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Sample records for brain motor control

  1. Efficient foot motor control by Neymar’s brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichi eNaito

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available How very long-term (over many years motor skill training shapes internal motor representation remains poorly understood. We provide valuable evidence that the football brain of Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior (the Brasilian footballer recruits very limited neural resources in the motor-cortical foot regions during foot movements. We scanned his brain activity with a 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI while he rotated his right ankle at 1Hz. We also scanned brain activity when three other age-controlled professional footballers, two top-athlete swimmers and one amateur footballer performed the identical task. A comparison was made between Neymar’s brain activity with that obtained from the others. We found activations in the left medial-wall foot motor regions during the foot movements consistently across all participants. However, the size and intensity of medial-wall activity was smaller in the four professional footballers than in the three other participants, despite no difference in amount of foot movement. Surprisingly, the reduced recruitment of medial-wall foot motor regions became apparent in Neymar. His medial-wall activity was smallest among all participants with absolutely no difference in amount of foot movement. Neymar may efficiently control given foot movements probably by largely conserving motor-cortical neural resources. We discuss this possibility in terms of over-years motor skill training effect, use-dependent plasticity, and efficient motor control.

  2. Reorganization and Preservation of Motor Control of the Brain in Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kokotilo, K J; Eng, J; Curt, A.

    2009-01-01

    Reorganization of brain function in people with CNS damage has been identified as one of the fundamental mechanisms involved in the recovery of sensori-motor function. Spinal cord injury (SCI) brain mapping studies during motor tasks aim for assessing the reorganization and preservation of brain networks involved in motor control. Revealing the activation of cortical and sub-cortical brain areas in people with SCI can indicate principal patterns of brain reorganization when the neurotrauma is...

  3. Sensorless speed control of switched reluctance motor using brain emotional learning based intelligent controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a brain emotional learning based intelligent controller (BELBIC) is developed to control the switched reluctance motor (SRM) speed. Like other intelligent controllers, BELBIC is model free and is suitable to control nonlinear systems. Motor parameter changes, operating point changes, measurement noise, open circuit fault in one phase and asymmetric phases in SRM are also simulated to show the robustness and superior performance of BELBIC. To compare the BELBIC performance with other intelligent controllers, Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC) is developed. System responses with BELBIC and FLC are compared. Furthermore, by eliminating the position sensor, a method is introduced to estimate the rotor position. This method is based on Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). The estimator inputs are four phase flux linkages. Suggested rotor position estimator is simulated in different conditions. Simulation results confirm the accurate rotor position estimation in different loads and speeds.

  4. Sensorless speed control of switched reluctance motor using brain emotional learning based intelligent controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehkordi, Behzad Mirzaeian, E-mail: mirzaeian@eng.ui.ac.i [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Isfahan, Hezar-Jerib St., Postal code 8174673441, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parsapoor, Amir, E-mail: amirparsapoor@yahoo.co [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Isfahan, Hezar-Jerib St., Postal code 8174673441, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moallem, Mehdi, E-mail: moallem@cc.iut.ac.i [Department of Electrical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lucas, Caro, E-mail: lucas@ut.ac.i [Centre of Excellence for Control and Intelligent Processing, Electrical and Computer Engineering Faculty, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    In this paper, a brain emotional learning based intelligent controller (BELBIC) is developed to control the switched reluctance motor (SRM) speed. Like other intelligent controllers, BELBIC is model free and is suitable to control nonlinear systems. Motor parameter changes, operating point changes, measurement noise, open circuit fault in one phase and asymmetric phases in SRM are also simulated to show the robustness and superior performance of BELBIC. To compare the BELBIC performance with other intelligent controllers, Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC) is developed. System responses with BELBIC and FLC are compared. Furthermore, by eliminating the position sensor, a method is introduced to estimate the rotor position. This method is based on Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). The estimator inputs are four phase flux linkages. Suggested rotor position estimator is simulated in different conditions. Simulation results confirm the accurate rotor position estimation in different loads and speeds.

  5. Motor prediction in Brain-Computer Interfaces for controlling mobile robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Tao; Gan, John Q

    2008-01-01

    EEG-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) can be regarded as a new channel for motor control except that it does not involve muscles. Normal neuromuscular motor control has two fundamental components: (1) to control the body, and (2) to predict the consequences of the control command, which is called motor prediction. In this study, after training with a specially designed BCI paradigm based on motor imagery, two subjects learnt to predict the time course of some features of the EEG signals. It is shown that, with this newly-obtained motor prediction skill, subjects can use motor imagery of feet to directly control a mobile robot to avoid obstacles and reach a small target in a time-critical scenario.

  6. Brain-controlled telepresence robot by motor-disabled people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonin, Luca; Carlson, Tom; Leeb, Robert; del R Millán, José

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the first results of users with disabilities in mentally controlling a telepresence robot, a rather complex task as the robot is continuously moving and the user must control it for a long period of time (over 6 minutes) to go along the whole path. These two users drove the telepresence robot from their clinic more than 100 km away. Remarkably, although the patients had never visited the location where the telepresence robot was operating, they achieve similar performances to a group of four healthy users who were familiar with the environment. In particular, the experimental results reported in this paper demonstrate the benefits of shared control for brain-controlled telepresence robots. It allows all subjects (including novel BMI subjects as our users with disabilities) to complete a complex task in similar time and with similar number of commands to those required by manual control. PMID:22255272

  7. Brain-controlled telepresence robot by motor-disabled people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonin, Luca; Carlson, Tom; Leeb, Robert; del R Millán, José

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the first results of users with disabilities in mentally controlling a telepresence robot, a rather complex task as the robot is continuously moving and the user must control it for a long period of time (over 6 minutes) to go along the whole path. These two users drove the telepresence robot from their clinic more than 100 km away. Remarkably, although the patients had never visited the location where the telepresence robot was operating, they achieve similar performances to a group of four healthy users who were familiar with the environment. In particular, the experimental results reported in this paper demonstrate the benefits of shared control for brain-controlled telepresence robots. It allows all subjects (including novel BMI subjects as our users with disabilities) to complete a complex task in similar time and with similar number of commands to those required by manual control.

  8. Control of a specific motor program by a small brain area in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto eFajardo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex motor behaviors are thought to be coordinated by networks of brain nuclei that may control different elementary motor programs. Transparent zebrafish larvae offer the opportunity to analyze the functional organization of motor control networks by optical manipulations of neuronal activity during behavior. We examined motor behavior in transgenic larvae expressing channelrhodopsin-2 throughout many neurons in the brain. Wide-field optical stimulation triggered backward and rotating movements caused by the repeated execution of J-turns, a specific motor program that normally occurs during prey capture. Although optically evoked activity was widespread, behavioral responses were highly coordinated and lateralized. 3-D mapping of behavioral responses to local optical stimuli revealed that J-turns can be triggered specifically in the anterior-ventral optic tectum and/or the adjacent pretectum. These results suggest that the execution of J-turns is controlled by a small group of neurons in the midbrain that may act as a command center. The identification of a brain area controlling a defined motor program involved in prey capture is a step towards a comprehensive analysis of neuronal circuits mediating sensorimotor behaviors of zebrafish.

  9. Brain-Controlled Telepresence Robot by Motor-Disabled People

    OpenAIRE

    Tonin, Luca; Carlson, Tom; Leeb, Robert; José del R. Millán

    2011-01-01

    Abstract—In this paper we present the first results of users with disabilities in mentally controlling a telepresence robot, a rather complex task as the robot is continuously moving and the user must control it for a long period of time (over 6 minutes) to go along the whole path. These two users drove the telepresence robot from their clinic more than 100 km away. Remarkably, although the patients had never visited the location where the telepresence robot was operating, they achieve simila...

  10. Motor imagery for severely motor-impaired patients: evidence for brain-computer interfacing as superior control solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Höhne

    Full Text Available Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs strive to decode brain signals into control commands for severely handicapped people with no means of muscular control. These potential users of noninvasive BCIs display a large range of physical and mental conditions. Prior studies have shown the general applicability of BCI with patients, with the conflict of either using many training sessions or studying only moderately restricted patients. We present a BCI system designed to establish external control for severely motor-impaired patients within a very short time. Within only six experimental sessions, three out of four patients were able to gain significant control over the BCI, which was based on motor imagery or attempted execution. For the most affected patient, we found evidence that the BCI could outperform the best assistive technology (AT of the patient in terms of control accuracy, reaction time and information transfer rate. We credit this success to the applied user-centered design approach and to a highly flexible technical setup. State-of-the art machine learning methods allowed the exploitation and combination of multiple relevant features contained in the EEG, which rapidly enabled the patients to gain substantial BCI control. Thus, we could show the feasibility of a flexible and tailorable BCI application in severely disabled users. This can be considered a significant success for two reasons: Firstly, the results were obtained within a short period of time, matching the tight clinical requirements. Secondly, the participating patients showed, compared to most other studies, very severe communication deficits. They were dependent on everyday use of AT and two patients were in a locked-in state. For the most affected patient a reliable communication was rarely possible with existing AT.

  11. Brain motor control function in a patient with subacute, incomplete, asymmetrical spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-jia; WANG Yi; WEI Peng-xu; XU Jian-min; LI Jian-jun

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major cause of disability. A serious consequence of SCI is the loss or partial loss of motor control. A number of therapies are currently being developed for restoring motor function in SCI patients.1'2 However, such approaches generally require intact neural motor systems for driving limb movements.

  12. [Arm Motor Function Recovery during Rehabilitation with the Use of Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by Brain-Computer Interface: a Patient with Severe Brain Damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukova, E V; Pavlova, O G; Kurganskaya, M E; Bobrov, P D; Turbina, L G; Frolov, A A; Davydov, V I; Sil'tchenko, A V; Mokienko, O A

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of motor function recovery in a patient with severe brain damage in the course of neurorehabilitation using hand exoskeleton controlled by brain-computer interface. For estimating the motor function of paretic arm, we used the biomechanical analysis of movements registered during the course of rehabilitation. After 15 weekly sessions of hand exoskeleton control, the following results were obtained: a) the velocity profile of goal-directed movements of paretic hand became bell-shaped, b) the patient began to extend and abduct the hand which was flexed and adducted in the beginning of rehabilitation, and c) the patient began to supinate the forearm which was pronated in the beginning of rehabilitation. The first result is an evidence of the general improvement of the quality of motor control, while the second and third results prove that the spasticity of paretic arm has decreased. PMID:27188144

  13. Haptic fMRI: combining functional neuroimaging with haptics for studying the brain's motor control representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Samir; Brantner, Gerald; Aholt, Chris; Kay, Kendrick; Khatib, Oussama

    2013-01-01

    A challenging problem in motor control neuroimaging studies is the inability to perform complex human motor tasks given the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner's disruptive magnetic fields and confined workspace. In this paper, we propose a novel experimental platform that combines Functional MRI (fMRI) neuroimaging, haptic virtual simulation environments, and an fMRI-compatible haptic device for real-time haptic interaction across the scanner workspace (above torso ∼ .65×.40×.20m(3)). We implement this Haptic fMRI platform with a novel haptic device, the Haptic fMRI Interface (HFI), and demonstrate its suitability for motor neuroimaging studies. HFI has three degrees-of-freedom (DOF), uses electromagnetic motors to enable high-fidelity haptic rendering (>350Hz), integrates radio frequency (RF) shields to prevent electromagnetic interference with fMRI (temporal SNR >100), and is kinematically designed to minimize currents induced by the MRI scanner's magnetic field during motor displacement (haptically transparent and does not interfere with human motor tasks (tested for .4m reaches). By allowing fMRI experiments involving complex three-dimensional manipulation with haptic interaction, Haptic fMRI enables-for the first time-non-invasive neuroscience experiments involving interactive motor tasks, object manipulation, tactile perception, and visuo-motor integration.

  14. Haptic fMRI: combining functional neuroimaging with haptics for studying the brain's motor control representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Samir; Brantner, Gerald; Aholt, Chris; Kay, Kendrick; Khatib, Oussama

    2013-01-01

    A challenging problem in motor control neuroimaging studies is the inability to perform complex human motor tasks given the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner's disruptive magnetic fields and confined workspace. In this paper, we propose a novel experimental platform that combines Functional MRI (fMRI) neuroimaging, haptic virtual simulation environments, and an fMRI-compatible haptic device for real-time haptic interaction across the scanner workspace (above torso ∼ .65×.40×.20m(3)). We implement this Haptic fMRI platform with a novel haptic device, the Haptic fMRI Interface (HFI), and demonstrate its suitability for motor neuroimaging studies. HFI has three degrees-of-freedom (DOF), uses electromagnetic motors to enable high-fidelity haptic rendering (>350Hz), integrates radio frequency (RF) shields to prevent electromagnetic interference with fMRI (temporal SNR >100), and is kinematically designed to minimize currents induced by the MRI scanner's magnetic field during motor displacement (Tesla fMRI scanner's baseline noise variation (∼.85±.1%). Finally, HFI is haptically transparent and does not interfere with human motor tasks (tested for .4m reaches). By allowing fMRI experiments involving complex three-dimensional manipulation with haptic interaction, Haptic fMRI enables-for the first time-non-invasive neuroscience experiments involving interactive motor tasks, object manipulation, tactile perception, and visuo-motor integration. PMID:24110643

  15. Induction motor control design

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Riccardo; Verrelli, Cristiano M

    2010-01-01

    ""Nonlinear and Adaptive Control Design for Induction Motors"" is a unified exposition of the most important steps and concerns in the design of estimation and control algorithms for induction motors. A single notation and modern nonlinear control terminology is used to make the book accessible to readers who are not experts in electric motors at the same time as giving a more theoretical control viewpoint to those who are. In order to increase readability, the book concentrates on the induction motor, eschewing the much more complex and less-well-understood control of asynchronous motors. The

  16. Fine motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... figure out the child's developmental age. Children develop fine motor skills over time, by practicing and being taught. To have fine motor control, children need: Awareness and planning Coordination ...

  17. Visuo-motor coordination ability predicts performance with brain-computer interfaces controlled by modulation of sensorimotor rhythms (SMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Hammer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of sensorimotor rhythms (SMR was suggested as a control signal for brain-computer interfaces (BCI. Yet, there is a population of users estimated between 10 to 50% not able to achieve reliable control and only about 20% of users achieve high (80-100% performance. Predicting performance prior to BCI use would facilitate selection of the most feasible system for an individual, thus constitute a practical benefit for the user, and increase our knowledge about the correlates of BCI control. In a recent study, we predicted SMR-BCI performance from psychological variables that were assessed prior to the BCI sessions and BCI control was supported with machine-learning techniques. We described two significant psychological predictors, namely the visuo-motor coordination ability and the ability to concentrate on the task. The purpose of the current study was to replicate these results thereby validating these predictors within a neurofeedback based SMR-BCI that involved no machine learning. Thirty-three healthy BCI novices participated in a calibration session and three further neurofeedback training sessions. Two variables were related with mean SMR-BCI performance: (1 A measure for the accuracy of fine motor skills, i.e. a trade for a person’s visuo-motor control ability and (2 subject’s attentional impulsivity. In a linear regression they accounted for almost 20% in variance of SMR-BCI performance, but predictor (1 failed significance. Nevertheless, on the basis of our prior regression model for sensorimotor control ability we could predict current SMR-BCI performance with an average prediction error of M = 12.07%. In more than 50% of the participants, the prediction error was smaller than 10%. Hence, psychological variables played a moderate role in predicting SMR-BCI performance in a neurofeedback approach that involved no machine learning. Future studies are needed to further consolidate (or reject the present predictors.

  18. Toward brain-actuated car applications: Self-paced control with a motor imagery-based brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Jingsheng; Liu, Yadong; Hu, Dewen

    2016-10-01

    This study presented a paradigm for controlling a car using an asynchronous electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) and presented the experimental results of a simulation performed in an experimental environment outside the laboratory. This paradigm uses two distinct MI tasks, imaginary left- and right-hand movements, to generate a multi-task car control strategy consisting of starting the engine, moving forward, turning left, turning right, moving backward, and stopping the engine. Five healthy subjects participated in the online car control experiment, and all successfully controlled the car by following a previously outlined route. Subject S1 exhibited the most satisfactory BCI-based performance, which was comparable to the manual control-based performance. We hypothesize that the proposed self-paced car control paradigm based on EEG signals could potentially be used in car control applications, and we provide a complementary or alternative way for individuals with locked-in disorders to achieve more mobility in the future, as well as providing a supplementary car-driving strategy to assist healthy people in driving a car.

  19. Step Motor Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangShuochengt; WangDan; QiaoWeimin; JingLan

    2003-01-01

    All kinds of step motors and servomotors are widely used in CSR control system, such as many vacuum valves control that set on the HIRFL-CSR; all kinds of electric switches and knobs of ECR Ion Source; equipment of CSR Beam Diagnostics and a lot of large equipment like Inside Gun Toroid and Collector Toroid of HIRFL. A typical control system include up to 32 16-I/O Control boards, and each 16-I/O Control board can control 4 motors at the same time (including 8 Limit Switches).

  20. Bridging the gap between motor imagery and motor execution with a brain-robot interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert; Fels, Meike; Vukelić, Mathias; Ziemann, Ulf; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    According to electrophysiological studies motor imagery and motor execution are associated with perturbations of brain oscillations over spatially similar cortical areas. By contrast, neuroimaging and lesion studies suggest that at least partially distinct cortical networks are involved in motor imagery and execution. We sought to further disentangle this relationship by studying the role of brain-robot interfaces in the context of motor imagery and motor execution networks. Twenty right-handed subjects performed several behavioral tasks as indicators for imagery and execution of movements of the left hand, i.e. kinesthetic imagery, visual imagery, visuomotor integration and tonic contraction. In addition, subjects performed motor imagery supported by haptic/proprioceptive feedback from a brain-robot-interface. Principal component analysis was applied to assess the relationship of these indicators. The respective cortical resting state networks in the α-range were investigated by electroencephalography using the phase slope index. We detected two distinct abilities and cortical networks underlying motor control: a motor imagery network connecting the left parietal and motor areas with the right prefrontal cortex and a motor execution network characterized by transmission from the left to right motor areas. We found that a brain-robot-interface might offer a way to bridge the gap between these networks, opening thereby a backdoor to the motor execution system. This knowledge might promote patient screening and may lead to novel treatment strategies, e.g. for the rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke.

  1. Advanced AC Motor Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmierkowski, M.P. [Institute of Control and Industrial Electronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Warszawa (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    In this paper a review of control methods for high performance PWM inverter-fed induction motor drives is presented. Starting from the description of an induction motor by the help of the space vectors, three basic control strategic are discussed. As first, the most popular Field Oriented Control (FOC) is described. Secondly, the Direct Torque and Flux vector Control (DTFC) method, which - in contrast to FOC - depart from idea of coordinate transformation and analogy with DC motor, is briefly characterized. The last group is based on Feedback Linearization Control (FLC) and can be easy combined with sliding mode control. The simulation and experimental oscillograms that illustrate the performance of the discussed control strategies are shown. (orig.) 35 refs.

  2. A COMPUTATIONAL NEUROANATOMY FOR MOTOR CONTROL

    OpenAIRE

    Shadmehr, Reza; Krakauer, John W.

    2008-01-01

    The study of patients to infer normal brain function has a long tradition in neurology and psychology. More recently, the motor system has been subject to quantitative and computational characterization. The purpose of this review is to argue that the lesion approach and theoretical motor control can mutually inform each other. Specifically, one may identify distinct motor control processes from computational models and map them onto specific deficits in patients. Here we review some of the i...

  3. Development of motor control

    OpenAIRE

    Schellekens, Johannes Maria Hubertus

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of a series of investigations into the barrier function of human skin are presented. In these investigations, the barrier function was assessed by water vapour loss measurements of the skin using a method based on gradient estimation. The aim of this thesis is to study the role and efficiency of motor control and anticipation processes in the development of children with and without disturbances in the motor system. Chapter I is a general introduction to the subjec...

  4. Electric vehicle motors and controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secunde, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Improved and advanced components being developed include electronically commutated permanent magnet motors of both drum and disk configuration, an unconventional brush commutated motor, and ac induction motors and various controllers. Test results on developmental motors, controllers, and combinations thereof indicate that efficiencies of 90% and higher for individual components, and 80% to 90% for motor/controller combinations can be obtained at rated power. The simplicity of the developmental motors and the potential for ultimately low cost electronics indicate that one or more of these approaches to electric vehicle propulsion may eventually displace presently used controllers and brush commutated dc motors.

  5. Promoting motor function by exercising the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrey, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Exercise represents a behavioral intervention that enhances brain health and motor function. The increase in cerebral blood volume in response to physical activity may be responsible for improving brain function. Among the various neuroimaging techniques used to monitor brain hemodynamic response during exercise, functional near-infrared spectroscopy could facilitate the measurement of task-related cortical responses noninvasively and is relatively robust with regard to the subjects' motion. Although the components of optimal exercise interventions have not been determined, evidence from animal and human studies suggests that aerobic exercise with sufficiently high intensity has neuroprotective properties and promotes motor function. This review provides an insight into the effect of physical activity (based on endurance and resistance exercises) on brain function for producing movement. Since most progress in the study of brain function has come from patients with neurological disorders (e.g., stroke and Parkinson's patients), this review presents some findings emphasizing training paradigms for restoring motor function. PMID:24961309

  6. Control linear motor with DSP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book consists of control linear motor with DSP, which is composed of two parts. The title of the first part is control Algorithm and software with introduction and tracking controller, drive profile on decision of motion time, floating point DSP and quantization effect, motion override Algorithm and drive profile summary, design of digital controller on design for controller structure and analysis of PID control Loop and Motor turning, design for IIR digital filter and protocol structure for communication wit host. The second part describes control hardware, which mentions Linear motor and Amplifier, motor and power supply, DSP board and interface, control of Micro Linear Stepping Motor and conclusion.

  7. Promoting Motor Function by Exercising the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Stephane Perrey

    2013-01-01

    Exercise represents a behavioral intervention that enhances brain health and motor function. The increase in cerebral blood volume in response to physical activity may be responsible for improving brain function. Among the various neuroimaging techniques used to monitor brain hemodynamic response during exercise, functional near-infrared spectroscopy could facilitate the measurement of task-related cortical responses noninvasively and is relatively robust with regard to the subjects’ motion. ...

  8. Control of synchronous motors

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Synchronous motors are indubitably the most effective device to drive industrial production systems and robots with precision and rapidity. Their control law is thus critical for combining at the same time high productivity to reduced energy consummation. As far as possible, the control algorithms must exploit the properties of these actuators. Therefore, this work draws on well adapted models resulting from the Park's transformation, for both the most traditional machines with sinusoidal field distribution and for machines with non-sinusoidal field distribution which are more and more used in

  9. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. We differ from other animals in having direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal...... interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands...... and contributes importantly to the muscle activity underlying voluntary movements. Regulation of spinal interneurons is used to switch between motor states such as locomotion (reciprocal innervation) and stance (coactivation pattern). Cortical regulation of presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents may focus...

  10. Comparison of frequencies of non motor symptoms in Indian Parkinson's disease patients on medical management versus deep brain stimulation: A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandadai Rukmini Mridula

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Non motor symptoms (NMS of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD are a major cause of disability and recognition of these symptoms and treatment is important for comprehensive health care. Deep brain stimulation of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS has been shown to improve motor symptoms in PD and effects on NMS are unknown. To investigate the NMS among PD patients who underwent STN DBS.We recruited prospectively 56 patients with PD, who had undergone bilateral STN DBS and 53 age and duration of illness matched PD patients on dopaminergic therapy (controls. NMS were assessed using 30 item questionnaire NMS Quest. These questions evaluated 9 domains, gastrointestinal, urinary, cardiovascular, sexual, cognition (apathy/attention/memory, anxiety/depression, hallucinations/delusions, sleep and miscellaneous. Comparison was done on individual symptoms as well as in various domains. This study was carried at Nizam's Institution of Medical Sciences and study period was from January 2011 to December 2012.Patients who underwent STN DBS had a significantly lower mean total score on NMS quest (6.7 ± 3.8 compared to controls (8.4 ± 3.7 (P < 0.00100. Symptoms in the domains of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, sleep were significantly less frequent while sexual disturbances were significantly more frequent among patients compared to controls. On individual symptom analysis, nocturia  (P < 0.00010, unexplained pains (P < 0.00010, nausea and vomiting, constipation, lightheadedness, depression, and insomnia were less prevalent, while sexual disturbances were significantly more common in STN DBS group compared to controls.Bilateral STN DBS not only improves the motor symptoms but also improves many NMS in PD patients.

  11. Heritability of motor control and motor learning

    OpenAIRE

    Missitzi, Julia; Gentner, Reinhard; Misitzi, Angelica; Geladas, Nickos; Politis, Panagiotis; Klissouras, Vassilis; Classen, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to elucidate the relative contribution of genes and environment on individual differences in motor control and acquisition of a force control task, in view of recent association studies showing that several candidate polymorphisms may have an effect on them. Forty‐four healthy female twins performed brisk isometric abductions with their right thumb. Force was recorded by a transducer and fed back to the subject on a computer screen. The task was to place the...

  12. Promoting Motor Function by Exercising the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Perrey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise represents a behavioral intervention that enhances brain health and motor function. The increase in cerebral blood volume in response to physical activity may be responsible for improving brain function. Among the various neuroimaging techniques used to monitor brain hemodynamic response during exercise, functional near-infrared spectroscopy could facilitate the measurement of task-related cortical responses noninvasively and is relatively robust with regard to the subjects’ motion. Although the components of optimal exercise interventions have not been determined, evidence from animal and human studies suggests that aerobic exercise with sufficiently high intensity has neuroprotective properties and promotes motor function. This review provides an insight into the effect of physical activity (based on endurance and resistance exercises on brain function for producing movement. Since most progress in the study of brain function has come from patients with neurological disorders (e.g., stroke and Parkinson’s patients, this review presents some findings emphasizing training paradigms for restoring motor function.

  13. Quadcopter control in three-dimensional space using a noninvasive motor imagery-based brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, Karl; Cassady, Kaitlin; Doud, Alexander; Shades, Kaleb; Rogin, Eitan; He, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Objective. At the balanced intersection of human and machine adaptation is found the optimally functioning brain-computer interface (BCI). In this study, we report a novel experiment of BCI controlling a robotic quadcopter in three-dimensional (3D) physical space using noninvasive scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) in human subjects. We then quantify the performance of this system using metrics suitable for asynchronous BCI. Lastly, we examine the impact that the operation of a real world device has on subjects' control in comparison to a 2D virtual cursor task. Approach. Five human subjects were trained to modulate their sensorimotor rhythms to control an AR Drone navigating a 3D physical space. Visual feedback was provided via a forward facing camera on the hull of the drone. Main results. Individual subjects were able to accurately acquire up to 90.5% of all valid targets presented while travelling at an average straight-line speed of 0.69 m s-1. Significance. Freely exploring and interacting with the world around us is a crucial element of autonomy that is lost in the context of neurodegenerative disease. Brain-computer interfaces are systems that aim to restore or enhance a user's ability to interact with the environment via a computer and through the use of only thought. We demonstrate for the first time the ability to control a flying robot in 3D physical space using noninvasive scalp recorded EEG in humans. Our work indicates the potential of noninvasive EEG-based BCI systems for accomplish complex control in 3D physical space. The present study may serve as a framework for the investigation of multidimensional noninvasive BCI control in a physical environment using telepresence robotics.

  14. Control motor brushless sensorless

    OpenAIRE

    Solchaga Pérez de Lazárraga, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    El proyecto consiste en la creación de un circuito capaz de controlar la velocidad de un motor brushless sensorless. Este tipo de motores eléctricos tienen como característica que no tienen escobillas para cambiar la polaridad del bobinado de su interior y tampoco precisan de un sensor que indique que ha realizado una vuelta. Los motores brushless que son controlados por este tipo de circuitos son específicos para aeronaves no tripuladas y requieren un diseño diferente a un motor brushless pe...

  15. User Experience May be Producing Greater Heart Rate Variability than Motor Imagery Related Control Tasks during the User-System Adaptation in Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz M.; Gutiérrez-Begovich, David A.; Argüello-García, Janet; Sepulveda, Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Ricardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) is technology that is developing fast, but it remains inaccurate, unreliable and slow due to the difficulty to obtain precise information from the brain. Consequently, the involvement of other biosignals to decode the user control tasks has risen in importance. A traditional way to operate a BCI system is via motor imagery (MI) tasks. As imaginary movements activate similar cortical structures and vegetative mechanisms as a voluntary movement does, heart rate variability (HRV) has been proposed as a parameter to improve the detection of MI related control tasks. However, HR is very susceptible to body needs and environmental demands, and as BCI systems require high levels of attention, perceptual processing and mental workload, it is important to assess the practical effectiveness of HRV. The present study aimed to determine if brain and heart electrical signals (HRV) are modulated by MI activity used to control a BCI system, or if HRV is modulated by the user perceptions and responses that result from the operation of a BCI system (i.e., user experience). For this purpose, a database of 11 participants who were exposed to eight different situations was used. The sensory-cognitive load (intake and rejection tasks) was controlled in those situations. Two electrophysiological signals were utilized: electroencephalography and electrocardiography. From those biosignals, event-related (de-)synchronization maps and event-related HR changes were respectively estimated. The maps and the HR changes were cross-correlated in order to verify if both biosignals were modulated due to MI activity. The results suggest that HR varies according to the experience undergone by the user in a BCI working environment, and not because of the MI activity used to operate the system. PMID:27458384

  16. User Experience May be Producing Greater Heart Rate Variability than Motor Imagery Related Control Tasks during the User-System Adaptation in Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz M; Gutiérrez-Begovich, David A; Argüello-García, Janet; Sepulveda, Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Ricardo A

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) is technology that is developing fast, but it remains inaccurate, unreliable and slow due to the difficulty to obtain precise information from the brain. Consequently, the involvement of other biosignals to decode the user control tasks has risen in importance. A traditional way to operate a BCI system is via motor imagery (MI) tasks. As imaginary movements activate similar cortical structures and vegetative mechanisms as a voluntary movement does, heart rate variability (HRV) has been proposed as a parameter to improve the detection of MI related control tasks. However, HR is very susceptible to body needs and environmental demands, and as BCI systems require high levels of attention, perceptual processing and mental workload, it is important to assess the practical effectiveness of HRV. The present study aimed to determine if brain and heart electrical signals (HRV) are modulated by MI activity used to control a BCI system, or if HRV is modulated by the user perceptions and responses that result from the operation of a BCI system (i.e., user experience). For this purpose, a database of 11 participants who were exposed to eight different situations was used. The sensory-cognitive load (intake and rejection tasks) was controlled in those situations. Two electrophysiological signals were utilized: electroencephalography and electrocardiography. From those biosignals, event-related (de-)synchronization maps and event-related HR changes were respectively estimated. The maps and the HR changes were cross-correlated in order to verify if both biosignals were modulated due to MI activity. The results suggest that HR varies according to the experience undergone by the user in a BCI working environment, and not because of the MI activity used to operate the system.

  17. Alpha oscillatory correlates of motor inhibition in the aged brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene eBoenstrup

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Exerting inhibitory control is a cognitive ability mediated by functions known to decline with age. The goal of this study is to add to the mechanistic understanding of cortical inhibition during motor control in aged brains. Based on behavioral findings of impaired inhibitory control with age we hypothesized that elderly will show a reduced or a lack of EEG alpha-power increase during tasks that require motor inhibition. Since inhibitory control over movements has been shown to rely on prior motor memory formation, we investigated cortical inhibitory processes at two points in time - early after learning and after an overnight consolidation phase and hypothesized an overnight increase of inhibitory capacities. Young and elderly participants acquired a complex finger movement sequence and in each experimental session brain activity during execution and inhibition of the sequence was recorded with multi-channel EEG. We assessed cortical processes of sustained inhibition by means of task-induced changes of alpha oscillatory power. During inhibition of the learned movement, young participants showed a significant alpha power increase at the sensorimotor cortices whereas elderly did not. Interestingly, for both groups, the overnight consolidation phase improved up-regulation of alpha power during sustained inhibition. This points to deficits in the generation and enhancement of local inhibitory mechanisms at the sensorimotor cortices in aged brains. However, the alpha power increase in both groups implies neuroplastic changes that strengthen the network of alpha power generation over time in young as well as elderly brains.

  18. Effects of Action Observational Training Plus Brain-Computer Interface-Based Functional Electrical Stimulation on Paretic Arm Motor Recovery in Patient with Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, TaeHoon; Kim, SeongSik; Lee, ByoungHee

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether action observational training (AOT) plus brain-computer interface-based functional electrical stimulation (BCI-FES) has a positive influence on motor recovery of paretic upper extremity in patients with stroke. This was a hospital-based, randomized controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Thirty patients with a first-time stroke were randomly allocated to one of two groups: the BCI-FES group (n = 15) and the control group (n = 15). The BCI-FES group administered to AOT plus BCI-FES on the paretic upper extremity five times per week during 4 weeks while both groups received conventional therapy. The primary outcomes were the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the Upper Extremity, Motor Activity Log (MAL), Modified Barthel Index and range of motion of paretic arm. A blinded assessor evaluated the outcomes at baseline and 4 weeks. All baseline outcomes did not differ significantly between the two groups. After 4 weeks, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the Upper Extremity sub-items (total, shoulder and wrist), MAL (MAL-Activity of Use and Quality of Movement), Modified Barthel Index and wrist flexion range of motion were significantly higher in the BCI-FES group (p stroke rehabilitation. The limitations of the study are that subjects had a certain limited level of upper arm function, and the sample size was comparatively small; hence, it is recommended that future large-scale trials should consider stratified and lager populations according to upper arm function.

  19. Spatial constancy mechanisms in motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medendorp, W Pieter

    2011-02-27

    The success of the human species in interacting with the environment depends on the ability to maintain spatial stability despite the continuous changes in sensory and motor inputs owing to movements of eyes, head and body. In this paper, I will review recent advances in the understanding of how the brain deals with the dynamic flow of sensory and motor information in order to maintain spatial constancy of movement goals. The first part summarizes studies in the saccadic system, showing that spatial constancy is governed by a dynamic feed-forward process, by gaze-centred remapping of target representations in anticipation of and across eye movements. The subsequent sections relate to other oculomotor behaviour, such as eye-head gaze shifts, smooth pursuit and vergence eye movements, and their implications for feed-forward mechanisms for spatial constancy. Work that studied the geometric complexities in spatial constancy and saccadic guidance across head and body movements, distinguishing between self-generated and passively induced motion, indicates that both feed-forward and sensory feedback processing play a role in spatial updating of movement goals. The paper ends with a discussion of the behavioural mechanisms of spatial constancy for arm motor control and their physiological implications for the brain. Taken together, the emerging picture is that the brain computes an evolving representation of three-dimensional action space, whose internal metric is updated in a nonlinear way, by optimally integrating noisy and ambiguous afferent and efferent signals. PMID:21242137

  20. Intelligent Controller for Networked DC Motor Control

    OpenAIRE

    B. Sharmila; N. Devarajan

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the feasibility of Neural Network controller for Networked Control Systems. The Intelligent Controllers has been developed for controlling the speed of the Networked DC Motor by exploiting the features of Neural Networks and Fuzzy Logic Controllers. The major challenges in Networked Control Systems are the network induced delays and data packet losses in the closed loop. These challenges degrade the performance and destabilize the systems. The aim of the proposed Neural ...

  1. Cerebellum and Ocular Motor Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eKheradmand

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An intact cerebellum is a prerequisite for optimal ocular motor performance. The cerebellum fine-tunes each of the subtypes of eye movements so they work together to bring and maintain images of objects of interest on the fovea. Here we review the major aspects of the contribution of the cerebellum to ocular motor control. The approach will be based on structural-functional correlation, combining the effects of lesions and the results from physiologic studies, with the emphasis on the cerebellar regions known to be most closely related to ocular motor function: 1 the flocculus/paraflocculus for high-frequency (brief vestibular responses, sustained pursuit eye movements and gaze-holding, 2 the nodulus/ventral uvula for low-frequency (sustained vestibular responses, and 3 the dorsal oculomotor vermis and its target in the posterior portion of the fastigial nucleus (the fastigial oculomotor region for saccades and pursuit initiation.

  2. Parkinson's disease rigidity: relation to brain connectivity and motor performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin eBaradaran

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: 1 To determine the brain connectivity pattern associated with clinical rigidity scores in Parkinson's disease (PD and 2 to determine the relation between clinically-assessed rigidity and quantitative metrics of motor performance.Background: Rigidity, the resistance to passive movement, is exacerbated in PD by asking the subject to move the contralateral limb, implying that rigidity involves a distributed brain network. Rigidity mainly affects subjects when they attempt to move; yet the relation between clinical rigidity scores and quantitative aspects of motor performance are unknown.Methods: Ten clinically diagnosed PD patients (off medication and ten controls were recruited to perform an fMRI squeeze-bulb tracking task that included both visually guided and internally guided features. The direct functional connectivity between anatomically defined regions of interest was assessed with Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBNs. Tracking performance was assessed by fitting Linear Dynamical System (LDS models to the motor performance, and was compared to the clinical rigidity scores. A cross-validated Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO regression method was used to determine the brain connectivity network that best predicted clinical rigidity scores.Results: The damping ratio of the LDS models significantly correlated with clinical rigidity scores (p < 10-4. An fMRI connectivity network in subcortical and primary and premotor cortical regions accurately predicted clinical rigidity scores (p < 10-5. Conclusions: A widely distributed cortical/subcortical network is associated with rigidity observed in PD patients, which reinforces the importance of altered functional connectivity in the pathophysiology of PD. PD subjects with higher rigidity scores tend to have less overshoot in their tracking performance, and damping ratio may represent a robust, quantitative marker of the motoric effects of increasing rigidity.

  3. Thinking, Walking, Talking: Integratory Motor and Cognitive Brain Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisman, Gerry; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Shafir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we argue that motor and cognitive processes are functionally related and most likely share a similar evolutionary history. This is supported by clinical and neural data showing that some brain regions integrate both motor and cognitive functions. In addition, we also argue that cognitive processes coincide with complex motor output. Further, we also review data that support the converse notion that motor processes can contribute to cognitive function, as found by many rehabilitation and aerobic exercise training programs. Support is provided for motor and cognitive processes possessing dynamic bidirectional influences on each other. PMID:27252937

  4. Brain Connectivity Plasticity in the Motor Network after Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Jiang; Huijuan Xu; Chunshui Yu

    2013-01-01

    The motor function is controlled by the motor system that comprises a series of cortical and subcortical areas interacting via anatomical connections. The motor function will be disturbed when the stroke lesion impairs either any of these areas or their connections. More and more evidence indicates that the reorganization of the motor network including both areas and their anatomical and functional connectivity might contribute to the motor recovery after stroke. Here, we review recent studie...

  5. Control of non-conventional synchronous motors

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Classical synchronous motors are the most effective device to drive industrial production systems and robots with precision and rapidity. However, numerous applications require efficient controls in non-conventional situations. Firstly, this is the case with synchronous motors supplied by thyristor line-commutated inverters, or with synchronous motors with faults on one or several phases. Secondly, many drive systems use non-conventional motors such as polyphase (more than three phases) synchronous motors, synchronous motors with double excitation, permanent magnet linear synchronous motors,

  6. Mirroring pain in the brain : emotional expression versus motor imitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budell, Lesley; Kunz, Miriam; Jackson, Philip L; Rainville, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Perception of pain in others via facial expressions has been shown to involve brain areas responsive to self-pain, biological motion, as well as both performed and observed motor actions. Here, we investigated the involvement of these different regions during emotional and motor mirroring of pain ex

  7. Flux Tracking Control of Induction Motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LanLin; XiaowuMu; ChunxiaBu

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with flux tracking control of induction motors. Firstly,we analyze convergency of non-homogeneous linear time-varying systems and a sufficient condition is given. Finally, the flux regulator of induction motors is discussed.

  8. 4-CLASS MOTOR IMAGERY CLASSIFICATION FOR POST STROKE REHABILITATION USING BRAIN-COMPUTER INTERFACE

    OpenAIRE

    Aarathi Kumar*, Nisha. P. V

    2016-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a mechanism that helps in the control/communication of one’s environment through the brain signals obtained directly from the brain via an EEG signal acquisition unit. A BCI incorporating Motor Imagery for post-stroke rehabilitation of upper limbs and knee in fully disabled patients is designed. It helps in restoring some of the activities of the daily living. It aids post-stroke sufferers to carry out functionalities like movement of right an...

  9. Ipsilateral motor pathways after stroke: implications for noninvasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynley V Bradnam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In humans the two cerebral hemispheres have essential roles in controlling the upper limb. The purpose of this article is to draw attention to the potential importance of ipsilateral descending pathways for functional recovery after stroke, and the use of noninvasive brain stimulation (NBS protocols of the contralesional primary motor cortex (M1. Conventionally NBS is used to suppress contralesional M1, and to attenuate transcallosal inhibition onto the ipsilesional M1. There has been little consideration of the fact that contralesional M1 suppression may also reduce excitability of ipsilateral descending pathways that may be important for paretic upper limb control for some patients. One such ipsilateral pathway is the cortico-reticulo-propriospinal pathway (CRPP. In this review we outline a neurophysiological model to explain how contralesional M1 may gain control of the paretic arm via the CRPP. We conclude that the relative importance of the CRPP for motor control in individual patients must be considered before using NBS to suppress contralesional M1. Neurophysiological, neuroimaging and clinical assessments can assist this decision making and facilitate the translation of NBS into the clinical setting.

  10. Pain relativity in motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, I T; Seymour, B; Vlaev, I; Trommershäuser, J; Dolan, R J; Chater, N

    2010-06-01

    Motivational theories of pain highlight its role in people's choices of actions that avoid bodily damage. By contrast, little is known regarding how pain influences action implementation. To explore this less-understood area, we conducted a study in which participants had to rapidly point to a target area to win money while avoiding an overlapping penalty area that would cause pain in their contralateral hand. We found that pain intensity and target-penalty proximity repelled participants' movement away from pain and that motor execution was influenced not by absolute pain magnitudes but by relative pain differences. Our results indicate that the magnitude and probability of pain have a precise role in guiding motor control and that representations of pain that guide action are, at least in part, relative rather than absolute. Additionally, our study shows that the implicit monetary valuation of pain, like many explicit valuations (e.g., patients' use of rating scales in medical contexts), is unstable, a finding that has implications for pain treatment in clinical contexts.

  11. Pain relativity in motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, I T; Seymour, B; Vlaev, I; Trommershäuser, J; Dolan, R J; Chater, N

    2010-06-01

    Motivational theories of pain highlight its role in people's choices of actions that avoid bodily damage. By contrast, little is known regarding how pain influences action implementation. To explore this less-understood area, we conducted a study in which participants had to rapidly point to a target area to win money while avoiding an overlapping penalty area that would cause pain in their contralateral hand. We found that pain intensity and target-penalty proximity repelled participants' movement away from pain and that motor execution was influenced not by absolute pain magnitudes but by relative pain differences. Our results indicate that the magnitude and probability of pain have a precise role in guiding motor control and that representations of pain that guide action are, at least in part, relative rather than absolute. Additionally, our study shows that the implicit monetary valuation of pain, like many explicit valuations (e.g., patients' use of rating scales in medical contexts), is unstable, a finding that has implications for pain treatment in clinical contexts. PMID:20435952

  12. Functional MR imaging using sensory and motor task in brain tumors and other focal cerebral lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ok, Chul Su; Lim, Myung Kwan; Yu, Ki Bong; Kim, Hyung Jin; Suh, Chang Hae [College of Medicine, Inha Univ., Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    To determine the usefulness of the functional MRI (fMRI) using motor and sensory stimuli in patients with brain tumors of focal cerebral lesions. This study involved five patients with brain tumors (n=2) or cerebral lesions (cysticercosis (n=1)), arteriovenous malformation (n=1), focal infarction (n=1) and seven normal controls. For MR examinations a 1.5T scanner was used, and during motor or sensory stimulation, the EPI BOLD technique was employed. For image postprocessing an SPM program was utilized. In volunteers, contralateral sensori-motor cortices were activated by both motor and sensory stimuli, while supplementary motor cortices were activated by motor stimuli and other sensory cortices by sensory stimuli. Preoperative evaluation of the relationship between lesions and important sensory and motor areas was possible, and subsequent surgery was thus successful, involving no severe complications. Activation of ipsilateral or other areas occurred in patients with destruction of a major sensory and/or motor area, suggesting compensatory reorganization. fMRI could be a useful supportive method for determining the best approach to surgery treatment in patients with brain tumors or focal cerebral lesions.

  13. Functional MR imaging using sensory and motor task in brain tumors and other focal cerebral lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the usefulness of the functional MRI (fMRI) using motor and sensory stimuli in patients with brain tumors of focal cerebral lesions. This study involved five patients with brain tumors (n=2) or cerebral lesions (cysticercosis (n=1), arteriovenous malformation (n=1), focal infarction (n=1) and seven normal controls. For MR examinations a 1.5T scanner was used, and during motor or sensory stimulation, the EPI BOLD technique was employed. For image postprocessing an SPM program was utilized. In volunteers, contralateral sensori-motor cortices were activated by both motor and sensory stimuli, while supplementary motor cortices were activated by motor stimuli and other sensory cortices by sensory stimuli. Preoperative evaluation of the relationship between lesions and important sensory and motor areas was possible, and subsequent surgery was thus successful, involving no severe complications. Activation of ipsilateral or other areas occurred in patients with destruction of a major sensory and/or motor area, suggesting compensatory reorganization. fMRI could be a useful supportive method for determining the best approach to surgery treatment in patients with brain tumors or focal cerebral lesions

  14. Motor Skill Acquisition Promotes Human Brain Myelin Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Bimal Lakhani; Borich, Michael R.; Jackson, Jacob N.; Wadden, Katie P.; Sue Peters; Anica Villamayor; MacKay, Alex L.; Vavasour, Irene M.; Alexander Rauscher; Boyd, Lara A.

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent structural changes are widely evident in gray matter. Using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), the neuroplastic effect of motor training on white matter in the brain has been demonstrated. However, in humans it is not known whether specific features of white matter relate to motor skill acquisition or if these structural changes are associated to functional network connectivity. Myelin can be objectively quantified in vivo and used to index specific experience-dependent ch...

  15. Applied intelligent control of induction motor drives

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Tze Fun

    2011-01-01

    Induction motors are the most important workhorses in industry. They are mostly used as constant-speed drives when fed from a voltage source of fixed frequency. Advent of advanced power electronic converters and powerful digital signal processors, however, has made possible the development of high performance, adjustable speed AC motor drives.This book aims to explore new areas of induction motor control based on artificial intelligence (AI) techniques in order to make the controller less sensitive to parameter changes. Selected AI techniques are applied for different induction motor control s.

  16. A Bayesian framework for speech motor control

    OpenAIRE

    Patri, Jean-François; Diard, Julien; Perrier, Pascal; Schwartz, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The remarkable capacity of the speech motor system to adapt to various speech conditions is due to an excess of degrees of freedom, which enables producing similar acoustical properties with different sets of control strategies. To explain how the Central Nervous System selects one of the possible strategies, a common approach, in line with optimal motor control theories, is to model speech motor planning as the solution of an optimality problem based on cost functions. Despite the success of...

  17. Linear Parameter Varying Control of Induction Motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangbæk, Klaus

    The subject of this thesis is the development of linear parameter varying (LPV) controllers and observers for control of induction motors. The induction motor is one of the most common machines in industrial applications. Being a highly nonlinear system, it poses challenging control problems...... for high performance applications. This thesis demonstrates how LPV control theory provides a systematic way to achieve good performance for these problems. The main contributions of this thesis are the application of the LPV control theory to induction motor control as well as various contributions...

  18. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  19. Brain Connectivity Plasticity in the Motor Network after Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The motor function is controlled by the motor system that comprises a series of cortical and subcortical areas interacting via anatomical connections. The motor function will be disturbed when the stroke lesion impairs either any of these areas or their connections. More and more evidence indicates that the reorganization of the motor network including both areas and their anatomical and functional connectivity might contribute to the motor recovery after stroke. Here, we review recent studies employing models of anatomical, functional, and effective connectivity on neuroimaging data to investigate how ischemic stroke influences the connectivity of motor areas and how changes in connectivity relate to impaired function and functional recovery. We suggest that connectivity changes constitute an important pathophysiological aspect of motor impairment after stroke and important mechanisms of motor recovery. We also demonstrate that therapeutic interventions may facilitate motor recovery after stroke by modulating the connectivity among the motor areas. In conclusion, connectivity analyses improved our understanding of the mechanisms of motor recovery after stroke and may help to design hypothesis-driven treatment strategies and sensitive measures for outcome prediction in stroke patients.

  20. Speed Control of Bldc Motor Drive By Using Pid Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.Narendra Kumar,

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly deals with the Brushless DC (BLDC motor speed driving systems have sprouted in various small scale and large scale applications like automobile industries, domestic appliances etc. This leads to the development in Brushless DC motor (BLDCM. The usage of BLDC Motor enhances various performance factors ranging from higher efficiency, higher torque in low-speed range, high power density ,low maintenance and less noise than other motors. The BLDC Motor can act as an alternative for traditional motors like induction and switched reluctance motors. In this paper PID controller is implemented with speed feedback loop and it is observe that torque ripples are minimized. Simulation is carried out using MATLAB / SIMULINK. The results show that the performance of BLDC Motor is quite satisfactory for various loading conditions. Brushless DC motor drives are typically employed in speed controlled applications.

  1. New Heuristics for Interfacing Human Motor System using Brain Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed El-Dosuky

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many new forms of interfacing human users to machines. We persevere here electric-mechanical form of interaction between human and machine. The emergence of brain-computer interface allows mind-to-movement systems. The story of the Pied Piper inspired us to devise some new heuristics for interfacing human motor system using brain waves, by combining head helmet and LumbarMotionMonitor. For the simulation we use java GridGain. Brain responses of classified subjects during training indicates that Probe can be the best stimulus to rely on in distinguishing between knowledgeable and not knowledgeable

  2. New Heuristics for Interfacing Human Motor System using Brain Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed El-Dosuky; Ahmed El-Bassiouny; Taher Hamza; Magdy Rashad

    2012-01-01

    There are many new forms of interfacing human users to machines. We persevere here electric-mechanical form of interaction between human and machine. The emergence of brain-computer interface allows mind-to-movement systems. The story of the Pied Piper inspired us to devise some new heuristics for interfacing human motor system using brain waves, by combining head helmet and LumbarMotionMonitor. For the simulation we use java GridGain. Brain responses of classified subjects during training in...

  3. Speed controller for an alternating - current motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A controller for a multi-phase ac motor that is subject to a large inertial load, e.g. an induction motor driving a heavy spinning rotor of a neutron chopper that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal Esub(L) having a meandering line frequency, includes a sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor which is compared (by counting clock pulses between feedback pulses) with a reference clock signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal Esub(c). The motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error signal, a phase error signal, and a drift error signal, the magnitudes of which are recalculated and updated with each revolution of the motor shaft. The speed error signal is constant for large speed errors but highly sensitive to small speed errors. The stator windings of the motor are driven by variable-frequency power amplifiers which are controlled by the motor control signal Esub(c) via PROMs which store digital representations of sine and cosine waveforms in quadrature. (author)

  4. The minimum transition hypothesis for intermittent hierarchical motor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eKarniel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In intermittent control, instead of continuously calculating the control signal, the controller occasionally changes this signal at certain sparse points in time. The control law may include feedback, adaptation, optimization, or any other control strategies. When, where, and how does the brain employ intermittency as it controls movement? These are open questions in motor neuroscience. Evidence for intermittency in human motor control has been repeatedly observed in the neural control of movement literature. Moreover, some researchers have provided theoretical models to address intermittency. Even so, the vast majority of current models, and I would dare to say the dogma in most of the current motor neuroscience literature involves continuous control. In this paper, I focus on an area in which intermittent control has not yet been thoroughly considered, the structure of muscle synergies. A synergy in the muscle space is a group of muscles activated together by a single neural command. Under the assumption that the motor control is intermittent, I present the minimum transition hypothesis and its predictions with regards to the structure of muscle synergies. The minimum transitions hypothesis (MTH asserts that the purpose of synergies is to minimize the effort of the higher level in the hierarchy by minimizing the number of transitions in an intermittent control signal. The implications of the MTH are not only for the structure of the muscle synergies but also to the intermittent and hierarchical nature of the motor system, with various predictions as to the process of skill learning, and important implications to the design of brain machine interfaces and human robot interaction.

  5. Five phase hybrid stepping motor microstepping control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Albert Barabas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Single stepping a motor results in jerky movements of the motor, especially at lower speeds. Microstepping is used to achieve increased step resolution and smoother transitions between steps. In most applications, microstepping increases system performance while limiting noise and resonance problems. The paper presents a method for calculation the values of the phase currents for microstepping control of a 5 – phase hybrid stepping motor. This method uses the standard control of the stepping motor with rated currents and only during the commutation the currents of the switched phases change their values in small steps so as the natural step is divided into several micro – steps. The authors have developed a mathematical model and computer programs for simulation of the motor operation under investigated microstepping control. The paper contains also the results from simulations and corresponding conclusions.

  6. Brain volumetric and microstructural correlates of executive and motor performance in aged rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aadhavi eSridharan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aged rhesus macaque exhibits brain atrophy and behavioral deficits similar to normal aging in humans. Here we studied the association between cognitive and motor performance and anatomic and microstructural brain integrity measured with 3T magnetic resonance imaging in aged monkeys. About half of these animals were maintained on moderate calorie restriction, the only intervention shown to delay the aging process in lower animals. T1-weighted anatomic and diffusion tensor images were used to obtain gray matter volume, and fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity, respectively. We tested the extent to which brain health indexed by gray matter volume, fractional anisotropy, and mean diffusivity were related to executive and motor function, and determined the effect of the dietary intervention on this relationship. We hypothesized that fewer errors on the executive function test and faster motor times would be correlated with higher volume, higher fractional anisotropy, and lower mean diffusivity in frontal areas that mediate executive function, and in motor, premotor, subcortical, and cerebellar areas underlying goal-directed motor behaviors. Higher error percentage on a cognitive conceptual shift task was significantly associated with lower gray matter volume in frontal and parietal cortices, and lower fractional anisotropy in major association fiber bundles. Similarly, slower performance time on the motor task was significantly correlated with lower volumetric measures in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar areas and decreased fractional anisotropy in several major association fiber bundles. Notably, performance during the acquisition phase of the hardest level of the motor task was significantly associated with anterior mesial temporal lobe volume. Finally, these brain-behavior correlations for the motor task were attenuated in calorie restricted animals compared to controls, indicating a potential protective effect of the dietary

  7. Real-Time Brain-Computer Interface System Based on Motor Imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tie-Jun Liu; Ping Yang; Xu-Yong Peng; Yu Huang; De-Zhong Yao

    2009-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) real-time system based on motor imagery translates the user's motor intention into a real-time control signal for peripheral equipments.A key problem to be solved for practical applications is real-time data collection and processing.In this paper,a real-time BCI system is implemented on computer with electroencephalogram amplifier.In our implementation,the on-line voting method is adopted for feedback control strategy,and the voting results are used to control the cursor horizontal movement.Three subjects take part in the experiment.The results indicate that the best accuracy is 90%.

  8. Clinical studies of brain functional images by motor activation using single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Masahiro [Gifu Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-09-01

    Thirty participants (10 normal controls; group A, 5 patients with brain tumors located near central sulcus without hemiparesis; group B, 10 patients with brain tumors located near central sulcus with hemiparesis; group C, and 5 patients with brain tumors besides the central regions with hemiparesis; group D) were enrolled. The images were performed by means of split-dose method with {sup 99m}Tc-ECD at rest condition (SPECT 1) and during hand grasping (SPECT 2). The activation SPECT were obtained by subtracting SPECT 1 from SPECT 2, and the functional mapping was made by the strict registration of the activation SPECT with 3D MRI. To evaluate the changes of CBF (%{Delta}CBF) of the sensorimotor and supplementary motor areas on the functional mapping, ratio of the average counts of SPECT 1 and SPECT 2 was calculated and statistically compared. The functional activation paradigms caused a significant increase of CBF in the sensorimotor area contra-lateral to the stimulated hand, although the sensorimotor area and the central sulcus in groups B and C were dislocated, compared with hemisphere of non-tumor side. The sensorimotor area ipsi-lateral to the stimulated hand could be detected in almost of all subjects. The supplementary motor area could be detected in all subjects. In group A, the average %{Delta}CBF were up 24.1{+-}4.3% in the contra-lateral sensorimotor area, and 22.3{+-}3.6% in the supplementary motor area, respectively. The average %{Delta}CBF in the contra-lateral sensorimotor area of group D was significantly higher than that of group A. The brain functional mapping by motor activation using SPECT could localize the area of cortical motor function in normal volunteers and patients with brain tumors. The changes of regional CBF by activation SPECT precisely assess the cortical motor function even in patients with brain tumors located near central sulcus. (K.H.)

  9. Brain Plasticity and Motor Practice in Cognitive Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuyang eCai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available For more than two decades, there have been extensive studies of experience-based neural plasticity exploring effective applications of brain plasticity for cognitive and motor development. Research suggests that human brains continuously undergo structural reorganization and functional changes in response to stimulations or training. From a developmental point of view, the assumption of lifespan brain plasticity has been extended to older adults in terms of the benefits of cognitive training and physical therapy. To summarize recent developments, first, we introduce the concept of neural plasticity from a developmental perspective. Secondly, we note that motor learning often refers to deliberate practice and the resulting performance enhancement and adaptability. We discuss the close interplay between neural plasticity, motor learning and cognitive aging. Thirdly, we review research on motor skill acquisition in older adults with, and without, impairments relative to aging-related cognitive decline. Finally, to enhance future research and application, we highlight the implications of neural plasticity in skills learning and cognitive rehabilitation for the aging population.

  10. Brain plasticity and motor practice in cognitive aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Liuyang; Chan, John S. Y.; Yan, Jin H.; Peng, Kaiping

    2014-01-01

    For more than two decades, there have been extensive studies of experience-based neural plasticity exploring effective applications of brain plasticity for cognitive and motor development. Research suggests that human brains continuously undergo structural reorganization and functional changes in response to stimulations or training. From a developmental point of view, the assumption of lifespan brain plasticity has been extended to older adults in terms of the benefits of cognitive training and physical therapy. To summarize recent developments, first, we introduce the concept of neural plasticity from a developmental perspective. Secondly, we note that motor learning often refers to deliberate practice and the resulting performance enhancement and adaptability. We discuss the close interplay between neural plasticity, motor learning and cognitive aging. Thirdly, we review research on motor skill acquisition in older adults with, and without, impairments relative to aging-related cognitive decline. Finally, to enhance future research and application, we highlight the implications of neural plasticity in skills learning and cognitive rehabilitation for the aging population. PMID:24653695

  11. Alterations of motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Juanita; Karadayian, Analia G; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2012-08-01

    Ethanol has been known to affect various behavioral parameters in experimental animals, even several hours after ethanol (EtOH) is absent from blood circulation, in the period known as hangover. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acute ethanol hangover on motor performance in association with the brain cortex energetic metabolism. Evaluation of motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during alcohol hangover was performed in mice 6 hours after a high ethanol dose (hangover onset). Animals were injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8 g/kg BW) (hangover group). Ethanol hangover group showed a bad motor performance compared with control animals (p hangover animals showed a 34% decrease in the respiratory control rate as compared with the control group. Mitochondrial complex activities were decreased being the complex I-III the less affected by the hangover condition; complex II-III was markedly decreased by ethanol hangover showing 50% less activity than controls. Complex IV was 42% decreased as compared with control animals. Hydrogen peroxide production was 51% increased in brain cortex mitochondria from the hangover group, as compared with the control animals. Quantification of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential indicated that ethanol injected animals presented 17% less ability to maintain the polarized condition as compared with controls. These results indicate that a clear decrease in proton motive force occurs in brain cortex mitochondria during hangover conditions. We can conclude that a decreased motor performance observed in the hangover group of animals could be associated with brain cortex mitochondrial dysfunction and the resulting impairment of its energetic metabolism. PMID:22608205

  12. Linearizing Control of Induction Motor Based on Networked Control Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Ren; Chun-Wen Li; De-Zong Zhao

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to speed control of induction motors is developed by introducing networked control systems (NCSs) into the induction motor driving system. The control strategy is to stabilize and track the rotor speed of the induction motor when the network time delay occurs in the transport medium of network data. First, a feedback linearization method is used to achieve input-output linearization and decoupling control of the induction motor driving system based on rotor flux model, and then the characteristic of network data is analyzed in terms of the inherent network time delay. A networked control model of an induction motor is established. The sufficient condition of asymptotic stability for the networked induction motor driving system is given, and the state feedback controller is obtained by solving the linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Simulation results verify the efficiency of the proposed scheme.

  13. Motor Network Plasticity and Low-Frequency Oscillations Abnormalities in Patients with Brain Gliomas: A Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chen; Zhang, Ming; Min, Zhigang; Rana, Netra; Zhang, Qiuli; Liu, Xin; Li, Min; Lin, Pan

    2014-01-01

    Brain plasticity is often associated with the process of slow-growing tumor formation, which remodels neural organization and optimizes brain network function. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether motor function plasticity would display deficits in patients with slow-growing brain tumors located in or near motor areas, but who were without motor neurological deficits. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to probe motor networks in 15 patients with histopathologically confirmed brain gliomas and 15 age-matched healthy controls. All subjects performed a motor task to help identify individual motor activity in the bilateral primary motor cortex (PMC) and supplementary motor area (SMA). Frequency-based analysis at three different frequencies was then used to investigate possible alterations in the power spectral density (PSD) of low-frequency oscillations. For each group, the average PSD was determined for each brain region and a nonparametric test was performed to determine the difference in power between the two groups. Significantly reduced inter-hemispheric functional connectivity between the left and right PMC was observed in patients compared with controls (P<0.05). We also found significantly decreased PSD in patients compared to that in controls, in all three frequency bands (low: 0.01–0.02 Hz; middle: 0.02–0.06 Hz; and high: 0.06–0.1 Hz), at three key motor regions. These findings suggest that in asymptomatic patients with brain tumors located in eloquent regions, inter-hemispheric connection may be more vulnerable. A comparison of the two approaches indicated that power spectral analysis is more sensitive than functional connectivity analysis for identifying the neurological abnormalities underlying motor function plasticity induced by slow-growing tumors. PMID:24806463

  14. Motor network plasticity and low-frequency oscillations abnormalities in patients with brain gliomas: a functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Niu

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity is often associated with the process of slow-growing tumor formation, which remodels neural organization and optimizes brain network function. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether motor function plasticity would display deficits in patients with slow-growing brain tumors located in or near motor areas, but who were without motor neurological deficits. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to probe motor networks in 15 patients with histopathologically confirmed brain gliomas and 15 age-matched healthy controls. All subjects performed a motor task to help identify individual motor activity in the bilateral primary motor cortex (PMC and supplementary motor area (SMA. Frequency-based analysis at three different frequencies was then used to investigate possible alterations in the power spectral density (PSD of low-frequency oscillations. For each group, the average PSD was determined for each brain region and a nonparametric test was performed to determine the difference in power between the two groups. Significantly reduced inter-hemispheric functional connectivity between the left and right PMC was observed in patients compared with controls (P<0.05. We also found significantly decreased PSD in patients compared to that in controls, in all three frequency bands (low: 0.01-0.02 Hz; middle: 0.02-0.06 Hz; and high: 0.06-0.1 Hz, at three key motor regions. These findings suggest that in asymptomatic patients with brain tumors located in eloquent regions, inter-hemispheric connection may be more vulnerable. A comparison of the two approaches indicated that power spectral analysis is more sensitive than functional connectivity analysis for identifying the neurological abnormalities underlying motor function plasticity induced by slow-growing tumors.

  15. Deep networks for motor control functions

    OpenAIRE

    Berniker, Max; Kording, Konrad P.

    2015-01-01

    The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body's state (forward and inverse models), and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories w...

  16. Induction motor modelling for vector control purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, M.

    2000-07-01

    Widely used in many industrial applications, the induction motors represent the starting point when an electrical drive system has to be designed. In modern control theory, the induction motor is described by different mathematical models, according to the employed control method. In the symmetrical three-phase version or in the unsymmetrical two-phase version, this electrical motor type can be associated with vector control strategy. Through this control method, the induction motor operation can be analysed in a similar way to a DC motor. The goal of this research is to summarize the existing models and to develop new models, in order to obtain a unified approach on modelling of the induction machines for vector control purposes. Starting from vector control principles, the work suggests the d-q axes unified approach for all types of the induction motors. However, the space vector analysis is presented as a strong tool in modelling of the symmetrical induction machines. When an electrical motor is viewed as a mathematical system, with inputs and outputs, it can be analysed and described in multiple ways, considering different reference frames and state-space variables. All the mathematical possible models are illustrated in this report. The suggestions for what model is suitable for what application, are defined as well. As the practical implementation of the vector control strategies require digital signal processors (DSP), from the continuous time domain models are derived the discrete time domain models. The discrete models permit the implementation of the mathematical model of the induction motors, in order to obtain high efficiency sensorless drives. The stability of these various models is analysed. (orig.)

  17. Lubrication control of motors in paper mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, Yasuo

    1987-12-01

    This review is focused lubrication control of motors in paper mills. Smaller motors use deep groove ball bearings and lubricating grease. They need no make-up grease. Medium-size motors incorporate both sealed and open bearings or only open bearings and the grade, make-up intervals and make-up volume of the lubricating grease to be used are specified. Methods for automatic grease supply include the use of an automatic grease cup with improved injection mechanism, use of an injection pump for automatic supply to each motor, and group-control for parallel supply to several motors through distribution valves. For large-size motors, oil-bath lubricating is usually adopted in combination with a circulating oil supply device, etc. Improved techniques are currently available for automatization of the main systems and for automatization and reduction in cost of electric instrumentation. However, grease up of bearings, especially for medium-size motors, is performed by hand. Effective lubrication control and increased productivity are expected to be achieved by the combined use of automatic oil supply and monitoring devices. (14 figs, 4 tabs)

  18. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Pleger

    Full Text Available The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1 and motor cortex (M1 contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  19. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleger, Burkhard; Draganski, Bogdan; Schwenkreis, Peter; Lenz, Melanie; Nicolas, Volkmar; Maier, Christoph; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls) were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  20. BRAIN-COMPUTER-INTERFACE – SUPPORTED MOTOR IMAGERY TRAININTG FOR PATIENTS WITH HEMIPARESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Mokienko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to assess the feasibility of motor imagery supported brain-computer interface in patients with hemiparesis. 13 patients with central paresis of the hand and 15 healthy volunteers were learning to control EEG-based interface with feedback. No differences on interface control quality were found between patients and healthy subjects. The trainings were accompanied by the desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm. In patients with cortical damage the source of EEG-activity was dislocated.

  1. Adaptive Vector Control of Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Opeiko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A synthesis of adaptive PID controller has been executed for flux linkage and speed channels of a vector control system for an induction short-circuited motor. While using an imitation simulation method results of a synthesized system analysis show that the adaptive PID controller has some advantages under conditions of parametric disturbances affecting the object.

  2. Backstepping Strategy for Induction Motor Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    2000-01-01

    Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a novel approach to control of induction motors is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear controller for the torque and the amplitude of the field. A combination of nonlinear damping and observer backstepping with a s......Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a novel approach to control of induction motors is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear controller for the torque and the amplitude of the field. A combination of nonlinear damping and observer backstepping...

  3. Backstepping Strategy for Induction Motor Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    2000-01-01

    Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a novel approach to control of induction motors is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear controller for the torque and the amplitude of the field. A combination of nonlinear damping and observer backstepping...... with a simple flux observer is used in the design. Assuming known motor parameters the design achieves stability with guaranteed region of attraction. It is also shown how a conventional field oriented controller may be obtained by omitting parts of the nonlinear controller....

  4. The SM-200 step motor control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main nodes of the stand for testing and modeling solenoid coils, which define the focus of the beam of charged particles in the accelerator LUE-200 (IREN), is a device for positioning Hall sensors (HS). The mechanism of movement of the platform where HS are installed is activated by the step motor. This paper describes the control device of the step motor SM-200

  5. Perinatal Development of the Motor Systems Involved in Postural Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Vinay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor behaviors of some species, such as the rat and the human baby, are quite immature at birth. Here we review recent data on some of the mechanisms underlying the postnatal maturation of posture in the rat, in particular the development of pathways descending from the brain stem and projecting onto the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord. A short-lasting depletion in serotonin affects both posture and the excitability of motoneurons. Here we try to extrapolate to human development and suggest that the abnormalities in motor control observed in childhood—e.g, deficits in motor coordination—might have their roots in the prenatal period, in particular serotonin depletion due to exposure to several environmental and toxicological factors during pregnancy.

  6. Training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas eSpierer; Camille eChavan; Aurelie Lynn Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control, the ability to suppress ongoing or planned motor or cognitive processes, contribute to many psychiatric and neurological disorders. The rehabilitation of inhibition-related disorders may therefore benefit from neuroplasticity-based training protocols aiming at normalizing inhibitory control proficiency and the underlying brain networks. Current literature on training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control suggests that improvements may fo...

  7. Electroencephalographic Motor Imagery Brain Connectivity Analysis for BCI: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Mahyar; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Noor, Alias Mohd

    2016-06-01

    Recent research has reached a consensus on the feasibility of motor imagery brain-computer interface (MI-BCI) for different applications, especially in stroke rehabilitation. Most MI-BCI systems rely on temporal, spectral, and spatial features of single channels to distinguish different MI patterns. However, no successful communication has been established for a completely locked-in subject. To provide more useful and informative features, it has been recommended to take into account the relationships among electroencephalographic (EEG) sensor/source signals in the form of brain connectivity as an efficient tool of neuroscience. In this review, we briefly report the challenges and limitations of conventional MI-BCIs. Brain connectivity analysis, particularly functional and effective, has been described as one of the most promising approaches for improving MI-BCI performance. An extensive literature on EEG-based MI brain connectivity analysis of healthy subjects is reviewed. We subsequently discuss the brain connectomes during left and right hand, feet, and tongue MI movements. Moreover, key components involved in brain connectivity analysis that considerably affect the results are explained. Finally, possible technical shortcomings that may have influenced the results in previous research are addressed and suggestions are provided. PMID:27137671

  8. Deep networks for motor control functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max eBerniker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body’s state (forward and inverse models, and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories with a function; a representation across space and time. Since the output of this function includes time, it necessarily requires more parameters than a typical dynamical model. To avoid the problems of local minima these extra parameters introduce, we exploit recent advances in machine learning to build our function using a stacked autoencoder, or deep network. With initial and target states as inputs, this deep network can be trained to output an accurate temporal profile of the optimal command and state trajectory for a point-to-point reach of a nonlinear limb model, even when influenced by varying force fields. In a manner that mirrors motor babble, the network can also teach itself to learn through trial and error. Lastly, we demonstrate how this network can learn to optimize a cost objective. This functional approach to motor control is a sharp departure from the standard dynamical approach, and may offer new insights into the neural implementation of motor control.

  9. Deep networks for motor control functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berniker, Max; Kording, Konrad P

    2015-01-01

    The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body's state (forward and inverse models), and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories with a function; a representation across space and time. Since the output of this function includes time, it necessarily requires more parameters than a typical dynamical model. To avoid the problems of local minima these extra parameters introduce, we exploit recent advances in machine learning to build our function using a stacked autoencoder, or deep network. With initial and target states as inputs, this deep network can be trained to output an accurate temporal profile of the optimal command and state trajectory for a point-to-point reach of a non-linear limb model, even when influenced by varying force fields. In a manner that mirrors motor babble, the network can also teach itself to learn through trial and error. Lastly, we demonstrate how this network can learn to optimize a cost objective. This functional approach to motor control is a sharp departure from the standard dynamical approach, and may offer new insights into the neural implementation of motor control. PMID:25852530

  10. Digital Signal Controller Based Digital Control of Brushless DC Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Elizabeth Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the digital control of a brushless dc (BLDC motor using TMS320F2812 DSP controller and an EPROM. The real-time control of electrical motors is an application area that is not usually the domain of Digital Signal Processors. The TMS320F2812 has got dedicated modules for digital motor control. Control algorithms used for the control has been in TMS320F2812 DSP controller. The output of the driver is 6 independent PWM pulses that have to be given to the corresponding gates of the six MOSFETs power switches used in the three-phase bridge driving circuit whose output is given to the stator of the Brushless DC Motor. The commutation technique used in this work is the trapezoidal commutation owing to its excellent speed and current control and it has been implemented using an EPROM

  11. Motor Skill Acquisition Promotes Human Brain Myelin Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Bimal; Borich, Michael R; Jackson, Jacob N; Wadden, Katie P; Peters, Sue; Villamayor, Anica; MacKay, Alex L; Vavasour, Irene M; Rauscher, Alexander; Boyd, Lara A

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent structural changes are widely evident in gray matter. Using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), the neuroplastic effect of motor training on white matter in the brain has been demonstrated. However, in humans it is not known whether specific features of white matter relate to motor skill acquisition or if these structural changes are associated to functional network connectivity. Myelin can be objectively quantified in vivo and used to index specific experience-dependent change. In the current study, seventeen healthy young adults completed ten sessions of visuomotor skill training (10,000 total movements) using the right arm. Multicomponent relaxation imaging was performed before and after training. Significant increases in myelin water fraction, a quantitative measure of myelin, were observed in task dependent brain regions (left intraparietal sulcus [IPS] and left parieto-occipital sulcus). In addition, the rate of motor skill acquisition and overall change in myelin water fraction in the left IPS were negatively related, suggesting that a slower rate of learning resulted in greater neuroplastic change. This study provides the first evidence for experience-dependent changes in myelin that are associated with changes in skilled movements in healthy young adults. PMID:27293906

  12. Motor Skill Acquisition Promotes Human Brain Myelin Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimal Lakhani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience-dependent structural changes are widely evident in gray matter. Using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, the neuroplastic effect of motor training on white matter in the brain has been demonstrated. However, in humans it is not known whether specific features of white matter relate to motor skill acquisition or if these structural changes are associated to functional network connectivity. Myelin can be objectively quantified in vivo and used to index specific experience-dependent change. In the current study, seventeen healthy young adults completed ten sessions of visuomotor skill training (10,000 total movements using the right arm. Multicomponent relaxation imaging was performed before and after training. Significant increases in myelin water fraction, a quantitative measure of myelin, were observed in task dependent brain regions (left intraparietal sulcus [IPS] and left parieto-occipital sulcus. In addition, the rate of motor skill acquisition and overall change in myelin water fraction in the left IPS were negatively related, suggesting that a slower rate of learning resulted in greater neuroplastic change. This study provides the first evidence for experience-dependent changes in myelin that are associated with changes in skilled movements in healthy young adults.

  13. Motor Skill Acquisition Promotes Human Brain Myelin Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Bimal; Borich, Michael R.; Jackson, Jacob N.; Wadden, Katie P.; Peters, Sue; Villamayor, Anica; MacKay, Alex L.; Vavasour, Irene M.; Rauscher, Alexander; Boyd, Lara A.

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent structural changes are widely evident in gray matter. Using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), the neuroplastic effect of motor training on white matter in the brain has been demonstrated. However, in humans it is not known whether specific features of white matter relate to motor skill acquisition or if these structural changes are associated to functional network connectivity. Myelin can be objectively quantified in vivo and used to index specific experience-dependent change. In the current study, seventeen healthy young adults completed ten sessions of visuomotor skill training (10,000 total movements) using the right arm. Multicomponent relaxation imaging was performed before and after training. Significant increases in myelin water fraction, a quantitative measure of myelin, were observed in task dependent brain regions (left intraparietal sulcus [IPS] and left parieto-occipital sulcus). In addition, the rate of motor skill acquisition and overall change in myelin water fraction in the left IPS were negatively related, suggesting that a slower rate of learning resulted in greater neuroplastic change. This study provides the first evidence for experience-dependent changes in myelin that are associated with changes in skilled movements in healthy young adults. PMID:27293906

  14. Lost for emotion words: what motor and limbic brain activity reveals about autism and semantic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Rachel L; Shtyrov, Yury; Mohr, Bettina; Lombardo, Michael V; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are characterised by deficits in understanding and expressing emotions and are frequently accompanied by alexithymia, a difficulty in understanding and expressing emotion words. Words are differentially represented in the brain according to their semantic category and these difficulties in ASC predict reduced activation to emotion-related words in limbic structures crucial for affective processing. Semantic theories view 'emotion actions' as critical for learning the semantic relationship between a word and the emotion it describes, such that emotion words typically activate the cortical motor systems involved in expressing emotion actions such as facial expressions. As ASC are also characterised by motor deficits and atypical brain structure and function in these regions, motor structures would also be expected to show reduced activation during emotion-semantic processing. Here we used event-related fMRI to compare passive processing of emotion words in comparison to abstract verbs and animal names in typically-developing controls and individuals with ASC. Relatively reduced brain activation in ASC for emotion words, but not matched control words, was found in motor areas and cingulate cortex specifically. The degree of activation evoked by emotion words in the motor system was also associated with the extent of autistic traits as revealed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient. We suggest that hypoactivation of motor and limbic regions for emotion word processing may underlie difficulties in processing emotional language in ASC. The role that sensorimotor systems and their connections might play in the affective and social-communication difficulties in ASC is discussed.

  15. Brain versus Machine Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Carmena

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Octopus, the villain of the movie "Spiderman 2", is a fusion of man and machine. Neuroscientist Jose Carmena examines the facts behind this fictional account of a brain- machine interface

  16. Sliding Mode Control of Induction Motor Phase Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, R.B.; Hattel, T.; Bork, J;

    1995-01-01

    Sliding mode control of induction motor phase currents are investigated through development of two control concepts.......Sliding mode control of induction motor phase currents are investigated through development of two control concepts....

  17. Speed Control of BLDC Motor Using DSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.MadhusudhanaRao

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed the speed control of brushless dc motor drive employing PWM technique using TMS320F240 digital signal processor. BLDC is widely used because of its high mechanical power density, simplicity and cost effectiveness. The complete controller for BLDC is developed using TMS 320F240 digital signal processor, which has thespecial features for digital motor control. A mathematical model of the drive system is developed to analyze the performance of the proposed drive. The hall sensor signals are used to sense the rotor position. A shunt resistor is used to sense the actual current entering into the motor. These hall signals, phase current sensing signal and the speed command are the input to the DSP. Both the outer velocity control loop and inner current control loop uses PI controller that has been implemented by programming in TMS320F240 DSP processor [8]. According to the input command, feedback command andcontrol algorithm, the PWM pulses for each phase generated by the DSP is given to IGBT driver. The output of the driver is 6 independent PWM pulses that have to be given to the corresponding gate of the six IGBTs power switches used in the three-phase bridge inverter whose output is given to the stator of the BLDC motor. The drive performance is studied for starting, speed reversal and load perturbation.

  18. Representation and control in closed-loop brain-machine interface systems

    OpenAIRE

    Moorman, Helene

    2015-01-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) systems attempt to restore motor function lost due to injury or neurodegenerative disease by bypassing natural motor pathways and allowing direct neural control of a movement actuator. Such systems also hold promise for investigating questions about learning and motor control in a highly controlled and observable system. Here we utilize a BMI paradigm in which single unit neural spiking activity recorded from motor cortical areas in non-human primates is used to ...

  19. Serotonergic modulation of spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie; Cotel, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine that powerfully modulates spinal motor control by acting on intrasynaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. Here we review the diversity of 5-HT actions on locomotor and motoneuronal activities. Two approaches have been used on in vitro spinal cord preparations: either ...... and promotes the excitability of motoneurons, while stronger release inhibits rhythmic activity and motoneuron firing. This latter effect is responsible for central fatigue and secures rotation of motor units.......Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine that powerfully modulates spinal motor control by acting on intrasynaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. Here we review the diversity of 5-HT actions on locomotor and motoneuronal activities. Two approaches have been used on in vitro spinal cord preparations: either...

  20. A comparison of different models with motor dysfunction after traumatic brain injury in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Pu, Hongjian; Liu, Yingchao; Wang, Zengtao; Wang, Bomin; Xu, Wendong

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity of the model that could produce reproducible and persistent motor weakness and define the accurate tasks and testing parameters for longitudinal assessment of neurological deficits after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We compared the effects of two rat models that suffered different controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury, as well as extensive motor cortex resection model, on behavior recovery and brain morphology. Behavioral tests including the skilled reaching task, limb-use asymmetry test and the grasping test were employed to evaluate neurofunctional recovery from pre- to 12 weeks after the injury. The results demonstrated that all the rats in four groups showed spontaneous functional improvement with the past of time after surgery, especially in rats with mild and moderate CCI injury. At the end of the experiment, the animals' performance reached preoperative base lines on reaching task and limb-use asymmetry test in mild and moderate groups, while severe motor weakness could be observed in rats with severe CCI injury, as well as rats with extended motor cortex resection. Overall, the results of this study indicated that both models with severe CCI injury and extended resection of the motor cortex developed reproducible and long-lasting motor weakness, comparable in severity and duration and identified skilled reaching task, as well as limb-use asymmetry test, as sensitive assessments for slight neurological deficits after brain injury. This will help to provide the basis for further research of the processes after the TBI and development of novel therapies. PMID:25385190

  1. Arm coordination in octopus crawling involves unique motor control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Guy; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2015-05-01

    To cope with the exceptional computational complexity that is involved in the control of its hyper-redundant arms [1], the octopus has adopted unique motor control strategies in which the central brain activates rather autonomous motor programs in the elaborated peripheral nervous system of the arms [2, 3]. How octopuses coordinate their eight long and flexible arms in locomotion is still unknown. Here, we present the first detailed kinematic analysis of octopus arm coordination in crawling. The results are surprising in several respects: (1) despite its bilaterally symmetrical body, the octopus can crawl in any direction relative to its body orientation; (2) body and crawling orientation are monotonically and independently controlled; and (3) contrasting known animal locomotion, octopus crawling lacks any apparent rhythmical patterns in limb coordination, suggesting a unique non-rhythmical output of the octopus central controller. We show that this uncommon maneuverability is derived from the radial symmetry of the arms around the body and the simple pushing-by-elongation mechanism by which the arms create the crawling thrust. These two together enable a mechanism whereby the central controller chooses in a moment-to-moment fashion which arms to recruit for pushing the body in an instantaneous direction. Our findings suggest that the soft molluscan body has affected in an embodied way [4, 5] the emergence of the adaptive motor behavior of the octopus.

  2. Basal ganglia contributions to motor control: a vigorous tutor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert S; Desmurget, Michel

    2010-12-01

    The roles of the basal ganglia (BG) in motor control are much debated. Many influential hypotheses have grown from studies in which output signals of the BG were not blocked, but pathologically disturbed. A weakness of that approach is that the resulting behavioral impairments reflect degraded function of the BG per se mixed together with secondary dysfunctions of BG-recipient brain areas. To overcome that limitation, several studies have focused on the main skeletomotor output region of the BG, the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Using single-cell recording and inactivation protocols these studies provide consistent support for two hypotheses: the BG modulates movement performance ('vigor') according to motivational factors (i.e. context-specific cost/reward functions) and the BG contributes to motor learning. Results from these studies also add to the problems that confront theories positing that the BG selects movement, inhibits unwanted motor responses, corrects errors on-line, or stores and produces well-learned motor skills. PMID:20850966

  3. Integrated Control of Axonemal Dynein AAA+ Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Axonemal dyneins are AAA+ enzymes that convert ATP hydrolysis to mechanical work. This leads to the sliding of doublet microtubules with respect to each other and ultimately the generation of ciliary/flagellar beating. However, in order for useful work to be generated, the action of individual dynein motors must be precisely controlled. In addition, cells modulate the motility of these organelles through a variety of second messenger systems and these signals too must be integrated by the dynein motors to yield an appropriate output. This review describes the current status of efforts to understand dynein control mechanisms and their connectivity focusing mainly on studies of the outer dynein arm from axonemes of the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas. PMID:22406539

  4. Brain Connectomics’ Modification to Clarify Motor and Nonmotor Features of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Serra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adult form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 presents with paradoxical inconsistencies between severity of brain damage, relative preservation of cognition, and failure in everyday life. This study, based on the assessment of brain connectivity and mechanisms of plasticity, aimed at reconciling these conflicting issues. Resting-state functional MRI and graph theoretical methods of analysis were used to assess brain topological features in a large cohort of patients with DM1. Patients, compared to controls, revealed reduced connectivity in a large frontoparietal network that correlated with their isolated impairment in visuospatial reasoning. Despite a global preservation of the topological properties, peculiar patterns of frontal disconnection and increased parietal-cerebellar connectivity were also identified in patients’ brains. The balance between loss of connectivity and compensatory mechanisms in different brain networks might explain the paradoxical mismatch between structural brain damage and minimal cognitive deficits observed in these patients. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of brain abnormalities that fit well with both motor and nonmotor clinical features experienced by patients in their everyday life. The current findings suggest that measures of functional connectivity may offer the possibility of characterizing individual patients with the potential to become a clinical tool.

  5. Neurological rehabilitation of stroke patients via motor imaginary-based brain-computer interface technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyu Sun; Yang Xiang; Mingdao Yang

    2011-01-01

    The present study utilized motor imaginary-based brain-computer interface technology combined with rehabilitation training in 20 stroke patients. Results from the Berg Balance Scale and the Holden Walking Classification were significantly greater at 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.01), which suggested that motor imaginary-based brain-computer interface technology improved balance and walking in stroke patients.

  6. Motor imagery and EEG-based control of spelling devices and neuroprostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuper, Christa; Müller-Putz, Gernot R; Scherer, Reinhold; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    2006-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) transforms signals originating from the human brain into commands that can control devices or applications. With this, a BCI provides a new non-muscular communication channel, which can be used to assist patients who have highly compromised motor functions. The Graz-BCI uses motor imagery and associated oscillatory EEG signals from the sensorimotor cortex for device control. As a result of research in the past 15 years, the classification of ERD/ERS patterns in single EEG trials during motor execution and motor imagery forms the basis of this sensorimotor-rhythm controlled BCI. The major frequency bands of cortical oscillations considered here are the 8-13 and 15-30 Hz bands. This chapter describes the basic methods used in Graz-BCI research and outlines possible clinical applications. PMID:17071244

  7. An adaptive filter bank for motor imagery based Brain Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kavitha P; Guan, Cuntai; Tong, Lau Chiew; Prasad, Vinod A

    2008-01-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) provides an alternative communication and control method for people with severe motor disabilities. Motor imagery patterns are widely used in Electroencephalogram (EEG) based BCIs. These motor imagery activities are associated with variation in alpha and beta band power of EEG signals called Event Related Desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS). The dominant frequency bands are subject-specific and therefore performance of motor imagery based BCIs are sensitive to both temporal filtering and spatial filtering. As the optimum filter is strongly subject-dependent, we propose a method that selects the subject-specific discriminative frequency components using time-frequency plots of Fisher ratio of two-class motor imagery patterns. We also propose a low complexity adaptive Finite Impulse Response (FIR) filter bank system based on coefficient decimation technique which can realize the subject-specific bandpass filters adaptively depending on the information of Fisher ratio map. Features are extracted only from the selected frequency components. The proposed adaptive filter bank based system offers average classification accuracy of about 90%, which is slightly better than the existing fixed filter bank system. PMID:19162856

  8. Using non-invasive brain stimulation to augment motor training-induced plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual-Leone Alvaro; Bolognini Nadia; Fregni Felipe

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Therapies for motor recovery after stroke or traumatic brain injury are still not satisfactory. To date the best approach seems to be the intensive physical therapy. However the results are limited and functional gains are often minimal. The goal of motor training is to minimize functional disability and optimize functional motor recovery. This is thought to be achieved by modulation of plastic changes in the brain. Therefore, adjunct interventions that can augment the response of th...

  9. Energy Optimal Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Flemming

    purpose is demonstrate how this can be done for low-cost PWM-VSI drives without bringing the robustness of the drive below an acceptable level. Four drives are investigated with respect to energy optimal control: 2.2 kW standard and high-efficiency motor drives, 22 kW and 90 kW standard motor drives...... strategies by different steady-state calculations. Several control strategies were implemented and tested on a 2.2 kW scalar drive, both with respect to steady-state efficiency, convergence time in case of changing load, response to a large sudden load disturbance, and energy consumption in a realistic pump...... system. The dynamic performances were also evaluated in a vector controlled drive for CT applications. Based on these tests, the displacement power factor control and the direct air-gap flux control appeared to be best for small HVAC applications. Energy optimal control of medium-size drives was analyzed...

  10. Research on DSP-based Asynchronous Motor Control Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Motor in a variety of electrical transmission and position servo system occupies an extremely important position. After the DSP technology being applied to the motor control, the unification of the hardware and the flexibility of the software can be combined. Take the brushless DC motor for example, studied the mathematical model and the structure of the motor control system, also obtained the design scheme of the DSP-based asynchronous motor control system. With TI's 32 bit fixed point DSPTMS320F2812 as the core design of the hardware system, we wrote the system software, debug the motor control system and the results show that the system achieves the expected effect. The results of the research can be applied to brushless DC motor and other motor control, it will have a wide application prospects.

  11. Permanent magnet brushless DC motor drives and controls

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Chang-liang

    2012-01-01

    An advanced introduction to the simulation and hardware implementation of BLDC motor drives A thorough reference on the simulation and hardware implementation of BLDC motor drives, this book covers recent advances in the control of BLDC motor drives, including intelligent control, sensorless control, torque ripple reduction and hardware implementation. With the guidance of the expert author team, readers will understand the principle, modelling, design and control of BLDC motor drives. The advanced control methods and new achievements of BLDC motor drives, of interest to more a

  12. Permanent magnet brushless motor control based on ADRC

    OpenAIRE

    Li Xiaokun; Wang Song; Wang XiaoFan; Shi Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Permanent magnet brushless motor is a nonlinear system with multiple variables, the mathematical model of Permanent magnet brushless motor is difficult to establish, and since that the classic PID control is hard to precisely control the motor. Active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) technique is a new nonlinear controller which does not depend on the system model. It is starting from the classic PID control, and establishing the loop control system by error negative feedback, the ESO(ext...

  13. Improved Rotor Speed Brushless DC Motor Using Fuzzy Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Mostafapour

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A brushless DC (BLDC Motors have advantages over brushed, Direct current (DC Motors and , Induction motor (IM. They have better speed verses torque characteristics, high dynamic response, high efficiency, long operating life, noiseless operation, higher speed ranges, and rugged construction. Also, torque delivered to motor size is higher, making it useful in application where space and weight are critical factors. With these advantages BLDC motors find wide spread application in automotive appliance, aerospace medical, and instrumentation and automation industries This paper can be seen as fuzzy controllers compared to PI control BLDC motor rotor speed has improved significantly and beter result can be achieve.

  14. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation does not improve visuo-motor impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D Israeli-Korn

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate how bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS affects visuo-motor coordination (VMC in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. BACKGROUND: VMC involves multi-sensory integration, motor planning, executive function and attention. VMC deficits are well-described in PD. STN-DBS conveys marked motor benefit in PD, but pyscho-cognitive complications are recognized and the effect on VMC is not known. METHODS: Thirteen PD patients with bilateral STN-DBS underwent neurological, cognitive, and mood assessment before VMC testing with optimal DBS stimulation parameters ('on-stimulation' and then, on the same day without any medication changes, after DBS silencing and establishing motor function deterioration ('off-stimulation'. Twelve age-matched healthy controls performed 2 successive VMC testing sessions, with a break of similar duration to that of the PD group. The computer cursor was controlled with a dome-shaped 'mouse' hidden from view that minimized tremor effects. Movement duration, hand velocity, tracking continuity, directional control variables, and feedback utilization variables were measured. MANOVA was performed on (1 clinically measured motor function, (2 VMC performance and (3 mood and attention, looking for main and interaction effects of: (1 group (controls/PD, (2 test-order (controls: first/second, PD: on-stimulation/off-stimulation, (3 path (sine/square/circle and (4 hand (dominant/non-dominant. RESULTS: Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS Part III worsened off-stimulation versus on-stimulation (mean: 42.3 versus 21.6, p = 0.02, as did finger tapping (p = 0.02, posture-gait (p = 0.01, upper limb function (p<0.001 and backwards digit span (p = 0.02. Stimulation state did not affect mood. PD patients performed worse in non-velocity related VMC variables than controls (F(5,18 = 8.5, p<0.001. In the control group there were significant main effects of hand (dominant/non-dominant, path

  15. Comparison On Sensorless Control Of Synchronous Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu KREINDLER

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper compares two different methods for speed and position estimation in AC permanent magnet synchronous motors vector control applications. The first method implies two observer blocks — one for the speed, and the other for the electrical position, using the voltage equations in the (d,q reference frames. The second method estimates the same variables starting from the calculation of instantaneous reactive power. The tests have proved excellent behaviour in steady state (method 1 as well as in transient state (method 2. The implementation has been made on the 16 bits fixed-point DSP - TMS320F240 from Texas Instruments.

  16. Bipolar electrode selection for a motor imagery based brain computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Bin; Hong, Bo; Gao, Xiaorong; Gao, Shangkai

    2008-09-01

    A motor imagery based brain-computer interface (BCI) provides a non-muscular communication channel that enables people with paralysis to control external devices using their motor imagination. Reducing the number of electrodes is critical to improving the portability and practicability of the BCI system. A novel method is proposed to reduce the number of electrodes to a total of four by finding the optimal positions of two bipolar electrodes. Independent component analysis (ICA) is applied to find the source components of mu and alpha rhythms, and optimal electrodes are chosen by comparing the projection weights of sources on each channel. The results of eight subjects demonstrate the better classification performance of the optimal layout compared with traditional layouts, and the stability of this optimal layout over a one week interval was further verified.

  17. The effects of voluntary, involuntary, and forced exercises on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and motor function recovery: a rat brain ischemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stroke rehabilitation with different exercise paradigms has been investigated, but which one is more effective in facilitating motor recovery and up-regulating brain neurotrophic factor (BDNF after brain ischemia would be interesting to clinicians and patients. Voluntary exercise, forced exercise, and involuntary muscle movement caused by functional electrical stimulation (FES have been individually demonstrated effective as stroke rehabilitation intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of these three common interventions on brain BDNF changes and motor recovery levels using a rat ischemic stroke model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One hundred and seventeen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly distributed into four groups: Control (Con, Voluntary exercise of wheel running (V-Ex, Forced exercise of treadmill running (F-Ex, and Involuntary exercise of FES (I-Ex with implanted electrodes placed in two hind limb muscles on the affected side to mimic gait-like walking pattern during stimulation. Ischemic stroke was induced in all rats with the middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion model and fifty-seven rats had motor deficits after stroke. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, rats were arranged to their intervention programs. De Ryck's behavioral test was conducted daily during the 7-day intervention as an evaluation tool of motor recovery. Serum corticosterone concentration and BDNF levels in the hippocampus, striatum, and cortex were measured after the rats were sacrificed. V-Ex had significantly better motor recovery in the behavioral test. V-Ex also had significantly higher hippocampal BDNF concentration than F-Ex and Con. F-Ex had significantly higher serum corticosterone level than other groups. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Voluntary exercise is the most effective intervention in upregulating the hippocampal BDNF level, and facilitating motor recovery. Rats that exercised voluntarily also showed less

  18. Functional and Structural Brain Plasticity Enhanced by Motor and Cognitive Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Prosperini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation is recognized to be important in ameliorating motor and cognitive functions, reducing disease burden, and improving quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. In this systematic review, we summarize the existing evidences that motor and cognitive rehabilitation may enhance functional and structural brain plasticity in patients with MS, as assessed by means of the most advanced neuroimaging techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging and task-related and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In most cases, the rehabilitation program was based on computer-assisted/video game exercises performed in either an outpatient or home setting. Despite their heterogeneity, all the included studies describe changes in white matter microarchitecture, in task-related activation, and/or in functional connectivity following both task-oriented and selective training. When explored, relevant correlation between improved function and MRI-detected brain changes was often found, supporting the hypothesis that training-induced brain plasticity is specifically linked to the trained domain. Small sample sizes, lack of randomization and/or an active control group, as well as missed relationship between MRI-detected changes and clinical performance, are the major drawbacks of the selected studies. Knowledge gaps in this field of research are also discussed to provide a framework for future investigations.

  19. Functional and Structural Brain Plasticity Enhanced by Motor and Cognitive Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperini, Luca; Piattella, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Rehabilitation is recognized to be important in ameliorating motor and cognitive functions, reducing disease burden, and improving quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In this systematic review, we summarize the existing evidences that motor and cognitive rehabilitation may enhance functional and structural brain plasticity in patients with MS, as assessed by means of the most advanced neuroimaging techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging and task-related and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases, the rehabilitation program was based on computer-assisted/video game exercises performed in either an outpatient or home setting. Despite their heterogeneity, all the included studies describe changes in white matter microarchitecture, in task-related activation, and/or in functional connectivity following both task-oriented and selective training. When explored, relevant correlation between improved function and MRI-detected brain changes was often found, supporting the hypothesis that training-induced brain plasticity is specifically linked to the trained domain. Small sample sizes, lack of randomization and/or an active control group, as well as missed relationship between MRI-detected changes and clinical performance, are the major drawbacks of the selected studies. Knowledge gaps in this field of research are also discussed to provide a framework for future investigations. PMID:26064692

  20. Evidence suggesting individual ocular motor control of each eye (muscle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, L F

    1994-01-01

    Current models of the ocular motor system are usually presented in their most reduced form, are unilateral in architecture, and precise yoking is presumed. Although this simplifies the models, it does not accurately simulate the actual neuroanatomy and limits the models to simple, stereotyped responses. Studies of normal humans and monkeys have demonstrated striking disconjugacies in normal responses. Normal saccades may be disconjugate, or 1 eye may exhibit a dynamic overshoot. Asymmetric vergence can result in disconjugate saccades, unequal magnification spectacles cause differential saccadic gain adjustment, and saccades to unequal disparities also cause unequal saccades in the 2 eyes. In strabismus, deviated eyes typically do not mimic the movements of the fixating eye nor do their latent or congenital nystagmus waveforms duplicate those of the fixating eye. In spasmus nutans, each eye oscillates independently of the other. In achiasmatic dogs, uni-ocular saccades and uni-ocular nystagmus waveforms are seen; the same may be true in human achiasma. These data from both normals and those with abnormalities suggest that current models for ocular motor control are inadequate representations of the actual system. The inability of unilateral, yoked control (or even bilateral, yoked control) system models to duplicate the ocular motor responses of binocular mammals suggests that their ocular motor systems evolved from the bilateral, independent control systems seen in chameleons. One need only postulate a yoking overlay superimposed on two independent control systems to achieve conjugacy (bilateral, yoked, independent control) of the eyes. Abnormalities producing grossly disconjugate eye movements may then be simulated using the independent control of each eye released by a deficiency in the yoking overlay. Independent control of each eye coupled with the essential bilateral brain stem architecture implies that each individual muscle is driven by independent

  1. Voice-Based Control of a DC Servo Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaab Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Motors play a very important role in our life and among which is the DC servo motors. The techniques of controlling these DC motors are plenty, among which is sound. In this study, a voce-based technique was implemented to control the speed and the direction of rotation for a DC motor. Approach: A Microcontroller-based electronic control circuit was designed and implemented to achieve this goal. Results: The speed of the motor was controlled, in both directions, using pulse width modulation and a microcontroller was used to generate the right signal to be applied to the motor. Conclusion: The loudness of human voice was successfully divided into different levels where each level drives the motor at different speed."

  2. Patterns of regional brain activation associated with different forms of motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilardi, M; Ghez, C; Dhawan, V; Moeller, J; Mentis, M; Nakamura, T; Antonini, A; Eidelberg, D

    2000-07-14

    To examine the variations in regional cerebral blood flow during execution and learning of reaching movements, we employed a family of kinematically and dynamically controlled motor tasks in which cognitive, mnemonic and executive features of performance were differentiated and characterized quantitatively. During 15O-labeled water positron emission tomography (PET) scans, twelve right-handed subjects moved their dominant hand on a digitizing tablet from a central location to equidistant targets displayed with a cursor on a computer screen in synchrony with a tone. In the preceding week, all subjects practiced three motor tasks: 1) movements to a predictable sequence of targets; 2) learning of new visuomotor transformations in which screen cursor motion was rotated by 30 degrees -60 degrees; 3) learning new target sequences by trial and error, by using previously acquired routines in a task placing heavy load on spatial working memory. The control condition was observing screen and audio displays. Subtraction images were analyzed with Statistical Parametric Mapping to identify significant brain activation foci. Execution of predictable sequences was characterized by a modest decrease in movement time and spatial error. The underlying pattern of activation involved primary motor and sensory areas, cerebellum, basal ganglia. Adaptation to a rotated reference frame, a form of procedural learning, was associated with decrease in the imposed directional bias. This task was associated with activation in the right posterior parietal cortex. New sequences were learned explicitly. Significant activation was found in dorsolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. In this study, we have introduced a series of flexible motor tasks with similar kinematic characteristics and different spatial attributes. These tasks can be used to assess specific aspects of motor learning with imaging in health and disease. PMID:10882792

  3. Recovery of post stroke proximal arm function, driven by complex neuroplastic bilateral brain activation patterns and predicted by baseline motor dysfunction severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana ePundik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Neuroplastic changes that drive recovery of shoulder/elbow function after stoke have been poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between neuroplastic brain changes related to shoulder/elbow movement control in response to treatment and recovery of arm motor function in chronic stroke survivors. Methods: Twenty-three chronic stroke survivors were treated with 12 weeks of arm rehabilitation. Outcome measures included functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI for the shoulder/elbow components of reach and a skilled motor function test (Arm Motor Abilities Test (AMAT, collected before and after treatment.Results: We observed two patterns of neuroplastic changes that were associated with gains in motor function: decreased or increased task-related brain activation. Those with significantly better motor function at baseline exhibited a decrease in brain activation in response to treatment, evident in the ipsilesional primary motor and contralesional supplementary motor regions; in contrast, those with greater baseline motor impairment, exhibited increased brain activation in response to treatment. There was an linear relationship between greater functional gain (AMAT and increased activation in bilateral primary motor, contralesional primary and secondary sensory regions, and contralesional lateral premotor area, after adjusting for baseline AMAT, age, and time since stroke. Conclusions: Recovery of functional reach involves recruitment of several contralesional and bilateral primary motor regions. In response to intensive therapy, the direction of functional brain change (i.e. increase or decrease in task-related brain recruitment for shoulder/elbow reach components depends on baseline level of motor function and may represent either different phases or different strategies of neuroplasticity that drive functional recovery.

  4. Comparing Different Classifiers in Sensory Motor Brain Computer Interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bashashati

    Full Text Available A problem that impedes the progress in Brain-Computer Interface (BCI research is the difficulty in reproducing the results of different papers. Comparing different algorithms at present is very difficult. Some improvements have been made by the use of standard datasets to evaluate different algorithms. However, the lack of a comparison framework still exists. In this paper, we construct a new general comparison framework to compare different algorithms on several standard datasets. All these datasets correspond to sensory motor BCIs, and are obtained from 21 subjects during their operation of synchronous BCIs and 8 subjects using self-paced BCIs. Other researchers can use our framework to compare their own algorithms on their own datasets. We have compared the performance of different popular classification algorithms over these 29 subjects and performed statistical tests to validate our results. Our findings suggest that, for a given subject, the choice of the classifier for a BCI system depends on the feature extraction method used in that BCI system. This is in contrary to most of publications in the field that have used Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA as the classifier of choice for BCI systems.

  5. Comparing Different Classifiers in Sensory Motor Brain Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Hossein; Ward, Rabab K; Birch, Gary E; Bashashati, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A problem that impedes the progress in Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research is the difficulty in reproducing the results of different papers. Comparing different algorithms at present is very difficult. Some improvements have been made by the use of standard datasets to evaluate different algorithms. However, the lack of a comparison framework still exists. In this paper, we construct a new general comparison framework to compare different algorithms on several standard datasets. All these datasets correspond to sensory motor BCIs, and are obtained from 21 subjects during their operation of synchronous BCIs and 8 subjects using self-paced BCIs. Other researchers can use our framework to compare their own algorithms on their own datasets. We have compared the performance of different popular classification algorithms over these 29 subjects and performed statistical tests to validate our results. Our findings suggest that, for a given subject, the choice of the classifier for a BCI system depends on the feature extraction method used in that BCI system. This is in contrary to most of publications in the field that have used Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) as the classifier of choice for BCI systems.

  6. Three-dimensional visualization of functional brain tissue and functional magnetic resonance imaging-integrated neuronavigation in the resection of brain tumor adjacent to motor cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the value of three -dimensional visualization of functional brain tissue and the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-integrated neuronavigation in the resection of brain tumor adjacent to motor cortex. Method: Sixty patients with tumor located in the central sulcus were enrolled. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to function group and 30 to control group. Patients in function group underwent fMRI to localize the functional brain tissues. Then the function information was transferred to the neurosurgical navigator. The patients in control group underwent surgery with navigation without function information. The therapeutic effect, excision rate. improvement of motor function, and survival quality during follow-up were analyzed. Result: All patients in function group were accomplished visualization of functional brain tissues and fMRI-integrated neuronavigation. The locations of tumors, central sulcus and motor cortex were marked during the operation. The fMRI -integrated information played a great role in both pre- and post-operation. Pre-operation: designing the location of the skin flap and window bone, determining the relationship between the tumor and motor cortex, and designing the pathway for the resection. Post- operation: real-time navigation of relationship between the tumor and motor cortex, assisting to localize the motor cortex using interoperation ultra-sound for correcting the displacement by the CSF outflow and collapsing tumor. The patients in the function group had better results than the patients in the control group in therapeutic effect (u=2.646, P=0.008), excision rate (χ=7.200, P<0.01), improvement of motor function (u=2.231, P=0.026), and survival quality (KPS uc= 2.664, P=0.008; Zubrod -ECOG -WHO uc=2.135, P=0.033). Conclusions: Using preoperative three -dimensional visualization of cerebral function tissue and the fMRI-integrated neuronavigation technology, combining intraoperative accurate positioning

  7. Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2005-09-27

    Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the

  8. Robot Control Through Brain Computer Interface For Patterns Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belluomo, P.; Bucolo, M.; Fortuna, L.; Frasca, M.

    2011-09-01

    A Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system processes and translates neuronal signals, that mainly comes from EEG instruments, into commands for controlling electronic devices. This system can allow people with motor disabilities to control external devices through the real-time modulation of their brain waves. In this context an EEG-based BCI system that allows creative luminous artistic representations is here presented. The system that has been designed and realized in our laboratory interfaces the BCI2000 platform performing real-time analysis of EEG signals with a couple of moving luminescent twin robots. Experiments are also presented.

  9. SELF CONTROL OF SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR FED BY MATRIX CONVERTER

    OpenAIRE

    CALISKAN, ABUZER; Orhan, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    In this study self control of synchronous motor fed by matrix converter was examined by developing a Matlab/simulink model. Self control of synchronous motor was performed by fixing frequency of stator voltage to rotor speed. Thus, the probable danger of asynchronism of the motor during transient operation in open loop control is removed. In the developed model, simplified Venturini modulation algorithm was used. This algorithm provides unity fundamental displacement factor at the input regar...

  10. Motor-related brain activity during action observation: a neural substrate for electrocorticographic brain-computer interfaces after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Collinger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury (SCI, motor commands from the brain are unable to reach peripheral nerves and muscles below the level of the lesion. Action observation, in which a person observes someone else performing an action, has been used to augment traditional rehabilitation paradigms. Similarly, action observation can be used to derive the relationship between brain activity and movement kinematics for a motor-based brain-computer interface (BCI even when the user cannot generate overt movements. BCIs use brain signals to control external devices to replace functions that have been lost due to SCI or other motor impairment. Previous studies have reported congruent motor cortical activity during observed and overt movements using magnetoencephalography (MEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Recent single-unit studies using intracortical microelectrodes also demonstrated that a large number of motor cortical neurons had similar firing rate patterns between overt and observed movements. Given the increasing interest in electrocorticography (ECoG-based BCIs, our goal was to identify whether action observation-related cortical activity could be recorded using ECoG during grasping tasks. Specifically, we aimed to identify congruent neural activity during observed and executed movements in both the sensorimotor rhythm (10-40 Hz and the high-gamma band (65-115 Hz which contains significant movement-related information. We observed significant motor-related high-gamma band activity during action observation in both able-bodied individuals and one participant with a complete C4 SCI. Furthermore, in able-bodied participants, both the low and high frequency bands demonstrated congruent activity between action execution and observation. Our results suggest that action observation could be an effective and critical procedure for deriving the mapping from ECoG signals to intended movement for an ECoG-based BCI system for individuals with

  11. Reliability of the Motor Learning Strategy Rating Instrument for Children and Youth with Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Trishna; Pfeifer, Megan; Banerjee-Guenette, Priyanka; Hunter, Theresa; Ito, Julia; Salbach, Nancy M.; Wright, Virginia; Levac, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate reliability and feasibility of the Motor Learning Strategy Rating Instrument (MLSRI) in children with acquired brain injury (ABI). The MLSRI quantifies the extent to which motor learning strategies (MLS) are used within physiotherapy (PT) interventions. Methods: PT sessions conducted by ABI team physiotherapists with a…

  12. Motor Control of Drosophila Courtship Song

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy R. Shirangi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many animals utilize acoustic signals—or songs—to attract mates. During courtship, Drosophila melanogaster males vibrate a wing to produce trains of pulses and extended tone, called pulse and sine song, respectively. Courtship songs in the genus Drosophila are exceedingly diverse, and different song features appear to have evolved independently of each other. How the nervous system allows such diversity to evolve is not understood. Here, we identify a wing muscle in D. melanogaster (hg1 that is uniquely male-enlarged. The hg1 motoneuron and the sexually dimorphic development of the hg1 muscle are required specifically for the sine component of the male song. In contrast, the motoneuron innervating a sexually monomorphic wing muscle, ps1, is required specifically for a feature of pulse song. Thus, individual wing motor pathways can control separate aspects of courtship song and may provide a “modular” anatomical substrate for the evolution of diverse songs.

  13. Touch Screen based Speed Control of Single Phase Induction Motor

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mallika; W. Razia Sultana; Sarat Kumar Sahoo*

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a brief idea of touch screen technology and its interfacing with a controller to control the speed of single phase induction motor. Here touch screen technology and Programmable System on Chip (PSOC) microcontroller concept is utilized which is less spaceconsumption and easy to design. The aim of this paper is to have remote sensing and speed control of an AC motor.

  14. A natural basis for efficient brain-actuated control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeig, S.; Enghoff, S.; Jung, T. P.; Sejnowski, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    The prospect of noninvasive brain-actuated control of computerized screen displays or locomotive devices is of interest to many and of crucial importance to a few 'locked-in' subjects who experience near total motor paralysis while retaining sensory and mental faculties. Currently several groups are attempting to achieve brain-actuated control of screen displays using operant conditioning of particular features of the spontaneous scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) including central mu-rhythms (9-12 Hz). A new EEG decomposition technique, independent component analysis (ICA), appears to be a foundation for new research in the design of systems for detection and operant control of endogenous EEG rhythms to achieve flexible EEG-based communication. ICA separates multichannel EEG data into spatially static and temporally independent components including separate components accounting for posterior alpha rhythms and central mu activities. We demonstrate using data from a visual selective attention task that ICA-derived mu-components can show much stronger spectral reactivity to motor events than activity measures for single scalp channels. ICA decompositions of spontaneous EEG would thus appear to form a natural basis for operant conditioning to achieve efficient and multidimensional brain-actuated control in motor-limited and locked-in subjects.

  15. CAN-based Synchronized Motion Control for Induction Motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Ren; Chun-Wen Li; De-Zong Zhao

    2009-01-01

    A control area network (CAN) based multi-motor synchronized motion control system with an advanced synchronized control strategy is proposed.The strategy is to incorporate the adjacent cross-coupling control strategy into the sliding mode control architecture. As illustrated by the four-induction-motor-based experimental results,the multi-motor synchronized motion control system,via the CAN bus,has been successfully implemented.With the employment of the advanced synchronized motion control strategy,the synchronization performance can be significantly improved.

  16. Simulation of Brushless DC Motor using Direct Torque Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs.G. Kusuma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with modelling of three phases brushless dc motor with MATLAB/SIMULINK software BLDC motor have advantages according to brushless dc motor and induction motor’s. They have improve speed torque charactistics, high efficiency high transient response and small size. It approaches for reducing the torque ripples of BLDC motor using DTC, by using control technique’s ,but present work mainly concentrate on advanced method. The whole drive system is simulated based on the system devices, BLDC motor source inverter, space vector modulation.

  17. Sensorless Speed Control of Traveling Wave Ultrasonic Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Flückiger, Markus; Bullo, Matteo; Perriard, Yves

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasonic motors are a good alternative to electromagnetic motors in medical robotics, since they are electromagnetically compatible. Estimating speed instead of using encoders reduces cost and dimension of the robot on the one hand and increases reliability on the other hand. However, no sensorless speed controller is yet industrialized. Analytical models of the traveling wave ultrasonic motor being too complex to be exploited for sensorless control purpose, we suggest speed estimation base...

  18. The influence of scopolamine on motor control and attentional processes

    OpenAIRE

    Bestaven, Emma; Kambrun, Charline; Guehl, Dominique; Cazalets, Jean-René; Guillaud, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Background: Motion sickness may be caused by a sensory conflict between the visual and the vestibular systems. Scopolamine, known to be the most effective therapy to control the vegetative symptoms of motion sickness, acts on the vestibular nucleus and potentially the vestibulospinal pathway, which may affect balance and motor tasks requiring both attentional process and motor balance. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of scopolamine on motor control and attentional processes. M...

  19. Neuronal control of turtle hindlimb motor rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, P S G

    2005-03-01

    The turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans, uses its hindlimb during the rhythmic motor behaviors of walking, swimming, and scratching. For some tasks, one or more motor strategies or forms may be produced, e.g., forward swimming or backpaddling. This review discusses experiments that reveal characteristics of the spinal neuronal networks producing these motor behaviors. Limb-movement studies show shared properties such as rhythmic alternation between hip flexion and hip extension, as well as variable properties such as the timing of knee extension in the cycle of hip movements. Motor-pattern studies show shared properties such as rhythmic alternation between hip flexor and hip extensor motor activities, as well as variable properties such as modifiable timing of knee extensor motor activity in the cycle of hip motor activity. Motor patterns also display variations such as the hip-extensor deletion of rostral scratching. Neuronal-network studies reveal mechanisms responsible for movement and motor-pattern properties. Some interneurons in the spinal cord have shared activities, e.g., each unit is active during more than one behavior, and have distinct characteristics, e.g., each unit is most excited during a specific behavior. Interneuronal recordings during variations support the concept of modular organization of central pattern generators in the spinal cord.

  20. Action sentences activate sensory motor regions in the brain independently of their status of reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vega, Manuel; León, Inmaculada; Hernández, Juan A; Valdés, Mitchell; Padrón, Iván; Ferstl, Evelyn C

    2014-07-01

    Some studies have reported that understanding concrete action-related words and sentences elicits activations of motor areas in the brain. The present fMRI study goes one step further by testing whether this is also the case for comprehension of nonfactual statements. Three linguistic structures were used (factuals, counterfactuals, and negations), referring either to actions or, as a control condition, to visual events. The results showed that action sentences elicited stronger activations than visual sentences in the SMA, extending to the primary motor area, as well as in regions generally associated with the planning and understanding of actions (left superior temporal gyrus, left and right supramarginal gyri). Also, we found stronger activations for action sentences than for visual sentences in the extrastriate body area, a region involved in the visual processing of human body movements. These action-related effects occurred not only in factuals but also in negations and counterfactuals, suggesting that brain regions involved in action understanding and planning are activated by default even when the actions are described as hypothetical or as not happening. Moreover, some of these regions overlapped with those activated during the observation of action videos, indicating that the act of understanding action language and that of observing real actions share neural networks. These results support the claim that embodied representations of linguistic meaning are important even in abstract linguistic contexts.

  1. Controlling Assistive Machines in Paralysis Using Brain Waves and Other Biosignals

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Rogério de Almeida Ribeiro; Fabricio Lima Brasil; Matthias Witkowski; Farid Shiman; Christian Cipriani; Nicola Vitiello; Maria Chiara Carrozza; Surjo Raphael Soekadar

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which humans can interact with machines significantly enhanced through inclusion of speech, gestures, and eye movements. However, these communication channels depend on a functional motor system. As many people suffer from severe damage of the motor system resulting in paralysis and inability to communicate, the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMI) that translate electric or metabolic brain activity into control signals of external devices promises to overcome this depe...

  2. Using non-invasive brain stimulation to augment motor training-induced plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascual-Leone Alvaro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Therapies for motor recovery after stroke or traumatic brain injury are still not satisfactory. To date the best approach seems to be the intensive physical therapy. However the results are limited and functional gains are often minimal. The goal of motor training is to minimize functional disability and optimize functional motor recovery. This is thought to be achieved by modulation of plastic changes in the brain. Therefore, adjunct interventions that can augment the response of the motor system to the behavioural training might be useful to enhance the therapy-induced recovery in neurological populations. In this context, noninvasive brain stimulation appears to be an interesting option as an add-on intervention to standard physical therapies. Two non-invasive methods of inducing electrical currents into the brain have proved to be promising for inducing long-lasting plastic changes in motor systems: transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. These techniques represent powerful methods for priming cortical excitability for a subsequent motor task, demand, or stimulation. Thus, their mutual use can optimize the plastic changes induced by motor practice, leading to more remarkable and outlasting clinical gains in rehabilitation. In this review we discuss how these techniques can enhance the effects of a behavioural intervention and the clinical evidence to date.

  3. Brain gray matter volume changes associated with motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dezhi Kang; Fuyong Chen; Fangyu Wang; Guorong Wu; Ying Liu; Gang Wu; Lianghong Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease.Most studies have found that the histopathological lesion is not only localized at the extrapyramidal area (basal ganglia) but also at the cortex in PD patients.Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based on the voxel as a unit is described for quantitative detection of density and volume of brain tissue.In this study,VBM was used to investigate the brain gray matter changes associated with motor symptoms in PD patients.Methods:Twelve outpatients with PD and 12 healthy controls were recruited in our hospital from September 2013 to March 2014.VBM was performed on the whole brain of all subjects.Image processing and statistical analysis were performed using SPM8.A two-sample t test and multiple regression analysis were performed.Results were displayed with a threshold of P < 0.01,corrected by false discovery rate (FDR) correction and cluster size >30 voxels.Results:Comparing control healthy subjects with the patients,the data showed that PD patients had reduced gray matter volume in the postcentral gyrus,the right supramarginal center,superior temporal gyrus,precentral gyrus,Brodmann area 41,transverse temporal gyrus,Brodmann area 3,and inferior parietal Iobule.The data also found that between gray matter volume and UPDRSIII in PD patients,there were negative correlations in the right middle frontal gyrus,BA06,right precentral gyrus,right superior frontal gyrus,and medial frontal gyrus,and between gray matter volume and Hoehn-Yahr (HY) in PD patients,there were negative correlations in the right middle frontal gyrus,right superior frontal gyrus,BA6,and right precentral gyrus.Conclusions:These data supported that extensive changes associated with motor symptoms in the gray matter volume was mainly located in the related area of movement,which had obvious relevance with the progression of PD.

  4. Pneumatic motor speed control by trajectory tracking fuzzy logic controller

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cengiz Safak; Vedat Topuz; A Fevzi Baba

    2010-02-01

    In this study, trajectory tracking fuzzy logic controller (TTFLC) is proposed for the speed control of a pneumatic motor (PM). A third order trajectory is defined to determine the trajectory function that has to be tracked by the PM speed. Genetic algorithm (GA) is used to find the TTFLC boundary values of membership functions (MF) and weights of control rules. In addition, artificial neural networks (ANN) modelled dynamic behaviour of PM is given. This ANN model is used to find the optimal TTFLC parameters by offline GA approach. The experimental results show that designed TTFLC successfully enables the PM speed track the given trajectory under various working conditions. The proposed approach is superior to PID controller. It also provides simple and easy design procedure for the PM speed control problem.

  5. AC electric motors control advanced design techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, Fouad

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of AC motor control lies in the multivariable and nonlinear nature of AC machine dynamics. Recent advancements in control theory now make it possible to deal with long-standing problems in AC motors control. This text expertly draws on these developments to apply a wide range of model-based control designmethods to a variety of AC motors. Contributions from over thirty top researchers explain how modern control design methods can be used to achieve tight speed regulation, optimal energetic efficiency, and operation reliability and safety, by considering online state var

  6. Klinefelter syndrome has increased brain responses to auditory stimuli and motor output, but not to visual stimuli or Stroop adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Wallentin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY (KS is a genetic syndrome characterized by the presence of an extra X chromosome and low level of testosterone, resulting in a number of neurocognitive abnormalities, yet little is known about brain function. This study investigated the fMRI-BOLD response from KS relative to a group of Controls to basic motor, perceptual, executive and adaptation tasks. Participants (N: KS = 49; Controls = 49 responded to whether the words “GREEN” or “RED” were displayed in green or red (incongruent versus congruent colors. One of the colors was presented three times as often as the other, making it possible to study both congruency and adaptation effects independently. Auditory stimuli saying “GREEN” or “RED” had the same distribution, making it possible to study effects of perceptual modality as well as Frequency effects across modalities. We found that KS had an increased response to motor output in primary motor cortex and an increased response to auditory stimuli in auditory cortices, but no difference in primary visual cortices. KS displayed a diminished response to written visual stimuli in secondary visual regions near the Visual Word Form Area, consistent with the widespread dyslexia in the group. No neural differences were found in inhibitory control (Stroop or in adaptation to differences in stimulus frequencies. Across groups we found a strong positive correlation between age and BOLD response in the brain's motor network with no difference between groups. No effects of testosterone level or brain volume were found. In sum, the present findings suggest that auditory and motor systems in KS are selectively affected, perhaps as a compensatory strategy, and that this is not a systemic effect as it is not seen in the visual system.

  7. Design of BLDCM Driving and Control System for Motorized Treadmill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Zhang; Hui Li; Li-Bin Wang

    2007-01-01

    To satisfy the requirement of developing a new generation of motorized treadmill for a famous domestic manufacturer, a brushless DC motor (BLDCM) driving and control system for motorized treadmill is developed. High integration and reliability of this system are ensured under the condition that intelligent power module (TPM) is used and the protection module is included. Periodic current control method is applied to reduce the average current flowing through the armature winding of the motor when the treadmill is required to start with low speed while large load is added. Piecewise proportion-integration-differentiation (PID) control algorithm is applied to solve the problem of speed fluctuation when impulse load is added. The motorized treadmill of a new generation with the driving and control system has the advantages of high reliability, good speed stability, wide timing scope, low cost, and long life-span. And it is very promising for practical applications.

  8. ARDOLORES: an Arduino based motors control system for DOLORES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Manuel; Ventura, H.; San Juan, J.; Di Fabrizio, L.

    2014-07-01

    We present ARDOLORES a custom made motor control system for the DOLORES instrument in use at the TNG telescope. ARDOLORES replaced the original PMAC based motor control system at a fraction of the cost. The whole system is composed by one master Arduino ONE with its Ethernet shield, to handle the communications with the external world through an Ethernet socket, and by one Arduino ONE with its custom motor shield for each axis to be controlled. The communication between the master and slaves Arduinos is made possible through the I2C bus. Also a Java web-service has been written to control the motors from an higher level and provides an external API for the scientific GUI. The system has been working since January 2012 handling the DOLORES motors and has demonstrated to be stable, reliable, and with easy maintenance in both the hardware and the software parts.

  9. Genetic Algorithm Based Proportional Integral Controller Design for Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanasundaram Kuppusamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study has expounded the application of evolutionary computation method namely Genetic Algorithm (GA for estimation of feedback controller parameters for induction motor. GA offers certain advantages such as simple computational steps, derivative free optimization, reduced number of iterations and assured near global optima. The development of the method is well documented and computed and measured results are presented. Approach: The design of PI controller parameter for three phase induction motor drives was done using Genetic Algorithm. The objective function of motor current reduction, using PI controller, at starting is formulated as an optimization problem and solved with Genetic Algorithm. Results: The results showed the selected values of PI controller parameter using genetic algorithm approach, with objective of induction motor starting current reduction. Conclusions/Recommendation: The results proved the robustness and easy implementation of genetic algorithm selection of PI parameters for induction motor starting.

  10. How feedback, motor imagery, and reward influence brain self-regulation using real-time fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Pradyumna; Sitaram, Ranganatha; Rana, Mohit; Montalba, Cristian; Tejos, Cristian; Ruiz, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    The learning process involved in achieving brain self-regulation is presumed to be related to several factors, such as type of feedback, reward, mental imagery, duration of training, among others. Explicitly instructing participants to use mental imagery and monetary reward are common practices in real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) neurofeedback (NF), under the assumption that they will enhance and accelerate the learning process. However, it is still not clear what the optimal strategy is for improving volitional control. We investigated the differential effect of feedback, explicit instructions and monetary reward while training healthy individuals to up-regulate the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal in the supplementary motor area (SMA). Four groups were trained in a two-day rtfMRI-NF protocol: GF with NF only, GF,I with NF + explicit instructions (motor imagery), GF,R with NF + monetary reward, and GF,I,R with NF + explicit instructions (motor imagery) + monetary reward. Our results showed that GF increased significantly their BOLD self-regulation from day-1 to day-2 and GF,R showed the highest BOLD signal amplitude in SMA during the training. The two groups who were instructed to use motor imagery did not show a significant learning effect over the 2 days. The additional factors, namely motor imagery and reward, tended to increase the intersubject variability in the SMA during the course of training. Whole brain univariate and functional connectivity analyses showed common as well as distinct patterns in the four groups, representing the varied influences of feedback, reward, and instructions on the brain. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3153-3171, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27272616

  11. PID controller simulator software for DC motor of gamma scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostly PID controller (Proportional-Integral-Derivative) has been used in industry. For certain applications, it can be used as a Proportional (P) model only, or as a Proportional-Integral (PI) model. The aim of this paper is to design a PID controller simulator software for DC motor which is used in gamma scanning system. A DC motor is described as a plant of SISO (Single Input Single Output) which is used for pulling down the load (detector + casing) and gamma radiation source (Co-60 + container) by using sling cable. A DC motor consist of an armature and a rotor, the equivalent circuit of DC motor is shown in a transfer function equation between output parameter (angular speed DC motor) and input parameter (voltage of DC motor). Methods used for the process of PID controller design is to arrange the PID controller parameter (Kc, Ti, Td) so that there are more PID controller transfer function model which are able to control angular speed of DC motor in stable condition, as design criteria requirement is needed. Design criteria requirement for control system are the settling time < 3 second, overshoot < 5%, rise time = 0.25 second, steady state gain = 1 and peak time < 3 second with step response reference 1 rad/second. The result of simulation gives several models of PID controller in function transfer equation which is similar with design criteria requirement in a equation of function transfer of order 2 for numerator and order 1 for denominator. (author)

  12. Examination of motor unit control properties in stroke survivors using surface EMG decomposition: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Nina; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Ping; Rymer, William Zev

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to examine alterations in motor unit (MU) control properties, (i.e. MU recruitment and firing rate) after stroke utilizing a recently developed high-yield surface electromyogram (EMG) decomposition technique. Two stroke subjects participated in this study. A sensor array was used to record surface EMG signals from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle during voluntary isometric contraction at varying force levels. The recording was performed in both paretic and contralateral muscles using a matched force protocol. Single motor unit activity was extracted using the surface EMG decomposition software from Delsys Inc. The results from the two stroke subjects indicate a reduction in the mean motor unit firing rate and a compression of motor unit recruitment range in paretic muscle as compared with the contralateral muscles. These findings provide further evidence of spinal motoneuron involvement after a hemispheric brain lesion, and help us to understand the complex origins of stroke induced muscle weakness.

  13. The amygdalo-motor pathway and the control of facial expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin M Gothard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Facial expressions reflect decisions about the perceived meaning of social stimuli emitted by others and the expected socio-emotional outcome of the reciprocating expression. The decision to produce a facial expression emerges from the joint activity of a network of structures that include the amygdala and multiple, interconnected cortical and subcortical motor areas. Reciprocal transformations between sensory and motor signals give rise to distinct brain states that promote, or impede the production of facial expressions. The muscles of the upper and lower face are controlled by anatomically distinct motor areas and thus require distinct patterns of motor commands. Concomitantly multiple areas, including the amygdala, monitor the ongoing overt behavior (the expression of self and the covert, autonomic responses that accompany emotional expressions. Interoceptive signals and visceral states, therefore, should be incorporated into the formalisms of decision making in order account for decisions that govern the receiving-emitting cycle of facial expressions.

  14. Sensorless Control of PM Synchronous Motors and Brushless DC Motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montesinos, D.; Galceran, Samuel; Blaabjerg, Frede;

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the literature addressing sensorless operation methods of PM brushless machines. The methods explained are state-of-the-art of open and closed loop control strategies. The closed loop review includes those methods based on voltage and current measurements, those me...

  15. Self-Control and the Developing Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarullo, Amanda R.; Obradovic, Jelena; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2009-01-01

    Self-control is a skill that children need to succeed academically, socially, and emotionally. Brain regions essential to self-control are immature at birth and develop slowly throughout childhood. From ages 3 to 6 years, as these brain regions become more mature, children show improved ability to control impulses, shift their attention flexibly,…

  16. Gestalt Principles in the Control of Motor Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapp, Stuart T.; Jagacinski, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    We argue that 4 fundamental gestalt phenomena in perception apply to the control of motor action. First, a motor gestalt, like a perceptual gestalt, is holistic in the sense that it is processed as a single unit. This notion is consistent with reaction time results indicating that all gestures for a brief unit of action must be programmed prior to…

  17. Position versus force control: using the 2-DOF robotic ankle trainer to assess ankle's motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjadian, Amir B; Nabian, Mohsen; Hartman, Amber; Corsino, Johnathan; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Holden, Maureen K

    2014-01-01

    An estimated of 2,000,000 acute ankle sprains occur annually in the United States. Furthermore, ankle disabilities are caused by neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and stroke. The virtually interfaced robotic ankle and balance trainer (vi-RABT) was introduced as a cost-effective platform-based rehabilitation robot to improve overall ankle/balance strength, mobility and control. The system is equipped with 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF) controlled actuation along with complete means of angle and torque measurement mechanisms. Vi-RABT was used to assess ankle strength, flexibility and motor control in healthy human subjects, while playing interactive virtual reality games on the screen. The results suggest that in the task with 2-DOF, subjects have better control over ankle's position vs. force.

  18. Molecular mapping of movement-associated areas in the avian brain: a motor theory for vocal learning origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa Feenders

    Full Text Available Vocal learning is a critical behavioral substrate for spoken human language. It is a rare trait found in three distantly related groups of birds-songbirds, hummingbirds, and parrots. These avian groups have remarkably similar systems of cerebral vocal nuclei for the control of learned vocalizations that are not found in their more closely related vocal non-learning relatives. These findings led to the hypothesis that brain pathways for vocal learning in different groups evolved independently from a common ancestor but under pre-existing constraints. Here, we suggest one constraint, a pre-existing system for movement control. Using behavioral molecular mapping, we discovered that in songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds, all cerebral vocal learning nuclei are adjacent to discrete brain areas active during limb and body movements. Similar to the relationships between vocal nuclei activation and singing, activation in the adjacent areas correlated with the amount of movement performed and was independent of auditory and visual input. These same movement-associated brain areas were also present in female songbirds that do not learn vocalizations and have atrophied cerebral vocal nuclei, and in ring doves that are vocal non-learners and do not have cerebral vocal nuclei. A compilation of previous neural tracing experiments in songbirds suggests that the movement-associated areas are connected in a network that is in parallel with the adjacent vocal learning system. This study is the first global mapping that we are aware for movement-associated areas of the avian cerebrum and it indicates that brain systems that control vocal learning in distantly related birds are directly adjacent to brain systems involved in movement control. Based upon these findings, we propose a motor theory for the origin of vocal learning, this being that the brain areas specialized for vocal learning in vocal learners evolved as a specialization of a pre-existing motor

  19. Molecular mapping of movement-associated areas in the avian brain: a motor theory for vocal learning origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feenders, Gesa; Liedvogel, Miriam; Rivas, Miriam; Zapka, Manuela; Horita, Haruhito; Hara, Erina; Wada, Kazuhiro; Mouritsen, Henrik; Jarvis, Erich D

    2008-03-12

    Vocal learning is a critical behavioral substrate for spoken human language. It is a rare trait found in three distantly related groups of birds-songbirds, hummingbirds, and parrots. These avian groups have remarkably similar systems of cerebral vocal nuclei for the control of learned vocalizations that are not found in their more closely related vocal non-learning relatives. These findings led to the hypothesis that brain pathways for vocal learning in different groups evolved independently from a common ancestor but under pre-existing constraints. Here, we suggest one constraint, a pre-existing system for movement control. Using behavioral molecular mapping, we discovered that in songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds, all cerebral vocal learning nuclei are adjacent to discrete brain areas active during limb and body movements. Similar to the relationships between vocal nuclei activation and singing, activation in the adjacent areas correlated with the amount of movement performed and was independent of auditory and visual input. These same movement-associated brain areas were also present in female songbirds that do not learn vocalizations and have atrophied cerebral vocal nuclei, and in ring doves that are vocal non-learners and do not have cerebral vocal nuclei. A compilation of previous neural tracing experiments in songbirds suggests that the movement-associated areas are connected in a network that is in parallel with the adjacent vocal learning system. This study is the first global mapping that we are aware for movement-associated areas of the avian cerebrum and it indicates that brain systems that control vocal learning in distantly related birds are directly adjacent to brain systems involved in movement control. Based upon these findings, we propose a motor theory for the origin of vocal learning, this being that the brain areas specialized for vocal learning in vocal learners evolved as a specialization of a pre-existing motor pathway that controls

  20. Touch Screen based Speed Control of Single Phase Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mallika

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief idea of touch screen technology and its interfacing with a controller to control the speed of single phase induction motor. Here touch screen technology and Programmable System on Chip (PSOC microcontroller concept is utilized which is less spaceconsumption and easy to design. The aim of this paper is to have remote sensing and speed control of an AC motor.

  1. Nonlinear Control of Induction Motors: A Performance Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    1998-01-01

    A novel approach to control of induction motors based on nonlinear state feedback has previously been presented by the authors. The resulting scheme gives a linearized input-output decoupling of the torque and the amplitude of the field. The proposed approach is used to design controllers...... for the field amplitude and the motor torque. The method is compared with the traditional Rotor Field Oriented Control method as regards variations in rotor resistance an magnetizing inductance...

  2. Switch Reluctance Motor Control Based on Fuzzy Logic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Aleksandrovsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its intrinsic simplicity and reliability, the switched reluctance motor (SRM has now become a promising candidate for variable-speed drive applications as an alternative induction motor in various industrial application. However, the SRM has the disadvantage of nonlinear characteristic and control. It is suggested to use controller based on fuzzy logic system. Design of FLS controller and simulation model presented.

  3. Longitudinal Changes in the Motor Learning-Related Brain Activation Response in Presymptomatic Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtbernd, Florian; Tang, Chris C.; Feigin, Andrew; Dhawan, Vijay; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Paulsen, Jane S.; Guttman, Mark; Eidelberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive decline, including deficits in motor learning, occurs in the presymptomatic phase of Huntington’s disease (HD) and precedes the onset of motor symptoms. Findings from recent neuroimaging studies have linked these deficits to alterations in fronto-striatal and fronto-parietal brain networks. However, little is known about the temporal dynamics of these networks when subjects approach phenoconversion. Here, 10 subjects with presymptomatic HD were scanned with 15O-labeled water at baseline and again 1.5 years later while performing a motor sequence learning task and a kinematically matched control task. Spatial covariance analysis was utilized to characterize patterns of change in learning-related neural activation occurring over time in these individuals. Pattern expression was compared to corresponding values in 10 age-matched healthy control subjects. Spatial covariance analysis revealed significant longitudinal changes in the expression of a specific learning-related activation pattern characterized by increasing activity in the right orbitofrontal cortex, with concurrent reductions in the right medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate regions, the left insula, left precuneus, and left cerebellum. Changes in the expression of this pattern over time correlated with baseline measurements of disease burden and learning performance. The network changes were accompanied by modest improvement in learning performance that took place concurrently in the gene carriers. The presence of increased network activity in the setting of stable task performance is consistent with a discrete compensatory mechanism. The findings suggest that this effect is most pronounced in the late presymptomatic phase of HD, as subjects approach clinical onset. PMID:27192167

  4. Hierarchical control of motor units in voluntary contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Carlo J; Contessa, Paola

    2012-01-01

    For the past five decades there has been wide acceptance of a relationship between the firing rate of motor units and the afterhyperpolarization of motoneurons. It has been promulgated that the higher-threshold, larger-soma, motoneurons fire faster than the lower-threshold, smaller-soma, motor units. This relationship was based on studies on anesthetized cats with electrically stimulated motoneurons. We questioned its applicability to motor unit control during voluntary contractions in humans. We found that during linearly force-increasing contractions, firing rates increased as exponential functions. At any time and force level, including at recruitment, the firing rate values were inversely related to the recruitment threshold of the motor unit. The time constants of the exponential functions were directly related to the recruitment threshold. From the Henneman size principle it follows that the characteristics of the firing rates are also related to the size of the soma. The "firing rate spectrum" presents a beautifully simple control scheme in which, at any given time or force, the firing rate value of earlier-recruited motor units is greater than that of later-recruited motor units. This hierarchical control scheme describes a mechanism that provides an effective economy of force generation for the earlier-recruited lower force-twitch motor units, and reduces the fatigue of later-recruited higher force-twitch motor units-both characteristics being well suited for generating and sustaining force during the fight-or-flight response.

  5. How does the motor relearning program improve neurological function of brain ischemia monkeys?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Yin; Zhongtang Feng; Zhen Gu; Lei Pan; Lu Gan; Dongdong Qin; Bo Yang; Jin Guo; Xintian Hu; Tinghua Wang

    2013-01-01

    The motor relearning program can significantly improve various functional disturbance induced by ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. However, its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In injured brain tissues, glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurofilament protein changes can reflect the condition of injured neurons and astrocytes, while vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor changes can indicate angiogenesis. In the present study, we induced ischemic brain injury in the rhesus macaque by electrocoagulation of the M1 segment of the right middle cerebral artery. The motor relearning program was conducted for 60 days from the third day after model establishment. Immunohistochemistry and single-photon emission CT showed that the numbers of glial fibrillary acidic protein-, neurofilament protein-, vascular endothelial growth factorand basic fibroblast growth factor-positive cells were significantly increased in the infarcted side compared with the contralateral hemisphere following the motor relearning program. Moreover, cerebral blood flow in the infarcted side was significantly improved. The clinical rating scale for stroke was used to assess neurological function changes in the rhesus macaque following the motor relearning program. Results showed that motor function was improved, and problems with consciousness, self-care ability and balance function were significantly ameliorated. These findings indicate that the motor relearning program significantly promoted neuronal regeneration, repair and angiogenesis in the surroundings of the infarcted hemisphere, and improve neurological function in the rhesus macaque following brain ischemia.

  6. Increased brain cortical activity during parabolic flights has no influence on a motor tracking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stefan; Brümmer, Vera; Mierau, Andreas; Carnahan, Heather; Dubrowski, Adam; Strüder, Heiko K

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies showed that changing forces of gravity as they typically occur during parabolic flights might be responsible for adaptional processes of the CNS. However, until now it has not been differentiated between primary influences of weightlessness and secondary influences due to psycho-physiological factors (e.g., physical or mental strain). With the aim of detecting parabolic flight related changes in central cortical activity, a resting EEG was deduced in 16 subjects before, during and after parabolic flights. After subdividing EEG into alpha-, beta-,delta- and theta-wave bands, an increase in beta-power was noticeable inflight, whereas alpha(1)-power was increased postflight. No changes could be observed for the control group. To control possible effects of cortical activation, a manual tracking task with mirror inversion was performed during either the phase of weightlessness or during the normal gravity phase of a parabolic flight. No differences in performance nor in adaptation could be observed between both groups. A third group, performing under normal and stress-free conditions in a lab showed similar tracking values. We assume that the specific increase in brain activity is a sign of an increase in arousal inflight. This does support previous assumptions of non-specific stressors during parabolic flights and has to be considered as a relevant factor for experiments on central nerve adaptation. Although no influences of stress and/or weightlessness on motor performance and adaptation could be observed, we suggest that an "inflight" control group seems to be more adequate than a laboratory control group to investigate gravity-dependent changes in motor control.

  7. Brushless DC Motor Control System Design Based on DSP2812

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By comparison various control methods currently for permanent magnet brushless DC motor, on the basis of motor principle analysis, a current smallest and most real-time all-digital rare earth permanent magnet brushless DC motor control system is designed. The high-speed digital signal processor DSP2812 is applied as the main control unit. The fuzzy PID control algorithm is used to control rectifier regulator and speed, which the speed and current is double closed loop in the system. The principle of control system, control strategy and software is analyzed in this paper. The system has some features such as less overshoot, rapid response speed, good performance of anti-jamming, simple structure, high control precision, flexible in changing control policies and so on. Validity of the design is verified by prototype test.

  8. Discrete-Time LPV Current Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we apply a new method for gain-scheduled output feedback control of nonlinear systems to current control of an induction motor. The method relies on recently developed controller synthesis results for linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems, where the controller synthesis is formulated...... as a set of linear matrix inequalities with full-block multipliers. A standard nonlinear model of the motor is constructed and written on LPV form. We then show that, although originally developed in continuous time, the controller synthesis results can be applied to a discrete-time model as well without...... further complications. The synthesis method is applied to the model, yielding an LPV discrete-time controller. Finally, the efficiency of the control scheme is validated via simulations as well as on the actual induction motor, both in open-loop current control and when an outer speed control loop...

  9. Juggling with the brain - thought and action in the human motor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensteller, Uta

    2009-01-01

    Empirical findings from various research fields indicate that cognitive and motor processes are far less dissimilar than previously thought. The present chapter takes a neuroscientific perspective and offers evidence for similarities between cognition and action focusing on three key players of the classical motor system: the primary motor cortex, the cerebellum, and the premotor cortex. Briefly, although movement execution is apparently supported in part by the same cerebral resources engaged in cognitive processes, the three brain regions reviewed here are differentially engaged in more or less action-bound cognitive processes. PMID:19477347

  10. Klinefelter syndrome has increased brain responses to auditory stimuli and motor output, but not to visual stimuli or Stroop adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Skakkebæk, Anne; Bojesen, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) (KS) is a genetic syndrome characterized by the presence of an extra X chromosome and low level of testosterone, resulting in a number of neurocognitive abnormalities, yet little is known about brain function. This study investigated the fMRI-BOLD response from KS...... relative to a group of Controls to basic motor, perceptual, executive and adaptation tasks. Participants (N: KS=49; Controls=49) responded to whether the words “GREEN” or “RED” were displayed in green or red (incongruent versus congruent colors). One of the colors was presented three times as often...... with the widespread dyslexia in the group. No neural differences were found in inhibitory control (Stroop) or in adaptation to differences in stimulus frequencies. Across groups we found a strong positive correlation between age and BOLD response in the brain’s motor network with no difference between groups...

  11. Maturation of Sensori-Motor Functional Responses in the Preterm Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allievi, Alessandro G; Arichi, Tomoki; Tusor, Nora; Kimpton, Jessica; Arulkumaran, Sophie; Counsell, Serena J; Edwards, A David; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth engenders an increased risk of conditions like cerebral palsy and therefore this time may be crucial for the brain's developing sensori-motor system. However, little is known about how cortical sensori-motor function matures at this time, whether development is influenced by experience, and about its role in spontaneous motor behavior. We aimed to systematically characterize spatial and temporal maturation of sensori-motor functional brain activity across this period using functional MRI and a custom-made robotic stimulation device. We studied 57 infants aged from 30 + 2 to 43 + 2 weeks postmenstrual age. Following both induced and spontaneous right wrist movements, we saw consistent positive blood oxygen level-dependent functional responses in the contralateral (left) primary somatosensory and motor cortices. In addition, we saw a maturational trend toward faster, higher amplitude, and more spatially dispersed functional responses; and increasing integration of the ipsilateral hemisphere and sensori-motor associative areas. We also found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was significantly related to ex-utero exposure, suggesting the influence of experience-dependent mechanisms. At term equivalent age, we saw a decrease in both response amplitude and interhemispheric functional connectivity, and an increase in spatial specificity, culminating in the establishment of a sensori-motor functional response similar to that seen in adults.

  12. Spatial constancy mechanisms in motor control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medendorp, W.P.

    2011-01-01

    The success of the human species in interacting with the environment depends on the ability to maintain spatial stability despite the continuous changes in sensory and motor inputs owing to movements of eyes, head and body. In this paper, I will review recent advances in the understanding of how the

  13. Combined motor disturbances following severe traumatic brain injury: an integrative long-term treatment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, O; Reznik, J; Groswasser, Z

    2001-07-01

    Patients surviving severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) often suffer from residual impairments in motor control, communication skills, cognition and social behaviour. These distinctly hamper their capability to return to their 'pre-trauma' activity. Comprehensive and integrated rehabilitation programmes initiate, during the acute phase, a prolonged treatment process which starts at the most sophisticated medical systems. There is no clear end point for the treatment of these patients, since the recovery process and the rehabilitation activity may continue for years, even after patients return home to live with their families. The inherent inability to make a firm early prediction regarding outcome of patients and the late appearance of additional symptoms stress the need for a comprehensive close long-term follow-up. The following presentation concerns the description of the treatment strategy and long-term improvement of a 22-year-old male who suffered from very severe TBI. On admission to the emergency room, he was in the decerebrated position and his Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was at the lowest (3). The focus of this presentation is on the recovery of motor function. The initial motor disabilities included weakness in all four limbs, in particular left hemiplegia, and right hemiparesis with severe bilateral ataxic elements and a marked tremor of the right arm. Range of motion was limited in hips, and he suffered from stiff trunk and neck. Goals of physiotherapy were directed towards improving range of motion (ROM) and active movement. Casting, use of orthoses, biofeedback, hydrotherapy, hippotherapy, medication and nerve blocks for reducing spasticity were timely applied during the process. The motor improvement in this very severe TBI patient who is now over 3 years post-injury still continues and has a functional meaning. He has succeeded in being able to stand up by himself from a chair and is able to walk unaided and without orthoses for very short distances

  14. Universal Brushless-DC Motor Controller for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this SBIR is to adapt an initial prototype ultra-miniature high-performance brushless-DC-motor controller, code named 'Puck', for use by NASA across a...

  15. Broad Application of a Reconfigurable Motor Controller Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An ultra-miniature (<50 grams) high-performance brushless-motor controller, code named 'Puck', has been developed by Barrett for Earth-based mobile-manipulation...

  16. Discrete-Time LPV Current Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we apply a new method for gain-scheduled output feedback control of nonlinear systems to current control of an induction motor. The method relies on recently developed controller synthesis results for linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems, where the controller synthesis is formulated...... as a set of linear matrix inequalities with full-block multipliers. A standard nonlinear model of the motor is then constructed and written on LPV form. We then show that, although originally developed in continuous time, the controller synthesis results can be applied to a discrete-time model as well...... without further complications. The synthesis method is applied to the model, yielding an LPV discrete-time controller. Finally, the efficiency of the control scheme is validated via simulations as well as experimentally on the actual induction motor, both in open-loop current control and when an outer...

  17. Structural and functional hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis progression in motor- and memory-related brain regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Michael Stoppel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS multiple motor and extra-motor regions display structural and functional alterations. However, their temporal dynamics during disease-progression are unknown. To address this question we employed a longitudinal design assessing motor- and novelty-related brain activity in two fMRI sessions separated by a 3-month interval. In each session, patients and controls executed a Go/NoGo-task, in which additional presentation of novel stimuli served to elicit hippocampal activity. We observed a decline in the patients' movement-related activity during the 3-month interval. Importantly, in comparison to controls, the patients' motor activations were higher during the initial measurement. Thus, the relative decrease seems to reflect a breakdown of compensatory mechanisms due to progressive neural loss within the motor-system. In contrast, the patients' novelty-evoked hippocampal activity increased across 3 months, most likely reflecting the build-up of compensatory processes typically observed at the beginning of lesions. Consistent with a stage-dependent emergence of hippocampal and motor-system lesions, we observed a positive correlation between the ALSFRS-R or MRC-Megascores and the decline in motor activity, but a negative one with the hippocampal activation-increase. Finally, to determine whether the observed functional changes co-occur with structural alterations, we performed voxel-based volumetric analyses on magnetization transfer images in a separate patient cohort studied cross-sectionally at another scanning site. Therein, we observed a close overlap between the structural changes in this cohort, and the functional alterations in the other. Thus, our results provide important insights into the temporal dynamics of functional alterations during disease-progression, and provide support for an anatomical relationship between functional and structural cerebral changes in ALS.

  18. Closed Loop Speed Control of a BLDC Motor Drive Using Adaptive Fuzzy Tuned PI Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Latha Eti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Brushless DC Motors are widely used for many industrial applications because of their high efficiency, high torque and low volume. This paper proposed an improved Adaptive Fuzzy PI controller to control the speed of BLDC motor. This paper provides an overview of different tuning methods of PID Controller applied to control the speed of the transfer function model of the BLDC motor drive and then to the mathematical model of the BLDC motor drive. It is difficult to tune the parameters and get satisfied control characteristics by using normal conventional PI controller. The experimental results verify that Adaptive Fuzzy PI controller has better control performance than the conventional PI controller. The modeling, control and simulation of the BLDC motor have been done using the MATLAB/SIMULINK software. Also, the dynamic characteristics of the BLDC motor (i.e. speed and torque as well as currents and voltages of the inverter components are observed by using the developed model.

  19. Space motion sickness: The sensory motor controls and cardiovascular correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvestre, Philippe A.; Blaber, Andrew P.; Landrock, Clinton K.

    Background and PurposeSpace motion sickness (SMS) and related symptoms remain a major limiting factor in Space operations. A recent comprehensive literature review [J.R. Lackner, Z. DiZio, Space motion sickness, Experimental Brain Research 175 (2006) 377-399, doi 10.1007/s00221-006-0697-y] concluded that SMS does not represent a unique diagnostic entity, and there is no adequate predictor of SMS' susceptibility and severity. No countermeasure has been found reliable to prevent or treat SMS symptoms onset. Recent neurophysiological findings on sensory-motor controls monitoring [P.A. Souvestre, C. Landrock, Biomedical-performance monitoring and assessment of astronauts by means of an ocular vestibular monitoring system, Acta Astronautica, 60 (4-7) (2007) 313-321, doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2006.08.013] and heart-rate variability (HRV) measurements relationship could explain post-flight orthostatic intolerance (PFOI) in astronauts [A.P. Blaber, R.L. Bondar, M.S. Kassam, Heart rate variability and short duration space flight: relationship to post-flight orthostatic intolerance, BMC Physiology 4 (2004) 6]. These two methodologies are generally overlooked in SMS' analysis. In this paper we present the case for a strong relationship between sensory-motor controls related symptoms, including orthostatic intolerance (OI) and SMS symptoms. MethodsThis paper expands on several previously published papers [J.R. Lackner, Z. DiZio, Space motion sickness, Experimental Brain Research 175 (2006) 377-399, doi 10.1007/s00221-006-0697-y; P.A. Souvestre, C. Landrock, Biomedical-performance monitoring and assessment of astronauts by means of an ocular vestibular monitoring system, Acta Astronautica, 60 (4-7) (2007) 313-321, doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2006.08.013] along with an updated literature review. An analysis of a 10-year period clinical data from trauma patients experiencing postural deficiency syndrome (PDS) show assessment and monitoring techniques which successfully identify trauma

  20. Bearingless Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor using Independent Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normaisharah Mamat

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bearingless permanent magnet synchronous motor (BPMSM combines the characteristic of the conventional permanent magent synchronous motor and magnetic bearing in one electric motor. BPMSM is a kind of high performance motor due to having both advantages of PMSM and magnetic bearing with simple structure, high efficiency, and reasonable cost. The research on BPMSM is to design and analyse BPMSM by using Maxwell 2-Dimensional of ANSYS Finite Element Method (FEM. Independent suspension force model and bearingless PMSM model are developed by using the method of suspension force. Then, the mathematical model of electromagnetic torque and radial suspension force has been developed by using Matlab/Simulink. The relation between force, current, distance and other parameter are determined. This research covered the principle of suspension force, the mathematical model, FEM analysis and digital control system of bearingless PMSM. This kind of motor is widely used in high speed application such as compressors, pumps and turbines.

  1. Study on Control of Brain Temperature for Brain Hypothermia Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaohua, Lu; Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi

    The brain hypothermia treatment is an attractive therapy for the neurologist because of its neuroprotection in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients. The present paper deals with the possibility of controlling the brain and other viscera in different temperatures from the viewpoint of system control. It is theoretically attempted to realize the special brain hypothermia treatment to cool only the head but to warm the body by using the simple apparatus such as the cooling cap, muffler and warming blanket. For this purpose, a biothermal system concerning the temperature difference between the brain and the other thoracico-abdominal viscus is synthesized from the biothermal model of hypothermic patient. The output controllability and the asymptotic stability of the system are examined on the basis of its structure. Then, the maximum temperature difference to be realized is shown dependent on the temperature range of the apparatus and also on the maximum gain determined from the coefficient matrices A, B and C of the biothermal system. Its theoretical analysis shows the realization of difference of about 2.5°C, if there is absolutely no constraint of the temperatures of the cooling cap, muffler and blanket. It is, however, physically unavailable. Those are shown by simulation example of the optimal brain temperature regulation using a standard adult database. It is thus concluded that the surface cooling and warming apparatus do no make it possible to realize the special brain hypothermia treatment, because the brain temperature cannot be cooled lower than those of other viscera in an appropriate temperature environment. This study shows that the ever-proposed good method of clinical treatment is in principle impossible in the actual brain hypothermia treatment.

  2. Steering Control of Wheeled Armored Vehicle with Brushless DC Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Considering the steering characters of one type of wheeled armored vehicle, a brushless direct current (DC) motor is adapted as the actuator for steering control. After investigating the known algorithms, one kind of algorithm, which combines the fuzzy logic control with the self-adapting PID control and the startup and pre-brake control, is put forward. Then a test-bed is constructed, and an experiment is conducted. The result of experiment confirms the validity of this algorithm in steering control of wheeled armored vehicle with brushless DC motor.

  3. Discrete-Time LPV Current Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we apply a new method for gain-scheduled output feedback control of nonlinear systems to current control of an induction motor. The method relies on recently developed controller synthesis results for linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems, where the controller synthesis is formulated...... as a set of linear matrix inequalities with full-block multipliers. A standard nonlinear model of the motor is constructed and written on LPV form. We then show that, although originally developed in continuous time, the controller synthesis results can be applied to a discrete-time model as well...

  4. Analysis and Design of PLL Motor Speed Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Chao Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phase-locked technology in motor speed control system has a wide range of applications, Especially for high accuracy in the motor steady speed operation situation, more and more use of phase-locked servo control system. This paper describes the block diagram and mathematical model of phase-locked control system, Shows the circuit parameter calculation method This and combined with design example analysis of phase-locked control system, Indicated through the theory and practice, using PLL can obtain good speed control precision.

  5. Quantifying the role of motor imagery in brain-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesotti, Silvia; Bassolino, Michela; Serino, Andrea; Bleuler, Hannes; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-04-01

    Despite technical advances in brain machine interfaces (BMI), for as-yet unknown reasons the ability to control a BMI remains limited to a subset of users. We investigate whether individual differences in BMI control based on motor imagery (MI) are related to differences in MI ability. We assessed whether differences in kinesthetic and visual MI, in the behavioral accuracy of MI, and in electroencephalographic variables, were able to differentiate between high- versus low-aptitude BMI users. High-aptitude BMI users showed higher MI accuracy as captured by subjective and behavioral measurements, pointing to a prominent role of kinesthetic rather than visual imagery. Additionally, for the first time, we applied mental chronometry, a measure quantifying the degree to which imagined and executed movements share a similar temporal profile. We also identified enhanced lateralized μ-band oscillations over sensorimotor cortices during MI in high- versus low-aptitude BMI users. These findings reveal that subjective, behavioral, and EEG measurements of MI are intimately linked to BMI control. We propose that poor BMI control cannot be ascribed only to intrinsic limitations of EEG recordings and that specific questionnaires and mental chronometry can be used as predictors of BMI performance (without the need to record EEG activity).

  6. Similar brain networks for detecting visuo-motor and visuo-propriceptive synchrony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Årup; Lund, Torben Ellegaard;

    2006-01-01

    is compared with either (a) the proprioceptive feedback or with (b) the motor command and if they match, then the external stimulus is identified as feedback. Hypothesis (a) predicts that the neural mechanisms or brain areas involved in distinguishing self from other during passive and active movement...

  7. Similar brain networks for detecting visuo-motor and visuo-proprioceptive synchrony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Å; Ellegaard Lund, Torben;

    2006-01-01

    is compared with either (a) the proprioceptive feedback or with (b) the motor command and if they match, then the external stimulus is identified as feedback. Hypothesis (a) predicts that the neural mechanisms or brain areas involved in distinguishing self from other during passive and active movement...

  8. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging with fluorescein sodium dyeing for surgery of gliomas in brain motor functional areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jia-gang; YANG Shuai-feng; LIU Yan-hui; WANG Xiang; MAO Qing

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor surgery in brain motor functional areas remains challenging.Novel techniques are being developed to gain maximal and safe resection for brain tumor surgery.Herein,we assessed the magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) and fluorescein sodium dyeing (FLS) guiding technique for surgery of glioma located in brain motor functional areas.Methods Totally 83 patients were enrolled according to our inclusion and exclusion criteria (56 patients in experimental group,27 patients in control group).In the experimental group,the surgical approach was designed by DTI imaging,which showed the relationship between the tumor and motor tract.The range of resection in the operation was determined using the FLS-stained area,which recognized the tumor and its infiltrated tissue.The traditional routine method was used in the control group.Postoperatively,all patients underwent enhanced brain MRI within 72 hours to ascertain the extent of resection.Patients were followed in our outpatient clinic over 6-24 months.Neurological deficits and Karnofsky scoring (KPS) were evaluated.Results There were no significant differences in balance test indexes of preoperative data (sex,age,lesion location and volume,and neurological deficits before operation) and diagnosis of histopathology between the two groups.There was a trend in the experimental group for greater rates of gross total resection (80.4% vs.40.7%),and the paralysis rate caused by surgery was lower in experimental (25.0%) vs.control (66.7%) groups (P <0.05).The 6-month KPS in the low-grade and high-grade gliomas was 91±11 and 73±26,respectively,in the experimental group vs.82±9 and 43±27,respectively,in the control group (P <0.05 for both).Conclusions MR-DTI and FLS dye guiding for surgery of glioma located in brain motor functional areas can increase the gross total resection rate,decrease the paralysis rate caused by surgery,and improve patient quality of life compared with traditional

  9. Remote control of molecular motors using light-activated gearshifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Zev

    2013-03-01

    Engineering molecular motors with dynamically controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in vivo and provide sophisticated components for directed nanoscale transport in vitro. We previously constructed myosin motors that respond to a change in [Ca++] by reversing their direction of motion along the polarized actin filament. To expand the potential applications of controllable molecular motors, we have now developed myosins that shift gears in response to blue light illumination. Light is a versatile control signal that can be readily modulated in time and space, and is generally orthogonal to cellular signaling. Using structure-guided protein engineering, we have incorporated LOV photoreceptor domains into the lever arms of chimeric myosins, resulting in motors that robustly speed up, slow down, or switch directions upon illumination. These genetically encoded motors should be directly deployable inside living cells. Our successful designs include constructs based on two different myosin classes, and we show that optical velocity control can be implemented in motors that move at microns/sec speeds, enabling practical biological and bioengineering applications.

  10. Control of Rotor Function in Light-Driven Molecular Motors

    OpenAIRE

    Lubbe, Anouk S.; Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Caroli, Giuseppe; Feringa, Ben L.

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented on the control of rotary motion of an appending rotor unit in a light-driven molecular motor. Two new light driven molecular motors were synthesized that contain aryl groups connected to the stereogenic centers. The aryl groups behave as bidirectional free rotors in three of the four isomers of the 360 degrees rotation cycle, but rotation of the rotors is hindered in the fourth isomer. Kinetic studies of both motor and rotor functions of the two new compounds are given, u...

  11. Micro-stepping motor control for tuner and coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the superconducting linear accelerator at PLF, Mumbai each RF cavity is fitted with a coupler for feeding RF power and a tuner for frequency adjustment, The coupler/tuner are controlled using a stepper motor coupled to a suitable mechanical arrangement. Presently, bipolar stepper motors are used with a single channel motor controller. Thus any dynamic adjustment on multiple cavities during the beam operation requires interruption in beam. Further, this bipolar motor doesn't have the micro-stepping control and hence operations in cold condition are not always smooth. Therefore, an improved control module for multichannel control with communication to PC is designed. The design is based on Leadshine make EM503 micro-stepping module and uses Silicon lab make C8051F020 microcontroller. The module can control upto 16 couplers/tuners. The multiplexing is done using high current four pole relays. The design also has additional features like motor selection, start/stop, speed change, limit control and remote operation. (author)

  12. Speed Control of Induction Motor Using PLC and SCADA System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Seksak Elsaid,

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Automation or automatic control is the use of various control systems for operating equipment such as machinery, processes in factories, boilers and heat-treating ovens, switching in telephone networks, steering and stabilization of ships, aircraft and other applications with minimal or reduced human intervention. Some processes have been completely automated. The motor speed is controlled via the driver as an open loop control. To make a more precise closed loop control of motor speed we will use a tachometer to measure the speed and feed it back to the PLC, which compares to the desired value and take a control action, then the signal is transferred to the motor – via driver – to increase / decrease the speed. We will measure the speed of the motor using an incremental rotary encoder by adjusting parameters (PLC, driver and also we need to reduce the overall cost of the system. Our control system will be held using the available Siemens PLC. In addition, we will monitor motor parameters via SCADA system.

  13. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller of switched reluctance motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahour Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of adaptive neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS control for switched reluctance motor (SRM speed. The ANFIS has the advantages of expert knowledge of the fuzzy inference system and the learning capability of neural networks. An adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller of the motor speed is then designed and simulated. Digital simulation results show that the designed ANFIS speed controller realizes a good dynamic behaviour of the motor, a perfect speed tracking with no overshoot and a good rejection of impact loads disturbance. The results of applying the adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller to a SRM give better performance and high robustness than those obtained by the application of a conventional controller (PI.

  14. Learned EEG-based regulation of motor-related brain oscillations during application of transcranial electric currents: feasibility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjo R Soekadar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS improves motor learning and can influence emotional processing or attention. However, it remained unclear whether learned electroencephalography (EEG-based brain-machine interface (BMI control during tDCS is feasible and how application of transcranial electric currents during BMI control would interfere with feature-extraction of physiological brain signals. Here we tested this combination and evaluated stimulation-dependent artifacts across different EEG frequencies and stability of motor imagery-based BMI control. Approach: Ten healthy volunteers were invited to two BMI-sessions, each comprising two 60-trial blocks. During the trials, modulation of mu-rhythms (8-15Hz associated with motor imagery recorded over C4 was translated into online cursor movements on a computer screen. During block 2, either sham (session A or anodal tDCS (session B was applied at 1mA with the stimulation electrode placed 1cm anterior of C4. Main results: tDCS was associated with a significant signal power increase in the lower frequencies most evident in the signal spectrum of the EEG channel closest to the stimulation electrode. Stimulation-dependent signal power increase exhibited a decay of 12dB per decade, leaving frequencies above 9Hz unaffected. Analysis of BMI control performance did not indicate a difference between blocks and tDCS conditions. Conclusion: Application of tDCS during learned EEG-based self-regulation of brain oscillations above 9Hz is feasible and safe, and might improve applicability of BMI systems in patient populations.

  15. Analysis of Brain Cognitive State for Arithmetic Task and Motor Task Using Electroencephalography Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kalpana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To localize the brain dynamics for cognitive processes from EEG signature has been a challenging taskfrom last two decades. In this paper we explore the spatial-temporal correlations of brain electricalneuronal activity for cognitive task such as Arithmetic and Motor Task using 3D cortical distributionmethod. Ten healthy right handed volunteers participated in the experiment. EEG signal was acquiredduring resting state with eyes open and eyes closed; performing motor task and arithmetic calculations.The signal was then computed for three dimensional cortical distributions on realistic head model withMNI152 template using standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA. Thiswas followed by an appropriate standardization of the current density, producing images of electricneuronal activity without localization bias. Neuronal generators responsible for cognitive state such asArithmetic Task and Motor Task were localized. The result was correlated with the previous neuroimaging(fMRI study investigation. Hence our result directed that the neuronal activity from EEG signal can bedemonstrated in cortical level with good spatial resolution. 3D cortical distribution method, thus, may beused to obtain both spatial and temporal information from EEG signal and may prove to be a significanttechnique to investigate the cognitive functions in mental health and brain dysfunctions. Also, it may behelpful for brain/human computer interfacing.

  16. Advanced dc motor controller for battery-powered electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsterling, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    A motor generation set is connected to run from the dc source and generate a voltage in the traction motor armature circuit that normally opposes the source voltage. The functional feasibility of the concept is demonstrated with tests on a Proof of Principle System. An analog computer simulation is developed, validated with the results of the tests, applied to predict the performance of a full scale Functional Model dc Controller. The results indicate high efficiencies over wide operating ranges and exceptional recovery of regenerated energy. The new machine integrates both motor and generator on a single two bearing shaft. The control strategy produces a controlled bidirectional plus or minus 48 volts dc output from the generator permitting full control of a 96 volt dc traction motor from a 48 volt battery, was designed to control a 20 hp traction motor. The controller weighs 63.5 kg (140 lb.) and has a peak efficiency of 90% in random driving modes and 96% during the SAE J 227a/D driving cycle.

  17. Brushless DC motor Drive during Speed regulation with Current Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhikshalu Manchala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brushless DC Motor (BLDC is one of the best electrical drives that have increasing popularity, due to their high efficiency, reliability, good dynamic response and very low maintenance. Due to the increasing demand for compact & reliable motors and the evolution of low cost power semiconductor switches and permanent magnet (PM materials, brushless DC motors become popular in every application from home appliances to aerospace industry. The conventional techniques for controlling the stator phase current in a brushless DC drive are practically effective in low speed and cannot reduce the commutation torque ripple in high speed range. This paper presents the PI controller for speed control of BLDC motor. The output of the PI controllers is summed and is given as the input to the current controller. The BLDC motor is fed from the inverter where the rotor position and current controller is the input. The complete model of the proposed drive system is developed and simulated using MATLAB/Simulink software. The operation principle of using component is analysed and the simulation results are presented in this to verify the theoretical analysis.

  18. AN INVESTIGATION ON SWITCHING BEHAVIOURS OF VECTOR CONTROLLED INDUCTION MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz Korkmaz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Field oriented control and direct torque control are the most popular methods in high performance industrial control applications for induction motors. Naturally, the strengths and weaknesses of each control method are available. Therefore, the selection of optimum control method is vitally important for many industrial applications. So, the advantages and the disadvantages of both control methods have to be well defined. In this paper, a new and different perspective has been presented regarding the comparison of the inverter switching behaviours on the FOC and the DTC drivers. For this purpose, the experimental studies have been carried out to compare the inverter switching frequencies and torque responses of induction motors in the FOC and the DTC systems. The dSPACE 1103 controller board has been programmed with Matlab/Simulink software. As expected, the experimental studies have showed that the FOC controlled motors have had a lessened torque ripple. On the other hand, the FOC controlled motor switching frequency has about 75% more than the DTC controlled.

  19. Permanent magnet brushless motor control based on ADRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaokun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Permanent magnet brushless motor is a nonlinear system with multiple variables, the mathematical model of Permanent magnet brushless motor is difficult to establish, and since that the classic PID control is hard to precisely control the motor. Active disturbance rejection control (ADRC technique is a new nonlinear controller which does not depend on the system model. It is starting from the classic PID control, and establishing the loop control system by error negative feedback, the ESO(extended state observer observing system which comes from the observer theory of modern control theory to observe internal and external perturbations. ADRC inherits the advantages of PID with little overshoot, high convergence speed, high accuracy, strong anti-interference ability and other characteristics, and it has a strong disturbance adaptability and robustness as for the uncertainty perturbation and their internal disturbance of control objects. Therefore, This paper attempts to use Active disturbance rejection control(ADRC, in order to improve the control of permanent magnet brushless motor. In this design of control system, the simulation of the system is realized based on MATLAB, and then the discrete control algorithm is transplanted to the embedded system to control the permanent magnet brushless DC motor (PMBLDCM. The control system is implemented on the DSP-F28335 digital signal processor, and the DSP also provides the functions like voltage and current AD sampling, PWM driver generation, speed and rotor position calculation, etc. The simulation and experiment results indicate that, the system has good dynamic performance and anti-disturbance performance.

  20. ON THE ISSUE OF VECTOR CONTROL OF THE ASYNCHRONOUS MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Firago

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the issue of one of the widespread types of vector control realization for the asynchronous motors with a short-circuited rotor. Of all more than 20 vector control types known presently, the following are applied most frequently: direct vector control with velocity pickup (VP, direct vector control without VP, indirect vector control with VP and indirect vector control without VP. Despite the fact that the asynchronous-motor indirect vector control without VP is the easiest and most spread, the absence of VP does not allow controlling the motor electromagnetic torque at zero velocity. This is the reason why for electric motor drives of such requirements they utilize the vector control with a velocity transducer. The systems of widest dissemination became the direct and indirect vector control systems with X-axis alignment of the synchronously rotating x–y-coordinate frame along the rotor flux-linkage vector inasmuch as this provides the simplest correlations for controlling variables. Although these two types of vector control are well presented in literature, a number of issues concerning their realization and practical application require further elaboration. These include: the block schemes adequate representation as consisted with the modern realization of vector control and clarification of the analytical expressions for evaluating the regulator parameters.The authors present a technique for evaluating the dynamics of an asynchronous electric motor drive with direct vector control and x-axis alignment along the vector of rotor flux linkage. The article offers a generalized structure of this vector control type with detailed description of its principal blocks: controlling system, frequency converter, and the asynchronous motor.The paper presents a direct vector control simulating model developed in the MatLab environment on the grounds of this structure. The authors illustrate the described technique with the results

  1. Selection of motor programs for suppressing food intake and inducing locomotion in the Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoofs, Andreas; Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Peters, Marc; Zeymer, Malou; Spieß, Roland; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Pankratz, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    Central mechanisms by which specific motor programs are selected to achieve meaningful behaviors are not well understood. Using electrophysiological recordings from pharyngeal nerves upon central activation of neurotransmitter-expressing cells, we show that distinct neuronal ensembles can regulate different feeding motor programs. In behavioral and electrophysiological experiments, activation of 20 neurons in the brain expressing the neuropeptide hugin, a homolog of mammalian neuromedin U, simultaneously suppressed the motor program for food intake while inducing the motor program for locomotion. Decreasing hugin neuropeptide levels in the neurons by RNAi prevented this action. Reducing the level of hugin neuronal activity alone did not have any effect on feeding or locomotion motor programs. Furthermore, use of promoter-specific constructs that labeled subsets of hugin neurons demonstrated that initiation of locomotion can be separated from modulation of its motor pattern. These results provide insights into a neural mechanism of how opposing motor programs can be selected in order to coordinate feeding and locomotive behaviors. PMID:24960360

  2. Selection of motor programs for suppressing food intake and inducing locomotion in the Drosophila brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schoofs

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central mechanisms by which specific motor programs are selected to achieve meaningful behaviors are not well understood. Using electrophysiological recordings from pharyngeal nerves upon central activation of neurotransmitter-expressing cells, we show that distinct neuronal ensembles can regulate different feeding motor programs. In behavioral and electrophysiological experiments, activation of 20 neurons in the brain expressing the neuropeptide hugin, a homolog of mammalian neuromedin U, simultaneously suppressed the motor program for food intake while inducing the motor program for locomotion. Decreasing hugin neuropeptide levels in the neurons by RNAi prevented this action. Reducing the level of hugin neuronal activity alone did not have any effect on feeding or locomotion motor programs. Furthermore, use of promoter-specific constructs that labeled subsets of hugin neurons demonstrated that initiation of locomotion can be separated from modulation of its motor pattern. These results provide insights into a neural mechanism of how opposing motor programs can be selected in order to coordinate feeding and locomotive behaviors.

  3. PMBLDC motor drive with power factor correction controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    George, G.J.; Ramachandran, Rakesh; Arun, N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a boost converter configuration, control scheme and design of single phase power factor controller for permanent magnet brushless DC motor (PMBLDCM) drive. PMBLDC motors are the latest choice of researchers, due to the high efficiency, silent operation, compact size, high...... reliability, and low maintenance requirements. The proposed Power Factor Controller topology improves power quality by improving performance of PMBLDCM drive, such as reduction of AC main current harmonics, near unity power factor. PFC converter forces the drive to draw sinusoidal supply current in phase...

  4. Design and Implementation of Three Phase Unbalanced Voltage Motor Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. A. Mashud

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A state-of-the-art-technology was used to design the unbalanced three phase motor controller. The fluctuation of line voltage has been questioned in recent times due to the use of heavy powered machine with three phases. This paper is focused on deriving a control scheme to drive a three phase motor that could be used in industry or households. The very simple circuitry has been employed in this design. To do this, extensive MATLAB analysis and PSpice software was conducted in order to optimize the control system and finally the results are practically verified.

  5. Interfaz cerebro computador basada en P300 para la comunicación alternativa: estudio de caso en dos adolescentes en situación de discapacidad motora [P300 based Brain Computer Interface for alternative communication: a case study with two teenagers with motor disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Cossio, E.; Fernandez, C.; Gaviria, M.E.; Palacio, C.; Alvaran, L.; Torres Villa, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Brain computer interface systems use brain signals to enable the control of external devices, such as: wheelchairs, communicators, neuro-prosthesis, among others; in people with severe motor disabilities. In this study two young men with motor disabilities were trained to learn how to control a brai

  6. Design and Comparison Direct Torque Control Techniques for Induction Motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Kazmierkowski, Marian P.; Zelechowski, Marcin;

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a comparison of two significant control methods of induction motor are presented. The first one is a classical Direct Torque and Flux Control (DTC) and is compared with a scheme, which uses Space Vector Modulator (DTC-SVM). A comparison in respect to dynamic and steady state...

  7. Application of Fuzzy Logic in Control of Switched Reluctance Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Brandstetter

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The flux linkage of switched reluctance motor (SRM depends on the stator current and position between the rotor and stator poles. The fact determines that during control of SRM current with the help of classical PI controllers in a wide regulation range unsatisfied results occur. The main reasons of the mentioned situation are big changes of the stator inductance depending on the stator current and rotor position. In a switched reluctance motor the stator phase inductance is a non-linear function of the stator phase current and rotor position. Fuzzy controller and fuzzy logic are generally non-linear systems; hence they can provide better performance in this case. Fuzzy controller is mostly presented as a direct fuzzy controller or as a system, which realizes continued changing parameters of other controller, so-called fuzzy supervisor. Referring to the usage of fuzzy logic as a supervisor of conventional PI controller in control of SRM possible improvement occurs.

  8. Cognitive and Neurophysiological Effects of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Stroke Patients after Motor Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, Federico; Peila, Elena; Cicerale, Alessandro; Caglio, Marcella M; Caroppo, Paola; Vighetti, Sergio; Piedimonte, Alessandro; Minuto, Alice; Campagnoli, Marcello; Salatino, Adriana; Molo, Maria T; Mortara, Paolo; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Massazza, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two specific Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS) paradigms, the repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), in the upper limb rehabilitation of patients with stroke. Short and long term outcomes (after 3 and 6 months, respectively) were evaluated. We measured, at multiple time points, the manual dexterity using a validated clinical scale (ARAT), electroencephalography auditory event related potentials, and neuropsychological performances in patients with chronic stroke of middle severity. Thirty four patients were enrolled and randomized. The intervention group was treated with a NIBS protocol longer than usual, applying a second cycle of stimulation, after a washout period, using different techniques in the two cycles (rTMS/tDCS). We compared the results with a control group treated with sham stimulation. We split the data analysis into three studies. In this first study we examined if a cumulative effect was clinically visible. In the second study we compared the effects of the two techniques. In the third study we explored if patients with minor cognitive impairment have most benefit from the treatment and if cognitive and motor outcomes were correlated. We found that the impairment in some cognitive domains cannot be considered an exclusion criterion for rehabilitation with NIBS. ERP improved, related to cognitive and attentional processes after stimulation on the motor cortex, but transitorily. This effect could be linked to the restoration of hemispheric balance or by the effects of distant connections. In our study the effects of the two NIBS were comparable, with some advantages using tDCS vs. rTMS in stroke rehabilitation. Finally we found that more than one cycle (2-4 weeks), spaced out by washout periods, should be used, only in responder patients, to obtain clinical relevant results. PMID:27445730

  9. Discrete Current Control Strategy of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A control strategy of permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs, which is different from the traditional vector control (VC and direct torque control (DTC, is proposed. Firstly, the circular rotating magnetic field is analyzed on the simplified model and discredited into stepping magnetic field. The stepping magnetomotive force will drive the rotor to run as the stepping motor. Secondly, the stator current orientation is used to build the control model instead of rotor flux orientation. Then, the discrete current control strategy is set and adopted in positioning control. Three methods of the strategy are simulated in computer and tested on the experiment platform of PMSM. The control precision is also verified through the experiment.

  10. Treatment of Wilson's disease motor complications with deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedera, Peter

    2014-05-01

    A considerable proportion of patients with Wilson's disease (WD) experience neurologic symptoms that are functionally disabling. The most common neurologic problems in advanced WD include dystonia and tremor. Medically refractory idiopathic dystonia and essential tremor (ET) have been successfully treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS), functional surgical therapy targeting the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi), or the ventral intermediate (Vim) thalamic nucleus. Even though the pathophysiology of tremor is different in WD and ET, available experience supports DBS targeting the Vim for WD patients. Dystonia associated with WD is classified as secondary dystonia and GPi stimulation has yielded mixed results in these patients. The presence of structural changes in the basal ganglia may limit the therapeutic success of DBS for WD dystonia compared with idiopathic dystonia. In spite of these limitations, DBS in WD may be an effective approach to treat medically refractory residual neurologic symptoms in carefully selected patients. PMID:24547944

  11. Active Fault Tolerant Control for Ultrasonic Piezoelectric Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhnifer, Moussa

    2012-07-01

    Ultrasonic piezoelectric motor technology is an important system component in integrated mechatronics devices working on extreme operating conditions. Due to these constraints, robustness and performance of the control interfaces should be taken into account in the motor design. In this paper, we apply a new architecture for a fault tolerant control using Youla parameterization for an ultrasonic piezoelectric motor. The distinguished feature of proposed controller architecture is that it shows structurally how the controller design for performance and robustness may be done separately which has the potential to overcome the conflict between performance and robustness in the traditional feedback framework. A fault tolerant control architecture includes two parts: one part for performance and the other part for robustness. The controller design works in such a way that the feedback control system will be solely controlled by the proportional plus double-integral PI2 performance controller for a nominal model without disturbances and H∞ robustification controller will only be activated in the presence of the uncertainties or an external disturbances. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed fault tolerant control architecture.

  12. Morphological features of the neonatal brain support development of subsequent cognitive, language, and motor abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Marisa N; Bansal, Ravi; Rosen, Tove S; Peterson, Bradley S

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of the role of brain maturation in the development of cognitive abilities derives primarily from studies of school-age children to adults. Little is known about the morphological features of the neonatal brain that support the subsequent development of abilities in early childhood, when maturation of the brain and these abilities are the most dynamic. The goal of our study was to determine whether brain morphology during the neonatal period supports early cognitive development through 2 years of age. We correlated morphological features of the cerebral surface assessed using deformation-based measures (surface distances) of high-resolution MRI scans for 33 healthy neonates, scanned between the first to sixth week of postmenstrual life, with subsequent measures of their motor, language, and cognitive abilities at ages 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. We found that morphological features of the cerebral surface of the frontal, mesial prefrontal, temporal, and occipital regions correlated with subsequent motor scores, posterior parietal regions correlated with subsequent language scores, and temporal and occipital regions correlated with subsequent cognitive scores. Measures of the anterior and middle portions of the cingulate gyrus correlated with scores across all three domains of ability. Most of the significant findings were inverse correlations located bilaterally in the brain. The inverse correlations may suggest either that a more protracted morphological maturation or smaller local volumes of neonatal brain tissue supports better performance on measures of subsequent motor, language, and cognitive abilities throughout the first 2 years of postnatal life. The correlations of morphological measures of the cingulate with measures of performance across all domains of ability suggest that the cingulate supports a broad range of skills in infancy and early childhood, similar to its functions in older children and adults.

  13. Factors of Influence on the Performance of a Short-Latency Non-Invasive Brain Switch: Evidence in Healthy Individuals and Implication for Motor Function Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren eXu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfacing (BCI has recently been applied as a rehabilitation approach for patients with motor disorders, such as stroke. In these closed-loop applications, a brain switch detects the motor intention from brain signals, e.g. scalp EEG, and triggers a neuroprosthetic device, either to deliver sensory feedback or to mimic real movements, thus re-establishing the compromised sensory-motor control loop and promoting neural plasticity. In this context, single trial detection of motor intention with short latency is a prerequisite. The performance of the event detection from EEG recordings is mainly determined by three factors: the type of motor imagery (e.g., repetitive, ballistic, the frequency band (or signal modality used for discrimination (e.g., alpha, beta, gamma, and MRCP, i.e. movement-related cortical potential, and the processing technique (e.g., time-series analysis, sub-band power estimation. In this study, we investigated single trial EEG traces during movement imagination on healthy individuals, and provided a comprehensive analysis of the performance of a short-latency brain switch when varying these three factors. The morphological investigation showed a cross-subject consistency of a prolonged negative phase in MRCP, and a delayed beta rebound in sensory-motor rhythms during repetitive tasks. The detection performance had the greatest accuracy when using ballistic MRCP with time-series analysis. In this case, the true positive rate was ~70% for a detection latency of ~200 ms. The results presented here are of practical relevance for designing BCI systems for motor function rehabilitation.

  14. Flux-weakening control methods for hybrid excitation synchronous motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid excitation synchronous motor (HESM, which aim at combining the advantages of permanent magnet motor and wound excitation motor, have the characteristics of low-speed high-torque hill climbing and wide speed range. Firstly, a new kind of HESM is presented in the paper, and its structure and mathematical model are illustrated. Then, based on a space voltage vector control, a novel flux-weakening method for speed adjustment in the high speed region is presented. The unique feature of the proposed control method is that the HESM driving system keeps the q-axis back-EMF components invariable during the flux-weakening operation process. Moreover, a copper loss minimization algorithm is adopted to reduce the copper loss of the HESM in the high speed region. Lastly, the proposed method is validated by the simulation and the experimental results.

  15. Neural changes in the primate brain correlated with the evolution of complex motor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Y; Hikishima, K; Saiki, M; Inada, M; Sasaki, E; Lemon, R N; Price, C J; Okano, H; Iriki, A

    2016-01-01

    Complex motor skills of eventual benefit can be learned after considerable trial and error. What do structural brain changes that accompany such effortful long-term learning tell us about the mechanisms for developing innovative behavior? Using MRI, we monitored brain structure before, during and after four marmosets learnt to use a rake, over a long period of 10-13 months. Throughout learning, improvements in dexterity and visuo-motor co-ordination correlated with increased volume in the lateral extrastriate cortex. During late learning, when the most complex behavior was maintained by sustained motivation to acquire the skill, the volume of the nucleus accumbens increased. These findings reflect the motivational state required to learn, and show accelerated function in higher visual cortex that is consistent with neurocognitive divergence across a spectrum of primate species. PMID:27498966

  16. Costs of control: decreased motor cortex engagement during a Go/NoGo task in Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomalla, Götz; Jonas, Melanie; Bäumer, Tobias; Siebner, Hartwig R; Biermann-Ruben, Katja; Ganos, Christos; Orth, Michael; Hummel, Friedhelm C; Gerloff, Christian; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten; Schnitzler, Alfons; Münchau, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by an impaired ability to inhibit unwanted behaviour. Although the presence of chronic motor and vocal tics defines Tourette's syndrome, other distinctive behavioural features like echo- and coprophenomena, and non-obscene socially inappropriate behaviour are also core features. We investigated neuronal activation during stimulus-driven execution and inhibition of prepared movements in Tourette's syndrome. To this end, we performed event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and structural diffusion tensor imaging in 15 moderately affected uncomplicated patients with 'pure' Tourette's syndrome and 15 healthy control participants matched for age and gender. Subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a Go/NoGo reaction time task. They had to withhold a prepared finger movement for a variable time until a stimulus instructed them to either execute (Go) or inhibit it (NoGo). Tics were monitored throughout the experiments, combining surface electromyogram, video recording, and clinical assessment in the scanner. Patients with Tourette's syndrome had longer reaction times than healthy controls in Go trials and made more errors in total. Their functional brain activation was decreased in left primary motor cortex and secondary motor areas during movement execution (Go trials) but not during response inhibition (NoGo trials) compared with healthy control subjects. Volume of interest analysis demonstrated less task-related activation in patients with Tourette's syndrome in primary and secondary motor cortex bilaterally, but not in the basal ganglia and cortical non-motor areas. They showed reduced co-activation between the left primary sensory-motor hand area and a network of contralateral sensory-motor areas and ipsilateral cerebellar regions. There were no between-group differences in structural connectivity of the left primary sensory-motor cortex as measured by

  17. Energy-saving technology of vector controlled induction motor based on the adaptive neuro-controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, E.; Kovalev, I. V.; Karandeev, D.

    2015-10-01

    The ongoing evolution of the power system towards a Smart Grid implies an important role of intelligent technologies, but poses strict requirements on their control schemes to preserve stability and controllability. This paper presents the adaptive neuro-controller for the vector control of induction motor within Smart Gird. The validity and effectiveness of the proposed energy-saving technology of vector controlled induction motor based on adaptive neuro-controller are verified by simulation results at different operating conditions over a wide speed range of induction motor.

  18. Voluntary motor commands reveal awareness and control of involuntary movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Havas, Jack; Ghosh, Arko; Gomi, Hiroaki; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    The capacity to inhibit actions is central to voluntary motor control. However, the control mechanisms and subjective experience involved in voluntarily stopping an involuntary movement remain poorly understood. Here we examined, in humans, the voluntary inhibition of the Kohnstamm phenomenon, in which sustained voluntary contraction of shoulder abductors is followed by involuntary arm raising. Participants were instructed to stop the involuntary movement, hold the arm in a constant position, and 'release' the inhibition after ∼2s. Participants achieved this by modulating agonist muscle activity, rather than by antagonist contraction. Specifically, agonist muscle activity plateaued during this voluntary inhibition, and resumed its previous increase thereafter. There was no discernible antagonist activation. Thus, some central signal appeared to temporarily counter the involuntary motor drive, without directly affecting the Kohnstamm generator itself. We hypothesise a form of "negative motor command" to account for this novel finding. We next tested the specificity of the negative motor command, by inducing bilateral Kohnstamm movements, and instructing voluntary inhibition for one arm only. The results suggested negative motor commands responsible for inhibition are initially broad, affecting both arms, and then become focused. Finally, a psychophysical investigation found that the perceived force of the aftercontraction was significantly overestimated, relative to voluntary contractions with similar EMG levels. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that the Kohnstamm generator does not provide an efference copy signal. Our results shed new light on this interesting class of involuntary movement, and provide new information about voluntary inhibition of action. PMID:27399155

  19. Optimal motor control may mask sensory dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Carver, Sean G.; Kiemel, Tim; Cowan, Noah J.; John J Jeka

    2009-01-01

    Properties of neural controllers for closed-loop sensorimotor behavior can be inferred with system identification. Under the standard paradigm, the closed-loop system is perturbed (input), measurements are taken (output), and the relationship between input and output reveals features of the system under study. Here we show that under common assumptions made about such systems (e.g. the system implements optimal control with a penalty on mechanical, but not sensory, states) important aspects o...

  20. An Algorithm for Idle-State Detection in Motor-Imagery-Based Brain-Computer Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Yijun Wang; Dan Zhang; Xiaorong Gao; Bo Hong; Shangkai Gao

    2007-01-01

    For a robust brain-computer interface (BCI) system based on motor imagery (MI), it should be able to tell when the subject is not concentrating on MI tasks (the “idle state”) so that real MI tasks could be extracted accurately. Moreover, because of the diversity of idle state, detecting idle state without training samples is as important as classifying MI tasks. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for solving this ...

  1. Controller Design for Direct Torque Controlled Space Vector Modulated (DTC-SVM) Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zelechowski, M.; Kazmierkowski, M.P.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    In this paper two different methods of PI controllers for direct torque controlled-space vector modulated induction motor drives have been studied. The first one is simple method based only on symmetric optimum criterion. The second approach takes into account the full model of induction motor in...

  2. Piano training in youths with hand motor impairments after damage to the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Renée; Thienel, Anna; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Blumenstein, Tobias; Turova, Varvara; Alves-Pinto, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the developing brain may lead to impairment of the hand motor function and negatively impact on patients' quality of life. Development of manual dexterity and finger and hand motor function may be promoted by learning to play the piano. The latter brings together music with the intensive training of hand coordination and fine finger mobility. We investigated if learning to play the piano helped to improve hand motor skills in 18 youths with hand motor disorders resulting from damage during early brain development. Participants trained 35-40 minutes twice a week for 18 months with a professional piano teacher. With the use of a Musical Instrument Digital Interface piano, the uniformity of finger strokes could be objectively assessed from the timing of keystrokes. The analysis showed a significant improvement in the uniformity of keystrokes during the training. Furthermore, the youths showed strong motivation and engagement during the study. This is nevertheless an open study, and further studies remain needed to exclude effects of growth and concomitant therapies on the improvements observed and clarify which patients will more likely benefit from learning to play the piano. PMID:26345312

  3. Prediction of motor imagery based brain computer interface performance using a reaction time test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishi, Sam; Abbott, Derek; Baumert, Mathias

    2015-08-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) enable human brains to interact directly with machines. Motor imagery based BCI (MI-BCI) encodes the motor intentions of human agents and provides feedback accordingly. However, 15-30% of people are not able to perform vivid motor imagery. To save time and monetary resources, a number of predictors have been proposed to screen for users with low BCI aptitude. While the proposed predictors provide some level of correlation with MI-BCI performance, simple, objective and accurate predictors are currently not available. Thus, in this study we have examined the utility of a simple reaction time (SRT) test for predicting MI-BCI performance. We enrolled 10 subjects and measured their motor imagery performance with either visual or proprioceptive feedback. Their reaction time was also measured using a SRT test. The results show a significant negative correlation (r ≈ -0.67) between SRT and MI-BCI performance. Therefore SRT may be used as a simple and reliable predictor of MI-BCI performance. PMID:26736893

  4. Piano training in youths with hand motor impairments after damage to the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Renée; Thienel, Anna; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Blumenstein, Tobias; Turova, Varvara; Alves-Pinto, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the developing brain may lead to impairment of the hand motor function and negatively impact on patients' quality of life. Development of manual dexterity and finger and hand motor function may be promoted by learning to play the piano. The latter brings together music with the intensive training of hand coordination and fine finger mobility. We investigated if learning to play the piano helped to improve hand motor skills in 18 youths with hand motor disorders resulting from damage during early brain development. Participants trained 35-40 minutes twice a week for 18 months with a professional piano teacher. With the use of a Musical Instrument Digital Interface piano, the uniformity of finger strokes could be objectively assessed from the timing of keystrokes. The analysis showed a significant improvement in the uniformity of keystrokes during the training. Furthermore, the youths showed strong motivation and engagement during the study. This is nevertheless an open study, and further studies remain needed to exclude effects of growth and concomitant therapies on the improvements observed and clarify which patients will more likely benefit from learning to play the piano.

  5. Position Control of Switched Reluctance Motor Using Super Twisting Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rafiq Mufti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent problem of chattering in traditional sliding mode control is harmful for practical application of control system. This paper pays a considerable attention to a chattering-free control method, that is, higher-order sliding mode (super twisting algorithm. The design of a position controller for switched reluctance motor is presented and its stability is assured using Lyapunov stability theorem. In order to highlight the advantages of higher-order sliding mode controller (HOSMC, a classical first-order sliding mode controller (FOSMC is also applied to the same system and compared. The simulation results reflect the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  6. Effective and Robust Generalized Predictive Speed Control of Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patxi Alkorta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and validates a new proposal for effective speed vector control of induction motors based on linear Generalized Predictive Control (GPC law. The presented GPC-PI cascade configuration simplifies the design with regard to GPC-GPC cascade configuration, maintaining the advantages of the predictive control algorithm. The robust stability of the closed loop system is demonstrated by the poles placement method for several typical cases of uncertainties in induction motors. The controller has been tested using several simulations and experiments and has been compared with Proportional Integral Derivative (PID and Sliding Mode (SM control schemes, obtaining outstanding results in speed tracking even in the presence of parameter uncertainties, unknown load disturbance, and measurement noise in the loop signals, suggesting its use in industrial applications.

  7. A Wearable Channel Selection-Based Brain-Computer Interface for Motor Imagery Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chi-Chun; Chien, Tsung-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Shang-Ho; Fang, Wai-Chi; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2016-02-06

    Motor imagery-based brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication interface between an external machine and the brain. Many kinds of spatial filters are used in BCIs to enhance the electroencephalography (EEG) features related to motor imagery. The approach of channel selection, developed to reserve meaningful EEG channels, is also an important technique for the development of BCIs. However, current BCI systems require a conventional EEG machine and EEG electrodes with conductive gel to acquire multi-channel EEG signals and then transmit these EEG signals to the back-end computer to perform the approach of channel selection. This reduces the convenience of use in daily life and increases the limitations of BCI applications. In order to improve the above issues, a novel wearable channel selection-based brain-computer interface is proposed. Here, retractable comb-shaped active dry electrodes are designed to measure the EEG signals on a hairy site, without conductive gel. By the design of analog CAR spatial filters and the firmware of EEG acquisition module, the function of spatial filters could be performed without any calculation, and channel selection could be performed in the front-end device to improve the practicability of detecting motor imagery in the wearable EEG device directly or in commercial mobile phones or tablets, which may have relatively low system specifications. Finally, the performance of the proposed BCI is investigated, and the experimental results show that the proposed system is a good wearable BCI system prototype.

  8. A Wearable Channel Selection-Based Brain-Computer Interface for Motor Imagery Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chun Lo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery-based brain-computer interface (BCI is a communication interface between an external machine and the brain. Many kinds of spatial filters are used in BCIs to enhance the electroencephalography (EEG features related to motor imagery. The approach of channel selection, developed to reserve meaningful EEG channels, is also an important technique for the development of BCIs. However, current BCI systems require a conventional EEG machine and EEG electrodes with conductive gel to acquire multi-channel EEG signals and then transmit these EEG signals to the back-end computer to perform the approach of channel selection. This reduces the convenience of use in daily life and increases the limitations of BCI applications. In order to improve the above issues, a novel wearable channel selection-based brain-computer interface is proposed. Here, retractable comb-shaped active dry electrodes are designed to measure the EEG signals on a hairy site, without conductive gel. By the design of analog CAR spatial filters and the firmware of EEG acquisition module, the function of spatial filters could be performed without any calculation, and channel selection could be performed in the front-end device to improve the practicability of detecting motor imagery in the wearable EEG device directly or in commercial mobile phones or tablets, which may have relatively low system specifications. Finally, the performance of the proposed BCI is investigated, and the experimental results show that the proposed system is a good wearable BCI system prototype.

  9. Evaluation of Methods for Estimating Fractal Dimension in Motor Imagery-Based Brain Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Kiong Loo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain computer interface BCI enables direct communication between a brain and a computer translating brain activity into computer commands using preprocessing, feature extraction, and classification operations. Feature extraction is crucial, as it has a substantial effect on the classification accuracy and speed. While fractal dimension has been successfully used in various domains to characterize data exhibiting fractal properties, its usage in motor imagery-based BCI has been more recent. In this study, commonly used fractal dimension estimation methods to characterize time series Katz's method, Higuchi's method, rescaled range method, and Renyi's entropy were evaluated for feature extraction in motor imagery-based BCI by conducting offline analyses of a two class motor imagery dataset. Different classifiers fuzzy k-nearest neighbours FKNN, support vector machine, and linear discriminant analysis were tested in combination with these methods to determine the methodology with the best performance. This methodology was then modified by implementing the time-dependent fractal dimension TDFD, differential fractal dimension, and differential signals methods to determine if the results could be further improved. Katz's method with FKNN resulted in the highest classification accuracy of 85%, and further improvements by 3% were achieved by implementing the TDFD method.

  10. Sensorless Passivity Based Control of a DC Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Seethamathavi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In last couple of decades, the control of motors has increased drastically. With this increase, current control techniques are developed. In sensor-less passivity control of a DC Motor the term passivity means the property of stability in an input and output. To maintain the stability at the input side the solar pv panel is connected with MPPT which extract maximum and stable voltage. For output we simultaneously regulate, both, the output voltage of the SEPIC-converter to a value larger than the solar panel output voltage, and the speed of motor, in any of the turning senses, so that it tracks a prespecified constant reference. For a sensor less current control of a PMDC motor, its small-signal model that contains a number of parasitic parameters the observed current may diverge due to the parasitic resistors and the forward conduction voltage of the diode. Moreover, the divergence of the observed current will cause steady state errors in the output voltage a self-correction differential current observer (SDCO is proposed to eliminate this steady-state error and gain high transient response speed. By carrying out a series of MATLAB simulation verifications, further investigation proves that the proposed algorithm has good robustness.

  11. Velocity control in three-phase induction motors using PIC; Controle de velocidade de motor de inducao trifasico usando PIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcelino, M.A.; Silva, G.B.S.; Grandinetti, F.J. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia; Universidade de Taubate (UNITAU), SP (Brazil)], Emails: abud@feg.unesp.br, gabonini@yahoo.com.br, grandinetti@unitau.br

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a technique for speed control three-phase induction motor using the pulse width modulation (PWM), in open loop while maintaining the tension for constant frequency. The technique is adapted from a thesis entitled 'Control of the three-phase induction motor, using discrete PWM generation, optimized and synchronized', where studies are presented aimed at their application in home appliances, to eliminate mechanical parts, replaced by low cost electronic control, thus having a significant reduction in power consumption. Initially the experiment was done with the Intel 80C31 micro controller. In this paper, the PWM modulation is implemented using a PIC micro controller, and the speed control kept a low profile, based on tables, synchronized with transitions and reduced generation of harmonics in the network. Confirmations were made using the same process of building tables, but takes advantage of the program of a RISC device.

  12. Sensorless Control of Electric Motors with Kalman Filters: Applications to Robotic and Industrial Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gerasimos G. Rigatos; Pierluigi Siano

    2011-01-01

    The paper studies sensorless control for DC and induction motors, using Kalman Filtering techniques. First the case of a DC motor is considered and Kalman Filter-based control is implemented. Next the nonlinear model of a field-oriented induction motor is examined and the motor

  13. Impulsive control of permanent magnet synchronous motors with parameters uncertainties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Dong; Wang Shi-Long; Zhang Xiao-Hong; Yang Dan; Wang Hui

    2008-01-01

    The permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) may have chaotic behaviours for the uncertain values of parameters or under certain working conditions,which threatens the secure and stable operation of motor-driven.It is important to study methods of controlling or suppressing chaos in PMSMs. In this paper,robust stabilities of PMSM with parameter uncertainties are investigated.After the uncertain matrices which represent the variable system parameters are formulated through matrix analysis,a novel asymptotical stability criterion is established.Some illustrated examples are also given to show the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  14. Training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas eSpierer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in inhibitory control, the ability to suppress ongoing or planned motor or cognitive processes, contribute to many psychiatric and neurological disorders. The rehabilitation of inhibition-related disorders may therefore benefit from neuroplasticity-based training protocols aiming at normalizing inhibitory control proficiency and the underlying brain networks. Current literature on training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control suggests that improvements may follow either from the development of automatic forms of inhibition or from the strengthening of top-down, controlled inhibition. Automatic inhibition develops in conditions of consistent and repeated associations between inhibition-triggering stimuli and stopping goals. Once established, the stop signals directly elicit inhibition, thereby bypassing slow, top-down executive control and accelerating stopping processes. In contrast, training regimens involving varying stimulus-response associations or frequent inhibition failures prevent the development of automatic inhibition and thus strengthen top-down inhibitory processes rather than bottom-up ones. We discuss these findings in terms of developing optimal inhibitory control training regimens for rehabilitation purposes.

  15. Acupuncture De Qi in Stable Somatosensory Stroke Patients: Relations with Effective Brain Network for Motor Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Bai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture has been widely used for treating stroke and De Qi may play an important role. In spite of its acceptance, the neural mechanism underlying acupuncture for motor recovery is still elusive. Particularly, by what extent De Qi sensations can reliably predict the therapeutical acupuncture effect on the mediating recovery from stroke is urgent to investigate. Nine stroke patients were assessed by De Qi, neurological examination, and scanned with acupuncture stimuli across two time points at an interval of two weeks. And we adopted multivariate Granger causality analysis to explore the interregional influences within motor executive brain network during post-acupuncture resting state. Our findings indicated that acupuncture at GB34 can enhance the recovery of stroke mainly by strengthening causal influences between the ipsilesional and contralesional motor cortex. Moreover, centrality of some motor-related regions correlated with clinical variables and thus served as a predictor of stroke recovery. Along the same line, the centrality of these motor-related regions has also high relations with the De Qi sensation. Our findings suggest that De Qi having relatively stable reliability may be essential and used as a predictor to the therapeutic effectiveness of acupuncture for stroke recovery.

  16. Simulation of Field Oriented Control in Induction Motor Drive System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a 3-phase induction motor model for simulation the field oriented control (FOC system based on space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM is established in Ansoft/Simplorer software. The theory of field oriented control (FOC and the principle of space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM were introduced. The simulation results are presented and analyzed. A Simulink simulation model of field oriented control system is presented as a comparison under the same conditions. The results indicated that the Simplorer model had quick response speed, small torque fluctuations and good performance both in steady and dynamic states. Furthermore, the Simplorer model can be coupled with the finite element model of the motor to achieve field-circuit coupling simulation of induction motor’s field oriented control system.    

  17. Microgravity induced changes in the control of motor units

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, C.; Roy, S.

    The goal of this project is to understand the effects of microgravity on the control of muscles. It is motivated by the notion that in order to adequately address microgravity-induced deterioration in the force generating capacity of muscles, one needs to understand the changes in the control aspects in addition to histochemical and morphological changes. The investigations into muscle control need to include the regulation of the firing activity of motor units that make up a muscle and the coordination of different muscles responsible for the control of a joint. In order to understand the effects of microgravity on these two aspects of muscle control, we will test astronauts before and after spaceflight. The investigations of the control of motor units will involve intramuscular EMG techniques developed in our laboratory. We will use a quadrifilar electrode to detect simultaneously three differential channels of EMG activity. These data will be decomposed accurately using a sophisticated set of algorithms constructed with artificial intelligence knowledge- based techniques. Particular attention will be paid to the firing rate and recruitment behavior of motor units and we will study the degree of cross-correlation of the firing rates. This approach will enable us to study the firing behavior of several (approx. 10) concurrently active motor units. This analysis will enable us to detect modifications in the control of motor units. We will perform these investigations in a hand muscle, which continues being used in prehensile tasks in space, and a leg muscle whose antigravity role is not needed in space. The comparison of the effects of weightlessness on these muscles will determine if continued use of muscles in space deters the possible deleterious effects of microgravity on the control of motor units, in addition to slowing down atrophy. We are particularly interested in comparing the results of this study to similar data already obtained from elderly subjects

  18. Speed Control of Induction Motor using FOC Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafeezul Haq

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of applications in high performing electrical drive systems use nowadays, squirrel-cage induction motors. This paper describes a simplified method for the speed control of a three phase AC drive using Proportional-Integral controller. The simulation results show that the step response of the model is very fast, steady and able to work in four quadrants, and robustness and high performance is achieved.

  19. DIRECT TORQUE CONTROL FOR INDUCTION MOTOR USING INTELLIGENT TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Toufouti

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose two approach intelligent techniques of improvement of Direct Torque Control (DTC of Induction motor such as fuzzy logic (FL and artificial neural network (ANN, applied in switching select voltage vector .The comparison with conventional direct torque control (DTC, show that the use of the DTC_FL and DTC_ANN, reduced the torque, stator flux, and current ripples. The validity of the proposed methods is confirmed by the simulative results.

  20. Common Spatio-Time-Frequency Patterns for Motor Imagery-Based Brain Machine Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Higashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For efficient decoding of brain activities in analyzing brain function with an application to brain machine interfacing (BMI, we address a problem of how to determine spatial weights (spatial patterns, bandpass filters (frequency patterns, and time windows (time patterns by utilizing electroencephalogram (EEG recordings. To find these parameters, we develop a data-driven criterion that is a natural extension of the so-called common spatial patterns (CSP that are known to be effective features in BMI. We show that the proposed criterion can be optimized by an alternating procedure to achieve fast convergence. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively extract discriminative features for a motor imagery-based BMI.

  1. Electric fields of motor and frontal tDCS in a standard brain space: A computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Tanaka, Satoshi; Mikkonen, Marko; Koyama, Soichiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-08-15

    The electric field produced in the brain is the main physical agent of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Inter-subject variations in the electric fields may help to explain the variability in the effects of tDCS. Here, we use multiple-subject analysis to study the strength and variability of the group-level electric fields in the standard brain space. Personalized anatomically-accurate models of 62 subjects were constructed from T1- and T2-weighted MRI. The finite-element method was used to computationally estimate the individual electric fields, which were registered to the standard space using surface based registration. Motor cortical and frontal tDCS were modelled for 16 electrode montages. For each electrode montage, the group-level electric fields had a consistent strength and direction in several brain regions, which could also be located at some distance from the electrodes. In other regions, the electric fields were more variable, and thus more likely to produce variable effects in each individual. Both the anode and cathode locations affected the group-level electric fields, both directly under the electrodes and elsewhere. For motor cortical tDCS, the electric fields could be controlled at the group level by moving the electrodes. However, for frontal tDCS, the group-level electric fields were more variable, and the electrode locations had only minor effects on the group average fields. Our results reveal the electric fields and their variability at the group level in the standard brain space, providing insights into the mechanisms of tDCS for plasticity induction. The data are useful for planning, analysing and interpreting tDCS studies. PMID:27188218

  2. A novel Morse code-inspired method for multiclass motor imagery brain-computer interface (BCI) design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Yu, Yang; Liu, Yadong; Hu, Dewen

    2015-11-01

    Motor imagery (MI)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow disabled individuals to control external devices voluntarily, helping us to restore lost motor functions. However, the number of control commands available in MI-based BCIs remains limited, limiting the usability of BCI systems in control applications involving multiple degrees of freedom (DOF), such as control of a robot arm. To address this problem, we developed a novel Morse code-inspired method for MI-based BCI design to increase the number of output commands. Using this method, brain activities are modulated by sequences of MI (sMI) tasks, which are constructed by alternately imagining movements of the left or right hand or no motion. The codes of the sMI task was detected from EEG signals and mapped to special commands. According to permutation theory, an sMI task with N-length allows 2 × (2(N)-1) possible commands with the left and right MI tasks under self-paced conditions. To verify its feasibility, the new method was used to construct a six-class BCI system to control the arm of a humanoid robot. Four subjects participated in our experiment and the averaged accuracy of the six-class sMI tasks was 89.4%. The Cohen's kappa coefficient and the throughput of our BCI paradigm are 0.88 ± 0.060 and 23.5bits per minute (bpm), respectively. Furthermore, all of the subjects could operate an actual three-joint robot arm to grasp an object in around 49.1s using our approach. These promising results suggest that the Morse code-inspired method could be used in the design of BCIs for multi-DOF control. PMID:26340647

  3. A novel Morse code-inspired method for multiclass motor imagery brain-computer interface (BCI) design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Yu, Yang; Liu, Yadong; Hu, Dewen

    2015-11-01

    Motor imagery (MI)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow disabled individuals to control external devices voluntarily, helping us to restore lost motor functions. However, the number of control commands available in MI-based BCIs remains limited, limiting the usability of BCI systems in control applications involving multiple degrees of freedom (DOF), such as control of a robot arm. To address this problem, we developed a novel Morse code-inspired method for MI-based BCI design to increase the number of output commands. Using this method, brain activities are modulated by sequences of MI (sMI) tasks, which are constructed by alternately imagining movements of the left or right hand or no motion. The codes of the sMI task was detected from EEG signals and mapped to special commands. According to permutation theory, an sMI task with N-length allows 2 × (2(N)-1) possible commands with the left and right MI tasks under self-paced conditions. To verify its feasibility, the new method was used to construct a six-class BCI system to control the arm of a humanoid robot. Four subjects participated in our experiment and the averaged accuracy of the six-class sMI tasks was 89.4%. The Cohen's kappa coefficient and the throughput of our BCI paradigm are 0.88 ± 0.060 and 23.5bits per minute (bpm), respectively. Furthermore, all of the subjects could operate an actual three-joint robot arm to grasp an object in around 49.1s using our approach. These promising results suggest that the Morse code-inspired method could be used in the design of BCIs for multi-DOF control.

  4. Interfaz cerebro computador basada en P300 para la comunicación alternativa: estudio de caso en dos adolescentes en situación de discapacidad motora [P300 based Brain Computer Interface for alternative communication: a case study with two teenagers with motor disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Cossio, E.; Fernandez, C; Gaviria, M.E.; Palacio, C.; Alvaran, L.; Torres Villa, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Brain computer interface systems use brain signals to enable the control of external devices, such as: wheelchairs, communicators, neuro-prosthesis, among others; in people with severe motor disabilities. In this study two young men with motor disabilities were trained to learn how to control a brain computer interface (BCI) using the P300 evoked potential recorded by electroencephalography (EEG). This interface enables the verbal communication through a stimulation matrix (4x3 rows and colum...

  5. Risks of postoperative paresis in motor eloquently and non-eloquently located brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When treating cerebral metastases all involved multidisciplinary oncological specialists have to cooperate closely to provide the best care for these patients. For the resection of brain metastasis several studies reported a considerable risk of new postoperative paresis. Pre- and perioperative chemotherapy (Ctx) or radiotherapy (Rtx) alter vasculature and adjacent fiber tracts on the one hand, and many patients already present with paresis prior to surgery on the other hand. As such factors were repeatedly considered risk factors for perioperative complications, we designed this study to also identify risk factors for brain metastases resection. Between 2006 and 2011, we resected 206 brain metastases consecutively, 56 in eloquent motor areas and 150 in non-eloquent ones. We evaluated the influences of preoperative paresis, previous Rtx or Ctx as well as recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class on postoperative outcome. In general, 8.7% of all patients postoperatively developed a new permanent paresis. In contrast to preoperative Ctx, previous Rtx as a single or combined treatment strategy was a significant risk factor for postoperative motor weakness. This risk was even increased in perirolandic and rolandic lesions. Our data show significantly increased risk of new deficits for patients assigned to RPA class 3. Even in non-eloquently located brain metastases the risk of new postoperative paresis has not to be underestimated. Despite the microsurgical approach, our cohort shows a high rate of unexpected residual tumors in postoperative MRI, which supports recent data on brain metastases’ infiltrative nature but might also be the result of our strict study protocol. Surgical resection is a safe treatment of brain metastases. However, preoperative Rtx and RPA score 3 have to be taken into account when surgical resection is considered

  6. Effects of muscle atrophy on motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    As a biological tissue, muscle adapts to the demands of usage. One traditional way of assessing the extent of this adaptation has been to examine the effects of an altered-activity protocol on the physiological properties of muscles. However, in order to accurately interpret the changes associated with an activity pattern, it is necessary to employ an appropriate control model. A substantial literature exists which reports altered-use effects by comparing experimental observations with those from animals raised in small laboratory cages. Some evidence suggests that small-cage-reared animals actually represent a model of reduced use. For example, laboratory animals subjected to limited physical activity have shown resistance to insulin-induced glucose uptake which can be altered by exercise training. This project concerned itself with the basic mechanisms underlying muscle atrophy. Specifically, the project addressed the issue of the appropriateness of rats raised in conventional-sized cages as experimental models to examine this phenomenon. The project hypothesis was that rats raised in small cages are inappropriate models for the study of muscle atrophy. The experimental protocol involved: 1) raising two populations of rats, one group in conventional (small)-sized cages and the other group in a much larger (133x) cage, from weanling age (21 days) through to young adulthood (125 days); 2) comparison of size- and force-related characteristics of selected test muscles in an acute terminal paradigm.

  7. Visual-Motor Control in Baseball Batting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Gray

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available With margins for error of a few milliseconds and fractions of an inch it is not surprising that hitting a baseball is considered to be one of the most difficult acts in all of sports. We have been investigating this challenging behavior using a virtual baseball batting setup in which simulations of an approaching ball, pitcher, and field are combined with real-time recording of bat and limb movements. I will present evidence that baseball batting involves variable pre-programmed control in which the swing direction and movement time (MT are set prior to the initiation of the action but can take different values from swing-to-swing. This programming process utilizes both advance information (pitch history and count and optical information picked-up very early in the ball's flight (ball time to contact TTC and rotation direction. The pre-programmed value of MT is used to determine a critical value of TTC for swing initiation. Finally, because a baseball swing is an action that is occasionally interrupted online (i.e., a “check swing”, I will discuss experiments that examine when this pre-programmed action can be stopped and the sources of optical information that trigger stopping.

  8. Impulse control in developing brain

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Miu-ching, Adelina.; 劉妙貞.

    2012-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex, multifaceted domain with cognitive (level of attention), affective (emotion regulation) and behavioural (reward responsiveness) manifestations. No study had been done so far on trajectory of impulse control, attention and reward responsiveness in child development. The aim of the present study is to compare the level of impulsivity, attention and reward responsiveness among children at different stages of development. Forty Chines...

  9. Fuzzy Impulsive Control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dong; WANG Shi-Long; ZHANG Xiao-Hong; YANG Dan; WANG Hui

    2008-01-01

    The permanent magnet synchronous motors(PMSMs)may experience chaotic behaviours with systemic parameters falling into a certain area or under certain working conditions,which threaten the secure and stable operation of motor-driven.Hence,it is important to study the methods of controlling or suppressing chaos in PMSMs.In this work,the Takagi-Sugeno(T-S)fuzzy impulsive control model for PMSMs is established via the T-S modelling methodology and impulsive technology.Based on the new model,the control conditions of asymptotical stability and exponential stability for PMSMs have been derived by the Lyapunov method.Finally,an illustrated example is also given to show the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  10. Gait variability and motor control in people with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, Tine; Raffalt, Peter C; Dalsgaard, Helle;

    2015-01-01

    fluctuation analysis. The motor control was assessed by the soleus (SO) Hoffmann (H)-reflex modulation and muscle co-activation during walking. The results showed no statistically significant mean group differences in any of the gait variability measures or muscle co-activation levels. The SO H...... impact of their disease. These results suggest that the OA group in general sustained a normal gait pattern with natural variability but with suggestions of facilitated SO H-reflex in the swing to stance phase transition. We speculate that the difference in SO H-reflex modulation reflects that the OA......Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease that impairs walking ability and function. We compared the temporal gait variability and motor control in people with knee OA with healthy controls. The purpose was to test the hypothesis that the temporal gait variability would reflect a more...

  11. Signal differentiation in position tracking control of dc motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An asymptotic differentiation approach with respect to time is used for on-line estimation of velocity and acceleration signals in controlled dc motors. The attractive feature of this differentiator of signals is that it does not require any system mathematical model, which allows its use in engineering systems that require the signal differentiation for its control, identification, fault detection, among other applications. Moreover, it is shown that the differentiation approach can be applied for output signals showing a chaotic behavior. In addition a differential flatness control scheme with additional integral compensation of the output error is proposed for tracking tasks of position reference trajectories for direct current electric motors using angular position measurements only

  12. Efficiency optimized control of medium-size induction motor drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, F.; Blaabjerg, Frede; Pedersen, John Kim;

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of a variable speed induction motor drive can be optimized by adaption of the motor flux level to the load torque. In small drives (<10 kW) this can be done without considering the relatively small converter losses, but for medium-size drives (10-1000 kW) the losses can not be disr......The efficiency of a variable speed induction motor drive can be optimized by adaption of the motor flux level to the load torque. In small drives (... not be disregarded without further analysis. The importance of the converter losses on efficiency optimization in medium-size drives is analyzed in this paper. Based on the experiments with a 90 kW drive it is found that it is not critical if the converter losses are neglected in the control, except...... that the robustness towards load disturbances may unnecessarily be reduced. Both displacement power factor and model-based efficiency optimizing control methods perform well in medium-size drives. The last strategy is also tested on a 22 kW drive with good results....

  13. Advanced induction motor drive control with single current sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Evgenije M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes induction motor drive control method which uses minimal number of sensors, providing only DC-link current as a feedback signal. Improved DC-link current sampling scheme and modified asymmetrical switching pattern cancels characteristic waveform errors which exist in all three reconstructed motor line-currents. Motor linecurrent harmonic content is reduced to an acceptable level, eliminating torque and speed oscillations which were inherent for conventional single sensor drives. Consequently, use of single current sensor and line-current reconstruction technique is no longer acceptable only for low and medium performance drives, but also for drives where priority is obtaining a highly accurate, stable and fast response. Proposed control algorithm is validated using induction motor drive hardware prototype based on TMS320F2812 digital signal processor. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 042004 and by the Provincial Secretariat for Science and Technological Development of AP Vojvodina under contract No. 114-451-3508/2013-04

  14. Motor Control and Regulation for a Flywheel Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Barbara; Lyons, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    This talk will focus on the motor control algorithms used to regulate the flywheel system at the NASA Glenn Research Center. First a discussion of the inner loop torque control technique will be given. It is based on the principle of field orientation and is implemented without a position or speed sensor (sensorless control). Then the outer loop charge and discharge algorithm will be presented. This algorithm controls the acceleration of the flywheel during charging and the deceleration while discharging. The algorithm also allows the flywheel system to regulate the DC bus voltage during the discharge cycle.

  15. Modeling and control of V/f controlled induction motor using genetic-ANFIS algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ustun, Seydi Vakkas (Vocational High School, Adiyaman University, Adiyaman/Turkey); Demirtas, Metin (Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Balikesir University, Balikesir/Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    This paper deals with modeling and performance analysis of the voltage/frequency (V/f) control of induction motor drives. The V/f control, which realizes a low cost and simple design, is advantageous in the middle to high-speed range. Its torque response depends on the electrical time constant of the motor and adjustments of the control parameters are not need. Therefore, V/f control of induction motor is carried out. Space vector pulse width modulation is used for controlling the motor because of including minimum harmonics according to the other PWM techniques. Proportional Integral (PI) controller is used to control speed of induction motor. In this work, optimization of PI coefficients is carried out by Ziegler-Nichols model and Genetic-Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model. These controllers are applied to drive system with 0.55 kW induction motor. A digital signal processor controller (dsPIC30F6010) is used to carry out control applications. The proposed method is compared Ziegler-Nichols model. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed control method. (author)

  16. Robust Adaptive Speed Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidstrup, N.

    This thesis concerns speed control of current vector controlled induction motor drives (CVC drives). The CVC drive is an existing prototype drive developed by Danfoss A/S, Transmission Division. Practical tests have revealed that the open loop dynamical properties of the CVC drive are highly......, (LS) identification and generalized predictive control (GPC) has been implemented and tested on the CVC drive. Allthough GPC is a robust control method, it was not possible to maintain specified controller performance in the entire operating range. This was the main reason for investigating truly...... adaptive speed control of the CVC drive. A direct truly adaptive speed controller has been implemented. The adaptive controller is a moving Average Self-Tuning Regulator which is abbreviated MASTR throughout the thesis. Two practical implementations of this controller were proposed. They were denoted MASTR...

  17. Novel intelligent PID control of traveling wave ultrasonic motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingzhuo, Shi; Yu, Liu; Jingtao, Huang; Meiyu, Xu; Juwei, Zhang; Lei, Zhang

    2014-09-01

    A simple control strategy with acceptable control performance can be a good choice for the mass production of ultrasonic motor control system. In this paper, through the theoretic and experimental analyses of typical control process, a simpler intelligent PID speed control strategy of TWUM is proposed, involving only two expert rules to adjust the PID control parameters based on the current status. Compared with the traditional PID controller, this design requires less calculation and more cheap chips which can be easily involved in online performance. Experiments with different load torques and voltage amplitudes show that the proposed controller can deal with the nonlinearity and load disturbance to maintain good control performance of TWUM. PMID:24957274

  18. Comparative Study of Controller Design for Four Quadrant Operation of Three Phase BLDC Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Ms.K.Suganya*1

    2014-01-01

    Brushless DC motor drives are becoming more popular in industrial and traction applications. The control of BLDC motor in four quadrants is very vital. The three-phase permanent magnet brushless dc motor inherently needs an electronic commutation circuit to drive it, because it is not a self-commutating motor. It is contrary to the conventional brush motor which commutates itself. This paper presents a comparison study of three type of control such as PI, PID & fuzzy. The char...

  19. Adaptive Stacked Generalization for Multiclass Motor Imagery-Based Brain Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis F; Corralejo, Rebeca; Gomez-Pilar, Javier; Álvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Practical motor imagery-based brain computer interface (MI-BCI) applications are limited by the difficult to decode brain signals in a reliable way. In this paper, we propose a processing framework to address non-stationarity, as well as handle spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics associated with execution of motor tasks. Stacked generalization is used to exploit the power of classifier ensembles for combining information coming from multiple sources and reducing the existing uncertainty in EEG signals. The outputs of several regularized linear discriminant analysis (RLDA) models are combined to account for temporal, spatial, and spectral information. The resultant algorithm is called stacked RLDA (SRLDA). Additionally, an adaptive processing stage is introduced before classification to reduce the harmful effect of intersession non-stationarity. The benefits of the proposed method are evaluated on the BCI Competition IV dataset 2a. We demonstrate its effectiveness in binary and multiclass settings with four different motor imagery tasks: left-hand, right-hand, both feet, and tongue movements. The results show that adaptive SRLDA outperforms the winner of the competition and other approaches tested on this multiclass dataset.

  20. Functional localization of the cortical motor area in the brain Electrocorticogram analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Jiang; Xiaoming Wu; Binggang Ye; Sijuan Huang

    2010-01-01

    The method for rapidly,precisely and non-invasively localizing functional regions of the brain is a problem in neuromedicine research.Cortical electrostimulation is the optimal localization method during brain surgery,with a degree of accuracy of approximately 5 mm.However,electrostimulation can damage the cerebral cortex,trigger epilepsy,and extend the operation time.Studies are required to determine whether cortical motor regions can be localized by wavelet analysis from electrocorticograms.In this study,based on wavelet analysis of electrocorticograms,a selection of algorithms for classification of the mu rhythm in the motor regions utilizing experimental data was verified.Results demonstrated that a characteristic quantity of energy ratio in the reconstructed signal was filtered in the d6(7.81-15.62 Hz)band prior to and following motion events.A characteristic threshold was considered to be 40%.The accuracy of localization detection was 93%.The degree of accuracy was less than 5 mm.The present study avoided the problems of cerebral cortex injury and epilepsy onset,with an operation time of 60 seconds.Therefore,wavelet analysis on electrocorticogram is feasible for localizing cortical motor regions.Furthermore,this localization technique is accurate,safe and rapid.

  1. Brain-Machine Interfacing Control of Whole-Body Humanoid Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim eBouyarmane

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose to tackle in this paper the problem of controlling whole-body humanoid robot behavior through non-invasive brain-machine interfacing (BMI, motivated by the perspective of mapping human motor control strategies to human-like mechanical avatar. Our solution is based on the adequate reduction of the controllable dimensionality of a high-DOF humanoid motion in line with the state-of-the-art possibilities of non-invasive BMI technologies, leaving the complement subspace part of the motion to be planned and executed by an autonomous humanoid whole-body motion planning and control framework. The results are shown in full physics-based simulation of a 36-degree-of-freedom humanoid motion controlled by a user through EEG-extracted brain signals generated with motor imagery task.

  2. Brain oscillatory activity during motor imagery in EEG-fMRI coregistration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaggio, Emanuela; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Cerini, Roberto; Fiaschi, Antonio; Manganotti, Paolo

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the correlation between topographical changes in brain oscillatory activity and the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal during a motor imagery (MI) task using electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) coregistration. EEG was recorded in 7 healthy subjects inside a 1.5 T MR scanner during the imagination of the kinesthetic experience of movement. A Fast Fourier Transform was applied to EEG signal in the rest and active conditions. We used the event-related-synchronization (ERS)/desynchronization (ERD) approach to characterize where the imagination of movement produces a decrease in alpha and beta power. The mean alpha map showed ERD decrease localized over the contralateral sensory motor area (SM1c) and a light desynchronization in the ipsilateral sensory motor area (SM1i); whereas the mean beta map showed ERD decrease over the supplementary motor area (SMA). fMRI showed significant activation in SMA, SM1c, SM1i. The correlation is negative in the contralateral side and positive in the ipsilateral side. Using combined EEG-fMRI signals we obtained useful new information on the description of the changes in oscillatory activity in alpha and beta bands during MI and on the investigation of the sites of BOLD activity as possible sources in generating these rhythms. By correlating BOLD and ERD/ERS we may identify more accurately which regions contribute to changes of the electrical response. PMID:20850237

  3. Adaptive Motor Imagery: A Multimodal Study of Immobilization-Induced Brain Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burianová, Hana; Sowman, Paul F; Marstaller, Lars; Rich, Anina N; Williams, Mark A; Savage, Greg; Al-Janabi, Shahd; de Lissa, Peter; Johnson, Blake W

    2016-03-01

    The consequences of losing the ability to move a limb are traumatic. One approach that examines the impact of pathological limb nonuse on the brain involves temporary immobilization of a healthy limb. Here, we investigated immobilization-induced plasticity in the motor imagery (MI) circuitry during hand immobilization. We assessed these changes with a multimodal paradigm, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure neural activation, magnetoencephalography (MEG) to track neuronal oscillatory dynamics, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess corticospinal excitability. fMRI results show a significant decrease in neural activation for MI of the constrained hand, localized to sensorimotor areas contralateral to the immobilized hand. MEG results show a significant decrease in beta desynchronization and faster resynchronization in sensorimotor areas contralateral to the immobilized hand. TMS results show a significant increase in resting motor threshold in motor cortex contralateral to the constrained hand, suggesting a decrease in corticospinal excitability in the projections to the constrained hand. These results demonstrate a direct and rapid effect of immobilization on MI processes of the constrained hand, suggesting that limb nonuse may not only affect motor execution, as evidenced by previous studies, but also MI. These findings have important implications for the effectiveness of therapeutic approaches that use MI as a rehabilitation tool to ameliorate the negative effects of limb nonuse. PMID:25477368

  4. Vector Control Algorithm for Electric Vehicle AC Induction Motor Based on Improved Variable Gain PID Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration performance of EV, which affects a lot of performances of EV such as start-up, overtaking, driving safety, and ride comfort, has become increasingly popular in recent researches. An improved variable gain PID control algorithm to improve the acceleration performance is proposed in this paper. The results of simulation with Matlab/Simulink demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm through the control performance of motor velocity, motor torque, and three-phase current of motor. Moreover, it is investigated that the proposed controller is valid by comparison with the other PID controllers. Furthermore, the AC induction motor experiment set is constructed to verify the effect of proposed controller.

  5. Self-Controlled Feedback for a Complex Motor Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Peter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-controlled augmented feedback enhances learning of simple motor tasks. Thereby, learners tend to request feedback after trials that were rated as good by themselves. Feedback after good trials promotes positive reinforcement, which enhances motor learning. The goal of this study was to investigate when naïve learners request terminal visual feedback in a complex motor task, as conclusions drawn on simple tasks can hardly be transferred to complex tasks. Indeed, seven of nine learners stated to have intended to request feedback predominantly after good trials, but in contrast to their intention, kinematic analysis showed that feedback was rather requested randomly (23% after good, 44% after intermediate, 33% after bad trials. Moreover, requesting feedback after good trials did not correlate with learning success. It seems that self-estimation of performance in complex tasks is challenging. As a consequence, learners might have focused on certain movement aspects rather than on the overall movement. Further studies should assess the current focus of the learner in detail to gain more insight in self-estimation capabilities during complex motor task learning.

  6. Robust Precision Positioning Control on Linear Ultrasonic Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Minh H-T; Tan, Kok Kiong; Liang, Wenyu; Teo, Chek Sing

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic motors used in high-precision mechatronics are characterized by strong frictional effects, which are among the main problems in precision motion control. The traditional methods apply model-based nonlinear feedforward to compensate the friction, thus requiring closed-loop stability and safety constraint considerations. Implementation of these methods requires complex designed experiments. This paper introduces a systematic approach using piecewise affine models to emulate the frict...

  7. Inter-examiner reproducibility of tests for lumbar motor control

    OpenAIRE

    Elkjaer Arne; Remvig Lars; Kjaer Per; Enoch Flemming; Juul-Kristensen Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Many studies show a relation between reduced lumbar motor control (LMC) and low back pain (LBP). However, test circumstances vary and during test performance, subjects may change position. In other words, the reliability - i.e. reproducibility and validity - of tests for LMC should be based on quantitative data. This has not been considered before. The aim was to analyse the reproducibility of five different quantitative tests for LMC commonly used in daily clinical practi...

  8. Mechanisms of motor adaptation in reactive balance control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrence D J Welch

    Full Text Available Balance control must be rapidly modified to provide stability in the face of environmental challenges. Although changes in reactive balance over repeated perturbations have been observed previously, only anticipatory postural adjustments preceding voluntary movements have been studied in the framework of motor adaptation and learning theory. Here, we hypothesized that adaptation occurs in task-level balance control during responses to perturbations due to central changes in the control of both anticipatory and reactive components of balance. Our adaptation paradigm consisted of a Training set of forward support-surface perturbations, a Reversal set of novel countermanding perturbations that reversed direction, and a Washout set identical to the Training set. Adaptation was characterized by a change in a motor variable from the beginning to the end of each set, the presence of aftereffects at the beginning of the Washout set when the novel perturbations were removed, and a return of the variable at the end of the Washout to a level comparable to the end of the Training set. Task-level balance performance was characterized by peak center of mass (CoM excursion and velocity, which showed adaptive changes with repetitive trials. Only small changes in anticipatory postural control, characterized by body lean and background muscle activity were observed. Adaptation was found in the evoked long-latency muscular response, and also in the sensorimotor transformation mediating that response. Finally, in each set, temporal patterns of muscle activity converged towards an optimum predicted by a trade-off between maximizing motor performance and minimizing muscle activity. Our results suggest that adaptation in balance, as well as other motor tasks, is mediated by altering central sensitivity to perturbations and may be driven by energetic considerations.

  9. Study on Rotor IGBT Chopper Control for Induction Motor Drive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Rotor chopper control is a simple and effective drive method for induction motor. This paper presents a novel IGBT chopper topology,which can both adjust rotor resistance and protect IGBT efficiently. Investigation on the quasi-transient state of the rotor rectifying circuit is made, and a nonlinear mapping between the equivalent resistance and the duty cycle is deduced. Furthermore, the method for determining the magnitude of the external resistor is introduced.

  10. Brain N-acetylaspartate levels correlate with motor function in metachromatic leukodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    í Dali, Christine; Hanson, Lars G.; Barton, N. W.;

    2010-01-01

    development of future reatments. Methods: A cross-section of 13 children with late infantile MLD were examined by proton MRS. Signals from NAA, total choline, and total creatine in the deep white matter were measured and correlated with the results of cognitive and motor function tests. Results: The NAA...... observed in cognitive function. We report strong positive correlations between standardized measures of motor and cognitive function and NAA levels in the deep white matter. Conclusions: We suggest that NAA levels could serve as a sensitive biomarker in children with MLD. Proton MRS may provide a valuable...... in oligodendrocytes and is known as a marker for neuronal and axonal loss. NAA and other metabolite levels measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) correlate with performance of the brain in normal children. There is a need for sensitive measures of disease progression in patients with MLD to enable...

  11. Piano training in youths with hand motor impairments after damage to the developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampe R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Renée Lampe,1,* Anna Thienel,2 Jürgen Mitternacht,1 Tobias Blumenstein,1 Varvara Turova,1 Ana Alves-Pinto1,* 1Research Unit for Paediatric Neuroorthopaedics and Cerebral Palsy, Orthopaedics Department, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 2Department Sonderpädagogik, Ludwig Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Damage to the developing brain may lead to impairment of the hand motor function and negatively impact on patients’ quality of life. Development of manual dexterity and finger and hand motor function may be promoted by learning to play the piano. The latter brings together music with the intensive training of hand coordination and fine finger mobility. We investigated if learning to play the piano helped to improve hand motor skills in 18 youths with hand motor disorders resulting from damage during early brain development. Participants trained 35–40 minutes twice a week for 18 months with a professional piano teacher. With the use of a Musical Instrument Digital Interface piano, the uniformity of finger strokes could be objectively assessed from the timing of keystrokes. The analysis showed a significant improvement in the uniformity of keystrokes during the training. Furthermore, the youths showed strong motivation and engagement during the study. This is nevertheless an open study, and further studies remain needed to exclude effects of growth and concomitant therapies on the improvements observed and clarify which patients will more likely benefit from learning to play the piano. Keywords: manual skill, cerebral palsy, neurodevelopmental disorder, music, rehabilitation

  12. Construction of AC Motor Controllers for NOvA Experiment Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Cooley, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    I have been constructing Alternating Current (AC) motor controllers for manipulation of particle beam detectors. The capability and reliability of these motor controllers are essential to the Laboratory's mission of accurate analysis of the particle beam's position. The device is moved in and out of the beam's path by the motor controller followed by the Neutrinos at the Main Injector Off-Axis {\

  13. Performance Enhancement of PID Controllers by Modern Optimization Techniques for Speed Control of PMBL DC Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Antony Freeda Rani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Permanent Magnet Brushless DC motor (PMBL DC is used in a large number of industrial and automotive applications because of their high efficiency, compactness and excellent reliability. However to design an efficient PMBL DC motor, it is necessary to provide an effective controller that has to reduce the overshoot, settling and rise time. In this study, an improved PID controller has been designed by optimizing the parameters of PID controller based on two advanced optimization techniques ANFIS and Cuckoo Search optimization for speed control of a PMBL DC motor. The proposed approach has superior features, including easy implementation, stable convergence characteristic and good computational efficiency. The PMBL DC motor is modeled in SIMULINK implementing the algorithms in MATLAB and the performance evaluation has been studied.

  14. Speed Sensorless Vector Control of Induction Motor Drive with PI and Fuzzy Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gunabalan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper directed the speed-sensorless vector control of induction motor drive with PI and fuzzy controllers.  Natural observer with fourth order state space model is employed to estimate the speed and rotor fluxes of the induction motor. The formation of the natural observer is similar to and as well as its attribute is identical to the induction motor. Load torque adaptation is provided to estimate the torque and rotor speed is estimated from the load torque, rotor fluxes and stator currents. There is no direct feedback in natural observer and also observer gain matrix is absent. Both the induction motor and the observer are characterized by state space model. Simple fuzzy logic controller and conventional PI controllers are used to control the speed of the induction motor in closed loop. MATLAB simulations are made with PI and fuzzy controllers and the performance of fuzzy controller is better than PI controller in view of torque ripples. The simulation results are obtained for various running conditions to exhibit the suitability of this method for sensorless vector control. Experimental results are provided for natual observer based sensorless vector control with conventional PI controller.

  15. The brain decade in debate: VI. Sensory and motor maps: dynamics and plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Das

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is an edited transcription of a virtual symposium promoted by the Brazilian Society of Neuroscience and Behavior (SBNeC. Although the dynamics of sensory and motor representations have been one of the most studied features of the central nervous system, the actual mechanisms of brain plasticity that underlie the dynamic nature of sensory and motor maps are not entirely unraveled. Our discussion began with the notion that the processing of sensory information depends on many different cortical areas. Some of them are arranged topographically and others have non-topographic (analytical properties. Besides a sensory component, every cortical area has an efferent output that can be mapped and can influence motor behavior. Although new behaviors might be related to modifications of the sensory or motor representations in a given cortical area, they can also be the result of the acquired ability to make new associations between specific sensory cues and certain movements, a type of learning known as conditioning motor learning. Many types of learning are directly related to the emotional or cognitive context in which a new behavior is acquired. This has been demonstrated by paradigms in which the receptive field properties of cortical neurons are modified when an animal is engaged in a given discrimination task or when a triggering feature is paired with an aversive stimulus. The role of the cholinergic input from the nucleus basalis to the neocortex was also highlighted as one important component of the circuits responsible for the context-dependent changes that can be induced in cortical maps.

  16. Cascade Control Solution for Traction Motor for Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsa Preitl

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a hybrid electric vehicle is considered, which contains both aninternal combustion engine and an electric motor (EM. Without focusing on the othercomponents of the vehicle, the EM is treated in detail, both regarding modelling aspectsand control solutions.After a brief modelling of the plant, two cascade speed control solutions are presented: firsta classical PI+PI cascade control solution is presented. The control systems related totraction electric motors (used in vehicle traction must be able to cope with differentrequests, such as variation of the reference signal, load disturbances which depend on thetransport conditions and parametric disturbances regarding changes in the total mass ofthe vehicle. For this purpose, in the design of the speed controller (external loop a specificmethodology based on extension of the symmetrical optimum method is presented. Thecontrollers are developed using the Modulus–Optimum method for the inner loop, and theExtended Symmetrical Optimum Method, corrected based on the 2p-SO-method, for theouter loop (for a more efficient disturbance rejection.In order to force the behaviour of the system regarding the reference input, a correctionterm is introduced as a non-homogenous structured PI controller solution.Simulations were performed using numerical values taken from a real applicationconsisting in a hybrid vehicle prototype, showing satisfactory behaviour.

  17. Neural Network Controllers in DTC of Synchronous Motor Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar Ambarapu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM have gained numerous industrial applications, because of simple structure, high efficiency and ease of maintenance. But these motors have a nonlinear mathematical model. To resolve this problem several studies have suggested the application of vector control (VC and direct torque control (DTC with soft-computing (SC techniques. This paper presents neuro direct torque control (NDTC of PMSM. Hence this paper aims to present a technique to control speed and torque with reduced ripple compared to previous techniques. The outputs of Artificial Neural Network(ANN controller mechanism is compared with that of classical DTC and the results demonstrate the influence of ANN is improved compared to classical DTC topology. The system is also verified and proved to be operated stably with reduced torque ripple, very low speed, sudden speed reversals, at low torque and at high torque. The proposed method validity and effectiveness has been verified by computer simulations using Matlab/Simulink®. These results are compared with the ones obtained with a classical DTC using PI speed controller.

  18. Voltage Controller Saves Energy, Prolongs Life of Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    In 1985, Power Efficiency Corporation of Las Vegas licensed NASA voltage controller technology from Marshall Space Flight Center. In the following years, Power Efficiency made patented improvements to the technology and marketed the resulting products throughout the world as the Performance Controller and the Power Efficiency energy-saving soft start. Soft start gradually introduces power to an electric motor, thus eliminating the harsh, violent mechanical stresses of having the device go from a dormant state to one of full activity; prevents it from running too hot; and increases the motor's lifetime. The product can pay for itself through the reduction in electricity consumed (according to Power Efficiency, within 3 years), depending on the duty cycle of the motor and the prevailing power rates. In many instances, the purchaser is eligible for special utility rebates for the environmental protection it provides. Common applications of Power Efficiency's soft start include mixers, grinders, granulators, conveyors, crushers, stamping presses, injection molders, elevators with MG sets, and escalators. The device has been retrofitted onto equipment at major department store chains, hotels, airports, universities, and for various manufacturers

  19. Non-invasive brain stimulation: enhancing motor and cognitive functions in healthy old subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximo Zimerman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthy aging is accompanied by changes in cognitive and motor functions that result in impairment of activities of daily living. This process involves a number of modifications in the brain and is associated with metabolic, structural and physiological changes; some of these serving as adaptive responses to the functional declines. Up to date there are no universally accepted strategies to ameliorate declining functions in this population. An essential basis to develop such strategies is a better understanding of neuroplastic changes during healthy aging. In this context, non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial direct current or transcranial magnetic stimulation, provide an attractive option to modulate cortical neuronal assemblies, even with subsequent changes in neuroplasticity. Thus, in the present review we discuss the use of these techniques as a tool to study underlying cortical mechanisms during healthy aging and as an interventional strategy to enhance declining functions and learning abilities in aged subjects.

  20. Direct-Torque Neuro-Fuzzy Control of Induction Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐君鹏; CHEN Yan-feng; LI Guo-hou

    2007-01-01

    Fuzzy systems are currently being used in a wide field of industrial and scientific applications. Since the design and especially the optimization process of fuzzy systems can be very time consuming, it is convenient to have algorithms which construct and optimize them automatically. In order to improve the system stability and raise the response speed, a new control scheme, direct-torque neuro-fuzzy control for induction motor drive, was put forward. The design and tuning procedure have been described. Also, the improved stator flux estimation algorithm, which guarantees eccentric estimated flux has been proposed.

  1. Improved direct torque control of induction motor with dither injection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Behera; S P Das

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, a three-level inverter-fed induction motor drive operating under Direct Torque Control (DTC) is presented. A triangular wave is used as dither signal of minute amplitude (for torque hysteresis band and flux hysteresis band respectively) in the error block. This method minimizes flux and torque ripple in a three-level inverter fed induction motor drive while the dynamic performance is not affected. The optimal value of dither frequency and magnitude is found out under free running condition. The proposed technique reduces torque ripple by 60% (peak to peak) compared to the case without dither injection, results in low acoustic noise and increases the switching frequency of the inverter. A laboratory prototype of the drive system has been developed and the simulation and experimental results are reported.

  2. Research of Control Method for Improving Mechanical Performance of Winding Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhao-zhang; YANG Zheng-lin

    2002-01-01

    A reformed PHD (Proportional-Integral- Differential)motor controller is developed for the ideal winding performance. It is verified that the PHD motor controller can largely improve the mechanical performance and raise the production efficiency by means of the test of a winding production system driven by a motor with high internal resistance rotator. It indicates that improving the control method is one of the most effective ways to improve the winding performance of the motor in winding production.

  3. Reversing cognitive-motor impairments in Parkinson's disease patients using a computational modelling approach to deep brain stimulation programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankemolle, Anneke M M; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Ho, Jason C; Vitek, Jerrold L; McIntyre, Cameron C; Alberts, Jay L

    2010-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus is an effective and safe surgical procedure that has been shown to reduce the motor dysfunction of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, however, has been associated with declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. It has been hypothesized that spread of current to nonmotor areas of the subthalamic nucleus may be responsible for declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. The aim of this study was to assess the cognitive-motor performance in advanced Parkinson's disease patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation parameters determined clinically (Clinical) to settings derived from a patient-specific computational model (Model). Data were collected from 10 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease bilaterally implanted with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation systems. These patients were assessed off medication and under three deep brain stimulation conditions: Off, Clinical or Model based stimulation. Clinical stimulation parameters had been determined based on clinical evaluations and were stable for at least 6 months prior to study participation. Model-based parameters were selected to minimize the spread of current to nonmotor portions of the subthalamic nucleus using Cicerone Deep Brain Stimulation software. For each stimulation condition, participants performed a working memory (n-back task) and motor task (force tracking) under single- and dual-task settings. During the dual-task, participants performed the n-back and force-tracking tasks simultaneously. Clinical and Model parameters were equally effective in improving the Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale III scores relative to Off deep brain stimulation scores. Single-task working memory declines, in the 2-back condition, were significantly less under Model compared with Clinical deep brain stimulation settings. Under dual-task conditions, force

  4. Evaluation of a modified Fitts law brain-computer interface target acquisition task in able and motor disabled individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, E. A.; Radwin, R. G.; Wilson, J. A.; Williams, J. C.

    2009-10-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that takes recorded brain signals and translates them into real-time actions, in this case movement of a cursor on a computer screen. This work applied Fitts' law to the evaluation of performance on a target acquisition task during sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI training. Fitts' law, which has been used as a predictor of movement time in studies of human movement, was used here to determine the information transfer rate, which was based on target acquisition time and target difficulty. The information transfer rate was used to make comparisons between control modalities and subject groups on the same task. Data were analyzed from eight able-bodied and five motor disabled participants who wore an electrode cap that recorded and translated their electroencephalogram (EEG) signals into computer cursor movements. Direct comparisons were made between able-bodied and disabled subjects, and between EEG and joystick cursor control in able-bodied subjects. Fitts' law aptly described the relationship between movement time and index of difficulty for each task movement direction when evaluated separately and averaged together. This study showed that Fitts' law can be successfully applied to computer cursor movement controlled by neural signals.

  5. Model-Based Torque Control of Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Motors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors (PUMs) are ideal actuators for a variety of spaced-based robotics applications. These motors replace conventional drive systems...

  6. Direct Torque Control of Induction Motor with Matrix Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaf Salloum Gaeid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The matrix converter (MC with direct torque control (DTC combination is efficient way to get better performance specifications in the industry. The MC and the DTC advantages are combined together. The reduction of complexity and cost of DC link in the DTC since it has no capacitors in the circuit. However, the controlling torque is a big problem it in DTC because of high ripple torque production which results in vibrations response in the operation of the iductuction motor as it has no PID to control the torque directly. To overcome this, a combination of MC with DTC is applied to reduce the fluctuation in the output torque and minimize the steady state error. This paper presents the simulation analysis of induction machine drives using Maltlab/Simulink toolbox R2012a. Design of DTC induction motor drive, MC with constant switching frequency, speed controller and stability investigation as well as controllability and observabilty with minimum final prediction (FPE steady state error and loss functionality has been carried out precisely.

  7. Motor and cognitive outcome after specific early lesions of the brain - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hielkema, Tjitske; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to study motor and cognitive outcome in infants with severe early brain lesions and to evaluate effects of side of the lesion, sex, and social economic status on outcome. A literature search was performed using the databases Pubmed and Embase. Included studies involved infants with either cystic periventricular leukomalacia (cPVL), preterm, or term stroke (i.e. parenchymal lesion of the brain). Outcome was expressed as cerebral palsy (CP) and intellectual disability (mental retardation). Median prevalence rates of CP after cPVL, preterm, and term stroke were 86%, 71%, and 29% respectively; of intellectual disability 50%, 27%, and 33%. Most infants with cPVL developed bilateral CP, those with term stroke unilateral CP, whereas after preterm stroke bilateral and unilateral CP occurred equally often. Information on the effects of sex and social economic status on outcome after specific brain lesions was very limited. Our findings show that the risk for CP is high after cPVL, moderate after preterm stroke, and lowest after term stroke. The risk for intellectual disability after an early brain lesion is lower than that for CP. Predicting outcome at individual level remains difficult; new imaging techniques may improve predicting developmental trajectories. PMID:27027607

  8. LINKING MOTOR-RELATED BRAIN POTENTIALS AND VELOCITY PROFILES IN MULTI-JOINT ARM REACHING MOVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julià L Amengual

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of the movement related brain potentials (MRPBs needs accurate technical approaches to disentangle the specific patterns of bran activity during the preparation and execution of movements. During the last forty years, synchronizing the electromiographic activation (EMG of the muscle with the electrophysiological recordings (EEG has been commonly ussed for these purposes. However, new clinical approaches in the study of motor diseases and rehabilitation suggest the demand of new paradigms that might go further into the study of the brain activity associated with the kinematics of movement. As a response to this call, we have used a 3-D hand tracking system with the aim to record continuously the position of an ultrasonic sender located on the hand during the performance of multi-joint self-pace movements. We synchronized the time-series of position of velocity of the sender with the EEG recordings, obtaining specific patterns of brain activity as a function of the fluctuations of the kinematics during the natural movement performance. Additionally, the distribution of the brain activity during the preparation and execution phases of movement was similar that reported previously using the EMG, suggesting the validity of our technique. We claim that this paradigm could be usable in patients because of its simplicity and the potential knowledge that can be extracted from clinical protocols.

  9. 基于fNIRS的运动执行与运动想象脑激活模式比较%Comparison of motor execution and motor imagery brain activation patterns:A fNIRS Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白学军; 张琪涵; 章鹏; 周菘; 刘颖; 宋星; 彭国慧

    2016-01-01

    It is widely believed that activity in the primary motor cortex relates only to motor execution. However, the extent to which similar activity occurs when imagining motor movements remains to be determined and, while some researchers report activity in the primary motor cortex during both motor execution and motor imagery tasks (e.g.Solodkin et al., 2004; Sharma et al., 2008), others report no effects of motor imagery (e.g., Binkofski et al., 2000; Hanakawa et al., 2003; Hétu et al., 2013). It is still unknown whether brain activation patterns of motor execution and motor imagery are similar, and whether both tasks activate the primary motor cortex. In addition, it is also unclear about the effect of imagination intensity on the primary motor cortex (this effect has been well established in motor execution tasks). Accordingly, the present research investigated the relationship between the intensity of real and imagined exercise on cortical activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), especially in the primary motor cortex. A preliminary assessment used 10 participants (5 male, 5 female), who did not take part in the main experiment, to establish an appropriate level of exercise intensity. For the main experiment, 30 participants (15 male, 15 female) with high imagination ability were selected using the Motor Imagery Questionnaire (Revised). These participants performed a motor execution task in which they actually lifted dumbbells under two levels of exercise intensity (males, 4 pounds and 8 pounds; females, 2 pounds and 4 pounds) and an imagery version of this task in which they imagined lifting dumbbells of these weights. The fNIRS was used to measure cortical changes in oxygen level during the performance of the two tasks. Finally, on completion of the imagery task, the “motor imagery self-assessment questionnaire” was administered to assess the quality of the participants’ imagination. All participants reported that they could imagine

  10. Energy efficiency in speed control system for induction motors; Eficiencia energetica em sistema de controle de velocidade em motores de inducao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Arlete Vieira da; Ribeiro, Elisangela do Nascimento; Tenorio, Iana Cavalcanti; Horta, Mario Marcos Brito [Centro Universitario de Belo Horizonte (UnBH), MG (Brazil)], e-mails: arlete.silva@prof.unibh.br, nr.elisangela@gmail.com, ianactenorio@gmail.com, mario_bhorta@yahoo.com.br

    2011-07-01

    This work has as objective the study of energy efficiency of induction motors fed by frequency inverters, since this is a practical resource that has progressively allowed the replacement of mechanical speed reducers. In this work the speed control of induction motors of the squirrel cage has steeped through the frequency inverters using scalar control. Induction motors are frequently used in industrial applications due to its simple construction, its low maintenance and reduced in size. It was possible through tests made at UNI-BH Electrical Engineering laboratory to obtain satisfactory results regarding the performance of the inverter CFW08 (WEG), speed control of induction motor. (author)

  11. Design Intelligent Model-free Hybrid Guidance Controller for Three Dimension Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Abdol Majid Mirshekaran; Farzin Piltan; Nasri Sulaiman; Alireza Siahbazi; Ali Barzegar; Mahmood Vosoogh

    2014-01-01

    The minimum rule base Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) Fuzzy hybrid guidance Controller for three dimensions spherical motor is presented in this research. A three dimensions spherical motor is well equipped with conventional control techniques and, in particular, various PID controllers which demonstrate a good performance and successfully solve different guidance problems. Guidance control in a three dimensions spherical motor is performed by the PID controllers producing the control ...

  12. Robot-assisted motor activation monitored by time-domain optical brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, O.; Wabnitz, H.; Schmid, S.; Steingräber, R.; Schmidt, H.; Krüger, J.; Macdonald, R.

    2011-07-01

    Robot-assisted motor rehabilitation proved to be an effective supplement to conventional hand-to-hand therapy in stroke patients. In order to analyze and understand motor learning and performance during rehabilitation it is desirable to develop a monitor to provide objective measures of the corresponding brain activity at the rehabilitation progress. We used a portable time-domain near-infrared reflectometer to monitor the hemodynamic brain response to distal upper extremity activities. Four healthy volunteers performed two different robot-assisted wrist/forearm movements, flexion-extension and pronation-supination in comparison with an unassisted squeeze ball exercise. A special headgear with four optical measurement positions to include parts of the pre- and postcentral gyrus provided a good overlap with the expected activation areas. Data analysis based on variance of time-of-flight distributions of photons through tissue was chosen to provide a suitable representation of intracerebral signals. In all subjects several of the four detection channels showed a response. In some cases indications were found of differences in localization of the activated areas for the various tasks.

  13. Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease dissociates mood and motor circuits: a functional MRI case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefurak, Taresa; Mikulis, David; Mayberg, Helen; Lang, Anthony E; Hevenor, Stephanie; Pahapill, Peter; Saint-Cyr, Jean; Lozano, Andres

    2003-12-01

    Behavioral disturbances have been reported with subthalamic (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD). We report correlative functional imaging (fMRI) of mood and motor responses induced by successive right and left DBS. A 36-year-old woman with medically refractory PD and a history of clinically remitted depression underwent uncomplicated implantation of bilateral STN DBS. High-frequency stimulation of the left electrode improved motor symptoms. Unexpectedly, right DBS alone elicited several reproducible episodes of acute depressive dysphoria. Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) imaging was carried out with sequential individual electrode stimulation. The electrode on the left was within the inferior STN, whereas the right electrode was marginally superior and lateral to the intended STN target within the Fields of Forel/zona incerta. fMRI image analysis (Analysis of Functional NeuroImages, AFNI) contrasting OFF versus ON stimulation identified significant lateralized blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes with DBS (P disturbance resolved spontaneously in 4 weeks despite identical stimulation parameters. Transient depressive mood induced by subcortical DBS stimulation was correlated with changes in mesolimbic cortical structures. This case provides new evidence supporting cortical segregation of motor and nonmotor cortico-basal ganglionic systems that may converge in close proximity at the level of the STN and the adjacent white matter tracts (Fields of Forel/zona incerta). PMID:14673888

  14. Power Efficient Higher Order Sliding Mode Control of SR Motor for Speed Control Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rafiq

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel scheme for speed regulation/tracking of Switched Reluctance (SR motors based on Higher-Order Sliding-Mode technique. In particular, a Second-Order Sliding-Mode Controller (SOSMC based on Super Twisting algorithm is devel-oped. Owing to the peculiar structural properties of SRM, torque produced by each motor phase is a function of phase current as well as rotor position. More importantly, unlike many other motors the polarity of the phase torque in SR motors is solely determined by the rotor position and is independent of the polarity of the applied voltage or phase current. The proposed controller takes advantage of this property and incorporates a commutation scheme which, at any time instant, selects only those motor phases for the computation of control law, which can contribute torque of the desired polarity at that instant. This feature helps in achieving the desired speed regulation/tracking objective in a power efficient manner as control efforts are applied through selective phases and counterproductive phases are left un-energized. This approach also minimizes the power loss in the motor windings thus reducing the heat generation within the motor. In order to highlight the advantages of Higher-Order Sliding-Mode controllers, a classical First-Order Sliding-Mode controller (FOSMC is also developed and applied to the same system. The comparison of the two schemes shows much reduced chattering in case of SOSMC. The performance of the proposed SOSMC controller for speed regulation is also compared with that of another sliding mode speed controller published in the literature.

  15. Hand grips strength effect on motor function in human brain using fMRI: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several methods of motor tasks for fMRI scanning have been evolving from simple to more complex tasks. Motor tasks on upper extremity were applied in order to excite the increscent of motor activation on contralesional and ipsilateral hemispheres in brain. The main objective of this study is to study the different conditions for motor tasks on upper extremity that affected the brain activation. Ten healthy right handed with normal vision (3 male and 7 female, age range=20-30 years, mean=24.6 years, SD=2.21) participated in this study. Prior to the scanning, participants were trained on hand grip tasks using rubber ball and pressure gauge tool outside the scanner. During fMRI session, a block design with 30-s task blocks and alternating 30-s rest periods was employed while participants viewed a computer screen via a back projection-mirror system and instructed to follow the instruction by gripping their hand with normal and strong grips using a rubber ball. Statistical Parametric mapping (SPM8) software was used to determine the brain activation. Both tasks activated the primary motor (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA), dorsal and ventral of premotor cortex area (PMA) in left hemisphere while in right hemisphere the area of primary motor (M1) somatosensory was activated. However, the comparison between both tasks revealed that the strong hand grip showed the higher activation at M1, PMA and SMA on left hemisphere and also the area of SMA on right hemisphere. Both conditions of motor tasks could provide insights the functional organization on human brain

  16. Hand grips strength effect on motor function in human brain using fMRI: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S. S.; Mohamad, M.; Syazarina, S. O.; Nafisah, W. Y.

    2014-11-01

    Several methods of motor tasks for fMRI scanning have been evolving from simple to more complex tasks. Motor tasks on upper extremity were applied in order to excite the increscent of motor activation on contralesional and ipsilateral hemispheres in brain. The main objective of this study is to study the different conditions for motor tasks on upper extremity that affected the brain activation. Ten healthy right handed with normal vision (3 male and 7 female, age range=20-30 years, mean=24.6 years, SD=2.21) participated in this study. Prior to the scanning, participants were trained on hand grip tasks using rubber ball and pressure gauge tool outside the scanner. During fMRI session, a block design with 30-s task blocks and alternating 30-s rest periods was employed while participants viewed a computer screen via a back projection-mirror system and instructed to follow the instruction by gripping their hand with normal and strong grips using a rubber ball. Statistical Parametric mapping (SPM8) software was used to determine the brain activation. Both tasks activated the primary motor (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA), dorsal and ventral of premotor cortex area (PMA) in left hemisphere while in right hemisphere the area of primary motor (M1) somatosensory was activated. However, the comparison between both tasks revealed that the strong hand grip showed the higher activation at M1, PMA and SMA on left hemisphere and also the area of SMA on right hemisphere. Both conditions of motor tasks could provide insights the functional organization on human brain.

  17. Development of a Simulink/RTW-Based Realtime Control System for an Induction Motor Vector Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, M. H. [Sunmoon University, Chonan (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    In this research a Simulink/RTW-based realtime control system was developed for an induction motor vector control. On the Simulink window, the control system is designed in the form of block diagrams, program codes are produced automatically with the RTW(Real Time Workshop), then an DSP c compiles the program codes. With this automatic program producing method rapid prototyping is realized with the least time-consuming manual programming procedures. To show effectiveness of the proposed system designing scheme a DSP-based induction motor vector controller was constructed and implemented. (author). 10 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Assessing the feasibility of time-resolved fNIRS to detect brain activity during motor imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalmalak, Androu; Milej, Daniel; Diop, Mamadou; Naci, Lorina; Owen, Adrian M.; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2016-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive optical technique for detecting brain activity, which has been previously used during motor and motor executive tasks. There is an increasing interest in using fNIRS as a brain computer interface (BCI) for patients who lack the physical, but not the mental, ability to respond to commands. The goal of this study is to assess the feasibility of time-resolved fNIRS to detect brain activity during motor imagery. Stability tests were conducted to ensure the temporal stability of the signal, and motor imagery data were acquired on healthy subjects. The NIRS probes were placed on the scalp over the premotor cortex (PMC) and supplementary motor area (SMA), as these areas are responsible for motion planning. To confirm the fNIRS results, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the same task. Seven subjects have participated to date, and significant activation in the SMA and/or the PMC during motor imagery was detected by both fMRI and fNIRS in 4 of the 7 subjects. No activation was detected by either technique in the remaining three participants, which was not unexpected due to the nature of the task. The agreement between the two imaging modalities highlights the potential of fNIRS as a BCI, which could be adapted for bedside studies of patients with disorders of consciousness.

  19. Study on maximum efficiency control strategy for induction motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Two new techniques for effficiency-optimization control (EOC) of induction motor drives were proposed. The first method combined Loss Model and "golden section technique", which was faster than the available methods. Secondly, the low-frequency ripple torque due to decrease of rotor flux was compensated in a feedforward manner. If load torque or speed command changed, the efficiency search algorithm would be abandoned and the rated flux would be established to get the best transient response. The close agreement between the simulation and the experimental results confirmed the validity and usefulness of the proposed techniques.

  20. The Speed Control of Constant Tension Motor of Marine Crane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xinyang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the working principle of the marine beacon crane hanging disc mechanical anti-sway device, and establish mathematical model on the rope controlling hanging disc of mechanical anti-sway device; Through matlab simulation analysis, this article obtains the relation curve between the velocity of traction rope of hanging disc and output frequency of the crane motor, combining rotary crane scaled model, this article carries out anti-sway experiment for the rotary crane to examine the crane’s anti-sway effects.

  1. What is the evidence of impaired motor skills and motor control among children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? Systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, Marie-Laure; Schoemaker, M M; Albaret, J-M; Geuze, R H

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the studies that have analysed the motor skills of ADHD children without medication and the influence of medication on their motor skills. The following two questions guided the study: What is the evidence of impairment of motor skills and aspects of motor control a

  2. Visual processing of optic flow and motor control in the human posterior cingulate sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, David T; Inman, Laura A; Li, Li

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the human posterior cingulate contains a visual processing area selective for optic flow (CSv). However, other studies performed in both humans and monkeys have identified a somatotopic motor region at the same location (CMA). Taken together, these findings suggested the possibility that the posterior cingulate contains a single visuomotor integration region. To test this idea we used fMRI to identify both visual and motor areas of the posterior cingulate in the same brains and to test the activity of those regions during a visuomotor task. Results indicated that rather than a single visuomotor region the posterior cingulate contains adjacent but separate motor and visual regions. CSv lies in the fundus of the cingulate sulcus, while CMA lies in the dorsal bank of the sulcus, slightly superior in terms of stereotaxic coordinates. A surprising and novel finding was that activity in CSv was suppressed during the visuomotor task, despite the visual stimulus being identical to that used to localize the region. This may provide an important clue to the specific role played by this region in the utilization of optic flow to control self-motion.

  3. Ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws parallel great apes in motor self-regulation despite smaller brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadayi, Can; Taylor, Lucy A; von Bayern, Auguste M P; Osvath, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    Overriding motor impulses instigated by salient perceptual stimuli represent a fundamental inhibitory skill. Such motor self-regulation facilitates more rational behaviour, as it brings economy into the bodily interaction with the physical and social world. It also underlies certain complex cognitive processes including decision making. Recently, MacLean et al. (MacLean et al. 2014 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 111, 2140-2148. (doi:10.1073/pnas.1323533111)) conducted a large-scale study involving 36 species, comparing motor self-regulation across taxa. They concluded that absolute brain size predicts level of performance. The great apes were most successful. Only a few of the species tested were birds. Given birds' small brain size-in absolute terms-yet flexible behaviour, their motor self-regulation calls for closer study. Corvids exhibit some of the largest relative avian brain sizes-although small in absolute measure-as well as the most flexible cognition in the animal kingdom. We therefore tested ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws in the so-called cylinder task. We found performance indistinguishable from that of great apes despite the much smaller brains. We found both absolute and relative brain volume to be a reliable predictor of performance within Aves. The complex cognition of corvids is often likened to that of great apes; our results show further that they share similar fundamental cognitive mechanisms. PMID:27152224

  4. Using Ipsilateral Motor Signals in the Unaffected Cerebral Hemisphere as a Signal Platform for Brain Computer Interfaces in Hemiplegic Stroke Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, David T.; Wronkiewicz, Mark; Sharma, Mohit; Moran, Daniel W.; Corbetta, Maurizio; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Brain computer interface (BCI) systems have emerged as a method to restore function and enhance communication in motor impaired patients. To date, this has been primarily applied to patients who have a compromised motor outflow due to spinal cord dysfunction, but an intact and functioning cerebral cortex. The cortical physiology associated with movement of the contralateral limb has typically been the signal substrate that has been used as a control signal. While this is an ideal control platform in patients with an intact motor cortex, these signals are lost after a hemispheric stroke. Thus, a different control signal is needed that could provide control capability for a patient with a hemiparetic limb. Previous studies have shown that there is a distinct cortical physiology associated with ipsilateral, or same sided, limb movements. Thus far, it was unknown whether stroke survivors could intentionally and effectively modulate this ipsilateral motor activity from their unaffected hemisphere. Therefore, this study seeks to evaluate whether stroke survivors could effectively utilize ipsilateral motor activity from their unaffected hemisphere to achieve this BCI control. Approach To investigate this possibility, electroencephalographic (EEG) signals were recorded from four chronic hemispheric stroke patients as they performed (or attempted to perform) real and imagined hand tasks using either their affected or unaffected hand. Following performance of the screening task, the ability of patients to utilize a BCI system was investigated during on-line control of a 1-dimensional control task. Main Results Significant ipsilateral motor signals (associated with movement intentions of the affected hand) in the unaffected hemisphere, which were found to be distinct from rest and contralateral signals, were identified and subsequently used for a simple online BCI control task. We demonstrate here for the first time that EEG signals from the unaffected hemisphere

  5. Using ipsilateral motor signals in the unaffected cerebral hemisphere as a signal platform for brain-computer interfaces in hemiplegic stroke survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, David T.; Wronkiewicz, Mark; Sharma, Mohit; Moran, Daniel W.; Corbetta, Maurizio; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2012-06-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems have emerged as a method to restore function and enhance communication in motor impaired patients. To date, this has been applied primarily to patients who have a compromised motor outflow due to spinal cord dysfunction, but an intact and functioning cerebral cortex. The cortical physiology associated with movement of the contralateral limb has typically been the signal substrate that has been used as a control signal. While this is an ideal control platform in patients with an intact motor cortex, these signals are lost after a hemispheric stroke. Thus, a different control signal is needed that could provide control capability for a patient with a hemiparetic limb. Previous studies have shown that there is a distinct cortical physiology associated with ipsilateral, or same-sided, limb movements. Thus far, it was unknown whether stroke survivors could intentionally and effectively modulate this ipsilateral motor activity from their unaffected hemisphere. Therefore, this study seeks to evaluate whether stroke survivors could effectively utilize ipsilateral motor activity from their unaffected hemisphere to achieve this BCI control. To investigate this possibility, electroencephalographic (EEG) signals were recorded from four chronic hemispheric stroke patients as they performed (or attempted to perform) real and imagined hand tasks using either their affected or unaffected hand. Following performance of the screening task, the ability of patients to utilize a BCI system was investigated during on-line control of a one-dimensional control task. Significant ipsilateral motor signals (associated with movement intentions of the affected hand) in the unaffected hemisphere, which were found to be distinct from rest and contralateral signals, were identified and subsequently used for a simple online BCI control task. We demonstrate here for the first time that EEG signals from the unaffected hemisphere, associated with overt and

  6. Central motor control failure in fibromyalgia: a surface electromyography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buskila Dan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is characterised by diffuse musculoskeletal pain and stiffness at multiple sites, tender points in characteristic locations, and the frequent presence of symptoms such as fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess whether the myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue in patients affected by FM are central or peripheral in origin. Methods Eight female patients aged 55.6 ± 13.6 years (FM group and eight healthy female volunteers aged 50.3 ± 9.3 years (MCG were studied by means of non-invasive surface electromyography (s-EMG involving a linear array of 16 electrodes placed on the skin overlying the biceps brachii muscle, with muscle fatigue being evoked by means of voluntary and involuntary (electrically elicited contractions. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs, motor unit action potential conduction velocity distributions (mean ± SD and skewness, and the mean power frequency of the spectrum (MNF were estimated in order to assess whether there were any significant differences between the two groups and contraction types. Results The motor pattern of recruitment during voluntary contractions was altered in the FM patients, who also showed fewer myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue (normalised conduction velocity rate of changes: -0.074 ± 0.052%/s in FM vs -0.196 ± 0.133%/s in MCG; normalised MNF rate of changes: -0.29 ± 0.16%/s in FM vs -0.66 ± 0.34%/s in MCG. Mean conduction velocity distribution and skewnesses values were higher (p Conclusion The apparent paradox of fewer myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue in FM is the electrophysiological expression of muscle remodelling in terms of the prevalence of slow conducting fatigue-resistant type I fibres. As the only between-group differences concerned voluntary contractions, they are probably more related to central motor control failure than muscle membrane alterations, which suggests pathological muscle fibre remodelling related to altered

  7. Challenges in Identifying the Foot Motor Region in Patients with Brain Tumor on Routine MRI: Advantages of fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisicaro, R.A.; Jiao, R.X.; Stathopoulos, C.; Brennan, N.M. Petrovich; Peck, K.K.; Holodny, A.I.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Accurate localization of the foot/leg motor homunculus is essential because iatrogenic damage can render a patient wheelchair- or bed-bound. We hypothesized the following: 1) Readers would identify the foot motor homunculus <100% of the time on routine MR imaging, 2) neuroradiologists would perform better than nonradiologists, and 3) those with fMRI experience would perform better than those without it. MATERIALSANDMETHODS Thirty-five attending-level raters (24 neuroradiologists, 11 nonradiologists) evaluated 14 brain tumors involving the frontoparietal convexity. Raters were asked to identify the location of the foot motor homunculus and determine whether the tumor involved the foot motor area and/or motor cortex by using anatomic MR imaging. Results were compared on the basis of prior fMRI experience and medical specialty by using Mann-Whitney U test statistics. RESULTS No rater was 100% correct. Raters correctly identified whether the tumor was in the foot motor cortex 77% of the time. Raters with fMRI experience were significantly better than raters without experience at foot motor fMRI centroid predictions (13 ± 6 mm versus 20 ± 13 mm from the foot motor cortex center, P = 2 × 10−6) and arrow placement in the motor gyrus (67% versus 47%, P = 7 × 10−5). Neuroradiologists were significantly better than nonradiologists at foot motor fMRI centroid predictions (15 ± 8 mm versus 20 ± 14 mm, P = .005) and arrow placement in the motor gyrus (61% versus 46%, P = .008). CONCLUSIONS The inability of experienced readers to consistently identify the location of the foot motor homunculus on routine MR imaging argues for using fMRI in the preoperative setting. Experience with fMRI leads to improved accuracy in identifying anatomic structures, even on routine MR imaging. PMID:25882288

  8. PID Neural Network Based Speed Control of Asynchronous Motor Using Programmable Logic Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARABA, V. A.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the structure and characteristics of PID Neural Network controller for single input and single output systems. PID Neural Network is a new kind of controller that includes the advantages of artificial neural networks and classic PID controller. Functioning of this controller is based on the update of controller parameters according to the value extracted from system output pursuant to the rules of back propagation algorithm used in artificial neural networks. Parameters obtained from the application of PID Neural Network training algorithm on the speed model of the asynchronous motor exhibiting second order linear behavior were used in the real time speed control of the motor. Programmable logic controller (PLC was used as real time controller. The real time control results show that reference speed successfully maintained under various load conditions.

  9. Planar Task Space Control of a Biarticular Manipulator Driven by Spiral Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zaki bin Hj Shukor

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates upon a musculoskeletal‐inspired robot manipulator using a prototype of the spiral motor developed in our laboratory. The spiral motors represent the antagonistic muscles due to the high forward/backward drivability without any gears or mechanisms. Modelling of the biarticular structure with spiral motor dynamics was presented and simulations were carried out to compare two control methods, Inverse Kinematics (IK and direct‐Cartesian control, between monoarticular only structures and biarticular structures using the spiral motor. The results show the feasibility of the control, especially in maintaining air gaps within the spiral motor.

  10. Hybrid model predictive control for speed control of permanent magnet synchronous motor with saturation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A discrete-time hybrid model of a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) with saturation in voltage and current is formulated.The controller design with incorporated constraints is achieved in a systematic way from modeling to control synthesis and implementation.The Hybrid System Description Language is used to obtain a mixed-logical dynamical (MLD) model.Based on the MLD model,a model predictive controller is designed for an optimal speed regulation of the motor.For reducing computation complexity and ...

  11. Study on Current Sensorless Vector Control Method for Electric Vehicle Drive Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyong Shen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available With the aggravation of environment pollution and the reduction of petroleum resources, the development of electric vehicle (EV draws more and more people’s attention. In the EV research field, that seeking for a high efficient and reliable motor control method that suits the operating conditions and characteristics of the vehicle drive motor has become one of the key techniques that need to be broken through urgently. Owing to the problems that the efficient work area is narrow and it leads to over-current phenomenon when traditional motor vector control method is applied to vehicle drive motor, this paper presents a current sensorless vector control technique for electric vehicle drive motor. According to motor speed and command torque which is gained from the speed loop control, this method directly controls the magnitude and phase angle of voltage vector to realize the orientation control of the magnetic field and then achieve the purpose of controlling the motor torque and speed. The feasibility and effectiveness of this method are verified by simulation results and bench test. Moreover, this method can not only improve the efficient work area, but also increase the reliability of motor control system. At the same time, it overcomes the dependence on the current sensor, circumvents the over-current defect caused by traditional motor vector control approach and reduces its cost. So it is a suitable and efficient control method for electric vehicle drive motor.  

  12. Deficient grip force control in schizophrenia: behavioral and modeling evidence for altered motor inhibition and motor noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teremetz, Maxime; Amado, Isabelle; Bendjemaa, Narjes; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Lindberg, Pavel G; Maier, Marc A

    2014-01-01

    Whether upper limb sensorimotor control is affected in schizophrenia and how underlying pathological mechanisms may potentially intervene in these deficits is still being debated. We tested voluntary force control in schizophrenia patients and used a computational model in order to elucidate potential cerebral mechanisms underlying sensorimotor deficits in schizophrenia. A visuomotor grip force-tracking task was performed by 17 medicated and 6 non-medicated patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) and by 15 healthy controls. Target forces in the ramp-hold-and-release paradigm were set to 5 N and to 10% maximal voluntary grip force. Force trajectory was analyzed by performance measures and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). A computational model incorporating neural control signals was used to replicate the empirically observed motor behavior and to explore underlying neural mechanisms. Grip task performance was significantly lower in medicated and non-medicated schizophrenia patients compared to controls. Three behavioral variables were significantly higher in both patient groups: tracking error (by 50%), coefficient of variation of force (by 57%) and duration of force release (up by 37%). Behavioral performance did not differ between patient groups. Computational simulation successfully replicated these findings and predicted that decreased motor inhibition, together with an increased signal-dependent motor noise, are sufficient to explain the observed motor deficits in patients. PCA also suggested altered motor inhibition as a key factor differentiating patients from control subjects: the principal component representing inhibition correlated with clinical severity. These findings show that schizophrenia affects voluntary sensorimotor control of the hand independent of medication, and suggest that reduced motor inhibition and increased signal-dependent motor noise likely reflect key pathological mechanisms of the sensorimotor deficit.

  13. Structural Brain Alterations in Motor Subtypes of Parkinson’s Disease: Evidence from Probabilistic Tractography and Shape Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, Griet; Leunissen, Inge; Firbank, Michael; Heremans, Elke; Nackaerts, Evelien; Vandenberghe, Wim; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The postural instability and gait disorder (PIGD) and tremor dominant (TD) subtypes of Parkinson’s disease (PD) show different patterns of alterations in functional connectivity (FC) between specific brain regions. This study aimed to investigate the relation between symptomatic heterogeneity in PD and structural alterations underlying these FC changes. Methods 68 PD patients classified as PIGD (n = 41) or TD (n = 19) and 19 age-matched controls underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Diffusion-weighted images were used to assess fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) at the whole-brain level using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). In addition, structural connectivity was assessed between regions that previously showed altered FC using probabilistic tractography. Anatomical images were used to determine shape and volume of the putamen, caudate and pallidum. Results TBSS revealed widespread FA reductions in PIGD compared to controls involving the superior longitudinal fasciculi and corpus callosum. No such differences were found in TD. Both PD subgroups had increased MD compared to controls in tracts connecting the left caudate with the bilateral ventral putamen. TD patients additionally showed increased MD compared to PIGD and controls in tracts connecting the right inferior parietal lobule with the right premotor and primary motor cortex, which previously showed altered FC. We also found grey matter atrophy in the rostrodorsal head of the caudate in PIGD compared to controls. Conclusion Microstructural changes in white matter tracts, particularly in those connecting striatal sub-areas, partly underlie FC alterations in PD subtypes. Caudate shape alterations further implicate the striatum in PIGD pathophysiology. PMID:27314952

  14. A Neuro-Inspired Spike-Based PID Motor Controller for Multi-Motor Robots with Low Cost FPGAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Civit-Balcells

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a neuro-inspired spike-based close-loop controller written in VHDL and implemented for FPGAs. This controller has been focused on controlling a DC motor speed, but only using spikes for information representation, processing and DC motor driving. It could be applied to other motors with proper driver adaptation. This controller architecture represents one of the latest layers in a Spiking Neural Network (SNN, which implements a bridge between robotics actuators and spike-based processing layers and sensors. The presented control system fuses actuation and sensors information as spikes streams, processing these spikes in hard real-time, implementing a massively parallel information processing system, through specialized spike-based circuits. This spike-based close-loop controller has been implemented into an AER platform, designed in our labs, that allows direct control of DC motors: the AER-Robot. Experimental results evidence the viability of the implementation of spike-based controllers, and hardware synthesis denotes low hardware requirements that allow replicating this controller in a high number of parallel controllers working together to allow a real-time robot control.

  15. Implementation of Slip-Controller for Induction Motor Drive Employing Indirect Matrix Converter

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    K. Ganesan, S. Subamalini, A. Dhinesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme to design the proportional integral (PI type controller for speed control of a constant Volts/Hz (V/F three phase induction motor drive employing a matrix converter has been presented. An approximate linear model of induction motor operating in constant Volts/Hz scheme is derived and a design example of a slip controller for a three phase motor is presented. Performance of the designed controller is verified with results from simulation using Mat lab

  16. Development of EPICS based beam-line experimental control employing motor controller for precision positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a Synchrotron Radiation Source the beamline experiments are carried out in radiation prone environment, inside the hutch, which demands to conduct experiments remotely. These experiments involves instrument control and data acquisition from various devices. Another factor which attributes to system complexity is precise positioning of sample and placement of detectors. A large number of stepper motors are engaged for achieving the required precision positioning. This work is a result of development of Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) based control system to interface a stepper motor controller developed indigenously by Laser Electronics Support Division of RRCAT. EPICS is an internationally accepted open source software environment which follows toolkit approach and standard model paradigm. The operator interface for the control system software was implemented using CSS BOY. The system was successfully tested for Ethernet based remote access. The developed control software comprises of an OPI and alarm handler (EPICS ALH). Both OPI and ALH are linked with PV's defined in database files. The development process resulted into a set of EPICS based commands for controlling stepper motor. These commands are independent of operator interface, i.e. stepper motor can be controlled by using these set of commands directly on EPICS prompt. This command set is illustrated in the above table. EPICS Alarm Handler was also tested independently by running these commands on EPIC prompt. If not using ALH, operator can read the alarm status of a PV using 'SEVR' and 'STAT' attributes. (author)

  17. Promoting Neuroplasticity for Motor Rehabilitation After Stroke: Considering the Effects of Aerobic Exercise and Genetic Variation on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Mang, Cameron S.; Campbell, Kristin L.; Ross, Colin J.D.; Boyd, Lara A

    2013-01-01

    Recovery of motor function after stroke involves relearning motor skills and is mediated by neuroplasticity. Recent research has focused on developing rehabilitation strategies that facilitate such neuroplasticity to maximize functional outcome poststroke. Although many molecular signaling pathways are involved, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has emerged as a key facilitator of neuroplasticity involved in motor learning and rehabilitation after stroke. Thus, rehabilitation strategie...

  18. Comparison between Conventional and Fuzzy Logic PID Controllers for Controlling DC Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Natsheh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy logic and proportional-integral-derivative (PID controllers are compared for use in direct current (DC motors positioning system. A simulation study of the PID position controller for the armature-controlled with fixed field and field controlled with fixed armature current DC motors is performed. Fuzzy rules and the inferencing mechanism of the fuzzy logic controller (FLC are evaluated by using conventional rule-lookup tables that encode the control knowledge in a rules form. The performance assessment of the studied position controllers is based on transient response and error integral criteria. The results obtained from the FLC are not only superior in the rise time, speed fluctuations, and percent overshoot but also much better in the controller output signal structure, which is much remarkable in terms of the hardware implementation.

  19. Direct Vector Control of Induction Motor Based on Sinusoidal PWM Inverter with Fuzzy Logic Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirban Chakraborty

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the speed control scheme of direct vector control of Induction Motor drive (IM drive. The Fuzzy logic controller is (FLC used as the controller part here for the direct vector control of Induction Motor using Sinusoidal PWM Inverter (SPWM. Fuzzy logic controller has become a very popular controlling scheme in the field of Industrial application. The entire module of this IM is divided into several parts such as IM body module, Inverter module, coordinate transformation module and Sinusoidal pulse width modulation (SPWM production module and so on. With the help of this module we can analyze a variety of different simulation waveforms, which provide an effective means for the analysis and design of the IM control system using FLC technique.

  20. Motor planning modulates sensory-motor control of collision avoidance behavior in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Nakagawa

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we examined the collision avoidance behavior of the frog, Rana catesbeiana to an approaching object in the upper visual field. The angular velocity of the frog's escape turn showed a significant positive correlation with the turn angle (r2 = 0.5741, P0.05. Thus, the frog was not able to control the velocity of the large escape turns accurately and did not complete the behavior within a constant time. In the latter case, there was a small but significant positive correlation between the threshold angular size and the angular velocity (r2 = 0.1459, P<0.05. This suggests that the threshold is controlled to compensate for the insufficient escape velocity achieved during large turn angles, and could explain a significant negative correlation between the turn angle and the threshold angular size (r2 = 0.1145, P<0.05. Thus, it is likely that the threshold angular size is also controlled by the turn angle and is modulated by motor planning.

  1. Control of rotor motion in a light-driven molecular motor : Towards a molecular gearbox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, Matthijs K.J. ter; Delden, Richard A. van; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Controlled intramolecular movement and coupling of motor and rotor functions is exerted by this new molecular device. The rate of rotation of the rotor part of the molecule can be adjusted by alteration of the conformation of the motor part of the molecule. For all states of the motor part, differen

  2. Neuromolecular Imaging Shows Temporal Synchrony Patterns between Serotonin and Movement within Neuronal Motor Circuits in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Broderick

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present discourse links the electrical and chemical properties of the brain with neurotransmitters and movement behaviors to further elucidate strategies to diagnose and treat brain disease. Neuromolecular imaging (NMI, based on electrochemical principles, is used to detect serotonin in nerve terminals (dorsal and ventral striata and somatodendrites (ventral tegmentum of reward/motor mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal brain circuits. Neuronal release of serotonin is detected at the same time and in the same animal, freely moving and unrestrained, while open-field behaviors are monitored via infrared photobeams. The purpose is to emphasize the unique ability of NMI and the BRODERICK PROBE® biosensors to empirically image a pattern of temporal synchrony, previously reported, for example, in Aplysia using central pattern generators (CPGs, serotonin and cerebral peptide-2. Temporal synchrony is reviewed within the context of the literature on central pattern generators, neurotransmitters and movement disorders. Specifically, temporal synchrony data are derived from studies on psychostimulant behavior with and without cocaine while at the same time and continuously, serotonin release in motor neurons within basal ganglia, is detected. The results show that temporal synchrony between the neurotransmitter, serotonin and natural movement occurs when the brain is NOT injured via, e.g., trauma, addictive drugs or psychiatric illness. In striking contrast, in the case of serotonin and cocaine-induced psychostimulant behavior, a different form of synchrony and also asynchrony can occur. Thus, the known dysfunctional movement behavior produced by cocaine may well be related to the loss of temporal synchrony, the loss of the ability to match serotonin in brain with motor activity. The empirical study of temporal synchrony patterns in humans and animals may be more relevant to the dynamics of motor circuits and movement behaviors than are studies of

  3. Bi-level Control and Chopper Control Methods for Improving the Dynamic Performance of Stepper Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Walid Emar, Eng. Ziad Sobih, Dr. Musbah Aqel & Dr. Mahmoud Awad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares between chopper control method and bi-level controlmethod. Both methods are used for improving the dynamic performance ofvariable reluctance stepper motor (VRSM by modifying its time constant andthus, increasing its stepping rate. Therefore, the initial torque developed by themotor is high; the switching from one coil to the next is faster than normal andconsequently, the rotor moves as quickly as it should be. The circuitry discussedin this paper is connected directly to the motor windings and the motor powersupply, and this circuitry is controlled by a digital system that determines whenthe switches are turned on or off. Each class of drive circuit is illustrated withpractical examples, but these examples are not intended as an exhaustivecatalog of the commercially available control circuits, nor is the information givenhere intended to substitute for the information found on the manufacturer'scomponent data sheets for the parts mentioned.

  4. Fuzzy PID Controllers Using Matlab GUI Based for Real Time DC Motor Speed Control

    OpenAIRE

    Suhas Yadav*1

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an integrated electronic system has been designed, constructed and tested. Controlling DC (Direct current) Motor drive is design and development of real time MATLAB –GUI based using fuzzy logic controller. First, a controller is designed according to fuzzy rules such that the systems are fundamentally robust. To obtain the globally optimal values, parameters of the fuzzy controller are improved by MATLAB-GUI based FLC and IFLC algorithms optimization model. Comp...

  5. Association between the fMRI manifestations of activated brain areas and muscle strength in patients with space-occupying lesions in motor cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbin Zheng; Xiaoke Chen; Guorui Liu; Renhua Wu

    2006-01-01

    simple active finger-tapping movements, and for the 3 cases whose clinical symptoms were severe in the patient group, the simple passive finger-tapping movements were used. The manifestations in the activated brain areas were analyzed in the patients with brain tumor of different muscle strength and the controls. The motor deficit and activation of contralateral primary motor cortex (M1) in simple finger-tapping movements were observed in the patient group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Brain areas activated by finger-tapping movements in each group; ② Activated volumes in hemisphere by finger-tapping movements between groups.RESULTS: The contralateral M1 area could not be activated in 1 case in the patient group,, all the other 22 patients and 9 healthy subjects were involved in the analysis of results. ① In the control group, unilateral finger tapping movement activated the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), bilateral SMA and bilateral PMC. The activation volume was the largest in contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), smaller in the SMA,and the smallest in PMC. The finger tapping movement in healthy subjects could activate contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), bilateral SMA and bilateral PMC, which had no obvious differences from the manifestations of brain functional area activated by active finger tapping. There was no significant difference in the volume of activated functional areas between right and left hands. In the patient group, the central sulcus around the tumor in the activated M1 area displaced towards dorsal or ventral side, also extended. The distance of displacement in the functional area was determined as compared with the contralateral central sulcus, and the results suggested the M1 displacement, including that there were 10 cases with the M1 displacement larger than 10 mm in the patients with motor deficit, which were obviously more than in those without motor deficit (n =1, P < 0.01), and the activated volume in contralateral M1 area

  6. Time sparsification of EEG signals in motor-imagery based brain computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method of sparsifying EEG signals in the time domain for common spatial patterns (CSP) which are often used for feature extraction in brain computer interfaces (BCI). For accurate classification, it is important to analyze the period of time when a BCI user performs a mental task. We address this problem by optimizing the CSP cost with a time sparsification that removes unnecessary samples from the classification. We design a cost function that has CSP spatial weights and time window as optimization parameters. To find these parameters, we use alternating optimization. In an experiment on classification of motor-imagery EEG signals, the proposed method increased classification accuracy by 6% averaged over five subjects.

  7. Simultaneous Brain-Cervical Cord fMRI Reveals Intrinsic Spinal Cord Plasticity during Motor Sequence Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahabeddin Vahdat

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The spinal cord participates in the execution of skilled movements by translating high-level cerebral motor representations into musculotopic commands. Yet, the extent to which motor skill acquisition relies on intrinsic spinal cord processes remains unknown. To date, attempts to address this question were limited by difficulties in separating spinal local effects from supraspinal influences through traditional electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence for local learning-induced plasticity in intact human spinal cord through simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord during motor sequence learning. Specifically, we show learning-related modulation of activity in the C6-C8 spinal region, which is independent from that of related supraspinal sensorimotor structures. Moreover, a brain-spinal cord functional connectivity analysis demonstrates that the initial linear relationship between the spinal cord and sensorimotor cortex gradually fades away over the course of motor sequence learning, while the connectivity between spinal activity and cerebellum gains strength. These data suggest that the spinal cord not only constitutes an active functional component of the human motor learning network but also contributes distinctively from the brain to the learning process. The present findings open new avenues for rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries, as they demonstrate that this part of the central nervous system is much more plastic than assumed before. Yet, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying this intrinsic functional plasticity in the spinal cord warrant further investigations.

  8. Robust control of integrated motor-transmission powertrain system over controller area network for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Hui; Cao, Dongpu; Fang, Zongde

    2015-06-01

    Integrated motor-transmission (IMT) powertrain system with directly coupled motor and gearbox is a good choice for electric commercial vehicles (e.g., pure electric buses) due to its potential in motor size reduction and energy efficiency improvement. However, the controller design for powertrain oscillation damping becomes challenging due to the elimination of damping components. On the other hand, as controller area network (CAN) is commonly adopted in modern vehicle system, the network-induced time-varying delays that caused by bandwidth limitation will further lead to powertrain vibration or even destabilize the powertrain control system. Therefore, in this paper, a robust energy-to-peak controller is proposed for the IMT powertrain system to address the oscillation damping problem and also attenuate the external disturbance. The control law adopted here is based on a multivariable PI control, which ensures the applicability and performance of the proposed controller in engineering practice. With the linearized delay uncertainties characterized by polytopic inclusions, a delay-free closed-loop augmented system is established for the IMT powertrain system under discrete-time framework. The proposed controller design problem is then converted to a static output feedback (SOF) controller design problem where the feedback control gains are obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). The effectiveness as well as robustness of the proposed controller is demonstrated by comparing its performance against that of a conventional PI controller.

  9. Comparison of clinical types of Wilson's disease and glucose metabolism in extrapyramidal motor brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, W; Barthel, H; Hesse, S; Grahmann, F; Kühn, H-J; Wagner, A; Villmann, T

    2002-07-01

    In Wilson's disease a disturbed glucose metabolism especially in striatal and cerebellar areas has been reported. This is correlated with the severity of extrapyramidal motor symptoms (EPS). These findings are only based on a small number of patients. Up to now it is unknown whether EPS are caused by various patterns of disturbed basal ganglia glucose metabolism. We investigated 37 patients and 9 normal volunteers to characterize the disturbed glucose metabolism in Wilson's disease more precisely. The glucose metabolism was determined in 5 cerebellar and cerebral areas (putamen, caput nuclei caudati, cerebellum, midbrain and thalamic area) by using (18)F-Fluorodesoxyglucose-Positron-Emission-Tomography ( [(18)F]FDG-PET). The database was evaluated by a cluster analysis. Additionally, the severity extrapyramidal motor symptoms were judged by a clinical score system. Three characteristic patterns of glucose metabolism in basal ganglia were obtained. Two of them may be assigned to patients with neurological symptoms whereas the third cluster corresponds to most patients without EPS or normal volunteers. The clusters can be identified by characteristic consumption rates in this 5 brain areas. The severity of EPS can not clearly be assigned to one of the clusters with disturbed glucose metabolism. However, the most severe cases are characterized by the lowest consumption in the striatal area. When there is marked improvement of EPS impaired glucose consumption reveals a persistent brain lesion. Finally, the neurological symptoms in Wilson's disease are caused by (at least) two different patterns of disturbed glucose metabolism in basal ganglia and cerebellum. The severity of EPS seems to be determined by a disturbed consumption in the striatal area. PMID:12140675

  10. Task-related changes in functional properties of the human brain network underlying attentional control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Kida

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated task-related changes in brain activation and inter-regional connectivity but the temporal dynamics of functional properties of the brain during task execution is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated task-related changes in functional properties of the human brain network by applying graph-theoretical analysis to magnetoencephalography (MEG. Subjects performed a cue-target attention task in which a visual cue informed them of the direction of focus for incoming auditory or tactile target stimuli, but not the sensory modality. We analyzed the MEG signal in the cue-target interval to examine network properties during attentional control. Cluster-based non-parametric permutation tests with the Monte-Carlo method showed that in the cue-target interval, beta activity was desynchronized in the sensori-motor region including premotor and posterior parietal regions in the hemisphere contralateral to the attended side. Graph-theoretical analysis revealed that, in beta frequency, global hubs were found around the sensori-motor and prefrontal regions, and functional segregation over the entire network was decreased during attentional control compared to the baseline. Thus, network measures revealed task-related temporal changes in functional properties of the human brain network, leading to the understanding of how the brain dynamically responds to task execution as a network.

  11. A Fully Automated Trial Selection Method for Optimization of Motor Imagery Based Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bangyan; Wu, Xiaopei; Lv, Zhao; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Xiaojin

    2016-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) as a promising spatial filtering method can separate motor-related independent components (MRICs) from the multichannel electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. However, the unpredictable burst interferences may significantly degrade the performance of ICA-based brain-computer interface (BCI) system. In this study, we proposed a new algorithm frame to address this issue by combining the single-trial-based ICA filter with zero-training classifier. We developed a two-round data selection method to identify automatically the badly corrupted EEG trials in the training set. The "high quality" training trials were utilized to optimize the ICA filter. In addition, we proposed an accuracy-matrix method to locate the artifact data segments within a single trial and investigated which types of artifacts can influence the performance of the ICA-based MIBCIs. Twenty-six EEG datasets of three-class motor imagery were used to validate the proposed methods, and the classification accuracies were compared with that obtained by frequently used common spatial pattern (CSP) spatial filtering algorithm. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed optimizing strategy could effectively improve the stability, practicality and classification performance of ICA-based MIBCI. The study revealed that rational use of ICA method may be crucial in building a practical ICA-based MIBCI system. PMID:27631789

  12. Reducing current reversal time in electric motor control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredemann, Michael V

    2014-11-04

    The time required to reverse current flow in an electric motor is reduced by exploiting inductive current that persists in the motor when power is temporarily removed. Energy associated with this inductive current is used to initiate reverse current flow in the motor.

  13. Brain state-dependent closed-loop modulation of paired associative stimulation controlled by sensorimotor desynchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav eRoyter

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pairing peripheral electrical stimulation (ES and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS increases corticospinal excitability when applied with a specific temporal pattern. When the two stimulation techniques are applied separately, motor imagery (MI-related oscillatory modulation amplifies both ES-related cortical effects -sensorimotor event-related desynchronization (ERD - and TMS-induced peripheral responses - motor-evoked potentials (MEP. However, the influence of brain self-regulation on the associative pairing of these stimulation techniques is still unclear.Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of MI-related ERD during associative ES and TMS on subsequent corticospinal excitability. Method: The paired application of functional electrical stimulation (FES of the extensor digitorum communis (EDC muscle and subsequent single-pulse TMS (110% resting motor threshold of the contralateral primary motor cortex was controlled by beta-band (16-22Hz ERD during motor-imagery of finger extension and applied within a brain-machine interface environment in six healthy subjects. Neural correlates were probed by acquiring the stimulus-response curve (SRC of both MEP peak-to-peak amplitude and area under the curve (AUC before and after the intervention. Result: The application of approximately 150 pairs of associative FES and TMS resulted in a significant increase of MEP amplitudes and AUC, indicating that the induced increase of corticospinal excitability was mediated by the recruitment of additional neuronal pools. MEP increases were brain-state dependent and correlated with beta-band ERD, but not with the background EDC muscle activity; this finding was independent of the FES intensity applied.Conclusion: These results could be relevant for developing closed-loop therapeutic approaches such as the application of brain state-dependent, paired associative stimulation in the context of neurorehabilitation.

  14. Microcontroller based PWM Inverter for Speed Control of a Three Phase Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Latif

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Three phase induction motor has proven to be an extremely reliable electromechanical energy conversion device for over 100 years. The speed control of induction motor is a crying need for the real world industrial applications. However, there are so many options available for the precise speed control of induction motor except by changingthe frequency. Therefore to achieve the goal of speed control of induction motor, there is no alternative of inverters. With the availability of high speed power semiconductor devices, the three phase inverters play the key role for variable speed ac motor drives. In addition to the speed control, the inverter can also provide some unique features, like voltage control, torque control, power factor correction, auto breaking, built in protection system and so forth.In this paper, a three phases PWM inverter using MC3PHAC microcontroller with computer interface is proposed to run a squirrel case induction motor. Some results of the proposed inverter are presented.

  15. A resting state network in the motor control circuit of the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruzzone Lorenzo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the absence of overt stimuli, the brain shows correlated fluctuations in functionally related brain regions. Approximately ten largely independent resting state networks (RSNs showing this behaviour have been documented to date. Recent studies have reported the existence of an RSN in the basal ganglia - albeit inconsistently and without the means to interpret its function. Using two large study groups with different resting state conditions and MR protocols, the reproducibility of the network across subjects, behavioural conditions and acquisition parameters is assessed. Independent Component Analysis (ICA, combined with novel analyses of temporal features, is applied to establish the basis of signal fluctuations in the network and its relation to other RSNs. Reference to prior probabilistic diffusion tractography work is used to identify the basal ganglia circuit to which these fluctuations correspond. Results An RSN is identified in the basal ganglia and thalamus, comprising the pallidum, putamen, subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra, with a projection also to the supplementary motor area. Participating nuclei and thalamo-cortical connection probabilities allow this network to be identified as the motor control circuit of the basal ganglia. The network was reproducibly identified across subjects, behavioural conditions (fixation, eyes closed, field strength and echo-planar imaging parameters. It shows a frequency peak at 0.025 ± 0.007 Hz and is most similar in spectral composition to the Default Mode (DM, a network of regions that is more active at rest than during task processing. Frequency features allow the network to be classified as an RSN rather than a physiological artefact. Fluctuations in this RSN are correlated with those in the task-positive fronto-parietal network and anticorrelated with those in the DM, whose hemodynamic response it anticipates. Conclusion Although the basal ganglia RSN has not been

  16. Motor abundance and control structure in the golf swing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, A; McGrath, D; Wallace, E S

    2016-04-01

    Variability and control structure are under-represented areas of golf swing research. This study investigated the use of the abundant degrees of freedom in the golf swing of high and intermediate skilled golfers using uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis. The variance parallel to (VUCM) and orthogonal to (VOrth) the UCM with respect to the orientation and location of the clubhead were calculated. The higher skilled golfers had proportionally higher values of VUCM than lower skilled players for all measured outcome variables. Motor synergy was found in the control of the orientation of the clubhead and the combined outcome variables but not for clubhead location. Clubhead location variance zeroed-in on impact as has been previously shown, whereas clubhead orientation variance increased near impact. Both skill levels increased their control over the clubhead location leading up to impact, with more control exerted over the clubhead orientation in the early downswing. The results suggest that to achieve higher skill levels in golf may not lie simply in optimal technique, but may lie more in developing control over the abundant degrees of freedom in the body. PMID:26784706

  17. Adaptive sensorless field oriented control of PM motors including zero speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a simple control method for controlling permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM) in a wide speed range without a shaft sensor. An adaptive observer is used for estimation of the rotor position and speed of a permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM). The observer compensates...... from zero. In order to verify the applicability of the method the controller has been implemented and tested on a 800 W motor....

  18. A discreet control of sliding ways of an induction motor; Control discreto de modos deslizantes de un motor de induccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera Dominguez, Jorge

    2001-12-15

    A control of sliding ways in discreet time for non-linear discreet systems is designed, also the technique of the control by histograms for non-linear discreet systems was developed, and an observer of reduced order was developed for non-linear electromechanical discreet systems. All these techniques are applied to a non-linear discreet model of an induction motor that was found here, that posses electrical and mechanical dynamics, in which the load pair is considered an unknown disturbance. With complete measurements of the states are satisfied the pursuing of the rotor velocity and the amplitude of the magnetic flux of the rotor, where the unknown load does not affect the velocity regulation. Next, an observer of reduced order is implemented where the velocity and current measurements are employed to consider the load pair and the flows that are very difficult to measure. The proposed method has a design and stability procedure of direct analyses, conserving a simple structure of the control law. The simulations predict that the system is robust with respect to several types of load pairs. The responses of velocity and amplitude of the rotor flow and the entrance references evolved very well. These references have a linear dynamics of second order with time constants that can be chosen by the motor user. The practical aspects for a future digital implementation of the control law are considered, including the velocity and currents sensors, the preparation of signals, the transformation of the current in the frame of stationary reference, PWM and inverter modules, which were seen in detail. The experimental results are left as a future work. [Spanish] Se disena un control de modos deslizantes en tiempo discreto para sistemas discretos no lineales, tambien se desarrollo la tecnica del control por bloques para sistemas discretos no lineales, y un observador de orden reducido fue desarrollado para sistemas discretos electromecanicos no lineales. Todas estas tecnicas

  19. Position Control of Synchronous Motor Drive by Modified Adaptive Two-phase Sliding Mode Controller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Said Sayed Ahmed; Ping Zhang; Yun-Jie Wu

    2008-01-01

    A modified adaptive two-phase sliding mode controller for the synchronous motor drive that is highly robust to uncertain-ties and external disturbances is proposed in this paper. The proposed controller uses two-phase sliding mode control (SMC) where the 1st phase mainly controls the system in steady states and disturbed states-it is a smoothing phase. The 2nd phase is used mainly in the case of disturbed states. Also, it is an autotuning phase and uses a simple adaptive algorithm to tune the gain of conventional variable structure control (VSC). The modified controller is useful in position control of a permanent magnet synchronous drive.

  20. Position Control of Linear Synchronous Motor Drives with Exploitation of Forced Dynamics Control Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vittek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Closed-loop position control of mechanisms directly driven by linear synchronous motors with permanent magnets is presented. The control strategy is based on forced dynamic control, which is a form of feedback linearisation, yielding a non-liner multivariable control law to obtain a prescribed linear speed dynamics together with the vector control condition of mutal orthogonality between the stator current and magnetic flux vectors (assuming perfect estimates of the plant parameters. Outer position control loop is closed via simple feedback with proportional gain. Simulations of the design control sysstem, including the drive with power electronic switching, predict the intended drive performance.

  1. Intelligent robust control law for induction motors based on field-oriented control theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barambones, O.; Alcorta, P.; Sevillano, G.; Garrido, A.; Garrido, I. [Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dpto. Ingenieri a de Sistemas y Automatica

    2009-07-01

    A sensorless adaptive control law was developed to improve the trajectory tracking performance of induction motors. The law used an integral sliding mode algorithm to avoid the necessity of calculating an upper bound for system uncertainties. The vector control theory was used to develop the induction motor drives. The sliding mode control law incorporated an adaptive switching gain and included a method of estimating rotor speeds. Rotor speed estimation errors were presented as a first order simple function based on the difference between real stator currents and estimated stator currents. The Lyapunov stability theory was used to analyze the controller under different load disturbances and parameter uncertainties. Results of the study showed that the control signal of the scheme was smaller than signals obtained using traditional variable structure control schemes. It was concluded that speed tracking objectives can be obtained under various parameter and torque uncertainties. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Combined Sliding Mode Control with a Feedback Linearization for Speed Control of Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Hashim Obeid Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Induction Motor (IM speed control is an area of research that has been in prominence for some time now. In this paper, a nonlinear controller is presented for IM drives. The nonlinear controller is designed based on input-output feedback linearization control technique, combined with sliding mode control (SMC to obtain a robust, fast and precise control of IM speed. The input-output feedback linearization control decouples the flux control from the speed control and makes the synthesis of linear controllers possible. To validate the performances of the proposed control scheme, we provided a series of simulation results and a comparative study between the performances of the proposed control strategy and those of the feedback linearization control (FLC schemes. Simulation results show that the proposed control strategy scheme shows better performance than the FLC strategy in the face of system parameters variation

  3. High temperature brushless DC motor system and its operation mode control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹继斌; 胡建辉; 徐永向

    2001-01-01

    The high temperature ( 175 ℃ ) operation of a motor spells out special requirements for control algorithms, materials and elements. The stability of motor characteristic is guaranteed by the digital control strategy. Constant velocity operation is achieved by phase-locked loop ( PLL), and constant power operation is achieved by a current-restricting circuit. A motor for constant speed and constant power operation has been built and the speed control system is tuned by MATLAB simulation. Experimental and simulation results for operation mode control of brushless DC motor are presented.

  4. Feed-forward motor control of ultrafast, ballistic movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagaya, K; Patek, S N

    2016-02-01

    To circumvent the limits of muscle, ultrafast movements achieve high power through the use of springs and latches. The time scale of these movements is too short for control through typical neuromuscular mechanisms, thus ultrafast movements are either invariant or controlled prior to movement. We tested whether mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda: Neogonodactylus bredini) vary their ultrafast smashing strikes and, if so, how this control is achieved prior to movement. We collected high-speed images of strike mechanics and electromyograms of the extensor and flexor muscles that control spring compression and latch release. During spring compression, lateral extensor and flexor units were co-activated. The strike initiated several milliseconds after the flexor units ceased, suggesting that flexor activity prevents spring release and determines the timing of strike initiation. We used linear mixed models and Akaike's information criterion to serially evaluate multiple hypotheses for control mechanisms. We found that variation in spring compression and strike angular velocity were statistically explained by spike activity of the extensor muscle. The results show that mantis shrimp can generate kinematically variable strikes and that their kinematics can be changed through adjustments to motor activity prior to the movement, thus supporting an upstream, central-nervous-system-based control of ultrafast movement. Based on these and other findings, we present a shishiodoshi model that illustrates alternative models of control in biological ballistic systems. The discovery of feed-forward control in mantis shrimp sets the stage for the assessment of targets, strategic variation in kinematics and the role of learning in ultrafast animals. PMID:26643091

  5. Controlling the Dc-link Midpoint Potential in a Six-phase Motor-drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Flemming Buus; Blaabjerg, Frede; Rasmussen, Peter Omand;

    2004-01-01

    inverter branch and filter inductances is needed for stabilizing the midpoint potential of the series connected dc-capacitor link. A new control strategy that pre-calculates the allowed voltage ripple and controls the motor voltage accordingly (using two standard three phase inverter modules) is suggested......Traditionally electrical motors have three phases, but multiphase motors have shown to improve motor performance and efficiency. This paper concentrates about the control algorithm for a six-phase induction motor with third harmonic current injection. The problem is that typically a seventh....... With this new control strategy the seventh branch and an inductance can be saved. It also opens the possibility to use two standard three-phase inverters to supply the six-phase motor. An experimental setup is build and the theory is verified in the test case. The proposed control strategy works satisfactory...

  6. Stepping motor control processor reference manual. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual is intended to serve several purposes. The first goal is to describe the capabilities and operation of the SMC processor package from an operator or user point of view. Secondly, the manual will describe in some detail the basic hardware elements and how they can be used effectively to implement a step motor control system. Practical information on the use, installation and checkout of the hardware set is presented in the following sections along with programming suggestions. Available related system software is described in this manual for reference and as an aid in understanding the system architecture. Section two presents an overview and operations manual of the SMC processor describing its composition and functional capabilities. Section three contains hardware descriptions in some detail for the LLL-designed hardware used in the SMC processor. Basic theory of operation and important features are explained

  7. Multisensory systems integration for high-performance motor control in flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Mark A

    2010-06-01

    Engineered tracking systems 'fuse' data from disparate sensor platforms, such as radar and video, to synthesize information that is more reliable than any single input. The mammalian brain registers visual and auditory inputs to directionally localize an interesting environmental feature. For a fly, sensory perception is challenged by the extreme performance demands of high speed flight. Yet even a fruit fly can robustly track a fragmented odor plume through varying visual environments, outperforming any human engineered robot. Flies integrate disparate modalities, such as vision and olfaction, which are neither related by spatiotemporal spectra nor processed by registered neural tissue maps. Thus, the fly is motivating new conceptual frameworks for how low-level multisensory circuits and functional algorithms produce high-performance motor control. PMID:20202821

  8. Multisensory systems integration for high-performance motor control in flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Mark A

    2010-06-01

    Engineered tracking systems 'fuse' data from disparate sensor platforms, such as radar and video, to synthesize information that is more reliable than any single input. The mammalian brain registers visual and auditory inputs to directionally localize an interesting environmental feature. For a fly, sensory perception is challenged by the extreme performance demands of high speed flight. Yet even a fruit fly can robustly track a fragmented odor plume through varying visual environments, outperforming any human engineered robot. Flies integrate disparate modalities, such as vision and olfaction, which are neither related by spatiotemporal spectra nor processed by registered neural tissue maps. Thus, the fly is motivating new conceptual frameworks for how low-level multisensory circuits and functional algorithms produce high-performance motor control.

  9. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease with Early Motor Complications: A UK Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Fundament

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a debilitating illness associated with considerable impairment of quality of life and substantial costs to health care systems. Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an established surgical treatment option for some patients with advanced PD. The EARLYSTIM trial has recently demonstrated its clinical benefit also in patients with early motor complications. We sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of DBS, compared to best medical therapy (BMT, among PD patients with early onset of motor complications, from a United Kingdom (UK payer perspective.We developed a Markov model to represent the progression of PD as rated using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS over time in patients with early PD. Evidence sources were a systematic review of clinical evidence; data from the EARLYSTIM study; and a UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD dataset including DBS patients. A mapping algorithm was developed to generate utility values based on UPDRS data for each intervention. The cost-effectiveness was expressed as the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to explore the effect of parameter uncertainty.Over a 15-year time horizon, DBS was predicted to lead to additional mean cost per patient of £26,799 compared with BMT (£73,077/patient versus £46,278/patient and an additional mean 1.35 QALYs (6.69 QALYs versus 5.35 QALYs, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £19,887 per QALY gained with a 99% probability of DBS being cost-effective at a threshold of £30,000/QALY. One-way sensitivity analyses suggested that the results were not significantly impacted by plausible changes in the input parameter values.These results indicate that DBS is a cost-effective intervention in PD patients with early motor complications when compared with existing interventions, offering additional health benefits at acceptable incremental

  10. Optimal Fuzzy Controller Tuned by TV-PSO for Induction Motor Speed Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KULIC, F.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports an automated procedure for the design of an optimal fuzzy logic controller to be used as an induction motor speed controller. The procedure consists of selection of a suitable well known fuzzy logic controller and tuning via particle swarm optimization optimal for the selected criteria. In this way the time required for tuning of the controller is significantly reduced in comparison with trial and error methods. As a benchmark a proportional-integral (PI controller is used. The PI controller is tuned via the symmetrical optimum procedure, the standard procedure for tuning a speed controller of an induction motor. Simulation results are obtained via a mathematical model developed in Matlab/Simulink. Experimental verification is carried out with a laboratory model based on the DS1104 digital control card. To minimize iron losses and to provide better motor performance for low loads, flux is reduced from nominal and speed is kept below nominal. Results are presented in tables and graphics. The optimal fuzzy logic controller provides a slight practical advantage.

  11. Speed Control of Induction Motor Using New Sliding Mode Control Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Hashim Obeid Ahmed

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Induction Motors have been used as the workhorse in the industry for a long time due to its easy build, high robustness, and generally satisfactory efficiency. However, they are significantly more difficult to control than DC motors. One of the problems which might cause unsuccessful attempts for designing a proper controller would be the time varying nature of parameters and variables which might be changed while working with the motion systems. One of the best suggested solutions to solve this problem would be the use of Sliding Mode Control (SMC. This paper presents the design of a new controller for a vector control induction motor drive that employs an outer loop speed controller using SMC. Several tests were performed to evaluate the performance of the new controller method, and two other sliding mode controller techniques. From the comparative simulation results, one can conclude that the new controller law provides high performance dynamic characteristics and is robust with regard to plant parameter variations.

  12. Emotional Learning Based Intelligent Controllers for Rotor Flux Oriented Control of Induction Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Rohollah; Farhangi, Reza; Yarahmadi, Ali

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents design and evaluation of a novel approach based on emotional learning to improve the speed control system of rotor flux oriented control of induction motor. The controller includes a neuro-fuzzy system with speed error and its derivative as inputs. A fuzzy critic evaluates the present situation, and provides the emotional signal (stress). The controller modifies its characteristics so that the critics stress is reduced. The comparative simulation results show that the proposed controller is more robust and hence found to be a suitable replacement of the conventional PI controller for the high performance industrial drive applications.

  13. Design of Fuzzy PID controller to control DC motor with zero overshoot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Chourasiya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the real time operation based physical system, digital PID is used in field such as servo-motor/dc motor/temperature control system, robotics, power electronics etc. need to interface with high speed constraints, higher density PLD’s such as FPGA used to integrate several logics on single IC. There are some limitations in it to overcome these limitations Fuzzy logic is introduced with PID and Fuzzy PID is formed. This paper explains experimental design of Fuzzy PID controller. We aimed to make controller power efficient, more compact, and zero overshoot. MATLAB is used to design PID controller to calculate and plot the time response of the control system and Simulink to generate a set of coefficients.

  14. Research on Sensorless Control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor for Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Motor speed can’t change suddenly during the operation of motor because of inertia. In the short process of motor being not driven by motor controller, the operation of motor can be thought of as a uniform motion process. Making use of this property, it can be estimated next or next several cycles by measuring previous one or several cycles of motor. So the motor speed can be Figured out according to measured cycles. The phase angle can be estimated by zero crossing point of induced electromotive force produced in the running process of motor. Then the magnetic field position is estimated, and the angle measured by position sensors can be replaced by estimated angle. At last, bench test proves that this method can improve the reliability and safety of the motor control and has a good fault tolerance so as to be used as an auxiliary control method in motor control of electric vehicle and realize multi-mode control.

  15. Output torque and temperature control technologies for an electrical screw press motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun-chao; HUANG Shu-huai; FENG Yi

    2008-01-01

    The DSC (direct self control) of speed regulation technology was applied to drive a motor running at a certain overloading ratio in intermittent working conditions. To control motor temperatures rising effectively, a finite element method with an iterative approach was applied to simulate real working conditions and analyze the temperature rising of the inner part of the motor. Application of DSC speed regulation realizes the invariable torque output quickly and avoids the peak current at the start state in favor of the motor temperature decreasing. Based on an analysis with the finite limit method, some effective measures were taken to improve the ability of the motor to expel heat. The overload ability of the motor was improved and the stable motor temperature rising was obtained, fulfilling the demands of electrical screw presses.

  16. Growth hormone combined with child-specific motor training improves motor development in infants with Prader-Willi syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reus, Linda; Pelzer, Ben J; Otten, Barto J; Siemensma, Elbrich P C; van Alfen-van der Velden, Janielle A A E M; Festen, Dederieke A M; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2013-10-01

    Although severe motor problems in infants with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are striking, motor development has never been studied longitudinally and the results of growth hormone (GH) treatment on motor development are contradictory. The authors studied whether GH treatment can enhance the effect of physical training on motor development in infants with PWS. Twenty-two infants were followed for two years during a randomized controlled trial. The treatment and control groups began GH after baseline or following a control period, respectively. Both groups followed a child-specific physical training program. Motor performance was measured every three months. Multi-level regression analysis revealed that motor development differed significantly between infants (pchild-specific physical training on both motor developmental rate and motor developmental potential. Moreover, this effect was more pronounced when GH treatment was initiated at a younger age.

  17. Feed-forward control of a redundant motor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Simon R; Latash, Mark L

    2006-09-01

    We describe a model of feed-forward control of a redundant motor system and validate it using, as examples, tasks of multi-finger force production. The model assumes the existence of two input signals at an upper level of the control hierarchy, related and unrelated to a task variable. Knowledge of the Jacobian of the system is assumed at the level of generation of elemental variables (variables at the level of effectors). Variance at the level of elemental variables is considered as the sum of two components, related and unrelated to variability in the task variable. An index of stabilization of the task variable is similarly introduced as to how it was done in several studies using the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. Several phenomena have been simulated including data point distributions corresponding to presence and absence of force-stabilizing synergies in two-finger tasks, changes in synergies with practice, and changes in synergy indices in preparation to a fast action. The model is discussed in comparison to other models of control of multi-element systems based on feedback processes. It shows that patterns of structured variability in the space of elemental variables can result from feed-forward processes. Relations of the model to the equilibrium-point hypothesis are also discussed. PMID:16838148

  18. Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Attitude Control Motor Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Paschal, Keith B.; Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Foley, Robert; Mayfield, David; Cross, Jared

    2011-01-01

    Current Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) configurations use an eight-jet, solid-fueled Attitude Control Motor (ACM) to provide required vehicle control for all proposed abort trajectories. Due to the forward position of the ACM on the LAV, it is necessary to assess the effects of jet-interactions (JI) between the various ACM nozzle plumes and the external flow along the outside surfaces of the vehicle. These JI-induced changes in flight control characteristics must be accounted for in developing ACM operations and LAV flight characteristics. A test program to generate jet interaction aerodynamic increment data for multiple LAV configurations was conducted in the NASA Ames and NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels from August 2007 through December 2009. Using cold air as the simulant gas, powered subscale models were used to generate interaction data at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic test conditions. This paper presents an overview of the complete ACM JI experimental test program for Orion LAV configurations, highlighting ACM system modeling, nozzle scaling assumptions, experimental test techniques, and data reduction methodologies. Lessons learned are discussed, and sample jet interaction data are shown. These data, in conjunction with computational predictions, were used to create the ACM JI increments for all relevant flight databases.

  19. Vector Control of Three-Phase Induction Motor with Two Stator Phases Open-Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hesam Asgari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Variable frequency drives are used to provide reliable dynamic systems and significant reduction in usage of energy and costs of the induction motors. Modeling and control of faulty or an unbalanced three-phase induction motor is obviously different from healthy three-phase induction motor. Using conventional vector control techniques such as Field-Oriented Control (FOC for faulty three-phase induction motor, results in a significant torque and speed oscillation. This research presented a novel method for vector control of three-phase induction motor under fault condition (two-phase open circuit fault. The proposed method for vector control of faulty machine is based on rotor FOC method. A comparison between conventional and modified controller shows that the modified controller has been significantly reduced the torque and speed oscillations.

  20. Optimal speech motor control and token-to-token variability: a Bayesian modeling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Patri, Jean-François; Diard, Julien; Perrier, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The remarkable capacity of the speech motor system to adapt to various speech conditions is due to an excess of degrees of freedom, which enables producing similar acoustical properties with different sets of control strategies. To explain how the Central Nervous System selects one of the possible strategies, a common approach, in line with optimal motor control theories, is to model speech motor planning as the solution of an optimality problem based on cost functions. Despite the success of...

  1. Contouring Control for a CNC Milling Machine Driven by Direct thrust Controlled Linear Induction Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled N. Faris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available According to various advantages of linear induction motor (LIM, such as high starting thrust force, high speed operation and reduction of mechanical losses, more applications have utilized this type of motors. Direct Thrust Control (DTC technique is considered as one of the most efficient techniques that can be used for LIM. DTC is preferable to give a fast and good dynamic thrust response. So, to improve the accuracy and robustness of contouring control for CNC machine tools, linear induction motors with a direct thrust control technique are introduced for driving these machines. An industry standard motion control system is applied for reducing the tracking error and improving the desired accuracy. Different loading conditions are simulated to validate the reliability and robustness of the introduced system to match the application field. The proposed system is simulated using the MATLAB/SIMULINK Package; simulation results validated both tracking accuracy and robustness of the proposed motion control system for contouring control for a CNC (Computer Numerical Control milling machine.

  2. Torque Ripple Reduction in Direct Torque Control Based Induction Motor using Intelligent Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Ambarapu; Vijaya Kumar, M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents intelligent control scheme together with conventional control scheme to overcome the problems with uncertainties in the structure encountered with classical model based design of induction motor drive based on direct torque control (DTC). It allows high dynamic performance to be obtained with very simple hysteresis control scheme. Direct control of the torque and flux is achieved by proper selection of inverter voltage space vector through a lookup table. This paper also presents the application of intelligent controllers like neural network and fuzzy logic controllers to control induction machines with DTC. Intelligent controllers are used to emulate the state selector of the DTC. With implementation of intelligent controllers the system is also verified and proved to be operated stably with reduced torque ripple. The proposed method validity and effectiveness has been verified by computer simulations using Matlab/Simulink®. These results are compared with the ones obtained with a classical DTC using proportional integral speed controller.

  3. A study of EV induction motor controller based on rotor flux oriented control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Jianguo; Chen Quanshi

    2006-01-01

    Induction motor is a multi-parameter, non-linear and strong coupling system, which requires efficient control algorithms. In this paper, rotor flux oriented control (FOC) algorithm based on voltage source inverter-fed is deduced in detail, including stator voltage compensation, closed-loop PI parameters' calculation of torque and rotor flux. FOC's Simulink model is setup to simulate torque and rotor flux's response. At last, the experimental results are shown.

  4. Evaluation of a 2-Channel NIRS-Based Optical Brain Switch for Motor Disabilities' Communication Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Kazuhiko; Kido, Kunihiko

    We have developed a portable NIRS-based optical BCI system that features a non-invasive, facile probe attachment and does not require muscle movement to control the target devices. The system consists of a 2-channel probe, a signal-processing unit, and an infrared-emission device, which measures the blood volume change in the participant's prefrontal cortex in a real time. We use the threshold logic as a switching technology, which transmits a control signal to a target device when the electrical waveforms exceed the pre-defined threshold. Eight healthy volunteers participated in the experiments and they could change the television channel or control the movement of a toy robot with average switching times of 11.5±5.3s and the hit rate was 83.3%. These trials suggest that this system provides a novel communication aid for people with motor disabilities.

  5. An Algorithm for Idle-State Detection in Motor-Imagery-Based Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Wang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available For a robust brain-computer interface (BCI system based on motor imagery (MI, it should be able to tell when the subject is not concentrating on MI tasks (the “idle state” so that real MI tasks could be extracted accurately. Moreover, because of the diversity of idle state, detecting idle state without training samples is as important as classifying MI tasks. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for solving this problem. A three-class classifier was constructed by combining two two-class classifiers, one specified for idle-state detection and the other for these two MI tasks. Common spatial subspace decomposition (CSSD was used to extract the features of event-related desynchronization (ERD in two motor imagery tasks. Then Fisher discriminant analysis (FDA was employed in the design of two two-class classifiers for completion of detecting each task, respectively. The algorithm successfully provided a way to solve the problem of “idle-state detection without training samples.” The algorithm was applied to the dataset IVc from BCI competition III. A final result with mean square error of 0.30 was obtained on the testing set. This is the winning algorithm in BCI competition III. In addition, the algorithm was also validated by applying to the EEG data of an MI experiment including “idle” task.

  6. Evolutionary History of a Brain Controlling Brain Size

    OpenAIRE

    Natalay Kouprina; Adam Pavlicek; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Gregory Solomon; William Gersch; Young-Ho Yoon; Randall Collura; Maryellen Ruvolo; J Carl Barrett; C Geoffrey Woods; Walsh, Christopher A.; Jerzy Jurka; Vladimir Larionov

    2004-01-01

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global reduction in cerebral cortical volume. The microcephalic brain has a volume comparable to that of early hominids, raising the possibility that some MCPH genes may have been evolutionary targets in the expansion of the cerebral cortex in mammals and especially primates. Mutations in ASPM, which encodes the human homologue of a fly protein essential for spindle function, are the most common known cause of MCPH....

  7. The effects of Nintendo Wii on the postural control of patients affected by acquiered brain injury: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Vicario Méndez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Scientific literature demonstrates that postural control after suffering a brain injury can actually relate to its functional prognosis. Postural control is a result of complex interactions of different body systems that co-operate in order to control the position of the body in the space and is determined by the functional task as well as by the environment in which it is developed. The use in rehabilitation of Nintendo's Wii® gives some results on motor functions. Objective:...

  8. Imparting Motion to a Test Object Such as a Motor Vehicle in a Controlled Fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southward, Stephen C. (Inventor); Reubush, Chandler (Inventor); Pittman, Bryan (Inventor); Roehrig, Kurt (Inventor); Gerard, Doug (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus imparts motion to a test object such as a motor vehicle in a controlled fashion. A base has mounted on it a linear electromagnetic motor having a first end and a second end, the first end being connected to the base. A pneumatic cylinder and piston combination have a first end and a second end, the first end connected to the base so that the pneumatic cylinder and piston combination is generally parallel with the linear electromagnetic motor. The second ends of the linear electromagnetic motor and pneumatic cylinder and piston combination being commonly linked to a mount for the test object. A control system for the linear electromagnetic motor and pneumatic cylinder and piston combination drives the pneumatic cylinder and piston combination to support a substantial static load of the test object and the linear electromagnetic motor to impart controlled motion to the test object.

  9. Motor control impairment of the contralateral wrist in patients with unilateral chronic wrist pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeulders, MJC; Kreulen, M; Hage, JJ; Ritt, MJPF; Mulder, T

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Assessment of the quality of fine motor control in patients with unilateral chronic wrist pain seldom focuses on the possibility that control of movements is effector independent at the cerebral level. This mechanism may be involved in an impairment of motor function in the unaffected wri

  10. Fibroblast growth factor-2 induced by enriched environment enhances angiogenesis and motor function in chronic hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hwa Seo

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched environment (EE on promoting angiogenesis and neurobehavioral function in an animal model of chronic hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injury. HI brain damage was induced in seven day-old CD-1® mice by unilateral carotid artery ligation and exposure to hypoxia (8% O2 for 90 min. At six weeks of age, the mice were randomly assigned to either EE or standard cages (SC for two months. Rotarod, forelimb-use asymmetry, and grip strength tests were performed to evaluate neurobehavioral function. In order to identify angiogenic growth factors regulated by EE, an array-based multiplex ELISA assay was used to measure the expression in frontal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum. Among the growth factors, the expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 was confirmed using western blotting. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA were also evaluated using immunohistochemistry. As a result, mice exposed to EE showed significant improvements in rotarod and ladder walking performances compared to SC controls. The level of FGF-2 was significantly higher in the frontal cortex of EE mice at 8 weeks after treatment in multiplex ELISA and western blot. On the other hand, FGF-2 in the striatum significantly increased at 2 weeks after exposure to EE earlier than in the frontal cortex. Expression of activin A was similarly upregulated as FGF-2 expression pattern. Particularly, all animals treated with FGF-2 neutralizing antibody abolished the beneficial effect of EE on motor performance relative to mice not given anti-FGF-2. Immunohistochemistry showed that densities of α-SMA(+ and PECAM-1(+ cells in frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus were significantly increased following EE, suggesting the histological findings exhibit a similar pattern to the upregulation of FGF-2 in the brain. In conclusion, EE enhances endogenous angiogenesis and neurobehavioral functions

  11. Multi-class motor imagery EEG decoding for brain-computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng eWang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show that scalp electroencephalography (EEG as a non-invasive interface has great potential for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs. However, one factor that has limited practical applications for EEG-based BCI so far is the difficulty to decode brain signals in a reliable and efficient way. This paper proposes a new robust processing framework for decoding of multi-class motor imagery (MI that is based on five main processing steps. (i Raw EEG segmentation without the need of visual artifact inspection. (ii Considering that EEG recordings are often contaminated not just by electrooculography (EOG but also other types of artifacts, we propose to first implement an automatic artifact correction method that combines regression analysis with independent component analysis (ICA for recovering the original source signals. (iii The significant difference between frequency components based on event-related (de- synchronization and sample entropy is then used to find non-continuous discriminating rhythms. After spectral filtering using the discriminating rhythms, a channel selection algorithm is used to select only relevant channels. (iv Feature vectors are extracted based on the inter-class diversity and time-varying dynamic characteristics of the signals. (v Finally, a support vector machine (SVM is employed for four-class classification. We tested our proposed algorithm on experimental data that was obtained from dataset 2a of BCI competition IV (2008. The overall four-class kappa values (between 0.41 and 0.80 were comparable to other models but without requiring any artifact-contaminated trial removal. The performance showed that multi-class MI tasks can be reliably discriminated using artifact-contaminated EEG recordings from a few channels. This may be a promising avenue for online robust EEG-based BCI applications.

  12. SIMULATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF PID-ANN CONTROLLER FOR CHOPPER FED EMBEDDED PMDC MOTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Madheswaran

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The closed loop control of PMDC drive with an inner current controller and an outer PID-ANN (Proportional Integral Derivative – Artificial Neural Network based speed controller is designed and presented in this paper. Motor is fed by DC / DC buck converter (DC Chopper. The controller is used to change the duty cycle of the converter and thereby, the voltage fed to the PMDC motor to regulate the speed. The PID-ANN controller designed was evaluated by computer simulation and it was implemented using an 8051 based embedded system. This system will operate in forward motoring with variable speed.

  13. Brain Computer Interface-Controlling Devices Utilizing The Alpha Brain Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Rohan Hundia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes the development and testing of an interface system whereby one can control external devices by voluntarily controlling alpha waves that is through eye movement. Such a system may be used for the control of prosthetics robotic arms and external devices like wheelchairs using the alpha brain waves and the Mu rhythm. The response generated through the movement of the eye detecting and controlling the amplitude of the alpha brain waves is interfaced and processed to...

  14. UNIFIED CONTROL STRUCTURE OF MULTI-TYPE INTERIOR PERMANENT MAGNET MOTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. NORHISAM

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the control strategy structure to extract the speed torque characteristic for the newly designed three phase Multi Type Interior Permanent Magnet Motor. The proposed structure with the driving circuits exhibit the performance of torque characteristics of the stepper motor and brushless motor with independent coil winding per phase especially used as an in-wheel motor in agricultural applications. Brushless Direct Current motors exhibit characteristics of generating high torque at high speed while the Permanent Magnet Stepper motors has characteristic of generating high torque at low speed. The typical characteristics of the above two are integrated in the proposed structure with a complex control structure that handle the switching complexity and speed control in real time. Thus, a specially designed driving system is essential to drive and control this special motor. The evaluation of the motor mechanical characteristics when applying load torque is also presented. The result determines the practical torque range applicable for each motor configuration and as combined machine.

  15. Effect of melatonin on motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Czerniczyniec, A; Cutrera, R A; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2014-06-01

    Increased reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial dysfunction occur during ethanol hangover. The aim of this work was to study the effect of melatonin pretreatment on motor performance and mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover. Male mice received melatonin solution or its vehicle in drinking water during 7 days and i.p. injection with EtOH (3.8 g/kg BW) or saline at the eighth day. Motor performance and mitochondrial function were evaluated at the onset of hangover (6h after injection). Melatonin improved motor coordination in ethanol hangover mice. Malate-glutamate-dependent oxygen uptake was decreased by ethanol hangover treatment and partially prevented by melatonin pretreatment. Melatonin alone induced a decrease of 30% in state 4 succinate-dependent respiratory rate. Also, the activity of the respiratory complexes was decreased in melatonin-pretreated ethanol hangover group. Melatonin pretreatment before the hangover prevented mitochondrial membrane potential collapse and induced a 79% decrement of hydrogen peroxide production as compared with ethanol hangover group. Ethanol hangover induced a 25% decrease in NO production. Melatonin alone and as a pretreatment before ethanol hangover significantly increased NO production by nNOS and iNOS as compared with control groups. No differences were observed in nNOS protein expression, while iNOS expression was increased in the melatonin group. Increased NO production by melatonin could be involved in the decrease of succinate-dependent oxygen consumption and the inhibition of complex IV observed in our study. Melatonin seems to act as an antioxidant agent in the ethanol hangover condition but also exhibited some dual effects related to NO metabolism.

  16. Effect of melatonin on motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Czerniczyniec, A; Cutrera, R A; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2014-06-01

    Increased reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial dysfunction occur during ethanol hangover. The aim of this work was to study the effect of melatonin pretreatment on motor performance and mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover. Male mice received melatonin solution or its vehicle in drinking water during 7 days and i.p. injection with EtOH (3.8 g/kg BW) or saline at the eighth day. Motor performance and mitochondrial function were evaluated at the onset of hangover (6h after injection). Melatonin improved motor coordination in ethanol hangover mice. Malate-glutamate-dependent oxygen uptake was decreased by ethanol hangover treatment and partially prevented by melatonin pretreatment. Melatonin alone induced a decrease of 30% in state 4 succinate-dependent respiratory rate. Also, the activity of the respiratory complexes was decreased in melatonin-pretreated ethanol hangover group. Melatonin pretreatment before the hangover prevented mitochondrial membrane potential collapse and induced a 79% decrement of hydrogen peroxide production as compared with ethanol hangover group. Ethanol hangover induced a 25% decrease in NO production. Melatonin alone and as a pretreatment before ethanol hangover significantly increased NO production by nNOS and iNOS as compared with control groups. No differences were observed in nNOS protein expression, while iNOS expression was increased in the melatonin group. Increased NO production by melatonin could be involved in the decrease of succinate-dependent oxygen consumption and the inhibition of complex IV observed in our study. Melatonin seems to act as an antioxidant agent in the ethanol hangover condition but also exhibited some dual effects related to NO metabolism. PMID:24713372

  17. Hybrid EEG-fNIRS Asynchronous Brain-Computer Interface for Multiple Motor Tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Paolo Buccino

    Full Text Available Non-invasive Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI have demonstrated great promise for neuroprosthetics and assistive devices. Here we aim to investigate methods to combine Electroencephalography (EEG and functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS in an asynchronous Sensory Motor rhythm (SMR-based BCI. We attempted to classify 4 different executed movements, namely, Right-Arm-Left-Arm-Right-Hand-Left-Hand tasks. Previous studies demonstrated the benefit of EEG-fNIRS combination. However, since normally fNIRS hemodynamic response shows a long delay, we investigated new features, involving slope indicators, in order to immediately detect changes in the signals. Moreover, Common Spatial Patterns (CSPs have been applied to both EEG and fNIRS signals. 15 healthy subjects took part in the experiments and since 25 trials per class were available, CSPs have been regularized with information from the entire population of participants and optimized using genetic algorithms. The different features have been compared in terms of performance and the dynamic accuracy over trials shows that the introduced methods diminish the fNIRS delay in the detection of changes.

  18. Electroencephalography(EEG)-based instinctive brain-control of a quadruped locomotion robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wenchuan; Huang, Dandan; Luo, Xin; Pu, Huayan; Chen, Xuedong; Bai, Ou

    2012-01-01

    Artificial intelligence and bionic control have been applied in electroencephalography (EEG)-based robot system, to execute complex brain-control task. Nevertheless, due to technical limitations of the EEG decoding, the brain-computer interface (BCI) protocol is often complex, and the mapping between the EEG signal and the practical instructions lack of logic associated, which restrict the user's actual use. This paper presents a strategy that can be used to control a quadruped locomotion robot by user's instinctive action, based on five kinds of movement related neurophysiological signal. In actual use, the user drives or imagines the limbs/wrists action to generate EEG signal to adjust the real movement of the robot according to his/her own motor reflex of the robot locomotion. This method is easy for real use, as the user generates the brain-control signal through the instinctive reaction. By adopting the behavioral control of learning and evolution based on the proposed strategy, complex movement task may be realized by instinctive brain-control.

  19. Development of speech motor control: lip movement variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schötz, Susanne; Frid, Johan; Löfqvist, Anders

    2013-06-01

    This study examined variability of lip movements across repetitions of the same utterance as a function of age in Swedish speakers. The specific purpose was to extend earlier findings by examining variability in both phase and amplitude. Subjects were 50 typically developed native Swedish children and adults (28 females, 22 males, aged 5 to 31 yr). Lip movements were recorded during 15 to 20 repetitions of a short Swedish phrase using three-dimensional articulography. After correction for head movements, the kinematic records were expressed in a maxilla-based coordinate system. Movement onset and offset of the utterance were identified using kinematic landmarks. The Euclidean distance between receivers on the upper and lower lips was calculated and subjected to functional data analysis to assess both phase and amplitude variability. Results show a decrease in both indices as a function of age, with a greater reduction of amplitude variability. There was no difference between males and females for either index. The two indices were moderately correlated with each other, suggesting that they capture different aspects of speech production. Utterance duration also decreased with age, but variability was unrelated to duration. The standard deviation of utterance duration also decreased with age. The present results thus suggest that age related changes in speech motor control continue up until 30 years of age.

  20. Key parameters controlling the performance of catalytic motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplandiu, Maria J.; Afshar Farniya, Ali; Reguera, David

    2016-03-01

    The development of autonomous micro/nanomotors driven by self-generated chemical gradients is a topic of high interest given their potential impact in medicine and environmental remediation. Although impressive functionalities of these devices have been demonstrated, a detailed understanding of the propulsion mechanism is still lacking. In this work, we perform a comprehensive numerical analysis of the key parameters governing the actuation of bimetallic catalytic micropumps. We show that the fluid motion is driven by self-generated electro-osmosis where the electric field originates by a proton current rather than by a lateral charge asymmetry inside the double layer. Hence, the surface potential and the electric field are the key parameters for setting the pumping strength and directionality. The proton flux that generates the electric field stems from the proton gradient induced by the electrochemical reactions taken place at the pump. Surprisingly the electric field and consequently the fluid flow are mainly controlled by the ionic strength and not by the conductivity of the solution, as one could have expected. We have also analyzed the influence of the chemical fuel concentration, electrochemical reaction rates, and size of the metallic structures for an optimized pump performance. Our findings cast light on the complex chemomechanical actuation of catalytic motors and provide important clues for the search, design, and optimization of novel catalytic actuators.

  1. FPGA-Based Implementation Direct Torque Control of Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Krim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a digital implementation of the direct torque control (DTC of an Induction Motor (IM with an observation strategy on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA. The hardware solution based on the FPGA is caracterised by fast processing speed due to the parallel processing. In this study the FPGA is used to overcome the limitation of the software solutions (Digital Signal Processor (DSP and Microcontroller. Also, the DTC of IM has many drawbacks such as for example; The open loop pure integration has from the problems of integration especially at the low speed and the variation of the stator resistance due to the temperature. To tackle these problems we use the Sliding Mode Observer (SMO. This observer is used estimate the stator flux, the stator current and the stator resistance. The hardware implementation method is based on Xilinx System Generator (XSG which a modeling tool developed by Xilinx for the design of implemented systems on FPGA; from the design of the DTC with SMO from XSG we can automatically generate the VHDL code. The model of the DTC with SMO has been designed and simulated using XSG blocks, synthesized with Xilinx ISE 12.4 tool and implemented on Xilinx Virtex-V FPGA.

  2. Speed Synchronization of Multi Induction Motors with Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HACHEMI Glaoui

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A continuous web winding system is a large-scale, complex interconnected dynamic system with numerous tension zones to transport the web while processing it. There are two control schemes for large-scale system control: the centralized scheme and the decentralized scheme. Centralized control is the traditional control method, which considers all the information about the system to be a single dynamic model and design a control system for this model. Aspeed synchronization control strategy for multiple induction motors, based on adjacent cross-coupling control structure, is developed by employing total sliding mode control method. The proposed controlstrategy is to stabilize speed tracking of each induction motor while synchronizing its speed with the speed of the other motors so as to make speed synchronization error amongst induction motors converge to zero. The global stability and the convergence of the designedcontroller are proved by using Lyapunov method. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Testing the Self-Similarity Exponent to Feature Extraction in Motor Imagery Based Brain Computer Interface Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Bermúdez, Germán; Sánchez-Granero, Miguel Ángel; García-Laencina, Pedro J.; Fernández-Martínez, Manuel; Serna, José; Roca-Dorda, Joaquín

    2015-12-01

    A Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system is a tool not requiring any muscle action to transmit information. Acquisition, preprocessing, feature extraction (FE), and classification of electroencephalograph (EEG) signals constitute the main steps of a motor imagery BCI. Among them, FE becomes crucial for BCI, since the underlying EEG knowledge must be properly extracted into a feature vector. Linear approaches have been widely applied to FE in BCI, whereas nonlinear tools are not so common in literature. Thus, the main goal of this paper is to check whether some Hurst exponent and fractal dimension based estimators become valid indicators to FE in motor imagery BCI. The final results obtained were not optimal as expected, which may be due to the fact that the nature of the analyzed EEG signals in these motor imagery tasks were not self-similar enough.

  4. The performance and efficiency of four motor/controller/battery systems for the simpler electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipps, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    A test and analysis program performed on four complete propulsion systems for an urban electric vehicle (EV) is described and results given. A dc series motor and a permanent magnet (PM) motor were tested, each powered by an EV battery pack and controlled by (1) a series/parallel voltage-switching (V-switch) system; and (2) a system using a pulse width modulation, 400 Hz transistorized chopper. Dynamometer tests were first performed, followed by eV performance predictions and data correlating road tests. During dynamometer tests using chopper control; current, voltage, and power were measured on both the battery and motor sides of the chopper, using three types of instrumentation. Conventional dc instruments provided adequate accuracy for eV power and energy measurements, when used on the battery side of the controller. When using the chopper controller, the addition of a small choke inductor improved system efficiency in the lower duty cycle range (some 8% increase at 50% duty cycle) with both types of motors. Overall system efficiency rankings during road tests were: (1) series motor with V-switch; (2) PM motor with V-switch; (3) series motor with chopper; and (4) PM motor with chopper. Chopper control of the eV was smoother and required less driver skill than V-switch control.

  5. The performance and efficiency of four motor/controller/battery systems for the simpler electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipps, P. R.

    1980-05-01

    A test and analysis program performed on four complete propulsion systems for an urban electric vehicle (EV) is described and results given. A dc series motor and a permanent magnet (PM) motor were tested, each powered by an EV battery pack and controlled by (1) a series/parallel voltage-switching (V-switch) system; and (2) a system using a pulse width modulation, 400 Hz transistorized chopper. Dynamometer tests were first performed, followed by eV performance predictions and data correlating road tests. During dynamometer tests using chopper control; current, voltage, and power were measured on both the battery and motor sides of the chopper, using three types of instrumentation. Conventional dc instruments provided adequate accuracy for eV power and energy measurements, when used on the battery side of the controller. When using the chopper controller, the addition of a small choke inductor improved system efficiency in the lower duty cycle range (some 8% increase at 50% duty cycle) with both types of motors. Overall system efficiency rankings during road tests were: (1) series motor with V-switch; (2) PM motor with V-switch; (3) series motor with chopper; and (4) PM motor with chopper. Chopper control of the eV was smoother and required less driver skill than V-switch control.

  6. Magnetic Field Equivalent Current Analysis-Based Radial Force Control for Bearingless Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    OpenAIRE

    Huangqiu Zhu; Hui Li

    2015-01-01

    Bearingless permanent magnet synchronous motors (BPMSMs), with all advantages of permanent magnet motors (PMSMs) and magnetic bearings, have become an important research direction in the bearingless motor field. To realize a stable suspension for the BPMSM, accurate decoupling control between the electromagnetic torque and radial suspension force is indispensable. In this paper, a concise and reliable analysis method based on a magnetic field equivalent current is presented. By this analysis ...

  7. Performance Analysis of Induction Motor of Electric Vehicle Using Vector control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu ping

    2012-01-01

    According to the principle of Vector controlused in an asyn- chronous motor,a simulation model of the asynchronous motor in elec-tric vehicle and Vectorcontrolsystem was established with Matlab/Simu-link software. Simulation analysis of the asynchronous motor driving an electric vehicle was performedunder the classic mode of EV , and the simulation results show the modeland control scheme has better stable and dynamic performance,whichcanbe a good candidate for electric ve- hicle propulsion system

  8. A new Observer for Speed Sensorless Field Oriented Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Using adaptive Lyapunov design a new approach for the design of an observer for speed sensorless field oriented control is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear full order observer for the motor states including the rotor speed. Assuming motor parameters known the design achieves...... stability with guaranteed region of attraction. Experiments on a real motor demonstrate high dynamic performance even at very low rotor speed and stability is extended to zero speed....

  9. Relationship between writing skills and visual-motor control in low-vision students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasavun Uysal, Songül; Aki, Esra

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between handwriting skills and visual motor control among students with low vision and to compare this with the performance of their normal sighted peers. 42 students with low vision and 26 normal sighted peers participated. The Bruininks-Oseretsky Motor Proficiency Test-Short Form (BOTMP-SF), Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test's writing subtest, and a legibility assessment were administered. Significant differences were found between groups for students' writing speed, legibility, and visual motor control. Visual motor control was correlated both writing speed and legibility. Students with low vision had poorer handwriting performance, with lower legibility and slower writing speed. Writing performance time was related to visual motor control in students with low vision.

  10. Application of stepping motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is divided into three parts, which is about practical using of stepping motor. The first part has six chapters. The contents of the first part are about stepping motor, classification of stepping motor, basic theory og stepping motor, characteristic and basic words, types and characteristic of stepping motor in hybrid type and basic control of stepping motor. The second part deals with application of stepping motor with hardware of stepping motor control, stepping motor control by microcomputer and software of stepping motor control. The last part mentions choice of stepping motor system, examples of stepping motor, measurement of stepping motor and practical cases of application of stepping motor.

  11. Analysis and control of excitation, field weakening and stability in direct torque controlled electrically excited synchronous motor drives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyrhoenen, O.

    1998-12-31

    Direct torque control (DTC) is a new control method for rotating field electrical machines. DTC controls directly the motor stator flux linkage with the stator voltage, and no stator current controllers are used. With the DTC method very good torque dynamics can be achieved. Until now, DTC has been applied to asynchronous motor drives. The purpose of this work is to analyse the applicability of DTC to electrically excited synchronous motor drives. Compared with asynchronous motor drives, electrically excited synchronous motor drives require an additional control for the rotor field current. The field current control is called excitation control in this study. The dependence of the static and dynamic performance of DTC synchronous motor drives on the excitation control has been analysed and a straightforward excitation control method has been developed and tested. In the field weakening range the stator flux linkage modulus must be reduced in order to keep the electro motive force of the synchronous motor smaller than the stator voltage and in order to maintain a sufficient voltage reserve. The dynamic performance of the DTC synchronous motor drive depends on the stator flux linkage modulus. Another important factor for the dynamic performance in the field weakening range is the excitation control. The field weakening analysis considers both dependencies. A modified excitation control method, which maximises the dynamic performance in the field weakening range, has been developed. In synchronous motor drives the load angle must be kept in a stabile working area in order to avoid loss of synchronism. The traditional vector control methods allow to adjust the load angle of the synchronous motor directly by the stator current control. In the DTC synchronous motor drive the load angle is not a directly controllable variable, but it is formed freely according to the motor`s electromagnetic state and load. The load angle can be limited indirectly by limiting the torque

  12. Online MTPA Control Approach for Synchronous Reluctance Motor Drives Based on Emotional Controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daryabeigi, Ehsan; Zarchi, Hossein Abootorabi; Markadeh, G. R. Arab;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, speed and torque control modes (SCM and TCM) of synchronous reluctance motor (SynRM) drives are proposed based on emotional controllers and space vector modulation under an automatic search of the maximum-torque-per-ampere (MTPA) strategy. Furthermore, in order to achieve an MTPA...... is compared with an optimized conventional PI controller under different operating conditions. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the benefits of the proposed approach. This structure shows superiority of the proposed method, such as fast dynamic, simple implementation and robustness to parameter...

  13. Sensorless Control of Low-cost Single-phase Hybrid Switched Reluctance Motor Drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Uffe; Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a sensorless-controlled, low-cost, low-power, and variable-speed drive system suitable for fan and pump applications. The main advantages of this drive system are the low system cost, simple converter structure, and simple but robust sensorless control technique. The drive motor...... is a special hybrid switched reluctance motor. The proposed sensorless control method beneficially utilizes the stator side PM field and its performance is motor parameter independent. The unique low-cost drive system solution, simple and robust sensorless control features of this drive system, is demonstrated...

  14. Motor de reluctancia conmutada: modelado, simulación y control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Galvis-Restrepo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The switched reluctance motor (SRM is a doubly-salient machine. This means that it has salient poles on both the rotor and stator. A SRM construction is simple as compared to other types of electric motors. The rotor has no windings or magnet; the windings are concentrated in the stator. The purpose of this article is the development of a speed control strategy for this kind of motor. Description of a nonlinear SRM model and its respective simulation in Matlab/Simulink environment is presented. The constant rotor speed control of SRM is achieved from current control perspective with a PI controller.

  15. Speed Tracking of Field Oriented Control Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Using Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Mulyo Utomo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The field oriented control theory and space vector pulse width modulation technique make a permanent magnet synchronous motor can achieve the performance as well as a DC motor. However, due to the nonlinearity of the permanent magnet synchronous motor drive characteristics, it is difficult to control by using conventional proportional-integral-derivative controller. By this reason in this paper an online neural network controller for the permanent magnet synchronous motor is proposed. The controller is designed to tracks variations of speed references and also during load disturbance. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by develop simulation model in MATLAB-simulink program. The simulation results show that the proposed controller can reduce the overshoot, settling time and rise time. It can be concluded that the performance of the controller is improved.

  16. Performance Analysis of a DTC and SVM Based Field-Orientation Control Induction Motor Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rashedul Islam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a performance analysis of two most popular control strategies for Induction Motor (IM drives: direct torque control (DTC and space vector modulation (SVM strategies. The performance analysis is done by applying field-orientation control (FOC technique because of its good dynamic response. The theoretical principle, simulation results are discussed to study the dynamic performances of the drive system for individual control strategies using actual parameters of induction motor. A closed loop PI controller scheme has been used. The main purpose of this study is to minimize ripple in torque response curve and to achieve quick speed response as well as to investigate the condition for optimum performance of induction motor drive. Depending on the simulation results this study also presents a detailed comparison between direct torque control and space vector modulation based field-orientation control method for the induction motor drive.

  17. Nonlinear Differential Geometry Method and Its Application in Induction Motor Decoupling Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linyuan Fan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An alternating current induction motor is a nonlinear, multi-variable, and strong-coupled system that is difficult to control. To address this problem, a novel control strategy based on nonlinear differential geometry theory was proposed. First, a five-order affine mathematical model for an alternating current induction motor was provided. Then, the feedback linearization method was used to realize decoupling and full linearization of the system model. Moreover, a general and simplified control law was adopted to facilitate practical applications. Finally, a controller was designed using the pole assignment method. Simulation results show that the proposed method can decouple the system model into two independent subsystems, and that the closed-loop system exhibits good dynamic and static performances. The proposed decoupling control method is useful to reduce the system complexity of an induction motor and to improve its control performance, thereby providing a new and feasible dynamic decoupling control for an alternating current induction motor.

  18. PERFORMANCE OF ANN BASED INDIRECT VECTOR CONTROL INDUCTION MOTOR DRIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sharma,

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Indirect field orientation (IFO induction machine drives are increasingly employed in industrial drive systems, but the drive performance is often degrades. Motor works on best performance at certain voltage and frequency for certain loads. In this paper artificial neural network is used to predict the operating voltage and frequency when the load torque and speed going changed so motor efficiency is increased. Simulation and experimental results are shown to validate the scheme.

  19. PERFORMANCE OF ANN BASED INDIRECT VECTOR CONTROL INDUCTION MOTOR DRIVE

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Sharma,; R. A. Gupta; Laxmi Srivastava

    2007-01-01

    Indirect field orientation (IFO) induction machine drives are increasingly employed in industrial drive systems, but the drive performance is often degrades. Motor works on best performance at certain voltage and frequency for certain loads. In this paper artificial neural network is used to predict the operating voltage and frequency when the load torque and speed going changed so motor efficiency is increased. Simulation and experimental results are shown to validate the scheme.

  20. Passive control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor chaotic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Dong-lian; WANG Jia-jun; ZHAO Guang-zhou

    2005-01-01

    Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor model can exhibit a variety of chaotic phenomena under some choices of system parameters and external input. Based on the property of passive system, the essential conditions were studied, by which Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor chaotic system could be equivalent to passive system. Using Lyapunov stability theory, the convergence condition deciding the system's characters was discussed. In the convergence condition area, the equivalent passive system could be globally asymptotically stabilized by smooth state feedback.

  1. Summary on Sensorless permanent magnet Brushless DC Motor Control Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hai Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing the development process and application of permanent magnet brushless DC motor. By referring to the related literatures, this thesis gives an overview of several common non-position sensor detection technologies, analyzing their strengths and weaknesses as well as a number of new and improved methods in practical applications. Besides, The application situation of the electric door with sensorless permanent magnet brushless DC motor was illustrated.

  2. GENETIC BASED PLUS INTEGRAL CONTROLLER FOR PMBLDC MOTOR CONTROL USING RESONANT POLE INVERTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muruganantham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Permanent Magnet Brushless DC (PMBLDC motor drives are increasingly popular in industrial applications due to rapid progress of technologies in power electronics and the growing demand for energy saving. The increasing demand of energy saving from society is the external force for the development of PMBLDC motor drives. It is however driven by a hard-switching Pulse Width Modulation (PWM inverter, which has low switching frequency, high switching loss, high Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI, high acoustic noise and low efficiency, etc. To solve these problems of the hard-switching inverter, many soft-switching inverters have been designed in the past. Unfortunately, high device voltage stress, large dc link voltage ripples, complex control scheme and so on are noticed in the soft-switching inverters. This study introduces a novel genetic-proportional Plus Integral (PI controller based resonant pole inverter using transformer, which can generate dc link voltage notches during chopping which minimize the drawbacks of soft-switching. Hence all switches work in zero-voltage switching condition. The performance of the genetic-based PI controller is compared with conventional PI controller. The experimental results show that the genetic-based PI controller renders a better transient response than the conventional PI controller resulting in negligible overshoot, smaller settling time and rise time. Moreover the proposed controller provides low torque ripples and high starting torque. Both simulation and experimental results are presented to show the superiority of the proposed GA-PI controller based resonant pole inverter.

  3. Comparative Analysis between Digital PWM and PI with Fuzzy Logic Controller for the Speed Control of BLDC Motor.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchita Patel; Hemant Amhia

    2013-01-01

    Residential and commercial appliances such as refrigerators and air conditioning systems have been using conventional motor drive technology. The machines in these applications typically have low efficiencies and high maintenance. Development of advanced motor drives has yielded increases in efficiency and reliability. A Brushless DC (BLDC) drives are known for higher efficiency, lower maintenance and higher cost. In this paper presents a proposed method for speed control of BLDC motor using ...

  4. Fuzzy Adaptive Model Following Speed Control for Vector Controlled Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baghdad BELABES

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a hybrid controller combining a linear model following controller (LMFC and fuzzy logic control (FLC for speed vector controlled permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM is described on this study. The FLC is introduced at the adaptive mechanism level. First, an LMFC system is designed to allow the plant states to be controlled to follow the states produced by a reference model. In the nominal conditions, the model following is perfect and the adaptive mechanism based on the fuzzy logic is idle. Secondly, when parameter variations or external disturbances occur, an augmented signal will be generated by FLC mechanism to preserve the desired model following control performance. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed controller is demonstrated by some simulation results.

  5. Indirect Vector Control of an Induction Motor with Fuzzy-Logic based Speed Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIROU, I.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present a new speed control structure for induction motors (IM by using fuzzy-logic based speed controllers. A fuzzy controller is designed to achieve fast dynamic response and robustness for low and high speeds. Different types of membership functions of the linguistic variables and output/input characteristics are analyzed. A simple but robust structure enables a wide range speed control of the driving system. The rotor flux field oriented control (FOC is realized by using a flux observer based on the IM model with nonlinear parameters. The control is extended to operate also in the field weakening region with an optimal rotor flux regulation. The control structure was implemented on a computer system, based on a fixed point digital signal processor (DSP. To verify the performances of the proposed driving system, simulated and experimental results are presented.

  6. A combination strategy based brain-computer interface for two-dimensional movement control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bin; Maysam, Oladazimi; Veser, Sandra; Cao, Lei; Li, Jie; Jia, Jie; Xie, Hong; Birbaumer, Niels

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Two-dimensional (2D) movement control is an important issue in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) research because being able to move, for example, a cursor with the brain will enable patients with motor disabilities to control their environment. However, it is still a challenge to continuously control 2D movement with a non-invasive BCI system. In this paper, we developed a 2D cursor control with motor imagery BCI tasks allowing users to move a cursor to any position by using a combination strategy. With this strategy, a user can combine multiple motor imagery tasks, alternatively or simultaneously, to control 2D movements. Approach. After a training session, six participants took part in the first control strategy experiment (the center-out experiment) to verify the effectiveness of the cursor control. Three of the six participants performed an additional experiment, in which they were required to move the cursor to hit five targets in a given sequence. Main results. The average hit rate was more than 95.6% and the trajectories were close to the shortest path. The average hit rate was more than 95.6% and the trajectories were close to the shortest path in the center-out experiment. In the additional experiment, three participants achieved a 100% hit rate with a short trajectory. Significance. The results demonstrated that users were able to effectively control the 2D movement using the proposed strategy. The present system may be used as a tool to interact with the external world.

  7. Speed control of SR motor by self-tuning fuzzy PI controller with artificial neural network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ercument Karakas; Soner Vardarbasi

    2007-10-01

    In this work, the dynamic model, flux-current-rotor position and torque-current-rotor position values of the switched reluctance motor (SRM) are obtained in MATLAB/Simulink. Motor control speed is achieved by self-tuning fuzzy PI (Proportional Integral) controller with artificial neural network tuning (NSTFPI). Performance of NSTFPI controller is compared with performance of fuzzy logic (FL) and fuzzy logic PI (FLPI) controllers in respect of rise time, settling time, overshoot and steady state error

  8. Does changing from a first generation antipsychotic (perphenazin) to a second generation antipsychotic (risperidone) alter brain activation and motor activity? A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Berle, Jan Øystein; Løberg, Else-Marie; Fasmer, Ole Bernt

    2013-01-01

    Background: In patients with schizophrenia, altered brain activation and motor activity levels are central features, reflecting cognitive impairments and negative symptoms, respectively. Newer studies using nonlinear methods have addressed the severe disturbances in neurocognitive functioning that is regarded as one of the core features of schizophrenia. Our aim was to compare brain activation and motor activity in a patient during pharmacological treatment that was switched fr...

  9. DSP Based Direct Torque Control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM) using Space Vector Modulation (DTC-SVM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swierczynski, Dariusz; Kazmierkowski, Marian P.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2002-01-01

    DSP Based Direct Torque Control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM) using Space Vector Modulation (DTC-SVM)......DSP Based Direct Torque Control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM) using Space Vector Modulation (DTC-SVM)...

  10. Energy optimal control strategies for electro motors; low-cost and sensorless PWM-VSI based induction motor control. Vol. 1: Main report, appendix and annex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamsen, F.

    1998-02-01

    When variable speed induction motor drives are used in applications that run at low load for long periods, energy can be saved by reducing the motor flux at low load. In this report the efficiency of 2.2 kW standard and high-efficiency motor drives are investigated experimentally with efficiency optimized and constant flux control, with sinusoidal and PWM voltage supply and with varying switching frequency. Steady-state motor models are developed and verified experimentally, and are used to analyze and develop efficiency optimizing control strategies. Four energy optimal control strategies are tested experimentally: cos({phi}) control, model-based control, off-line calculated airgap flux control and stator current/input power minimising search control. Their dynamical properties and their ability to reject load disturbances are analysed. Their ability to save energy is tested on a water pump system. For a typical predefined test-cycle the energy optimal control reduces the energy consumption with 10% compared with classical constant V/Hz control. (au)

  11. Simulasi Pengaturan Kecepatan Motor Induksi Tiga Phasa Dengan Direct Torque Control Dengan Menggunakan Matlab 7.0.1

    OpenAIRE

    Jeremia Purba

    2009-01-01

    Motor induksi banyak dipergunakan dalam industri saat ini karena dalam penggunaannya motor induksi dapat dioperasikan dengan kecepatan yang bervariasi. Pengaturan kecepatan putaran motor induksi dapat dilakukan dengan beberapa metode dan salah satu metode yang digunakan adalah dengan mengatur torsi secara langsung. Direct Torque Control (DTC) merupakan teknologi terbaru yang dapat mengatur fluks dan torsi motor induksi secara langsung dengan mengatur vektor tegangannya. P...

  12. Passive control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor chaotic system based on state observer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Dong-lian; WANG Qiao

    2006-01-01

    Passive system theory was applied to propose a new passive control method with nonlinear observer of the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor chaotic system. Through constructing a Lyapunov function, the subsystem of the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor chaotic system could be proved to be globally stable at the equilibrium point. Then a controller with smooth state feedback is designed so that the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor chaotic system can be equivalent to a passive system.To get the state variables of the controller, the nonlinear observer is also studied. It is found that the outputs of the nonlinear observer can approximate the state variables of the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor chaotic system if the system's nonlinear function is a globally Lipschitz function. Simulation results showed that the equivalent passive system of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor chaotic system could be globally asymptotically stabilized by smooth state feedback in the observed parameter convergence condition area.

  13. PC based speed control of dc motor using fuzzy logic controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, S.K.; Kanphade, R.D.; Lavekar, K.P.

    1998-07-01

    The dc motor is extensively used as constant speed drive in textile mills, paper mills, printing press, etc.. If the load and supply voltage are time varying, the speed will be changed. Since last few decades the conventional PID controllers are used to maintain the constant speed by controlling the duty ratio of Chopper. Generally, four quadrant chopper is used for regenerative braking and reverse motoring operation. Fuzzy Logic is newly introduced in control system. Fuzzy Control is based on Fuzzy Logic, a logical system which is too much closer in spirit to human thinking and natural language. The Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC) provides a linguistic control strategy based on knowledge base of the system. Firstly, the machine is started very smoothly from zero to reference speed in the proposed scheme by increasing the duty ratio. Then change and rate of change of speed (dN, dN/dt), change and rate of change input voltage (dV, dV/dt) and load current are input to FLC. The new value of duty ratio is determined from the Fuzzy rule base and defuzzification method. The chopper will be 'ON' according to new duty ratio to maintain the constant speed. The dynamic and steady state performance of the proposed system is better than conventional control system. In this paper mathematical simulation and experimental implementation are carried out to investigate the drive performance.

  14. Assessment of the pyramidal tract by diffusion tensor analysis in brain hemorrhage patients for motor function prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In patients with brain hemorrhage, the entire visualized pyramidal tract was established as an area of interest (ROI). Its Fractional Anisotropy (FA) value was determined by diffusion tensor analysis (DTA), and its relationship to motor function at the onset and three months later was investigated. In 30 patients with brain hemorrhage accompanying paralysis, MRI was performed during the subacute phase (6-14 days after onset). In addition, using a workstation, DTA was performed in order to visualize the pyramidal tract. The FA of the ROI was measured on the affected and unaffected sides, and as previously reported, the ratio of FA in the affected and unaffected sides was calculated. Subsequently, we examined the relationship between the FA ratio and motor function prognosis. Motor function prognosis was assessed based on the sum of the Brunnstrom stage at the onset and three months later. A strong correlation coefficient existed between the FA ratio of the entire pyramidal tract and the sum of the Brunnstrom stage three months after onset (0.74, p<0.001), and prognosis of motor function tended to improve in patients with FA ratios of 0.95 or higher. Patients with mild paralysis were identified in order to ascertain the degree of improvement in paralysis, and a significant correlation between the FA ratio of the entire pyramidal tract and the degree of improvement in the Brunnstrom stage was observed (correlation coefficient 0.77, p<0.001). When compared to putamen hemorrhage, the FA ratio affected the prognosis of paralysis more in thalamic hemorrhage. The results suggest that in patients with an FA ratio of 1.0, the recovery rate of paralysis three months after onset is markedly high. In brain hemorrhage patients, a reduction in the FA ratio of the entire pyramidal tract was correlated with the functional prognosis of motor paralysis, and in thalamic hemorrhage, it may be possible to predict motor function based on FA ratios. Hence, the DTA of the pyramidal tract

  15. Motor Control: Illuminating an Enigmatic Midbrain Locomotor Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Maria S; Arber, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    A recent study has functionally disentangled the hitherto enigmatic mesencephalic locomotor region of the brain on the basis of cell type diversity and identified differential upstream regulatory pathways.

  16. Backstepping Adaptive Controller of Electro-Hydraulic Servo System of Continuous Rotary Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoJing Wang; ChangFu Xian; CaoLei Wan; JinBao Zhao; LiWei Xiu; AnCai Yu

    2014-01-01

    In order to consider the influence of the continuous rotary motor electro-hydraulic servo system parameters change on its performance, the design method of backstepping adaptive controller is put forward. The mathematical model of electro-hydraulic servo system of continuous rotary motor is established, and the whole system is decomposed into several lower order subsystems, and the virtual control signal is designed for each subsystem from the final subsystem with motor angular displacement to the subsystem with system control input voltage. Based on Lyapunov method and the backstepping theory, an adaptive backstepping controller is designed with the changed parameters adaptive law. It is proved that the system reaches the global asymptotic stability, and the system tracking error asymptotically tends to zero. The simulation results show that the backstepping adaptive controller based on the adaptive law of the changed parameters can improve the performance of continuous rotary motor, and the proposed control strategy is feasible.

  17. A NEW FUZZY LOGIC BASED SPACE VECTOR MODULATION APPROACH ON DIRECT TORQUE CONTROLLED INDUCTION MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Korkmaz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The induction motors are indispensable motor types for industrial applications due to its wellknown advantages. Therefore, many kind of control scheme are proposed for induction motors over the past years and direct torque control has gained great importance inside of them due to fast dynamic torque response behavior and simple control structure. This paper suggests a new approach on the direct torque controlled induction motors, Fuzzy logic based space vector modulation, to overcome disadvantages of conventional direct torque control like high torque ripple. In the proposed approach, optimum switching states are calculated by fuzzy logic controller and applied by space vector pulse width modulator to voltage source inverter. In order to test and compare the proposed DTC scheme with conventional DTC scheme simulations, in Matlab/Simulink, have been carried out in different speed and load conditions. The simulation results showed that a significant improvement in the dynamic torque and speed responses when compared to the conventional DTC scheme.

  18. Randomized controlled trial of surface peroneal nerve stimulation for motor relearning in lower limb hemiparesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheffler, L.R.; Taylor, P.N.; Gunzler, D.D.; Buurke, J.H.; IJzerman, M.J.; Chae, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the motor relearning effect of a surface peroneal nerve stimulator (PNS) versus usual care on lower limb motor impairment, activity limitation, and quality of life among chronic stroke survivors. Design: Single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Setting: Teaching hospital of

  19. The central role of trunk control in the gross motor function of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Derek John; Butler, Penny; Saavedra, Sandy;

    2015-01-01

    Aim Improvement of gross motor function and mobility are primary goals of physical therapy in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between segmental control of the trunk and the corresponding gross motor function in children with CP...

  20. Influence of PWM Modes on Commutation Torque Ripples in Sensorless Brushless DC Motor Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGXiang-jun; CHENBo-shi; 等

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces four PWM modes used in the sensorless brushless DC motor control system,analyzes their different influences on the commutation torque ripple in detail,and selects the best PWM mode in four given types to reduce commutation torque ripple of Brushless OC( BLDC) motors,Simulation and experimental results show that the selection is correct and practical.

  1. Higher Levels of Psychopathy Predict Poorer Motor Control: Implications for Understanding the Psychopathy Construct

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Michael D.; Bresin, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    A review of the literature suggests that higher levels of psychopathy may be linked to less effective behavioral control. However, several commentators have urged caution in making statements of this type in the absence of direct evidence. In two studies (total N = 142), moment-to-moment accuracy in a motor control task was examined as a function of dimensional variations in psychopathy in an undergraduate population. As hypothesized, motor control was distinctively worse at higher levels of ...

  2. METHODICAL TUNING OF PROPORTIONAL PLUS INTEGRAL CONTROLLERS FOR CASCADE CONTROL OF SEPARATELY EXCITED DC MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Al-Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cascade control of DC motors by PI controllers was extensively used in industry. Approximation rules based on plotting the output of the system or on computer simulation were used to determine the parameters of these controllers. This study was done to develop mathematical expressions to calculate the parameters of these controllers. Output time functions of the system and there derivatives were used to obtain mathematical relationships relating directly the motor parameters and the controller parameters. These relationships were used in tuning process of the cascade system. The dynamic performances of the system were examined in single loop form and in closed loop form for a step change in control variable (the input voltage as well as for step change in disturbance (mechanical load. The performances of current closed loop system and the speed closed loop were acceptable. The steady state error was zero and the maximum overshoot was less than 20%. The developed relationships can be used in design and analysis of cascade DC drive systems and cascade AC drive systems.

  3. Perception and cognition of cues used in synchronous brain-computer interfaces modify electroencephalographic patterns of control tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Maria eAlonso Valerdi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A motor imagery (MI based brain computer interface (BCI is a system that enables humans to interact with their environment by translating their brain signals into control commands for a target device. In particular, synchronous BCI systems make use of cues to trigger the motor activity of interest. So far, it has been shown that Electroencephalographic (EEG patterns before and after cue onset can reveal the user cognitive state and enhance the discrimination of MI related control tasks. However, there has been no detailed investigation of the nature of those EEG patterns. We, therefore, propose to study the cue effects on MI related control tasks by selecting EEG patterns that best discriminate such control tasks, and analysing where those patterns are coming from. The study was carried out under two methods: standard and all-embracing. The standard method was based on sources (recording sites, frequency bands and time windows, where the modulation of EEG signals due to motor activity is typically detected. The all-embracing method included a wider variety of sources, where not only motor activity is reflected. The findings of this study showed that the classification accuracy of MI related control tasks did not depend on the type of cue in use. However, EEG patterns which best differentiated those control tasks emerged from sources well defined by the perception and cognition of the cue in use. An implication of this study is the possibility of obtaining different control commands that could be detected with the same accuracy. Since different cues trigger control tasks that yield similar classification accuracies, and those control tasks produce EEG patterns differentiated by the cue nature, this leads to accelerate the brain-computer communication by having a wider variety of detectable control commands. This is an important issue for Neuroergonimcs research because neural activity could not only be used to monitor the human mental state as is

  4. Glial and neuronal control of brain blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwell, David; Buchan, Alastair M; Charpak, Serge;

    2010-01-01

    Blood flow in the brain is regulated by neurons and astrocytes. Knowledge of how these cells control blood flow is crucial for understanding how neural computation is powered, for interpreting functional imaging scans of brains, and for developing treatments for neurological disorders. It is now...

  5. Optogenetic control of human neurons in organotypic brain cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, My; Avaliani, Natalia; Svensson, Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics is one of the most powerful tools in neuroscience, allowing for selective control of specific neuronal populations in the brain of experimental animals, including mammals. We report, for the first time, the application of optogenetic tools to human brain tissue providing a proof...

  6. Using Fractal and Local Binary Pattern Features for Classification of ECOG Motor Imagery Tasks Obtained from the Right Brain Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fangzhou; Zhou, Weidong; Zhen, Yilin; Yuan, Qi; Wu, Qi

    2016-09-01

    The feature extraction and classification of brain signal is very significant in brain-computer interface (BCI). In this study, we describe an algorithm for motor imagery (MI) classification of electrocorticogram (ECoG)-based BCI. The proposed approach employs multi-resolution fractal measures and local binary pattern (LBP) operators to form a combined feature for characterizing an ECoG epoch recording from the right hemisphere of the brain. A classifier is trained by using the gradient boosting in conjunction with ordinary least squares (OLS) method. The fractal intercept, lacunarity and LBP features are extracted to classify imagined movements of either the left small finger or the tongue. Experimental results on dataset I of BCI competition III demonstrate the superior performance of our method. The cross-validation accuracy and accuracy is 90.6% and 95%, respectively. Furthermore, the low computational burden of this method makes it a promising candidate for real-time BCI systems. PMID:27255798

  7. Research of Compound Control for DC Motor System Based on Global Sliding Mode Disturbance Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problems of modeling errors, parameter variations, and load moment disturbances in DC motor control system, one global sliding mode disturbance observer (GSMDO is proposed based on the global sliding mode (GSM control theory. The output of GSMDO is used as the disturbance compensation in control system, which can improve the robust performance of DC motor control system. Based on the designed GSMDO in inner loop, one compound controller, composed of a feedback controller and a feedforward controller, is proposed in order to realize the position tracking of DC motor system. The gains of feedback controller are obtained by means of linear quadratic regulator (LQR optimal control theory. Simulation results present that the proposed control scheme possesses better tracking properties and stronger robustness against modeling errors, parameter variations, and friction moment disturbances. Moreover, its structure is simple; therefore it is easy to be implemented in engineering.

  8. Frequency control system based on power factor control of asynchronous motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-chun; YANG Fei-xia; REN Zhi-ling

    2005-01-01

    Deduced the relationship between the power factor (PF) and the angular frequency according to the simplified equivalent circuit of asynchronous motor, forming a power factor auto-control system. An anti-interference circuit was also introduced in the middle voltage link of inverter to avoid the shift of the optimum PF point caused by the change of the load and the reliable run of the control system was assured. The experiment results show that it has a good self-adaptation in the whole scope of speed adjustment and an obvious economization on energy while it runs under load.

  9. Design Intelligent Robust Model-base Sliding Guidance Controller for Spherical Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Yaghoot

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Stability, robust and reliability are the main objectives to design a controller for highly nonlinear spherical motor. Most of linear and nonlinear controllers are stable, model-base controllers are reliable but in this group sliding mode controller is a robust controller. Therefore in this research sliding mode controller is used to design stable, robust and reliable controller. For intelligence part, the minimum rule base Proportional Integral Derivative (PID Fuzzy hybrid guidance Controller for three dimensions spherical motor is presented in this research. Guidance control in a three dimensions spherical motor is performed by the robust sliding mode controllers producing the control signals which are applied to systems torque. Sliding mode controller has an important problem, namely chattering. In this research, chattering-free sliding mode controller is design as a robust guidance controller to their robust performance in a wide range of operating conditions. In this research the PID-like fuzzy controller can be constructed as a parallel structure of a PD-like fuzzy controller and a PI-like controller to have the minimum rule base. Nonlinear type robust sliding mode controller is used to modify PID fuzzy logic theory to design robust and reliable hybrid guidance methodology. This research is used to reduce or eliminate the fuzzy and conventional sliding mode controller problem based on minimum rule base fuzzy logic theory and modified it by sliding mode method to control of spherical motor system.

  10. Variable-Speed Induction Motor Drives for Aircraft Environmental Control Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildice, J. W.; Hansen, I. G.; Schreiner, K. E.; Roth, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    New, more-efficient designs for aircraft jet engines are not capable of supplying the large quantities of bleed air necessary to provide pressurization and air conditioning for the environmental control systems (ECS) of the next generation of large passenger aircraft. System analysis and engineering have determined that electrically-driven ECS can help to maintain the improved fuel efficiencies; and electronic controllers and induction motors are now being developed in a NASA/NPD SBIR Program to drive both types of ECS compressors. Previous variable-speed induction motor/controller system developments and publications have primarily focused on field-oriented control, with large transient reserve power, for maximum acceleration and optimum response in actuator and robotics systems. The application area addressed herein is characterized by slowly-changing inputs and outputs, small reserve power capability for acceleration, and optimization for maximum efficiency. This paper therefore focuses on the differences between this case and the optimum response case, and shows the development of this new motor/controller approach. It starts with the creation of a new set of controller requirements. In response to those requirements, new control algorithms are being developed and implemented in an embedded computer, which is integrated into the motor controller closed loop. Buffered logic outputs are used to drive the power switches in a resonant-technology, power processor/motor-controller, at switching/resonant frequencies high enough to support efficient high-frequency induction motor operation at speeds up to 50,000-RPA

  11. The role of endocannabinoid signaling in motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Manira, A; Kyriakatos, A

    2010-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid signaling are distributed throughout the rostrocaudal neuraxis. Retrograde signaling via endocannabinoid mediates synaptic plasticity in many regions in the central nervous system. Here, we review the role of endocannabinoid signaling in different parts of the vertebrate motor system from networks responsible for the execution of movement to planning centers in the basal ganglia and cortex. The ubiquity of endocannabinoid-mediated plasticity suggests that it plays an important role in producing motion from defined circuitries and also for reconfiguring networks to learn new motor skills. The long-term plasticity induced by endocannabinoids may provide a long-term buffer that stabilizes the organization of motor circuits and their activity. PMID:20699469

  12. YAMS: a stepper motor controller for the FERMI-Elettra free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New projects, like FERMI-Elettra, demand for the standardization of the systems in order to cut development and maintenance costs. The various motion control applications foreseen in this project required a specific controller able to flexibly adapt to any need while maintaining a common interface to the control system to minimize software development efforts. These reasons led us to design and build 'Yet Another Motor Sub-rack', (YAMS), a 3U chassis containing a commercial stepper motor controller, up to eight motor drivers and all the necessary auxiliary systems. The motors can be controlled locally by means of an operator panel or remotely through an Ethernet interface and a dedicated Tango device server. The paper describes the details of the project and the deployment issues

  13. Insect-machine hybrid system for understanding and evaluating sensory-motor control by sex pheromone in Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Ryohei; Minegishi, Ryo; Namiki, Shigehiro; Ando, Noriyasu

    2013-11-01

    To elucidate the dynamic information processing in a brain underlying adaptive behavior, it is necessary to understand the behavior and corresponding neural activities. This requires animals which have clear relationships between behavior and corresponding neural activities. Insects are precisely such animals and one of the adaptive behaviors of insects is high-accuracy odor source orientation. The most direct way to know the relationships between neural activity and behavior is by recording neural activities in a brain from freely behaving insects. There is also a method to give stimuli mimicking the natural environment to tethered insects allowing insects to walk or fly at the same position. In addition to these methods an 'insect-machine hybrid system' is proposed, which is another experimental system meeting the conditions necessary for approaching the dynamic processing in the brain of insects for generating adaptive behavior. This insect-machine hybrid system is an experimental system which has a mobile robot as its body. The robot is controlled by the insect through its behavior or the neural activities recorded from the brain. As we can arbitrarily control the motor output of the robot, we can intervene at the relationship between the insect and the environmental conditions.

  14. Remote control of myosin and kinesin motors using light-activated gearshifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Muneaki; Chen, Lu; Howes, Stuart C; Schindler, Tony D; Nogales, Eva; Bryant, Zev

    2014-09-01

    Cytoskeletal motors perform critical force generation and transport functions in eukaryotic cells. Engineered modifications of motor function provide direct tests of protein structure-function relationships and potential tools for controlling cellular processes or for harnessing molecular transport in artificial systems. Here, we report the design and characterization of a panel of cytoskeletal motors that reversibly change gears--speed up, slow down or switch directions--when exposed to blue light. Our genetically encoded structural designs incorporate a photoactive protein domain to enable light-dependent conformational changes in an engineered lever arm. Using in vitro motility assays, we demonstrate robust spatiotemporal control over motor function and characterize the kinetics of the optical gearshifting mechanism. We have used a modular approach to create optical gearshifting motors for both actin-based and microtubule-based transport.

  15. Optimal Control Strategy for Marine Ssp Podded Propulsion Motor Based on Strong Tracking-Epf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Wenlong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the non-linearity of state equation and observation equation of SSP (Siemen Schottel Propulsor propulsion motor, an improved particle filter algorithm based on strong tracking extent Kalman filter (ST-EKF was presented, and it was imported into the marine SSP propulsion motor control system. The strong tracking filter was used to update particles in the new algorithm and produce importance densities. As a result, the problems of particle degeneracy and sample impoverishment were ameliorated, the propulsion motor states and the rotor resistance were estimated simultaneously using strong track filter (STF, and the tracking ability of marine SSP propulsion motor control system was improved. Simulation result shown that the improved EPF algorithm was not only improving the prediction accuracy of the motor states and the rotor resistance, but also it can satisfy the requirement of navigation in harbor. It had the better accuracy than EPF algorithm.

  16. SDRE control strategy applied to a nonlinear robotic including drive motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Jeferson J.; Tusset, Angelo M.; Janzen, Frederic C.; Piccirillo, Vinicius; Nascimento, Claudinor B.; Balthazar, José M.; Brasil, Reyolando M. L. R. da Fonseca

    2014-12-01

    A robotic control design considering all the inherent nonlinearities of the robot-engine configuration is developed. The interactions between the robot and joint motor drive mechanism are considered. The proposed control combines two strategies, one feedforward control in order to maintain the system in the desired coordinate, and feedback control system to take the system into a desired coordinate. The feedback control is obtained using State-Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE). For link positioning two cases are considered. Case I: For control positioning, it is only used motor voltage; Case II: For control positioning, it is used both motor voltage and torque between the links. Simulation results, including parametric uncertainties in control shows the feasibility of the proposed control for the considered system.

  17. SDRE control strategy applied to a nonlinear robotic including drive motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Jeferson J. de, E-mail: jefersonjl82@gmail.com, E-mail: tusset@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: fcjanzen@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: claudinor@utfpr.edu.br; Tusset, Angelo M., E-mail: jefersonjl82@gmail.com, E-mail: tusset@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: fcjanzen@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: claudinor@utfpr.edu.br; Janzen, Frederic C., E-mail: jefersonjl82@gmail.com, E-mail: tusset@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: fcjanzen@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: claudinor@utfpr.edu.br; Piccirillo, Vinicius, E-mail: jefersonjl82@gmail.com, E-mail: tusset@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: fcjanzen@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: claudinor@utfpr.edu.br; Nascimento, Claudinor B., E-mail: jefersonjl82@gmail.com, E-mail: tusset@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: fcjanzen@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: claudinor@utfpr.edu.br [UTFPR-PONTA GROSSA, PR (Brazil); Balthazar, José M., E-mail: jmbaltha@rc.unesp.br [UNESP-BAURU, SP (Brazil); Brasil, Reyolando M. L. R. da Fonseca, E-mail: reyolando.brasil@ufabc.edu.br [UFABC-SANTO ANDRE, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-10

    A robotic control design considering all the inherent nonlinearities of the robot-engine configuration is developed. The interactions between the robot and joint motor drive mechanism are considered. The proposed control combines two strategies, one feedforward control in order to maintain the system in the desired coordinate, and feedback control system to take the system into a desired coordinate. The feedback control is obtained using State-Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE). For link positioning two cases are considered. Case I: For control positioning, it is only used motor voltage; Case II: For control positioning, it is used both motor voltage and torque between the links. Simulation results, including parametric uncertainties in control shows the feasibility of the proposed control for the considered system.

  18. A Novel BLDC-Like DTC Control Technique for Induction Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rossi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available DC brushless motors are widely adopted for their simplicity of control, even in sensorless configuration, and their high torque density. On the other hand, induction motors are very economical due to the absence of permanent magnets; for the same reason they can easily be driven in the flux-weakening region to attain a wide speed range. Nevertheless, high dynamic induction motors drives, based on field-oriented (FOC or predictive control, require large amounts of computing power and are rather sensitive to motor parameter variations. This paper presents a simple DTC induction motor control algorithm based on a well-known BLDC control technique, which allows to realize a high dynamic induction motor speed control with wide speed range. The firmware implementation is very compact and occupies a low amount of program memory, comparable to volt-per-Hertz- (V/f- based control algorithms. The novel control algorithm presents also good performance and low current ripple and can be implemented on a low-cost motion control DSP without resorting to high-frequency PWM.

  19. Speed Control of BLDC Motor Based on Recurrent Wavelet Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel A. Obed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, artificial intelligence techniques such as wavelet neural network have been applied to control the speed of the BLDC motor drive. The BLDC motor is a multivariable and nonlinear system due to variations in stator resistance and moment of inertia. Therefore, it is not easy to obtain a good performance by applying conventional PID controller. The Recurrent Wavelet Neural Network (RWNN is proposed, in this paper, with PID controller in parallel to produce a modified controller called RWNN-PID controller, which combines the capability of the artificial neural networks for learning from the BLDC motor drive and the capability of wavelet decomposition for identification and control of dynamic system and also having the ability of self-learning and self-adapting. The proposed controller is applied for controlling the speed of BLDC motor which provides a better performance than using conventional controllers with a wide range of speed. The parameters of the proposed controller are optimized using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithm. The BLDC motor drive with RWNN-PID controller through simulation results proves a better in the performance and stability compared with using conventional PID and classical WNN-PID controllers.

  20. Design New PID like Fuzzy CTC Controller: Applied to Spherical Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad shamsodini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The minimum rule base Proportional Integral Derivative (PID Fuzzy Computed Torque Controller with application to spherical motor is presented in this research. The popularity of PID Fuzzy Computed Torque Controller can be attributed to their robust performance in a wide range of operating conditions and partly to their functional simplicity. PID methodology has three inputs and if any input is described with seven linguistic values, and any rule has three conditions we will need 343 rules. It is too much work to write 343 rules and have lots of problem to design embedded control system e.g., Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA. In this research the PID-like fuzzy controller can be constructed as a parallel structure of a PD-like fuzzy controller and a conventional PI controller to have the minimum rule base and acceptable trajectory follow disturbance to control of spherical motor. However computed torque controller is work based on cancelling decoupling and nonlinear terms of dynamic parameters for each direction of three degree of freedom spherical motor, this controller is work based on motor dynamic model and this technique is highly sensitive to the knowledge of all parameters of nonlinear spherical motor’s dynamic equation. This research is used to reduce or eliminate the computed torque controller problem based on minimum rule base fuzzy logic theory to control of three degrees of freedom spherical motor system and testing of the quality of process control in the simulation environment of MATLAB/SIMULINK Simulator.

  1. Filtering and Control of High Speed Motor Current in a Flywheel Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Santiago, Walter

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been developing technology to enable the use of high speed flywheel energy storage units in future spacecraft for the last several years. An integral part of the flywheel unit is the three phase motor/generator that is used to accelerate and decelerate the flywheel. The motor/generator voltage is supplied from a pulse width modulated (PWM) inverter operating from a fixed DC voltage supply. The motor current is regulated through a closed loop current control that commands the necessary voltage from the inverter to achieve the desired current. The current regulation loop is the innermost control loop of the overall flywheel system and, as a result, must be fast and accurate over the entire operating speed range (20,000 to 60,000 rpm) of the flywheel. The voltage applied to the motor is a high frequency PWM version of the DC bus voltage that results in the commanded fundamental value plus higher order harmonics. Most of the harmonic content is at the switching frequency and above. The higher order harmonics cause a rapid change in voltage to be applied to the motor that can result in large voltage stresses across the motor windings. In addition, the high frequency content in the motor causes sensor noise in the magnetic bearings that leads to disturbances for the bearing control. To alleviate these problems, a filter is used to present a more sinusoidal voltage to the motor/generator. However, the filter adds additional dynamics and phase lag to the motor system that can interfere with the performance of the current regulator. This paper will discuss the tuning methodology and results for the motor/generator current regulator and the impact of the filter on the control. Results at speeds up to 50,000 rpm are presented.

  2. Stator Flux Oriented Vector Control of Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors with Maximum Power Factor Per Ampere Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Hasanpour

    2007-01-01

    Permanent magnet synchronous motors attract more attentions in motion control application in recent years. In this paper a novel stator flux oriented vector control scheme with maximum power factor to current trajectory is presented for a permanent magnet synchronous motor. This system is then implemented in Matlab/Simulink and the motor performance under this control method is investigated via excessive simulation results. Finally, the effect of stator resistance on the power factor of motor...

  3. Unexpected events induce motor slowing via a brain mechanism for action-stopping with global suppressive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jan R; Aron, Adam R

    2013-11-20

    When an unexpected event occurs in everyday life (e.g., a car honking), one experiences a slowing down of ongoing action (e.g., of walking into the street). Motor slowing following unexpected events is a ubiquitous phenomenon, both in laboratory experiments as well as such everyday situations, yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that unexpected events recruit the same inhibition network in the brain as does complete cancellation of an action (i.e., action-stopping). Using electroencephalography and independent component analysis in humans, we show that a brain signature of successful outright action-stopping also exhibits activity following unexpected events, and more so in blocks with greater motor slowing. Further, using transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure corticospinal excitability, we show that an unexpected event has a global motor suppressive effect, just like outright action-stopping. Thus, unexpected events recruit a common mechanism with outright action-stopping, moreover with global suppressive effects. These findings imply that we can now leverage the considerable extant knowledge of the neural architecture and functional properties of the stopping system to better understand the processing of unexpected events, including perhaps how they induce distraction via global suppression.

  4. Control and sensor techniques for PAD servo motor drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zsurzsan, Tiberiu-Gabriel; Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.;

    2015-01-01

    The Piezoelectric Actuator Drive (PAD) is a new type of electrical motor that employs piezoelectric multilayer actuators coupled with a form-fitted micro-mechanical gearing to generate rotary motion. The PAD is precise, having a positioning error of less than 2 arc-seconds. Its typical output tor...

  5. Adaptive observer for speed sensorless PM motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive observer for extimating the rotor position and speed of a permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM). The observer compensates for voltage offsets and permanent magnet strength variations. The adaptation structure for estimating the strength of the permanent magnet...

  6. Functional Neuroimaging of Motor Control inParkinson’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M; Eickhoff, Simon B; Løkkegaard, Annemette;

    2014-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has been widely used to study the activation patterns of the motor network in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), but these studies have yielded conflicting results. This meta-analysis of previous neuroimaging studies was performed to identify patterns of abnormal...

  7. Motor vehicle fuel economy, the forgotten HC control stragegy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deluchi, M.; Wang, Quanlu; Greene, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    Emissions of hydrocarbons from motor vehicles are recognized as major contributors to ozone pollution in urban areas. Petroleum-based motor fuels contain volatile organic compounds (VOC) which, together with oxides of nitrogen, promote the formation of ozone in the troposphere via complex photochemical reactions. VOC emissions from the tailpipe and evaporation from the fuel and engine systems of highway vehicles are believed to account for about 40% of total VOC emissions in any region. But motor fuels also generate emissions throughout the fuel cycle, from crude oil production to refining, storage, transportation, and handling, that can make significant contributions to the total inventory of VOC emissions. Many of these sources of emissions are directly related to the quantity of fuel produced and handled throughout the fuel cycle. It is, therefore, reasonable to expect that a reduction in total fuel throughput might result in a reduction of VOC emissions. In particular, reducing vehicle fuel consumption by increasing vehicle fuel economy should reduce total fuel throughput, thereby cutting total emissions of VOCS. In this report we identify the sources of VOC emissions throughout the motor fuel cycle, quantify them to the extent possible, and describe their dependence on automobile and light truck fuel economy.

  8. Brain dysfunction in psychiatric patients during music perception measured by EEG mapping: relation to motor dysfunction and influence of neuroleptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, W; Steinberg, R; Streck, P; Banquet, J P; Bscheid, I; Raith, L; Riedel, R; Klages, U; Stiltz, I

    1991-05-01

    We report here our findings on music perception obtained as a companion study to the investigation with 16-channel EEG mapping in psychiatric patients during motor activation, published recently elsewhere. We decided to add on a study of this functional circuit, since there is evidence that it is disturbed in various psychiatric patient groups (another "functio laesa"). Involved in the study were 23 male and 25 female schizophrenics, 11 male and 18 female non-endogenously depressed patients (not presently under medication, i.e. drug-naive or wash-out period from 1 week to 17 years), 26 male and 37 female endogenously depressed patients (medicated with tri- or tetracyclic antidepressants and/or benzodiazepines; no lithium), and 22 male and 17 female control subjects (i.e. n = 179). We compared resting conditions after a special relaxation procedure with three music perception tasks: (1) a standardised rumba rhythm generated by a keyboard and delivered binaurally by earphones, (2) the same as an arpeggio in D major, and (3) the same as an arpeggio with a tonic-subdominant-dominant cadence. Major results were obtained in the delta and alpha frequency bands, yielding signs of "diffuse hyperactivation", most prominent in schizophrenic males, and not observed to a similar extent in any other patient group or in normal controls. Interestingly, there were major sex differences, yielding a more diffuse EEG activation pattern in normal females than in males and thus possibly obscuring signs of brain function diffusion in female patients. Viewing our broader evidence of similar brain dysfunction when examining motor functional circuits, especially in schizophrenics, these findings provide further evidence of a brain disorganization with lack of laterality/diffusion which may be found in subgroups of these patients and not in other psychiatric disorders. In schizophrenic patients, these EEG signs of "diffuse hyperactivation" on simple motor and/or music stimulation were

  9. Motor Controller for Extreme Environments Based on SiGe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a motor-control subsystem capable of operation in extreme environments, including those to be encountered on the Moon and Mars....

  10. Sensorless AC electric motor control robust advanced design techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Glumineau, Alain

    2015-01-01

    This monograph shows the reader how to avoid the burdens of sensor cost, reduced internal physical space, and system complexity in the control of AC motors. Many applications fields—electric vehicles, wind- and wave-energy converters and robotics, among them—will benefit. Sensorless AC Electric Motor Control describes the elimination of physical sensors and their replacement with observers, i.e., software sensors. Robustness is introduced to overcome problems associated with the unavoidable imperfection of knowledge of machine parameters—resistance, inertia, and so on—encountered in real systems. The details of a large number of speed- and/or position-sensorless ideas for different types of permanent-magnet synchronous motors and induction motors are presented along with several novel observer designs for electrical machines. Control strategies are developed using high-order, sliding-mode and quasi-continuous-sliding-mode techniques and two types of observer–controller schemes based on backstepping ...

  11. Inter-examiner reproducibility of tests for lumbar motor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkjaer Arne

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies show a relation between reduced lumbar motor control (LMC and low back pain (LBP. However, test circumstances vary and during test performance, subjects may change position. In other words, the reliability - i.e. reproducibility and validity - of tests for LMC should be based on quantitative data. This has not been considered before. The aim was to analyse the reproducibility of five different quantitative tests for LMC commonly used in daily clinical practice. Methods The five tests for LMC were: repositioning (RPS, sitting forward lean (SFL, sitting knee extension (SKE, and bent knee fall out (BKFO, all measured in cm, and leg lowering (LL, measured in mm Hg. A total of 40 subjects (14 males, 26 females 25 with and 15 without LBP, with a mean age of 46.5 years (SD 14.8, were examined independently and in random order by two examiners on the same day. LBP subjects were recruited from three physiotherapy clinics with a connection to the clinic's gym or back-school. Non-LBP subjects were recruited from the clinic's staff acquaintances, and from patients without LBP. Results The means and standard deviations for each of the tests were 0.36 (0.27 cm for RPS, 1.01 (0.62 cm for SFL, 0.40 (0.29 cm for SKE, 1.07 (0.52 cm for BKFO, and 32.9 (7.1 mm Hg for LL. All five tests for LMC had reproducibility with the following ICCs: 0.90 for RPS, 0.96 for SFL, 0.96 for SKE, 0.94 for BKFO, and 0.98 for LL. Bland and Altman plots showed that most of the differences between examiners A and B were less than 0.20 cm. Conclusion These five tests for LMC displayed excellent reproducibility. However, the diagnostic accuracy of these tests needs to be addressed in larger cohorts of subjects, establishing values for the normal population. Also cut-points between subjects with and without LBP must be determined, taking into account age, level of activity, degree of impairment and participation in sports. Whether reproducibility of these

  12. Control System of Sensorless Brushless DC Motor Based on TMS320F240

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zeng

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A brushless DC(BLDC motor with the characteristics of high speed and high power density has been more widely used in industrial area. The BLDC motor requires the position and speed sensors for control. However the position sensors are undesirable from standpoints of size, cost, maintenance and reliability. There are some different ways that can solve this problem, depending on the flux distribution. This paper describes a control system of sensorless BLDC motor. The back-EMF is adopted to detect the rotor position. The back-EMF is very small in the motor starting process, and it is difficult to obtain rotor position efficiently. A re-setting method of the rotor is proposed in the paper, and current closed loop is used for high-speed and safety in the motor starting process. A good speed and current double closed loops system is designed. The speed and current regulators are implemented by a digital signal processor(DSP. A simple algorithm is used to calculate motor speed indirectly by the software, which simplifies the system hardware structure. The hardware structure and software design of sensorless BLDC motor control system are described in details. The simulation and experimental results have shown the validity of the sensorless control system and the accuracy of the detective position signal obtained.

  13. Wireless brain-machine interface using EEG and EOG: brain wave classification and robot control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sechang; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-04-01

    A brain-machine interface (BMI) links a user's brain activity directly to an external device. It enables a person to control devices using only thought. Hence, it has gained significant interest in the design of assistive devices and systems for people with disabilities. In addition, BMI has also been proposed to replace humans with robots in the performance of dangerous tasks like explosives handling/diffusing, hazardous materials handling, fire fighting etc. There are mainly two types of BMI based on the measurement method of brain activity; invasive and non-invasive. Invasive BMI can provide pristine signals but it is expensive and surgery may lead to undesirable side effects. Recent advances in non-invasive BMI have opened the possibility of generating robust control signals from noisy brain activity signals like EEG and EOG. A practical implementation of a non-invasive BMI such as robot control requires: acquisition of brain signals with a robust wearable unit, noise filtering and signal processing, identification and extraction of relevant brain wave features and finally, an algorithm to determine control signals based on the wave features. In this work, we developed a wireless brain-machine interface with a small platform and established a BMI that can be used to control the movement of a robot by using the extracted features of the EEG and EOG signals. The system records and classifies EEG as alpha, beta, delta, and theta waves. The classified brain waves are then used to define the level of attention. The acceleration and deceleration or stopping of the robot is controlled based on the attention level of the wearer. In addition, the left and right movements of eye ball control the direction of the robot.

  14. Organizing motor imageries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakawa, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few decades, motor imagery has attracted the attention of researchers as a prototypical example of 'embodied cognition' and also as a basis for neuro-rehabilitation and brain-machine interfaces. The current definition of motor imagery is widely accepted, but it is important to note that various abilities rather than a single cognitive entity are dealt with under a single term. Here, motor imagery has been characterized based on four factors: (1) motor control, (2) explicitness, (3) sensory modalities, and (4) agency. Sorting out these factors characterizing motor imagery may explain some discrepancies and variability in the findings from previous studies and will help to optimize a study design in accordance with the purpose of each study in the future. PMID:26602980

  15. Speed Control of Switched Reluctance Motor Using New Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Thanushkodi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The main objective of this research is to obtain the speed control of switched reluctance motor with minimum settling time and without overshoot. Approach: A new algorithm has been developed with the combination of differential evolution and particle swarm optimization and applied for speed control of switched reluctance motor under sudden change in speed. Also speed control of switched reluctance motor was obtained by other artificial intelligence methods such as fuzzy logic controller, fuzzy PI controller and particle swarm optimization based tuning of fuzzy PI controller. Matlab/Simulink environment was used for the simulation. Results: Results are discussed and tabulated based on the performance of the controllers. Conclusion: From the comparison of all above methods, the algorithm has given better results in speed response than other controllers.

  16. POSITION CONTROL OF BRUSHLESS DC MOTOR BASED ON DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çetin GENÇER

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Brushless DC Motors (BLDC have been used widely high performance control systems which are depended on to development of power electronic and control technology. In these motors to fed commutated supply, the control of position without oscilation has been required. In this study, position control of BLDC with digital signal processing has been implemented by a proportional-derivative (PD controller because of its simple structure. It has been seen that the controller which is proposed from simulation and experimental studies, has a quick dynamic responce with nonoscillation.

  17. Speed Sensorless Vector Control of Unbalanced Three-Phase Induction Motor with Adaptive Sliding Mode Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jannati

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a technique for speed sensorless Rotor Flux Oriented Control (RFOC of 3-phase Induction Motor (IM under open-phase fault (unbalanced or faulty IM. The presented RFOC strategy is based on rotational transformation. An adaptive sliding mode control system with an adaptive switching gain is proposed instead of the speed PI controller. Using an adaptive sliding mode control causes the proposed speed sensorless RFOC drive system to become insensitive to uncertainties such as load disturbances and parameter variations. Moreover, with adaptation of the sliding switching gain, calculation of the system uncertainties upper bound is not needed. Finally, simulation results have been presented to confirm the good performance of the proposed method.

  18. Modeling and adaptive pinning synchronization control for a chaotic-motion motor in complex network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Darui, E-mail: zdarui@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an 710049 (China); School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Liu, Chongxin; Yan, Bingnan [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an 710049 (China); School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2014-01-24

    We introduce a chaos model for a permanent-magnet synchronous motor and construct a coupled chaotic motor in a complex dynamic network using the Newman–Watts small-world network algorithm. We apply adaptive pinning control theory for complex networks to obtain suitable adaptive feedback gain and the number of nodes to be pinned. Nodes of low degree are pinned to realize global asymptotic synchronization in the complex network. The proposed adaptive pinning controller is added to the complex motor network for simulation and verification.

  19. Senserless Speed and Position of Direct Field Orientation Control Induction Motor Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Khalil Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct field-orientation Control (DFOC of induction motor drives without mechanical speed sensors at the motor shaft has the attractions of low cost and high reliability. To replace the sensor, information on the rotor speed and position are extracted from measured stator currents and from voltages at motor terminals. In this paper presents direct field-orientation control (DFOC with two type of kalman filter (complete order and reduced order extended kalman filter to estimate flux, speed, torque and position. Simulated results show how good performance for reduced order extended kalman filter over that of complete order extended kalman filter in tracking performance and reduced time of state estimation.

  20. Brain-Computer Interface Controlled Cyborg: Establishing a Functional Information Transfer Pathway from Human Brain to Cockroach Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    An all-chain-wireless brain-to-brain system (BTBS), which enabled motion control of a cyborg cockroach via human brain, was developed in this work. Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) based brain-computer interface (BCI) was used in this system for recognizing human motion intention and an optimization algorithm was proposed in SSVEP to improve online performance of the BCI. The cyborg cockroach was developed by surgically integrating a portable microstimulator that could generate invasive electrical nerve stimulation. Through Bluetooth communication, specific electrical pulse trains could be triggered from the microstimulator by BCI commands and were sent through the antenna nerve to stimulate the brain of cockroach. Serial experiments were designed and conducted to test overall performance of the BTBS with six human subjects and three cockroaches. The experimental results showed that the online classification accuracy of three-mode BCI increased from 72.86% to 78.56% by 5.70% using the optimization algorithm and the mean response accuracy of the cyborgs using this system reached 89.5%. Moreover, the results also showed that the cyborg could be navigated by the human brain to complete walking along an S-shape track with the success rate of about 20%, suggesting the proposed BTBS established a feasible functional information transfer pathway from the human brain to the cockroach brain. PMID:26982717

  1. Brain-Computer Interface Controlled Cyborg: Establishing a Functional Information Transfer Pathway from Human Brain to Cockroach Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangye; Zhang, Dingguo

    2016-01-01

    An all-chain-wireless brain-to-brain system (BTBS), which enabled motion control of a cyborg cockroach via human brain, was developed in this work. Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) based brain-computer interface (BCI) was used in this system for recognizing human motion intention and an optimization algorithm was proposed in SSVEP to improve online performance of the BCI. The cyborg cockroach was developed by surgically integrating a portable microstimulator that could generate invasive electrical nerve stimulation. Through Bluetooth communication, specific electrical pulse trains could be triggered from the microstimulator by BCI commands and were sent through the antenna nerve to stimulate the brain of cockroach. Serial experiments were designed and conducted to test overall performance of the BTBS with six human subjects and three cockroaches. The experimental results showed that the online classification accuracy of three-mode BCI increased from 72.86% to 78.56% by 5.70% using the optimization algorithm and the mean response accuracy of the cyborgs using this system reached 89.5%. Moreover, the results also showed that the cyborg could be navigated by the human brain to complete walking along an S-shape track with the success rate of about 20%, suggesting the proposed BTBS established a feasible functional information transfer pathway from the human brain to the cockroach brain. PMID:26982717

  2. Effects of Running Speed, Fatigue, and Bracing on Motor Control of Chronically Unstable Ankles

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Courtney Ann

    2013-01-01

    Ankle sprains are among the most common injuries for participants in running and jumping sports. Following an initial sprain injury, many (30-40%) will develop chronic ankle instability (CAI), characterized by a perception of instability and repeated sprain injuries. Quasi-static test methods indicate poor postural stability and joint position sense (JPS) as associated motor control deficits. Little research, though, has investigated ankle motor control under dynamic (simulated sport) or fati...

  3. The performance analysis and calculation for variable frequency speed control motors with the rotor structure optimized

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jun-ci; LI Wei-li

    2005-01-01

    In the paper, the method to optimize the rotor structure in variable frequency speed control motors is introduced. The saturation and the skin effect are considered and 2D no-load and load electromagnetic field is calculated in finite elements for a variable frequency speed control motor before and after optimization. Finally,no-load current and operation performance before and after optimization are obtained and the two results are contrasted.

  4. Investigation of Closed Vector Control System for Asynchronous Motor Drive of Shipboard Tow Winch

    OpenAIRE

    Н. Mehdiyev; Е. Sultanov

    2014-01-01

    The paper considers a closed vector control system for induction motor rotation speed of a shipboard tow winch. Structural schemes and transfer functions of the system at control and disturbing influences are presented in the paper. The system with asynchronous motor drive parameters of a shipboard tow winch has been investigated in the paper. It has been revealed that transit process duration of the given system is insignificant. The fact is rather important to prevent accidents in case of v...

  5. Perception and control of upper limb movement: Insights gained by analysis of sensory and motor variability

    OpenAIRE

    Domkin, Dmitry

    2005-01-01

    Chronic neck-shoulder pain is associated with impairments of proprioception and motor control. Thus, assessment of proprioceptive and motor function may be powerful tools both for research and clinical practice. However, insufficient knowledge of certain features of human sensorimotor control hampers both development and interpretation of results of clinically relevant tests. For example, evidence is lacking which proprioception submodalities are reflected in common tests of proprioception. F...

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor--a major player in stimulation-induced homeostatic metaplasticity of human motor cortex?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastroeni, Claudia; Bergmann, Til Ole; Rizzo, Vincenzo;

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the human motor hand area (M1HAND) can induce lasting changes in corticospinal excitability as indexed by a change in amplitude of the motor-evoked potential. The plasticity-inducing effects of rTMS in M1HAND show substantial inter-individual......Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the human motor hand area (M1HAND) can induce lasting changes in corticospinal excitability as indexed by a change in amplitude of the motor-evoked potential. The plasticity-inducing effects of rTMS in M1HAND show substantial inter......-individual variability which has been partially attributed to the val(66)met polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene. Here we used theta burst stimulation (TBS) to examine whether the BDNF val(66)met genotype can be used to predict the expression of TBS-induced homeostatic metaplasticity in...... effects was modulated by the BDNF val(66)met polymorphism, our results do not support the notion that the BDNF val(66)met genotype is a major player with regard to TBS-induced plasticity and metaplasticity in the human M1HAND....

  7. Sensorless Vector Control of AC Induction Motor Using Sliding-Mode Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Thinh Doan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a sensorless vector controlled method for AC induction motor using sliding-mode observer. For developing the control algorithm, modeling of AC induction motor is presented. After that, a sliding mode observer is proposed to estimate the motor speed, the rotor flux, the angular position of the rotor flux and the motor torque from monitored stator voltages and currents. The use of the nonlinear sliding mode observer provides very good performance for both low and high speed motor operation. Furthermore, the proposed system is robust in motor losses and load variations. The convergence of the proposed observer is obtained using the Lyapunov theory. Hardware and software for simulation and experiment of the AC induction motor drive are introduced. The hardware consists of a 1.5kw AC induction motor connected in series with a torque sensor and a powder brake. A controller is developed based on DSP TMS320F28355. The simulation and experimental results illustrate that fast torque and speed response with small torque ripples can be achieved. The proposed control scheme is suitable to the application fields that require high performance of torque response such as electric vehicles. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/ijse.4.2.2013.39-43 [How to cite this article: Doan, P. T., Nguyen, T. T., Jeong, S. K., Oh, S. J., & Kim, S. B. (2013. Sensorless Vector Control of AC Induction Motor Using Sliding-Mode Observer. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, 4(2, 39-43; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/ijse.4.2.2013.39-43

  8. Bidirectional control of a one-dimensional robotic actuator by operant conditioning of a single unit in rat motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Jean eArduin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The design of efficient neuroprosthetic devices has become a major challenge for the long-term goal of restoring autonomy to motor-impaired patients. One approach for brain control of actuators consists in decoding the activity pattern obtained by simultaneously recording large neuronal ensembles in order to predict in real-time the subject’s intention, and move the prosthesis accordingly. An alternative way is to assign the output of one or a few neurons by operant conditioning to control the prosthesis with rules defined by the experimenter, and rely on the functional adaptation of these neurons during learning to reach the desired behavioral outcome. Here, several motor cortex neurons were recorded simultaneously in head-fixed awake rats and were conditioned, one at a time, to modulate their firing rate up and down in order to control the speed and direction of a one-dimensional actuator carrying a water bottle. The goal was to maintain the bottle in front of the rat’s mouth, allowing it to drink. After learning, all conditioned neurons modulated their firing rate, effectively controlling the bottle position so that the drinking time was increased relative to chance. The mean firing rate averaged over all bottle trajectories depended non-linearly on position, so that the mouth position operated as an attractor. Some modifications of mean firing rate were observed in the surrounding neurons, but to a lesser extent. Notably, the conditioned neuron reacted faster and led to a better control than surrounding neurons, as calculated by using the activity of those neurons to generate simulated bottle trajectories. Our study demonstrates the feasibility, even in the rodent, of using a motor cortex neuron to control a prosthesis in real-time bidirectionally. The learning process includes modifications of the activity of neighboring cortical neurons, while the conditioned neuron selectively leads the activity patterns associated with the prosthesis

  9. TMS-EEG: A window into the neurophysiological effects of transcranial electrical stimulation in non-motor brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Aron T; Rogasch, Nigel C; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Hoy, Kate E

    2016-05-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) techniques are able to induce changes in cortical excitability and plasticity through the administration of weak currents to the brain and are currently being used to manipulate a vast array of cognitive processes. Despite the widespread use of tES technologies within both research and remedial settings, their precise neurophysiological mechanisms of action are not well established outside of the motor cortex. The expanding use of tES within non-motor brain regions highlights the growing need for a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of stimulation across a diversity of cortical locations. The combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) provides a method of directly probing both local and widespread changes in brain neurophysiology, through the recording of TMS-evoked potentials and cortical oscillations. In this review we explore TMS-EEG as a tool for examining the impact of tES on cortical function and argue that multimodal approaches which combine tES with TMS-EEG could lead to a deeper understanding of the mechanisms which underlie tES-induced cognitive modulation.

  10. Speed Control of Induction Motor Fed from Wind Turbine via Particle Swarm Optimization Based PI Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Oshaba

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-phase Induction Motor (IM is widely used in the industry because of its rugged construction and absence of brushes. However, speed control of IM is required depending on the desired speed and application. This study proposes a design of a Proportional Integral (PI controller using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithm to control the speed of an IM supplied from wind turbine. The wind turbine acts as a prime mover to a connected DC generator. Pulse Width Modulation (PWM is used to obtain three phase AC voltage from the output of DC generator. The proposed design problem of speed controller is formulated as an optimization problem. PSO is employed to search for optimal controller parameters by minimizing the time domain objective function. The performance of the proposed technique has been evaluated with respect to the variation of load torque and speed wind turbine. Also the performance of the proposed controller has been evaluated with the performance of the PI controller tuned by Genetic Algorithm (GA in order to demonstrate the superior efficiency of the proposed PSO in tuning PI controller. Simulation results emphasis on the better performance of the optimized PI controller based on PSO in compare to optimized PI controller based on GA over a wide range of load torque and speed wind turbine.

  11. Motor cortex stimulation(MCS) for intractable complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type II: PSM analysis of Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. A.; Son, B. C.; Yoo, I. R.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, E. N.; Park, Y. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Sohn, H. S.; Chung, S. K. [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    We had experienced a patient with intractable CRPS in whom statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of cerebral perfusion explained the mechanism of pain control by MCS. A 43-year-old man presented spontaneous severe burning pain in his left hand and forearm and allodynia over the left arm and left hemibody. After the electrodes for neuromodulation therapy were inserted in the central sulcus, the baseline and stimulation brain perfusion SPECT using Tc-99m ECD were obtained within two days. The differences between the baseline and stimulation SPECT images, estimated at every voxel using t-statistics using SPM-99 software, were considered significant at a threshold of uncorrected P values less than 0.01. Among several areas significantly activated following pain relief with MCS, ipsilateral pyramidal tract in the cerebral peduncle might be related to the mechanism of pain control with MCS through efferent motor pathway. The result suggested that corticospinal neurons themselves or motor cortex efferent pathway maintained by the presence of intact corticospinal neurons could play an important role in producing pain control after MCS. This study would helpful in understanding of neurophysiology.

  12. Control of Surface Mounted Permanent Magnet Motors with Special Application to Fractional-Slot Motors with Concentrated Windings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeever, John W [ORNL; Patil, Niranjan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lawler, Jack [ORNL

    2007-07-01

    A 30 pole, 6 kW, and 6000 maximum revolutions per minute (rpm) prototype of the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) with fractional-slot concentrated windings (FSCW) has been designed, built, and tested at the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UWM). This machine has significantly more inductance than that of regular PMSMs. The prototype was delivered in April 2006 to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing and development of a controller that will achieve maximum efficiency. In advance of the test/control development effort, ORNL has used the PMSM models developed over a number of previous studies to study how steady state performance of high inductance PMSM machines relates to control issues. This report documents the results of this research. The amount of inductance that enables the motor to achieve infinite constant power speed ratio (CPSR) is given by L{sub {infinity}} = E{sub b}/{Omega}{sub b}I{sub R}, where E{sub b} is the root-mean square (rms) magnitude of the line-to-neutral back-electromotive force (emf) at base speed, {Omega}{sub b} is the base speed in electrical radians per second, and I{sub R} is the rms current rating of the motor windings. The prototype machine that was delivered to ORNL has about 1.5 times as much inductance as a typical PMSM with distributed integral slot windings. The inventors of the FSCW method, who designed the prototype machine, remarked that they were 'too successful' in incorporating inductance into their machine and that steps would be taken to modify the design methodology to reduce the inductance to the optimum value. This study shows a significant advantage of having the higher inductance rather than the optimal value because it enables the motor to develop the required power at lower current thereby reducing motor and inverter losses and improving efficiency. The main problem found with high inductance machines driven by a conventional phase advance (CPA) method is that the motor current

  13. Arranque de un motor de inducción usando control difuso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Barriga Turriago

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of fuzzy logic as part of artiÞ cial intelligence in the area of power electronics and motor drivers to improve performance during the startup of an induction motor. To feed the induction motor, two circuit configurations have been chosen to use: a series of thyristors connected in ant parallel and a threephaseinverter. Control strategies such as soft start and Direct Torque Control incorporating fuzzy control have been current proposals to reduce and improve torque. The results of a simulated induction motor squirrel cage of 1.1 KW to these electronic methods show an improvement in performance at boot time, reducing power and increasingthe torque.

  14. Voice-controlled Internet Browsing for Motor-handicapped Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Tom; Aaskoven, Erik

    2006-01-01

    with an advisory board of motor-handicapped (potential) end-users and underlies a number of a priori defined design criteria: learnability and memorability rather than naturalness, minimal need for maintenance after release, support for "all" web standards (not just HTML conforming to certain "recommendations......"), independency of the language on the websites being browsed, etc. These criteria have lead to a primarily message-driven system interacting with an existing browser on the end users' systems...

  15. Adaptive Quasi-Sliding Mode Control for Permanent Magnet DC Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy E. Hoyos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The motor speed of a buck power converter and DC motor coupled system is controlled by means of a quasi-sliding scheme. The fixed point inducting control technique and the zero average dynamics strategy are used in the controller design. To estimate the load and friction torques an online estimator, computed by the least mean squares method, is used. The control scheme is tested in a rapid control prototyping system which is based on digital signal processing for a dSPACE platform. The closed loop system exhibits adequate performance, and experimental and simulation results match.

  16. Incorporation of fractional-order dynamics into an existing PI/PID DC motor control loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepljakov, Aleksei; Gonzalez, Emmanuel A; Petlenkov, Eduard; Belikov, Juri; Monje, Concepción A; Petráš, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    The problem of changing the dynamics of an existing DC motor control system without the need of making internal changes is considered in the paper. In particular, this paper presents a method for incorporating fractional-order dynamics in an existing DC motor control system with internal PI or PID controller, through the addition of an external controller into the system and by tapping its original input and output signals. Experimental results based on the control of a real test plant from MATLAB/Simulink environment are presented, indicating the validity of the proposed approach.

  17. SIMULATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF PID-ANN CONTROLLER FOR CHOPPER FED EMBEDDED PMDC MOTOR

    OpenAIRE

    M. Madheswaran; Muruganandam, M.

    2012-01-01

    The closed loop control of PMDC drive with an inner current controller and an outer PID-ANN (Proportional Integral Derivative – Artificial Neural Network) based speed controller is designed and presented in this paper. Motor is fed by DC / DC buck converter (DC Chopper). The controller is used to change the duty cycle of the converter and thereby, the voltage fed to the PMDC motor to regulate the speed. The PID-ANN controller designed was evaluated by computer simulation and it was implemente...

  18. Glial and neuronal control of brain blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwell, David; Buchan, Alastair M; Charpak, Serge;

    2010-01-01

    Blood flow in the brain is regulated by neurons and astrocytes. Knowledge of how these cells control blood flow is crucial for understanding how neural computation is powered, for interpreting functional imaging scans of brains, and for developing treatments for neurological disorders. It is now...... recognized that neurotransmitter-mediated signalling has a key role in regulating cerebral blood flow, that much of this control is mediated by astrocytes, that oxygen modulates blood flow regulation, and that blood flow may be controlled by capillaries as well as by arterioles. These conceptual shifts...... in our understanding of cerebral blood flow control have important implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches....

  19. Inhibitory Control after Traumatic Brain Injury in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Sinopoli, Katia J.; Dennis, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory control describes a number of distinct processes. Effortless inhibition refers to acts of control that are automatic and reflexive. Effortful inhibition refers to voluntary, goal-directed acts of control such as response flexibility, interference control, cancellation inhibition, and restraint inhibition. Disruptions to a number of inhibitory control processes occur as a consequence of childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI). This paper reviews the current knowledge of inhibition de...

  20. High Performance Speed Sensorless Control of Three-Phase Induction Motor Based on Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Salem

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Induction motor is a cast of alternating current motor where charge endures allotted to the rotor close-at-hand deputation of conductive charge. These motors are broadly applied in industrial claim due to they are arduous along with adhere no contacts. The speed controller of deltoid phase induction motor is applied to alleviate the aberration of speed. The central constructivist of this paper is to accrue the performance of speed sensorless control of three phase induction motor. To increase its performance, this paper presents a modified method for speed controller of an indirect vector-controlled induction motor drive using cloud computing technique. Our methodology depends on speed sensorless scheme to obtain the speed signal feedback; the speed estimator is based on model reference adaptive control that uses the stator current and rotor flux as state variables for estimating the speed. In this method, the stator current error is represented as a function of first degree of the estimated speed error. An analysis and simulation of the tried algorithm is birthed and applied easing a TMS320C31 floating-point notational alert Processor. And accumulate the action of the three phase induction motor we conceived our appraisals affixed to the accountant based on cloud computing tactics. This intelligent policy uses the guidelines of the speed controller efficiently. Simulation and experimental results depicted that the motor speed is decelerated articulately to destine its illusion apprise without above and inferior smack and with about zero steady state error. The apprised accelerate alert and its dispatching buoy amassed off line from burlesque. After effects display an advantageous affinity among the accounted speed alert and it's dispatching allocated as well as aped speed flares

  1. A microcomputer-based data acquisition system for diagnostic monitoring and control of high-speed electric motors

    OpenAIRE

    Moyers, Kevin Keith

    1987-01-01

    A microcomputer-based data acquisition and control system was designed for the diagnostic monitoring and control of high-speed electric motors. The system was utilized in high-speed bearing life-testing, using an electric motor as a test vehicle. Bearing vibration and outer race temperature were continuously monitored for each ball bearing in the motor. In addition, the stator winding and motor casing temperature were monitored. The monitoring system was successful i...

  2. Precision control system of two-DOF stage with linear ultrasonic motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanlei ZHANG; Yunlai SHI; Chunsheng ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    Using an appropriate control method, linear ultrasonic motors can be used in applications requiring high position accuracy. In this paper, a closed loop PI control system is designed to achieve high position accu-racy during the control of a two-DOF stage driven by linear ultrasonic motors, Two ultrasonic motors are mounted on the stage to generate motion in two ortho-gonal directions. The PI control algorithm is used to increase the stability and accuracy of position control. The x-axis mover covers 30 mm forward and backward in less than 0.3 s settling time and the y-axis mover in less than 0.4 s. Experimental results denote that the control strategy proposed in this paper appears to have high effi-ciency, quick response, and high accuracy.

  3. Nonlinear Field Oriented Control of Induction Motors using the Backstepping Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    1999-01-01

    Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a novel approach to control of induction motors is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear controller for the torque and the amplitude of the field. A combination of nonlinear damping and observer backstepping with a s......Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a novel approach to control of induction motors is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear controller for the torque and the amplitude of the field. A combination of nonlinear damping and observer backstepping...... with a simple flux observer is used in the design. Assuming known motor parameters the design achieves stabilioty with garanteed region of attraction. It is also shown how a conventional field oriented controller may be obtained by omitting parts of the nonlinear controller....

  4. Control of a Dual-Stator Flux-Modulated Motor for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Guo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the control strategies for a novel dual-stator flux-modulated (DSFM motor for application in electric vehicles (EVs. The DSFM motor can be applied to EVs because of its simple winding structure, high reliability, and its use of two stators and rotating modulation steels in the air gap. Moreover, it outperforms conventional brushless doubly-fed machines in terms of control performance. Two stator-current-oriented vector controls with different excitation in the primary winding, direct and alternating current excitation, are designed, simulated, and evaluated on a custom-made DSFM prototype allowing the decoupled control of torque. The stable speed response and available current characteristics strongly validate the feasibility of the two control methods. Furthermore, the proposed control methods can be employed in other applications of flux-modulated motors.

  5. High Performance Control of Matrix Converter Fed Induction Motor Drive System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙凯; 黄立培; MATSUSE Kouki

    2007-01-01

    Matrix converter fed motor drive is superior to pulse width modulation inverter drives since it not only provides bi-directional power flow, sinusoidal input/output currents, unity input power factor, but also allows a compact design due to the lack of DC-link capacitors for energy storage. In this paper, model and control of matrix converter fed induction motor drive system are analyzed. A combined control strategy is simplified and improved, which realizes space vector pulse width modulation of matrix converter and rotor flux oriented vector control technique for induction motor drive simultaneously. This control strategy combines the advantages of matrix converter with the good drive performance of vector control technique. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  6. High-order sliding mode control of a DC motor drive via a switched controlled multi-cellular converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemaï, M.; Busawon, K.; Benmansour, K.; Marouf, A.

    2011-11-01

    In this article, we present a high-order sliding mode controller of a DC motor drive connected to a multi-cellular converter. More specifically, we design a second-order (super-twisting) control algorithm for the speed regulation of a DC motor. For this, a switching control for the multi-cellular converter is derived in order to supply the correct reference value for the speed regulation. A practical implementation of the controller is realised using a laboratory set-up. The performance and the validity of the controller are shown experimentally.

  7. Is the Motor System Necessary for Processing Action and Abstract Emotion Words? Evidence from Focal Brain Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Felix R; Frey, Dietmar; Arana, Sophie; von Saldern, Sarah; Picht, Thomas; Vajkoczy, Peter; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging and neuropsychological experiments suggest that modality-preferential cortices, including motor- and somatosensory areas, contribute to the semantic processing of action related concrete words. Still, a possible role of sensorimotor areas in processing abstract meaning remains under debate. Recent fMRI studies indicate an involvement of the left sensorimotor cortex in the processing of abstract-emotional words (e.g., "love") which resembles activation patterns seen for action words. But are the activated areas indeed necessary for processing action-related and abstract words? The current study now investigates word processing in two patients suffering from focal brain lesion in the left frontocentral motor system. A speeded Lexical Decision Task on meticulously matched word groups showed that the recognition of nouns from different semantic categories - related to food, animals, tools, and abstract-emotional concepts - was differentially affected. Whereas patient HS with a lesion in dorsolateral central sensorimotor systems next to the hand area showed a category-specific deficit in recognizing tool words, patient CA suffering from lesion centered in the left supplementary motor area was primarily impaired in abstract-emotional word processing. These results point to a causal role of the motor cortex in the semantic processing of both action-related object concepts and abstract-emotional concepts and therefore suggest that the motor areas previously found active in action-related and abstract word processing can serve a meaning-specific necessary role in word recognition. The category-specific nature of the observed dissociations is difficult to reconcile with the idea that sensorimotor systems are somehow peripheral or 'epiphenomenal' to meaning and concept processing. Rather, our results are consistent with the claim that cognition is grounded in action and perception and based on distributed action perception circuits reaching into modality

  8. Systematic Review of Parameters of Stimulation: Clinical Trial Design Characteristics and Motor Outcomes in Noninvasive Brain Stimulation in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamidele Oyebamiji Adeyemo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation are two powerful non-invasive neuromodulatory therapies that have the potential to alter and evaluate the integrity of the corticospinal tract. Moreover, recent evidence has shown that brain stimulation might be beneficial in stroke recovery. Therefore, investigating and investing in innovative therapies that may improve neurorehabilitative stroke recovery are next steps in research and development.Methods: This article presents an up-to-date systematic review of the treatment effects of rTMS and tDCS on motor function. A literary search was conducted, utilizing search terms stroke and transcranial stimulation. Items were excluded if they failed to: (1 include stroke patients, (2 study motor outcomes, or (3 include rTMS/tDCS as treatments. Other exclusions included: (1 reviews, editorials, and letters, (2 animal or pediatric populations, (3 case reports or sample sizes < or = 2 patients, and (4 primary outcomes of dysphagia, dysarthria, neglect, or swallowing.Results: Investigation of PubMed English Database prior to 01/01/2012 produced 695 applicable results. Studies were excluded based on the aforementioned criteria, resulting in 50 remaining studies. They included 1314 participants (1282 stroke patients and 32 healthy subjects evaluated by motor function pre- and post- tDCS or rTMS. Heterogeneity among studies’ motor assessments was high and could not be accounted for by individual comparison. Pooled effect sizes for the impact of post-treatment improvement revealed consistently demonstrable improvements after tDCS and rTMS therapeutic stimulation. Most studies provided limited follow-up for long-term effects.Conclusions: It is apparent from the available studies that noninvasive stimulation may enhance motor recovery and may lead to clinically-meaningful functional improvements in the stroke population.

  9. Sarcosine attenuates toluene-induced motor incoordination, memory impairment, and hypothermia but not brain stimulation reward enhancement in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Ming-Huan [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Institute of Neuroscience, National Changchi University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Shiang-Sheng [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Yuli Veterans Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Stoker, Astrid K.; Markou, Athina [Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Chen, Hwei-Hsien, E-mail: hwei@nhri.org.tw [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Division of Mental Health and Addiction Medicine, Institute of Population Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    Toluene, a widely used and commonly abused organic solvent, produces various behavioral disturbances, including motor incoordination and cognitive impairment. Toluene alters the function of a large number of receptors and ion channels. Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors has been suggested to play a critical role in toluene-induced behavioral manifestations. The present study determined the effects of various toluene doses on motor coordination, recognition memory, body temperature, and intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds in mice. Additionally, the effects of sarcosine on the behavioral and physiological effects induced by toluene were evaluated. Sarcosine may reverse toluene-induced behavioral manifestations by acting as an NMDA receptor co-agonist and by inhibiting the effects of the type I glycine transporter (GlyT1). Mice were treated with toluene alone or combined with sarcosine pretreatment and assessed for rotarod performance, object recognition memory, rectal temperature, and ICSS thresholds. Toluene dose-dependently induced motor incoordination, recognition memory impairment, and hypothermia and lowered ICSS thresholds. Sarcosine pretreatment reversed toluene-induced changes in rotarod performance, novel object recognition, and rectal temperature but not ICSS thresholds. These findings suggest that the sarcosine-induced potentiation of NMDA receptors may reverse motor incoordination, memory impairment, and hypothermia but not the enhancement of brain stimulation reward function associated with toluene exposure. Sarcosine may be a promising compound to prevent acute toluene intoxications by occupational or intentional exposure. -- Highlights: ► Toluene induces impairments in Rotarod test and novel object recognition test. ► Toluene lowers rectal temperature and ICSS thresholds in mice. ► Sarcosine reverses toluene-induced changes in motor, memory and body temperature. ► Sarcosine pretreatment does not affect toluene

  10. Sarcosine attenuates toluene-induced motor incoordination, memory impairment, and hypothermia but not brain stimulation reward enhancement in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toluene, a widely used and commonly abused organic solvent, produces various behavioral disturbances, including motor incoordination and cognitive impairment. Toluene alters the function of a large number of receptors and ion channels. Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors has been suggested to play a critical role in toluene-induced behavioral manifestations. The present study determined the effects of various toluene doses on motor coordination, recognition memory, body temperature, and intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds in mice. Additionally, the effects of sarcosine on the behavioral and physiological effects induced by toluene were evaluated. Sarcosine may reverse toluene-induced behavioral manifestations by acting as an NMDA receptor co-agonist and by inhibiting the effects of the type I glycine transporter (GlyT1). Mice were treated with toluene alone or combined with sarcosine pretreatment and assessed for rotarod performance, object recognition memory, rectal temperature, and ICSS thresholds. Toluene dose-dependently induced motor incoordination, recognition memory impairment, and hypothermia and lowered ICSS thresholds. Sarcosine pretreatment reversed toluene-induced changes in rotarod performance, novel object recognition, and rectal temperature but not ICSS thresholds. These findings suggest that the sarcosine-induced potentiation of NMDA receptors may reverse motor incoordination, memory impairment, and hypothermia but not the enhancement of brain stimulation reward function associated with toluene exposure. Sarcosine may be a promising compound to prevent acute toluene intoxications by occupational or intentional exposure. -- Highlights: ► Toluene induces impairments in Rotarod test and novel object recognition test. ► Toluene lowers rectal temperature and ICSS thresholds in mice. ► Sarcosine reverses toluene-induced changes in motor, memory and body temperature. ► Sarcosine pretreatment does not affect toluene

  11. Rolling Stability Control Utilizing Rollover Index for In-wheel Motor Electric Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Kiyotaka; Uchida, Toshiyuki; Hori, Yoichi

    In this paper, a novel integrated stability program (ISP) based on robust rolling stability control (RSC) for in-wheel electric vehicle (EV) is proposed. Since EVs are driven by electric motors, they have the following four remarkable advantages: (1) motor torque generation is quick and accurate, (2) motor torque can be estimated precisely, (3) a motor can be attached to each wheel, and (4) a motor can output negative torque as a brake actuator. These advantages enable a high-performance three-dimensional vehicle motion control with a distributed in-wheel-motor system. Rolling stability is important for all classes of light-vehicles, especially, for EVs that have narrow tread and high center of gravity. In this study, RSC is designed using two-degree-of-freedom control (2-DOF), which achieves tracking capability to reference value and disturbance suppression. However, as the drivability of the vehicle will be changed significantly if only RSC is applied, vehicle rolling motion should be controlled depending on the rolling state. Therefore, variable weight-ISP and variable reference-ISP are proposed using rolling state information. For detecting rolling state, rollover index (RI) is introduced. The validity of the proposed methods is shown by the simulation and the experimental results.

  12. Computer Controlled Switching Device for Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tauchmanová

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has two goals. The practical part deals with the design of a computer controlled switching device for an external stimulator for deep brain stimulation. The switching device is used during investigations with functional magnetic resonance for controlling signals leading to the deep brain stimulation (DBS electrode in the patient's brain. The motivation for designing this device was improve measured data quality and to enable new types of experiments.The theoretical part reports on early attempts to approach the problem of modeling and localizing the neural response of the human brain as a system identification and estimation task. The parametric identification method and real fMRI data are used for modeling the hemodynamic response.The project is in cooperation with 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Na Homolce hospital in Prague.

  13. Stimulation-Based Control of Dynamic Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualetti, Fabio; Gu, Shi; Cieslak, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to modulate brain states using targeted stimulation is increasingly being employed to treat neurological disorders and to enhance human performance. Despite the growing interest in brain stimulation as a form of neuromodulation, much remains unknown about the network-level impact of these focal perturbations. To study the system wide impact of regional stimulation, we employ a data-driven computational model of nonlinear brain dynamics to systematically explore the effects of targeted stimulation. Validating predictions from network control theory, we uncover the relationship between regional controllability and the focal versus global impact of stimulation, and we relate these findings to differences in the underlying network architecture. Finally, by mapping brain regions to cognitive systems, we observe that the default mode system imparts large global change despite being highly constrained by structural connectivity. This work forms an important step towards the development of personalized stimulation protocols for medical treatment or performance enhancement. PMID:27611328

  14. Theory of feedback controlled brain stimulations for Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzeni, A.; Celani, A.; Tiana, G.; Vergassola, M.

    2016-01-01

    Limb tremor and other debilitating symptoms caused by the neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease are currently treated by administering drugs and by fixed-frequency deep brain stimulation. The latter interferes directly with the brain dynamics by delivering electrical impulses to neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. While deep brain stimulation has shown therapeutic benefits in many instances, its mechanism is still unclear. Since its understanding could lead to improved protocols of stimulation and feedback control, we have studied a mathematical model of the many-body neural network dynamics controlling the dynamics of the basal ganglia. On the basis of the results obtained from the model, we propose a new procedure of active stimulation, that depends on the feedback of the network and that respects the constraints imposed by existing technology. We show by numerical simulations that the new protocol outperforms the standard ones for deep brain stimulation and we suggest future experiments that could further improve the feedback procedure.

  15. Stimulation-Based Control of Dynamic Brain Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Sarah Feldt; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Gu, Shi; Cieslak, Matthew; Grafton, Scott T; Vettel, Jean M; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-09-01

    The ability to modulate brain states using targeted stimulation is increasingly being employed to treat neurological disorders and to enhance human performance. Despite the growing interest in brain stimulation as a form of neuromodulation, much remains unknown about the network-level impact of these focal perturbations. To study the system wide impact of regional stimulation, we employ a data-driven computational model of nonlinear brain dynamics to systematically explore the effects of targeted stimulation. Validating predictions from network control theory, we uncover the relationship between regional controllability and the focal versus global impact of stimulation, and we relate these findings to differences in the underlying network architecture. Finally, by mapping brain regions to cognitive systems, we observe that the default mode system imparts large global change despite being highly constrained by structural connectivity. This work forms an important step towards the development of personalized stimulation protocols for medical treatment or performance enhancement. PMID:27611328

  16. How do glial cells contribute to motor control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus Kordt; Petersen, Anders Victor; Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie

    2013-01-01

    For many years, glial cells from the central nervous system have been considered as support cells involved in the homeostasis of the brain. However, a series of key-findings obtained during the past two decades has put light on unexpected roles for glia and it is getting more and more admitted th...

  17. DECOUPLING CONTROL OF TWO MOTORS SYSTEM BASED ON NEURAL NETWORK INVERSE SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Deming; Ju Ping; Liu Guohai

    2004-01-01

    In accordance with the characteristics of two motors system, the united mathematic model of two-motors inverter system with v/f variable frequency speed-regulating is given. Two-motor inverter system can be decoupled by the neural network invert system, and changed into a sub-system of speed and a sub-system of tension. Multiple controllers are designed, and good results are obtained. The system has good static and dynamic performances and high anti-disturbance of load.

  18. Relationship between reaction time, fine motor control, and visual-spatial perception on vigilance and visual-motor tasks in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Howley, Sarah A

    2012-10-15

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) is a common microdeletion disorder associated with mild to moderate intellectual disability and specific neurocognitive deficits, particularly in visual-motor and attentional abilities. Currently there is evidence that the visual-motor profile of 22q11DS is not entirely mediated by intellectual disability and that these individuals have specific deficits in visual-motor integration. However, the extent to which attentional deficits, such as vigilance, influence impairments on visual motor tasks in 22q11DS is unclear. This study examines visual-motor abilities and reaction time using a range of standardised tests in 35 children with 22q11DS, 26 age-matched typically developing (TD) sibling controls and 17 low-IQ community controls. Statistically significant deficits were observed in the 22q11DS group compared to both low-IQ and TD control groups on a timed fine motor control and accuracy task. The 22q11DS group performed significantly better than the low-IQ control group on an untimed drawing task and were equivalent to the TD control group on point accuracy and simple reaction time tests. Results suggest that visual motor deficits in 22q11DS are primarily attributable to deficits in psychomotor speed which becomes apparent when tasks are timed versus untimed. Moreover, the integration of visual and motor information may be intact and, indeed, represent a relative strength in 22q11DS when there are no time constraints imposed. While this may have significant implications for cognitive remediation strategies for children with 22q11DS, the relationship between reaction time, visual reasoning, cognitive complexity, fine motor speed and accuracy, and graphomotor ability on visual-motor tasks is still unclear.

  19. Efficiency of particle swarm optimization applied on fuzzy logic DC motor speed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allaoua Boumediene

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of Fuzzy Logic for DC motor speed control using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. Firstly, the controller designed according to Fuzzy Logic rules is such that the systems are fundamentally robust. Secondly, the Fuzzy Logic controller (FLC used earlier was optimized with PSO so as to obtain optimal adjustment of the membership functions only. Finally, the FLC is completely optimized by Swarm Intelligence Algorithms. Digital simulation results demonstrate that in comparison with the FLC the designed FLC-PSO speed controller obtains better dynamic behavior and superior performance of the DC motor, as well as perfect speed tracking with no overshoot.

  20. Integrated control strategies for railway vehicles with independently-driven wheel motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinzhi FENG; Jun LI; R. M. Goodall

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the development of inte-grated control strategies for railway vehicles with inde-pendently-driven wheel motors. First, a non-linear vehicle dynamic model and motor drive strategy are pre-sented, which are followed by an investigation of the inte-grated control of stabilization, steering, and traction for the vehicle. Meanwhile a reformulated Kalman filter is developed and applied to estimate the required feedback by the control system. Finally, the effectiveness and prac-ticality of the proposed integrated controller are examined and assessed by real-time simulation based on host-target computer technology provided by Matlab/Simulink.