent motor intent. Here we recast the decoder design problem from a physical control system perspective, and investigate how various classes of decoders lead to different types of physical systems for the subject to control. This framework leads to new interpretations of why certain types of decoders have been shown to perform better than others. These results have implications for understanding how motor neurons are recruited to perform various tasks, and may lend insight into the brain's ability to conceptualize artificial systems.

  4. Optical mapping of the dominant frequency of brain signal oscillations in motor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Feng-Mei; Wang, Yi-Feng; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Hua-Fu; Yuan, Zhen

    2017-11-07

    Recent neuroimaging studies revealed that the dominant frequency of neural oscillations is brain-region-specific and can vary with frequency-specific reorganization of brain networks during cognition. In this study, we examined the dominant frequency in low-frequency neural oscillations represented by oxygenated hemoglobin measurements after the hemodynamic response function (HRF) deconvolution. Twenty-nine healthy college subjects were recruited to perform a serial finger tapping task at the frequency of 0.2 Hz. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was applied to record the hemodynamic signals over the primary motor cortex, supplementary motor area (SMA), premotor cortex, and prefrontal area. We then explored the low frequency steady-state brain response (lfSSBR), which was evoked in the motor systems at the fundamental frequency (0.2 Hz) and its harmonics (0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 Hz). In particular, after HRF deconvolution, the lfSSBR at the frequency of 0.4 Hz in the SMA was identified as the dominant frequency. Interestingly, the domain frequency exhibited the correlation with behavior data such as reaction time, indicating that the physiological implication of lfSSBR is related to the brain anatomy, stimulus frequency and cognition. More importantly, the HRF deconvolution showed its capability for recovering signals probably reflecting neural-level events and revealing the physiological meaning of lfSSBR.

  5. Spatial Attention, Motor Intention, and Bayesian Cue Predictability in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Anna B; Dombert, Pascasie L; Mengotti, Paola; Fink, Gereon R; Vossel, Simone

    2017-05-24

    Predictions about upcoming events influence how we perceive and respond to our environment. There is increasing evidence that predictions may be generated based upon previous observations following Bayesian principles, but little is known about the underlying cortical mechanisms and their specificity for different cognitive subsystems. The present study aimed at identifying common and distinct neural signatures of predictive processing in the spatial attentional and motor intentional system. Twenty-three female and male healthy human volunteers performed two probabilistic cueing tasks with either spatial or motor cues while lying in the fMRI scanner. In these tasks, the percentage of cue validity changed unpredictably over time. Trialwise estimates of cue predictability were derived from a Bayesian observer model of behavioral responses. These estimates were included as parametric regressors for analyzing the BOLD time series. Parametric effects of cue predictability in valid and invalid trials were considered to reflect belief updating by precision-weighted prediction errors. The brain areas exhibiting predictability-dependent effects dissociated between the spatial attention and motor intention task, with the right temporoparietal cortex being involved during spatial attention and the left angular gyrus and anterior cingulate cortex during motor intention. Connectivity analyses revealed that all three areas showed predictability-dependent coupling with the right hippocampus. These results suggest that precision-weighted prediction errors of stimulus locations and motor responses are encoded in distinct brain regions, but that crosstalk with the hippocampus may be necessary to integrate new trialwise outcomes in both cognitive systems.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The brain is able to infer the environments' statistical structure and responds strongly to expectancy violations. In the spatial attentional domain, it has been shown that parts of the attentional networks are

  6. PD control for robot manipulators actuated by switched reluctance motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Guzmán, Victor M.; Carrillo-Serrano, Roberto V.; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón

    2013-03-01

    This article is concerned with position regulation in direct-drive n degrees of freedom rigid robots equipped only with revolute joints when actuated by switched reluctance motors. Our controller represents an extension to this case of a previous work in the literature which was proposed for a single-switched reluctance motor when moving a simple linear mechanical load. We show how to avoid a singularity present in such a previous controller. We also introduce some simplifications since the number of terms to be fedback is smaller. Further, a linear proportional inner electric current loop is included instead of a velocity dependent one.

  7. Cognitive and Neurophysiological Effects of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Stroke Patients after Motor Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, Federico; Peila, Elena; Cicerale, Alessandro; Caglio, Marcella M; Caroppo, Paola; Vighetti, Sergio; Piedimonte, Alessandro; Minuto, Alice; Campagnoli, Marcello; Salatino, Adriana; Molo, Maria T; Mortara, Paolo; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Massazza, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two specific Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS) paradigms, the repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), in the upper limb rehabilitation of patients with stroke. Short and long term outcomes (after 3 and 6 months, respectively) were evaluated. We measured, at multiple time points, the manual dexterity using a validated clinical scale (ARAT), electroencephalography auditory event related potentials, and neuropsychological performances in patients with chronic stroke of middle severity. Thirty four patients were enrolled and randomized. The intervention group was treated with a NIBS protocol longer than usual, applying a second cycle of stimulation, after a washout period, using different techniques in the two cycles (rTMS/tDCS). We compared the results with a control group treated with sham stimulation. We split the data analysis into three studies. In this first study we examined if a cumulative effect was clinically visible. In the second study we compared the effects of the two techniques. In the third study we explored if patients with minor cognitive impairment have most benefit from the treatment and if cognitive and motor outcomes were correlated. We found that the impairment in some cognitive domains cannot be considered an exclusion criterion for rehabilitation with NIBS. ERP improved, related to cognitive and attentional processes after stimulation on the motor cortex, but transitorily. This effect could be linked to the restoration of hemispheric balance or by the effects of distant connections. In our study the effects of the two NIBS were comparable, with some advantages using tDCS vs. rTMS in stroke rehabilitation. Finally we found that more than one cycle (2-4 weeks), spaced out by washout periods, should be used, only in responder patients, to obtain clinical relevant results.

  8. 76 FR 70128 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Amendments to the California Heavy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Amendments to the California Heavy... thereof shall adopt or attempt to enforce any standard relating to the control of emissions from new motor..., inspection or any other approval relating to the control of emissions from any new motor vehicle or new motor...

  9. 76 FR 5368 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Greenhouse Gas Regulations; Within...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Greenhouse Gas Regulations; Within-the... thereof shall adopt or attempt to enforce any standard relating to the control of emissions from new motor..., inspection or any other approval relating to the control of emissions from any new motor vehicle or new motor...

  10. 76 FR 61095 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Within the Scope Determination and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Within the Scope Determination and... certification, inspection or any other approval relating to the control of emissions from any new motor vehicle...) for the control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor engines prior to March 30, 1966,\\9...

  11. 75 FR 11878 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Amendments to the California Zero...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Amendments to the California Zero... certification, inspection or any other approval relating to the control of emissions from any new motor vehicle... standards) for the control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle engines prior to March...

  12. 78 FR 51724 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas... shall adopt or attempt to enforce any standard relating to the control of emissions from new motor..., inspection or any other approval relating to the control of emissions from any new motor vehicle or new motor...

  13. Somatotopic organization of the white matter tracts underpinning motor control in humans: an electrical stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Fabien; Herbet, Guillaume; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Duffau, Hugues

    2016-09-01

    The somatotopic organization of the primary motor cortex is well documented. However, a possible somatotopy of the network involved in motor control, i.e., eliciting negative motor phenomena during electrostimulation, is unknown in humans, particularly at the subcortical level. Here, we performed electrical stimulation mapping in awake patients operated for gliomas, to study the distribution of the white matter tracts subserving movement control of the lower limb, upper limb(s), and speech. Eighteen patients underwent awake surgery for frontal low-grade gliomas, by using intraoperative subcortical electrostimulation mapping to search interference with movement of the leg, arm(s), and face. We assessed the negative motor responses and their distribution throughout the tracts located under premotor areas. The corresponding stimulation sites were reported on a standard brain template for visual analysis and between-subjects comparisons. During stimulation of the white matter underneath the dorsal premotor cortex and supplementary motor area, rostral to the corticospinal tracts, all patients experienced cessation of the movement of lower and upper limbs, of bimanual coordination, and/or speech. These subcortical sites were somatotopically distributed. Indeed, stimulation of the fibers from mesial to lateral directions and from posterior to anterior directions evoked arrest of movement of the lower limb (mesially and posteriorly), upper limb(s), and face/speech (laterally and anteriorly). There were no postoperative permanent deficits. This is the first evidence of a somatotopic organization of the white matter bundles underpinning movement control in humans. A better knowledge of the distribution of this motor control network may be helpful in neurosciences and neurosurgery.

  14. Frequency Regulation Control of Wind Turbine Incorporating Stepper Motor in Pitch System

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Zikriya Shah; Muhammad Naeem Arbab

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the presentation of a stepper motor in the pitch control system to regulate frequency. The controller sense the frequency deviation. If the frequency deviation is positive the stepper motor will recommend the motor to pitch the turbine blade slightly away from wind pressure. Similarly if the frequency deviation is negative the stepper motor will recommend the motor to pitch the turbine blade slightly towards wind pressure. The blade pitching is performed by another motor....

  15. Higher-order brain areas associated with real-time functional MRI neurofeedback training of the somato-motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Tibor; Dewiputri, Wan Ilma; Frahm, Jens; Schweizer, Renate

    2016-04-29

    Neurofeedback (NFB) allows subjects to learn self-regulation of neuronal brain activation based on information about the ongoing activation. The implementation of real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) for NFB training now facilitates the investigation into underlying processes. Our study involved 16 control and 16 training right-handed subjects, the latter performing an extensive rt-fMRI NFB training using motor imagery. A previous analysis focused on the targeted primary somato-motor cortex (SMC). The present study extends the analysis to the supplementary motor area (SMA), the next higher brain area within the hierarchy of the motor system. We also examined transfer-related functional connectivity using a whole-volume psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis to reveal brain areas associated with learning. The ROI analysis of the pre- and post-training fMRI data for motor imagery without NFB (transfer) resulted in a significant training-specific increase in the SMA. It could also be shown that the contralateral SMA exhibited a larger increase than the ipsilateral SMA in the training and the transfer runs, and that the right-hand training elicited a larger increase in the transfer runs than the left-hand training. The PPI analysis revealed a training-specific increase in transfer-related functional connectivity between the left SMA and frontal areas as well as the anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC) for right- and left-hand trainings. Moreover, the transfer success was related with training-specific increase in functional connectivity between the left SMA and the target area SMC. Our study demonstrates that NFB training increases functional connectivity with non-targeted brain areas. These are associated with the training strategy (i.e., SMA) as well as with learning the NFB skill (i.e., aMCC and frontal areas). This detailed description of both the system to be trained and the areas involved in learning can provide valuable information

  16. Control of asynchronous motors. Volume 1. Modeling, vectorial control and direct torque control; Commande des moteurs asynchrones. Volume 1. Modelisation, controle vectoriel et DTC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canudas de Wit, C. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d' Ingenieurs de Genie Chimique, ENSIGC, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2000-07-01

    This first volume deals with the problems of control of asynchronous motors in industrial environments: industrial environment, variable speed, asynchronous motors and power supplies, modeling, direct torque control laws, control by controlled limit cycles under frequency constraints. (J.S.)

  17. How do glial cells contribute to motor control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus Kordt; Petersen, Anders Victor; Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie

    2013-01-01

    including glutamate, ATP, GABA or serine. In the present review we will focus on astrocytes and review the evidence suggesting and demonstrating their role in motor control. Rhythmic motor behaviors such as locomotion, swimming or chewing are generated by networks of neurons termed central pattern...... of the blood pH by releasing ATP on neurons that in turn adapt the frequency of respiration. In the spinal cord, diverse transmitters such as ATP, adenosine or endocannabinoids modulate the CPG responsible for locomotion. A growing body of evidence suggests that glial cells release some of these molecules....... These data suggest that astrocytes play an essential role in motor control and we believe that a range of studies will confirm this view in the near future....

  18. On-Line Efficiency Improvement of Induction Motor Vector Controlled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djamel Benoudjit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency improvement is an important challenge for electric motor driven systems. For an induction motor, operation under rated conditions (at rated load with rated flux is very efficient. However, in many situations, operation with rated flux causes low efficiency especially at light load ranges. In these applications, induction motor should operate at reduced flux which causes a balance between iron losses and copper losses leading to an improved efficiency. This paper concerns energy optimization, i.e. efficiency improvement is carried out via a controller designed on the basis of imposing the rated power factor, by finding a relationship between rotor flux and torque current component which can optimize the compromise between torque and efficiency in steady state as well as in transient state. Experimental results are presented to prove the effectiveness and validity of the proposed controller.

  19. Flux-weakening control methods for hybrid excitation synchronous motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid excitation synchronous motor (HESM, which aim at combining the advantages of permanent magnet motor and wound excitation motor, have the characteristics of low-speed high-torque hill climbing and wide speed range. Firstly, a new kind of HESM is presented in the paper, and its structure and mathematical model are illustrated. Then, based on a space voltage vector control, a novel flux-weakening method for speed adjustment in the high speed region is presented. The unique feature of the proposed control method is that the HESM driving system keeps the q-axis back-EMF components invariable during the flux-weakening operation process. Moreover, a copper loss minimization algorithm is adopted to reduce the copper loss of the HESM in the high speed region. Lastly, the proposed method is validated by the simulation and the experimental results.

  20. Morphological features of the neonatal brain support development of subsequent cognitive, language, and motor abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Marisa N; Bansal, Ravi; Rosen, Tove S; Peterson, Bradley S

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of the role of brain maturation in the development of cognitive abilities derives primarily from studies of school-age children to adults. Little is known about the morphological features of the neonatal brain that support the subsequent development of abilities in early childhood, when maturation of the brain and these abilities are the most dynamic. The goal of our study was to determine whether brain morphology during the neonatal period supports early cognitive development through 2 years of age. We correlated morphological features of the cerebral surface assessed using deformation-based measures (surface distances) of high-resolution MRI scans for 33 healthy neonates, scanned between the first to sixth week of postmenstrual life, with subsequent measures of their motor, language, and cognitive abilities at ages 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. We found that morphological features of the cerebral surface of the frontal, mesial prefrontal, temporal, and occipital regions correlated with subsequent motor scores, posterior parietal regions correlated with subsequent language scores, and temporal and occipital regions correlated with subsequent cognitive scores. Measures of the anterior and middle portions of the cingulate gyrus correlated with scores across all three domains of ability. Most of the significant findings were inverse correlations located bilaterally in the brain. The inverse correlations may suggest either that a more protracted morphological maturation or smaller local volumes of neonatal brain tissue supports better performance on measures of subsequent motor, language, and cognitive abilities throughout the first 2 years of postnatal life. The correlations of morphological measures of the cingulate with measures of performance across all domains of ability suggest that the cingulate supports a broad range of skills in infancy and early childhood, similar to its functions in older children and adults. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The effects of voluntary, involuntary, and forced exercises on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and motor function recovery: a rat brain ischemia model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ke, Zheng; Yip, Shea Ping; Li, Le; Zheng, Xiao-Xiang; Tong, Kai-Yu

    2011-01-01

    ...) have been individually demonstrated effective as stroke rehabilitation intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of these three common interventions on brain BDNF changes and motor recovery levels using a rat ischemic stroke model...

  2. Energy-saving technology of vector controlled induction motor based on the adaptive neuro-controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, E.; Kovalev, I. V.; Karandeev, D.

    2015-10-01

    The ongoing evolution of the power system towards a Smart Grid implies an important role of intelligent technologies, but poses strict requirements on their control schemes to preserve stability and controllability. This paper presents the adaptive neuro-controller for the vector control of induction motor within Smart Gird. The validity and effectiveness of the proposed energy-saving technology of vector controlled induction motor based on adaptive neuro-controller are verified by simulation results at different operating conditions over a wide speed range of induction motor.

  3. Speed tracking and synchronization of multiple motors using ring coupling control and adaptive sliding mode control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le-Bao; Sun, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Sheng-Zhou; Yang, Qing-Quan

    2015-09-01

    A new control approach for speed tracking and synchronization of multiple motors is developed, by incorporating an adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) technique into a ring coupling synchronization control structure. This control approach can stabilize speed tracking of each motor and synchronize its motion with other motors' motion so that speed tracking errors and synchronization errors converge to zero. Moreover, an adaptive law is exploited to estimate the unknown bound of uncertainty, which is obtained in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem to minimize the control effort and attenuate chattering. Performance comparisons with parallel control, relative coupling control and conventional PI control are investigated on a four-motor synchronization control system. Extensive simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors of Influence on the Performance of a Short-Latency Non-Invasive Brain Switch: Evidence in Healthy Individuals and Implication for Motor Function Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren eXu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfacing (BCI has recently been applied as a rehabilitation approach for patients with motor disorders, such as stroke. In these closed-loop applications, a brain switch detects the motor intention from brain signals, e.g. scalp EEG, and triggers a neuroprosthetic device, either to deliver sensory feedback or to mimic real movements, thus re-establishing the compromised sensory-motor control loop and promoting neural plasticity. In this context, single trial detection of motor intention with short latency is a prerequisite. The performance of the event detection from EEG recordings is mainly determined by three factors: the type of motor imagery (e.g., repetitive, ballistic, the frequency band (or signal modality used for discrimination (e.g., alpha, beta, gamma, and MRCP, i.e. movement-related cortical potential, and the processing technique (e.g., time-series analysis, sub-band power estimation. In this study, we investigated single trial EEG traces during movement imagination on healthy individuals, and provided a comprehensive analysis of the performance of a short-latency brain switch when varying these three factors. The morphological investigation showed a cross-subject consistency of a prolonged negative phase in MRCP, and a delayed beta rebound in sensory-motor rhythms during repetitive tasks. The detection performance had the greatest accuracy when using ballistic MRCP with time-series analysis. In this case, the true positive rate was ~70% for a detection latency of ~200 ms. The results presented here are of practical relevance for designing BCI systems for motor function rehabilitation.

  5. The MDS-UPDRS tracks motor and non-motor improvement due to subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Kelvin L; Taylor, Jennifer L; Patil, Parag G

    2013-11-01

    The Movement Disorders Society revision of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) improves upon the original UPDRS by adding more non-motor items, making it a more robust tool to evaluate the severity of motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson disease. Previous studies on deep brain stimulation have not used the MDS-UPDRS. To determine if the MDS-UPDRS could detect improvement in both motor and non-motor symptoms after bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease. We compared scores on the entire MDS-UPDRS prior to surgery (baseline) and approximately six months following the initial programming visit in twenty subjects (12M/8F) with Parkinson disease undergoing bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. STN DBS significantly improved the scores for every section of the MDS-UPDRS at the 6 month follow-up. Part I improved by 3.1 points (22%), Part II by 5.3 points (29%), Part III by 13.1 points (29%) with stimulation alone, and Part IV by 7.1 points (74%). Individual non-motor items in Part I that improved significantly were constipation, light-headedness, and fatigue. Both motor and non-motor symptoms, as assessed by the MDS-UPDRS, improve with bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation six months after the stimulator is turned on. We recommend that the MDS-UPDRS be utilized in future deep brain stimulation studies because of the advantage of detecting change in non-motor symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Motor Learning Induces Plasticity in the Resting Brain-Drumming Up a Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amad, Ali; Seidman, Jade; Draper, Stephen B; Bruchhage, Muriel M K; Lowry, Ruth G; Wheeler, James; Robertson, Andrew; Williams, Steven C R; Smith, Marcus S

    2017-03-01

    Neuroimaging methods have recently been used to investigate plasticity-induced changes in brain structure. However, little is known about the dynamic interactions between different brain regions after extensive coordinated motor learning such as drumming. In this article, we have compared the resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) in 15 novice healthy participants before and after a course of drumming (30-min drumming sessions, 3 days a week for 8 weeks) and 16 age-matched novice comparison participants. To identify brain regions showing significant FC differences before and after drumming, without a priori regions of interest, a multivariate pattern analysis was performed. Drum training was associated with an increased FC between the posterior part of bilateral superior temporal gyri (pSTG) and the rest of the brain (i.e., all other voxels). These regions were then used to perform seed-to-voxel analysis. The pSTG presented an increased FC with the premotor and motor regions, the right parietal lobe and a decreased FC with the cerebellum. Perspectives and the potential for rehabilitation treatments with exercise-based intervention to overcome impairments due to brain diseases are also discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Robust Adaptive Speed Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidstrup, N.

    This thesis concerns speed control of current vector controlled induction motor drives (CVC drives). The CVC drive is an existing prototype drive developed by Danfoss A/S, Transmission Division. Practical tests have revealed that the open loop dynamical properties of the CVC drive are highly...... adaptive speed control of the CVC drive. A direct truly adaptive speed controller has been implemented. The adaptive controller is a moving Average Self-Tuning Regulator which is abbreviated MASTR throughout the thesis. Two practical implementations of this controller were proposed. They were denoted MASTR...

  8. Position Control of Switched Reluctance Motor Using Super Twisting Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rafiq Mufti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent problem of chattering in traditional sliding mode control is harmful for practical application of control system. This paper pays a considerable attention to a chattering-free control method, that is, higher-order sliding mode (super twisting algorithm. The design of a position controller for switched reluctance motor is presented and its stability is assured using Lyapunov stability theorem. In order to highlight the advantages of higher-order sliding mode controller (HOSMC, a classical first-order sliding mode controller (FOSMC is also applied to the same system and compared. The simulation results reflect the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  9. A Microprocessor Control Scheme For Switched Reluctance Motor Drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, A. R.; Krishnan, R.; Adkar, S.

    1987-10-01

    A microprocessor control scheme for a switched reluctance motor(SRM) drive is discussed. A SRM is inherently a variable speed machine since it requires a converter even for constant speed running. Starting with a conceptual development, a particular hardware scheme is discussed for controller implementation. Hardware-software tradeoffs incorporated in the design are discussed. Some results of an actual system are evaluated. It is shown that a microprocessor controller has many advantages over conventional controllers. The controller design uses rotor position and speed feedbacks. Self-starting is incorporated into the design. Use of off-the-shelf components makes the controller simple, reliable, and economical.

  10. Performance variation in motor imagery brain-computer interface: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minkyu; Jun, Sung Chan

    2015-03-30

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology has attracted significant attention over recent decades, and has made remarkable progress. However, BCI still faces a critical hurdle, in that performance varies greatly across and even within subjects, an obstacle that degrades the reliability of BCI systems. Understanding the causes of these problems is important if we are to create more stable systems. In this short review, we report the most recent studies and findings on performance variation, especially in motor imagery-based BCI, which has found that low-performance groups have a less-developed brain network that is incapable of motor imagery. Further, psychological and physiological states influence performance variation within subjects. We propose a possible strategic approach to deal with this variation, which may contribute to improving the reliability of BCI. In addition, the limitations of current work and opportunities for future studies are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A square root ensemble Kalman filter application to a motor-imagery brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrunnahar, M; Schiff, S J

    2011-01-01

    We here investigated a non-linear ensemble Kalman filter (SPKF) application to a motor imagery brain computer interface (BCI). A square root central difference Kalman filter (SR-CDKF) was used as an approach for brain state estimation in motor imagery task performance, using scalp electroencephalography (EEG) signals. Healthy human subjects imagined left vs. right hand movements and tongue vs. bilateral toe movements while scalp EEG signals were recorded. Offline data analysis was conducted for training the model as well as for decoding the imagery movements. Preliminary results indicate the feasibility of this approach with a decoding accuracy of 78%-90% for the hand movements and 70%-90% for the tongue-toes movements. Ongoing research includes online BCI applications of this approach as well as combined state and parameter estimation using this algorithm with different system dynamic models.

  12. Effective and Robust Generalized Predictive Speed Control of Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patxi Alkorta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and validates a new proposal for effective speed vector control of induction motors based on linear Generalized Predictive Control (GPC law. The presented GPC-PI cascade configuration simplifies the design with regard to GPC-GPC cascade configuration, maintaining the advantages of the predictive control algorithm. The robust stability of the closed loop system is demonstrated by the poles placement method for several typical cases of uncertainties in induction motors. The controller has been tested using several simulations and experiments and has been compared with Proportional Integral Derivative (PID and Sliding Mode (SM control schemes, obtaining outstanding results in speed tracking even in the presence of parameter uncertainties, unknown load disturbance, and measurement noise in the loop signals, suggesting its use in industrial applications.

  13. Enhanced pid vs model predictive control applied to bldc motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaya, M. S.; Muhammad, Auwal; Aliyu Abdulkadir, Rabiu; Salim, S. N. S.; Madugu, I. S.; Tijjani, Aminu; Aminu Yusuf, Lukman; Dauda Umar, Ibrahim; Khairi, M. T. M.

    2018-01-01

    BrushLess Direct Current (BLDC) motor is a multivariable and highly complex nonlinear system. Variation of internal parameter values with environment or reference signal increases the difficulty in controlling the BLDC effectively. Advanced control strategies (like model predictive control) often have to be integrated to satisfy the control desires. Enhancing or proper tuning of a conventional algorithm results in achieving the desired performance. This paper presents a performance comparison of Enhanced PID and Model Predictive Control (MPC) applied to brushless direct current motor. The simulation results demonstrated that the PSO-PID is slightly better than the PID and MPC in tracking the trajectory of the reference signal. The proposed scheme could be useful algorithms for the system.

  14. Simple Approach For Induction Motor Control Using Reconfigurable Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József VÁSÁRHELYI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with rotor-field-oriented vector control structures for the induction motor drives fed by the so-called tandem frequency converter. It is composed of two different types of DC-link converters connected in parallel arrangement. The larger-power one has current-source character and is operating synchronized in time and in amplitude with the stator currents. The other one has voltage-source character and it is the actuator of the motor control system. The drive is able to run also with partial-failed tandem converter, if the control strategy corresponds to the actual operating mode. A reconfigurable hardware implemented in configurable logic cells ensures the changing of the vector-control structure. The proposed control schemes were tested by simulation based on Matlab-Simulink model.

  15. Improved direct torque control of induction motor with dither injection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, a three-level inverter-fed induction motor drive operating under Direct Torque Control (DTC) is presented. A triangular wave is used as dither signal of minute amplitude (for torque hysteresis band and flux hysteresis band respectively) in the error block. This method minimizes flux and torque ripple in ...

  16. Localization of Brain Electrical Activity Sources and Hemodynamic Activity Foci during Motor Imagery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolov, A. A.; Húsek, Dušan; Mokienko, O.; Bobrov, P.; Chernikova, L.; Konovalov, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 3 (2014), s. 273-283 ISSN 0362-1197 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0070; GA MŠk(CZ) EE.2.3.20.0073 Program:ED Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : brain computer interface * independent component analysis * EEG pattern classification * motor imagery * inverse EEG problem Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  17. Velocity control in three-phase induction motors using PIC; Controle de velocidade de motor de inducao trifasico usando PIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcelino, M.A.; Silva, G.B.S.; Grandinetti, F.J. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia; Universidade de Taubate (UNITAU), SP (Brazil)], Emails: abud@feg.unesp.br, gabonini@yahoo.com.br, grandinetti@unitau.br

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a technique for speed control three-phase induction motor using the pulse width modulation (PWM), in open loop while maintaining the tension for constant frequency. The technique is adapted from a thesis entitled 'Control of the three-phase induction motor, using discrete PWM generation, optimized and synchronized', where studies are presented aimed at their application in home appliances, to eliminate mechanical parts, replaced by low cost electronic control, thus having a significant reduction in power consumption. Initially the experiment was done with the Intel 80C31 micro controller. In this paper, the PWM modulation is implemented using a PIC micro controller, and the speed control kept a low profile, based on tables, synchronized with transitions and reduced generation of harmonics in the network. Confirmations were made using the same process of building tables, but takes advantage of the program of a RISC device.

  18. Distinguishable brain activation networks for short- and long-term motor skill learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyer-Lea, A; Matthews, P M

    2005-07-01

    The acquisition of a new motor skill is characterized first by a short-term, fast learning stage in which performance improves rapidly, and subsequently by a long-term, slower learning stage in which additional performance gains are incremental. Previous functional imaging studies have suggested that distinct brain networks mediate these two stages of learning, but direct comparisons using the same task have not been performed. Here we used a task in which subjects learn to track a continuous 8-s sequence demanding variable isometric force development between the fingers and thumb of the dominant, right hand. Learning-associated changes in brain activation were characterized using functional MRI (fMRI) during short-term learning of a novel sequence, during short-term learning after prior, brief exposure to the sequence, and over long-term (3 wk) training in the task. Short-term learning was associated with decreases in activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal, anterior cingulate, posterior parietal, primary motor, and cerebellar cortex, and with increased activation in the right cerebellar dentate nucleus, the left putamen, and left thalamus. Prefrontal, parietal, and cerebellar cortical changes were not apparent with short-term learning after prior exposure to the sequence. With long-term learning, increases in activity were found in the left primary somatosensory and motor cortex and in the right putamen. Our observations extend previous work suggesting that distinguishable networks are recruited during the different phases of motor learning. While short-term motor skill learning seems associated primarily with activation in a cortical network specific for the learned movements, long-term learning involves increased activation of a bihemispheric cortical-subcortical network in a pattern suggesting "plastic" development of new representations for both motor output and somatosensory afferent information.

  19. Cooperation in mind: Motor imagery of joint and single actions is represented in different brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wriessnegger, S C; Steyrl, D; Koschutnig, K; Müller-Putz, G R

    2016-11-01

    In this study brain activity during motor imagery (MI) of joint actions, compared to single actions and rest conditions, was investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first neuroimaging study which directly investigated the neural correlates of joint action motor imagery. Twenty-one healthy participants imagined three different motor tasks (dancing, carrying a box, wiping). Each imagery task was performed at two kinds: alone (single action MI) or with a partner (joint action MI). We hypothesized that to imagine a cooperative task would lead to a stronger cortical activation in motor related areas due to a higher vividness and intensification of the imagery. This would be elicited by the integration of the action simulation of the virtual partner to one's own action. Comparing the joint action and the single action condition with the rest condition, we found significant activation in the precentral gyrus and precuneus respectively. Furthermore the joint action MI showed higher activation patterns in the premotor cortex (inferior and middle frontal gyrus) compared to the single action MI. The imagery of a more vivid and engaging task, like our joint action imagery, could improve rehabilitation processes since a more distributed brain activity is found. Furthermore, the joint action imagery compared to single action imagery might be an appropriate BCI task due to its clear spatial distinction of activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Parameter Estimation for Sensorless Controlled Induction Motors using Nonlinear Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozuki, Takashi; Kawabata, Yoshitaka; Sugimoto, Sueo

    In this paper, we consider parameter estimation of the state variables and unknown parameters of Induction Motors (IMs) using nonlinear filters. Simultaneous estimation is the most general method for sensorless controlled IMs, and at present, by the advance of computer processors, nonlinear filters have been applied to various occasions, so we describe the method for applying nonlinear filters to Induction Motors model, and consider its estimate performance by simulations. Simulation results showed that nonlinear filters have more accuracy estimate performance than the adaptive observer, and the excellent noise immunity.

  1. Voice-controlled Internet Browsing for Motor-handicapped Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Tom; Aaskoven, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The public-funded project "Indtal" ("Speak-it") has succeeded in developing a Danish voice-controlled utility for internet browsing targeting motor-handicapped users having difficulties using a standard keyboard and/or a standard mouse. The system has been designed and implemented in collaboration...... with an advisory board of motor-handicapped (potential) end-users and underlies a number of a priori defined design criteria: learnability and memorability rather than naturalness, minimal need for maintenance after release, support for "all" web standards (not just HTML conforming to certain "recommendations...

  2. Apomorphine pump in advanced Parkinson's disease: Effects on motor and nonmotor symptoms with brain metabolism correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, Manon; Le Jeune, Florence; Maurus, Anne; Drapier, Sophie; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Robert, Gabriel Hadrien; Sauleau, Paul; Vérin, Marc

    2017-01-15

    Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) and contraindications for subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS) could particularly benefit from subcutaneous infusion therapy with apomorphine. This original study was designed to evaluate the general efficacy of add-on apomorphine in motor and nonmotor symptoms in advanced PD, while characterizing the changes induced in brain glucose metabolism. The aim was to look at the underlying anatomical-functional pathways. 12 patients with advanced PD were assessed before and after 6months of add-on apomorphine, using resting-state (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and exhaustive clinical assessments. After 6months of therapy, oral treatment was significantly reduced. Both motor and nonmotor scores improved, with a beneficial effect on executive functions, quality of life and apathy. Significant metabolic changes were observed, with overall increases in the right fusiform gyrus and hippocampus, alongside a decrease in the left middle frontal gyrus. Consistent correlations between significant changes in clinical scores and metabolism were established. Well tolerated, add-on apomorphine appears to be an interesting option for patients with fluctuations and contra-indications for DBS. Changes in brain metabolism, with beneficial effects on motor and nonmotor symptoms were observed after 6months. These preliminary results have to be confirmed by further studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Wearable Channel Selection-Based Brain-Computer Interface for Motor Imagery Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chi-Chun; Chien, Tsung-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Shang-Ho; Fang, Wai-Chi; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2016-02-06

    Motor imagery-based brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication interface between an external machine and the brain. Many kinds of spatial filters are used in BCIs to enhance the electroencephalography (EEG) features related to motor imagery. The approach of channel selection, developed to reserve meaningful EEG channels, is also an important technique for the development of BCIs. However, current BCI systems require a conventional EEG machine and EEG electrodes with conductive gel to acquire multi-channel EEG signals and then transmit these EEG signals to the back-end computer to perform the approach of channel selection. This reduces the convenience of use in daily life and increases the limitations of BCI applications. In order to improve the above issues, a novel wearable channel selection-based brain-computer interface is proposed. Here, retractable comb-shaped active dry electrodes are designed to measure the EEG signals on a hairy site, without conductive gel. By the design of analog CAR spatial filters and the firmware of EEG acquisition module, the function of spatial filters could be performed without any calculation, and channel selection could be performed in the front-end device to improve the practicability of detecting motor imagery in the wearable EEG device directly or in commercial mobile phones or tablets, which may have relatively low system specifications. Finally, the performance of the proposed BCI is investigated, and the experimental results show that the proposed system is a good wearable BCI system prototype.

  4. Dynamics of brain activity in motor and frontal cortical areas during music listening: a magnetoencephalographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Mihai; Otsuka, Asuka; Ioannides, Andreas A

    2004-04-01

    There are formidable problems in studying how 'real' music engages the brain over wide ranges of temporal scales extending from milliseconds to a lifetime. In this work, we recorded the magnetoencephalographic signal while subjects listened to music as it unfolded over long periods of time (seconds), and we developed and applied methods to correlate the time course of the regional brain activations with the dynamic aspects of the musical sound. We showed that frontal areas generally respond with slow time constants to the music, reflecting their more integrative mode; motor-related areas showed transient-mode responses to fine temporal scale structures of the sound. The study combined novel analysis techniques designed to capture and quantify fine temporal sequencing from the authentic musical piece (characterized by a clearly defined rhythm and melodic structure) with the extraction of relevant features from the dynamics of the regional brain activations. The results demonstrated that activity in motor-related structures, specifically in lateral premotor areas, supplementary motor areas, and somatomotor areas, correlated with measures of rhythmicity derived from the music. These correlations showed distinct laterality depending on how the musical performance deviated from the strict tempo of the music score, that is, depending on the musical expression.

  5. Acute, transient hemorrhagic hypotension does not aggravate structural damage or neurologic motor deficits but delays the long-term cognitive recovery following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Christian; Stover, John F.; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Hoover, Rachel C.; Morales, Diego M.; Schouten, Joost W.; McMillan, Asenia; Soltesz, Kristie; Motta, Melissa; Spangler, Zachery; Neugebauer, Edmund; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Posttraumatic hypotension is believed to increase morbidity and mortality in traumatically brain-injured patients. Using a clinically relevant model of combined traumatic brain injury with superimposed hemorrhagic hypotension in rats, the present study evaluated whether a reduction in mean arterial blood pressure aggravates regional brain edema formation, regional cell death, and neurologic motor/cognitive deficits associated with traumatic brain injury. Design Experimental prospective, randomized study in rodents. Setting Experimental laboratory at a university hospital. Subjects One hundred nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350-385 g. Interventions Experimental traumatic brain injury of mild to moderate severity was induced using the lateral fluid percussion brain injury model in anesthetized rats (n = 89). Following traumatic brain injury, in surviving animals one group of animals was subjected to pressure-controlled hemorrhagic hypotension, maintaining the mean arterial blood pressure at 50-60 mm Hg for 30 mins (n = 47). The animals were subsequently either resuscitated with lactated Ringer’s solution (three times shed blood volume, n = 18) or left uncompensated (n = 29). Other groups of animals included those with isolated traumatic brain injury (n = 34), those with isolated hemorrhagic hypotension (n = 8), and sham-injured control animals receiving anesthesia and surgery alone (n = 22). Measurements and Main Results The withdrawal of 6-7 mL of arterial blood significantly reduced mean arterial blood pressure by 50% without decreasing arterial oxygen saturation or Pao2. Brain injury induced significant cerebral edema (p hypotension. Brain injury-induced neurologic deficits persisted up to 20 wks after injury and were also not aggravated by the hemorrhagic hypotension. Cognitive dysfunction persisted for up to 16 wks postinjury. The superimposition of hemorrhagic hypotension significantly delayed the time course of cognitive recovery

  6. Sensorless Control of Electric Motors with Kalman Filters: Applications to Robotic and Industrial Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimos G. Rigatos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies sensorless control for DC and induction motors, using Kalman Filtering techniques. First the case of a DC motor is considered and Kalman Filter-based control is implemented. Next the nonlinear model of a field-oriented induction motor is examined and the motor

  7. Robust Adaptive Speed Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidstrup, N.

    This thesis concerns speed control of current vector controlled induction motor drives (CVC drives). The CVC drive is an existing prototype drive developed by Danfoss A/S, Transmission Division. Practical tests have revealed that the open loop dynamical properties of the CVC drive are highly......, (LS) identification and generalized predictive control (GPC) has been implemented and tested on the CVC drive. Allthough GPC is a robust control method, it was not possible to maintain specified controller performance in the entire operating range. This was the main reason for investigating truly...

  8. Sensorless Control of Electric Motors with Kalman Filters: Applications to Robotic and Industrial Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gerasimos G. Rigatos; Pierluigi Siano

    2011-01-01

    The paper studies sensorless control for DC and induction motors, using Kalman Filtering techniques. First the case of a DC motor is considered and Kalman Filter-based control is implemented. Next the nonlinear model of a field-oriented induction motor is examined and the motor's angular velocity is estimated by an Extended Kalman Filter which processes measurements of the rotor's angle. Sensorless control of the induction motor is again implemented through feedback of the estimated state vec...

  9. Self-controlled practice benefits motor learning in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessa, Helena Thofehrn; Chiviacowsky, Suzete

    2015-04-01

    Providing learners with the chance to choose over certain aspects of practice has been consistently shown to facilitate the acquisition of motor skills in several populations. However, studies investigating the effects of providing autonomy support during the learning process of older adults remain scarce. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of self-controlled amount of practice on the learning of a sequential motor task in older adults. Participants in the self-control group were able to choose when to stop practicing a speed cup stacking task, while the number of practice trials for a yoked group was pre-determined, mirroring the self-control group. The opportunity to choose when stop practicing facilitated motor performance and learning compared to the yoked condition. The findings suggest that letting older adult learners choose the amount of practice, supporting their autonomy needs, has a positive influence on motor learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Microgravity induced changes in the control of motor units

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, C.; Roy, S.

    The goal of this project is to understand the effects of microgravity on the control of muscles. It is motivated by the notion that in order to adequately address microgravity-induced deterioration in the force generating capacity of muscles, one needs to understand the changes in the control aspects in addition to histochemical and morphological changes. The investigations into muscle control need to include the regulation of the firing activity of motor units that make up a muscle and the coordination of different muscles responsible for the control of a joint. In order to understand the effects of microgravity on these two aspects of muscle control, we will test astronauts before and after spaceflight. The investigations of the control of motor units will involve intramuscular EMG techniques developed in our laboratory. We will use a quadrifilar electrode to detect simultaneously three differential channels of EMG activity. These data will be decomposed accurately using a sophisticated set of algorithms constructed with artificial intelligence knowledge- based techniques. Particular attention will be paid to the firing rate and recruitment behavior of motor units and we will study the degree of cross-correlation of the firing rates. This approach will enable us to study the firing behavior of several (approx. 10) concurrently active motor units. This analysis will enable us to detect modifications in the control of motor units. We will perform these investigations in a hand muscle, which continues being used in prehensile tasks in space, and a leg muscle whose antigravity role is not needed in space. The comparison of the effects of weightlessness on these muscles will determine if continued use of muscles in space deters the possible deleterious effects of microgravity on the control of motor units, in addition to slowing down atrophy. We are particularly interested in comparing the results of this study to similar data already obtained from elderly subjects

  11. Extraction and localization of mesoscopic motor control signals for human ECoG neuroprosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Justin C; Gunduz, Aysegul; Carney, Paul R; Principe, Jose C

    2008-01-15

    Electrocorticogram (ECoG) recordings for neuroprosthetics provide a mesoscopic level of abstraction of brain function between microwire single neuron recordings and the electroencephalogram (EEG). Single-trial ECoG neural interfaces require appropriate feature extraction and signal processing methods to identify and model in real-time signatures of motor events in spontaneous brain activity. Here, we develop the clinical experimental paradigm and analysis tools to record broadband (1Hz to 6kHz) ECoG from patients participating in a reaching and pointing task. Motivated by the significant role of amplitude modulated rate coding in extracellular spike based brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), we develop methods to quantify spatio-temporal intermittent increased ECoG voltages to determine if they provide viable control inputs for ECoG neural interfaces. This study seeks to explore preprocessing modalities that emphasize amplitude modulation across frequencies and channels in the ECoG above the level of noisy background fluctuations in order to derive the commands for complex, continuous control tasks. Preliminary experiments show that it is possible to derive online predictive models and spatially localize the generation of commands in the cortex for motor tasks using amplitude modulated ECoG.

  12. 78 FR 32223 - Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 80, 85, 86, 600, 1036, 1037, 1065, and 1066 RIN 2060-A0 Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles: Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... (``EPA'') is announcing an extension of the public comment period for the proposed rule ``Control of Air...

  13. When the brain speaks for itself : exploiting hemodynamic brain signals for motor-independent communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorger, B.

    2010-01-01

    Communication is an essential element of human interaction but can be compromised in several clinical conditions. In the so-called 'locked-in' syndrome (LIS), resulting from a severe motor paralysis, patients are literally confined to their own bodies, while at the same time being fully conscious

  14. An Improved Adaptive Tracking Controller of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat-Bao-Thien Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new adaptive fuzzy neural control to suppress chaos and also to achieve the speed tracking control in a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM drive system with unknown parameters and uncertainties. The control scheme consists of fuzzy neural and compensatory controllers. The fuzzy neural controller with online parameter tuning is used to estimate the unknown nonlinear models and construct linearization feedback control law, while the compensatory controller is employed to attenuate the estimation error effects of the fuzzy neural network and ensure the robustness of the controlled system. Moreover, due to improvement in controller design, the singularity problem is surely avoided. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate that the proposed control scheme can successfully remove chaotic oscillations and allow the speed to follow the desired trajectory in a chaotic PMSM despite the existence of unknown models and uncertainties.

  15. Visual-Motor Control in Baseball Batting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Gray

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available With margins for error of a few milliseconds and fractions of an inch it is not surprising that hitting a baseball is considered to be one of the most difficult acts in all of sports. We have been investigating this challenging behavior using a virtual baseball batting setup in which simulations of an approaching ball, pitcher, and field are combined with real-time recording of bat and limb movements. I will present evidence that baseball batting involves variable pre-programmed control in which the swing direction and movement time (MT are set prior to the initiation of the action but can take different values from swing-to-swing. This programming process utilizes both advance information (pitch history and count and optical information picked-up very early in the ball's flight (ball time to contact TTC and rotation direction. The pre-programmed value of MT is used to determine a critical value of TTC for swing initiation. Finally, because a baseball swing is an action that is occasionally interrupted online (i.e., a “check swing”, I will discuss experiments that examine when this pre-programmed action can be stopped and the sources of optical information that trigger stopping.

  16. Effects of muscle atrophy on motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    As a biological tissue, muscle adapts to the demands of usage. One traditional way of assessing the extent of this adaptation has been to examine the effects of an altered-activity protocol on the physiological properties of muscles. However, in order to accurately interpret the changes associated with an activity pattern, it is necessary to employ an appropriate control model. A substantial literature exists which reports altered-use effects by comparing experimental observations with those from animals raised in small laboratory cages. Some evidence suggests that small-cage-reared animals actually represent a model of reduced use. For example, laboratory animals subjected to limited physical activity have shown resistance to insulin-induced glucose uptake which can be altered by exercise training. This project concerned itself with the basic mechanisms underlying muscle atrophy. Specifically, the project addressed the issue of the appropriateness of rats raised in conventional-sized cages as experimental models to examine this phenomenon. The project hypothesis was that rats raised in small cages are inappropriate models for the study of muscle atrophy. The experimental protocol involved: 1) raising two populations of rats, one group in conventional (small)-sized cages and the other group in a much larger (133x) cage, from weanling age (21 days) through to young adulthood (125 days); 2) comparison of size- and force-related characteristics of selected test muscles in an acute terminal paradigm.

  17. A review: Motor rehabilitation after stroke with control based on human intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Xu, Guanghua; Xie, Jun; Chen, Chaoyang

    2018-02-01

    Strokes are a leading cause of acquired disability worldwide, and there is a significant need for novel interventions and further research to facilitate functional motor recovery in stroke patients. This article reviews motor rehabilitation methods for stroke survivors with a focus on rehabilitation controlled by human motor intent. The review begins with the neurodevelopmental principles of motor rehabilitation that provide the neuroscientific basis for intuitively controlled rehabilitation, followed by a review of methods allowing human motor intent detection, biofeedback approaches, and quantitative motor rehabilitation assessment. Challenges for future advances in motor rehabilitation after stroke using intuitively controlled approaches are addressed.

  18. A hybrid brain-machine interface based on EEG and EMG activity for the motor rehabilitation of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarasola-Sanz, Andrea; Irastorza-Landa, Nerea; Lopez-Larraz, Eduardo; Bibian, Carlos; Helmhold, Florian; Broetz, Doris; Birbaumer, Niels; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander

    2017-07-01

    Including supplementary information from the brain or other body parts in the control of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) has been recently proposed and investigated. Such enriched interfaces are referred to as hybrid BMIs (hBMIs) and have been proven to be more robust and accurate than regular BMIs for assistive and rehabilitative applications. Electromyographic (EMG) activity is one of the most widely utilized biosignals in hBMIs, as it provides a quite direct measurement of the motion intention of the user. Whereas most of the existing non-invasive EEG-EMG-hBMIs have only been subjected to offline testings or are limited to one degree of freedom (DoF), we present an EEG-EMG-hBMI that allows the simultaneous control of 7-DoFs of the upper limb with a robotic exoskeleton. Moreover, it establishes a biologically-inspired hierarchical control flow, requiring the active participation of central and peripheral structures of the nervous system. Contingent visual and proprioceptive feedback about the user's EEG and EMG activity is provided in the form of velocity modulation during functional task training. We believe that training with this closed-loop system may facilitate functional neuroplastic processes and eventually elicit a joint brain and muscle motor rehabilitation. Its usability is validated during a real-time operation session in a healthy participant and a chronic stroke patient, showing encouraging results for its application to a clinical rehabilitation scenario.

  19. Proactive motor control reduces monetary risk taking in gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Frederick; Adams, Rachel; Chambers, Christopher D

    2012-07-01

    Less supervision by the executive system after disruption of the right prefrontal cortex leads to increased risk taking in gambling because superficially attractive-but risky-choices are not suppressed. Similarly, people might gamble more in multitask situations than in single-task situations because concurrent executive processes usually interfere with each other. In the study reported here, we used a novel monetary decision-making paradigm to investigate whether multitasking could reduce rather than increase risk taking in gambling. We found that performing a task that induced cautious motor responding reduced gambling in a multitask situation (Experiment 1). We then found that a short period of inhibitory training lessened risk taking in gambling at least 2 hr later (Experiments 2 and 3). Our findings indicate that proactive motor control strongly affects monetary risk taking in gambling. The link between control systems at different cognitive levels might be exploited to develop new methods for rehabilitation of addiction and impulse-control disorders.

  20. Advanced induction motor drive control with single current sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Evgenije M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes induction motor drive control method which uses minimal number of sensors, providing only DC-link current as a feedback signal. Improved DC-link current sampling scheme and modified asymmetrical switching pattern cancels characteristic waveform errors which exist in all three reconstructed motor line-currents. Motor linecurrent harmonic content is reduced to an acceptable level, eliminating torque and speed oscillations which were inherent for conventional single sensor drives. Consequently, use of single current sensor and line-current reconstruction technique is no longer acceptable only for low and medium performance drives, but also for drives where priority is obtaining a highly accurate, stable and fast response. Proposed control algorithm is validated using induction motor drive hardware prototype based on TMS320F2812 digital signal processor. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 042004 and by the Provincial Secretariat for Science and Technological Development of AP Vojvodina under contract No. 114-451-3508/2013-04

  1. Common Spatio-Time-Frequency Patterns for Motor Imagery-Based Brain Machine Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihisa

    2013-01-01

    For efficient decoding of brain activities in analyzing brain function with an application to brain machine interfacing (BMI), we address a problem of how to determine spatial weights (spatial patterns), bandpass filters (frequency patterns), and time windows (time patterns) by utilizing electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. To find these parameters, we develop a data-driven criterion that is a natural extension of the so-called common spatial patterns (CSP) that are known to be effective features in BMI. We show that the proposed criterion can be optimized by an alternating procedure to achieve fast convergence. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively extract discriminative features for a motor imagery-based BMI. PMID:24302929

  2. Motor Control and Regulation for a Flywheel Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Barbara; Lyons, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    This talk will focus on the motor control algorithms used to regulate the flywheel system at the NASA Glenn Research Center. First a discussion of the inner loop torque control technique will be given. It is based on the principle of field orientation and is implemented without a position or speed sensor (sensorless control). Then the outer loop charge and discharge algorithm will be presented. This algorithm controls the acceleration of the flywheel during charging and the deceleration while discharging. The algorithm also allows the flywheel system to regulate the DC bus voltage during the discharge cycle.

  3. Reversing motor adaptation deficits in the ageing brain using non-invasive stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panouillères, Muriel T N; Joundi, Raed A; Brittain, John-Stuart; Jenkinson, Ned

    2015-08-15

    Healthy ageing in man is associated with a decline in motor adaptation. Transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) or the lateral cerebellum can improve motor adaptation in young and older adults, but as yet no direct comparisons of TDCS effects exist between the two age groups and the two stimulation sites. TDCS over M1 enhanced the motor adaptation in both age groups by ∼30% relative to their respective non-stimulated groups and improved the performance of older adults to the extent that it compared with that of young adults without stimulation. The study suggests that the plastic mechanisms activated by TDCS that underpin improvements in motor behaviour in young adults remain available in older adults. The results indicate that TDCS may be a useful tool to help combat the normal decline in motor performance seen in normal healthy ageing. Healthy ageing is characterised by deterioration of motor performance. In normal circumstances motor adaptation corrects for movements' inaccuracies and as such, it is critical in maintaining optimal motor control. However, motor adaptation performance is also known to decline with age. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) of the cerebellum and the primary motor cortex (M1) have been found to improve visuomotor adaptation in healthy young and older adults. However, no study has directly compared the effect of TDCS on motor adaptation between the two age populations. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the application of anodal TDCS over the lateral cerebellum and M1 affected motor adaptation in young and older adults similarly. Young and older participants performed a visuomotor rotation task and concurrently received TDCS over the left M1, the right cerebellum or received sham stimulation. Our results replicated the finding that older adults are impaired compared to the young adults in visuomotor adaptation. At the end of the adaptation session, older adults

  4. Novel intelligent PID control of traveling wave ultrasonic motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingzhuo, Shi; Yu, Liu; Jingtao, Huang; Meiyu, Xu; Juwei, Zhang; Lei, Zhang

    2014-09-01

    A simple control strategy with acceptable control performance can be a good choice for the mass production of ultrasonic motor control system. In this paper, through the theoretic and experimental analyses of typical control process, a simpler intelligent PID speed control strategy of TWUM is proposed, involving only two expert rules to adjust the PID control parameters based on the current status. Compared with the traditional PID controller, this design requires less calculation and more cheap chips which can be easily involved in online performance. Experiments with different load torques and voltage amplitudes show that the proposed controller can deal with the nonlinearity and load disturbance to maintain good control performance of TWUM. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Robust Adaptive Speed Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidstrup, N.

    adaptive speed control of the CVC drive. A direct truly adaptive speed controller has been implemented. The adaptive controller is a moving Average Self-Tuning Regulator which is abbreviated MASTR throughout the thesis. Two practical implementations of this controller were proposed. They were denoted MASTR......This thesis concerns speed control of current vector controlled induction motor drives (CVC drives). The CVC drive is an existing prototype drive developed by Danfoss A/S, Transmission Division. Practical tests have revealed that the open loop dynamical properties of the CVC drive are highly...... dependent of the operating point, which is characterised by the speed and load. If the requirements to the controller performance is large, then it is difficult to maintain specified controller performance with a fixed controller, because of the open loop variations. An auto-tuner based on least squares...

  6. Robust Adaptive Speed Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidstrup, N.

    This thesis concerns speed control of current vector controlled induction motor drives (CVC drives). The CVC drive is an existing prototype drive developed by Danfoss A/S, Transmission Division. Practical tests have revealed that the open loop dynamical properties of the CVC drive are highly......, (LS) identification and generalized predictive control (GPC) has been implemented and tested on the CVC drive. Allthough GPC is a robust control method, it was not possible to maintain specified controller performance in the entire operating range. This was the main reason for investigating truly...... adaptive speed control of the CVC drive. A direct truly adaptive speed controller has been implemented. The adaptive controller is a moving Average Self-Tuning Regulator which is abbreviated MASTR throughout the thesis. Two practical implementations of this controller were proposed. They were denoted MASTR...

  7. A novel Morse code-inspired method for multiclass motor imagery brain-computer interface (BCI) design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Yu, Yang; Liu, Yadong; Hu, Dewen

    2015-11-01

    Motor imagery (MI)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow disabled individuals to control external devices voluntarily, helping us to restore lost motor functions. However, the number of control commands available in MI-based BCIs remains limited, limiting the usability of BCI systems in control applications involving multiple degrees of freedom (DOF), such as control of a robot arm. To address this problem, we developed a novel Morse code-inspired method for MI-based BCI design to increase the number of output commands. Using this method, brain activities are modulated by sequences of MI (sMI) tasks, which are constructed by alternately imagining movements of the left or right hand or no motion. The codes of the sMI task was detected from EEG signals and mapped to special commands. According to permutation theory, an sMI task with N-length allows 2 × (2(N)-1) possible commands with the left and right MI tasks under self-paced conditions. To verify its feasibility, the new method was used to construct a six-class BCI system to control the arm of a humanoid robot. Four subjects participated in our experiment and the averaged accuracy of the six-class sMI tasks was 89.4%. The Cohen's kappa coefficient and the throughput of our BCI paradigm are 0.88 ± 0.060 and 23.5bits per minute (bpm), respectively. Furthermore, all of the subjects could operate an actual three-joint robot arm to grasp an object in around 49.1s using our approach. These promising results suggest that the Morse code-inspired method could be used in the design of BCIs for multi-DOF control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling and control of V/f controlled induction motor using genetic-ANFIS algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ustun, Seydi Vakkas (Vocational High School, Adiyaman University, Adiyaman/Turkey); Demirtas, Metin (Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Balikesir University, Balikesir/Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    This paper deals with modeling and performance analysis of the voltage/frequency (V/f) control of induction motor drives. The V/f control, which realizes a low cost and simple design, is advantageous in the middle to high-speed range. Its torque response depends on the electrical time constant of the motor and adjustments of the control parameters are not need. Therefore, V/f control of induction motor is carried out. Space vector pulse width modulation is used for controlling the motor because of including minimum harmonics according to the other PWM techniques. Proportional Integral (PI) controller is used to control speed of induction motor. In this work, optimization of PI coefficients is carried out by Ziegler-Nichols model and Genetic-Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model. These controllers are applied to drive system with 0.55 kW induction motor. A digital signal processor controller (dsPIC30F6010) is used to carry out control applications. The proposed method is compared Ziegler-Nichols model. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed control method. (author)

  9. Controlling Assistive Machines in Paralysis Using Brain Waves and Other Biosignals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rogério de Almeida Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which humans can interact with machines significantly enhanced through inclusion of speech, gestures, and eye movements. However, these communication channels depend on a functional motor system. As many people suffer from severe damage of the motor system resulting in paralysis and inability to communicate, the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMI that translate electric or metabolic brain activity into control signals of external devices promises to overcome this dependence. People with complete paralysis can learn to use their brain waves to control prosthetic devices or exoskeletons. However, information transfer rates of currently available noninvasive BMI systems are still very limited and do not allow versatile control and interaction with assistive machines. Thus, using brain waves in combination with other biosignals might significantly enhance the ability of people with a compromised motor system to interact with assistive machines. Here, we give an overview of the current state of assistive, noninvasive BMI research and propose to integrate brain waves and other biosignals for improved control and applicability of assistive machines in paralysis. Beside introducing an example of such a system, potential future developments are being discussed.

  10. Risks of postoperative paresis in motor eloquently and non-eloquently located brain metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background When treating cerebral metastases all involved multidisciplinary oncological specialists have to cooperate closely to provide the best care for these patients. For the resection of brain metastasis several studies reported a considerable risk of new postoperative paresis. Pre- and perioperative chemotherapy (Ctx) or radiotherapy (Rtx) alter vasculature and adjacent fiber tracts on the one hand, and many patients already present with paresis prior to surgery on the other hand. As such factors were repeatedly considered risk factors for perioperative complications, we designed this study to also identify risk factors for brain metastases resection. Methods Between 2006 and 2011, we resected 206 brain metastases consecutively, 56 in eloquent motor areas and 150 in non-eloquent ones. We evaluated the influences of preoperative paresis, previous Rtx or Ctx as well as recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class on postoperative outcome. Results In general, 8.7% of all patients postoperatively developed a new permanent paresis. In contrast to preoperative Ctx, previous Rtx as a single or combined treatment strategy was a significant risk factor for postoperative motor weakness. This risk was even increased in perirolandic and rolandic lesions. Our data show significantly increased risk of new deficits for patients assigned to RPA class 3. Even in non-eloquently located brain metastases the risk of new postoperative paresis has not to be underestimated. Despite the microsurgical approach, our cohort shows a high rate of unexpected residual tumors in postoperative MRI, which supports recent data on brain metastases’ infiltrative nature but might also be the result of our strict study protocol. Conclusions Surgical resection is a safe treatment of brain metastases. However, preoperative Rtx and RPA score 3 have to be taken into account when surgical resection is considered. PMID:24422871

  11. The Teenage Brain: Self Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Bj; Caudle, Kristina

    2013-04-01

    Adolescence refers to the transition from childhood to adulthood that begins with the onset of puberty and ends with successful independence from the parent. A paradox for human adolescence is why, during a time when the individual is probably faster, stronger, of higher reasoning capacity and more resistant to disease, there is such an increase in mortality relative to childhood. These untimely deaths are not due to disease, but rather to preventable forms of death (accidental fatalities, suicide and homicide) associated with adolescents putting themselves in harm's way due, in part, to diminished self control - the ability to suppress inappropriate emotions, desires and actions. This paper highlights how self control varies as a function of age, context and the individual and delineates its neurobiological basis.

  12. Direct brain control and communication in paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbaumer, Niels; Gallegos-Ayala, Guillermo; Wildgruber, Moritz; Silvoni, Stefano; Soekadar, Surjo R

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable growth in the field of brain-computer or brain-machine interface (BCI/BMI) research reflected in several hundred publications each year, little progress was made to enable patients in complete locked-in state (CLIS) to reliably communicate using their brain activity. Independent of the invasiveness of the BCI systems tested, no sustained direct brain control and communication was demonstrated in a patient in CLIS so far. This suggested a more fundamental theoretical problem of learning and attention in brain communication with BCI/BMI, formulated in the extinction-of-thought hypothesis. While operant conditioning and goal-directed thinking seems impaired in complete paralysis, classical conditioning of brain responses might represent the only alternative. First experimental studies in CLIS using semantic conditioning support this assumption. Evidence that quality-of-life in locked-in-state is not as limited and poor as generally believed draise doubts that "patient wills" or "advanced directives"signed long-before the locked-in-state are useful. On the contrary, they might be used as an excuse to shorten anticipated long periods of care for these patients avoiding associated financial and social burdens. Current state and availability of BCI/BMI systems urge a broader societal discourse on the pressing ethical challenges associated with the advancements in neurotechnology and BCI/BMI research.

  13. Inducing disbelief in free will alters brain correlates of preconscious motor preparation: the brain minds whether we believe in free will or not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoni, Davide; Kühn, Simone; Sartori, Giuseppe; Brass, Marcel

    2011-05-01

    The feeling of being in control of one's own actions is a strong subjective experience. However, discoveries in psychology and neuroscience challenge the validity of this experience and suggest that free will is just an illusion. This raises a question: What would happen if people started to disbelieve in free will? Previous research has shown that low control beliefs affect performance and motivation. Recently, it has been shown that undermining free-will beliefs influences social behavior. In the study reported here, we investigated whether undermining beliefs in free will affects brain correlates of voluntary motor preparation. Our results showed that the readiness potential was reduced in individuals induced to disbelieve in free will. This effect was evident more than 1 s before participants consciously decided to move, a finding that suggests that the manipulation influenced intentional actions at preconscious stages. Our findings indicate that abstract belief systems might have a much more fundamental effect than previously thought.

  14. A hybrid NIRS-EEG system for self-paced brain computer interface with online motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bonkon; Lee, Hwan-Gon; Nam, Yunjun; Kang, Hyohyeong; Koh, Chin Su; Shin, Hyung-Cheul; Choi, Seungjin

    2015-04-15

    For a self-paced motor imagery based brain-computer interface (BCI), the system should be able to recognize the occurrence of a motor imagery, as well as the type of the motor imagery. However, because of the difficulty of detecting the occurrence of a motor imagery, general motor imagery based BCI studies have been focusing on the cued motor imagery paradigm. In this paper, we present a novel hybrid BCI system that uses near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) systems together to achieve online self-paced motor imagery based BCI. We designed a unique sensor frame that records NIRS and EEG simultaneously for the realization of our system. Based on this hybrid system, we proposed a novel analysis method that detects the occurrence of a motor imagery with the NIRS system, and classifies its type with the EEG system. An online experiment demonstrated that our hybrid system had a true positive rate of about 88%, a false positive rate of 7% with an average response time of 10.36 s. As far as we know, there is no report that explored hemodynamic brain switch for self-paced motor imagery based BCI with hybrid EEG and NIRS system. From our experimental results, our hybrid system showed enough reliability for using in a practical self-paced motor imagery based BCI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Controlling Precision Stepper Motors in Flight Using (Almost) No Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, David

    2010-01-01

    This concept allows control of high-performance stepper motors with minimal parts count and minimal flight software complexity. Although it uses a small number of common flight-qualified parts and simple control algorithms, it is capable enough to meet demanding system requirements. Its programmable nature makes it trivial to implement changes to control algorithms both during integration & test and in flight. Enhancements such as microstepping, half stepping, back-emf compensation, and jitter reduction can be tailored to the requirements of a large variety of stepper motor based applications including filter wheels, focus mechanisms, antenna tracking subsystems, pointing and mobility. The hardware design (using an H-bridge motor controller IC) was adapted from JPL's MER mission, still operating on Mars. This concept has been fully developed and incorporated into the MCS instrument on MRO, currently operating in Mars orbit. It has been incorporated into the filter wheel mechanism and linear stage (focus) mechanism for the AMT instrument. On MCS/MRO, two of these circuits control the elevation and azimuth of the MCS telescope/radiometer assembly, allowing the instrument to continuously monitor the limb of the Martian atmosphere. Implementation on MCS/MRO resulted in a 4:1 reduction in the volume and mass required for the motor driver electronics (100:25 square inches of PCB space), producing a very compact instrument. In fact, all of the electronics for the MCS instrument are packaged within the movable instrument structure. It also saved approximately 3 Watts of power. Most importantly, the design enabled MCS to meet very its stringent maximum allowable torque disturbance requirements.

  16. Control Code for Bearingless Switched-Reluctance Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carlos R.

    2007-01-01

    A computer program has been devised for controlling a machine that is an integral combination of magnetic bearings and a switched-reluctance motor. The motor contains an eight-pole stator and a hybrid rotor, which has both (1) a circular lamination stack for levitation and (2) a six-pole lamination stack for rotation. The program computes drive and levitation currents for the stator windings with real-time feedback control. During normal operation, two of the four pairs of opposing stator poles (each pair at right angles to the other pair) levitate the rotor. The remaining two pairs of stator poles exert torque on the six-pole rotor lamination stack to produce rotation. This version is executable in a control-loop time of 40 s on a Pentium (or equivalent) processor that operates at a clock speed of 400 MHz. The program can be expanded, by addition of logic blocks, to enable control of position along additional axes. The code enables adjustment of operational parameters (e.g., motor speed and stiffness, and damping parameters of magnetic bearings) through computer keyboard key presses.

  17. Motor priming in virtual reality can augment motor-imagery training efficacy in restorative brain-computer interaction: a within-subject analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vourvopoulos, Athanasios; Berm?dez i Badia, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of Brain?Computer Interface (BCI) technology in neurorehabilitation provides new strategies to overcome stroke-related motor limitations. Recent studies demonstrated the brain's capacity for functional and structural plasticity through BCI. However, it is not fully clear how we can take full advantage of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying recovery and how to maximize restoration through BCI. In this study we investigate the role of multimodal virtual reality (VR) sim...

  18. Controller Design for Direct Torque Controlled Space Vector Modulated (DTC-SVM) Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zelechowski, M.; Kazmierkowski, M.P.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    In this paper two different methods of PI controllers for direct torque controlled-space vector modulated induction motor drives have been studied. The first one is simple method based only on symmetric optimum criterion. The second approach takes into account the full model of induction motor...... including rotor voltage equation and uses root locus method. Some simulated and experimental oscillograms that illustrate properties of the presented controller design methods are shown....

  19. MaLT - Combined Motor and Language Therapy Tool for Brain Injury Patients Using Kinect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wairagkar, Maitreyee; McCrindle, Rachel; Robson, Holly; Meteyard, Lotte; Sperrin, Malcom; Smith, Andy; Pugh, Moyra

    2017-03-23

    The functional connectivity and structural proximity of elements of the language and motor systems result in frequent co-morbidity post brain injury. Although rehabilitation services are becoming increasingly multidisciplinary and "integrated", treatment for language and motor functions often occurs in isolation. Thus, behavioural therapies which promote neural reorganisation do not reflect the high intersystem connectivity of the neurologically intact brain. As such, there is a pressing need for rehabilitation tools which better reflect and target the impaired cognitive networks. The objective of this research is to develop a combined high dosage therapy tool for language and motor rehabilitation. The rehabilitation therapy tool developed, MaLT (Motor and Language Therapy), comprises a suite of computer games targeting both language and motor therapy that use the Kinect sensor as an interaction device. The games developed are intended for use in the home environment over prolonged periods of time. In order to track patients' engagement with the games and their rehabilitation progress, the game records patient performance data for the therapist to interrogate. MaLT incorporates Kinect-based games, a database of objects and language parameters, and a reporting tool for therapists. Games have been developed that target four major language therapy tasks involving single word comprehension, initial phoneme identification, rhyme identification and a naming task. These tasks have 8 levels each increasing in difficulty. A database of 750 objects is used to programmatically generate appropriate questions for the game, providing both targeted therapy and unique gameplay every time. The design of the games has been informed by therapists and by discussions with a Public Patient Involvement (PPI) group. Pilot MaLT trials have been conducted with three stroke survivors for the duration of 6 to 8 weeks. Patients' performance is monitored through MaLT's reporting facility

  20. Inhibitory Control of Memory Retrieval and Motor Processing Associated with the Right Lateral Prefrontal Cortex: Evidence from Deficits in Individuals with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depue, B. E.; Burgess, G. C.; Willcutt, E. G.; Ruzic, L.; Banich, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of inhibitory control have focused on inhibition of motor responses. Individuals with ADHD consistently show reductions in inhibitory control and exhibit reduced activity of rLPFC activity compared to controls when performing such tasks. Recently these same brain regions have been implicated in the inhibition of memory retrieval. The…

  1. Effects on motor development of kicking and stepping exercise in preterm infants with periventricular brain injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Suzann K; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Zawacki, Laura; Clark, April; Boynewicz, Kara; deRegnier, Raye-Ann; Kuroda, Maxine M; Bhat, Rama; Yu, Jinsheng; Campise-Luther, Rose; Kale, Dipti; Bulanda, Michelle; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe

    2012-01-01

    Preterm infants with periventricular brain injury (PBI) have a high incidence of atypical development and leg movements. Determine whether kicking and treadmill stepping intervention beginning at 2 months corrected age (CA) in children with PBI improves motor function at 12 months CA when compared with control subjects. In a multi-center pilot study for a controlled clinical trial, sixteen infants with PBI were randomly assigned to home exercise consisting of kicking and treadmill stepping or a no-training control condition. Development was assessed at 2, 4, 6, 10, and 12 months CA with the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS). At 12 months children were classified as normal, delayed, or with cerebral palsy (CP). At 12 months CA 3 of 7 (43%) of the exercise group children walked alone or with one hand held versus 1 of 9 (11%) in the control group (p=0.262), but no significant differences in AIMS scores were found at any age. Half of the subjects had CP or delay; the outcomes of these infants were not improved by exercise. Compliance with the home program was lower than requested and may have affected results. Although not statistically significant with a small sample size, self-produced kicking and treadmill exercise may lower age at walking in infants with normal development following PBI, but improvements of the protocol to increase and document compliance are needed before a larger study is implemented.

  2. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation for Enhancement of Corticospinal Excitability and Motor Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapour Jaberzadeh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available During the past .. years, non-invasive .rain stimulation has .ecome an emerging .eld in clinical neuroscience due to its capability to transiently modulate corticospinal excitability, motor and cognitive functions. .hereas transcranial magnetic stimulation has .een used e.tensively since more than t.o decades ago as a potential .neuromodulator., transcranial current stimulation .tCS. has more recently gathered increased scienti.c interests. The primary aim of this narrative revie. is to descri.e characteristics of different tCS paradigms.  tCS is an umbrella term for a number of brain modulating paradigms such as transcranial direct current stimulation .tDCS., transcranial alternative current stimulation .tACS., and transcranial random noise stimulation .tR.S.. Their ef.cacy is dependent on t.o current parameters: intensity and length of application. .nlike tACS and tR.S, tDCS is polarity dependent.These techniques could be used as stand-alone techniques or can be used to prime the effects of other movement trainingsThe review also summarises safety issues, the mechanisms of tDCS-induced neuroplasticity, limitations of current state of knowledge in the literature, tool that could be used to understand brain plasticity effects in motor regions and tool that could be used to understand motor learning effects.

  3. Digital Position Control System of a Motorized Valve in a Process Plant Using Hybrid Stepper Motor as Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata CHATTOPADHYAY

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In any control loop of a process plant, the motorized valve, used as a final control element, may be required to be positioned according to the set point decided by the process requirement. There are various types of position control techniques of a motorized valve. The position control systems used in different applications need to meet the high performance, accuracy and reliability to achieve the desired output. Microcontrollers can be used as suitable means for meeting these needs. In the present paper, a position control scheme of a motorized valve has been described using microcontroller-based configuration for controlling stepper motor as actuator. The final calibration data reported in the paper reveal the linearity and reliability of the control system.

  4. Efficiency optimized control of medium-size induction motor drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, F.; Blaabjerg, Frede; Pedersen, John Kim

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of a variable speed induction motor drive can be optimized by adaption of the motor flux level to the load torque. In small drives (small converter losses, but for medium-size drives (10-1000 kW) the losses can...... not be disregarded without further analysis. The importance of the converter losses on efficiency optimization in medium-size drives is analyzed in this paper. Based on the experiments with a 90 kW drive it is found that it is not critical if the converter losses are neglected in the control, except...... that the robustness towards load disturbances may unnecessarily be reduced. Both displacement power factor and model-based efficiency optimizing control methods perform well in medium-size drives. The last strategy is also tested on a 22 kW drive with good results....

  5. Low speed phaselock speed control system. [for brushless dc motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, R. W.; Sudey, J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A motor speed control system for an electronically commutated brushless dc motor is provided which includes a phaselock loop with bidirectional torque control for locking the frequency output of a high density encoder, responsive to actual speed conditions, to a reference frequency signal, corresponding to the desired speed. The system includes a phase comparator, which produces an output in accordance with the difference in phase between the reference and encoder frequency signals, and an integrator-digital-to-analog converter unit, which converts the comparator output into an analog error signal voltage. Compensation circuitry, including a biasing means, is provided to convert the analog error signal voltage to a bidirectional error signal voltage which is utilized by an absolute value amplifier, rotational decoder, power amplifier-commutators, and an arrangement of commutation circuitry.

  6. Impact of localisation of deep brain stimulation electrodes on motor and neurobehavioural outcomes in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chazeron, I; Pereira, B; Chereau-Boudet, I; Durif, F; Lemaire, J J; Brousse, G; Ulla, M; Derost, P; Debilly, B; Llorca, P M

    2016-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) represents a well-established treatment in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) for motor signs, but it is still debated concerning psychiatric effects. Exploration of relation between position of active electrode contacts and neuropsychological and motor change after STN DBS procedure for PD. A cohort of 34 patients who underwent STN DBS was followed for 6 months. Preoperative and postoperative assessments included mood evaluation (depression and mania) and motor status. Active contact localisation was identified regarding position into the STN (4 groups: IN meant contacts were IN-IN IN-BORDER; OUT: OUT-OUT or OUT-BORDER; BORDER: BORDER-BORDER; IN-OUT: IN-OUT) and compared with clinical outcomes. STN DBS significantly improved motor scores and reduced dopaminergic medication when compared with baseline and active lead groups: the best result was seen with the IN group. At 3 and 6 months postsurgery, depression and manic scores do not significantly differ compared with baseline and between leads groups. Focusing on symptom domains and compared with baseline, a significant loss of appetite was observed for the IN group at M3 and a significant increase in appetite from baseline was observed at M3 for the OUT group. Graphic representations illustrate that postsurgery evolution parameters at M3 or M6 are very good discriminant variables and well differentiate all leading groups. Stimulation of zona incerta may influence appetite and weight gain. Our clinical results seem to support a personalised DBS-targeted Parkinson therapy including individual motor and non-motor parameters. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Genetic variation in the human brain dopamine system influences motor learning and its modulation by L-Dopa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Pearson-Fuhrhop

    Full Text Available Dopamine is important to learning and plasticity. Dopaminergic drugs are the focus of many therapies targeting the motor system, where high inter-individual differences in response are common. The current study examined the hypothesis that genetic variation in the dopamine system is associated with significant differences in motor learning, brain plasticity, and the effects of the dopamine precursor L-Dopa. Skilled motor learning and motor cortex plasticity were assessed using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design in 50 healthy adults during two study weeks, one with placebo and one with L-Dopa. The influence of five polymorphisms with established effects on dopamine neurotransmission was summed using a gene score, with higher scores corresponding to higher dopaminergic neurotransmission. Secondary hypotheses examined each polymorphism individually. While training on placebo, higher gene scores were associated with greater motor learning (p = .03. The effect of L-Dopa on learning varied with the gene score (gene score*drug interaction, p = .008: participants with lower gene scores, and thus lower endogenous dopaminergic neurotransmission, showed the largest learning improvement with L-Dopa relative to placebo (p<.0001, while L-Dopa had a detrimental effect in participants with higher gene scores (p = .01. Motor cortex plasticity, assessed via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, also showed a gene score*drug interaction (p = .02. Individually, DRD2/ANKK1 genotype was significantly associated with motor learning (p = .02 and its modulation by L-Dopa (p<.0001, but not with any TMS measures. However, none of the individual polymorphisms explained the full constellation of findings associated with the gene score. These results suggest that genetic variation in the dopamine system influences learning and its modulation by L-Dopa. A polygene score explains differences in L-Dopa effects on learning and plasticity most

  8. Variable-frequency inverter controls torque, speed, and braking in ac induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Dc to ac inverter provides optimum frequency and voltage to ac induction motor, in response to different motor-load and speed requirements. Inverter varies slip frequency of motor in proportion to required torque. Inverter protects motor from high current surges, controls negative slip to apply braking, and returns energy stored in momentum of load to dc power source.

  9. Vector Control Algorithm for Electric Vehicle AC Induction Motor Based on Improved Variable Gain PID Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration performance of EV, which affects a lot of performances of EV such as start-up, overtaking, driving safety, and ride comfort, has become increasingly popular in recent researches. An improved variable gain PID control algorithm to improve the acceleration performance is proposed in this paper. The results of simulation with Matlab/Simulink demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm through the control performance of motor velocity, motor torque, and three-phase current of motor. Moreover, it is investigated that the proposed controller is valid by comparison with the other PID controllers. Furthermore, the AC induction motor experiment set is constructed to verify the effect of proposed controller.

  10. Orofacial cutaneous function in speech motor control and learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Somatosensory signals from facial skin can provide a rich source of sensory input. However, it is unknown yet how cutaneous input works on speech motor control and learning. This chapter introduces a kinesthetic role of orofacial cutaneous afferents in speech processing. We argue for specificity of the orofacial somatosensory system from anatomical and physiological perspectives. The contribution of cutaneous afferents to speech production is evident in neurophysiologi...

  11. Are Articulatory Settings Mechanically Advantageous for Speech Motor Control?

    OpenAIRE

    Vikram Ramanarayanan; Adam Lammert; Louis Goldstein; Shrikanth Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    We address the hypothesis that postures adopted during grammatical pauses in speech production are more "mechanically advantageous" than absolute rest positions for facilitating efficient postural motor control of vocal tract articulators. We quantify vocal tract posture corresponding to inter-speech pauses, absolute rest intervals as well as vowel and consonant intervals using automated analysis of video captured with real-time magnetic resonance imaging during production of read and spontan...

  12. Review of Apraxia: The cognitive side of motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Ferreiro, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Reviews the book, Apraxia: The Cognitive Side of Motor Control by G. Goldenberg (see record 2013-31133-000). The book makes a significant contribution to the study of this multifaceted syndrome, especially in relation to limb apraxia, the author’s main research area. Despite more than 100 years o...... and current state of apraxia research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)...

  13. Brain-machine interfacing control of whole-body humanoid motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyarmane, Karim; Vaillant, Joris; Sugimoto, Norikazu; Keith, François; Furukawa, Jun-ichiro; Morimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We propose to tackle in this paper the problem of controlling whole-body humanoid robot behavior through non-invasive brain-machine interfacing (BMI), motivated by the perspective of mapping human motor control strategies to human-like mechanical avatar. Our solution is based on the adequate reduction of the controllable dimensionality of a high-DOF humanoid motion in line with the state-of-the-art possibilities of non-invasive BMI technologies, leaving the complement subspace part of the motion to be planned and executed by an autonomous humanoid whole-body motion planning and control framework. The results are shown in full physics-based simulation of a 36-degree-of-freedom humanoid motion controlled by a user through EEG-extracted brain signals generated with motor imagery task. PMID:25140134

  14. Brain-Machine Interfacing Control of Whole-Body Humanoid Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim eBouyarmane

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose to tackle in this paper the problem of controlling whole-body humanoid robot behavior through non-invasive brain-machine interfacing (BMI, motivated by the perspective of mapping human motor control strategies to human-like mechanical avatar. Our solution is based on the adequate reduction of the controllable dimensionality of a high-DOF humanoid motion in line with the state-of-the-art possibilities of non-invasive BMI technologies, leaving the complement subspace part of the motion to be planned and executed by an autonomous humanoid whole-body motion planning and control framework. The results are shown in full physics-based simulation of a 36-degree-of-freedom humanoid motion controlled by a user through EEG-extracted brain signals generated with motor imagery task.

  15. Brain-machine interfacing control of whole-body humanoid motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyarmane, Karim; Vaillant, Joris; Sugimoto, Norikazu; Keith, François; Furukawa, Jun-Ichiro; Morimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We propose to tackle in this paper the problem of controlling whole-body humanoid robot behavior through non-invasive brain-machine interfacing (BMI), motivated by the perspective of mapping human motor control strategies to human-like mechanical avatar. Our solution is based on the adequate reduction of the controllable dimensionality of a high-DOF humanoid motion in line with the state-of-the-art possibilities of non-invasive BMI technologies, leaving the complement subspace part of the motion to be planned and executed by an autonomous humanoid whole-body motion planning and control framework. The results are shown in full physics-based simulation of a 36-degree-of-freedom humanoid motion controlled by a user through EEG-extracted brain signals generated with motor imagery task.

  16. Disorganization of Equilibrium Directional Interactions in the Brain Motor Network of Parkinson's disease: New Insight of Resting State Analysis Using Granger Causality and Graphical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mahdieh; Mahloojifar, Ali

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity, and slowness of movements. Particular changes related to various pathological attacks in PD could result in causal interactions of the brain network from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data. In this paper, we aimed to disclose the network structure of the directed influences over the brain using multivariate Granger causality analysis and graph theory in patients with PD as compared with control group. rs-fMRI at rest from 10 PD patients and 10 controls were analyzed. Topological properties of the networks showed that information flow in PD is smaller than that in healthy individuals. We found that there is a balanced local network in healthy control group, including positive pair-wise cross connections between caudate and cerebellum and reciprocal connections between motor cortex and caudate in the left and right hemispheres. The results showed that this local network is disrupted in PD due to disturbance of the interactions in the motor networks. These findings suggested alteration of the functional organization of the brain in the resting state that affects the information transmission from and to other brain regions related to both primary dysfunctions and higher-level cognition impairments in PD. Furthermore, we showed that regions with high degree values could be detected as betweenness centrality nodes. Our results demonstrate that properties of small-world connectivity could also recognize and quantify the characteristics of directed influence brain networks in PD.

  17. Adaptive Motor Imagery: A Multimodal Study of Immobilization-Induced Brain Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burianová, Hana; Sowman, Paul F; Marstaller, Lars; Rich, Anina N; Williams, Mark A; Savage, Greg; Al-Janabi, Shahd; de Lissa, Peter; Johnson, Blake W

    2016-03-01

    The consequences of losing the ability to move a limb are traumatic. One approach that examines the impact of pathological limb nonuse on the brain involves temporary immobilization of a healthy limb. Here, we investigated immobilization-induced plasticity in the motor imagery (MI) circuitry during hand immobilization. We assessed these changes with a multimodal paradigm, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure neural activation, magnetoencephalography (MEG) to track neuronal oscillatory dynamics, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess corticospinal excitability. fMRI results show a significant decrease in neural activation for MI of the constrained hand, localized to sensorimotor areas contralateral to the immobilized hand. MEG results show a significant decrease in beta desynchronization and faster resynchronization in sensorimotor areas contralateral to the immobilized hand. TMS results show a significant increase in resting motor threshold in motor cortex contralateral to the constrained hand, suggesting a decrease in corticospinal excitability in the projections to the constrained hand. These results demonstrate a direct and rapid effect of immobilization on MI processes of the constrained hand, suggesting that limb nonuse may not only affect motor execution, as evidenced by previous studies, but also MI. These findings have important implications for the effectiveness of therapeutic approaches that use MI as a rehabilitation tool to ameliorate the negative effects of limb nonuse. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Research design and statistics in biomechanics and motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullineaux, D R; Bartlett, R M; Bennett, S

    2001-10-01

    Biomechanics and motor control researchers measure how the body moves and interacts with its environment. The aim of this review paper is to consider some key issues in research methods in biomechanics and motor control. The review is organized into four sections: proposing, conducting, analysing and reporting research. In the first of these, we emphasize the importance of defining a worthy research question and of planning the study before its implementation to prevent later difficulties in the analysis and interpretation of data. In the second section, we cover selection of trial sizes and suggest that using three trials or more may be beneficial to provide more 'representative' and valid data. The third section on analysis of data concentrates on effect size statistics, qualitative and numerical trend analysis and cross-correlations. As sample sizes are often small, the use of effect size is recommended to support the results of statistical significance testing. In using cross-correlations, we recommend that scatterplots of one variable against the other, with the identified time lag included, be inspected to confirm that the linear relationship assumption underpinning this statistic is met and, if appropriate, that a linearity transformation be applied. Finally, we consider important information related to the issues above that should be included when reporting research. We recommend reporting checks or corrections for violations of underpinning assumptions, and the effect of these checks or corrections, to assist in advancing knowledge in biomechanics and motor control.

  19. A Comparison Between Fuzzy-PSO Controller and PID-PSO Controller for Controlling a DC Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Ghareaghaji, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The Direct current motors are in different types and there are several methods for controlling of their speed. In this paper two ways for speed controlling suggested. First a fuzzy logic speed controller for DC motor is designed and it's parameter calculated by Particle Sward Optimization (PSO). The speed controller designed according to fuzzy rules, then for having better performance, the controller optimized with PSO. Secondly a PID controller that it's parameter find by PSO, is used for sp...

  20. Motor programme activating therapy influences adaptive brain functions in multiple sclerosis: clinical and MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasova, Kamila; Prochazkova, Marie; Tintera, Jaroslav; Ibrahim, Ibrahim; Zimova, Denisa; Stetkarova, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    There is still little scientific evidence for the efficacy of neurofacilitation approaches and their possible influence on brain plasticity and adaptability. In this study, the outcome of a new kind of neurofacilitation approach, motor programme activating therapy (MPAT), was evaluated on the basis of a set of clinical functions and with MRI. Eighteen patients were examined four times with standardized clinical tests and diffusion tensor imaging to monitor changes without therapy, immediately after therapy and 1 month after therapy. Moreover, the strength of effective connectivity was analysed before and after therapy. Patients underwent a 1-h session of MPAT twice a week for 2 months. The data were analysed by nonparametric tests of association and were subsequently statistically evaluated. The therapy led to significant improvement in clinical functions, significant increment of fractional anisotropy and significant decrement of mean diffusivity, and decrement of effective connectivity at supplementary motor areas was observed immediately after the therapy. Changes in clinical functions and diffusion tensor images persisted 1 month after completing the programme. No statistically significant changes in clinical functions and no differences in MRI-diffusion tensor images were observed without physiotherapy. Positive immediate and long-term effects of MPAT on clinical and brain functions, as well as brain microstructure, were confirmed.

  1. Motor rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury and stroke - Advances in assessment and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Thomas; Hesse, S.; Mauritz, K.-H.

    1999-01-01

    A long-term goal in motor rehabilitation is that treatment is not selected on the basis of 'schools of thought', but rather, based on knowledge about efficacy and effectiveness of specific interventions for specific situations (e.g. functional syndromes). Motor dysfunction after stroke or TBI can be caused by many different functional syndromes such as paresis, ataxia, deafferentaion, visuo-perceptual deficits, or apraxia. Examples are provided showing that theory-based analysis of motor behavior makes it possible to describe 'syndrome-specific motor deficits'. Its potential implications for motor rehabilitation are that our understanding of altered motor behavior as well as specific therapeutic approaches might be promoted. A methodological prerequisite for clinical trials in rehabilitation is knowledge about test properties of assessment tools in follow-up situations such as test-retest reliability and responsiveness to change. Test-retest reliability assesses whether a test can produce stable measures with test repetition, while sensitivity to change reflects whether a test detects changes that occur over time. Exemplifying these considerations, a reliability and validity study of a kinematic arm movement analysis is summarized. In terms of new therapeutic developments, two examples of clinical therapeutic studies are provided assessing the efficacy of specific inter-ventions for specific situations in arm and gait rehabilitation: the Arm Ability Training for high functioning hemiparetic stroke and TBI patients, and the treadmill training for non-ambulatory hemiparetic patients. In addition, a new technical development, a machine-controlled gait trainer ist introduced.

  2. Minimizing motor mimicry by myself: Self-focus enhances online action-control mechanisms during motor contagion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spengler, S.; Brass, M.; Kühn, S.; Schutz-Bosbach, S.

    2010-01-01

    Ideomotor theory of human action control proposes that activation of a motor representation can occur either through internally-intended or externally-perceived actions. Critically, sometimes these alternatives of eliciting a motor response may be conflicting, for example, when Intending one action

  3. Motor skill experience modulates executive control for task switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiuhua; Chan, Chetwyn C H; Chau, Bolton; Fu, Amy S N

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of types of motor skills, including open and closed skills on enhancing proactive and reactive controls for task switching. Thirty-six athletes in open (n=18) or closed (n=18) sports and a control group (n=18) completed the task-switching paradigm and the simple reaction task. The task-switching paradigm drew on the proactive and reactive control of executive functions, whereas the simple reaction task assessed the processing speed. Significant Validity×Group effect revealed that the participants with open skills had a lower switch cost of response time compared to the other two groups when the task cue was 100% valid; whereas the participants regardless of motor skills had a lower switch cost of response time compared to the control group when the task cue was 50% valid. Hierarchical stepwise regression analysis further confirmed these findings. For the simple reaction task, there were no differences found among the three groups. These findings suggest that experience in open skills has benefits of promoting both proactive and reactive controls for task switching, which corresponds to the activity context exposed by the participants. In contrast, experience in closed skills appears to only benefit development of reactive control for task switching. The neural mechanisms for the proactive and reactive controls of executive functions between experts with open and closed skills call for future study. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Prefrontal control of cerebellum-dependent associative motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Yang, Li; Xu, Yan; Wu, Guang-yan; Yao, Juan; Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Zhi-ru; Hu, Zhi-an; Sui, Jian-feng; Hu, Bo

    2014-02-01

    Behavioral studies have demonstrated that both medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and cerebellum play critical roles in trace eyeblink conditioning. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which the two brain regions interact. By use of electrical stimulation of the caudal mPFC as a conditioned stimulus, we show evidence that persistent outputs from the mPFC to cerebellum are necessary and sufficient for the acquisition and expression of a trace conditioned response (CR)-like response. Specifically, the persistent outputs of caudal mPFC are relayed to the cerebellum via the rostral part of lateral pontine nuclei. Moreover, interfering with persistent activity by blockade of the muscarinic Ach receptor in the caudal mPFC impairs the expression of learned trace CRs. These results suggest an important way for the caudal mPFC to interact with the cerebellum during associative motor learning.

  5. 40 CFR 80.24 - Controls applicable to motor vehicle manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Controls applicable to motor vehicle... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Controls and Prohibitions § 80.24 Controls applicable to motor vehicle manufacturers. (a) (b) The manufacturer of any motor vehicle equipped with an...

  6. Towards building hybrid biological/in silico neural networks for motor neuroprosthetic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eKocaturk

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we introduce the Bioinspired Neuroprosthetic Design Environment (BNDE as a practical platform for the development of novel brain machine interface (BMI controllers which are based on spiking model neurons. We built the BNDE around a hard real-time system so that it is capable of creating simulated synapses from extracellularly recorded neurons to model neurons. In order to evaluate the practicality of the BNDE for neuroprosthetic control experiments, a novel, adaptive BMI controller was developed and tested using real-time closed-loop simulations. The present controller consists of two in silico medium spiny neurons which receive simulated synaptic inputs from recorded motor cortical neurons. In the closed-loop simulations, the recordings from the cortical neurons were imitated using an external, hardware-based neural signal synthesizer. By implementing a reward-modulated spike timing-dependent plasticity rule, the controller achieved perfect target reach accuracy for a two target reaching task in one dimensional space. The BNDE combines the flexibility of software-based spiking neural network (SNN simulations with powerful online data visualization tools and is a low-cost, PC-based and all-in-one solution for developing neurally-inspired BMI controllers. We believe the BNDE is the first implementation which is capable of creating hybrid biological/in silico neural networks for motor neuroprosthetic control and utilizes multiple CPU cores for computationally intensive real-time SNN simulations.

  7. Piano training in youths with hand motor impairments after damage to the developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampe R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Renée Lampe,1,* Anna Thienel,2 Jürgen Mitternacht,1 Tobias Blumenstein,1 Varvara Turova,1 Ana Alves-Pinto1,* 1Research Unit for Paediatric Neuroorthopaedics and Cerebral Palsy, Orthopaedics Department, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 2Department Sonderpädagogik, Ludwig Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Damage to the developing brain may lead to impairment of the hand motor function and negatively impact on patients’ quality of life. Development of manual dexterity and finger and hand motor function may be promoted by learning to play the piano. The latter brings together music with the intensive training of hand coordination and fine finger mobility. We investigated if learning to play the piano helped to improve hand motor skills in 18 youths with hand motor disorders resulting from damage during early brain development. Participants trained 35–40 minutes twice a week for 18 months with a professional piano teacher. With the use of a Musical Instrument Digital Interface piano, the uniformity of finger strokes could be objectively assessed from the timing of keystrokes. The analysis showed a significant improvement in the uniformity of keystrokes during the training. Furthermore, the youths showed strong motivation and engagement during the study. This is nevertheless an open study, and further studies remain needed to exclude effects of growth and concomitant therapies on the improvements observed and clarify which patients will more likely benefit from learning to play the piano. Keywords: manual skill, cerebral palsy, neurodevelopmental disorder, music, rehabilitation

  8. A new method for evaluation of motor injury after acute brain ischemic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zeng-Chun; Ma, Hui; Fan, Qing; Yin, Jian; Wei, Ming-Hai; Lin, Yong-Zhong; Fan, Ming; Sun, Chang-Kai

    2015-04-01

    Motor impairment is an important index for assessing the extent of brain injury. The present study uses a new method, the movement capture analysis (MOCA) system, for assessing motor damage after acute ischemia. Forty rats were divided into four groups: standard ischemia, sham-operated, Dizocilpine (MK-801), and Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) groups. Brain ischemia was induced using the temporary right middle cerebral artery occlusion model. Longa score and MOCA were used to assess motor injury one day after ischemia. Infarct volume was delineated with 2% 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. The correlation of infarct volume with Longa score and MOCA data was calculated. Compared with the sham-operated group (0.10 ± 0.31), Longa scores of MK-801 (2.33 ± 0.73), GBE (1.80 ± 0.58), and standard (2.88 ± 0.83) groups showed a statistical difference (p 801 and standard groups. MOCA was able to clearly discern the differences in motor disparity among the four groups, standard (1.00 ± 0.19), sham-operated group (0.17 ± 0.02), MK-801 (0.79 ± 0.08), GBE (0.38 ± 0.05) (p 801 (18.03 ± 0.96%) and GBE (10.82 ± 1.93%) treatment reduced infarct size compared with the standard ischemia group (25.88 ± 1.16%) (p < 0.05). The MOCA data showed a more significant correlation with infarct size than Longa score (r = 0.85:0.53). MOCA system proved to be more sensitive than the Longa score. It may potentially be more accurate method for behavioral evaluation in clinical trials.

  9. Direct Torque Control With Feedback Linearization for Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, Cristian; Jafarzadeh, Saeed; Fadali, Sami M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a direct-torque-controlled (DTC) induction motor (IM) drive that employs feedback linearization and sliding-mode control (SMC). A new feedback linearization approach is proposed, which yields a decoupled linear IM model with two state variables: torque and stator flux magnitude....... This intuitive linear model is used to implement a DTC-type controller that preserves all DTC advantages and eliminates its main drawback, the flux and torque ripple. Robust, fast, and ripple-free control is achieved by using SMC with proportional control in the vicinity of the sliding surface. SMC assures...... robustness as in DTC, while the proportional component eliminates the torque and flux ripple. The torque time response is similar to conventional DTC and the proposed solution is flexible and highly tunable due to the P component. The controller design is presented, and its robust stability is analyzed...

  10. FUZZY SLIDING MODE CONTROLLER FOR DOUBLY FED INDUCTION MOTOR SPEED CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bekakra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper, presents a Direct Field-Oriented Control (DFOC of doubly fed induction motor (DFIM with a fuzzy sliding mode controller (FSMC. Our aim is to make the speed control robust to parameter variations. The variation of motor parameters during operation degrades the performance of the controllers. The use of the nonlinear fuzzy sliding mode method provides very good performance for motor operation and robustness of the control law despite the external/internal perturbations. The chattering effects is eliminated by a particular function "sat" that presents a serious problem to applications of variable structure systems. The fuzzy sliding mode controller is designed in order to improve the control performances and to reduce the chattering phenomenon. In this technique the saturation function is replaced by a fuzzy inference system to smooth the control action. The proposed scheme gives fast dynamic response with no overshoot and zero static error. To show the validity and the effectiveness of the control method, simulation results are performed for the speed control of a doubly fed induction motor. Simulation results showed that improvement made by our approach compared to conventional sliding mode control (SMC with the presence of variations of the parameters of the motor, in particular the face of variation of moment of inertia and disturbances of load torque. The results show that the FSMC and SMC are robust against internal and external perturbations, but the FSMC is superior to SMC in eliminating chattering phenomena and response time.

  11. FUZZY SLIDING MODE CONTROLLER FOR DOUBLY FED INDUCTION MOTOR SPEED CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bekakra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper, presents a Direct Field-Oriented Control (DFOC of doubly fed induction motor (DFIM with a fuzzy sliding mode controller (FSMC. Our aim is to make the speed control robust to parameter variations. The variation of motor parameters during operation degrades the performance of the controllers. The use of the nonlinear fuzzy sliding mode method provides very good performance for motor operation and robustness of the control law despite the external/internal perturbations. The chattering effects is eliminated by a particular function "sat" that presents a serious problem to applications of variable structure systems. The fuzzy sliding mode controller is designed in order to improve the control performances and to reduce the chattering phenomenon. In this technique the saturation function is replaced by a fuzzy inference system to smooth the control action. The proposed scheme gives fast dynamic response with no overshoot and zero static error. To show the validity and the effectiveness of the control method, simulation results are performed for the speed control of a doubly fed induction motor. Simulation results showed that improvement made by our approach compared to conventional sliding mode control (SMC with the presence of variations of the parameters of the motor, in particular the face of variation of moment of inertia and disturbances of load torque. The results show that the FSMC and SMC are robust against internal and external perturbations, but the FSMC is superior to SMC in eliminating chattering phenomena and response time.

  12. Implementation of FPGA based PID Controller for DC Motor Speed Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita SONOLI

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the implementation of software module using ‘VHDL’ for Xilinx FPGA (XC3S400 based PID controller for DC motor speed control system is presented. The tools used for building and testing the software modules are Xilinx ISE 9.2i and ModelSim XE III 6.3c. Before verifying the design on FPGA the complete design is simulated using Modelsim Simulation tool. A test bench is written where the set speed can be changed for the motor. It is observed that the motor speed gradually changes to the set speed and locks to the set speed.

  13. Speed Sensorless Vector Control of Induction Motor Drive with PI and Fuzzy Controller

    OpenAIRE

    R. Gunabalan; V. Subbiah

    2015-01-01

    This paper directed the speed-sensorless vector control of induction motor drive with PI and fuzzy controllers.  Natural observer with fourth order state space model is employed to estimate the speed and rotor fluxes of the induction motor. The formation of the natural observer is similar to and as well as its attribute is identical to the induction motor. Load torque adaptation is provided to estimate the torque and rotor speed is estimated from the load torque, rotor fluxes and stator curre...

  14. Posterolateral Trajectories Favor a Longer Motor Domain in Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Idit; Marmor-Levin, Odeya; Eitan, Renana; Bergman, Hagai; Israel, Zvi

    2017-10-01

    The clinical outcome of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) who undergo subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is, in part, determined by the length of the electrode trajectory through the motor STN domain, the dorsolateral oscillatory region (DLOR). Trajectory length has been found to correlate with the stimulation-related improvement in patients' motor function (estimated by part III of the United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]). Therefore, it seems that ideally trajectories should have maximal DLOR length. We retrospectively studied the influence of various anatomic aspects of the brains of patients with PD and the geometry of trajectories planned on the length of the DLOR and STN recorded during DBS surgery. We examined 212 trajectories and 424 microelectrode recording tracks in 115 patients operated on in our center between 2010 and 2015. We found a strong correlation between the length of the recorded DLOR and STN. Trajectories that were more lateral and/or posterior in orientation had a longer STN and DLOR pass, although the DLOR/STN fraction length remained constant. The STN target was more lateral when the third ventricle was wider, and the latter correlated with older age and male gender. Trajectory angles correlate with the recorded STN and DLOR lengths, and should be altered toward a more posterolateral angle in older patients and atrophied brains to compensate for the changes in STN location and geometry. These fine adjustments should yield a longer motor domain pass, thereby improving the patient's predicted outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of Sensorless Sliding Mode Observer in Control of Induction Motor Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau Si Thien Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Induction motors are widely used in an industry and it is necessary to improve control methods for induction motors to increase the efficiency of them. In this paper, sliding mode controllers are proposed instead of traditional PI controllers in vector control of induction motor drives. Moreover, rotor speed is estimated by a sliding mode observer. In addition, the robustness of control and observer algorithms are also proved by Lyapunov’s criterion. The experiments are obtained in different speed changes of an induction motor drive. These experimental results confirm the dynamic properties of a sensorless sliding mode control of an induction motor drive.

  16. Control of a dc motor using fuzzy logic control algorithm | Usoro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to establish the impact of a fuzzy logic controller (FLC) and a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller in the control performance of an industrial type DC motor using MATLAB. The fuzzy logic controller was developed on the basis of Mamdani type fuzzy inference system (FIS). The centroid method ...

  17. Voltage Controller Saves Energy, Prolongs Life of Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    In 1985, Power Efficiency Corporation of Las Vegas licensed NASA voltage controller technology from Marshall Space Flight Center. In the following years, Power Efficiency made patented improvements to the technology and marketed the resulting products throughout the world as the Performance Controller and the Power Efficiency energy-saving soft start. Soft start gradually introduces power to an electric motor, thus eliminating the harsh, violent mechanical stresses of having the device go from a dormant state to one of full activity; prevents it from running too hot; and increases the motor's lifetime. The product can pay for itself through the reduction in electricity consumed (according to Power Efficiency, within 3 years), depending on the duty cycle of the motor and the prevailing power rates. In many instances, the purchaser is eligible for special utility rebates for the environmental protection it provides. Common applications of Power Efficiency's soft start include mixers, grinders, granulators, conveyors, crushers, stamping presses, injection molders, elevators with MG sets, and escalators. The device has been retrofitted onto equipment at major department store chains, hotels, airports, universities, and for various manufacturers

  18. Neuromodulation of lower limb motor control in restorative neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minassian, Karen; Hofstoetter, Ursula; Tansey, Keith; Mayr, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    One consequence of central nervous system injury or disease is the impairment of neural control of movement, resulting in spasticity and paralysis. To enhance recovery, restorative neurology procedures modify altered, yet preserved nervous system function. This review focuses on functional electrical stimulation (FES) and spinal cord stimulation (SCS) that utilize remaining capabilities of the distal apparatus of spinal cord, peripheral nerves and muscles in upper motor neuron dysfunctions. FES for the immediate generation of lower limb movement along with current rehabilitative techniques is reviewed. The potential of SCS for controlling spinal spasticity and enhancing lower limb function in multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury is discussed. The necessity for precise electrode placement and appropriate stimulation parameter settings to achieve therapeutic specificity is elaborated. This will lead to our human work of epidural and transcutaneous stimulation targeting the lumbar spinal cord for enhancing motor functions in spinal cord injured people, supplemented by pertinent human research of other investigators. We conclude that the concept of restorative neurology recently received new appreciation by accumulated evidence for locomotor circuits residing in the human spinal cord. Technological and clinical advancements need to follow for a major impact on the functional recovery in individuals with severe damage to their motor system. PMID:22464657

  19. Universal adaptive torque control for PM motors for field-weakening region operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royak, Semyon [Beachwood, OH; Harbaugh, Mark M [Richfield, OH; Breitzmann, Robert J [South Russel, OH; Nondahl, Thomas A [Wauwatosa, WI; Schmidt, Peter B [Franklin, WI; Liu, Jingbo [Milwaukee, WI

    2011-03-29

    The invention includes a motor controller and method for controlling a permanent magnet motor. In accordance with one aspect of the present technique, a permanent magnet motor is controlled by, among other things, receiving a torque command, determining a normalized torque command by normalizing the torque command to a characteristic current of the motor, determining a normalized maximum available voltage, determining an inductance ratio of the motor, and determining a direct-axis current based upon the normalized torque command, the normalized maximum available voltage, and the inductance ratio of the motor.

  20. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on dopaminergic function and motor behavior during aging

    OpenAIRE

    Boger, Heather A.; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Saylor, Alicia J.; Bender, Tara S.; McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Fortress, Ashley M.; Zaman, Vandana; Huang, Peng; Middaugh, Lawrence D.; Randall, Patrick K.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.; Rohrer, Baerbel; Helke, Kristi L.; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical in synaptic plasticity and in the survival and function of midbrain dopamine neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of a partial genetic deletion of BDNF on motor function and dopamine (DA) neurotransmitter measures by comparing (Bdnf+/−) with wildtype mice (WT) at different ages. Bdnf+/ and WT mice had similar body weights until 12 months of age; however, at 21 months, Bdnf+/− mice were significantly heavier than WT mice. H...

  1. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, D. T.

    1985-04-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The motor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor be regulated by applying a separate control signal and each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  2. Brain implants for substituting lost motor function: state of the art and potential impact on the lives of motor-impaired seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, N F; Aarnoutse, E J; Vansteensel, M J

    2014-01-01

    Recent scientific achievements bring the concept of neural prosthetics for reinstating lost motor function closer to medical application. Current research involves severely paralyzed people under the age of 65, but implications for seniors with stroke or trauma-induced impairments are clearly on the horizon. Demographic changes will lead to a shortage of personnel to care for an increasing population of senior citizens, threatening maintenance of an acceptable level of care and urging ways for people to live longer at their home independent from personal assistance. This is particularly challenging when people suffer from disabilities such as partial paralysis after stroke or trauma, where daily personal assistance is required. For some of these people, neural prosthetics can reinstate some lost motor function and/or lost communication, thereby increasing independence and possibly quality of life. In this viewpoint article, we present the state of the art in decoding brain activity in the service of brain-computer interfacing. Although some noninvasive applications produce good results, we focus on brain implants that benefit from better quality brain signals. Fully implantable neural prostheses for home use are not available yet, but clinical trials are being prepared. More sophisticated systems are expected to follow in the years to come, with capabilities of interest for less severe paralysis. Eventually the combination of smart robotics and brain implants is expected to enable people to interact well enough with their environment to live an independent life in spite of motor disabilities. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. When "altering brain function" becomes "mind control".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuniemi, Andrew; Otto, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Functional neurosurgery has seen a resurgence of interest in surgical treatments for psychiatric illness. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) technology is the preferred tool in the current wave of clinical experiments because it allows clinicians to directly alter the functions of targeted brain regions, in a reversible manner, with the intent of correcting diseases of the mind, such as depression, addiction, anorexia nervosa, dementia, and obsessive compulsive disorder. These promising treatments raise a critical philosophical and humanitarian question. "Under what conditions does 'altering brain function' qualify as 'mind control'?" In order to answer this question one needs a definition of mind control. To this end, we reviewed the relevant philosophical, ethical, and neurosurgical literature in order to create a set of criteria for what constitutes mind control in the context of DBS. We also outline clinical implications of these criteria. Finally, we demonstrate the relevance of the proposed criteria by focusing especially on serendipitous treatments involving DBS, i.e., cases in which an unintended therapeutic benefit occurred. These cases highlight the importance of gaining the consent of the subject for the new therapy in order to avoid committing an act of mind control.

  4. Dual-mode noninvasive brain stimulation over the bilateral primary motor cortices in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae Yong; Lee, Ahee; Kim, Min Su; Park, Eunhee; Chang, Won Hyuk; Shin, Yong-Il; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation (NBS) using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has recently been adopted for modulating motor function in stroke patients. We investigated the effect of simultaneous dual-mode stimulation using rTMS and tDCS over the bilateral primary motor cortices (M1) to assess its efficacy as compared to single stimulation using rTMS for the recovery of motor function in subacute stroke patients. Thirty subacute stroke patients were recruited in this study. In the dual-mode stimulation group, 10 Hz rTMS (90% of resting motor threshold, 1,000 pulses) was applied over the ipsilesional M1 for 20 minutes with the simultaneous application of cathodal tDCS (2 mA) on the contralesional M1. The single stimulation group underwent 10 Hz rTMS without tDCS. Ten daily sessions were conducted for two consecutive weeks. The total Fugl-Meyer (FMA-T), upper limb (FMA-UL), and lower limb (FMA-LL) scores were measured before, after, and two months later. The FMA-T and FMA- UL were significantly improved over time in both the dual and single stimulation group (p stimulation group. Dual-mode NBS with the simultaneous application of 10 Hz rTMS and cathodal tDCS over the bilateral M1s was safe and superior to 10 Hz rTMS alone for improving motor function in subacute stroke patients.

  5. The brain decade in debate: VI. Sensory and motor maps: dynamics and plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Das

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is an edited transcription of a virtual symposium promoted by the Brazilian Society of Neuroscience and Behavior (SBNeC. Although the dynamics of sensory and motor representations have been one of the most studied features of the central nervous system, the actual mechanisms of brain plasticity that underlie the dynamic nature of sensory and motor maps are not entirely unraveled. Our discussion began with the notion that the processing of sensory information depends on many different cortical areas. Some of them are arranged topographically and others have non-topographic (analytical properties. Besides a sensory component, every cortical area has an efferent output that can be mapped and can influence motor behavior. Although new behaviors might be related to modifications of the sensory or motor representations in a given cortical area, they can also be the result of the acquired ability to make new associations between specific sensory cues and certain movements, a type of learning known as conditioning motor learning. Many types of learning are directly related to the emotional or cognitive context in which a new behavior is acquired. This has been demonstrated by paradigms in which the receptive field properties of cortical neurons are modified when an animal is engaged in a given discrimination task or when a triggering feature is paired with an aversive stimulus. The role of the cholinergic input from the nucleus basalis to the neocortex was also highlighted as one important component of the circuits responsible for the context-dependent changes that can be induced in cortical maps.

  6. APPLICATION FEATURES OF FUZZY CONTROLLERS ON EXAMPLE OF DC MOTOR SPEED CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Demidova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A prerequisite for the use of intelligent control methods, including algorithms of fuzzy logic, is increasing complexity in all industries, especially when parameters of technical systems while in operation vary in wide range. The paper provides comparative analysis of the basic types of common fuzzy direct action controllers on the example of speed control system in the DC motor drive. Design features of these types of fuzzy controllers are shown. Their comparison with traditional PI controller is carried out through the use of simulation, including the conditions of uncertainty expressed in changing of equivalent moment of inertia of the motor shaft. As a result, the conclusion about the feasibility of fuzzy PID-type controller application is made. The features of fuzzy controllers outlined in the paper can be summarized to more complex motor drive systems and to other non-linear systems that require the maintenance of any parameter within a given range.

  7. Attention, motor control and motor imagery in schizophrenia: implications for the role of the parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danckert, James; Saoud, Mohamed; Maruff, Paul

    2004-10-01

    Many recent models of schizophrenia have attempted to explain the so-called first-rank symptoms in terms of a breakdown in the self-monitoring of thoughts and behaviours. These models have focused on the most common symptom of schizophrenia auditory hallucinations-suggesting that they may represent disordered self-monitoring of internal speech. As such, much attention has been given to the role of the temporal and frontal cortices in the clinical presentation of patients with schizophrenia. In this review, we examine the role of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in schizophrenia within the context of recent models of self-monitoring deficits in these patients. Attentional dysfunctions and certain impairments of motor control and motor imagery all point towards the involvement of the parietal cortex in the disorder. In particular, we suggest that patients experiencing passivity phenomena (e.g., delusions of control) may have particular impairments of parietal function related to poor utilisation of forward models of intended actions. We also present a novel hypothesis that suggests differential impairments of the left and right parietal cortices in schizophrenia may help explain many of the first-rank symptoms of the disorder.

  8. Motor impairment after severe traumatic brain injury: A longitudinal multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, William C; Pickett, Treven C

    2007-01-01

    Neuromotor impairment is a common sequela of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) but has been understudied relative to neurocognitive outcomes. This multicenter cohort study describes the longitudinal course of neurological examination-based motor abnormalities after severe TBI. Subjects were enrolled from the four lead Department of Veterans Affairs and Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center sites. The study cohort consisted of 102 consecutive patients (active duty, veteran, or military dependent) with severe TBI who consented during acute rehabilitation for data collection and completed all follow-up evaluations. Paresis, ataxia, and postural instability measures showed a pattern of improvement over time, with the greatest improvement occurring between the inpatient (baseline) and 6-month follow-up assessments. Involuntary movement disorders were rare at all time points. Two years following acute rehabilitation, more than one-third of subjects continued to display a neuromotor abnormality on basic neurological examination. Persistence of tandem gait abnormality was particularly common.

  9. Non-invasive brain stimulation: enhancing motor and cognitive functions in healthy old subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximo Zimerman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthy aging is accompanied by changes in cognitive and motor functions that result in impairment of activities of daily living. This process involves a number of modifications in the brain and is associated with metabolic, structural and physiological changes; some of these serving as adaptive responses to the functional declines. Up to date there are no universally accepted strategies to ameliorate declining functions in this population. An essential basis to develop such strategies is a better understanding of neuroplastic changes during healthy aging. In this context, non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial direct current or transcranial magnetic stimulation, provide an attractive option to modulate cortical neuronal assemblies, even with subsequent changes in neuroplasticity. Thus, in the present review we discuss the use of these techniques as a tool to study underlying cortical mechanisms during healthy aging and as an interventional strategy to enhance declining functions and learning abilities in aged subjects.

  10. Severe motor disability affects functional cortical integration in the context of brain-computer interface (BCI) use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Chang S; Woo, Jincheol; Bahn, Sangwoo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cortical interaction between brain regions in people with and without severe motor disability during brain-computer interface (BCI) operation through coherence analysis. Eighteen subjects, including six patients with cerebral palsy (CP) and three patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), participated. The results showed (1) the existence of BCI performance difference caused by severe motor disability; (2) different coherence patterns between participants with and without severe motor disability during BCI operation and (3) effects of motor disability on cortical connections varying in the brain regions for the different frequency bands, indicating reduced cortical differentiation and specialisation. Participants with severe neuromuscular impairments, as compared with the able-bodied group, recruited more cortical regions to compensate for the difficulties caused by their motor disability, reflecting a less efficient operating strategy for the BCI task. This study demonstrated that coherence analysis can be applied to examine the ways cortical networks cooperate with each other during BCI tasks. Few studies have investigated the electrophysiological underpinnings of differences in BCI performance. This study contributes by assessing neuronal synchrony among brain regions. Our findings revealed that severe motor disability causes more cortical areas to be recruited to perform the BCI task, indicating reduced cortical differentiation and specialisation.

  11. Variable frequency inverter for ac induction motors with torque, speed and braking control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A variable frequency inverter was designed for driving an ac induction motor which varies the frequency and voltage to the motor windings in response to varying torque requirements for the motor so that the applied voltage amplitude and frequency are of optimal value for any motor load and speed requirement. The slip frequency of the motor is caused to vary proportionally to the torque and feedback is provided so that the most efficient operating voltage is applied to the motor. Winding current surge is limited and a controlled negative slip causes motor braking and return of load energy to a dc power source.

  12. Model-Based Torque Control of Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Motors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors (PUMs) are ideal actuators for a variety of spaced-based robotics applications. These motors replace conventional drive systems...

  13. Digitally-Controlled Optimal Position Servo Of Induction Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneda, H.; Nagao, A.

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of the paper is to propose a new high-performance optimal position servo of an induction motor fully controlled by a micro-computer, which was designed and realized through a waterfall type top-down design in a newly developed CAD environment. Field-orientation control was used to design a new voltage-controlled optimal regulator for position control. Globally stable observers were designed and utilized to overcome the restricted availability of sensed variables: winding voltages & currents and shaft speed & angle. The digital scheme was experimentally tested and verified. Also shown is the effect of quantization errors and sampling period in A/D's & D/A's on the response and accuracy of the control system.

  14. Direct Torque Control of Induction Motor with Matrix Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaf Salloum Gaeid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The matrix converter (MC with direct torque control (DTC combination is efficient way to get better performance specifications in the industry. The MC and the DTC advantages are combined together. The reduction of complexity and cost of DC link in the DTC since it has no capacitors in the circuit. However, the controlling torque is a big problem it in DTC because of high ripple torque production which results in vibrations response in the operation of the iductuction motor as it has no PID to control the torque directly. To overcome this, a combination of MC with DTC is applied to reduce the fluctuation in the output torque and minimize the steady state error. This paper presents the simulation analysis of induction machine drives using Maltlab/Simulink toolbox R2012a. Design of DTC induction motor drive, MC with constant switching frequency, speed controller and stability investigation as well as controllability and observabilty with minimum final prediction (FPE steady state error and loss functionality has been carried out precisely.

  15. Brain-computer interface controlled robotic gait orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, An H; Wang, Po T; King, Christine E; Chun, Sophia N; Nenadic, Zoran

    2013-12-09

    Excessive reliance on wheelchairs in individuals with tetraplegia or paraplegia due to spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to many medical co-morbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, metabolic derangements, osteoporosis, and pressure ulcers. Treatment of these conditions contributes to the majority of SCI health care costs. Restoring able-body-like ambulation in this patient population can potentially reduce the incidence of these medical co-morbidities, in addition to increasing independence and quality of life. However, no biomedical solution exists that can reverse this loss of neurological function, and hence novel methods are needed. Brain-computer interface (BCI) controlled lower extremity prostheses may constitute one such novel approach. One able-bodied subject and one subject with paraplegia due to SCI underwent electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings while engaged in alternating epochs of idling and walking kinesthetic motor imagery (KMI). These data were analyzed to generate an EEG prediction model for online BCI operation. A commercial robotic gait orthosis (RoGO) system (suspended over a treadmill) was interfaced with the BCI computer to allow for computerized control. The subjects were then tasked to perform five, 5-min-long online sessions where they ambulated using the BCI-RoGO system as prompted by computerized cues. The performance of this system was assessed with cross-correlation analysis, and omission and false alarm rates. The offline accuracy of the EEG prediction model averaged 86.30% across both subjects (chance: 50%). The cross-correlation between instructional cues and the BCI-RoGO walking epochs averaged across all subjects and all sessions was 0.812 ± 0.048 (p-value <10(-4)). Also, there were on average 0.8 false alarms per session and no omissions. These results provide preliminary evidence that restoring brain-controlled ambulation after SCI is feasible. Future work will test the function of this system in a population of subjects with

  16. The speed control of DC motor under the load condition using PI and PID controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corapsiz, Muhammed Reşit; Kahveci, Hakan

    2017-04-01

    In this study, it was aimed to compare PI (Proportional-Integral) and PID (Proportional-Integral-Derivative) controllers for speed control of Permanent Magnet Direct Current (PMDC) motor under both load and without load. For this purpose, firstly, the mathematical model was obtained from the dynamic equations of the PMDC motor and the obtained mathematical model was transferred to the simulation environment and modeled using Matlab/SIMULINK. Following the modeling process, PI and PID controller structures were formed, respectively. Secondly, after these structures were formed, the PMDC motor was run without any controller. Then, the control of the PMDC motor with no load was provided by using PI and PID controllers. Finally, the PMDC motor were loaded under the constant load (TL = 3 N.m.) for each condition and selected time period (t = 3 s). The obtained result for each control operations was comparatively given by observing effects of loading process on systems. When the obtained results were evaluated for each condition, it was observed that PID controller have the best performance with respect to PI controller.

  17. [Operative treatment of primary brain tumors localised in motor zone with direct corticalis electrostimulation--series of 62 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasić, Goran M; Nestorović, Branislav D; Milić, Ivan S; Nikolić, Igor M; Jovanović, Vladimir T; Bogosavljević, Vojislav; Janićijević, Aleksandar M; Radosavljević, Marina

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the progress made in diagnostic procedures and development of the operating rooms technology, considerable neurological deficit after operation of tumors localised in the brain motor zone commits one to direct intraoperative identification of the motor zone. By introducing direct electrocortical stimulation into the routine intraoperative application the primary goal has been achieved -reaching the maximum degree of radicalness of surgical resection while preserving motor centres in the cerebral cortex. We are hereby demonstrating a series of 60 patients operated for primary brain tumors localised in the area in the front and around the central sulcus. All operations have been performed under the general anesthetics. During the operations the method of direct electrostimulation (ES) was used for the purpose of identifying motor centres. Intraoperatively a level of subtotal resection was achieved in 22 cases, while radical resection was possible in 38 cases. Significantly higher level of radicalness of surgical resection of the low grade glioma tumor was confirmed statistically in relation to the group of patients with glioblastoma multiforme by applying the ES cortex (p brain glioma have statistically considerably higher KI value in relation to the KI values in the group of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (p 0 brain cortex is a safe, simple and precise method for identification of the brain motor zone which enables prevention of additional postoperative deficit and higher level of surgical radicalness.

  18. Probabilistic fiber tracking of the language and motor white matter pathways of the supplementary motor area (SMA) in patients with brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenabi, Mehrnaz; Peck, Kyung K; Young, Robert J; Brennan, Nicole; Holodny, Andrei I

    2014-12-01

    Accurate localization of anatomically and functionally separate SMA tracts is important to improve planning prior to neurosurgery. Using fMRI and probabilistic DTI techniques, we assessed the connectivity between the frontal language area (Broca's area) and the rostral pre-SMA (language SMA) and caudal SMA proper (motor SMA). Twenty brain tumor patients completed motor and language fMRI paradigms and DTI. Peaks of functional activity in the language SMA, motor SMA and Broca's area were used to define seed regions for probabilistic tractography. fMRI and probabilistic tractography identified separate and unique pathways connecting the SMA to Broca's area - the language SMA pathway and the motor SMA pathway. For all subjects, the language SMA pathway had a larger number of voxels (Planguage and motor SMA pathways than in background pathways (Planguage SMA pathway (degree of connectivity: Planguage SMA and motor SMA to Broca's area. The language SMA is more significantly connected to Broca's area than is the motor subdivision of the SMA proper. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in brain electrical activity after cognitive behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder in patients injured in motor vehicle accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, Sirko; Zoellner, Tanja; Beauducel, Andrë; Maercker, Andreas; Karl, Anke

    2008-01-01

    To explore changes for the first time in neural processing due to effective cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after severe motor vehicle accidents. Recent studies have highlighted the role of right hemisphere activation during withdrawal-related emotions (e.g., anxiety). There has been little research on changes in brain function due to cognitive-behavioral interventions in anxiety disorders. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial comparing cognitive-behavioral therapy with an assessment-only Wait-list condition. Spontaneous electroencephalographic activity was recorded from left and right anterior and posterior regions in participants with PTSD/subsyndromal PTSD receiving CBT (n = 17) before and after a CBT program. Wait-list controls (n = 18) were investigated before and after 3 months. At the pretreatment assessment, a pattern of increased right-sided activation during exposure to a trauma-related picture (relative to a neutral picture) was observed in both CBT and Wait-list participants. At posttreatment, there was a greater reduction of right anterior activation in the CBT group as compared with Wait-list controls. Across both groups, PTSD symptom reduction was significantly positively correlated with a decrease in right anterior activation to the trauma stimulus. These findings suggest that effective CBT treatment of PTSD may be accompanied by adaptive changes in asymmetrical brain function. Future studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  20. Non-dopaminergic treatments for motor control in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Susan H

    2013-09-01

    The pathological processes underlying Parkinson's disease (PD) involve more than dopamine cell loss within the midbrain. These non-dopaminergic neurotransmitters include noradrenergic, serotonergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic systems within cortical, brainstem and basal ganglia regions. Several non-dopaminergic treatments are now in clinical use to treat motor symptoms of PD, or are being evaluated as potential therapies. Agents for symptomatic monotherapy and as adjunct to dopaminergic therapies for motor symptoms include adenosine A2A antagonists and the mixed monoamine-B inhibitor (MAO-BI) and glutamate release agent safinamide. The largest area of potential use for non-dopaminergic drugs is as add-on therapy for motor fluctuations. Thus adenosine A2A antagonists, safinamide, and the antiepileptic agent zonisamide can extend the duration of action of levodopa. To reduce levodopa-induced dyskinesia, drugs that target overactive glutamatergic neurotransmission can be used, and include the non-selective N-methyl D-aspartate antagonist amantadine. More recently, selective metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR₅) antagonists are being evaluated in phase II randomized controlled trials. Serotonergic agents acting as 5-HT2A/2C antagonists, such as the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, may also reduce dyskinesia. 5-HT1A agonists theoretically can reduce dyskinesia, but in practice, may also worsen PD motor symptoms, and so clinical applicability has not yet been shown. Noradrenergic α2A antagonism using fipamezole can potentially reduce dyskinesia. Several non-dopaminergic agents have also been investigated to reduce non-levodopa-responsive motor symptoms such as gait and tremor. Thus the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil showed mild benefit in gait, while the predominantly noradrenergic re-uptake inhibitor methylphenidate had conflicting results in advanced PD subjects. Tremor in PD may respond to muscarinic M4 cholinergic antagonists (anticholinergics), but

  1. When Altering Brain Function Becomes Mind Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Sanford Koivuniemi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional neurosurgery has seen a resurgence of interest in surgical treatments for psychiatric illness. Deep brain stimulation (DBS technology is the preferred tool in the current wave of clinical experiments because it allows clinicians to directly alter the functions of targeted brain regions, in a reversible manner, with the intent of correcting diseases of the mind, such as depression, addiction, anorexia nervosa, dementia, and obsessive compulsive disorder. These promising treatments raise a critical philosophical and humanitarian question. Under what conditions does ‘altering brain function’ qualify as ‘mind control’? In order to answer this question one needs a definition of mind control. To this end, we reviewed the relevant philosophical, ethical, and neurosurgical literature in order to create a set of criteria for what constitutes mind control in the context of DBS. We also outline clinical implications of these criteria. Finally, we demonstrate the relevance of the proposed criteria by focusing especially on serendipitous treatments involving DBS, i.e., cases in which an unintended therapeutic benefit occurred. These cases highlight the importance of gaining the consent of the subject for the new therapy in order to avoid committing an act of mind control.

  2. Energy efficiency in speed control system for induction motors; Eficiencia energetica em sistema de controle de velocidade em motores de inducao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Arlete Vieira da; Ribeiro, Elisangela do Nascimento; Tenorio, Iana Cavalcanti; Horta, Mario Marcos Brito [Centro Universitario de Belo Horizonte (UnBH), MG (Brazil)], e-mails: arlete.silva@prof.unibh.br, nr.elisangela@gmail.com, ianactenorio@gmail.com, mario_bhorta@yahoo.com.br

    2011-07-01

    This work has as objective the study of energy efficiency of induction motors fed by frequency inverters, since this is a practical resource that has progressively allowed the replacement of mechanical speed reducers. In this work the speed control of induction motors of the squirrel cage has steeped through the frequency inverters using scalar control. Induction motors are frequently used in industrial applications due to its simple construction, its low maintenance and reduced in size. It was possible through tests made at UNI-BH Electrical Engineering laboratory to obtain satisfactory results regarding the performance of the inverter CFW08 (WEG), speed control of induction motor. (author)

  3. LINKING MOTOR-RELATED BRAIN POTENTIALS AND VELOCITY PROFILES IN MULTI-JOINT ARM REACHING MOVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julià L Amengual

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of the movement related brain potentials (MRPBs needs accurate technical approaches to disentangle the specific patterns of bran activity during the preparation and execution of movements. During the last forty years, synchronizing the electromiographic activation (EMG of the muscle with the electrophysiological recordings (EEG has been commonly ussed for these purposes. However, new clinical approaches in the study of motor diseases and rehabilitation suggest the demand of new paradigms that might go further into the study of the brain activity associated with the kinematics of movement. As a response to this call, we have used a 3-D hand tracking system with the aim to record continuously the position of an ultrasonic sender located on the hand during the performance of multi-joint self-pace movements. We synchronized the time-series of position of velocity of the sender with the EEG recordings, obtaining specific patterns of brain activity as a function of the fluctuations of the kinematics during the natural movement performance. Additionally, the distribution of the brain activity during the preparation and execution phases of movement was similar that reported previously using the EMG, suggesting the validity of our technique. We claim that this paradigm could be usable in patients because of its simplicity and the potential knowledge that can be extracted from clinical protocols.

  4. An Artificial Neural Network Based Robot Controller that Uses Rat’s Brain Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsel Mano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain machine interface (BMI has been proposed as a novel technique to control prosthetic devices aimed at restoring motor functions in paralyzed patients. In this paper, we propose a neural network based controller that maps rat’s brain signals and transforms them into robot movement. First, the rat is trained to move the robot by pressing the right and left lever in order to get food. Next, we collect brain signals with four implanted electrodes, two in the motor cortex and two in the somatosensory cortex area. The collected data are used to train and evaluate different artificial neural controllers. Trained neural controllers are employed online to map brain signals and transform them into robot motion. Offline and online classification results of rat’s brain signals show that the Radial Basis Function Neural Networks (RBFNN outperforms other neural networks. In addition, online robot control results show that even with a limited number of electrodes, the robot motion generated by RBFNN matched the motion generated by the left and right lever position.

  5. Firing Tests of Thrust Controllable Solid Rocket Motors Part 1:300-mm-Diameter End-Burning Grain Motors

    OpenAIRE

    GODAI, Tomifumi; SHIMIZU, Morio; Ito, Katsuya; Tanemura, Toshiharu; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; KUSAKA, Kazuo; Kisara, Katsuto; Sato, Masahiro; Takahashi, Mamoru; Izumikawa, Muneo; 五代, 富文; 清水, 盛生; 伊藤, 克弥; 種村, 利春; 藤原, 勉

    1980-01-01

    300-mm-diameter thrust controllable solid rocket motors were successfully fired under atmospheric conditions. Thrust magnitude control was attained by changing the flow rate of the hydrogen peroxide decomposition gas injected into the solid rocket motor. Incomplete combustion termination that occurred earlier than expected was due to the excessive heat flux irradiated from the hot surfaces of the ablative insulation liner towards the extinguished propellant surface. More effective liner mater...

  6. Active Wheatstone Bridge — A solution of tight speed dc motor control

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Very tight control of the speed of a d.c. motor drive may be achieved by incorporating the machine within a closed loop system. The employed feedback signal is proportional to the motor speed for comparison against a reference quantity. For armature-controlled d.c. motors the difference or error signal provides appropriate ...

  7. 76 FR 78 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard; Engine Control Module Speed Limiter Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... posted speed limit of 55 mph that was in effect in 1991. \\2\\ Comercial Motor Vehicle Speed Control... improved truck designs. \\3\\ Comercial Motor Vehicle Speed Control Devices (1991), DOT HS 807 725. TCA... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard...

  8. Robot-assisted motor activation monitored by time-domain optical brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, O.; Wabnitz, H.; Schmid, S.; Steingräber, R.; Schmidt, H.; Krüger, J.; Macdonald, R.

    2011-07-01

    Robot-assisted motor rehabilitation proved to be an effective supplement to conventional hand-to-hand therapy in stroke patients. In order to analyze and understand motor learning and performance during rehabilitation it is desirable to develop a monitor to provide objective measures of the corresponding brain activity at the rehabilitation progress. We used a portable time-domain near-infrared reflectometer to monitor the hemodynamic brain response to distal upper extremity activities. Four healthy volunteers performed two different robot-assisted wrist/forearm movements, flexion-extension and pronation-supination in comparison with an unassisted squeeze ball exercise. A special headgear with four optical measurement positions to include parts of the pre- and postcentral gyrus provided a good overlap with the expected activation areas. Data analysis based on variance of time-of-flight distributions of photons through tissue was chosen to provide a suitable representation of intracerebral signals. In all subjects several of the four detection channels showed a response. In some cases indications were found of differences in localization of the activated areas for the various tasks.

  9. Neurofunctional modulation of brain regions by distinct forms of motor cognition and movement features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piefke, Martina; Kramer, Kira; Korte, Mia; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Korte, Jan M; Wohlschläger, Afra M; Weber, Jochen; Shah, Nadim J; Huber, Walter; Fink, Gereon R

    2009-02-01

    Extrastriate, parietal, and frontal brain regions are differentially involved in distinct kinds of body movements and motor cognition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the neural mechanisms underlying the observation and mental imagery of meaningful face and limb movements with or without objects. The supplementary motor area was differentially recruited by the mental imagery of movements while there were differential responses of the extrastriate body area (EBA) during the observation conditions. Contrary to most previous reports, the EBA responded to face movements, albeit to a lesser degree than to limb movements. The medial wall of the intraparietal sulcus and adjacent intraparietal cortex was selectively recruited by the processing of meaningful upper limb movements, irrespective of whether these were object-related or not. Besides reach and grasp movements, the intraparietal sulcus may thus be involved in limb gesture processing, that is, in an important aspect of human social communication. We conclude that subregions of a frontal-parietal network differentially interact during the cognitive processing of body movements according to the specific motor-related task at hand and the particular movement features involved.

  10. Study on High Current PWM Unipolar Four Phases Driver for Stepper Motor Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Morar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study on high – current PWM, unipolar stepper motor controller/driver, are remarkable for simplicity, high – reliability, multifunctional facilities for four phases hybrid stepper motor.

  11. Neural control of finger movement via intracortical brain-machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Z T; Schroeder, K E; Vu, P P; Bullard, A J; Tat, D M; Nu, C S; Vaskov, A; Nason, S R; Thompson, D E; Bentley, J N; Patil, P G; Chestek, C A

    2017-12-01

    Intracortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) are a promising source of prosthesis control signals for individuals with severe motor disabilities. Previous BMI studies have primarily focused on predicting and controlling whole-arm movements; precise control of hand kinematics, however, has not been fully demonstrated. Here, we investigate the continuous decoding of precise finger movements in rhesus macaques. In order to elicit precise and repeatable finger movements, we have developed a novel behavioral task paradigm which requires the subject to acquire virtual fingertip position targets. In the physical control condition, four rhesus macaques performed this task by moving all four fingers together in order to acquire a single target. This movement was equivalent to controlling the aperture of a power grasp. During this task performance, we recorded neural spikes from intracortical electrode arrays in primary motor cortex. Using a standard Kalman filter, we could reconstruct continuous finger movement offline with an average correlation of ρ  =  0.78 between actual and predicted position across four rhesus macaques. For two of the monkeys, this movement prediction was performed in real-time to enable direct brain control of the virtual hand. Compared to physical control, neural control performance was slightly degraded; however, the monkeys were still able to successfully perform the task with an average target acquisition rate of 83.1%. The monkeys' ability to arbitrarily specify fingertip position was also quantified using an information throughput metric. During brain control task performance, the monkeys achieved an average 1.01 bits s -1 throughput, similar to that achieved in previous studies which decoded upper-arm movements to control computer cursors using a standard Kalman filter. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of brain control of finger-level fine motor skills. We believe that these results represent an important step

  12. Brain-computer interfacing based on cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteensel, Mariska J; Hermes, Dora; Aarnoutse, Erik J; Bleichner, Martin G; Schalk, Gerwin; van Rijen, Peter C; Leijten, Frans S S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2010-06-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) translate deliberate intentions and associated changes in brain activity into action, thereby offering patients with severe paralysis an alternative means of communication with and control over their environment. Such systems are not available yet, partly due to the high performance standard that is required. A major challenge in the development of implantable BCIs is to identify cortical regions and related functions that an individual can